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Sample records for configuration dependent pairing

  1. Spatiotemporal configuration dependent pairing of nerve events in dark-adapted human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Maarten A.

    2002-02-01

    In the model presented here, in the dark any single quantum absorption in a rod or cone produces a subliminal excitation. Subliminal excitations from both halves of a twin unit pair in the retina for the perception of light from the stimulus. A twin unit contains either two red or two green cones. The twin units are intertwined in triples of two red units and one green unit in a hexagon called a trion. P satellite rods surround each cone, P being approximately proportional to the square of eccentricity. A successful pairing for light perception represents-through the points of time and locations of the creation of its partners in the retina-a direction event with two possible polarities and with the orientation of the elongated shape of the twin unit. The polarity of the event depends on which of the two partners arrives first at the twin's pairing facility. Simultaneous events and successive events with the same polarity in adjacent units that are aligned along one of the three orientations of the hexagonal retinal mosaic pair in the cortex for the perception of edge and of movement. Inter-twin pairing products of the three differently oriented sets of aligned twins are independent of each other and sum vectorially in the cortex. This system of three sub-retinas is called the retrinet. Two one-quantum excitations in any of a twin's receptors make the percept colored. The odd blue cone produces already a blue signal for a single one-quantum excitation. Intra-receptor pairing in a rod, a red cone and a green cone is for white, red, and green respectively. Red and green cone products of a trion cross-pair in the retina and produce a yellow signal. Red and green cone products of a hexagon of adjacent trions cross-pair in the cortex and produce a white signal. This large hexagon with a total of seven trions is called a persepton. After subliminal excitations in a twin have paired successfully, further subliminal receptor excitations in neighboring and aligned twins are

  2. Nuclear pairing within a configuration-space Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingle, Mark; Volya, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Pairing correlations in nuclei play a decisive role in determining nuclear drip lines, binding energies, and many collective properties. In this work a new configuration-space Monte Carlo (CSMC) method for treating nuclear pairing correlations is developed, implemented, and demonstrated. In CSMC the Hamiltonian matrix is stochastically generated in Krylov subspace, resulting in the Monte Carlo version of Lanczos-like diagonalization. The advantages of this approach over other techniques are discussed; the absence of the fermionic sign problem, probabilistic interpretation of quantum-mechanical amplitudes, and ability to handle truly large-scale problems with defined precision and error control are noteworthy merits of CSMC. The features of our CSMC approach are shown using models and realistic examples. Special attention is given to difficult limits: situations with nonconstant pairing strengths, cases with nearly degenerate excited states, limits when pairing correlations in finite systems are weak, and problems when the relevant configuration space is large.

  3. Energetics and configurations of He-He pair in vacancy of transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengbo; Zhao, Jijun

    2014-03-01

    We report an atomistic study of energetics and configurations of He-He pair in vacancy of bcc transition metals (V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Fe) using first-principles methods. The results show He-vacancy attractions in the group VB metals are 2-3 times weaker than those in Cr, Mo, W and Fe. The <111> dumbbell configuration for He-He pair in vacancy is the most stable except for V. Calculated formation energies of He-He pair in vacancy of group VB metals (3.2-3.95 eV) are systematically lower than those of group VIB and VIIIB metals (4.25-5.67 eV), while He-He distance for V metal is greater than other metals. He-metal repulsion is stronger than He-He due to longer He-metal distance in metal vacancy. Calculated densities of states provide a reasonable explanation for most stable configuration; thus the stability of He-He pairs depends strongly on the electronic structure of the host and insignificantly on its atomic size. Moreover, the group-specific trends of He-He and self-interstitial configurations are discussed.

  4. Photon pair production from a hot atomic ensemble in the diamond configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Richard Thomas

    This thesis discusses four-wave mixing (4WM) in a warm ensemble of rubidium using the diamond configuration level structure. Both classical 4WM and nonclassical photon-pair production are investigated. Quantum information science has spawned a great amount of experimental work on the interaction of light with collective modes of excitation in atomic ensembles. Plans to build quantum networks and quantum repeaters with atom ensembles take advantage of nonlinear interactions to produce and store non-classical states of light. These technologies will require photon sources that not only generate nonclassical light, but also resonant, narrow band light. Here we investigate a system which could be used as such a source. We take advantage of the 4WM interaction in a warm ensemble of Rubidium atoms. Our scheme utilizes the diamond energy level configuration which, in rubidium, allows for correlated pairs at telecommunications wavelengths. We start by examining the properties of classical 4WM in the system. We measure the resonance structure and see that it can be understood in terms of velocity class selective resonant enhancement and power splitting effects. The efficiency of the process is low and limited by linear absorption of the pumps. Our observations agree with a semi-classical Maxwell-Bloch theoretical treatment. Next we observe pair generation by spontaneous 4WM from the warm ensemble. The temporal profile of the cross-correlation function (CCF) for the photons depends on pump-laser power and detuning. This allows us to produce biphotons with controllable spectra. A simple quantum optical theoretical treatment based on linear filtering gives qualitative agreement with the data. We show that the photon pairs are polarization entangled, clearly violating Bell's Inequality. A perturbative quantum optical treatment predicts the polarization state of the pairs and agrees with our measurements. We analyze the photon statistics of the source and find the largest

  5. A configuration space Monte Carlo algorithm for solving the nuclear pairing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingle, Mark

    Nuclear pairing correlations using Quantum Monte Carlo are studied in this dissertation. We start by defining the nuclear pairing problem and discussing several historical methods developed to solve this problem, paying special attention to the applicability of such methods. A numerical example discussing pairing correlations in several calcium isotopes using the BCS and Exact Pairing solutions are presented. The ground state energies, correlation energies, and occupation numbers are compared to determine the applicability of each approach to realistic cases. Next we discuss some generalities related to the theory of Markov Chains and Quantum Monte Carlo in regards to nuclear structure. Finally we present our configuration space Monte Carlo algorithm starting from a discussion of a path integral approach by the authors. Some general features of the Pairing Hamiltonian that boost the effectiveness of a configuration space Monte Carlo approach are mentioned. The full details of our method are presented and special attention is paid to convergence and error control. We present a series of examples illustrating the effectiveness of our approach. These include situations with non-constant pairing strengths, limits when pairing correlations are weak, the computation of excited states, and problems when the relevant configuration space is large. We conclude with a chapter examining some of the effects of continuum states in 24O.

  6. Isospin Dependent Pairing Interactions and BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Margueron, J.; Hagino, K.

    2008-11-11

    We propose new types of density dependent contact pairing interaction which reproduce the pairing gaps in symmetric and neutron matters obtained by a microscopic treatment based on the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. The BCS-BEC crossover of neutrons pairs in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matters is studied by using these contact interactions. It is shown that the bare and screened pairing interactions lead to different features of the BCS-BEC crossover in symmetric nuclear matter. We perform Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations for semi-magic Calcium, Nickel, Tin and Lead isotopes and N = 20, 28, 50 and 82 isotones using these density-dependent pairing interactions. Our calculations well account for the experimental data for the neutron number dependence of binding energy, two neutrons separation energy, and odd-even mass staggering of these isotopes. Especially the interaction IS+IV Bare without the medium polarization effect gives satisfactory results for all the isotopes.

  7. Transition state in DNA polymerase β catalysis: rate-limiting chemistry altered by base-pair configuration.

    PubMed

    Oertell, Keriann; Chamberlain, Brian T; Wu, Yue; Ferri, Elena; Kashemirov, Boris A; Beard, William A; Wilson, Samuel H; McKenna, Charles E; Goodman, Myron F

    2014-03-25

    Kinetics studies of dNTP analogues having pyrophosphate-mimicking β,γ-pCXYp leaving groups with variable X and Y substitution reveal striking differences in the chemical transition-state energy for DNA polymerase β that depend on all aspects of base-pairing configurations, including whether the incoming dNTP is a purine or pyrimidine and if base-pairings are right (T•A and G•C) or wrong (T•G and G•T). Brønsted plots of the catalytic rate constant (log(kpol)) versus pKa4 for the leaving group exhibit linear free energy relationships (LFERs) with negative slopes ranging from -0.6 to -2.0, consistent with chemical rate-determining transition-states in which the active-site adjusts to charge-stabilization demand during chemistry depending on base-pair configuration. The Brønsted slopes as well as the intercepts differ dramatically and provide the first direct evidence that dNTP base recognition by the enzyme-primer-template complex triggers a conformational change in the catalytic region of the active-site that significantly modifies the rate-determining chemical step. PMID:24580380

  8. Isospin-dependent pairing interaction from nuclear matter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. S.; Cao, L. G.; Lombardo, U.; Zhao, E. G.; Zhou, S. G.

    2010-04-15

    The isospin dependence of the effective pairing interaction is discussed on the basis of the Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer theory of superfluid asymmetric nuclear matter. It is shown that the energy gap, calculated within the mean field approximation in the range from symmetric nuclear matter to pure neutron matter, is not linearly dependent on the symmetry parameter owing to the nonlinear structure of the gap equation. Moreover, the construction of a zero-range effective pairing interaction compatible with the neutron and proton gaps in homogeneous matter is investigated, along with some recent proposals of isospin dependence tested on the nuclear data table.

  9. Exotic paired phases in ladders with spin-dependent hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2011-03-15

    Fermions in two dimensions, when subject to anisotropic spin-dependent hopping, can potentially give rise to unusual paired states in unpolarized mixtures that can behave as non-Fermi liquids. One possibility is a fully paired state with a gap for fermion excitations in which the Cooper pairs remain uncondensed. Such a ''Cooper-pair Bose-metal'' phase would be expected to have a singular Bose surface in momentum space. As demonstrated in the context of two-dimensional bosons hopping with a frustrating ring-exchange interaction, an analogous Bose-metal phase has a set of quasi-one-dimensional descendant states when put on a ladder geometry. Here we present a density matrix renormalization group study of the attractive Hubbard model with spin-dependent hopping on a two-leg ladder geometry. In our setup, one spin species moves preferentially along the leg direction, while the other does so along the rung direction. We find compelling evidence for the existence of a novel Cooper-pair Bose-metal phase in a region of the phase diagram at intermediate coupling. We further explore the phase diagram of this model as a function of hopping anisotropy, density, and interaction strength, finding a conventional superfluid phase as well as a phase of paired Cooper pairs with d-wave symmetry, similar to the one found in models of hard-core bosons with ring exchange. We argue that simulating this model with cold Fermi gases on spin-dependent optical lattices is a promising direction for realizing exotic quantum states.

  10. Observer dependence of bubble nucleation and Schwinger pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Kanno, Sugumi; Vilenkin, Alexander; Sasaki, Misao; Soda, Jiro E-mail: sugumi@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-12-01

    Pair production in a constant electric field is closely analogous to bubble nucleation in a false vacuum. The classical trajectories of the pairs are Lorentz invariant, but it appears that this invariance should be broken by the nucleation process. Here, we use a model detector, consisting of other particles interacting with the pairs, to investigate how pair production is seen by different Lorentzian observers. We focus on the idealized situation where a constant external electric field is present for an infinitely long time, and we consider the in-vacuum state for a charged scalar field that describes the nucleating pairs. The in-vacuum is defined in terms of modes which are positive frequency in the remote past. Even though the construction uses a particular reference frame and a gauge where the vector potential is time dependent, we show explicitly that the resulting quantum state is Lorentz invariant. We then introduce a ''detector'' particle which interacts with the nucleated pairs, and show that all Lorentzian observers will see the particles and antiparticles nucleating preferentially at rest in the detector's rest frame. Similar conclusions are expected to apply to bubble nucleation in a sufficiently long lived vacuum. We also comment on certain unphysical aspects of the Lorentz invariant in-vacuum, associated with the fact that it contains an infinite density of particles. This can be easily remedied by considering Lorentz breaking initial conditions.

  11. String pair production in a time-dependent gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Tolley, Andrew J.; Wesley, Daniel H.

    2005-12-15

    We study the pair creation of point particles and strings in a time-dependent, weak gravitational field. We find that, for massive string states, there are surprising and significant differences between the string and point-particle results. Central to our approach is the fact that a weakly curved spacetime can be represented by a coherent state of gravitons, and therefore we employ standard techniques in string perturbation theory. String and point-particle pairs are created through tree-level interactions between the background gravitons. In particular, we focus on the production of excited string states and perform explicit calculations of the production of a set of string states of arbitrary excitation level. The differences between the string and point-particle results may contain important lessons for the pair production of strings in the strong gravitational fields of interest in cosmology and black hole physics.

  12. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  13. Variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method applied to pairing correlations in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pillet, N.; Berger, J.-F.; Caurier, E.

    2008-08-15

    Applying a variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method whose purpose is to include correlations beyond the mean field in a unified way without particle number and Pauli principle violations, we investigate pairing-like correlations in the ground states of {sup 116}Sn, {sup 106}Sn, and {sup 100}Sn. The same effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, namely, the D1S parametrization of the Gogny force, is used to derive both the mean field and correlation components of nuclear wave functions. Calculations are performed using an axially symmetric representation. The structure of correlated wave functions, their convergence with respect to the number of particle-hole excitations, and the influence of correlations on single-particle level spectra and occupation probabilities are analyzed and compared with results obtained with the same two-body effective interaction from BCS, Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov, and particle number projected after variation BCS approaches. Calculations of nuclear radii and the first theoretical excited 0{sup +} states are compared with experimental data.

  14. Using full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo in a seniority zero space to investigate the correlation energy equivalence of pair coupled cluster doubles and doubly occupied configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has shown promise for the description of strong correlation. This promise is related to its apparent ability to match results from doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), even though the latter method has exponential computational cost. Here, by modifying the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to sample only the seniority zero sector of Hilbert space, we show that the DOCI and pCCD energies are in agreement for a variety of 2D Hubbard models, including for systems well out of reach for conventional configuration interaction algorithms. Our calculations are aided by the sign problem being much reduced in the seniority zero space compared with the full space. We present evidence for this and then discuss the sign problem in terms of the wave function of the system which appears to have a simplified sign structure.

  15. Nuclear inertia from the time dependent pairing equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2016-10-01

    In a dynamical system, the momenta of inertia and the effective masses are not adiabatic quantities, but are dynamical ones that depend on the dissipated energy accumulated during motion. However, these parameters are calculated for adiabatic nuclear systems, leaving no room for dissipated energy. In this work, a formalism is elaborated in order to derive simultaneously the nuclear momenta of inertia and the effective masses by taking into account the appearance of dissipated energy for large amplitude motion of the nuclear system. The expressions that define the inertia are obtained from the variational principle. The same principle manages the time dependent pairing equations, offering estimations of the averaged dissipation energy for large amplitude motions. The model is applied to 232Th fission. The fission barrier was calculated along the least action trajectory. The dissipation energy, effective mass and moment of inertia are determined for different values of the collective velocities. The dissipation increases with the internuclear velocity in binary disintegration processes and modifies the effective mass parameters. We observed that the inertia decreases as long as the collective velocity increases to some moderate values and begins to grow for larger collective velocities. So, a dependence between the cranking mass parameters and the intrinsic excitation energy is evidenced. In order to investigate the overall effect, the half-lives are predicted for adiabatic and dynamics simulations.

  16. Novel Circuitry Configuration with Paired-Cell Erase Operation for High-Density 90-nm Embedded Resistive Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Koji; Aoki, Masaki; Sugiyama, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    We propose a novel circuitry configuration for high-density 90-nm embedded resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The memory cells are operated at 2 V, and a small memory cell size of 6F2 consisting of a 1.2-V standard transistor and a resistive junction (1T-1R) is designed, where F is the feature size. The unique circuitry configuration is that each pair of source-lines connects to each source-line selective gate. Therefore, erasing is done by a pair of cells in turn in the whole sector, while the reading or programming is done by a random accessing operation. We simulated the ReRAM circuit for read and write operations with SPICE. As a result, we found that 5-ns high-speed read access was obtained in the 256-word lines (WLs) × 256-bit lines (BLs) and that the SET/RESET operation was stable.

  17. Spatial configuration of vertically related word pairs modulates the N400 component.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tyler M; Magne, Cyrille; Langston, William

    2014-12-17

    This study examined the effect of spatial iconicity on the N400 component. Spatial iconicity is defined as the spatial arrangement of words on a screen relative to the spatial arrangement of their referents (e.g. attic-basement). In two experiments, electroencephalograms were recorded in 32 participants while performing a semantic relatedness judgment task on pairs of words that were either related or unrelated. All of the related word pairs were parts of objects that shared a vertical spatial relationship. In Experiment 1, the words of each pair were presented simultaneously on top of one another. Results showed that related word pairs presented in a spatial arrangement that mismatched the spatial relationship of their referents were associated with increased error rates as well as larger N400 components known to index semantic/conceptual processing cost. These findings thus suggest that the words automatically activated visuospatial simulations of their referents and that semantic/conceptual processing difficulty arose when the vertical arrangement of the word pairs was inconsistent with those simulations. In line with this interpretation, these effects were not present in Experiment 2 when the words of each pair were presented in succession in the middle of the screen. Overall, these results provide evidence that perceptual simulations contribute to some of the underlying processes of the N400 component (see video abstract, Supplemental digital content 1, http://links.lww.com/WNR/A304). PMID:25371283

  18. Chain-configuration dependent rheological properties in transient networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Michelle; Wang, Zhen-Gang; McKinley, Gareth; Olsen, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Complex associative networks capable of shear thinning followed by recovery on the order of seconds are of interest as injectable biomaterials. However, there is a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to rheological properties such as the network's yield stress and rate of self-healing. Here we present a transient network theory for associative physical gels arising from the chemical kinetic form of the Smoluchowski Equation capable of modeling the full chain end-to-end distance distribution while tracking the fraction of looped, bridged, and free chain configurations in the gel. By varying the equilibrium association rate relative to the material relaxation time, we are able to track the evolution of loop and bridge chain fraction as the system undergoes stress instabilities. We have evidence that these instabilities result from non-monotonic trends in loop and bridge chain fraction when the end group association rate is high relative to the dissociation rate. This behavior provides insight into the complex kinetic interactions responsible for certain mechanical behaviors while serving as a valuable predictive tool for gel design. Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Department of Defense National Defense Science and Engineering Fellowship Program

  19. Effect of total and pair configurational entropy in determining dynamics of supercooled liquids over a range of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Atreyee; Nandi, Manoj Kumar; Sastry, Srikanth; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a study of supercooled liquids interacting with the Lennard Jones potential and the corresponding purely repulsive (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen) potential, over a range of densities and temperatures, in order to understand the origin of their different dynamics in spite of their structures being similar. Using the configurational entropy as the thermodynamic marker via the Adam Gibbs relation, we show that the difference in the dynamics of these two systems at low temperatures can be explained from thermodynamics. At higher densities both the thermodynamical and dynamical difference between these model systems decrease, which is quantitatively demonstrated in this paper by calculating different parameters. The study also reveals the origin of the difference in pair entropy despite the similarity in the structure. Although the maximum difference in structure is obtained in the partial radial distribution function of the B type of particles, the rdf of AA pairs and AB pairs gives rise to the differences in the entropy and dynamics. This work supports the observation made in an earlier study [A. Banerjee et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 225701 (2014)] and shows that they are generic in nature, independent of density.

  20. Effect of total and pair configurational entropy in determining dynamics of supercooled liquids over a range of densities.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Atreyee; Nandi, Manoj Kumar; Sastry, Srikanth; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we present a study of supercooled liquids interacting with the Lennard Jones potential and the corresponding purely repulsive (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen) potential, over a range of densities and temperatures, in order to understand the origin of their different dynamics in spite of their structures being similar. Using the configurational entropy as the thermodynamic marker via the Adam Gibbs relation, we show that the difference in the dynamics of these two systems at low temperatures can be explained from thermodynamics. At higher densities both the thermodynamical and dynamical difference between these model systems decrease, which is quantitatively demonstrated in this paper by calculating different parameters. The study also reveals the origin of the difference in pair entropy despite the similarity in the structure. Although the maximum difference in structure is obtained in the partial radial distribution function of the B type of particles, the rdf of AA pairs and AB pairs gives rise to the differences in the entropy and dynamics. This work supports the observation made in an earlier study [A. Banerjee et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 225701 (2014)] and shows that they are generic in nature, independent of density.

  1. Inversion of the Odd-Even Effect in Cold Fission from the Time-Dependent Pairing Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2016-06-01

    A peculiar phenomenon was observed experimentally in cold fission: the odd partition yields are favored over the even ones for excitations energies of the fragments smaller than 4 MeV. In this contribution, a microscopic model is proposed for the explanation of this odd-even effect in cold fission. This explanation is based on a mixing configuration mechanism that is produced during the fission process. This configuration mixing mechanism is obtained dynamically by solving a the generalized system of time-dependent pairing equations, which include a pair-breaking effect. The time dependent equations of motion for the pair breaking effect were corroborated with a condition that fixes dynamically the number of particles on the two fission fragment. The single particle level scheme was calculated with the Woods-Saxon superasymmetric two center shell model, providing a continuous variation of the single particle energies and of the wave functions from one nucleus up to two separated fragments. A first rule can be extracted from this model. The even-even fission products cannot be obtained at zero excitation energies because of the existence of dynamical excitations produced in the avoided- level-crossing regions when the nuclear system deforms slowly.

  2. ON THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF A GIANT PLANET PAIR EMBEDDED IN A GASEOUS DISK. II. A SATURN-JUPITER CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2010-08-10

    We carry out a series of high-resolution (1024 x 1024) hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the orbital evolution of a Saturn-Jupiter pair embedded in a gaseous disk. This work extends the results of our previous work by exploring a different orbital configuration-Jupiter lies outside Saturn (q < 1, where q {identical_to} M{sub i} /M{sub o} is the mass ratio of the inner planet and the outer one). We focus on the effects of different initial separations (d) between the two planets and the various surface density profiles of the disk, where {sigma} {proportional_to} r {sup -}{alpha}. We also compare the results of different orbital configurations of the planet pair. Our results show that (1) when the initial separation is relatively large (d>d {sub iLr}, where d {sub iLr} is the distance between Jupiter and its first inner Lindblad resonance), the two planets undergo divergent migration. However, the inward migration of Saturn could be halted when Jupiter compresses the inner disk in which Saturn is embedded. (2) Convergent migration occurs when the initial separation is smaller (d < d {sub iLr}) and the density slope of the disk is nearly flat ({alpha} < 1/2). Saturn is then forced by Jupiter to migrate inward where the two planets are trapped into mean motion resonances (MMRs), and Saturn may get very close to the central star. (3) In the case of q < 1, the eccentricity of Saturn could be excited to a very high value (e{sub S} {approx} 0.4-0.5) by the MMRs and the system could maintain stability. These results explain the formation of MMRs in the exoplanet systems where the outer planet is more massive than the inner one. It also helps us to understand the origin of the 'hot Jupiter/Saturn' with a highly eccentric orbit.

  3. Temperature-dependent isovector pairing gap equations using a path integral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Belabbas, M.; Oudih, M. R.; Benhamouda, N.

    2007-10-15

    Temperature-dependent isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing gap equations have been established by means of the path integral approach. These equations generalize the BCS ones for the pairing between like particles at finite temperature. The method has been numerically tested using the one-level model. It has been shown that the gap parameter {delta}{sub np} has a behavior analogous to that of {delta}{sub nn} and {delta}{sub pp} as a function of the temperature: one notes the presence of a critical temperature. Moreover, it has been shown that the isovector pairing effects remain beyond the critical temperature that corresponds to the pairing between like particles.

  4. A theoretical method to compute sequence dependent configurational properties in charged polymers and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawle, Lucas; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2015-08-01

    A general formalism to compute configurational properties of proteins and other heteropolymers with an arbitrary sequence of charges and non-uniform excluded volume interaction is presented. A variational approach is utilized to predict average distance between any two monomers in the chain. The presented analytical model, for the first time, explicitly incorporates the role of sequence charge distribution to determine relative sizes between two sequences that vary not only in total charge composition but also in charge decoration (even when charge composition is fixed). Furthermore, the formalism is general enough to allow variation in excluded volume interactions between two monomers. Model predictions are benchmarked against the all-atom Monte Carlo studies of Das and Pappu [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 13392 (2013)] for 30 different synthetic sequences of polyampholytes. These sequences possess an equal number of glutamic acid (E) and lysine (K) residues but differ in the patterning within the sequence. Without any fit parameter, the model captures the strong sequence dependence of the simulated values of the radius of gyration with a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.9. The model is then applied to real proteins to compare the unfolded state dimensions of 540 orthologous pairs of thermophilic and mesophilic proteins. The excluded volume parameters are assumed similar under denatured conditions, and only electrostatic effects encoded in the sequence are accounted for. With these assumptions, thermophilic proteins are found—with high statistical significance—to have more compact disordered ensemble compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The method presented here, due to its analytical nature, is capable of making such high throughput analysis of multiple proteins and will have broad applications in proteomic studies as well as in other heteropolymeric systems.

  5. A theoretical method to compute sequence dependent configurational properties in charged polymers and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sawle, Lucas; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2015-08-28

    A general formalism to compute configurational properties of proteins and other heteropolymers with an arbitrary sequence of charges and non-uniform excluded volume interaction is presented. A variational approach is utilized to predict average distance between any two monomers in the chain. The presented analytical model, for the first time, explicitly incorporates the role of sequence charge distribution to determine relative sizes between two sequences that vary not only in total charge composition but also in charge decoration (even when charge composition is fixed). Furthermore, the formalism is general enough to allow variation in excluded volume interactions between two monomers. Model predictions are benchmarked against the all-atom Monte Carlo studies of Das and Pappu [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 13392 (2013)] for 30 different synthetic sequences of polyampholytes. These sequences possess an equal number of glutamic acid (E) and lysine (K) residues but differ in the patterning within the sequence. Without any fit parameter, the model captures the strong sequence dependence of the simulated values of the radius of gyration with a correlation coefficient of R{sup 2} = 0.9. The model is then applied to real proteins to compare the unfolded state dimensions of 540 orthologous pairs of thermophilic and mesophilic proteins. The excluded volume parameters are assumed similar under denatured conditions, and only electrostatic effects encoded in the sequence are accounted for. With these assumptions, thermophilic proteins are found—with high statistical significance—to have more compact disordered ensemble compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The method presented here, due to its analytical nature, is capable of making such high throughput analysis of multiple proteins and will have broad applications in proteomic studies as well as in other heteropolymeric systems.

  6. Configuration-dependent diffusion can shift the kinetic transition state and barrier height of protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Jorge; Oliveira, Ronaldo J.; Leite, Vitor B. P.; Wang, Jin

    2007-01-01

    We show that diffusion can play an important role in protein-folding kinetics. We explicitly calculate the diffusion coefficient of protein folding in a lattice model. We found that diffusion typically is configuration- or reaction coordinate-dependent. The diffusion coefficient is found to be decreasing with respect to the progression of folding toward the native state, which is caused by the collapse to a compact state constraining the configurational space for exploration. The configuration- or position-dependent diffusion coefficient has a significant contribution to the kinetics in addition to the thermodynamic free-energy barrier. It effectively changes (increases in this case) the kinetic barrier height as well as the position of the corresponding transition state and therefore modifies the folding kinetic rates as well as the kinetic routes. The resulting folding time, by considering both kinetic diffusion and the thermodynamic folding free-energy profile, thus is slower than the estimation from the thermodynamic free-energy barrier with constant diffusion but is consistent with the results from kinetic simulations. The configuration- or coordinate-dependent diffusion is especially important with respect to fast folding, when there is a small or no free-energy barrier and kinetics is controlled by diffusion. Including the configurational dependence will challenge the transition state theory of protein folding. The classical transition state theory will have to be modified to be consistent. The more detailed folding mechanistic studies involving phi value analysis based on the classical transition state theory also will have to be modified quantitatively. PMID:17804812

  7. Pairing context determines condition-dependence of song rate in a monogamous passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    David, Morgan; Auclair, Yannick; Dall, Sasha R. X.; Cézilly, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Condition-dependence of male ornaments is thought to provide honest signals on which females can base their sexual choice for genetic quality. Recent studies show that condition-dependence patterns can vary within populations. Although long-term association is thought to promote honest signalling, no study has explored the influence of pairing context on the condition-dependence of male ornaments. In this study, we assessed the influence of natural variation in body condition on song rate in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in three different situations: during short and long encounters with an unfamiliar female, and within heterosexual mated pairs. We found consistent individual differences in male directed and undirected song rate. Moreover, body condition had a positive effect on song rate in paired males. However, male song rate was not influenced by body condition during short or long encounters with unfamiliar females. Song rate appears to be an unreliable signal of condition to prospective females as even poor-condition birds can cheat and sing at a high rate. By contrast, paired females can reliably use song rate to assess their mate's body condition, and possibly the genetic quality. We propose that species' characteristics, such as mating system, should be systematically taken into account to generate relevant hypotheses about the evolution of condition-dependent male ornaments. PMID:23256191

  8. Simulations of circular dichroism spectra of a pair of diterpene enantiomers by time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Chang, Jia-Lin; Chen, Shou-Fong; Huang, Jhih-Hong; Sie, Jyun-Fu; Cheng, Yung-Yi

    2011-11-01

    We present the first theoretical study on a pair of diterpene enantiomers of formula C 21H 34O 5, which were newly isolated from plants and identified as 3β,5β-dihydroxy-16 α/ β-methoxyhalima-13(14)-en-15,16-olide. The equilibrium geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of their low-lying conformers were obtained by using the AM1 and B3LYP/6-31+G(d) methods. At the optimized geometries, rotatory strengths of six excited states of each conformer were computed by the time-dependent density functional theory. The electronic circular dichroism spectra were simulated by taking Boltzmann averaging and considering the solvent effect, from which the absolute configurations of the enantiomers were determined. Their vibrational circular dichroism spectra were also predicted.

  9. ON THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF A GIANT PLANET PAIR EMBEDDED IN A GASEOUS DISK. I. JUPITER-SATURN CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2010-05-01

    We carry out a series of high-resolution (1024 x 1024) hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the orbital evolution of Jupiter and Saturn embedded in a gaseous protostellar disk. Our work extends the results in the classical papers of Masset and Snellgrove and Morbidelli and Crida by exploring various surface density profiles ({sigma}), where {sigma} {proportional_to} r {sup -{alpha}}. The stability of the mean motion resonances (MMRs) caused by the convergent migration of the two planets is studied as well. Our results show that (1) the gap formation process of Saturn is greatly delayed by the tidal perturbation of Jupiter. These perturbations cause inward or outward runaway migration of Saturn, depending on the density profiles on the disk. (2) The convergent migration rate increases as {alpha} increases and the type of MMRs depends on {alpha} as well. When 0 < {alpha} < 1, the convergent migration speed of Jupiter and Saturn is relatively slow, thus they are trapped into 2:1 MMR. When {alpha}>4/3, Saturn passes through the 2:1 MMR with Jupiter and is captured into the 3:2 MMR. (3) The 3:2 MMR turns out to be unstable when the eccentricity of Saturn (e{sub s} ) increases too high. The critical value above which instability will set in is e{sub s} {approx} 0.15. We also observe that the two planets are trapped into 2:1 MMR after the break of 3:2 MMR. This process may provide useful information for the formation of orbital configuration between Jupiter and Saturn in the solar system.

  10. Comparing thermal wave function methods for multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, U.; Saalfrank, P.

    2014-01-28

    We compare two methods for creating stochastic temperature wave functions that can be used for Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree (MCTDH) simulations. In the first method, the MCTDH coefficients are chosen randomly, while the other method uses a single Hartree product of random single-particle functions (SPFs). We find that using random SPFs dramatically improves convergence for a model system for surface sticking.

  11. Instabilities and inaccuracies of multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, C. M.; Bauch, S.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that the widely used multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree- Fock method is restricted to a certain class of applications and fails for scenarios where periods of low entanglement occur during the propagation. By using illustrative and physically relevant examples, based on the Hubbard model of solid state physics, we show the existence of serious instabilities in the method itself and demonstrate that the method does not converge with respect to electron correlations. Possible cures of the approach are discussed.

  12. Two methods for restricted configuration spaces within the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; McCurdy, C. William

    2015-01-01

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method has shown promise in calculating electronic dynamics in molecules driven by strong and high-energy lasers. It must incorporate restricted configuration spaces (meaning that a particular combination of Slater determinants is used, instead of full configuration interaction) to be applied to big systems. Two different Ansätze are used to determine the essential term in the equations. The first Ansatz is the Lagrangian variational principle. The explicit, complete MCTDHF equations of motion, satisfying that principle, for arbitrary configuration spaces, are given. The property that a restricted configuration list must satisfy in order for the Lagrangian and McLachlan variational principles to give different results is identified. The second Ansatz keeps the density matrix block diagonal among equivalent orbitals, in a generalization of the method of Worth [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 8322 (2000), 10.1063/1.481438]. The methods perform well in calculating the dynamics of Be and BC2 + subject to ultrafast, ultrastrong lasers in severely truncated Hilbert spaces, although they exhibit differing degrees of numerical stability as implemented.

  13. Nuclear level density of even-even nuclei with temperature-dependent pairing energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, V.; Alavi, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of using a temperature-dependent pairing term on the back-shifted Fermi gas (BSFG) model of nuclear level density of some even-even nuclei has been investigated. We have chosen an approach to determine the adjustable parameters from theoretical calculations, directly. The exact Ginzburg-Landau (EGL) theory was used to determine the temperature-dependent pairing energy as back-shifted parameter of the BSFG model. The level density parameter of the BSFG model has been determined through the Thomas-Fermi approximation. The level densities of 96Mo, 106,112Cd, 106,108Pd, 164Dy, 232Th, 238U and heat capacities of 96Mo and 164Dy nuclei were calculated. Good agreement between theory and experiment was observed.

  14. Cavity-configuration-dependent instability in a tightly focused end-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Hsu; Tai, Po-Tse; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2004-11-01

    We experimentally studied the cavity-configuration-dependent instability in an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser in the vicinity of the degenerate resonator configuration of g1g2 = 1/4 with small pump size. We found that the laser instability occurs in a narrow range of cavity tuning on each side of the degeneracy, which shows periodic, period-doubling, and chaotic time evolutions. By using Collin's integral together with rate equations and taking into account the thermal lens effect, we show that the simulation is consistent with the experiments. The observed instabilities are new and, as far as we know, this is the first report that discusses the relationship between the instability and the thermal lens effect.

  15. X-point position dependence of edge intrinsic toroidal rotation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Karpushov, A. N.; Sauter, O.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Camenen, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Recent theoretical work predicts intrinsic toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge to depend strongly on the normalized major radial position of the X-point. With this motivation, we conducted a series of Ohmic L-mode shots on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, moving the X-point from the inboard to the outboard edge of the last closed flux surface in both lower and upper single null configurations. The edge toroidal rotation evolved from strongly co-current for an inboard X-point to either vanishing or counter-current for an outboard X-point, in agreement with the theoretical expectations. The whole rotation profile shifted roughly rigidly with the edge rotation, resulting in variation of the peak core rotation by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation. Edge rotation was slightly more counter-current for unfavorable than favorable ∇B drift discharges.

  16. Brain State-Dependent Closed-Loop Modulation of Paired Associative Stimulation Controlled by Sensorimotor Desynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Royter, Vladislav; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pairing peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) increases corticospinal excitability when applied with a specific temporal pattern. When the two stimulation techniques are applied separately, motor imagery (MI)-related oscillatory modulation amplifies both ES-related cortical effects—sensorimotor event-related desynchronization (ERD), and TMS-induced peripheral responses—motor-evoked potentials (MEP). However, the influence of brain self-regulation on the associative pairing of these stimulation techniques is still unclear. Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of MI-related ERD during associative ES and TMS on subsequent corticospinal excitability. Method: The paired application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle and subsequent single-pulse TMS (110% resting motor threshold (RMT)) of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) was controlled by beta-band (16–22 Hz) ERD during MI of finger extension and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in six healthy subjects. Neural correlates were probed by acquiring the stimulus-response curve (SRC) of both MEP peak-to-peak amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) before and after the intervention. Result: The application of approximately 150 pairs of associative FES and TMS resulted in a significant increase of MEP amplitudes and AUC, indicating that the induced increase of corticospinal excitability was mediated by the recruitment of additional neuronal pools. MEP increases were brain state-dependent and correlated with beta-band ERD, but not with the background EDC muscle activity; this finding was independent of the FES intensity applied. Conclusion: These results could be relevant for developing closed-loop therapeutic approaches such as the application of brain state-dependent, paired associative stimulation (PAS) in the context of neurorehabilitation. PMID

  17. Direct observation of f-pair magnetic field effects and time-dependence of radical pair composition using rapidly switched magnetic fields and time-resolved infrared methods.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Jonathan R; Foster, Timothy J; Salaoru, Adrian T; Vink, Claire B

    2008-07-21

    A rapidly switched (<10 ns) magnetic field was employed to directly observe magnetic fields from f-pair reactions of radical pairs in homogeneous solution. Geminate radical pairs from the photoabstraction reaction of benzophenone from cyclohexanol were observed directly using a pump-probe pulsed magnetic field method to determine their existence time. No magnetic field effects from geminate pairs were observed at times greater than 100 ns after initial photoexcitation. By measuring magnetic field effects for fields applied continuously only after this initial geminate period, f-pair effects could be directly observed. Measurement of the time-dependence of the field effect for the photolysis of 2-hydroxy-4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-2-methylpropiophenone in cyclohexanol using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy revealed not only the presence of f-pair magnetic field effects but also the ability of the time dependence of the MARY spectra to observe the changing composition of the randomly encountering pairs throughout the second order reaction period.

  18. Single-molecule derivation of salt dependent base-pair free energies in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Josep M; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Forns, Núria; Smith, Steven B; Bustamante, Carlos; Ritort, Felix

    2010-08-31

    Accurate knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids is crucial to predicting their structure and stability. To date most measurements of base-pair free energies in DNA are obtained in thermal denaturation experiments, which depend on several assumptions. Here we report measurements of the DNA base-pair free energies based on a simplified system, the mechanical unzipping of single DNA molecules. By combining experimental data with a physical model and an optimization algorithm for analysis, we measure the 10 unique nearest-neighbor base-pair free energies with 0.1 kcal mol(-1) precision over two orders of magnitude of monovalent salt concentration. We find an improved set of standard energy values compared with Unified Oligonucleotide energies and a unique set of 10 base-pair-specific salt-correction values. The latter are found to be strongest for AA/TT and weakest for CC/GG. Our unique energy values and salt corrections improve predictions of DNA unzipping forces and are fully compatible with melting temperatures for oligos. The method should make it possible to obtain free energies, enthalpies, and entropies in conditions not accessible by bulk methodologies. PMID:20716688

  19. AdS/CFT energy loss in time-dependent string configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficnar, Andrej

    2012-08-01

    We analyze spacetime momentum currents on a classical string world sheet, study their generic connection via AdS/CFT correspondence to the instantaneous energy loss of the dual field theory degrees of freedom and suggest a general formula for computing energy loss in a time-dependent string configuration. Applying this formula to the case of falling strings, generally dual to light quarks, reveals that the energy loss does not display a well-pronounced Bragg peak at late times, as previously believed. Finally, we comment on the possible implications of this result to the jet quenching phenomena in heavy ion collisions.

  20. The influence of anharmonic and solvent effects on the theoretical vibrational spectra of the guanine-cytosine base pairs in Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations.

    PubMed

    Bende, Attila; Muntean, Cristina M

    2014-03-01

    The theoretical IR and Raman spectra of the guanine-cytosine DNA base pairs in Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations were computed using DFT method with M06-2X meta-hybrid GGA exchange-correlation functional, including the anharmonic corrections and solvent effects. The results for harmonic frequencies and their anharmonic corrections were compared with our previously calculated values obtained with the B3PW91 hybrid GGA functional. Significant differences were obtained for the anharmonic corrections calculated with the two different DFT functionals, especially for the stretching modes, while the corresponding harmonic frequencies did not differ considerable. For the Hoogtseen case the H⁺ vibration between the G-C base pair can be characterized as an asymmetric Duffing oscillator and therefore unrealistic anharmonic corrections for normal modes where this proton vibration is involved have been obtained. The spectral modification due to the anharmonic corrections, solvent effects and the influence of sugar-phosphate group for the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pair configurations, respectively, were also discussed. For the Watson-Crick case also the influence of the stacking interaction on the theoretical IR and Raman spectra was analyzed. Including the anharmonic correction in our normal mode analysis is essential if one wants to obtain correct assignments of the theoretical frequency values as compared with the experimental spectra. PMID:24567152

  1. Polyamine-dependent facilitation of postsynaptic AMPA receptors counteracts paired-pulse depression.

    PubMed

    Rozov, A; Burnashev, N

    1999-10-01

    At many glutamatergic synapses in the brain, calcium-permeable alpha - amino - 3 - hydro - 5 - methyl - 4 - isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) channels mediate fast excitatory transmission. These channels are blocked by endogenous intracellular polyamines, which are found in virtually every type of cell. In excised patches, use-dependent relief of polyamine block enhances glutamate-evoked currents through recombinant and native calcium-permeable, polyamine-sensitive AMPAR channels. The contribution of polyamine unblock to synaptic currents during high-frequency stimulation may be to facilitate currents and maintain current amplitudes in the face of a slow recovery from desensitization or presynaptic depression. Here we show, on pairs and triples of synaptically connected neurons in slices, that this mechanism contributes to short-term plasticity in local circuits formed by presynaptic pyramidal neurons and postsynaptic multipolar interneurons in layer 2/3 of rat neocortex. Activity-dependent relief from polyamine block of postsynaptic calcium-permeable AMPARs in the interneurons either reduces the rate of paired-pulse depression in a frequency-dependent manner or, at a given stimulation frequency, induces facilitation of a synaptic response that would otherwise depress. This mechanism for the enhancement of synaptic gain appears to be entirely postsynaptic.

  2. Configurable spatiotemporal properties in a photon-pair source based on spontaneous four-wave mixing with multiple transverse modes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Delgado, Daniel; Monroy-Ruz, Jorge; Barragan, Angela M; Ortiz-Ricardo, Erasto; Cruz-Ramirez, Hector; Ramirez-Alarcon, Roberto; Garay-Palmett, Karina; U'Ren, Alfred B

    2014-06-15

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of photon pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM), based on birefringent phasematching, in a fiber that supports more than one transverse mode. We present SFWM spectra, obtained through single-channel and coincidence photon counting, which exhibit multiple peaks shown here to be the result of multiple SFWM processes associated with different combinations of transverse modes for the pump, signal, and idler waves.

  3. Vlasov equation for Schwinger pair production in a time-dependent electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, Adolfo; Kim, Sang Pyo; Schubert, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Schwinger pair creation in a purely time-dependent electric field can be described through a quantum Vlasov equation describing the time evolution of the single-particle momentum distribution function. This equation exists in two versions, both of which can be derived by a Bogoliubov transformation, but whose equivalence is not obvious. For the spinless case, we show here that the difference between these two evolution equations corresponds to the one between the "in-out" and "in-in" formalisms. We give a simple relation between the asymptotic distribution functions generated by the two Vlasov equations. As examples we discuss the Sauter and single-soliton field cases.

  4. First proton-pair breaking in semi-magic nuclei beyond 132Sn and 208Pb: Configuration of the long-lived isomer of 217Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astier, Alain; Porquet, Marie-Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    The close similarity between the shell structures in the 132Sn and 208Pb regions is a well known phenomenon. Thus, using the correspondence between the high-j orbits located above the Z=50 and Z=82 shell gaps, we discuss the evolutions of the fully aligned states with one broken proton pair in the N=82 and N=126 isotones. A long-lived isomeric state was discovered in 217Pa more than thirty years ago and, despite two other experiments giving new experimental results, the discussions on its main properties (spin, parity, configuration) remained inconclusive. Then, using the comparison with the Iπ=17/2+ isomeric state recently measured in 139La, the isomeric state of 217Pa is assigned as the fully aligned state of the (πh9/2)2(πf7/2)1 configuration.

  5. Preparation of Honeycomb SnO₂ Foams and Configuration-Dependent Microwave Absorption Features.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Fan, Bingbing; Xu, Yawei; Shao, Gang; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhao, Wanyu; Zhang, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Ordered honeycomb-like SnO2 foams were successfully synthesized by means of a template method. The honeycomb SnO2 foams were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), laser Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). It can be found that the SnO2 foam configurations were determined by the size of polystyrene templates. The electromagnetic properties of ordered SnO2 foams were also investigated by a network analyzer. The results reveal that the microwave absorption properties of SnO2 foams were dependent on their configuration. The microwave absorption capabilities of SnO2 foams were increased by increasing the size of pores in the foam configuration. Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave absorption was also correlated with the pore contents in SnO2 foams. The large and high amounts pores can bring about more interfacial polarization and corresponding relaxation. Thus, the perfect ordered honeycomb-like SnO2 foams obtained in the existence of large amounts of 322 nm polystyrene spheres showed the outstanding electromagnetic wave absorption properties. The minimal reflection loss (RL) is -37.6 dB at 17.1 GHz, and RL less than -10 dB reaches 5.6 GHz (12.4-18.0 GHz) with thin thickness of 2.0 mm. The bandwidth (<-10 dB, 90% microwave dissipation) can be monitored in the frequency regime of 4.0-18.0 GHz with absorber thickness of 2.0-5.0 mm. The results indicate that these ordered honeycomb SnO2 foams show the superiorities of wide-band, high-efficiency absorption, multiple reflection and scatting, high antioxidation, lightweight, and thin thickness.

  6. Event-Related Potential Effects of Object Repetition Depend on Attention and Part-Whole Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, Angela; Thoma, Volker; de Fockert, Jan W.; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spatial attention and part-whole configuration on recognition of repeated objects were investigated with behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures. Short-term repetition effects were measured for probe objects as a function of whether a preceding prime object was shown as an intact image or coarsely scrambled (split into two halves) and whether or not it had been attended during the prime display. In line with previous behavioral experiments, priming effects were observed from both intact and split primes for attended objects, but only from intact (repeated same-view) objects when they were unattended. These behavioral results were reflected in ERP waveforms at occipital–temporal locations as more negative-going deflections for repeated items in the time window between 220 and 300 ms after probe onset (N250r). Attended intact images showed generally more enhanced repetition effects than split ones. Unattended images showed repetition effects only when presented in an intact configuration, and this finding was limited to the right-hemisphere electrodes. Repetition effects in earlier (before 200 ms) time windows were limited to attended conditions at occipito-temporal sites during the N1, a component linked to the encoding of object structure, while repetition effects at central locations during the same time window (P150) were found for attended and unattended probes but only when repeated in the same intact configuration. The data indicate that view-generalization is mediated by a combination of analytic (part-based) representations and automatic view-dependent representations. PMID:27721749

  7. Need for Space: The Key Distance Effect Depends on Spatial Stimulus Configurations

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Julia; Franz, Volker H.

    2014-01-01

    In numerous psychological experiments, participants classify stimuli by pressing response keys. According to Lakens, Schneider, Jostmann, and Schubert (2011), classification performance is affected by physical distance between response keys – indicating a cognitive tendency to represent categories in spatial code. However, previous evidence for a key distance effect (KDE) from a color-naming Stroop task is inconclusive as to whether: (a) key separation automatically leads to an internal spatial representation of non-spatial stimulus characteristics in participants, or if the KDE rather depends on physical spatial characteristics of the stimulus configuration; (b) the KDE attenuates the Stroop interference effect. We therefore first adopted the original Stroop task in Experiment 1, confirming that wider key distance facilitated responses, but did not modulate the Stroop effect as was previously found. In Experiments 2 and 3 we controlled potential mediator variables in the original design. When we did not display instructions about stimulus-response mappings, thereby removing the unintended spatial context from the Stroop stimuli, no KDE emerged. Presenting the instructions at a central position in Experiment 4 confirmed that key separation alone is not sufficient for a KDE, but correspondence between spatial configurations of stimuli and responses is also necessary. Evidence indicates that the KDE on Stroop performance is due to known mechanisms of stimulus-response compatibility and response discriminability. The KDE does, however, not demonstrate a general disposition to represent any stimulus in spatial code. PMID:24642888

  8. Inverse Temperature Dependence of Nuclear Quantum Effects in DNA Base Pairs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inherently quantum mechanical nature of hydrogen bonding, it is unclear how nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) alter the strengths of hydrogen bonds. With this in mind, we use ab initio path integral molecular dynamics to determine the absolute contribution of NQEs to the binding in DNA base pair complexes, arguably the most important hydrogen-bonded systems of all. We find that depending on the temperature, NQEs can either strengthen or weaken the binding within the hydrogen-bonded complexes. As a somewhat counterintuitive consequence, NQEs can have a smaller impact on hydrogen bond strengths at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. We rationalize this in terms of a competition of NQEs between low-frequency and high-frequency vibrational modes. Extending this idea, we also propose a simple model to predict the temperature dependence of NQEs on hydrogen bond strengths in general. PMID:27195654

  9. Polarization dependent extinction coefficients of superparamagnetic colloids in transverse and longitudinal configurations of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. V.

    2013-05-01

    We review here, our work on the light scattering by ferrofluids and mixture of ferrofluids and other nonmagnetic suspensions subjected to an external static magnetic field. Detailed derivation of extinction coefficients of the systems when incident light is propagating along transverse and longitudinal direction of the field are carried out. In case of inclusion of anisotropic diamagnetic micron sized particles in a ferrofluids, effects of'magnetic holes' generated in the system on the extinction are discussed. The present work is analyzed in light of other similar investigations. It is shown that the study of polarization dependence of extinction coefficients in transverse field configuration is useful to arrive at an unambiguous conclusion regarding chain formation in a ferrofluid.

  10. Configuration-dependent hybridization in electron spectroscopies of Ce-based compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, N.; Bertran, F.; Malterre, D.

    1997-12-01

    In this paper, we analyze Ce 3d core-level photoemission and inverse-photoemission spectra in the framework of the single-impurity Anderson model. We show that the Gunnarsson-Sch{umlt o}nhammer model generally used to describe spectroscopic properties of Ce-based systems cannot account for the description of core-hole photoemission and inverse-photoemission spectra with the same set of parameters. By introducing 4f configuration-dependent hybridization terms, the situation is significantly improved, and a satisfactory agreement between experimental and calculated spectra is obtained. This result shows that, in contrast to what was previously claimed for highly hybridized compounds, the spectroscopic data of cerium compounds can be described in the framework of the single-impurity Anderson model. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Dipole switching in large molecules described by explicitly time-dependent configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Pascal; Klamroth, Tillmann

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we report laser-driven charge transfer simulations for Li-(Ph)n-CN (n=1,2,3) using the time-dependent configuration interaction single approach. These molecules serve as systematically extendable model systems, in order to investigate the selectivity, and thus controllability, of an ultrashort laser-induced electronic excitation as a function of the molecular size. For example, such control would be needed if a small electronic molecular switch is connected to a larger molecular device. We demonstrate that for larger molecules, the selectivity of the electronic transition is considerably reduced even for rather long pulses due to dynamic polarizations of the molecules. We also show that these dynamic polarizations might be substantially underestimated in few state models.

  12. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems. PMID:26733922

  13. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems.

  14. A Pair of Pharyngeal Gustatory Receptor Neurons Regulates Caffeine-Dependent Ingestion in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaekyun; van Giesen, Lena; Choi, Min Sung; Kang, KyeongJin; Sprecher, Simon G.; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The sense of taste is an essential chemosensory modality that enables animals to identify appropriate food sources and control feeding behavior. In particular, the recognition of bitter taste prevents animals from feeding on harmful substances. Feeding is a complex behavior comprised of multiple steps, and food quality is continuously assessed. We here examined the role of pharyngeal gustatory organs in ingestion behavior. As a first step, we constructed a gustatory receptor-to-neuron map of the larval pharyngeal sense organs, and examined corresponding gustatory receptor neuron (GRN) projections in the larval brain. Out of 22 candidate bitter compounds, we found 14 bitter compounds that elicit inhibition of ingestion in a dose-dependent manner. We provide evidence that certain pharyngeal GRNs are necessary and sufficient for the ingestion response of larvae to caffeine. Additionally, we show that a specific pair of pharyngeal GRNs, DP1, responds to caffeine by calcium imaging. In this study we show that a specific pair of GRNs in the pharyngeal sense organs coordinates caffeine sensing with regulation of behavioral responses such as ingestion. Our results indicate that in Drosophila larvae, the pharyngeal GRNs have a major role in sensing food palatability to regulate ingestion behavior. The pharyngeal sense organs are prime candidates to influence ingestion due to their position in the pharynx, and they may act as first level sensors of ingested food. PMID:27486388

  15. Pressure Dependence of Anharmonic Effective Pair Potentials in Rock Salt Type AgI

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiasa, Akira; Sugahara, Masahiko; Fukui, Hiroshi; Arima, Hiroshi; Ohtaka, Osamu; Okube, Maki; Katayama, Yoshinori; Murai, Kei-ichiro

    2007-02-02

    Pressure dependence of anharmonic effective pair potentials V(u)=au2/2+bu3/3{exclamation_point} for the I-Ag bond in rock salt type AgI has been investigated by EXAFS Debye-Waller factors. EXAFS measurements near the I K-edge were performed under pressure up to 6.0 GPa using a multi-anvil high-pressure device and synchrotron radiation from SPring-8, Hyogo. The potential parameter a for rock-salt type is 1.66(5) eV/A2 at 1.0 GPa and increases to 1.88(6) eV/A2 at 6.0 GPa. The phonon energies in rock salt type AgI under pressure have been estimated using the potential parameter a by calculating the dynamical matrix. The anharmonic effective pair potential for each phase is influenced by pressure and becomes steeper with increasing pressure while the extent of anharmonicity decreases with pressure.

  16. Space-dependent formation of central pair microtubules and their interactions with radial spokes.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yuki; Ariyoshi, Tetsuro; Noga, Akira; Kamiya, Ritsu; Hirono, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella contain nine outer doublet microtubules and a pair of central microtubules. The central pair of microtubules (CP) is important for cilia/flagella beating, as clearly shown by primary ciliary dyskinesia resulting from the loss of the CP. The CP is thought to regulate axonemal dyneins through interaction with radial spokes (RSs). However, the nature of the CP-RS interaction is poorly understood. Here we examine the appearance of CPs in the axonemes of a Chlamydomonas mutant, bld12, which produces axonemes with 8 to 11 outer-doublets. Most of its 8-doublet axonemes lack CPs. However, in the double mutant of bld12 and pf14, a mutant lacking the RS, most 8-doublet axonemes contain the CP. Thus formation of the CP apparently depends on the internal space limited by the outer doublets and RSs. In 10- or 11-doublet axonemes, only 3-5 RSs are attached to the CP and the doublet arrangement is distorted most likely because the RSs attached to the CP pull the outer doublets toward the axonemal center. The CP orientation in the axonemes varies in double mutants formed between bld12 and mutants lacking particular CP projections. The mutant bld12 thus provides the first direct and visual information about the CP-RS interaction, as well as about the mechanism of CP formation.

  17. A Pair of Pharyngeal Gustatory Receptor Neurons Regulates Caffeine-Dependent Ingestion in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaekyun; van Giesen, Lena; Choi, Min Sung; Kang, KyeongJin; Sprecher, Simon G; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The sense of taste is an essential chemosensory modality that enables animals to identify appropriate food sources and control feeding behavior. In particular, the recognition of bitter taste prevents animals from feeding on harmful substances. Feeding is a complex behavior comprised of multiple steps, and food quality is continuously assessed. We here examined the role of pharyngeal gustatory organs in ingestion behavior. As a first step, we constructed a gustatory receptor-to-neuron map of the larval pharyngeal sense organs, and examined corresponding gustatory receptor neuron (GRN) projections in the larval brain. Out of 22 candidate bitter compounds, we found 14 bitter compounds that elicit inhibition of ingestion in a dose-dependent manner. We provide evidence that certain pharyngeal GRNs are necessary and sufficient for the ingestion response of larvae to caffeine. Additionally, we show that a specific pair of pharyngeal GRNs, DP1, responds to caffeine by calcium imaging. In this study we show that a specific pair of GRNs in the pharyngeal sense organs coordinates caffeine sensing with regulation of behavioral responses such as ingestion. Our results indicate that in Drosophila larvae, the pharyngeal GRNs have a major role in sensing food palatability to regulate ingestion behavior. The pharyngeal sense organs are prime candidates to influence ingestion due to their position in the pharynx, and they may act as first level sensors of ingested food. PMID:27486388

  18. Parameter dependence in the atmospheric decoherence of modally entangled photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Alpha Hamadou; Roux, Filippus S.; Konrad, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    When a pair of photons that are entangled in terms of their transverse modes, such as an orbital angular momentum (OAM) basis, propagates through atmospheric turbulence, the scintillation causes a decay of the entanglement. Here, we use numerical simulations to study how this decoherence process depends on the various dimension parameters of the system. The relevant dimension parameters are the propagation distance, the wavelength, the beam radius, and the refractive index structure constant, indicating the strength of the turbulence. We show that beyond the weak scintillation regime, the entanglement evolution cannot be accurately modeled by a single phase screen that is specified by a single dimensionless parameter. Two dimensionless parameters are necessary to describe the OAM entanglement evolution. Furthermore, it is found that higher OAM modes are not more robust in turbulence beyond the weak scintillation regime.

  19. Orbital Dependent Nucleonic Pairing in the Lightest Known Isotopes of Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, Iain; Grzywacz, R.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Gross, Carl J; Liddick, Sean; Nazarewicz, Witold; Padgett, Stephen; Papenbrock, T.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rotureau, J.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2010-01-01

    By studying the {sup 109}Xe {yields} {sup 105}Te {yields} {sup 101}Sn superallowed {alpha}-decay chain, we observe low-lying states in {sup 101}Sn, the one-neutron system outside doubly magic {sup 100}Sn. We find that the spins of the ground state (J=7/2) and first excited state (J=5/2) in {sup 101}Sn are reversed with respect to the traditional level ordering postulated for {sup 103}Sn and the heavier tin isotopes. Through simple arguments and state-of-the-art shell-model calculations we explain this unexpected switch in terms of a transition from the single-particle regime to the collective mode in which orbital-dependent pairing correlations dominate.

  20. Synthesizing mechanisms of density dependence in reef fishes: behavior, habitat configuration, and observational scale.

    PubMed

    White, J Wilson; Samhouri, Jameal F; Stier, Adrian C; Wormald, Clare L; Hamilton, Scott L; Sandin, Stuart A

    2010-07-01

    Coral and rocky reef fish populations are widely used as model systems for the experimental exploration of density-dependent vital rates, but patterns of density-dependent mortality in these systems are not yet fully understood. In particular, the paradigm for strong, directly density-dependent (DDD) postsettlement mortality stands in contrast to recent evidence for inversely density-dependent (IDD) mortality. We review the processes responsible for DDD and IDD per capita mortality in reef fishes, noting that the pattern observed depends on predator and prey behavior, the spatial configuration of the reef habitat, and the spatial and temporal scales of observation. Specifically, predators tend to produce DDD prey mortality at their characteristic spatial scale of foraging, but prey mortality is IDD at smaller spatial scales due to attack-abatement effects (e.g., risk dilution). As a result, DDD mortality may be more common than IDD mortality on patch reefs, which tend to constrain predator foraging to the same scale as prey aggregation, eliminating attack-abatement effects. Additionally, adjacent groups of prey on continuous reefs may share a subset of refuges, increasing per capita refuge availability and relaxing DDD mortality relative to prey on patch reefs, where the patch edge could prevent such refuge sharing. These hypotheses lead to a synthetic framework to predict expected mortality patterns for a variety of scenarios. For nonsocial, nonaggregating species and species that aggregate in order to take advantage of spatially clumped refuges, IDD mortality is possible but likely superseded by DDD refuge competition, especially on patch reefs. By contrast, for species that aggregate socially, mortality should be IDD at the scale of individual aggregations but DDD at larger scales. The results of nearly all prior reef fish studies fit within this framework, although additional work is needed to test many of the predicted outcomes. This synthesis reconciles some

  1. Dependence of effective internal field of congruent lithium niobate on its domain configuration and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ranjit E-mail: souvik2cat@gmail.com Ghosh, Souvik E-mail: souvik2cat@gmail.com Chakraborty, Rajib E-mail: souvik2cat@gmail.com

    2014-06-28

    Congruent lithium niobate is characterized by its internal field, which arises due to defect clusters within the crystal. Here, it is shown experimentally that this internal field is a function of the molecular configuration in a particular domain and also on the stability of that particular configuration. The measurements of internal field are done using interferometric technique, while the variation of domain configuration is brought about by room temperature high voltage electric field poling.

  2. A time dependent 2D divertor code with TVD scheme for complex divertor configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, K.; Takizuka, T.; Hirayama, T.

    1999-11-01

    In order to study the transport of heat and particles in the SOL and divertor plasmas, a two-dimensional divertor code, SOLDOR has been developed. The model used in this code is identical to the B2-code. Fluid equations are discretized in space under a non orthogonal mesh to treat accurately the W shape divertor configuration of JT-60U. The total variation diminishing scheme (TVD), which is a most familiar one in computational fluid dynamics, is applied for convective terms. The equations obtained by a finite volume method (FVM) are discretized in time with a full implicit scheme and are solved time-dependently using the Newton-Raphson method. The discretized equations are solved efficiently using approximate factorization method (AF). Test calculations in the slab geometry successfully reproduced the B2 results (B.J. Braams, NET report 1987) . We are going to apply this code to JT-60U divertor plasma and investigate the flow reversal and impurity transport.

  3. Energy management of electric and hybrid vehicles dependent on powertrain configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Bogdan Ovidiu

    2012-06-01

    Electric and hybrid vehicles are going to become the most reliable source of transport for future years. The CO2 and NOx targets in Euro 6 normative puts the producers of vehicles in a dilemma, whether to adapt the internal combustion engines further, or to develop hybrid or electric power trains that are going to reach the pollution limit of the future norms or to go below that. Before acting a well-developed strategy in determining the optimum power flow has to be developed by producers; CRUISE software is a tool with the unique and special characteristics to determine the optimum in this highly important area. Whether electric vehicle, electric vehicle with range extender or a hybrid with CVT or planetary gearbox, the complexity of the mathematical modules remains the same, giving the developer the possibility to create complex functions and distinctive characteristics for each component of the vehicle. With such a powerful tool it becomes extremely easy to evaluate the energy flow in all directions, from electric machine to the battery, from electric machine to the power generator, and from the electric machine to the internal combustion engine. Applying to the (Electric Vehicle, Electric Vehicle with Range Extender, Hybrid vehicle with CVT, Hybrid vehicle with planetary gear set) the ECE-15 in a virtual environment (urban driving cycle) the simulation results show a different usage, rate of storage and efficiency concerning the energy, this being dependent of the power train configuration in most part.

  4. Cultivation of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria: impact of reactor configuration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baolan; He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chen; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2014-09-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is mediated by bacteria that anaerobically oxidize methane coupled with nitrite reduction and is a potential bioprocess for wastewater treatment. In this work, the effect of reactor configuration on n-damo bacterial cultivation was investigated. A magnetically stirred gas lift reactor (MSGLR), a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were selected to cultivate the bacteria. Microbial community was monitored by using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pmoA gene sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The effects of substrate inhibition, methane mass transfer, and biomass washout in the three reactors were focused on. The results indicated that the MSGLR had the best performance among the three reactor systems, with the highest total and specific n-damo activities. Its maximum volumetric nitrogen removal rate was up to 76.9 mg N L(-1) day(-1), which was higher than previously reported values (5.1-37.8 mg N L(-1) d(-1)).

  5. Decomposition of the configuration-interaction coefficients in the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lötstedt, Erik; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    An approximate implementation of the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method is proposed, in which the matrix of configuration-interaction coefficients is decomposed into a product of matrices of smaller dimension. The applicability of this method in which all the configurations are kept in the expansion of the wave function, while the configuration-interaction coefficients are approximately calculated, is discussed by showing the results on three model systems: a one-dimensional model of a beryllium atom, a one-dimensional model of a carbon atom, and a one-dimensional model of a chain of four hydrogen atoms. The time-dependent electronic dynamics induced by a few-cycle, long-wavelength laser pulse is found to be well described at a lower computational cost compared to the standard multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock treatment. Drawbacks of the method are also discussed.

  6. Decomposition of the configuration-interaction coefficients in the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method.

    PubMed

    Lötstedt, Erik; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2016-04-21

    An approximate implementation of the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method is proposed, in which the matrix of configuration-interaction coefficients is decomposed into a product of matrices of smaller dimension. The applicability of this method in which all the configurations are kept in the expansion of the wave function, while the configuration-interaction coefficients are approximately calculated, is discussed by showing the results on three model systems: a one-dimensional model of a beryllium atom, a one-dimensional model of a carbon atom, and a one-dimensional model of a chain of four hydrogen atoms. The time-dependent electronic dynamics induced by a few-cycle, long-wavelength laser pulse is found to be well described at a lower computational cost compared to the standard multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock treatment. Drawbacks of the method are also discussed. PMID:27389213

  7. On mT dependence of femtoscopy scales for meson and baryon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Shapoval, V. M.; Naboka, V. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The mT-dependencies of the femto-scales, the so-called interferometry and source radii, are investigated within the hydrokinetic model for different types of particle pairs - pion-pion, kaon-kaon, proton-proton and proton-lambda, - produced in Pb+Pb and p + p collisions at the LHC. In particular, such property of the femto-scales momentum behavior as mT-scaling is studied for the systems with (w) and without (w/o) intensive transverse flow, and also w and w/o re-scattering at the final afterburner stage of the matter evolution. The detailed spatiotemporal description obtained within hydrokinetic model is compared with the simple analytical results for the spectra and longitudinal interferometry radii depending on the effective temperature on the hypersurface of maximal emission, proper time of such emission, and intensity of transverse flow. The derivation of the corresponding analytical formulas and discussion about a possibility for their utilization by the experimentalists for the simple femtoscopy data analysis is the main aim of this theoretical investigation.

  8. Instability of multi-layer fluid configurations in the presence of time-dependent accelerations in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, M. J.; Roh, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The increasing number of research opportunities in a microgravity environment will benefit not only fundamental studies in fluid dynamics, but also technological applications such as those involving materials processing. In particular, fluid configurations which involve fluid-fluid interfaces would occur in a variety of experimental investigations. This work investigates the stability of a configuration involving fluid-fluid interfaces in the presence of a time-dependent forcing. Both periodic (g-jitter) and nonperiodic accelerations are considered. The fluid configuration is multilayered, and infinite in extent. The analysis is linear and inviscid, and the acceleration vector is oriented perpendicular to each interface. A Floquet analysis is employed in the case of the periodic forcing. In the problem of nonperiodic forcing, the resulting system of equations are integrated in time. Specific nondimensional parameters appear in each problem. The configuration behavior is investigated for a range of parameter values.

  9. Two-fluid temperature-dependent relativistic waves in magnetized streaming pair plasmas.

    PubMed

    Soto-Chavez, A R; Mahajan, S M; Hazeltine, R D

    2010-02-01

    A relativistic two-fluid temperature-dependent approach for a streaming magnetized pair plasma is considered. Such a scenario corresponds to secondary plasmas created at the polar caps of pulsar magnetospheres. In the model the generalized vorticity rather than the magnetic field is frozen into the fluid. For parallel propagation four transverse modes are found. Two are electromagnetic plasma modes which at high temperature become light waves. The remaining two are Alfvénic modes split into a fast and slow mode. The slow mode is cyclotron two-stream unstable at large wavelengths and is always subluminous. We find that the instability cannot be suppressed by temperature effects in the limit of large (finite) magnetic field. The fast Alfvén mode can be superluminous only at large wavelengths, however it is always subluminous at high temperatures. In this incompressible approximation only the ordinary mode is present for perpendicular propagation. For oblique propagation the dispersion relation is studied for finite and large strong magnetic fields and the results are qualitatively described. PMID:20365661

  10. Uncovering hidden variance: pair-wise SNP analysis accounts for additional variance in nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Culverhouse, Robert C.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Stitzel, Jerry A.; Wang, Jen C.; Steinbach, Joseph H.; Goate, Alison M.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Grucza, Richard A.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies of complex traits account for only a modest proportion of the trait variance predicted to be due to genetics. We hypothesize that joint analysis of polymorphisms may account for more variance. We evaluated this hypothesis on a case–control smoking phenotype by examining pairs of nicotinic receptor single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the Restricted Partition Method (RPM) on data from the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence (COGEND). We found evidence of joint effects that increase explained variance. Four signals identified in COGEND were testable in independent American Cancer Society (ACS) data, and three of the four signals replicated. Our results highlight two important lessons: joint effects that increase the explained variance are not limited to loci displaying substantial main effects, and joint effects need not display a significant interaction term in a logistic regression model. These results suggest that the joint analyses of variants may indeed account for part of the genetic variance left unexplained by single SNP analyses. Methodologies that limit analyses of joint effects to variants that demonstrate association in single SNP analyses, or require a significant interaction term, will likely miss important joint effects. PMID:21079997

  11. Apolipoprotein A-I configuration and cell cholesterol efflux activity of discoidal lipoproteins depend on the reconstitution process.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Luz Ángela; Prieto, Eduardo Daniel; Cabaleiro, Laura Virginia; Garda, Horacio Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Discoidal high-density lipoproteins (D-HDL) are critical intermediates in reverse cholesterol transport. Most of the present knowledge of D-HDL is based on studies with reconstituted lipoprotein complexes of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) obtained by cholate dialysis (CD). D-HDL can also be generated by the direct microsolubilization (DM) of phospholipid vesicles at the gel/fluid phase transition temperature, a process mechanistically similar to the "in vivo" apoAI lipidation via ABCA1. We compared the apoA-I configuration in D-HDL reconstituted with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine by both procedures using fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements with apoA-I tryptophan mutants and fluorescently labeled cysteine mutants. Results indicate that apoA-I configuration in D-HDL depends on the reconstitution process and are consistent with a "double belt" molecular arrangement with different helix registry. As reported by others, a configuration with juxtaposition of helices 5 of each apoAI monomer (5/5 registry) predominates in D-HDL obtained by CD. However, a configuration with helix 5 of one monomer juxtaposed with helix 2 of the other (5/2 registry) would predominate in D-HDL generated by DM. Moreover, we also show that the kinetics of cholesterol efflux from macrophage cultures depends on the reconstitution process, suggesting that apoAI configuration is important for this HDL function. PMID:24201377

  12. Statistical mechanics of Roskilde liquids: Configurational adiabats, specific heat contours, and density dependence of the scaling exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicholas P.; Bøhling, Lasse; Veldhorst, Arno A.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2013-11-14

    We derive exact results for the rate of change of thermodynamic quantities, in particular, the configurational specific heat at constant volume, C{sub V}, along configurational adiabats (curves of constant excess entropy S{sub ex}). Such curves are designated isomorphs for so-called Roskilde liquids, in view of the invariance of various structural and dynamical quantities along them. The slope of the isomorphs in a double logarithmic representation of the density-temperature phase diagram, γ, can be interpreted as one third of an effective inverse power-law potential exponent. We show that in liquids where γ increases (decreases) with density, the contours of C{sub V} have smaller (larger) slope than configurational adiabats. We clarify also the connection between γ and the pair potential. A fluctuation formula for the slope of the C{sub V}-contours is derived. The theoretical results are supported with data from computer simulations of two systems, the Lennard-Jones fluid, and the Girifalco fluid. The sign of dγ/dρ is thus a third key parameter in characterizing Roskilde liquids, after γ and the virial-potential energy correlation coefficient R. To go beyond isomorph theory we compare invariance of a dynamical quantity, the self-diffusion coefficient, along adiabats and C{sub V}-contours, finding it more invariant along adiabats.

  13. Statistical mechanics of Roskilde liquids: configurational adiabats, specific heat contours, and density dependence of the scaling exponent.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Nicholas P; Bøhling, Lasse; Veldhorst, Arno A; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2013-11-14

    We derive exact results for the rate of change of thermodynamic quantities, in particular, the configurational specific heat at constant volume, CV, along configurational adiabats (curves of constant excess entropy Sex). Such curves are designated isomorphs for so-called Roskilde liquids, in view of the invariance of various structural and dynamical quantities along them. The slope of the isomorphs in a double logarithmic representation of the density-temperature phase diagram, γ, can be interpreted as one third of an effective inverse power-law potential exponent. We show that in liquids where γ increases (decreases) with density, the contours of CV have smaller (larger) slope than configurational adiabats. We clarify also the connection between γ and the pair potential. A fluctuation formula for the slope of the CV-contours is derived. The theoretical results are supported with data from computer simulations of two systems, the Lennard-Jones fluid, and the Girifalco fluid. The sign of dγ∕dρ is thus a third key parameter in characterizing Roskilde liquids, after γ and the virial-potential energy correlation coefficient R. To go beyond isomorph theory we compare invariance of a dynamical quantity, the self-diffusion coefficient, along adiabats and CV-contours, finding it more invariant along adiabats.

  14. Combinatory Microarray and SuperSAGE Analyses Identify Pairing-Dependently Transcribed Genes in Schistosoma mansoni Males, Including Follistatin

    PubMed Central

    Leutner, Silke; Oliveira, Katia C.; Rotter, Björn; Beckmann, Svenja; Buro, Christin; Hahnel, Steffen; Kitajima, Joao P.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Winter, Peter; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a disease of world-wide importance and is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. These parasites exhibit a unique reproduction biology as the female's sexual maturation depends on a constant pairing-contact to the male. Pairing leads to gonad differentiation in the female, and even gene expression of some gonad-associated genes is controlled by pairing. In contrast, no morphological changes have been observed in males, although first data indicated an effect of pairing also on gene transcription in males. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the influence of pairing on males, we performed a combinatory approach applying SuperSAGE and microarray hybridization, generating the most comprehensive data-set on differential transcription available to date. Of 6,326 sense transcripts detected by both analyses, 29 were significantly differentially transcribed. Besides mutual confirmation, the two methods complemented each other as shown by data comparison and real-time PCR, which revealed a number of genes with consistent regulation across all methods. One of the candidate genes, follistatin of S. mansoni (SmFst) was characterized in more detail by in situ hybridization and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction analyses with potential binding partners. Conclusions/Significance Beyond confirming previously hypothesized differences in metabolic processes between pairing-experienced (EM) and pairing-unexperienced males (UM), our data indicate that neuronal processes are involved in male-female interaction but also TGFβ-signaling. One candidate revealing significant down-regulation in EM was the TGFβ-pathway controlling molecule follistatin (SmFst). First functional analyses demonstrated SmFst interaction with the S. mansoni TGFβ-receptor agonists inhibin/activin (SmInAct) and bone morphogenic protein (SmBMP), and all molecules colocalized in the testes. This indicates a yet unknown role of the TGFβ-pathway for

  15. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields.

    PubMed

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN. PMID:27179472

  16. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  17. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields.

    PubMed

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  18. Temporal Interval Discrimination Thresholds Depend on Perceived Synchrony for Audio-Visual Stimulus Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Eijk, Rob L. J.; Kohlrausch, Armin; Juola, James F.; van de Par, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Audio-visual stimulus pairs presented at various relative delays, are commonly judged as being "synchronous" over a range of delays from about -50 ms (audio leading) to +150 ms (video leading). The center of this range is an estimate of the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS). The judgment boundaries, where "synchronous" judgments yield to a…

  19. Dependence of the Rate of LiF Ion-Pairing on the Description of Molecular Interaction.

    PubMed

    Pluhařová, Eva; Baer, Marcel D; Schenter, Gregory K; Jungwirth, Pavel; Mundy, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    We present an analysis of the dynamics of ion-pairing of lithium fluoride (LiF) in aqueous solvent using both detailed molecular simulation as well as reduced models within a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) framework. We explored the sensitivity of the ion-pairing phenomena to the details of descriptions of molecular interaction, comparing two empirical potentials to explicit quantum based density functional theory. We find quantitative differences in the potentials of mean force for ion-pairing as well as time dependent frictions that lead to variations in the rate constant and reactive flux correlation functions. These details reflect differences in solvent response to ion-pairing between different representations of molecular interaction and influence anharmonicity of the dynamic response. We find that the short-time anharmonic response is recovered with a GLE parametrization. Recovery of the details of long time response may require extensions to the reduced model. We show that the utility of using a reduced model leads to a straightforward application of variational transition state theory concepts to the condensed phase system. The significance of this is reflected in the analysis of committor distributions and the variation of planar hypersurfaces, leading to an improved understanding of factors that determine the rate of LiF ion-pairing.

  20. Schistosome sex matters: a deep view into gonad-specific and pairing-dependent transcriptomes reveals a complex gender interplay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhigang; Sessler, Florian; Holroyd, Nancy; Hahnel, Steffen; Quack, Thomas; Berriman, Matthew; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2016-01-01

    As a key event for maintaining life cycles, reproduction is a central part of platyhelminth biology. In case of parasitic platyhelminths, reproductive processes can also contribute to pathology. One representative example is the trematode Schistosoma, which causes schistosomiasis, an infectious disease, whose pathology is associated with egg production. Among the outstanding features of schistosomes is their dioecious lifestyle and the pairing-dependent differentiation of the female gonads which finally leads to egg synthesis. To analyze the reproductive biology of Schistosoma mansoni in-depth we isolated complete ovaries and testes from paired and unpaired schistosomes for comparative RNA-seq analyses. Of >7,000 transcripts found in the gonads, 243 (testes) and 3,600 (ovaries) occurred pairing-dependently. Besides the detection of genes transcribed preferentially or specifically in the gonads of both genders, we uncovered pairing-induced processes within the gonads including stem cell-associated and neural functions. Comparisons to work on neuropeptidergic signaling in planarian showed interesting parallels but also remarkable differences and highlights the importance of the nervous system for flatworm gonad differentiation. Finally, we postulated first functional hints for 235 hypothetical genes. Together, these results elucidate key aspects of flatworm reproductive biology and will be relevant for basic as well as applied, exploitable research aspects. PMID:27499125

  1. Schistosome sex matters: a deep view into gonad-specific and pairing-dependent transcriptomes reveals a complex gender interplay

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhigang; Sessler, Florian; Holroyd, Nancy; Hahnel, Steffen; Quack, Thomas; Berriman, Matthew; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2016-01-01

    As a key event for maintaining life cycles, reproduction is a central part of platyhelminth biology. In case of parasitic platyhelminths, reproductive processes can also contribute to pathology. One representative example is the trematode Schistosoma, which causes schistosomiasis, an infectious disease, whose pathology is associated with egg production. Among the outstanding features of schistosomes is their dioecious lifestyle and the pairing-dependent differentiation of the female gonads which finally leads to egg synthesis. To analyze the reproductive biology of Schistosoma mansoni in-depth we isolated complete ovaries and testes from paired and unpaired schistosomes for comparative RNA-seq analyses. Of >7,000 transcripts found in the gonads, 243 (testes) and 3,600 (ovaries) occurred pairing-dependently. Besides the detection of genes transcribed preferentially or specifically in the gonads of both genders, we uncovered pairing-induced processes within the gonads including stem cell-associated and neural functions. Comparisons to work on neuropeptidergic signaling in planarian showed interesting parallels but also remarkable differences and highlights the importance of the nervous system for flatworm gonad differentiation. Finally, we postulated first functional hints for 235 hypothetical genes. Together, these results elucidate key aspects of flatworm reproductive biology and will be relevant for basic as well as applied, exploitable research aspects. PMID:27499125

  2. Dependence of Localized Electronic Structure on Ligand Configuration in the [2Fe] Hydrogenase Catalytic Core^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher H.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-03-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme is found in a variety of organisms, including Archaea, Eubacteria, and green algae^1,2, and crystallographically determined atomic position data is available for two examples. The biologically unusual catalytic H-cluster, responsible for proton reduction to H2 in vivo, is conserved in the known structures and includes two bis-thiolato bridged iron ions with extensive cyano- and carbonyl ligation. To address the configurational specificity of the diatomic ligand ligation, density functional theoretical calculations were done on [2Fe] core models of the active center, with varying CO and CN^- ligation patterns. Bonding in each complex has been characterized within the Natural Bond Orbital formalism. The effect of ligand configuration on bonding and charge distribution as well as Kohn-Sham orbital structure will be presented. [1] M. Forestier, P. King, L. Zhang, M. Posewitz, S. Schwarzer, T. Happe, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Eur. J. Biochem. 270, 2750 (2003). [2] Posewitz, M.C., P.W. King, S.L. Smolinski, R.D. Smith, II, A.R. Ginley, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Biochem. Soc. Trans. 33, 102 (2005). ^*This work was supported by the US DOE-SC-BES Hydrogen Fuels Initiative, and done in collaboration with the NREL Chemical and Biosciences Center.

  3. Configuration dependence of band-gap narrowing and localization in dilute GaAs1 -xBix alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannow, Lars C.; Rubel, Oleg; Badescu, Stefan C.; Rosenow, Phil; Hader, Jörg; Moloney, Jerome V.; Tonner, Ralf; Koch, Stephan W.

    2016-05-01

    Anion substitution with bismuth (Bi) in III-V semiconductors is an effective method for experimental engineering of the band gap Eg at low Bi concentrations (≤2 % ), in particular in gallium arsenide (GaAs). The inverse Bi-concentration dependence of Eg has been found to be linear at low concentrations x and dominated by a valence band defect level anticrossing between As and Bi occupied p levels. Predictive models for the valence band hybridization require a first-principle understanding which can be obtained by density functional theory with the main challenges being the proper description of Eg and the spin-orbit coupling. By using an efficient method to include these effects, it is shown here that at high concentrations Eg is modified mainly by a Bi-Bi p orbital interaction and by the large Bi atom-induced strain. In particular, we find that at high concentrations, the Bi-Bi interactions depend strongly on model periodic cluster configurations, which are not captured by tight-binding models. Averaging over various configurations supports the defect level broadening picture. This points to the role of different atomic configurations obtained by varying the experimental growth conditions in engineering arsenide band gaps, in particular for telecommunication laser technology.

  4. The latitude dependencies of the solar wind. [of interplanetary magnetic field polarity and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, R. L.; Winge, C. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of spacecraft following the earth's orbit occurs within the solar latitude range of 7 deg 15 min N on approximately September 7 to 7 deg 15 min S on approximately March 6. The latitude dependencies so far detected within this range have shown that the photospheric dipole-like field of the sun makes very important contributions to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed near the ecliptic. Changes in geomagnetic activity from even to odd numbered 11-year solar cycles are related to changes in the sun's dipolar field. The north-south IMF component and meridional, nonradial flow are important to a complete understanding of steady-state solar wind dynamics. Coronal conditions must be latitude-dependent in a way that accounts for the observed latitude dependence of the velocity and density of the solar wind.

  5. Fock-space diagonalization of the state-dependent pairing Hamiltonian with the Woods-Saxon mean field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molique, H.; Dudek, J.

    1997-10-01

    A particle-number conserving approach is presented to solve the nuclear mean-field plus pairing Hamiltonian problem with a realistic deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential. The method is designed for the state-dependent monopole pairing Hamiltonian H⁁pair=∑αβGαβc†αc†α ¯cβ ¯cβ with an arbitrary set of matrix elements Gαβ. Symmetries of the Hamiltonians on the many-body level are discussed using the language of P symmetry introduced earlier in the literature and are employed to diagonalize the problem; the only essential approximation used is a many-body (Fock-space) basis cutoff. An optimal basis construction is discussed and the stability of the final result with respect to the basis cutoff is illustrated in details. Extensions of the concept of P symmetry are introduced and their consequences for an optimal many-body basis cutoff construction are exploited. An algorithm is constructed allowing to solve the pairing problems in the many-body spaces corresponding to p~40 particles on n~80 levels and for several dozens of lowest lying states with precision ~(1-2) % within seconds of the CPU time on a CRAY computer. Among applications, the presence of the low-lying seniority s=0 solutions, that are usually poorly described in terms of the standard approximations (BCS, HFB), is discussed and demonstrated to play a role in the interpretation of the spectra of rotating nuclei.

  6. Theory of antisymmetric spin-pair-dependent electric polarization in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, S.; Furukawa, N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetoelectric couplings between an electric polarization and an antisymmetric spin pair, Si×Sj , in a multiorbital Hubbard model on a distorted lattice. We microscopically derive a generic form of the electric polarization, pAS=d ̂(Si×Sj) , with a tensor, d ̂, which includes the electric polarization induced by the Katsura-Nagaosa-Balatsky formula as a subset. The origin and nature of these magnetoelectric couplings are clarified in a unified way; the results indicate that various noncollinear magnetic structures, such as canted antiferromagnetic, proper screw, and 120∘ spin structures, show multiferroic behaviors owing to non-Katsura-Nagaosa-Balatsky coupling.

  7. Accounting for Dependence Induced by Weighted KNN Imputation in Paired Samples, Motivated by a Colorectal Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Suyundikov, Anvar; Stevens, John R.; Corcoran, Christopher; Herrick, Jennifer; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Missing data can arise in bioinformatics applications for a variety of reasons, and imputation methods are frequently applied to such data. We are motivated by a colorectal cancer study where miRNA expression was measured in paired tumor-normal samples of hundreds of patients, but data for many normal samples were missing due to lack of tissue availability. We compare the precision and power performance of several imputation methods, and draw attention to the statistical dependence induced by K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) imputation. This imputation-induced dependence has not previously been addressed in the literature. We demonstrate how to account for this dependence, and show through simulation how the choice to ignore or account for this dependence affects both power and type I error rate control. PMID:25849489

  8. Time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction approach to photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, S.; Sørensen, L. K.; Madsen, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a wave-function-based method to solve the time-dependent many-electron Schrödinger equation with special emphasis on strong-field ionization phenomena. The theory builds on the configuration-interaction (CI) approach supplemented by the generalized-active-space concept from quantum chemistry. The latter allows for a controllable reduction in the number of configurations in the CI expansion by imposing restrictions on the active orbital space. The method is similar to the recently formulated time-dependent restricted-active-space CI method [D. Hochstuhl and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. A 86, 053424 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.053424]. We present details of our implementation and address convergence properties with respect to the active spaces and the associated account of electron correlation in both ground-state and excitation scenarios. We apply the time-dependent generalized-active-space CI theory to strong-field ionization of polar diatomic molecules and illustrate how the method allows us to uncover a strong correlation-induced shift of the preferred direction of emission of photoelectrons.

  9. Studying temperature dependence of pairing gap parameter in a nucleus as a small superconducting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatinejad, A.; Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we have taken the effect of small size of nucleus and static fluctuations into account in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity calculations of 45Ti nucleus. Thermodynamic quantities of 45Ti have been extracted within the BCS model with the inclusion of the average value of the pairing gap square, extracted by the modified Ginzburg-Landau (MGL) method for small systems. Calculated values of the excitation energy and entropy within the MGL+BCS method improve the extracted results within the usual BCS model and show a smooth behavior around the critical temperature with a very good agreement with the semi-empirical values. The result of using MGL+BCS method for the heat capacity of 45Ti is compared with the corresponding semi-empirical values and the calculated values within the BCS, static path approximation (SPA) and Modified Pairing gap BCS (MPBCS) which is a method that was proposed in our previous publications. Both MGL+BCS and MPBCS avoid the discontinuity of the heat capacity curve, which is observed in the usual BCS method, and lead to an S-shaped curve with a good agreement with the semi-empirical results.

  10. Scale-dependent effects of landscape composition and configuration on natural enemy diversity, crop herbivory, and yields.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily A; Seo, Bumsuk; Park, Chan-Ryul; Reineking, Björn; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2016-03-01

    , indicating positive density-dependence of enemies on pests. However, the diversity of aerial enemies was also positively related to yields. (5) Our results suggest that the effectiveness of agrienvironmental schemes for managing natural enemy diversity, crop damage and yields could be enhanced by optimizing the effects of distinct landscape parameters, particularly landscape configuration and diversity, across scales.

  11. Scale-dependent effects of landscape composition and configuration on natural enemy diversity, crop herbivory, and yields.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily A; Seo, Bumsuk; Park, Chan-Ryul; Reineking, Björn; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2016-03-01

    , indicating positive density-dependence of enemies on pests. However, the diversity of aerial enemies was also positively related to yields. (5) Our results suggest that the effectiveness of agrienvironmental schemes for managing natural enemy diversity, crop damage and yields could be enhanced by optimizing the effects of distinct landscape parameters, particularly landscape configuration and diversity, across scales. PMID:27209787

  12. Asymptotic expansion of pair production probability in a time-dependent electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We study particle creation in a single pulse of an electric field in scalar quantum electrodynamics. We investigate the parameter condition for the case where the dynamical pair creation and Schwinger mechanism respectively dominate. Then, an asymptotic expansion for the particle distribution in terms of the time interval of the applied electric field is derived. We compare our result with particle creation in a constant electric field with a finite-time interval. These results coincide in an extremely strong field, however they differ in general field strength. We interpret the reason of this difference as a nonperturbative effect of high-frequency photons in external electric fields. Moreover, we find that the next-to-leading-order term in our asymptotic expansion coincides with the derivative expansion of the effective action.

  13. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High-Tc Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.

    2010-05-03

    We report the discovery of a self-doped multi-layer high T{sub c} superconductor Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}F{sub 2} (F0234) which contains distinctly different superconducting gap magnitudes along its two Fermi surface(FS) sheets. While formal valence counting would imply this material to be an undoped insulator, it is a self-doped superconductor with a T{sub c} of 60K, possessing simultaneously both electron- and hole-doped FS sheets. Intriguingly, the FS sheet characterized by the much larger gap is the electron-doped one, which has a shape disfavoring two electronic features considered to be important for the pairing mechanism: the van Hove singularity and the antiferromagnetic ({pi}/a, {pi}/a) scattering.

  14. Laser-induced electron dynamics including photoionization: A heuristic model within time-dependent configuration interaction theory.

    PubMed

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Saalfrank, Peter; Klamroth, Tillmann

    2009-09-21

    We report simulations of laser-pulse driven many-electron dynamics by means of a simple, heuristic extension of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TD-CIS) approach. The extension allows for the treatment of ionizing states as nonstationary states with a finite, energy-dependent lifetime to account for above-threshold ionization losses in laser-driven many-electron dynamics. The extended TD-CIS method is applied to the following specific examples: (i) state-to-state transitions in the LiCN molecule which correspond to intramolecular charge transfer, (ii) creation of electronic wave packets in LiCN including wave packet analysis by pump-probe spectroscopy, and, finally, (iii) the effect of ionization on the dynamic polarizability of H(2) when calculated nonperturbatively by TD-CIS.

  15. The time-dependent generalized active space configuration interaction approach to correlated ionization dynamics of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, S.; Larsson, H. R.; Hinz, C.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution, we review the time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration interaction (TD-GAS-CI) approach to the photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules including electron correlation effects. It is based on the configuration interaction (CI) expansion of the many-body wave function and the restriction of the determinantal space to a reduced subspace. For its numerically efficient application to photoionization, a partially-rotated basis set is used which adopts features of a localized basis with a good reference description and a grid representation for escaping wave packets. After reviewing earlier applications of the theory, we address the strong-field ionization of a one-dimensional model of the four-electron LiH molecule using TD-GAS-CI and demonstrate the importance of electron-electron correlations in the ionization yield for different orientations of the molecule w.r.t the peak of the linearly polarized laser field. A pronounced orientation-dependent variation of the yield with the pulse duration and the level of considered electron-electron correlations is observed.

  16. Configuration and Heating Power Dependence of Edge Parameters and H-mode Dynamics in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Bush; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J. Boedo; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S. Kubota; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; R.J. Maqueda; S.A. Sabbagh; V.A. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; J.B. Wilgen; S.J. Zweben; W.M. Davis; D.A. Gates; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; H.W. Kugel; D. Mastrovito; S. Medley; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S.J. Paul; Y-K.M. Peng; R. Raman; P.G. Roney; A.L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; E.J. Synakowski; G. Taylor; the NSTX Team

    2003-01-09

    Edge parameters play a critical role in H-mode (high-confinement mode) access, which is a key component of plasma discharge optimization in present-day toroidal confinement experiments and the design of next-generation devices. Because the edge magnetic topology of a spherical torus (ST) differs from a conventional aspect ratio tokamak, H-modes in STs exhibit important differences compared with tokamaks. The dependence of the NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) edge plasma on heating power, including the L-H transition requirements and the occurrence of edge-localized modes (ELMs), and on divertor configuration is quantified. Comparisons between good L-modes (low-confinement modes) and H-modes show greater differences in the ion channel than the electron channel. The threshold power for the H-mode transition in NSTX is generally above the predictions of a recent ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) scaling. Correlations of transition and ELM phenomena with turbulent fluctuations revealed by Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and reflectometry are observed. In both single-null and double-null divertor discharges, the density peaks off-axis, sometimes developing prominent ''ears'' which can be sustained for many energy confinement times, tau subscript ''E'', in the absence of ELMs. A wide variety of ELM behavior is observed, and ELM characteristics depend on configuration and fueling.

  17. Effects of symmetry and spin configuration on spin-dependent transport properties of iron-phthalocyanine-based devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Li-Ling; Yang, Bing-Chu Li, Xin-Mei; Cao, Can; Long, Meng-Qiu

    2014-07-21

    Spin-dependent transport properties of nanodevices constructed by iron-phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule sandwiched between two zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes are studied using first-principles quantum transport calculations. The effects of the symmetry and spin configuration of electrodes have been taken into account. It is found that large magnetoresistance, large spin polarization, dual spin-filtering, and negative differential resistance (NDR) can coexist in these devices. Our results show that 5Z-FePc system presents well conductive ability in both parallel (P) and anti-parallel (AP) configurations. For 6Z-FePc-P system, spin filtering effect and large spin polarization can be found. A dual spin filtering and NDR can also be shown in 6Z-FePc-AP. Our studies indicate that the dual spin filtering effect depends on the orbitals symmetry of the energy bands and spin mismatching of the electrodes. And all the effects would open up possibilities for their applications in spin-valve, spin-filter as well as effective spin diode devices.

  18. Effects of symmetry and spin configuration on spin-dependent transport properties of iron-phthalocyanine-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li-Ling; Yang, Bing-Chu; Li, Xin-Mei; Cao, Can; Long, Meng-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    Spin-dependent transport properties of nanodevices constructed by iron-phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule sandwiched between two zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes are studied using first-principles quantum transport calculations. The effects of the symmetry and spin configuration of electrodes have been taken into account. It is found that large magnetoresistance, large spin polarization, dual spin-filtering, and negative differential resistance (NDR) can coexist in these devices. Our results show that 5Z-FePc system presents well conductive ability in both parallel (P) and anti-parallel (AP) configurations. For 6Z-FePc-P system, spin filtering effect and large spin polarization can be found. A dual spin filtering and NDR can also be shown in 6Z-FePc-AP. Our studies indicate that the dual spin filtering effect depends on the orbitals symmetry of the energy bands and spin mismatching of the electrodes. And all the effects would open up possibilities for their applications in spin-valve, spin-filter as well as effective spin diode devices.

  19. Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion at Next-to-Leading Order with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence.

    PubMed

    Borowka, S; Greiner, N; Heinrich, G; Jones, S P; Kerner, M; Schlenk, J; Schubert, U; Zirke, T

    2016-07-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO.

  20. Attention can increase or decrease spike count correlations between pairs of neurons depending on their role in a task

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Douglas A.; Cohen, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention enhances the responses of visual neurons that encode the attended location. Several recent studies showed that attention also decreases correlations between fluctuations in the responses of pairs of neurons (termed spike count correlation or rSC). The previous results are consistent with two hypotheses. Attention–related changes in rate and rSC might be linked (perhaps through a common mechanism), so that attention always decreases rSC. Alternately, attention might either increase or decrease rSC, possibly depending on the role the neurons play in the behavioral task. We recorded simultaneously from dozens of neurons in area V4 while monkeys performed a discrimination task. We found strong evidence in favor of the second hypothesis, showing that attention can flexibly increase or decrease correlations, depending on whether the neurons provide evidence for the same or opposite perceptual decisions. These results place important constraints on models of the neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive factors. PMID:25306550

  1. Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion at Next-to-Leading Order with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowka, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Jones, S. P.; Kerner, M.; Schlenk, J.; Schubert, U.; Zirke, T.

    2016-07-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO.

  2. Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion at Next-to-Leading Order with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence.

    PubMed

    Borowka, S; Greiner, N; Heinrich, G; Jones, S P; Kerner, M; Schlenk, J; Schubert, U; Zirke, T

    2016-07-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO. PMID:27419563

  3. Strong domain configuration dependence of the nonlinear dielectric response in (K,Na)NbO{sub 3}-based ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Huan, Yu; Wang, Xiaohui Li, Longtu; Koruza, Jurij

    2015-11-16

    The nonlinear dielectric response in (Na{sub 0.52}K{sub 0.4425}Li{sub 0.0375})(Nb{sub 0.92−x}Ta{sub x}Sb{sub 0.08})O{sub 3} ceramics with different amounts of Ta was measured using subcoercive electric fields and quantified by the Rayleigh model. The irreversible extrinsic contribution, mainly caused by the irreversible domain wall translation, was strongly dependent on the domain configuration. The irreversible extrinsic contributions remained approximately the same within the single-phase regions, either orthorhombic or tetragonal, due to the similar domain morphology. However, in the polymorphic phase transition region, the domain wall density was increased by minimized domain size, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. This resulted in constrained domain wall motion due to self-clamping and reduced the irreversible extrinsic contribution.

  4. Molecular wave function and effective adiabatic potentials calculated by extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Yoshihiro; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2015-12-31

    We first calculate the ground-state molecular wave function of 1D model H{sub 2} molecule by solving the coupled equations of motion formulated in the extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method by the imaginary time propagation. From the comparisons with the results obtained by the Born-Huang (BH) expansion method as well as with the exact wave function, we observe that the memory size required in the extended MCTDHF method is about two orders of magnitude smaller than in the BH expansion method to achieve the same accuracy for the total energy. Second, in order to provide a theoretical means to understand dynamical behavior of the wave function, we propose to define effective adiabatic potential functions and compare them with the conventional adiabatic electronic potentials, although the notion of the adiabatic potentials is not used in the extended MCTDHF approach. From the comparison, we conclude that by calculating the effective potentials we may be able to predict the energy differences among electronic states even for a time-dependent system, e.g., time-dependent excitation energies, which would be difficult to be estimated within the BH expansion approach.

  5. Detecting dependencies between spike trains of pairs of neurons through copulas.

    PubMed

    Sacerdote, Laura; Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Zucca, Cristina

    2012-01-24

    The dynamics of a neuron are influenced by the connections with the network where it lies. Recorded spike trains exhibit patterns due to the interactions between neurons. However, the structure of the network is not known. A challenging task is to investigate it from the analysis of simultaneously recorded spike trains. We develop a non-parametric method based on copulas, that we apply to simulated data according to different bivariate Leaky Integrate and Fire models. The method discerns dependencies determined by the surrounding network, from those determined by direct interactions between the two neurons. Furthermore, the method recognizes the presence of delays in the spike propagation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Neural Coding". PMID:21981802

  6. Characterizing Non-Linear Dependencies Among Pairs of Clinical Variables and Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Caban, Jesus J.; Bagci, Ulas; Mehari, Alem; Alam, Shoaib; Fontana, Joseph R.; Kato, Gregory J.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems have shown the benefits of using computer-based techniques to obtain quantitative image measurements of the extent of a particular disease. Such measurements provide more accurate information that can be used to better study the associations between anatomical changes and clinical findings. Unfortunately, even with the use of quantitative image features, the correlations between anatomical changes and clinical findings are often not apparent and definite conclusions are difficult to reach. This paper uses nonparametric exploration techniques to demonstrate that even when the associations between two-variables seems weak, advanced properties of the associations can be studied and used to better understand the relationships between individual measurements. This paper uses quantitative imaging findings and clinical measurements of 85 patients with pulmonary fibrosis to demonstrate the advantages of non-linear dependency analysis. Results show that even when the correlation coefficients between imaging and clinical findings seem small, statistical measurements such as the maximum asymmetry score (MAS) and maximum edge value (MEV) can be used to better understand the hidden associations between the variables. PMID:23366482

  7. Evidence for a Mass Dependent Forward-Backward Asymmetry in Top Quark Pair Production

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the inclusive forward-backward t{bar t} production asymmetry and its rapidity and mass dependence. The measurements are performed with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, recorded with the CDF II Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Significant inclusive asymmetries are observed in both the laboratory frame and the t{bar t} rest frame, and in both cases are found to be consistent with CP conservation under interchange of t and {bar t}. In the t{bar t} rest frame, the asymmetry is observed to increase with the t{bar t} rapidity difference, {Delta}y, and with the invariant mass M{sub t{bar t}} of the t{bar t} system. Fully corrected parton-level asymmetries are derived in two regions of each variable, and the asymmetry is found to be most significant at large {Delta}y and M{sub t{bar t}}. For M{sub t{bar t}} {ge} 450 GeV/c{sup 2}, the parton-level asymmetry in the t{bar t} rest frame is A{sup t{bar t}} = 0.475 {+-} 0.114 compared to a next-to-leading order QCD prediction of 0.088 {+-} 0.013.

  8. Time-dependent absorption of very high-energy gamma-rays from the Galactic center by pair-production

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, Attila; Horns, Dieter; Ripken, Joachim; Gillessen, Stefan; Eldik, Christopher van

    2008-12-24

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays have been detected from the direction of the Galactic center. The H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes have located this {gamma}-ray source with a preliminary position uncertainty of 8.5'' per axis (6'' statistic+6'' sytematic per axis). Within the uncertainty region several possible counterpart candidates exist: the Super Massive Black Hole Sgr A*, the Pulsar Wind Nebula candidate G359.95-0.04, the Low Mass X-Ray Binary-system J174540.0-290031, the stellar cluster IRS 13, as well as self-annihilating dark matter. It is experimentally very challenging to further improve the positional accuracy in this energy range and therefore, it may not be possible to clearly associate one of the counterpart candidates with the VHE-source. Here, we present a new method to investigate a possible link of the VHE-source with the near environment of Sgr A*(within approximately 1000 Schwarzschild radii). This method uses the time- and energy-dependent effect of absorption of VHE {gamma}-rays by pair-production (in the following named pair-eclipse) with low-energy photons of stars closely orbiting the SMBH Sgr A*.

  9. Contribution of a luminance-dependent S-cone mechanism to non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eiji; Kuroki, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    In the watercolor configuration composed of wavy double contours, both assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading have been demonstrated depending on the luminance conditions of the inner and outer contours (IC and OC, respectively). This study investigated how the induced color in the watercolor configuration was modulated by combinations of the IC and the OC color, particularly addressing non-assimilative color spreading. In two experiments, the IC color was fixed to a certain color and combined with various colors selected from a hue circle centered at the background white color. Color spreading was quantified with a chromatic cancelation technique. Results showed that both the magnitude and the apparent hue of the color spreading were largely changed with the luminance condition. When the IC contrast (Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminance) was smaller in size than the OC contrast (higher IC luminance condition), the color spreading was assimilative. When the luminance condition was reversed and the IC contrast was greater than the OC contrast (lower IC luminance condition), the color spreading was non-assimilative and yellowish. When the color spreading was analyzed in terms of cone-opponent excitations, the results were consistent with the interpretation that the color spreading is explainable by a combination of chromatic diffusion from the IC and chromatically opponent induction from the OC. The color spreading in the higher IC luminance condition mainly reflected the chromatic diffusion by both (L–M) and S cone-opponent mechanisms. The non-assimilative color spreading in the lower IC luminance condition mostly reflected S-cone mediated opponent induction and the contribution of −S inducing mechanisms was differentially large. These findings provided several constraints on possible visual mechanisms underlying the watercolor effect. PMID:25538602

  10. Electron hole pair mediated vibrational excitation in CO scattering from Au(111): Incidence energy and surface temperature dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Werdecker, Jörn; Golibrzuch, Kai; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bartels, Christof

    2014-09-28

    We investigated the translational incidence energy (E{sub i}) and surface temperature (T{sub s}) dependence of CO vibrational excitation upon scattering from a clean Au(111) surface. We report absolute v = 0 → 1 excitation probabilities for E{sub i} between 0.16 and 0.84 eV and T{sub s} between 473 and 973 K. This is now only the second collision system where such comprehensive measurements are available – the first is NO on Au(111). For CO on Au(111), vibrational excitation occurs via direct inelastic scattering through electron hole pair mediated energy transfer – it is enhanced by incidence translation and the electronically non-adiabatic coupling is about 5 times weaker than in NO scattering from Au(111). Vibrational excitation via the trapping desorption channel dominates at E{sub i} = 0.16 eV and quickly disappears at higher E{sub i}.

  11. Schwinger pair production in space- and time-dependent electric fields: Relating the Wigner formalism to quantum kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hebenstreit, F.; Alkofer, R.; Gies, H.

    2010-11-15

    The nonperturbative electron-positron pair production (Schwinger effect) is considered for space- and time-dependent electric fields E-vector(x-vector,t). Based on the Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism, we derive a system of partial differential equations of infinite order for the 16 irreducible components of the Wigner function. In the limit of spatially homogeneous fields the Vlasov equation of quantum kinetic theory is rediscovered. It is shown that the quantum kinetic formalism can be exactly solved in the case of a constant electric field E(t)=E{sub 0} and the Sauter-type electric field E(t)=E{sub 0}sech{sup 2}(t/{tau}). These analytic solutions translate into corresponding expressions within the Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism and allow to discuss the effect of higher derivatives. We observe that spatial field variations typically exert a strong influence on the components of the Wigner function for large momenta or for late times.

  12. Association of ADH and ALDH Genes With Alcohol Dependence in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence (IASPSAD) Sample

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Kalsi, Gursharan; Prescott, Carol A.; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Goldman, David; van den Oord, Edwin J.; Alexander, Jeffry; Jiang, Cizhong; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Patterson, Diana G.; Walsh, Dermot; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Riley, Brien P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The genes coding for ethanol metabolism enzymes [alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)] have been widely studied for their influence on the risk to develop alcohol dependence (AD). However, the relation between polymorphisms of these metabolism genes and AD in Caucasian subjects has not been clearly established. The present study examined evidence for the association of alcohol metabolism genes with AD in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of alcohol dependence. Methods: We conducted a case–control association study with 575 independent subjects who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, AD diagnosis and 530 controls. A total of 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the seven ADH (ADH1-7) and two ALDH genes (ALDH1A1 and ALDH2) were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate protocols. Several statistical procedures were implemented to control for false discoveries. Results: All markers with minor allele frequency greater than 0.01 were in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Numerous SNPs in ADH genes showed association with AD, including one marker in the coding region of ADH1C (rs1693482 in exon6, Ile271Gln). Haplotypic association was observed in the ADH5 and ADH1C genes, and in a long haplotype block formed by the ADH1A and ADH1B loci. We detected two significant interactions between pairs of markers in intron 6 of ADH6 and intron 12 of ALDH2 (p = 5 × 10−5), and 5′ of both ADH4 and ADH1A (p = 2 × 10−4). Conclusion: We found evidence for the association of several ADH genes with AD in a sample of Western European origin. The significant interaction effects between markers in ADH and ALDH genes suggest possible epistatic roles between alcohol metabolic enzymes in the risk for AD. PMID:18331377

  13. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length. PMID:25381499

  14. Using a pruned, nondirect product basis in conjunction with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodraszka, Robert; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a pruned, nondirect product multi-configuration time dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method for solving the Schrödinger equation. MCTDH uses optimized 1D basis functions, called single particle functions, but the size of the standard direct product MCTDH basis scales exponentially with D, the number of coordinates. We compare the pruned approach to standard MCTDH calculations for basis sizes small enough that the latter are possible and demonstrate that pruning the basis reduces the CPU cost of computing vibrational energy levels of acetonitrile (D = 12) by more than two orders of magnitude. Using the pruned method, it is possible to do calculations with larger bases, for which the cost of standard MCTDH calculations is prohibitive. Pruning the basis complicates the evaluation of matrix-vector products. In this paper, they are done term by term for a sum-of-products Hamiltonian. When no attempt is made to exploit the fact that matrices representing some of the factors of a term are identity matrices, one needs only to carefully constrain indices. In this paper, we develop new ideas that make it possible to further reduce the CPU time by exploiting identity matrices.

  15. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  16. Analytic derivative couplings for spin-flip configuration interaction singles and spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M.

    2014-08-14

    We revisit the calculation of analytic derivative couplings for configuration interaction singles (CIS), and derive and implement these couplings for its spin-flip variant for the first time. Our algorithm is closely related to the CIS analytic energy gradient algorithm and should be straightforward to implement in any quantum chemistry code that has CIS analytic energy gradients. The additional cost of evaluating the derivative couplings is small in comparison to the cost of evaluating the gradients for the two electronic states in question. Incorporation of an exchange-correlation term provides an ad hoc extension of this formalism to time-dependent density functional theory within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation, without the need to invoke quadratic response theory or evaluate third derivatives of the exchange-correlation functional. Application to several different conical intersections in ethylene demonstrates that minimum-energy crossing points along conical seams can be located at substantially reduced cost when analytic derivative couplings are employed, as compared to use of a branching-plane updating algorithm that does not require these couplings. Application to H{sub 3} near its D{sub 3h} geometry demonstrates that correct topology is obtained in the vicinity of a conical intersection involving a degenerate ground state.

  17. Structure of Hydronium (H3O+)/Chloride (Cl-) Contact Ion Pairs in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid Solution: A Zundel-like Local Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, John L.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam

    2010-09-15

    Details of the H3O+ and H2O structure in the first solvation shell about Cl- in aqueous HCl solutions are reported from x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. Results show increasing degrees of contact ion pairing between Cl- and H3O+ as the HCl concentration increases from 6.0 m, 10.0 m and finally 16.1 m HCl (concentrated acid). At the highest acid concentration there are on average, approximately 1.6 H3O+ ions and 4.2 H2O’s in the first shell about Cl-. The structure of the Cl-/H3O+ contact ion pair is distinctly different than that of the H2O structure about Cl-. The Cl-O bond length (2.98Å) for Cl-/H3O+ is approximately 0.16 Å shorter than the Cl-/H2O bond. The bridging proton resides at an intermediate position between Cl and O at 1.60 Å from the Cl- and approximately 1.37 Å from the O of the H3O+. The bridging-proton structure of this contact ion pair, [Cl-H-OH2], is similar to structure of the water Zundel ion, [H2O-H-OH2]+. In both cases there is a shortened Cl-O or O-O bond and the intervening proton bond distances are substantially longer than for the covalent bonds of either HCl or H2O. The results further our understanding of the interaction H3O+ with Cl- that is of interest to fundamental physical chemistry and that has consequences in biochemical, geochemical and atmospheric processes.

  18. Salt dependent premelting base pair opening probabilities of B and Z DNA Poly [d(G-C)] and significance for the B-Z transition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. Z.; Prohofsky, E. W.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate room temperature thermal fluctuational base pair opening probabilities of B and Z DNA Poly[d(G-C)] at various salt concentrations and discuss the significance of thermal fluctuation in facilitating base pair disruption during B to Z transition. Our calculated base pair opening probability of the B DNA at lower salt concentrations and the probability of the Z DNA at high salt concentrations are in agreement with observations. The salt dependence of the probabilities indicates a B to Z transition at a salt concentration close to the observed concentration. PMID:19431893

  19. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p^{↑}+p at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Ma, R; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-12-11

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p^{↑}+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions. PMID:26705627

  20. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p↑+p at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p↑+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η >0.5 , and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p +p collisions.

  1. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p^{↑}+p at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Ma, R; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-12-11

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p^{↑}+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions.

  2. Domain-specific perceptual causality in children depends on the spatio-temporal configuration, not motion onset.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Anne; Cole, Katy; Watts, Rhianna; White, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Humans, even babies, perceive causality when one shape moves briefly and linearly after another. Motion timing is crucial in this and causal impressions disappear with short delays between motions. However, the role of temporal information is more complex: it is both a cue to causality and a factor that constrains processing. It affects ability to distinguish causality from non-causality, and social from mechanical causality. Here we study both issues with 3- to 7-year-olds and adults who saw two computer-animated squares and chose if a picture of mechanical, social or non-causality fit each event best. Prior work fit with the standard view that early in development, the distinction between the social and physical domains depends mainly on whether or not the agents make contact, and that this reflects concern with domain-specific motion onset, in particular, whether the motion is self-initiated or not. The present experiments challenge both parts of this position. In Experiments 1 and 2, we showed that not just spatial, but also animacy and temporal information affect how children distinguish between physical and social causality. In Experiments 3 and 4 we showed that children do not seem to use spatio-temporal information in perceptual causality to make inferences about self- or other-initiated motion onset. Overall, spatial contact may be developmentally primary in domain-specific perceptual causality in that it is processed easily and is dominant over competing cues, but it is not the only cue used early on and it is not used to infer motion onset. Instead, domain-specific causal impressions may be automatic reactions to specific perceptual configurations, with a complex role for temporal information. PMID:23874308

  3. Collective aspects deduced from time-dependent microscopic mean-field with pairing: Application to the fission process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, Yusuke; Lacroix, Denis; Scamps, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    Given a set of collective variables, a method is proposed to obtain the associated conjugated collective momenta and masses starting from a microscopic time-dependent mean-field theory. The construction of pairs of conjugated variables is the first step to bridge microscopic and macroscopic approaches. The method is versatile and can be applied to study a large class of nuclear processes. An illustration is given here with the fission of 258Fm. Using the quadrupole moment and eventually higher-order multipole moments, the associated collective masses are estimated along the microscopic mean-field evolution. When more than one collective variable is considered, it is shown that the off-diagonal matrix elements of the inertia play a crucial role. Using the information on the quadrupole moment and associated momentum, the collective evolution is studied. It is shown that dynamical effects beyond the adiabatic limit are important. Nuclei formed after fission tend to stick together for a longer time leading to a dynamical scission point at a larger distance between nuclei compared to the one anticipated from the adiabatic energy landscape. The effective nucleus-nucleus potential felt by the emitted nuclei is finally extracted.

  4. Efficient aminoacylation of the tRNA(Ala) acceptor stem: dependence on the 2:71 base pair.

    PubMed Central

    Beuning, Penny J; Nagan, Maria C; Cramer, Christopher J; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Gelpí, Josep-Lluis; Bashford, Donald

    2002-01-01

    Specific aminoacylation by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases requires accurate recognition of cognate tRNA substrates. In the case of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS), RNA duplexes that mimic the acceptor stem of the tRNA are efficient substrates for aminoacylation in vitro. It was previously shown that recognition by AlaRS is severely affected by a simple base pair transversion of the G2:C71 pair at the second position in the RNA helix. In this study, we determined the aminoacylation efficiencies of 50 variants of the tRNA(Ala) acceptor stem containing substitutions at the 2:71 position. We find that there is not a single functional group of the wild-type G2:C71 base pair that is critical for positive recognition. Rather, we observed that base-pair orientation plays an important role in recognition. In particular, pyrimidine2:purine71 combinations generally resulted in decreased aminoacylation efficiency compared to the corresponding purine:pyrimidine pair. Moreover, the activity of a pyrimidine:purine variant could be partially restored by the presence of a major groove amino group at position 71. In an attempt to understand this result further, dielectric continuum electrostatic calculations were carried out, in some cases with additional inclusion of van der Waals interaction energies, to determine interaction potentials of the wild-type duplexAla and seven 2:71 variants. This analysis revealed a positive correlation between major groove negative electrostatic potential in the vicinity of the 3:70 base pair and measured aminoacylation efficiency. PMID:12022232

  5. Configuration-dependent Presentation of Multivalent IL-15:IL-15Rα Enhances the Antigen-specific T Cell Response and Anti-tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Enping; Usiskin, Ilana M; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Hanlon, Douglas J; Edelson, Richard L; Justesen, Sune; Pavlakis, George N; Flavell, Richard A; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2016-04-22

    Here we report a "configuration-dependent" mechanism of action for IL-15:IL-15Rα (heterodimeric IL-15 or hetIL-15) where the manner by which IL-15:IL-15Rα molecules are presented to target cells significantly affects its function as a vaccine adjuvant. Although the cellular mechanism of IL-15 trans-presentation via IL-15Rα and its importance for IL-15 function have been described, the full effect of the IL-15:IL-15Rα configuration on responding cells is not yet known. We found that trans-presenting IL-15:IL-15Rα in a multivalent fashion on the surface of antigen-encapsulating nanoparticles enhanced the ability of nanoparticle-treated dendritic cells (DCs) to stimulate antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. Localization of multivalent IL-15:IL-15Rα and encapsulated antigen to the same DC led to maximal T cell responses. Strikingly, DCs incubated with IL-15:IL-15Rα-coated nanoparticles displayed higher levels of functional IL-15 on the cell surface, implicating a mechanism for nanoparticle-mediated transfer of IL-15 to the DC surface. Using artificial antigen-presenting cells to highlight the effect of IL-15 configuration on DCs, we showed that artificial antigen-presenting cells presenting IL-15:IL-15Rα increased the sensitivity and magnitude of the T cell response, whereas IL-2 enhanced the T cell response only when delivered in a paracrine fashion. Therefore, the mode of cytokine presentation (configuration) is important for optimal immune responses. We tested the effect of configuration dependence in an aggressive model of murine melanoma and demonstrated significantly delayed tumor progression induced by IL-15:IL-15Rα-coated nanoparticles in comparison with monovalent IL-15:IL-15Rα. The novel mechanism of IL-15 transfer to the surface of antigen-processing DCs may explain the enhanced potency of IL-15:IL-15Rα-coated nanoparticles for antigen delivery. PMID:26719339

  6. Pressure dependence of the configurational bistability and deep electronic levels of the MFe center in InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, G. A.; Barnes, C. E.

    2006-04-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on the structural bistability and electronic properties of the processing-induced MFe center in Fe-doped n -type InP was investigated. Earlier work has shown that, when occupied by electrons, the center can be reversibly placed in either of two configurations, termed A and B , by the proper choice of electric biasing conditions and temperature. Pressure strongly modifies the energetics and kinetics of the various electronic transitions and of the transformations associated with the center. The activation volumes (ΔV*) for these processes were determined. In the absence of barriers to electron capture, or for small barriers, ΔV* can be interpreted as the breathing mode relaxation associated with electron emission or capture. At pressures ⩾8kbar , the center exists only in the A configuration regardless of bias conditions, because at these pressures the energetics and kinetics of the various processes have changed so much as to always favor the A configuration. It is also shown that, whereas the A⇄B transformations are charge state controlled at 1bar , this is not the case at high pressure where the transformations can be brought about without electron emission or hole capture. Earlier tentative atomic models for the center are discussed, and it is shown that some features of one of the models including the signs of the breathing mode relaxations associated with the various electron emissions are consistent with the experimental results, but issues remain. The results are also found to be generally consistent with first-principles calculations on defects in InP, but it is emphasized that whereas these calculations are for simple defects, the defects associated with the MFe center are more complex.

  7. Summary of historical data: interpretation of the pioneer and voyager cloud configurations in a time-dependent framework.

    PubMed

    Terrile, R J; Beebe, R F

    1979-06-01

    Ground-based imaging of Jupiter at visible and infrared wavelengths has been used to build up a time sequence of cloud feature variations. The global cloud configuration seen by Voyager 1 appears markedly different than that seen by Pioneer 10 and 11. In the context of historical data, these two different cloud distributions are not unique but part of a continuous spectrum of global variations. The most recent global changes occurred in a pattern which has been a characteristic trend observed many times before.

  8. Migration of helium-pair in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. L.; Geng, W. T.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a first-principles density functional theory investigation into the migration of both a single interstitial He and an interstitial He-pair in Fe, Mo, W, Cu, Pd, and Pt. We find the migration trajectories and barriers are determined predominantly by low-energy He-pair configurations which depend mainly on the energy state of a single He in different interstices. The migration barrier for a He-pair in bcc metals is always slightly higher than for a single He. Configurations of a He-pair in fcc metals are very complicated, due to the existence of interstitial sites with nearly identical energy for a single He. The migration barrier for a He-pair is slightly lower than (in Cu), or similar to (in Pd and Pt) a single He. The collective migrations of a He-pair are ensured by strong Hesbnd He interactions with strength-versus-distance forms resembling chemical bonds and can be described with Morse potentials.

  9. Dependence of acoustic surface gravity on geometric configuration of matter for axially symmetric background flows in the Schwarzschild metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarafdar, Pratik; Das, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    In black hole evaporation process, the mass of the hole anti-correlates with the Hawking temperature. This indicates that the smaller holes have higher surface gravity. For analogue Hawking effects, however, the acoustic surface gravity is determined by the local values of the dynamical velocity of the stationary background fluid flow and the speed of propagation of the characteristic perturbation embedded in the background fluid, as well as by their space derivatives evaluated along the direction normal to the acoustic horizon, respectively. The mass of the analogue system — whether classical or quantum — does not directly contribute to extremize the value of the associated acoustic surface gravity. For general relativistic axially symmetric background fluid flow in the Schwarzschild metric, we show that the initial boundary conditions describing such accretion influence the maximization scheme of the acoustic surface gravity and associated analogue temperature. Aforementioned background flow onto black holes can assume three distinct geometric configurations. Identical set of initial boundary conditions can lead to entirely different phase-space behavior of the stationary flow solutions, as well as the salient features of the associated relativistic acoustic geometry. This implies that it is imperative to investigate how the measure of the acoustic surface gravity corresponding to the accreting black holes gets influenced by the geometric configuration of the inflow described by various thermodynamic equations of state. Such investigation is useful to study the effect of Einstenian gravity on the nonconventional classical features as observed in Hawking like effect in a dispersive medium in the limit of a strong dispersion relation.

  10. Electron-correlation effects in enhanced ionization of molecules: A time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Bauch, S.; Madsen, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    We numerically study models of H2 and LiH molecules, aligned collinearly with the linear polarization of the external field, to elucidate the possible role of correlation in the enhanced-ionization (EI) phenomena. Correlation is considered at different levels of approximation with the time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction method. The results of our studies show that enhanced ionization occurs in multielectron molecules and that correlation is important, and they also demonstrate significant deviations between the results of the single-active-electron approximation and more accurate configuration-interaction methods. We further investigate the role of low-lying excited states in the EI phenomena. With the inclusion of correlation we show strong carrier-envelope-phase effects in the enhanced ionization of the asymmetric heteronuclear LiH -like molecule. The correlated calculation shows an intriguing feature of crossover in enhanced ionization with two carrier-envelope phases at critical internuclear separation.

  11. Inductrack magnet configuration

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2003-10-14

    A magnet configuration comprising a pair of Halbach arrays magnetically and structurally connected together are positioned with respect to each other so that a first component of their fields substantially cancels at a first plane between them, and a second component of their fields substantially adds at this first plane. A track of windings is located between the pair of Halbach arrays and a propulsion mechanism is provided for moving the pair of Halbach arrays along the track. When the pair of Halbach arrays move along the track and the track is not located at the first plane, a current is induced in the windings and a restoring force is exerted on the pair of Halbach arrays.

  12. Inductrack magnet configuration

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2003-12-16

    A magnet configuration comprising a pair of Halbach arrays magnetically and structurally connected together are positioned with respect to each other so that a first component of their fields substantially cancels at a first plane between them, and a second component of their fields substantially adds at this first plane. A track of windings is located between the pair of Halbach arrays and a propulsion mechanism is provided for moving the pair of Halbach arrays along the track. When the pair of Halbach arrays move along the track and the track is not located at the first plane, a current is induced in the windings and a restoring force is exerted on the pair of Halbach arrays.

  13. Paired Burst Stimulation Causes GABAA Receptor-Dependent Spike Firing Facilitation in CA1 of Rat Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Takashi; Tominaga, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    The theta oscillation (4-8 Hz) is a pivotal form of oscillatory activity in the hippocampus that is intermittently concurrent with gamma (25-100 Hz) burst events. In in vitro preparation, a stimulation protocol that mimics the theta oscillation, theta burst stimulation (TBS), is used to induce long-term potentiation. Thus, TBS is thought to have a distinct role in the neural network of the hippocampal slice preparation. However, the specific mechanisms that make TBS induce such neural circuit modifications are still unknown. Using electrophysiology and voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI), we have found that TBS induces augmentation of spike firing. The augmentation was apparent in the first couple of brief burst stimulation (100 Hz four pulses) on a TBS-train in a presence of NMDA receptor blocker (APV 50 μM). In this study, we focused on the characterizes of the NMDA independent augmentation caused by a pair of the brief burst stimulation (the first pair of the TBS; paired burst stimulation-PBS). We found that PBS enhanced membrane potential responses on VSDI signal and intracellular recordings while it was absent in the current recording under whole-cell clamp condition. The enhancement of the response accompanied the augmentation of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) to spike firing (E-S) coupling. The paired burst facilitation (PBF) reached a plateau when the number of the first burst stimulation (priming burst) exceeds three. The interval between the bursts of 150 ms resulted in the maximum PBF. Gabazine (a GABAA receptor antagonist) abolished PBF. The threshold for spike generation of the postsynaptic cells measured with a current injection to cells was not lowered by the priming burst of PBS. These results indicate that PBS activates the GABAergic system to cause short-term E-S augmentation without raising postsynaptic excitability. We propose that a GABAergic system of area CA1 of the hippocampus produce the short-term E-S plasticity that could

  14. Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation for spherical and deformed hot nuclei: Temperature dependence of the pairing energy and gaps, nuclear deformation, nuclear radii, excitation energy, and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Unbound single-particle states become important in determining the properties of a hot nucleus as its temperature increases. We present relativistic mean field (RMF) for hot nuclei considering not only the self-consistent temperature and density dependence of the self-consistent relativistic mean fields but also the vapor phase that takes into account the unbound nucleon states. Purpose: The temperature dependence of the pairing gaps, nuclear deformation, radii, binding energies, entropy, and caloric curves of spherical and deformed nuclei are obtained in self-consistent RMF calculations up to the limit of existence of the nucleus. Method: We perform Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov (DHB) calculations for hot nuclei using a zero-range approximation to the relativistic pairing interaction to calculate proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing energies and gaps. A vapor subtraction procedure is used to account for unbound states and to remove long range Coulomb repulsion between the hot nucleus and the gas as well as the contribution of the external nucleon gas. Results: We show that p -p and n -n pairing gaps in the S10 channel vanish for low critical temperatures in the range Tcp≈0.6 -1.1 MeV for spherical nuclei such as 90Zr, 124Sn, and 140Ce and for both deformed nuclei 150Sm and 168Er. We found that superconducting phase transition occurs at Tcp=1.03 Δp p(0 ) for 90Zr, Tcp=1.16 Δp p(0 ) for 140Ce, Tcp=0.92 Δp p(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=0.97 Δp p(0 ) for 168Er. The superfluidity phase transition occurs at Tcp=0.72 Δn n(0 ) for 124Sn, Tcp=1.22 Δn n(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=1.13 Δn n(0 ) for 168Er. Thus, the nuclear superfluidity phase—at least for this channel—can only survive at very low nuclear temperatures and this phase transition (when the neutron gap vanishes) always occurs before the superconducting one, where the proton gap is zero. For deformed nuclei the nuclear deformation disappear at temperatures of about Tcs=2.0 -4.0 MeV , well above the

  15. Energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates from a time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lu; Liang, WanZhen; Zhao, Yi; Zhong, Xinxin

    2014-06-07

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusive method [X. Zhong and Y. Zhao, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014111 (2013)] is extended to investigate the energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates with incorporation of Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling. The pair initial condition generated by laser pulse is represented by a Gaussian wavepacket with a central momentum. The results reveal that the hot electron energy relaxation is very well described by two rate processes with the fast rate much larger than the slow one, consistent with experimental observations, and an efficient electron-hole separation is accomplished accompanying the fast energy relaxation. Furthermore, although the extra energy indeed helps the separation by overcoming the Coulomb interaction, the width of initial wavepacket is much sensitive to the separation efficiency and the narrower wavepacket generates the more separated charges. This behavior may be useful to understand the experimental controversy of the hot carrier effect on charge separation.

  16. Population based study of prevalence of islet cell autoantibodies in monozygotic and dizygotic Danish twin pairs with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J. S.; Kyvik, K. O.; Bingley, P. J.; Gale, E. A.; Green, A.; Dyrberg, T.; Beck-Nielsen, H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the comparative importance of environment and genes in the development of islet cell autoimmunity associated with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: Population based study of diabetic twins. SETTING: Danish population. SUBJECTS: 18 monozygotic and 36 dizygotic twin pairs with one or both partners having insulin dependent diabetes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence of islet cell antibodies, insulin autoantibodies, and autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) in serum samples from twin pairs 10 years (range 0-30 years) and 9.5 years (2-30 years) after onset of disease. RESULTS: In those with diabetes the prevalence of islet cell antibodies, insulin autoantibodies, and autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase in the 26 monozygotic twins was 38%, 85%, and 92%, respectively, and in the dizygotic twins was 57%, 70%, and 57%, respectively. In those without diabetes the proportions were 20%, 50%, and 40% in the 10 monozygotic twins and 26%, 49%, and 40% in the 35 dizygotic twins. CONCLUSION: There is no difference between the prevalence of islet cell autoantibodies in dizygotic and monozygotic twins without diabetes, suggesting that islet cell autoimmunity is environmentally rather than genetically determined. Furthermore, the prevalence of islet cell antibodies was higher in the non-diabetic twins than in other first degree relatives of patients with insulin dependent diabetes. This implies that the prenatal or early postnatal period during which twins are exposed to the same environment, in contrast with that experienced by first degree relatives, is of aetiological importance. PMID:9169400

  17. Oxytocin has dose-dependent developmental effects on pair-bonding and alloparental care in female prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Bales, Karen L; van Westerhuyzen, Julie A; Lewis-Reese, Antoniah D; Grotte, Nathaniel D; Lanter, Jalene A; Carter, C Sue

    2007-08-01

    The present study examines the developmental consequences of neonatal exposure to oxytocin on adult social behaviors in female prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster). Female neonates were injected within 24 h of birth with isotonic saline or one of four dosages of oxytocin (OT). As adults, females were tested in an elevated plus-maze paradigm (a measure of anxiety and exploratory behavior), and for alloparental behavior and partner preferences. At 2 mg/kg OT, females took longer to approach pups, but were the only group to form a statistically significant within-group partner preference. At 4 mg/kg OT, females retrieved pups significantly more frequently but no longer displayed a partner preference; while females treated developmentally with 8 mg/kg spent significantly more time in side-to-side contact with a male stranger than any other treatment group. OT may have broad developmental consequences, but these effects are not linear and may both increase and decrease the propensity to display behaviors such as pair-bonding. PMID:17553502

  18. Age-Dependent Differences in the Strength and Persistence of Psychostimulant-Induced Conditioned Activity in Rats: Effects of a Single Environment-Cocaine Pairing

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Sanders A.; Pipkin, Joseph A.; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Cortez, Anthony M.; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lee, Ryan J.; Carbajal, Sandra; Mohd-Yusof, Alena

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the strength and persistence of cocaine-induced conditioned activity in young and adult rats. A one-trial protocol has proven useful for studying the ontogeny of psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization; therefore, a similar procedure was used to examine conditioned activity. On postnatal day (PD) 19 or PD 80, rats were injected with saline or cocaine in either a novel test chamber or the home cage. After various drug abstinence intervals (1–21 days), rats were injected with saline and returned to the test chamber, where conditioned activity was assessed. In a separate experiment, we examined whether cocaine-induced conditioned activity was a consequence of Pavlovian conditioning or a failure to habituate to the test environment. The results showed that adult rats exhibited strong one-trial conditioned activity that persisted for at least 21 days, whereas young rats did not show a conditioned locomotor response. The conditioned activity exhibited by adult rats did not result from a failure to habituate to the cocaine-paired environment. These results indicate that cocaine-paired contextual stimuli differentially affect behavior depending on age of the animal. The data provided by adult rats have potential translational relevance for humans because a single environment-drug pairing caused long-term alterations in behavior. PMID:25171082

  19. Sequence-Dependent T:G Base Pair Opening in DNA Double Helix Bound by Cren7, a Chromatin Protein Conserved among Crenarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lei; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Wang, Hanqian; Zhao, Mohan; Dong, Yuhui; Gong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    T:G base pair arising from spontaneous deamination of 5mC or polymerase errors is a great challenge for DNA repair of hyperthermophilic archaea, especially Crenarchaea. Most strains in this phylum lack the protein homologues responsible for the recognition of the mismatch in the DNA repair pathways. To investigate whether Cren7, a highly conserved chromatin protein in Crenarchaea, serves a role in the repair of T:G mispairs, the crystal structures of Cren7-GTAATTGC and Cren7-GTGATCGC complexes were solved at 2.0 Å and 2.1 Å. In our structures, binding of Cren7 to the AT-rich DNA duplex (GTAATTGC) induces opening of T2:G15 but not T10:G7 base pair. By contrast, both T:G mispairs in the GC-rich DNA duplex (GTGATCGC) retain the classic wobble type. Structural analysis also showed DNA helical changes of GTAATTGC, especially in the steps around the open T:G base pair, as compared to GTGATCGC or the matched DNAs. Surface plasmon resonance assays revealed a 4-fold lower binding affinity of Cren7 for GTAATTGC than that for GTGATCGC, which was dominantly contributed by the decrease of association rate. These results suggested that binding of Cren7 to DNA leads to T:G mispair opening in a sequence dependent manner, and therefore propose the potential roles of Cren7 in DNA repair. PMID:27685992

  20. Biomechanical evaluation of inferior scapula notching of reverse shoulder arthroplasty depending on implant configuration and scapula neck anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tomas; Bäunker, Alexandra; Krämer, Manuel; Hurschler, Christof; Kaufmann, Melena; Pastor, Marc Frederic; Wellmann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The presence of inferior scapula notching is significantly affected by the anatomy the scapula and can be influenced by the glenosphere design and position and the onlay type. Materials and Methods: A biomechanical study was undertaken with 13 human shoulder specimens in a robot-assisted shoulder simulator. Inferior scapula contact during adduction of the humerus was detected using a contact pressure film. Computed tomography scans with three-dimensional reconstructions of each specimen were performed. Results: The greatest improvement of the scapula notching angle (SNA) was achieved by simultaneous implantation of a shallow humeral onlay and an eccentric glenosphere design: 16.3-19.0° (P < 0.005). The SNA was significantly decreased by 5.8° when shifting from a 38 mm centric glenosphere to a 42 mm centric glenosphere (P < 0.005) and by 8.9° comparing the 38 mm centric glenosphere with 38 mm eccentric glenosphere (P < 0.005). The solitary implantation of a shallow onlay significantly decreased the SNA depending on the glenosphere size between 7.4° and 8.0° (P = 0.001). A more inferior position of the metaglene as well as a long scapula neck (P = 0.029) and a large lateral scapula pillar angle (P = 0.033) were correlated with a lower SNA. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the importance of inferior glenosphere placement and the benefit of eccentric glenosphere and shallow humeral cup design to reduce the adduction deficit of the reverse shoulder. The presence of a short neck of the scapula can have a negative prognostic effect on inferior impingement during adduction of the arm. Level of Evidence: Basic Science Study PMID:26622125

  1. Calculation of the pair potential interaction in electric double-layered magnetic fluids: a quantitative analysis of the pH-dependent phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; da Silva, G. J.; Depeyrot, J.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, the phase behavior of an acidic EDL-MF sample based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is studied in absence of external magnetic field and constant temperature. An experimental pH-dependent phase diagram of the ferrofluid sample is established and the result shows three phases in different pH ranges: a sol phase in low pH conditions, a gel phase when 3.8 dependence of the nanoparticle surface charge density is taken into account in the framework of the extended DLVO pair potential theory allowing a quantitative analysis of the observed phase diagram.

  2. Calculation of the vibrational excited states of malonaldehyde and their tunneling splittings with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Markus Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-07-21

    We report energies and tunneling splittings of vibrational excited states of malonaldehyde which have been obtained using full dimensional quantum mechanical calculations. To this end we employed the multi configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The results have been obtained using a recently published potential energy surface [Y. Wang, B. J. Braams, J. M. Bowman, S. Carter, and D. P. Tew, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 224314 (2008)] which has been brought into a suitable form by a modified version of the n-mode representation which was used with two different arrangements of coordinates. The relevant terms of the expansion have been identified with a Metropolis algorithm and a diffusion Monte-Carlo technique, respectively.

  3. Calculation of the vibrational excited states of malonaldehyde and their tunneling splittings with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Markus; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-07-01

    We report energies and tunneling splittings of vibrational excited states of malonaldehyde which have been obtained using full dimensional quantum mechanical calculations. To this end we employed the multi configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The results have been obtained using a recently published potential energy surface [Y. Wang, B. J. Braams, J. M. Bowman, S. Carter, and D. P. Tew, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 224314 (2008)] which has been brought into a suitable form by a modified version of the n-mode representation which was used with two different arrangements of coordinates. The relevant terms of the expansion have been identified with a Metropolis algorithm and a diffusion Monte-Carlo technique, respectively.

  4. Fuel cell system configurations

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Cyphers, Joseph A.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel cell stack configurations having elongated polygonal cross-sectional shapes and gaskets at the peripheral faces to which flow manifolds are sealingly affixed. Process channels convey a fuel and an oxidant through longer channels, and a cooling fluid is conveyed through relatively shorter cooling passages. The polygonal structure preferably includes at least two right angles, and the faces of the stack are arranged in opposite parallel pairs.

  5. Exact two-body quantum dynamics of an electron-hole pair in semiconductor coupled quantum wells: A time-dependent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, Federico; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We simulate the time-dependent coherent dynamics of a spatially indirect exciton—an electron-hole pair with the two particles confined in different layers—in a GaAs coupled quantum well system. We use a unitary wave-packet propagation method taking into account in full the four degrees of freedom of the two particles in a two-dimensional system, including both the long-range Coulomb attraction and arbitrary two-dimensional electrostatic potentials affecting the electron and/or the hole separately. The method has been implemented for massively parallel architectures to cope with the huge numerical problem, showing good scaling properties and allowing evolution for tens of picoseconds. We have investigated both transient time phenomena and asymptotic time transmission and reflection coefficients for potential profiles consisting of (i) extended barriers and wells and (ii) a single-slit geometry. We found clear signatures of the internal two-body dynamics, with transient phenomena in the picosecond time scale which might be revealed by optical spectroscopy. Exact results have been compared with mean-field approaches which, neglecting dynamical correlations by construction, turn out to be inadequate to describe the electron-hole pair evolution in realistic experimental conditions.

  6. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  7. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  8. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  9. Combinatorial DNA Damage Pairing Model Based on X-Ray-Induced Foci Predicts the Dose and LET Dependence of Cell Death in Human Breast Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil; Pham, Christopher; Georgescu, Walter; Deschamps, Thomas; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the classic view of static DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) being repaired at the site of damage, we hypothesize that DSBs move and merge with each other over large distances (m). As X-ray dose increases, the probability of having DSB clusters increases as does the probability of misrepair and cell death. Experimental work characterizing the X-ray dose dependence of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) is used here to validate a DSB clustering model. We then use the principles of the local effect model (LEM) to predict the yield of DSBs at the submicron level. Two mechanisms for DSB clustering, namely random coalescence of DSBs versus active movement of DSBs into repair domains are compared and tested. Simulations that best predicted both RIF dose dependence and cell survival after X-ray irradiation favored the repair domain hypothesis, suggesting the nucleus is divided into an array of regularly spaced repair domains of ~;;1.55 m sides. Applying the same approach to high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion tracks, we are able to predict experimental RIF/m along tracks with an overall relative error of 12percent, for LET ranging between 30 350 keV/m and for three different ions. Finally, cell death was predicted by assuming an exponential dependence on the total number of DSBs and of all possible combinations of paired DSBs within each simulated RIF. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) predictions for cell survival of MCF10A exposed to high-LET showed an LET dependence that matches previous experimental results for similar cell types. Overall, this work suggests that microdosimetric properties of ion tracks at the submicron level are sufficient to explain both RIF data and survival curves for any LET, similarly to the LEM assumption. Conversely, high-LET death mechanism does not have to infer linear-quadratic dose formalism as done in the LEM. In addition, the size of repair domains derived in our model

  10. Pair contact process with diffusion of pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, F. L.; Dickman, Ronald; Fulco, U. L.

    2011-03-01

    The pair contact process (PCP) is a nonequilibrium stochastic model which, like the basic contact process (CP), exhibits a phase transition to an absorbing state. The two models belong to the directed percolation (DP) universality class, despite the fact that the PCP possesses infinitely many absorbing configurations whereas the CP has but one. The critical behavior of the PCP with hopping by particles (PCPD) is as yet unclear. Here we study a version of the PCP in which nearest-neighbor particle pairs can hop but individual particles cannot. Using quasistationary simulations for three values of the diffusion probability (D = 0.1, 0.5 and 0.9), we find convincing evidence of DP-like critical behavior.

  11. Polarization dependence of phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry and its suppression method based on orthogonal-state of polarization pulse pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin; Xu, Yemian; Shan, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zhenhong; Zhu, Fan; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-07-01

    Phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) has been widely used in various applications for its distributed measurement capability of dynamic disturbance along the entire sensing fiber. Commonly, the sensing system is considered to be only sensitive to the phase change and capable of detecting multiple vibration events. In application, once any of the vibration events leads to a local birefringence change, the polarization evolution of the signal will be disturbed along the following fiber, which will result in the generation of polarization-related noise and the failure of identification for multipoint vibration events. We will reveal the polarization-dependence of Φ-OTDR both theoretically and experimentally. To suppress the polarization-dependence of Φ-OTDR, an orthogonal-state of polarization pulse pair method has been proposed, making the sensing system purely phase-sensitive. The experiment result has shown that maximum noise suppression ratio of 11.2 dB and mean noise suppression ratio of 4.9 dB could be achieved, which confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  12. Calculation of state-to-state cross sections for triatomic reaction by the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Dong-H.; Sun, Zhigang; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2014-04-28

    A framework for quantum state-to-state integral and differential cross sections of triatomic reactive scattering using the Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method is introduced, where a modified version of the Heidelberg MCTDH package is applied. Parity of the system is adopted using only non-negative helicity quantum numbers, which reduces the basis set size of the single particle functions in angular degree of freedom almost by half. The initial wave packet is constructed in the space-fixed frame, which can accurately account for the centrifugal potential. By using the reactant-coordinate-based method, the product state-resolved information can be accurately extracted. Test calculations are presented for the H + H{sub 2} reactive scattering. This work demonstrates the capability of the MCTDH method for extracting accurate state-to-state integral and differential cross sections. As an efficient scheme for high-dimensional problems, the MCTDH method may be promising for the study of product state-resolved cross sections for polyatomic reactive systems.

  13. Excited-State Electronic Structure with Configuration Interaction Singles and Tamm–Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory on Graphical Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Excited-state calculations are implemented in a development version of the GPU-based TeraChem software package using the configuration interaction singles (CIS) and adiabatic linear response Tamm–Dancoff time-dependent density functional theory (TDA-TDDFT) methods. The speedup of the CIS and TDDFT methods using GPU-based electron repulsion integrals and density functional quadrature integration allows full ab initio excited-state calculations on molecules of unprecedented size. CIS/6-31G and TD-BLYP/6-31G benchmark timings are presented for a range of systems, including four generations of oligothiophene dendrimers, photoactive yellow protein (PYP), and the PYP chromophore solvated with 900 quantum mechanical water molecules. The effects of double and single precision integration are discussed, and mixed precision GPU integration is shown to give extremely good numerical accuracy for both CIS and TDDFT excitation energies (excitation energies within 0.0005 eV of extended double precision CPU results). PMID:21687784

  14. The electrical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition Ga doped ZnO thin films depending on chemical bonding configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Doyoung; Kim, Hyungjun

    2014-04-01

    The electrical and chemical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LP-CVD) Ga doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) films were systematically investigated using Hall measurement and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Diethylzinc (DEZ) and O2 gas were used as precursor and reactant gas, respectively, and trimethyl gallium (TMGa) was used as a Ga doping source. Initially, the electrical properties of undoped LP-CVD ZnO films depending on the partial pressure of DEZ and O2 ratio were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) by changing partial pressure of DEZ from 40 to 140 mTorr and that of O2 from 40 to 80 mTorr. The resistivity was reduced by Ga doping from 7.24 × 10-3 Ω cm for undoped ZnO to 2.05 × 10-3 Ω cm for Ga doped ZnO at the TMG pressure of 8 mTorr. The change of electric properties of Ga doped ZnO with varying the amount of Ga dopants was systematically discussed based on the structural crystallinity and chemical bonding configuration, analyzed by XRD and XPS, respectively.

  15. Pick a Pair. Pancake Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2005-01-01

    Cold February weather and pancakes are a traditional pairing. Pancake Day began as a way to eat up the foods that were abstained from in Lent--traditionally meat, fat, eggs and dairy products. The best-known pancake event is The Pancake Day Race in Buckinghamshire, England, which has been run since 1445. This column describes pairs of books that…

  16. Critical Schwinger Pair Production.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-03-01

    We investigate Schwinger pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric backgrounds. A critical point for the onset of pair production can be approached by fields that marginally provide sufficient electrostatic energy for an off-shell long-range electron-positron fluctuation to become a real pair. Close to this critical point, we observe features of universality which are analogous to continuous phase transitions in critical phenomena with the pair-production rate serving as an order parameter: electric backgrounds can be subdivided into universality classes and the onset of pair production exhibits characteristic scaling laws. An appropriate design of the electric background field can interpolate between power-law scaling, essential Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type scaling, and a power-law scaling with log corrections. The corresponding critical exponents only depend on the large-scale features of the electric background, whereas the microscopic details of the background play the role of irrelevant perturbations not affecting criticality. PMID:26991162

  17. Spatial reproducibility of complex fractionated atrial electrogram depending on the direction and configuration of bipolar electrodes: an in-silico modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Hwang, Minki; Lee, Jung-Kee; Li, Changyong; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Although 3D-complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) mapping is useful in radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the directions and configuration of the bipolar electrodes may affect the electrogram. This study aimed to compare the spatial reproducibility of CFAE by changing the catheter orientations and electrode distance in an in-silico left atrium (LA). We conducted this study by importing the heart CT image of a patient with AF into a 3D-homogeneous human LA model. Electrogram morphology, CFAE-cycle lengths (CLs) were compared for 16 different orientations of a virtual bipolar conventional catheter (conv-cath: size 3.5 mm, inter-electrode distance 4.75 mm). Additionally, the spatial correlations of CFAE-CLs and the percentage of consistent sites with CFAE-CL<120 ms were analyzed. The results from the conv-cath were compared with that obtained using a mini catheter (mini-cath: size 1 mm, inter-electrode distance 2.5 mm). Depending on the catheter orientation, the electrogram morphology and CFAE-CLs varied (conv-cath: 11.5±0.7% variation, mini-cath: 7.1±1.2% variation), however the mini-cath produced less variation of CFAE-CL than conv-cath (p<0.001). There were moderate spatial correlations among CFAE-CL measured at 16 orientations (conv-cath: r=0.3055±0.2194 vs. mini-cath: 0.6074±0.0733, p<0.001). Additionally, the ratio of consistent CFAE sites was higher for mini catheter than conventional one (38.3±4.6% vs. 22.3±1.4%, p<0.05). Electrograms and CFAE distribution are affected by catheter orientation and electrode configuration in the in-silico LA model. However, there was moderate spatial consistency of CFAE areas, and narrowly spaced bipolar catheters were less influenced by catheter direction than conventional catheters. PMID:27610037

  18. Spatial reproducibility of complex fractionated atrial electrogram depending on the direction and configuration of bipolar electrodes: an in-silico modeling study.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Hwang, Minki; Lee, Jung-Kee; Li, Changyong; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shim, Eun Bo; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2016-09-01

    Although 3D-complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) mapping is useful in radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the directions and configuration of the bipolar electrodes may affect the electrogram. This study aimed to compare the spatial reproducibility of CFAE by changing the catheter orientations and electrode distance in an in-silico left atrium (LA). We conducted this study by importing the heart CT image of a patient with AF into a 3D-homogeneous human LA model. Electrogram morphology, CFAE-cycle lengths (CLs) were compared for 16 different orientations of a virtual bipolar conventional catheter (conv-cath: size 3.5 mm, inter-electrode distance 4.75 mm). Additionally, the spatial correlations of CFAE-CLs and the percentage of consistent sites with CFAE-CL<120 ms were analyzed. The results from the conv-cath were compared with that obtained using a mini catheter (mini-cath: size 1 mm, inter-electrode distance 2.5 mm). Depending on the catheter orientation, the electrogram morphology and CFAE-CLs varied (conv-cath: 11.5±0.7% variation, mini-cath: 7.1±1.2% variation), however the mini-cath produced less variation of CFAE-CL than conv-cath (p<0.001). There were moderate spatial correlations among CFAE-CL measured at 16 orientations (conv-cath: r=0.3055±0.2194 vs. mini-cath: 0.6074±0.0733, p<0.001). Additionally, the ratio of consistent CFAE sites was higher for mini catheter than conventional one (38.3±4.6% vs. 22.3±1.4%, p<0.05). Electrograms and CFAE distribution are affected by catheter orientation and electrode configuration in the in-silico LA model. However, there was moderate spatial consistency of CFAE areas, and narrowly spaced bipolar catheters were less influenced by catheter direction than conventional catheters. PMID:27610037

  19. Spatial reproducibility of complex fractionated atrial electrogram depending on the direction and configuration of bipolar electrodes: an in-silico modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Hwang, Minki; Lee, Jung-Kee; Li, Changyong; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Although 3D-complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) mapping is useful in radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the directions and configuration of the bipolar electrodes may affect the electrogram. This study aimed to compare the spatial reproducibility of CFAE by changing the catheter orientations and electrode distance in an in-silico left atrium (LA). We conducted this study by importing the heart CT image of a patient with AF into a 3D-homogeneous human LA model. Electrogram morphology, CFAE-cycle lengths (CLs) were compared for 16 different orientations of a virtual bipolar conventional catheter (conv-cath: size 3.5 mm, inter-electrode distance 4.75 mm). Additionally, the spatial correlations of CFAE-CLs and the percentage of consistent sites with CFAE-CL<120 ms were analyzed. The results from the conv-cath were compared with that obtained using a mini catheter (mini-cath: size 1 mm, inter-electrode distance 2.5 mm). Depending on the catheter orientation, the electrogram morphology and CFAE-CLs varied (conv-cath: 11.5±0.7% variation, mini-cath: 7.1±1.2% variation), however the mini-cath produced less variation of CFAE-CL than conv-cath (p<0.001). There were moderate spatial correlations among CFAE-CL measured at 16 orientations (conv-cath: r=0.3055±0.2194 vs. mini-cath: 0.6074±0.0733, p<0.001). Additionally, the ratio of consistent CFAE sites was higher for mini catheter than conventional one (38.3±4.6% vs. 22.3±1.4%, p<0.05). Electrograms and CFAE distribution are affected by catheter orientation and electrode configuration in the in-silico LA model. However, there was moderate spatial consistency of CFAE areas, and narrowly spaced bipolar catheters were less influenced by catheter direction than conventional catheters.

  20. Bosonic pair creation and the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Q. Z.; Bauke, Heiko; Su, Q.; Keitel, C. H.; Grobe, R.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between different bound states in bosonic systems can lead to pair creation. We study this process in detail by solving the Klein-Gordon equation on space-time grids in the framework of time-dependent quantum field theory. By choosing specific external field configurations, two bound states can become pseudodegenerate, which is commonly referred to as the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect. These pseudodegenerate bound states, which have complex energy eigenvalues, are related to the pseudo-Hermiticity of the Klein-Gordon Hamiltonian. In this work, the influence of the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect on pair production is studied. A generalized Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect, where several pairs of pseudodegenerate states appear, is found in combined electric and magnetic fields. The generalized Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect likewise triggers pair creation. The particle number in these situations obeys an exponential growth law in time enhancing the creation of bosons, which cannot be found in fermionic systems.

  1. Grade Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Where to locate the 7th and 8th grade is a perennial question. While there are many variations, three approaches are most often used---include them in a 7-12 secondary campus, maintain a separate middle grades campus, or include them as part of a K-8 program. Research says that grade configuration is inconclusive at best and there is no research…

  2. Multi-quasiparticle isomers near stability and reduced pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Dracoulis, G.D.

    1996-12-31

    The proximity of high-{Omega} orbitals near both proton and neutron Fermi surfaces in nuclei near Z = 74 and N = 104 results in high-K states competing with collective rotation of low-seniority configurations to generate the yrast line. In favorable situations it is possible to observe both the intrinsic states and associated rotational bands. The band properties allow characterization of the configurations and evaluation of orbital and seniority-dependent effects, including pairing reduction and consequent loss of nuclear superfluidity.

  3. Fingernail Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin Woo; Shin, Jun Ho; Kwon, Yu Jin; Hwang, Jae Ha; Lee, Sam Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background A number of conditions can alter a person's fingernail configuration. The ratio between fingernail width and length (W/L) is an important aesthetic criterion, and some underlying diseases can alter the size of the fingernail. Fingernail curvature can be altered by systemic disorders or disorders of the fingernail itself. Although the shape and curvature of the fingernail can provide diagnostic clues for various diseases, few studies have precisely characterized normal fingernail configuration. Methods We measured the W/L ratio of the fingernail, transverse fingernail curvature, hand length, hand breadth, and distal interphalangeal joint width in 300 volunteers with healthy fingernails. We also investigated whether age, sex, height, and handedness influenced the fingernail W/L ratio and transverse fingernail curvature. Results In women, fingernail W/L ratios were similar across all five fingers, and were lower than those in men. The highest value of transverse fingernail curvature was found in the thumb, followed by the index, middle, ring, and little fingers. Handedness and aging influenced transverse fingernail curvature, but not the fingernail W/L ratio. Fingernails were flatter on the dominant hand than on the non-dominant hand. The radius of transverse fingernail curvature increased with age, indicating that fingernails tended to flatten with age. Conclusions Our quantitative data on fingernail configuration can be used as a reference range for diagnosing various diseases and deformities of the fingernail, and for performing reconstructive or aesthetic fingernail surgery. PMID:26618124

  4. Impact of land-use on carbon storage as dependent on soil texture: evidence from a desertified dryland using repeated paired sampling design.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuehua; Tang, Shuangli; Cornwell, William K; Gao, Shuqin; Huang, Zhenying; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-03-01

    Desertification resulting from land-use affects large dryland areas around the world, accompanied by carbon loss. However it has been difficult to interpret different land-use contributions to carbon pools owing to confounding factors related to climate, topography, soil texture and other original soil properties. To avoid such confounding effects, a unique systematic and extensive repeated design of paired sampling plots of different land-use types was adopted on Ordos Plateau, N China. The sampling enabled to quantify the effects of the predominant land-use types on carbon storage as dependent on soil texture, and to define the most promising land-use choices for carbon storage, both in grassland on sandy soil and in desert grassland on brown calcareous soil. The results showed that (1) desertification control should be an effective measure to improve the carbon sequestration in sandy grassland, and shrub planting should be better than grass planting; (2) development of man-made grassland should be a good choice to solve the contradictions of ecology and economy in desert grassland; (3) grassland on sandy soil is more vulnerable to soil degradation than desert grassland on brown calcareous soil. The results may be useful for the selection of land-use types, aiming at desertification prevention in drylands. Follow-up studies should directly investigate the role of soil texture on the carbon storage dynamic caused by land-use change.

  5. Single pairing spike-timing dependent plasticity in BiFeO3 memristors with a time window of 25 ms to 125 μs.

    PubMed

    Du, Nan; Kiani, Mahdi; Mayr, Christian G; You, Tiangui; Bürger, Danilo; Skorupa, Ilona; Schmidt, Oliver G; Schmidt, Heidemarie

    2015-01-01

    Memristive devices are popular among neuromorphic engineers for their ability to emulate forms of spike-driven synaptic plasticity by applying specific voltage and current waveforms at their two terminals. In this paper, we investigate spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) with a single pairing of one presynaptic voltage spike and one post-synaptic voltage spike in a BiFeO3 memristive device. In most memristive materials the learning window is primarily a function of the material characteristics and not of the applied waveform. In contrast, we show that the analog resistive switching of the developed artificial synapses allows to adjust the learning time constant of the STDP function from 25 ms to 125 μs via the duration of applied voltage spikes. Also, as the induced weight change may degrade, we investigate the remanence of the resistance change for several hours after analog resistive switching, thus emulating the processes expected in biological synapses. As the power consumption is a major constraint in neuromorphic circuits, we show methods to reduce the consumed energy per setting pulse to only 4.5 pJ in the developed artificial synapses. PMID:26175666

  6. Impact of land-use on carbon storage as dependent on soil texture: evidence from a desertified dryland using repeated paired sampling design.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuehua; Tang, Shuangli; Cornwell, William K; Gao, Shuqin; Huang, Zhenying; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-03-01

    Desertification resulting from land-use affects large dryland areas around the world, accompanied by carbon loss. However it has been difficult to interpret different land-use contributions to carbon pools owing to confounding factors related to climate, topography, soil texture and other original soil properties. To avoid such confounding effects, a unique systematic and extensive repeated design of paired sampling plots of different land-use types was adopted on Ordos Plateau, N China. The sampling enabled to quantify the effects of the predominant land-use types on carbon storage as dependent on soil texture, and to define the most promising land-use choices for carbon storage, both in grassland on sandy soil and in desert grassland on brown calcareous soil. The results showed that (1) desertification control should be an effective measure to improve the carbon sequestration in sandy grassland, and shrub planting should be better than grass planting; (2) development of man-made grassland should be a good choice to solve the contradictions of ecology and economy in desert grassland; (3) grassland on sandy soil is more vulnerable to soil degradation than desert grassland on brown calcareous soil. The results may be useful for the selection of land-use types, aiming at desertification prevention in drylands. Follow-up studies should directly investigate the role of soil texture on the carbon storage dynamic caused by land-use change. PMID:25560656

  7. Single pairing spike-timing dependent plasticity in BiFeO3 memristors with a time window of 25 ms to 125 μs

    PubMed Central

    Du, Nan; Kiani, Mahdi; Mayr, Christian G.; You, Tiangui; Bürger, Danilo; Skorupa, Ilona; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Schmidt, Heidemarie

    2015-01-01

    Memristive devices are popular among neuromorphic engineers for their ability to emulate forms of spike-driven synaptic plasticity by applying specific voltage and current waveforms at their two terminals. In this paper, we investigate spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) with a single pairing of one presynaptic voltage spike and one post-synaptic voltage spike in a BiFeO3 memristive device. In most memristive materials the learning window is primarily a function of the material characteristics and not of the applied waveform. In contrast, we show that the analog resistive switching of the developed artificial synapses allows to adjust the learning time constant of the STDP function from 25 ms to 125 μs via the duration of applied voltage spikes. Also, as the induced weight change may degrade, we investigate the remanence of the resistance change for several hours after analog resistive switching, thus emulating the processes expected in biological synapses. As the power consumption is a major constraint in neuromorphic circuits, we show methods to reduce the consumed energy per setting pulse to only 4.5 pJ in the developed artificial synapses. PMID:26175666

  8. The role of Rydberg and continuum levels in computing high harmonic generation spectra of the hydrogen atom using time-dependent configuration interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Luppi, Eleonora; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2013-10-28

    We study the role of Rydberg bound-states and continuum levels in the field-induced electronic dynamics associated with the High-Harmonic Generation (HHG) spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom. Time-dependent configuration-interaction (TD-CI) is used with very large atomic orbital (AO) expansions (up to L= 4 with sextuple augmentation and off-center functions) to describe the bound Rydberg levels, and some continuum levels. To address the lack of ionization losses in TD-CI with finite AO basis sets, we employed a heuristic lifetime for energy levels above the ionization potential. The heuristic lifetime model is compared against the conventional atomic orbital treatment (infinite lifetimes), and a third approximation which is TD-CI using only the bound levels (continuum lifetimes go to zero). The results suggest that spectra calculated using conventional TD-CI do not converge with increasing AO basis set size, while the zero lifetime and heuristic lifetime models converge to qualitatively similar spectra, with implications for how best to apply bound state electronic structure methods to simulate HHG. The origin of HHG spectral features including the cutoff and extent of interference between peaks is uncovered by separating field-induced coupling between different types of levels (ground state, bound Rydberg levels, and continuum) in the simulated electronic dynamics. Thus the origin of deviations between the predictions of the semi-classical three step model and the full simulation can be associated with particular physical contributions, which helps to explain both the successes and the limitations of the three step model.

  9. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  10. The local post-perovskite structure and its temperature dependence : atom-pair distances in CalrO{sub 3} revealed through analysis of the total x-ray scattering at high temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C. D.; X-Ray Science Division

    2008-08-01

    The temperature-dependent post-perovskite structure model of MgSiO{sub 3} is reinvestigated through analysis of the atom-pair distances observed experimentally via Fourier transformation of X-ray diffraction and diffuse scattering, the total X-ray scattering, from CaIrO{sub 3}. In contrast to the results of a previous Rietveld structure refinement, which shows a negative or null thermal expansion of Ir-O and Ca-O bond lengths within the average long-range structure, visual inspection of these atom-pair distances in the pair-distribution function, in addition to structure models fitted through least-squares refinement to this local-structure data, strongly suggests that these distances between atom pairs increase with temperature. The average long-range structure of CaIrO{sub 3}, visible from Rietveld structure refinement, is distinct from the short-range structure ({le} 18 {angstrom}) at all of the temperatures examined in this study (325-1114 K) and is reproduced in structure models fitted to the pair-distribution function extending to sufficiently long atom-pair distances ({ge} 50 {angstrom}). While previous data obtained with Rietveld structure refinement show the iridium coordination octahedra to distort with increasing temperature, models of the short-range structure demonstrate that these polyhedra instead reduce distortion and rotate in a manner similar to that occurring in the perovskite structure.

  11. Aminoxyl Radicals of B/P Frustrated Lewis Pairs: Refinement of the Spin-Hamiltonian Parameters by Field- and Temperature-Dependent Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos; Knitsch, Robert; Sajid, Muhammad; Stute, Annika; Elmer, Lisa-Maria; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard; Magon, Claudio J.; Jeschke, Gunnar; Eckert, Hellmut

    2016-01-01

    Q-band and X-band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic methods (EPR) in the solid state were employed to refine the parameters characterizing the anisotropic interactions present in six nitroxide radicals prepared by N,N addition of NO to various borane-phosphane frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs). The EPR spectra are characterized by the g-anisotropy as well as by nuclear hyperfine coupling between the unpaired electron and the 11B/10B, 14N and 31P nuclear magnetic moments. It was previously shown that continuous-wave spectra measured at X-band frequency (9.5 GHz) are dominated by the magnetic hyperfine coupling to 14N and 31P, whereas the g-tensor values and the 11B hyperfine coupling parameters cannot be refined with high precision from lineshape fitting. On the other hand, the X-band electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) spectra are completely dominated by the nuclear hyperfine coupling to the 11B nuclei, allowing a selective determination of their interaction parameters. In the present work this analysis has been further validated by temperature dependent ESEEM measurements. In addition, pulsed EPR data measured in the Q-band (34 GHz) are reported, which present an entirely different situation: the g-tensor components can be measured with much higher precision, and the ESEEM and HYSCORE spectra contain information about all of the 10B, 11B, 14N and 31P hyperfine interaction parameters. Based on these new results, we report here high-accuracy and precision data of the EPR spin Hamiltonian parameters measured on six FLP-NO radical species embedded in their corresponding hydroxylamine host structures. While the ESEEM spectra at Q-band frequency turn out to be very complex (due to the multinuclear contribution to the overall signal) in the HYSCORE experiment the extension over two dimensions renders a better discrimination between the different nuclear species, and the signals arising from hyperfine

  12. Aminoxyl Radicals of B/P Frustrated Lewis Pairs: Refinement of the Spin-Hamiltonian Parameters by Field- and Temperature-Dependent Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos; Knitsch, Robert; Sajid, Muhammad; Stute, Annika; Elmer, Lisa-Maria; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard; Magon, Claudio J; Jeschke, Gunnar; Eckert, Hellmut

    2016-01-01

    Q-band and X-band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic methods (EPR) in the solid state were employed to refine the parameters characterizing the anisotropic interactions present in six nitroxide radicals prepared by N,N addition of NO to various borane-phosphane frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs). The EPR spectra are characterized by the g-anisotropy as well as by nuclear hyperfine coupling between the unpaired electron and the 11B/10B, 14N and 31P nuclear magnetic moments. It was previously shown that continuous-wave spectra measured at X-band frequency (9.5 GHz) are dominated by the magnetic hyperfine coupling to 14N and 31P, whereas the g-tensor values and the 11B hyperfine coupling parameters cannot be refined with high precision from lineshape fitting. On the other hand, the X-band electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) spectra are completely dominated by the nuclear hyperfine coupling to the 11B nuclei, allowing a selective determination of their interaction parameters. In the present work this analysis has been further validated by temperature dependent ESEEM measurements. In addition, pulsed EPR data measured in the Q-band (34 GHz) are reported, which present an entirely different situation: the g-tensor components can be measured with much higher precision, and the ESEEM and HYSCORE spectra contain information about all of the 10B, 11B, 14N and 31P hyperfine interaction parameters. Based on these new results, we report here high-accuracy and precision data of the EPR spin Hamiltonian parameters measured on six FLP-NO radical species embedded in their corresponding hydroxylamine host structures. While the ESEEM spectra at Q-band frequency turn out to be very complex (due to the multinuclear contribution to the overall signal) in the HYSCORE experiment the extension over two dimensions renders a better discrimination between the different nuclear species, and the signals arising from hyperfine

  13. Object representations in ventral and dorsal visual streams: fMRI repetition effects depend on attention and part–whole configuration

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Volker; Henson, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of attention and object configuration on the neural responses to short-lag visual image repetition were investigated with fMRI. Attention to one of two object images in a prime display was cued spatially. The images were either intact or split vertically; a manipulation that negates the influence of view-based representations. A subsequent single intact probe image was named covertly. Behavioural priming observed as faster button presses was found for attended primes in both intact and split configurations, but only for uncued primes in the intact configuration. In a voxel-wise analysis, fMRI repetition suppression (RS) was observed in a left mid-fusiform region for attended primes, both intact and split, whilst a right intraparietal region showed repetition enhancement (RE) for intact primes, regardless of attention. In a factorial analysis across regions of interest (ROIs) defined from independent localiser contrasts, RS for attended objects in the ventral stream was significantly left-lateralised, whilst repetition effects in ventral and dorsal ROIs correlated with the amount of priming in specific conditions. These fMRI results extend hybrid theories of object recognition, implicating left ventral stream regions in analytic processing (requiring attention), consistent with prior hypotheses about hemispheric specialisation, and implicating dorsal stream regions in holistic processing (independent of attention). PMID:21554967

  14. Pairing Properties of Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Pairing properties of even-even superheavy N=184 isotones are studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS approach. In the particle-hole channel we take the Skyrme energy density functional SLy4, while in the particle-particle channel we employ the seniority pairing force and zero-range delta-interactions with different forms of density dependence. We conclude that the calculated static fission trajectories weakly depend on the specific form of the delta-pairing interaction. We also investigate the impact of triaxiality on the inner fission barrier and find a rather strong Z dependence of the effect.

  15. Unsaturated syn- and anti-1,2-amino alcohols by cyclization of allylic bis-trichloroacetimidates. stereoselectivity dependence on substrate configuration.

    PubMed

    Grigorjeva, Liene; Kinens, Artis; Jirgensons, Aigars

    2015-01-16

    Disubstituted allylic bis-imidates undergo Lewis acid catalyzed or spontaneous cyclization to oxazolines, which are precursors of unsaturated amino alcohols. Stereoselectivity of the cyclization is mainly determined by the substrate configuration. Highly selective cis-oxazoline formation is achieved starting from anti-E-bis-imidates while trans-oxazoline predominantly forms from anti-Z-bis-imidates. On the basis of DFT calculations, the stereoselectivity trends can be explained by the formation of the energetically most stable carbenium ion conformation, followed by the cyclization via most favorable bond rotations. PMID:25484278

  16. A computational study of dsDNA pairs and vibrational resonance in separating water.

    PubMed

    Calloway, Richard J; Proctor, Michael D; Boyer, Victor M; Napier, Samantha

    2014-12-01

    This article investigates the relationship between molecular sequence and dependent interacting behavior of molecular segment pairs and secondly, sequence dependent, vibrational resonance in surrounding normal saline, protein-free water. The development of a molecular model to explore these systems phenomena, the results of several nanoscale molecular dynamics simulations, and analysis of behavior of interacting ΦX174 double-stranded DNA segment pair models in various configurations are presented. Fourier analysis revealed intriguing vibration frequencies within the solvent plane between the segments, while subsequent frequency domain transformation of the time domain waveforms revealed statistically significant resonating harmonic signals in the THz range.

  17. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  18. Time-dependent activation of parieto-frontal networks for directing attention to tactile space. A study with paired transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses in right-brain-damaged patients with extinction.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, M; Rossini, P M; Filippi, M M; Traversa, R; Cicinelli, P; Palmieri, M G; Pasqualetti, P; Caltagirone, C

    2000-09-01

    Tactile extinction has been interpreted as an attentional disorder, closely related to hemineglect, due to hyperactivation of the unaffected hemisphere, resulting in an ipsilesional attentional bias. Paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques, with a subthreshold conditioning stimulus (CS) followed at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) by a suprathreshold test stimulus (TS), are useful for investigating intracortical inhibition and facilitation in the human motor cortex. In the present work, we investigated the effects of paired TMS over the posterior parietal and frontal cortex of the unaffected hemisphere in a group of eight right-brain-damaged patients with tactile extinction who were carrying out a bimanual tactile discrimination task. The aim of the study was to verify if paired TMS could induce selective inhibition or facilitation of the unaffected hemisphere depending on the ISI, resulting, respectively, in an improvement and a worsening of contralesional extinction. In addition, we wanted to investigate if the effects of parietal and frontal TMS on contralesional extinction appeared at different intervals, suggesting time-dependent activation in the cortical network for the processing of tactile spatial information. Paired TMS stimuli with a CS and a TS, separated by two ISIs of 1 and 10 ms, were applied over the left parietal and frontal cortex after various intervals from the presentation of bimanual cutaneous stimuli. Single-test parietal TMS stimuli improved the patients' performance, whereas paired TMS had distinct effects depending on the ISI: at ISI = 1 ms the improvement in extinction was greater than that induced by single-pulse TMS; at ISI = 10 ms we observed worsening of extinction, with complete reversal of the effects of single-pulse TMS. Compared with TMS delivered over the frontal cortex, parietal TMS improved the extinction rate in a time window that began earlier. These findings shed further light on the mechanism of

  19. Pairing Learners in Pair Work Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Neomy; Aldosari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although pair work is advocated by major theories of second language (L2) learning and research findings suggest that pair work facilitates L2 learning, what is unclear is how to best pair students in L2 classes of mixed L2 proficiency. This study investigated the nature of pair work in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) class in a college in…

  20. Numerical Analysis on Adsorption Characteristics of Activated Carbon/Ethanol Pair in Finned Tube Type Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makimoto, Naoya; Kariya, Keishi; Koyama, Shigeru

    The cycle performance of adsorption cooling system depends on the thermophysical properties of the adsorbent/refrigerant pair and configuration of the adsorber/desorber heat exchanger. In this study, a twodimensional analysis is carried out in order to clarify the performance of the finned tube type adsorber/desorber heat exchanger using a highly porous activated carbon powder (ACP)/ethanol pair. The simulation results show that the average cooling capacity per unit volume of adsorber/desorber heat exchanger and coefficient of performance (COP) can be improved by optimizing fin thickness, fin height, fin pitch and tube diameter. The performance of a single stage adsorption cooling system using ACP/ethanol pair is also compared with that of activated carbon fiber (ACF)/ethanol pair. It is found that the cooling capacities of each adsorbent/refrigerant pair increase with the decrease of adsorption/desorption time and the cooling capacity of ACP/ethanol pair is approximately 2.5 times as much as that of ACF/ethanol pair. It is also shown that COP of ACP/ethanol pair is superior to that of ACF/ethanol pair.

  1. Specific spin-correlation dependent magnetic field effects on radical pairs photo-generated by electron transfer from biphenyl to phenyl-pyrilium salts in micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Partha Pratim; Manoj, N.; Banerjee, Sudip; Chowdhury, Mihir

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the magnetic field effects (MFEs) on photo-generated various geminate phenyl-pyrilium/biphenyl radical pair (PP rad /BP + rad ) of variable singlet/triplet spin-correlations within SDS micelle. When RPs are produced largely with singlet spin-correlation, the MFEs have been observed in two different time domains. It consists of both the initial ( t = 0) decrease of radical yield with field, considering nanosecond phenomenon, and comparatively slow microsecond MFE. However, the RPs of relatively lower singlet spin-correlation shows only slow μs behavior, which may indicate that only singlet spin-state is responsible for exhibiting initial stage MFEs. A kinetic scheme, based on Pedersen's 'super-cage model' for two-stage RP reaction in micelle, has been proposed for analysis.

  2. Study of hole pair condensation based on the SU(2) Slave-Boson approach to the t-J Hamiltonian: Temperature, momentum and doping dependences of spectral functions

    SciTech Connect

    Salk, S.H.S.; Lee, S.S.

    1999-11-01

    Based on the U(1) and SU(2) slave-boson approaches to the t-J Hamiltonian, the authors evaluate the one electron spectral functions for the hole doped high {Tc} cuprates for comparison with the angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data. They find that the observed quasiparticle peak in the superconducting state is correlated with the hump which exists in the normal state. They find that the spectral weight of the quasiparticle peak increases as doping rate increases, which is consistent with observation. As a consequence of the phase fluctuation effects of the spinon and holon pairing order parameters the spectral weight of the predicted peak obtained from the SU(2) theory is found to be smaller than the one predicted from U(1) mean field theory.

  3. Age-Related Enhancement of a Protein Synthesis-Dependent Late Phase of LTP Induced by Low Frequency Paired-Pulse Stimulation in Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2006-01-01

    Protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation (HFS). This form of L-LTP is reduced in the aged animal and is positively correlated with age-related memory loss. Here we report a novel form of protein synthesis-dependent late phase of LTP in the CA1 region of hippocampus induced by…

  4. [Structural and Dipole Structure Peculiarities of Hoogsteen Base Pairs Formed in Complementary Nucleobases according to ab initio Quantum Mechanics Studies].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Y M

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanics studies for the detection of structure and dipole structure peculiarities of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson-Crick base pairs, were performed during our work. These base pairs are formed as a result of complementary interactions. It was revealed, that adenine-thymine Hoogsteen base pair and adenine-thymine Watson-Crick base pairs can be formed depending on initial configuration. Cytosine-guanine Hoogsteen pairs are formed only when cytosine was originally protonated. Both types of Hoogsteen pairs have noticeable difference in the bond distances and angles. These differences appeared in purine as well as in pyrimidine parts of the pairs. Hoogsteen pairs have mostly shorter hydrogen bond lengths and significantly larger angles of hydrogen bonds and larger angles between the hydrogen bonds than Watson-Crick base pairs. Notable differences are also observed with respect to charge distribution and dipole moment. Quantitative data on these differences are shown in our work. It is also reported that the values of local parameters (according to Cambridge classification of the parameters which determine DNA properties) in Hoogsteen base pairs, are greatly different from Watson-Crick ones.

  5. Optical absorption of the anthracene and temperature-dependent capacitance-voltage characteristics of the Au/anthracene/n-Si heterojunction in metal-organic-semiconductor configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaçus, H.; Aydoğan, Ş.; Ekinci, D.; Kurudirek, S. V.; Türüt, A.

    2015-11-01

    An anthracene film has been deposited on an n-type silicon to fabricate an Au/anthracene/n-Si junction device. The band gap of the anthracene film has been determined from the optical measurement as Eg=1.65 eV. After the fabrication of the Au/anthracene/n-Si junction device, temperature dependent capacitance-voltage characteristics in the range of 160-300 K were studied to obtain the junction parameters of the device. The diffusion potential, barrier height, Fermi energy level and donor concentration parameters have been determined from the linear 1/C2-V curves with reverse bias at all temperatures. Both Fermi energy level and the barrier height increased with the increasing temperature. Temperature-dependence of the barrier height has been attributed to inhomogeneous barrier, traps and interface states. The ionized donor concentrations have varied with the temperature in an unsystematic manner due to the trapping/de-trapping of the charges at various temperatures.

  6. Scheduler for multiprocessor system switch with selective pairing

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael Karl; Salapura, Valentina

    2015-01-06

    System, method and computer program product for scheduling threads in a multiprocessing system with selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). The method configures the selective pairing facility to use checking provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability and allocate threads to corresponding processor cores indicating need for hardware checking. The method configures the selective pairing facility to provide multiple independent cores and allocate threads to corresponding processor cores indicating inherent resilience.

  7. Bound states and Cooper pairs of molecules in 2D optical lattices bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Guardian, A.; Domínguez-Castro, G. A.; Paredes, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the formation of Cooper pairs, bound dimers and the dimer-dimer elastic scattering of ultra- cold dipolar Fermi molecules confined in a 2D optical lattice bilayer configuration. While the energy and their associated bound states are determined in a variational way, the correlated two-molecule pair is addressed as in the original Cooper formulation. We demonstrate that the 2D lattice confinement favors the formation of zero center mass momentum bound states. Regarding the Cooper pairs binding energy, this depends on the molecule populations in each layer. Maximum binding energies occur for non-zero (zero) pair momentum when the Fermi system is polarized (unpolarized). We find an analytic expression for the dimer-dimer effective interaction in the deep BEC regime. The present analysis represents a route for addressing the BCS-BEC crossover superfluidity in dipolar Fermi gases confined in 2D optical lattices within the current experimental panorama.

  8. Pair correlation functions and the wavevector-dependent surface tension in a simple density functional treatment of the liquid-vapour interface.

    PubMed

    Parry, A O; Rascón, C; Willis, G; Evans, R

    2014-09-01

    We study the density-density correlation function G(r, r') in the interfacial region of a fluid (or Ising-like magnet) with short-ranged interactions using square gradient density functional theory. Adopting a simple double parabola approximation for the bulk free-energy density, we first show that the parallel Fourier transform G(z, z'; q) and local structure factor S(z; q) separate into bulk and excess contributions. We attempt to account for both contributions by deriving an interfacial Hamiltonian, characterised by a wavevector dependent surface tension σ(q), and then reconstructing density correlations from correlations in the interface position. We show that the standard crossing criterion identification of the interface, as a surface of fixed density (or magnetization), does not explain the separation of G(z, z'; q) and the form of the excess contribution. We propose an alternative definition of the interface position based on the properties of correlations between points that 'float' with the surface and show that this describes the full q and z dependence of the excess contributions to both G and S. However, neither the 'crossing-criterion' nor the new 'floating interface' definition of σ(q) are quantities directly measurable from the total structure factor S(tot)(q) which contains additional q dependence arising from the non-local relation between fluctuations in the interfacial position and local density. Since it is the total structure factor that is measured experimentally or in simulations, our results have repercussions for earlier attempts to extract and interpret σ(q).

  9. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  10. Chemical evidence for the pH-dependent control of ion-pair geometry in cathepsin B. Benzofuroxan as a reactivity probe sensitive to differences in the mutual disposition of the thiolate and imidazolium components of cysteine proteinase catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, F; Brocklehurst, K

    1986-08-15

    Benzofuroxan reacts with the catalytic-site thiol group of cathepsin B (EC 3.4.22.1) to produce stoichiometric amount of the chromophoric reduction product, o-benzoquinone dioxime. In a study of the pH-dependence of the kinetics of this reaction, most data were collected for the bovine spleen enzyme, but the more limited data collected for the rat liver enzyme were closely similar both in the magnitude of the values of the second-order rate constants (k) and in the shape of the pH-k profile. In acidic and weakly alkaline media, the reaction is faster than the reactions of benzofuroxan with some other cysteine proteinases. For example, in the pH region around 5-6, the reaction of cathepsin B is about 10 times faster than that of papain, 15 times faster than that of stem bromelain and 6 times faster than that of ficin. The pH-dependence of k for the reaction of cathepsin B with benzofuroxan was determined in the pH range 2.7-8.3. In marked contrast with the analogous reactions of papain, ficin and stem bromelain [reported by Shipton & Brocklehurst (1977) Biochem. J. 167, 799-810], the pH-k profile for the cathepsin B reaction contains a sigmoidal component with pKa 5.2 in which k increases with decrease in pH. This modulation of the reactivity of the catalytic-site -S-/-ImH+ ion-pair state of cathepsin B (produced by protonic dissociation from -SH/-ImH+ with pKa approx. 3) towards a small, rigid, electrophilic reagent, in a reaction that appears to involve both components of the ion-pair for efficient reaction, suggests that the state of ionization of a group associated with a molecular pKa of approx. 5 may control ion-pair geometry. This might account for the remarkable finding [reported by Willenbrock & Brocklehurst (1984) Biochem. J. 222, 805-814] that, although the ion-pair appears to be generated in cathepsin B as the pH is increased across pKa 3.4, catalytic competence is not generated until the pH is increased across pKa 5-6.

  11. Pair Excitations in Fermi Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Helga M.; Krotscheck, Eckhard; Schörkhuber, Karl; Springer, Josef

    2006-09-01

    We present a theory of multi-pair excitations in strongly interacting Fermi systems. Based on an equations-of-motion approach for time-dependent pair correlations it leads to a qualitatively new structure of the density-density response function. Our theory reduces to both, i) the "correlated" random-phase approximation (RPA) for fermions if the two-pair excitations are ignored, and ii) the correlated Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory for bosons in the appropriate limit. The theory preserves the two first energy-weighted sum rules. A familiar problem of the standard RPA is that its zero-sound mode is energetically much higher than found in experiments. The popular cure of introducing an average effective mass in the Lindhard function violates sum rules and describes the physics incorrectly. We demonstrate that the inclusion of correlated pair excitations gives the correct dispersion. As in 4He, a modification of the effective mass is unnecessary also in 3He.

  12. A Pair of Tabersonine 16-Hydroxylases Initiates the Synthesis of Vindoline in an Organ-Dependent Manner in Catharanthus roseus1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Besseau, Sébastien; Kellner, Franziska; Lanoue, Arnaud; Thamm, Antje M.K.; Salim, Vonny; Schneider, Bernd; Geu-Flores, Fernando; Höfer, René; Guirimand, Grégory; Guihur, Anthony; Oudin, Audrey; Glevarec, Gaëlle; Foureau, Emilien; Papon, Nicolas; Clastre, Marc; Giglioli-Guivarc’h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Burlat, Vincent; De Luca, Vincenzo; O’Connor, Sarah E.; Courdavault, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxylation of tabersonine at the C-16 position, catalyzed by tabersonine 16-hydroxylase (T16H), initiates the synthesis of vindoline that constitutes the main alkaloid accumulated in leaves of Catharanthus roseus. Over the last decade, this reaction has been associated with CYP71D12 cloned from undifferentiated C. roseus cells. In this study, we isolated a second cytochrome P450 (CYP71D351) displaying T16H activity. Biochemical characterization demonstrated that CYP71D12 and CYP71D351 both exhibit high affinity for tabersonine and narrow substrate specificity, making of T16H, to our knowledge, the first alkaloid biosynthetic enzyme displaying two isoforms encoded by distinct genes characterized to date in C. roseus. However, both genes dramatically diverge in transcript distribution in planta. While CYP71D12 (T16H1) expression is restricted to flowers and undifferentiated cells, the CYP71D351 (T16H2) expression profile is similar to the other vindoline biosynthetic genes reaching a maximum in young leaves. Moreover, transcript localization by carborundum abrasion and RNA in situ hybridization demonstrated that CYP71D351 messenger RNAs are specifically located to leaf epidermis, which also hosts the next step of vindoline biosynthesis. Comparison of high- and low-vindoline-accumulating C. roseus cultivars also highlights the direct correlation between CYP71D351 transcript and vindoline levels. In addition, CYP71D351 down-regulation mediated by virus-induced gene silencing reduces vindoline accumulation in leaves and redirects the biosynthetic flux toward the production of unmodified alkaloids at the C-16 position. All these data demonstrate that tabersonine 16-hydroxylation is orchestrated in an organ-dependent manner by two genes including CYP71D351, which encodes the specific T16H isoform acting in the foliar vindoline biosynthesis. PMID:24108213

  13. Temperature dependent absorption cross-sections of O2-O2 collision pairs between 340 and 630 nm and at atmospherically relevant pressure.

    PubMed

    Thalman, Ryan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-10-01

    The collisions between two oxygen molecules give rise to O4 absorption in the Earth atmosphere. O4 absorption is relevant to atmospheric transmission and Earth's radiation budget. O4 is further used as a reference gas in Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applications to infer properties of clouds and aerosols. The O4 absorption cross section spectrum of bands centered at 343, 360, 380, 446, 477, 532, 577 and 630 nm is investigated in dry air and oxygen as a function of temperature (203-295 K), and at 820 mbar pressure. We characterize the temperature dependent O4 line shape and provide high precision O4 absorption cross section reference spectra that are suitable for atmospheric O4 measurements. The peak absorption cross-section is found to increase at lower temperatures due to a corresponding narrowing of the spectral band width, while the integrated cross-section remains constant (within <3%, the uncertainty of our measurements). The enthalpy of formation is determined to be ΔH(250) = -0.12 ± 0.12 kJ mol(-1), which is essentially zero, and supports previous assignments of O4 as collision induced absorption (CIA). At 203 K, van der Waals complexes (O(2-dimer)) contribute less than 0.14% to the O4 absorption in air. We conclude that O(2-dimer) is not observable in the Earth atmosphere, and as a consequence the atmospheric O4 distribution is for all practical means and purposes independent of temperature, and can be predicted with an accuracy of better than 10(-3) from knowledge of the oxygen concentration profile.

  14. Temperature dependent absorption cross-sections of O2-O2 collision pairs between 340 and 630 nm and at atmospherically relevant pressure.

    PubMed

    Thalman, Ryan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-10-01

    The collisions between two oxygen molecules give rise to O4 absorption in the Earth atmosphere. O4 absorption is relevant to atmospheric transmission and Earth's radiation budget. O4 is further used as a reference gas in Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applications to infer properties of clouds and aerosols. The O4 absorption cross section spectrum of bands centered at 343, 360, 380, 446, 477, 532, 577 and 630 nm is investigated in dry air and oxygen as a function of temperature (203-295 K), and at 820 mbar pressure. We characterize the temperature dependent O4 line shape and provide high precision O4 absorption cross section reference spectra that are suitable for atmospheric O4 measurements. The peak absorption cross-section is found to increase at lower temperatures due to a corresponding narrowing of the spectral band width, while the integrated cross-section remains constant (within <3%, the uncertainty of our measurements). The enthalpy of formation is determined to be ΔH(250) = -0.12 ± 0.12 kJ mol(-1), which is essentially zero, and supports previous assignments of O4 as collision induced absorption (CIA). At 203 K, van der Waals complexes (O(2-dimer)) contribute less than 0.14% to the O4 absorption in air. We conclude that O(2-dimer) is not observable in the Earth atmosphere, and as a consequence the atmospheric O4 distribution is for all practical means and purposes independent of temperature, and can be predicted with an accuracy of better than 10(-3) from knowledge of the oxygen concentration profile. PMID:23928555

  15. Powered Tate Pairing Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bo Gyeong; Park, Je Hong

    In this letter, we provide a simple proof of bilinearity for the eta pairing. Based on it, we show an efficient method to compute the powered Tate pairing as well. Although efficiency of our method is equivalent to that of the Tate pairing on the eta pairing approach, but ours is more general in principle.

  16. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  17. Flux Quantization Without Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadin, Alan

    2013-03-01

    It is universally accepted that the superconducting flux quantum h/2e requires the existence of a phase-coherent macroscopic wave function of Cooper pairs, each with charge 2e. On the contrary, we assert that flux quantization can be better understood in terms of single-electron quantum states, localized on the scale of the coherence length and organized into a real-space phase-antiphase structure. This packing configuration is consistent with the Pauli exclusion principle for single-electron states, maintains long-range phase coherence, and is compatible with much of the BCS formalism. This also accounts for h/2e in the Josephson effect, without Cooper pairs. Experimental evidence for this alternative picture may be found in deviations from h/2e in loops and devices much smaller than the coherence length. A similar phase-antiphase structure may also account for superfluids, without the need for boson condensation.

  18. Improved Hodograph Method and the Amplitude-Phase Gradient Method to estimate the latitude dependence of the FLR frequency, plasma density, and the resonance width using data from a ground magnetometer pair: Application to CARISMA and MAGDAS station pairs in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, H.; Pilipenko, V.; Mann, I. R.; Milling, D. K.; Saita, S.; Kitamura, K.; Yumoto, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Improved Hodograph Method (IHM below) and the Amplitude-Phase Gradient Method (APGM below) are both applied to data from two ground magnetometers latitudinally separated by ~100km and yield the field-line-resonance (FLR) frequency and the ionospheric resonance width as functions of the latitude; from the FLR frequency we can estimate the magnetospheric plasma mass density, and from the resonance width we can estimate the damping rate of FLR, which is related to how much of the FLR-generated ULF waves are absorbed by the ionosphere. The both methods apply FFT to the two magnetometers' data, and calculate the amplitude ratio and the cross phase from the two stations' data as functions of the frequency. From there the two methods use different approaches: IHM fits a curve to the obtained ratio (as a complex number including both the amplitude ratio and the cross phase) on the complex plane to separate out the non-FLR signal in the data, while APGM assumes that the obtained amplitude ratio and cross phase include the FLR signal only and obtains the FLR frequency and the resonance width in an algebraic manner. In this paper we apply the two methods to simultaneously observed data from ground station pairs of WAD (CGM latitude and longitude: 61.3 and 318.3) - WEYB (58.6, 320.9), LGRR (61.8, 332.4) - PINA (60.0, 331.8), and PINA - THRF (57.8, 331.5), where WAD belongs to MAGDAS/CPMN while the other four belong to CARISMA. We show that IHM can properly estimate the latitudinal profile of the resonance width (which is the improved point of IHM over the original Hodograph Method) by comparing the results of applying IHM to the LGRR-PINA and PINA-THRF pairs, located along the same meridian. We also compare the IHM and APGM results to support the above-stated advantage of IHM over APGM. In addition, comparing the results of applying IHM and APGM to WAD-WEYB and LGRR-PINA-THRF, having similar latitudes but different longitudes, we discuss the longitude dependence of the FLR

  19. International Space Station Configuration Analysis and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    Ambitious engineering projects, such as NASA's International Space Station (ISS), require dependable modeling, analysis, visualization, and robotics to ensure that complex mission strategies are carried out cost effectively, sustainably, and safely. Learn how Booz Allen Hamilton's Modeling, Analysis, Visualization, and Robotics Integration Center (MAVRIC) team performs engineering analysis of the ISS Configuration based primarily on the use of 3D CAD models. To support mission planning and execution, the team tracks the configuration of ISS and maintains configuration requirements to ensure operational goals are met. The MAVRIC team performs multi-disciplinary integration and trade studies to ensure future configurations meet stakeholder needs.

  20. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  1. CONFIGURATION GENERATOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-11-18

    ''The Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' prescribes an approach to the methodology for performing postclosure criticality analyses within the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. An essential component of the methodology is the ''Configuration Generator Model for In-Package Criticality'' that provides a tool to evaluate the probabilities of degraded configurations achieving a critical state. The configuration generator model is a risk-informed, performance-based process for evaluating the criticality potential of degraded configurations in the monitored geologic repository. The method uses event tree methods to define configuration classes derived from criticality scenarios and to identify configuration class characteristics (parameters, ranges, etc.). The probabilities of achieving the various configuration classes are derived in part from probability density functions for degradation parameters. The NRC has issued ''Safety Evaluation Report for Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report, Revision 0''. That report contained 28 open items that required resolution through additional documentation. Of the 28 open items, numbers 5, 6, 9, 10, 18, and 19 were concerned with a previously proposed software approach to the configuration generator methodology and, in particular, the k{sub eff} regression analysis associated with the methodology. However, the use of a k{sub eff} regression analysis is not part of the current configuration generator methodology and, thus, the referenced open items are no longer considered applicable and will not be further addressed.

  2. Insensitivity of the pressure dependences of characteristic energy scales in Ce1–xRxCoIn₅ (R=Yb,Y,Gd) to the electronic configuration of the rare-earth ion

    SciTech Connect

    White, B. D.; Hamlin, J. J.; Huang, K.; Shu, L.; Lum, I. K.; Baumbach, R. E.; Janoschek, M.; Maple, M. B.

    2012-09-11

    Cooperative Ce and Yb valence fluctuations have recently been proposed as the mechanism responsible for stabilizing correlated electron phenomena in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅ over an unexpectedly large range of concentrations. In order to better understand the origins and character of this stability, we have measured the effect of applied pressure on relevant energy scales such as the superconducting critical (Tc) and Kondo-lattice coherence (T*) temperatures of Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ with R=Yb, Y, and Gd. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed under applied pressure on samples doped with intermediate-valent Yb and stable-valent Gd and Y, and the responses of Tc and T* to increased pressure in these systems are compared. The character of Tc(P) and T*(P) in Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ depends only on their respective ambient-pressure values Tc(0) and T*(0), independent of the electronic configuration of R or concentration x. The consequences of this result are discussed within the context of possible cooperative valence fluctuations in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅.

  3. Insensitivity of the pressure dependences of characteristic energy scales in Ce1–xRxCoIn₅ (R=Yb,Y,Gd) to the electronic configuration of the rare-earth ion

    DOE PAGES

    White, B. D.; Hamlin, J. J.; Huang, K.; Shu, L.; Lum, I. K.; Baumbach, R. E.; Janoschek, M.; Maple, M. B.

    2012-09-11

    Cooperative Ce and Yb valence fluctuations have recently been proposed as the mechanism responsible for stabilizing correlated electron phenomena in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅ over an unexpectedly large range of concentrations. In order to better understand the origins and character of this stability, we have measured the effect of applied pressure on relevant energy scales such as the superconducting critical (Tc) and Kondo-lattice coherence (T*) temperatures of Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ with R=Yb, Y, and Gd. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed under applied pressure on samples doped with intermediate-valent Yb and stable-valent Gd and Y, and the responses of Tc and T* to increased pressure inmore » these systems are compared. The character of Tc(P) and T*(P) in Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ depends only on their respective ambient-pressure values Tc(0) and T*(0), independent of the electronic configuration of R or concentration x. The consequences of this result are discussed within the context of possible cooperative valence fluctuations in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅.« less

  4. Configuration Management Process Assessment Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a strategy for assessing the development and effectiveness of configuration management systems within Programs, Projects, and Design Activities performed by technical organizations and their supporting development contractors. Scope: Various entities CM Systems will be assessed dependent on Project Scope (DDT&E), Support Services and Acquisition Agreements. Approach: Model based structured against assessing organizations CM requirements including best practices maturity criteria. The model is tailored to the entity being assessed dependent on their CM system. The assessment approach provides objective feedback to Engineering and Project Management of the observed CM system maturity state versus the ideal state of the configuration management processes and outcomes(system). center dot Identifies strengths and risks versus audit gotcha's (findings/observations). center dot Used "recursively and iteratively" throughout program lifecycle at select points of need. (Typical assessments timing is Post PDR/Post CDR) center dot Ideal state criteria and maturity targets are reviewed with the assessed entity prior to an assessment (Tailoring) and is dependent on the assessed phase of the CM system. center dot Supports exit success criteria for Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews. center dot Gives a comprehensive CM system assessment which ultimately supports configuration verification activities.*

  5. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. I. Recoupled pair bonds in carbon and sulfur monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Xu, Lu T.; Takeshita, Tyler Y.

    2015-01-21

    The number of singly occupied orbitals in the ground-state atomic configuration of an element defines its nominal valence. For carbon and sulfur, with two singly occupied orbitals in their {sup 3}P ground states, the nominal valence is two. However, in both cases, it is possible to form more bonds than indicated by the nominal valence—up to four bonds for carbon and six bonds for sulfur. In carbon, the electrons in the 2s lone pair can participate in bonding, and in sulfur the electrons in both the 3p and 3s lone pairs can participate. Carbon 2s and sulfur 3p recoupled pair bonds are the basis for the tetravalence of carbon and sulfur, and 3s recoupled pair bonds enable sulfur to be hexavalent. In this paper, we report generalized valence bond as well as more accurate calculations on the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, which are archetypal examples of molecules that possess recoupled pair bonds. These calculations provide insights into the fundamental nature of recoupled pair bonds and illustrate the key differences between recoupled pair bonds formed with the 2s lone pair of carbon, as a representative of the early p-block elements, and recoupled pair bonds formed with the 3p lone pair of sulfur, as a representative of the late p-block elements.

  6. Aircraft Configured for Flight in an Atmosphere Having Low Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, Mark A. (Inventor); Smith, Stephen C. (Inventor); Gelhausen, Paul A. (Inventor); Guynn, Mark D. (Inventor); Hunter, Craig A. (Inventor); Paddock, David A. (Inventor); Riddick, Steven E. (Inventor); Teter, Jr., John E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An aircraft is configured for flight in an atmosphere having a low density. The aircraft includes a fuselage, a pair of wings, and a rear stabilizer. The pair of wings extends from the fuselage in opposition to one another. The rear stabilizer extends from the fuselage in spaced relationship to the pair of wings. The fuselage, the wings, and the rear stabilizer each present an upper surface opposing a lower surface. The upper and lower surfaces have X, Y, and Z coordinates that are configured for flight in an atmosphere having low density.

  7. Configuration Effects on Liner Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic performance of a duct liner depends not only on the intrinsic properties of the liner but also on the configuration of the duct in which it is used. A series of experiments is performed in the NASA Langley Research Center Curved Duct Test Rig (at Mach 0.275) to evaluate the effect of duct configuration on the acoustic performance of single degree of freedom perforate-over-honeycomb liners. The liners form the sidewalls of the duct's test section. Variations of duct configuration include: asymmetric (liner on one side and hard wall opposite) and symmetric (liner on both sides) wall treatment; inlet and exhaust orientation, in which the sound propagates either against or with the flow; and straight and curved flow path. The effect that duct configuration has on the overall acoustic performance, particularly the shift in frequency and magnitude of peak attenuation, is quantified. The redistribution of incident mode content is shown. The liners constitute the side walls of the liner test section and the scatter of incident horizontal order 1 mode by the asymmetric treatment and order 2 mode by the symmetric treatment into order 0 mode is shown. Scatter of order 0 incident modes into higher order modes is also shown. This redistribution of mode content is significant because it indicates that the liner design can be manipulated such that energy is scattered into more highly attenuated modes, thus enhancing liner performance.

  8. Finite Momentum Pairing and Spatially Varying Order Parameter in Proximitized HgTe Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacoby, Amir

    Conventional s-wave superconductivity is understood to arise from singlet pairing of electrons with opposite Fermi momenta, forming Cooper pairs whose net momentum is zero. Several recent studies have focused on structures where such conventional s-wave superconductors are coupled to systems with an unusual configuration of electronic spin and momentum at the Fermi surface. Under these conditions, the nature of the paired state can be modified and the system may even undergo a topological phase transition. Here we present measurements and theoretical calculations of several HgTe quantum wells coupled to either aluminum or niobium superconductors and subject to a magnetic field in the plane of the quantum well. By studying the oscillatory response of Josephson interference to the magnitude of the in-plane magnetic field, we find that the induced pairing within the quantum well oscillates between singlet and triplet pairing and is spatially varying. Cooper pairs acquire a tunable momentum that grows with magnetic field strength, directly reflecting the response of the spin-dependent Fermi surfaces to the in-plane magnetic field. Our new understanding of the interplay between spin physics and superconductivity introduces a way to spatially engineer the order parameter, as well as a general framework within which to investigate electronic spin texture at the Fermi surface of materials.

  9. Explicitly correlated multireference configuration interaction: MRCI-F12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Toru; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    An internally contracted multireference configuration interaction is developed which employs wave functions that explicitly depend on the electron-electron distance (MRCI-F12). This MRCI-F12 method has the same applicability as the MRCI method, while having much improved basis-set convergence with little extra computational cost. The F12b approximation is used to arrive at a computationally efficient implementation. The MRCI-F12 method is applied to the singlet-triplet separation of methylene, the dissociation energy of ozone, properties of diatomic molecules, and the reaction barrier and exothermicity of the F + H{}_2 reaction. These examples demonstrate that already with basis sets of moderate size the method provides near complete basis set MRCI accuracy, and hence quantitative agreement with the experimental data. As a side product, we have also implemented the explicitly correlated multireference averaged coupled pair functional method (MRACPF-F12).

  10. Explicitly correlated multireference configuration interaction: MRCI-F12.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Toru; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-21

    An internally contracted multireference configuration interaction is developed which employs wave functions that explicitly depend on the electron-electron distance (MRCI-F12). This MRCI-F12 method has the same applicability as the MRCI method, while having much improved basis-set convergence with little extra computational cost. The F12b approximation is used to arrive at a computationally efficient implementation. The MRCI-F12 method is applied to the singlet-triplet separation of methylene, the dissociation energy of ozone, properties of diatomic molecules, and the reaction barrier and exothermicity of the F + H(2) reaction. These examples demonstrate that already with basis sets of moderate size the method provides near complete basis set MRCI accuracy, and hence quantitative agreement with the experimental data. As a side product, we have also implemented the explicitly correlated multireference averaged coupled pair functional method (MRACPF-F12). PMID:21261336

  11. Contact Pairing Interaction for the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J.

    2001-10-18

    Properties of density-dependent contact pairing interactions in nuclei are discussed. It is shown that the pairing interaction that is intermediate between surface and volume pairing forces gives the pairing gaps that are compatible with the experimental odd-even mass staggering. Results of the deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations for this ''mixed'' pairing interaction, and using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis, are presented.

  12. Matched-pair classification

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    Following an analogous distinction in statistical hypothesis testing, we investigate variants of machine learning where the training set comes in matched pairs. We demonstrate that even conventional classifiers can exhibit improved performance when the input data has a matched-pair structure. Online algorithms, in particular, converge quicker when the data is presented in pairs. In some scenarios (such as the weak signal detection problem), matched pairs can be generated from independent samples, with the effect not only doubling the nominal size of the training set, but of providing the structure that leads to better learning. A family of 'dipole' algorithms is introduced that explicitly takes advantage of matched-pair structure in the input data and leads to further performance gains. Finally, we illustrate the application of matched-pair learning to chemical plume detection in hyperspectral imagery.

  13. Paired watershed study design

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, J.C.; Spooner, J.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the fact sheet is to describe the paired watershed approach for conducting nonpoint source (NPS) water quality studies. The basic approach requires a minimum of two watersheds - control and treatment - and two periods of study - calibration and treatment. The basis of the paired watershed approach is that there is a quantifiable relationship between paired water quality data for the two watersheds, and that this relationship is valid until a major change is made in one of the watersheds.

  14. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  15. Pairing Beyond BCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We concentrate on the specifics of the nuclear pairing problem from the standpoint of the BCS approach. We consider the properties of nuclear pairing which usually are not discussed in standard texts: how good is the BCS theory in nuclear context compared to the exact large-scale diagonalization, whether it can be improved by the particle number conservation, how to mark the phase transition regions in a mesoscopic system like a nucleus, how may effective many-body forces influence the formation and structure of the pairing condensate, what effect the decay instability has on the paired nuclear structure, etc.

  16. Piston engine configuration alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Wyczalek, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a technological assessment of alternate engine component configuration and material alternatives. It includes a comparative analysis of key characteristics of Gasoline, Diesel and Gas Turbine engines built by Daihatsu, Honda, Isuzu, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Suburu, Suzuki and Toyota. The piston engines range from two to ten cylinders with inline, vee and opposed configurations. Furthermore, additional special features and alternative choices include variable compression ratio, ceramic structural components, supercharger, turbocharger, twin turbocharger, supercharger-turbocharger combined and the regenerative gas turbine.

  17. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  18. EPR pairing dynamics in Hubbard model with resonant U

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X. Z.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the collision between two fermions in Hubbard model with on-site interaction strength U. The exact solution shows that the scattering matrix for two-wavepacket collision is separable into two independent parts, operating on spatial and spin degrees of freedom, respectively. The S-matrix for spin configuration is equivalent to that of Heisenberg-type pulsed interaction with the strength depending on U and relative group velocity vr. This can be applied to create distant EPR pair, through a collision process for two fermions with opposite spins in the case of |vr/U| = 1, without the need for temporal control and measurement process. Multiple collision process for many particles is also discussed. PMID:26728282

  19. Final Report on project Photoinduced Dipoles and Charge Pairs in Condensed Media

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Charles L.

    2006-09-27

    find that the dipole moments increase strongly with solvent polarity. Under the simplifying assumption that the folded, contact configuration and the extended, solvent-separated configuration are the only two stable species after electron transfer quenching, the formation efficiencies of contact radical ion pairs (CRIPs) and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSRIPs) are estimated in different solvents. The results indicate that a significant fraction of the ion pairs exists as solvent-spearated ion pairs when the dielectric constant of the solvent is larger than 10 and that electron transfer quenching can indeed happen at large separations in polar solvents. Light-induced charge separation often occurs at the interfaces and surfaces in solar cells and other electro-optic devices. To produce a substantial photovoltaic effect, the electrically neutral excitons formed by photon absorption must diffuse to an interface and produce ion pairs by dissociation. Since low dielectric constants of 3-4 are typical for organic materials used to fabricate OPV cells, the geminate ion pairs formed after exciton dissociation are believed to have short separations and are strongly bound by Coulomb interaction. The binding energy can be estimated to be ~0.25 eV. However, the experimentally observed activation energies are typically less than 0.1 eV. The .weak temperature dependence of carrier photo generation indicates that, somehow, geminate ion pairs are formed at large separation or that some sort of energy assists separation of nearby geminate ion pairs into free ions. To understand the underlying mechanism behind the above observations; a model based on what we have learned from solution was developed for charge separation at interfaces or surfaces. It was proposed that, in order for loose radical ion pairs with long separations to escape in media with dielectric constants of 3-4, a potential barrier that can effectively stop their collapse is critically needed. Based on our model, it is

  20. CFD Simulations of Tiltrotor Configurations in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potsdam, Mark a.; Strawn, Roger C.

    2002-01-01

    Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics calculations are presented for isolated, half-span, and full-span V-22 tiltrotor hover configurations. These computational results extend the validity of CFD hover methodology beyond conventional rotorcraft applications to tiltrotor configurations. Computed steady-state, isolated rotor performance agrees well with experimental measurements, showing little sensitivity to grid resolution. However, blade-vortex interaction flowfield details are sensitive to numerical dissipation and are more difficult to model accurately. Time-dependent, dynamic, half- and full-span installed configurations show sensitivities in performance to the tiltrotor fountain flow. As such, the full-span configuration exhibits higher rotor performance and lower airframe download than the half-span configuration. Half-span rotor installation trends match available half-span data, and airframe downloads are reasonably well predicted. Overall, the CFD solutions provide a wealth of flowfield details that can be used to analyze and improve tiltrotor aerodynamic performance.

  1. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    SciTech Connect

    James Valles

    2008-07-23

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  2. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2016-07-12

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  3. A 1.5 ns OFF/ON switching-time voltage-mode LVDS driver/receiver pair for asynchronous AER bit-serial chip grid links with up to 40 times event-rate dependent power savings.

    PubMed

    Zamarreno-Ramos, Carlos; Kulkarni, Raghavendra; Silva-Martinez, Jose; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Linares-Barranco, Bernabe

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a low power fast ON/OFF switchable voltage mode implementation of a driver/receiver pair intended to be used in high speed bit-serial Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Address Event Representation (AER) chip grids, where short (like 32-bit) sparse data packages are transmitted. Voltage-Mode drivers require intrinsically half the power of their Current-Mode counterparts and do not require Common-Mode Voltage Control. However, for fast ON/OFF switching a special high-speed voltage regulator is required which needs to be kept ON during data pauses, and hence its power consumption must be minimized, resulting in tight design constraints. A proof-of-concept chip test prototype has been designed and fabricated in low-cost standard 0.35 μ m CMOS. At ± 500 mV voltage swing with 500 Mbps serial bit rate and 32 bit events, current consumption scales from 15.9 mA (7.7 mA for the driver and 8.2 mA for the receiver) at 10 Mevent/s rate to 406 μ A ( 343 μ A for the driver and 62.5 μA for the receiver) for an event rate below 10 Kevent/s, therefore achieving a rate dependent power saving of up to 40 times, while keeping switching times at 1.5 ns. Maximum achievable event rate was 13.7 Meps at 638 Mbps serial bit rate. Additionally, differential voltage swing is tunable, thus allowing further power reductions.

  4. Dimensional regularization in configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Bollini, C.G. |; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dimensional regularization is introduced in configuration space by Fourier transforming in {nu} dimensions the perturbative momentum space Green functions. For this transformation, the Bochner theorem is used; no extra parameters, such as those of Feynman or Bogoliubov and Shirkov, are needed for convolutions. The regularized causal functions in {ital x} space have {nu}-dependent moderated singularities at the origin. They can be multiplied together and Fourier transformed (Bochner) without divergence problems. The usual ultraviolet divergences appear as poles of the resultant analytic functions of {nu}. Several examples are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Multiple forearm robotic elbow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A dual forearmed robotic elbow configuration comprises a main arm having a double elbow from which two coplanar forearms depend, two actuators carried in the double elbow for moving the forearms, and separate, independent end effectors, operated by a cable carried from the main arm through the elbow, is attached to the distal end of each forearm. Coiling the cables around the actuators prevents bending or kinking when the forearms are rotated 360 degrees. The end effectors can have similar or different capabilities. Actuator cannisters within the dual elbow are modular for rapid replacement or maintenance. Coarse and fine resolver transducers within the actuators provide accurate position referencing information.

  6. Restructured Freedom configuration characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutman, Patrick A.; Heck, Michael L.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    In Jan. 1991, the LaRc SSFO performed an assessment of the configuration characteristics of the proposed pre-integrated Space Station Freedom (SSF) concept. Of particular concern was the relationship of solar array operation and orientation with respect to spacecraft controllability. For the man-tended configuration (MTC), it was determined that torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) seeking Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) control laws could not always maintain attitude. The control problems occurred when the solar arrays were tracking the sun to produce full power while flying in an arrow or gravity gradient flight mode. The large solar array articulations that sometimes result from having the functions of the alpha and beta joints reversed on MTC induced large product of inertia changes that can invalidate the control system gains during an orbit. Several modified sun tracking techniques were evaluated with respect to producing a controllable configuration requiring no modifications to the CMG control algorithms. Another assessment involved the permanently manned configuration (PMC) which has a third asymmetric PV unit on one side of the transverse boom. Recommendations include constraining alpha rotations for MTC in the arrow and gravity gradient flight modes and perhaps developing new non-TEA seeking control laws. Recommendations for PMC include raising the operational altitude and moving to a symmetric configuration as soon as possible.

  7. Electron pairing without superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-14

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances-paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. PMID:25971511

  8. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Software Configuration Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The growth in cost and importance of software to NASA has caused NASA to address the improvement of software development across the agency. One of the products of this program is a series of guidebooks that define a NASA concept of the assurance processes which are used in software development. The Software Assurance Guidebook, SMAP-GB-A201, issued in September, 1989, provides an overall picture of the concepts and practices of NASA in software assurance. Lower level guidebooks focus on specific activities that fall within the software assurance discipline, and provide more detailed information for the manager and/or practitioner. This is the Software Configuration Management Guidebook which describes software configuration management in a way that is compatible with practices in industry and at NASA Centers. Software configuration management is a key software development process, and is essential for doing software assurance.

  10. Seniority zero pair coupled cluster doubles theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Tamar; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2014-06-07

    Coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations accurately describes weak electron correlation but is known to fail in cases of strong static correlation. Fascinatingly, however, pair coupled cluster doubles (p-CCD), a simplified version of the theory limited to pair excitations that preserve the seniority of the reference determinant (i.e., the number of unpaired electrons), has mean field computational cost and is an excellent approximation to the full configuration interaction (FCI) of the paired space provided that the orbital basis defining the pairing scheme is adequately optimized. In previous work, we have shown that optimization of the pairing scheme in the seniority zero FCI leads to a very accurate description of static correlation. The same conclusion extends to p-CCD if the orbitals are optimized to make the p-CCD energy stationary. We here demonstrate these results with numerous examples. We also explore the contributions of different seniority sectors to the coupled cluster doubles (CCD) correlation energy using different orbital bases. We consider both Hartree-Fock and Brueckner orbitals, and the role of orbital localization. We show how one can pair the orbitals so that the role of the Brueckner orbitals at the CCD level is retained at the p-CCD level. Moreover, we explore ways of extending CCD to accurately describe strongly correlated systems.

  11. Pair correlation and dynamic Jahn-Teller effect: High-Tc in nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vladimir; Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Friedel, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    Electronic states in metallic nanoclusters form energy shells and degree of their filling depends on the number of delocalized electrons. In the region close to half-filling the cluster's geometry oscillates between the prolate and oblate configurations (dynamic Jahn-Teller effect). For large clusters (N > 102 N is the number of delocalized electrons) this effect competes with pair correlation and, as a result, it is perfectly realistic to observe the transition to the superconducting state. For some clusters (e.g., for Zn76, Al70) the value of the critical temperature is rather high (≳ 140 \\text{K}) .

  12. Enhanced Correlation of Electron-Positron Pair in Two and Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Suo; Xie, Bai-Song; Wang, Hong-Yu; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-Bin; Yu, Ming-Young

    2014-01-01

    Early time electron-positron correlation in vacuum pair-production in an external field is investigated. The entangled electron and positron wave functions are obtained analytically in the configuration and momentum spaces. It is shown that, relative to that of the one-dimensional theory, two- and three-dimensional calculations yield enhanced spatial correlation and broadened momentum spectra. In fact, at early times the electron and positron almost coincide spatially. The correlation also depends on the direction of the applied field. For the spatial correlation, the transverse correlation is stronger than the longitudinal correlation.

  13. Absorption of ultra-intense intense laser pulse in self-generated pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grismayer, Thomas; Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Plasma physics in extreme fields requires taking into account Quantum Electrodynamics effects such as non-linear Compton scattering and Breit-Wheeler pair production. Such effects intervene in laser-plasma interactions at ultra high intensities (I >1023 W/cm2). The self-consistent modeling of these scenarios is challenging since some localized regions of ultra-intense field will produce a vast number of pairs that may cause memory overflow during the simulation. To overcome this issue, we have developed a merging algorithm that allows merging a large number of particles into fewer particles with higher particle weights while conserving local particle distributions. This algorithm is crucial to investigate the laser absorption in self-generated pair plasmas. During the interaction, the laser energy is converted into pairs and photons and the absorption become significant when the plasma density reaches the critical density. We present the results of 3D PIC-QED simulations (Osiris 2.0) showing the respective fraction of laser energy transferred into pairs and photons. The dependence of the laser absorption on the laser parameters for various configurations is also discussed.

  14. Configuration of bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Martens, Dirk E; van den End, Evert J; Streefland, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Lab-scale stirred-tank bioreactors (0.2-20 l) are used for fundamental research on animal cells and in process development and troubleshooting for large-scale production. In this chapter, different configurations of bioreactor systems are shortly discussed and setting up these different configurations is described. In addition, online measurement and control of bioreactor parameters is described, with special attention to controller settings (PID) and online measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. Finally, methods for determining the oxygen transfer coefficient are described.

  15. The Memory of MICE: The Configuration Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. J.; Colling, D. J.; Hanlet, P.

    2012-12-01

    The configuration database (CDB) is the memory of the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). Its principle aim is to store temporal data associated with the running of the experiment; these data are used throughout the life cycle of experiment, from running the experiment through data analysis. The CDB also serves as a moderator in the MICE state machine by defining allowable operating states of subsystems depending on the overall state of MICE and other subsystems. Master and slave CDBs, with multiple mirrored pair raid arrays, have been set up in different parts of the site to increase resilience, as well as off site backups. Access to the CDB is via a Python API, which communicates with a WSDL interface provided by a web-service on the CDB. The priority is to ensure availability of the CDB in the experiment control room. The master CDB is located in the MICE control where it is only used by the running experiment. In the event of the failure of the master, the slave can easily be promoted to master. Read only access to the CDB for data analysis and reconstruction is provided by the slave which has an up to the minute copy of the data. As MICE is a precision experiment which will measure a 10% muon cooling effect with 1% precision, it is imperative that we minimize our systematic errors; the CDB will ensure reproducible and documented running conditions in a highly resilient manner. A description of the hardware and software used in the the MICE CDB will be described in what follows.

  16. Optimal configurations of full-Stokes polarimeter with immunity to both Poisson and Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Tingkui; Chen, Zeyu; Zhang, Chunmin; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-05-01

    For a full-Stokes polarimeter (FSP), generally there are two types of noise, signal-dependent Poisson shot noise and signal-independent additive Gaussian noise, which will degrade the signal-to-noise ratio on the measured Stokes parameters. The relation between the immunity to Gaussian noise and the condition of the measurement matrix has been widely studied in the recent literature. In this paper, we present a new merit function and use it to achieve optimal configurations with immunity to both types of noise. The numerical results show that, for the FSP consisting of variable retarders followed by a fixed polarizer, the four measurement channels immune to these two types of noise can be optimally composed by a 102.2° retardance with a pair of azimuths ±71.9° and a 142.1° retardance with a pair of azimuths ±34.95°, or by two quarter-wave plates with four pairs of azimuths (±70.15°, ±87.84°) and (±42.82°, ±19.14°). The tolerances of the retardances or azimuths in the optimized configurations are evaluated for practical manufacturing, assembling and alignment.

  17. Analytical calculation of spectral phase of grism pairs by the geometrical ray tracing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, L.; Askari, A. A.; Saghafifar, H.

    2016-07-01

    The most optimum operation of a grism pair is practically approachable when an analytical expression of its spectral phase is in hand. In this paper, we have employed the accurate geometrical ray tracing method to calculate the analytical phase shift of a grism pair, at transmission and reflection configurations. As shown by the results, for a great variety of complicated configurations, the spectral phase of a grism pair is in the same form of that of a prism pair. The only exception is when the light enters into and exits from different facets of a reflection grism. The analytical result has been used to calculate the second-order dispersions of several examples of grism pairs in various possible configurations. All results are in complete agreement with those from ray tracing method. The result of this work can be very helpful in the optimal design and application of grism pairs at various configurations.

  18. Collective pairing Hamiltonian in the GCM approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góźdź, A.; Pomorski, K.; Brack, M.; Werner, E.

    1985-08-01

    Using the generator coordinate method and the gaussian overlap approximation we derived the collective Schrödinger-type equation starting from a microscopic single-particle plus pairing hamiltonian for one kind of particle. The BCS wave function was used as the generator function. The pairing energy-gap parameter Δ and the gauge transformation anglewere taken as the generator coordinates. Numerical results have been obtained for the full and the mean-field pairing hamiltonians and compared with the cranking estimates. A significant role played by the zero-point energy correction in the collective pairing potential is found. The ground-state energy dependence on the pairing strength agrees very well with the exact solution of the Richardson model for a set of equidistant doubly-degenerate single-particle levels.

  19. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goals are to design, develop, and evaluate the scalability and commercial feasibility of the PSH Paired Straight Hearth Furnace alternative ironmaking process.

  20. Checking for odd-triplet pairing using novel superconducting spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapa, Pavel N.; Khaire, Trupti; Ding, Junjia; Pearson, John E.; Novosad, Valentyn; Hoffmann, Axel; Jiang, J. S.

    An excitation of odd-triplet pairing in a superconducting spin valve can be revealed by measuring the dependence of the superconducting critical temperature Tc with increasing non-collinearity of the magnetizations in adjacent ferromagnetic layers. A standard approach to create such a non-collinear magnetization configuration is to pin one ferromagnetic layers and control the magnetization in another layer by rotating the multilayer in a small magnetic field. Unfortunately, the rotation can modify the vortex current which also strongly affects the critical temperature. To exclude such spurious effects, we designed and fabricated a novel superconducting spin valve which allows us to create non-collinear magnetization configurations without using a sample rotator. The valve's operational principle is based on pinning of a synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF) by exchange coupling it to FeMn layer. The ability to imprint non-collinear magnetization configurations in the spin valve was confirmed using giant magneto resistance (GMR) measurements. The response of the magnetizations on an external magnetic field was simulated based on a coherent rotation model. The dependence of the Nb layer Tc on imprinted magnetization configuration will be presented. Work was supported by The Department of Energy Office of Science, Material Science and Engineering Division.

  1. Adaptive Pairing Reversible Watermarking.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-05-01

    This letter revisits the pairwise reversible watermarking scheme of Ou et al., 2013. An adaptive pixel pairing that considers only pixels with similar prediction errors is introduced. This adaptive approach provides an increased number of pixel pairs where both pixels are embedded and decreases the number of shifted pixels. The adaptive pairwise reversible watermarking outperforms the state-of-the-art low embedding bit-rate schemes proposed so far.

  2. Space Station Final Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An artist's conception of what the final configuration of the International Space Station (ISS) will look like when it is fully built and deployed. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  3. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  4. Resonantly paired fermionic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarie, V.; Radzihovsky, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present a theory of a degenerate atomic Fermi gas, interacting through a narrow Feshbach resonance, whose position and therefore strength can be tuned experimentally, as demonstrated recently in ultracold trapped atomic gases. The distinguishing feature of the theory is that its accuracy is controlled by a dimensionless parameter proportional to the ratio of the width of the resonance to Fermi energy. The theory is therefore quantitatively accurate for a narrow Feshbach resonance. In the case of a narrow s-wave resonance, our analysis leads to a quantitative description of the crossover between a weakly paired BCS superconductor of overlapping Cooper pairs and a strongly paired molecular Bose-Einstein condensate of diatomic molecules. In the case of pairing via a p-wave resonance, that we show is always narrow for a sufficiently low density, we predict a detuning-temperature phase diagram, that in the course of a BCS-BEC crossover can exhibit a host of thermodynamically distinct phases separated by quantum and classical phase transitions. For an intermediate strength of the dipolar anisotropy, the system exhibits a px + i py paired superfluidity that undergoes a topological phase transition between a weakly coupled gapless ground state at large positive detuning and a strongly paired fully gapped molecular superfluid for a negative detuning. In two dimensions the former state is characterized by a Pfaffian ground state exhibiting topological order and non-Abelian vortex excitations familiar from fractional quantum Hall systems.

  5. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  6. Dependence of the lone pair of bismuth on coordination environment and pressure: An ab initio study on Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 5}S{sub 10} and Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Arnskov Olsen, Lars; Lopez-Solano, Javier; Garcia, Alberto; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Makovicky, Emil

    2010-09-15

    DFT calculations have been carried out for Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 5}S{sub 10} and Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} to provide an analysis of the relation between electronic structure, lone electron pairs and the local geometry. The effect of pressure is considered in Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} and the results are compared to published experimental data. Bi{sup 3+} in Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 5}S{sub 10} is found at both symmetrically and asymmetrically coordinated sites, whereas the coordination environments of Bi in Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} are asymmetric at room conditions and get more regular with increasing pressure. The charge density maps of the asymmetric sites show the lone pairs as lobes of non-shared charge. These lobes are related to an effective Bi s-Bi p hybridization resulting from coupling to S p orbitals, supporting the modern view of the origin of the stereochemically active lone pair. No effective Bi s-p hybridization is seen for the symmetric site in Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 5}S{sub 10}, whereas Bi s-p hybridization coexists with a much reduced lone pair in Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} at high pressure. - Graphical abstract: The article includes charge density maps used to analyze the charge distribution around bismuth in sulfides. This map shows the orientation of a lone electron pair.

  7. Optical emission of a molecular nanoantenna pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, E. M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    The optical emission from a pair of nanoantennas is investigated within the theoretical framework of quantum electrodynamics. The analysis of fluorescent emission from a pair of molecular antenna species in close proximity is prompted by experimental work on oriented semiconductor polymer nanostructures. Each physically different possibility for separation-dependent features in photon emission by any such pair is explored in detail, leading to the identification of three distinct mechanisms: emission from a pair-delocalized exciton state, emission that engages electrodynamic coupling through quantum interference, and correlated photon emission from the two components of the pair. Although each mechanism produces a damped oscillatory dependence on the pair separation, each of the corresponding results exhibits an analytically different form. Significant differences in the associated spatial frequencies enable an apparent ambiguity in the interpretation of experiments to be resolved. Other major differences are found in the requisite conditions, the associated selection rules, and the variation with angular disposition of the emitters, together offering grounds for experimental discrimination between the coupling mechanisms. The analysis paves the way for investigations of pair-wise coupling effects in the emission from nanoantenna arrays.

  8. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  9. Spin dynamics of polarons and polaron pairs in a random hyperfine field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, Robert C.

    Spin-dependent recombination of polaron pairs and spin relaxation of a single polaron are the most fundamental processes are responsible for the performance of organic spintronics-based devices such as light-emitting diodes and organic spin valves. In organic materials, with no spin-orbit coupling, both processes are due to random hyperfine fields created by protons neighboring the polaron sites. The essence of spin-dependent recombination is that in order to recombine the pair must be in the singlet state. Hyperfine fields acting on the electron and hole govern the spin-dynamics of localized pairs during the waiting time for recombination. We demonstrate that for certain domain of trapping configurations of hyperfine fields, crossover to the singlet state is quenched. This leads to the blocking of current. The phenomenon of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) is described by counting the weights of trapping configurations as a function of magnetic field. This explains the universality of the lineshapes of the OMAR curves. In finite samples incomplete averaging over the hyperfine fields gives rise to mesoscopic fluctuations of the current response. We also demonstrate that under the condition of magnetic resonance, new trapping configurations emerge. This leads to nontrivial evolution of current through the sample with microwave power. When discussing spin-relaxation two questions can be asked: (a) How does the local spin polarization decay as a function of distance from the spin-polarized injector? (b) How does the injected spin decay as a function of time after spatial averaging? With regard to (a), we demonstrate that, while decaying exponentially on average, local spin-polarization exhibits giant fluctuations from point to point. Concerning (b), we find that for a spin-carrier which moves diffusively in low dimensions the decay is faster than a simple exponent. The underlying physics for both findings is that in describing spin evolution it is necessary to add up

  10. Electron-positron pair production in external electric fields varying both in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, I. A.; Plunien, G.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The Schwinger mechanism of electron-positron pair production in the presence of strong external electric fields is analyzed numerically for the case of one- and two-dimensional field configurations where the external field depends both on time and one spatial coordinate. In order to provide this analysis, a new efficient numerical approach is developed. The number of particles created is obtained numerically and also compared with the analytical results for several exactly solvable one-dimensional backgrounds. For the case of two-dimensional field configurations the effects of the spatial finiteness are examined, which confirms their importance and helps us to attest our approach further. The corresponding calculations are also performed for several more interesting and nontrivial combinations of temporal and spatial inhomogeneities. Finally, we discuss the case of a spatially periodic external field when the approach is particularly productive. The method employed is described in detail.

  11. The TITAN magnet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, C. G.

    The TITAN study uses copper-alloy ohmic-heating coils (OHC) to start up inductively a reversed-field-pinch (RFP) fusion reactor. The plasma equilibrium is maintained with a pair of superconducting equilibrium-field coils (EFCs). A second pair of copper EFCs provides the necessary trimming of the equilibrium field during plasma transients. A compact toroidal-field-coil (TFC) set is provided by an integrated blanket/coil (IBC). The IBC concept also is applied to the toroidal-field divertor coils. Steady-state operation is achieved with oscillating-field current drive, which oscillates at low amplitude and frequency the OHCs, EFCs, the TFCs, and divertor coils about their steady-state currents. An integrated magnet design, which uses low-field, low technology coils, and the related design basis is given.

  12. Dynamic Airspace Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In air traffic management systems, airspace is partitioned into regions in part to distribute the tasks associated with managing air traffic among different systems and people. These regions, as well as the systems and people allocated to each, are changed dynamically so that air traffic can be safely and efficiently managed. It is expected that new air traffic control systems will enable greater flexibility in how airspace is partitioned and how resources are allocated to airspace regions. In this talk, I will begin by providing an overview of some previous work and open questions in Dynamic Airspace Configuration research, which is concerned with how to partition airspace and assign resources to regions of airspace. For example, I will introduce airspace partitioning algorithms based on clustering, integer programming optimization, and computational geometry. I will conclude by discussing the development of a tablet-based tool that is intended to help air traffic controller supervisors configure airspace and controllers in current operations.

  13. Modular small hydro configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Smaller sites (those under 750 kilowatts) which previously were not attractive to develop using equipment intended for application at larger scale sites, were the focal point in the conception of a system which utilizes standard industrial components which are generally available within short procurement times. Such components were integrated into a development scheme for sites having 20 feet to 150 feet of head. The modular small hydro configuration maximizes the use of available components and minimizes modification of existing civil works. A key aspect of the development concept is the use of a vertical turbine multistage pump, used in the reverse mode as a hydraulic turbine. The configuration allows for automated operation and control of the hydroelectric facilities with sufficient flexibility for inclusion of potential hydroelectric sites into dispersed storage and generation (DSG) utility grid systems.

  14. Segmentation and the pairing hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bragason, Orn

    2004-09-30

    The effect of stimulus contiguity and response contingency on responding in chain schedules was examined in two experiments. In Experiment 1, four pigeons were trained on two simple three-link chain schedules that alternated within sessions. Initial links were correlated with a variable-interval 30s schedule, and middle and terminal links were correlated with interdependent variable-interval 30s variable-interval 30s schedules. The combined duration of the interdependent schedules summed to 60s. The two chains differed with respect to signaling of the schedule components: a two-stimulus chain had one stimulus paired with the initial link and one stimulus paired with both the middle and the terminal link, while a three-stimulus chain had a different stimulus paired with the each of the three links. The results showed that the two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain. In Experiment 2, four pigeons were exposed to three separate conditions, the two- and three-stimulus chains of Experiment 1 and a three-stimulus chain that had a 3s delay to terminal-link entry from the middle-link response that produced it. The two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain, as in Experiment 1, and a similar initial-link responding was maintained by the two-stimulus chain and the three-stimulus chain with the delay contingency. The results demonstrate that a stimulus noncontiguous with food can maintain responding that is sometimes greater than a stimulus contiguous with food, depending on the response contingency for terminal-link entry. The results are contrary to the pairing hypothesis of conditioned reinforcement.

  15. Polysoaps: Configurations and Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.

    1997-03-01

    Simple polymers are very long, flexible, linear molecules. Amphiphiles, soaps, are small molecules comprising of a part that prefers water over oil and a part that prefers oil over water. By combining the two we arrive at an interesting, little explored, class of materials: Polysoaps. These comprise of a water soluble backbone incorporating, at intervals, covalently bound amphiphilic monomers. In water, the polymerised amphiphiles aggregate into self assembled units known as micelles. This induces a dramatic modification of the spatial configurations of the polymers. What were featureless random coils now exhibit intramolecular, hierachial self organisation. Due to this self organisation it is necessary to modify the paradigms describing the large scale behaviour of these polymers: Their configurations, dimensions and elasticity. Understanding the behaviour of these polymers is of practical interest because of their wide range of industrial applications, ranging from cosmetics to paper coating. It is of fundamental interest because polysoaps are characterised by a rugged free energy landscape that is reminiscent of complex systems such as proteins and glasses. The talk concerns theoretical arguments regarding the following issues: (i) The design parameters that govern the spatial configurations of the polysoaps, (ii) The interaction between polysoaps and free amphiphiles, (iii) The effect of the intramolecular self organisation on the elasticity of the chains.

  16. Low-temperature NMR studies on inosine wobble base pairs.

    PubMed

    Janke, Eline M Basílio; Riechert-Krause, Fanny; Weisz, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    Base pairs formed by the inosine nucleoside (I) play an important role in many physiological processes as well as in various DNA technologies. Relative stabilities and favored base pair geometries of free inosine wobble base pairs in aprotic solvents have been determined through (1)H NMR measurements at room temperature and at very low temperatures in a freonic solvent. As indicated by its significantly deshielded imino proton, the Watson-Crick-type I·C base pair forms a remarkably strong NHN hydrogen bond. For the thermodynamically less stable I·A wobble base pair, two configurations of similar population coexist at 133 K in the slow hydrogen bond exchange regime, namely a Watson-Crick(I)-Watson-Crick(A) geometry and a Watson-Crick(I)-Hoogsteen(A) geometry. I·U base pairs are stabilized by two rather weak hydrogen bonds and are significantly disfavored over inosine self-associates in a low-temperature Freon solution. PMID:21644523

  17. Nonhomologous Chromosome Pairing in Aegilops-Secale Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Su, Yarui; Zhang, Dale; Li, Yuge; Li, Suoping

    2015-01-01

    Intergeneric hybrids and amphidiploid hybrids from crosses of Aegilopstauschii and Secale cereale were produced using young embryo rescue. The hybrids showed complete sets of both parental chromosomes. The dihaploid plants showed an average meiotic pairing configuration of 10.84 I + 1.57 II + 0.01 III. Genomic in situ staining revealed 3 types of bivalent associations, i.e. D-D, R-R and D-R at frequencies of 8.6, 8.2 and 83.3%, respectively. Trivalents consisted of D-R-D or R-D-R associations. These results suggested that both intra- and intergenomic chromosome homology were contributed to chromosome pairing. Derived amphidiploids with 2n = 28 paired at metaphase I of meiosis as 4.51 I + 11.70 II + 0.03 III. Chromosome pairing of amphidiploids appeared more or less regular, i.e. bivalent-like with some trivalent configurations. PMID:26950342

  18. Distance distribution in configuration-model networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Mor; Katzav, Eytan; Kühn, Reimer; Biham, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    We present analytical results for the distribution of shortest path lengths between random pairs of nodes in configuration model networks. The results, which are based on recursion equations, are shown to be in good agreement with numerical simulations for networks with degenerate, binomial, and power-law degree distributions. The mean, mode, and variance of the distribution of shortest path lengths are also evaluated. These results provide expressions for central measures and dispersion measures of the distribution of shortest path lengths in terms of moments of the degree distribution, illuminating the connection between the two distributions.

  19. Distance distribution in configuration-model networks.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Mor; Katzav, Eytan; Kühn, Reimer; Biham, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    We present analytical results for the distribution of shortest path lengths between random pairs of nodes in configuration model networks. The results, which are based on recursion equations, are shown to be in good agreement with numerical simulations for networks with degenerate, binomial, and power-law degree distributions. The mean, mode, and variance of the distribution of shortest path lengths are also evaluated. These results provide expressions for central measures and dispersion measures of the distribution of shortest path lengths in terms of moments of the degree distribution, illuminating the connection between the two distributions. PMID:27415282

  20. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  1. GSC configuration management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward

    1990-01-01

    The tools and methods used for the configuration management of the artifacts (including software and documentation) associated with the Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project are described. The GCS project is part of a software error studies research program. Three implementations of GCS are being produced in order to study the fundamental characteristics of the software failure process. The Code Management System (CMS) is used to track and retrieve versions of the documentation and software. Application of the CMS for this project is described and the numbering scheme is delineated for the versions of the project artifacts.

  2. Multi-pair states in electron-positron pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöllert, Anton; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    Ultra strong electromagnetic fields can lead to spontaneous creation of single or multiple electron-positron pairs. A quantum field theoretical treatment of the pair creation process combined with numerical methods provides a description of the fermionic quantum field state, from which all observables of the multiple electron-positron pairs can be inferred. This allows to study the complex multi-particle dynamics of electron-positron pair creation in-depth, including multi-pair statistics as well as momentum distributions and spin. To illustrate the potential benefit of this approach, it is applied to the intermediate regime of pair creation between nonperturbative Schwinger pair creation and perturbative multiphoton pair creation where the creation of multi-pair states becomes nonnegligible but cascades do not yet set in. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how spin and helicity of the created electrons and positrons are affected by the polarization of the counterpropagating laser fields, which induce the creation of electron-positron pairs.

  3. Configurational diffusion of asphaltenes in fresh and aged catalysts extrudates. [Mathematical configurational diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between the size and shape of coal and petroleum macromolecules and their diffusion rates i.e., effective diffusivities, in catalyst pore structures. That is, how do the effective intrapore diffusivities depend on molecule configuration and pore geometry. This quarter we made a more comprehensive literature survey concerning configurational diffusion in porous catalysts or catalyst supports. A detailed literature review is reported. Also, a mathematical configurational diffusion model was developed. By using this model, the effective diffusivity for model compounds diffusing in porous media and a linear adsorption constant can be determined by fitting experimental data.

  4. High base pair opening rates in tracts of GC base pairs.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, U; Leijon, M; Fritzsche, H

    1999-03-12

    Sequence-dependent structural features of the DNA double helix have a strong influence on the base pair opening dynamics. Here we report a detailed study of the kinetics of base pair breathing in tracts of GC base pairs in DNA duplexes derived from 1H NMR measurements of the imino proton exchange rates upon titration with the exchange catalyst ammonia. In the limit of infinite exchange catalyst concentration, the exchange times of the guanine imino protons of the GC tracts extrapolate to much shorter base pair lifetimes than commonly observed for isolated GC base pairs. The base pair lifetimes in the GC tracts are below 5 ms for almost all of the base pairs. The unusually rapid base pair opening dynamics of GC tracts are in striking contrast to the behavior of AT tracts, where very long base pair lifetimes are observed. The implication of these findings for the structural principles governing spontaneous helix opening as well as the DNA-binding specificity of the cytosine-5-methyltransferases, where flipping of the cytosine base has been observed, are discussed.

  5. Theory of sequence-dependent DNA elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Bernard D.; Olson, Wilma K.; Swigon, David

    2003-04-01

    The elastic properties of a molecule of duplex DNA are strongly dependent on nucleotide sequence. In the theory developed here the contribution ψn of the nth base-pair step to the elastic energy is assumed to be given by a function ψ˜n of six kinematical variables, called tilt, roll, twist, shift, slide, and rise, that describe the relative orientation and displacement of the nth and (n+1)th base pairs. The sequence dependence of elastic properties is determined when one specifies the way ψ˜n depends on the nucleotides of the two base pairs of the nth step. Among the items discussed are the symmetry relations imposed on ψ˜n by the complementarity of bases, i.e., of A to T and C to G, the antiparallel nature of the DNA sugar-phosphate chains, and the requirement that ψ˜n be independent of the choice of the direction of increasing n. Variational equations of mechanical equilibrium are here derived without special assumptions about the form of the functions ψ˜n, and numerical solutions of those equations are shown for illustrative cases in which ψ˜n is, for each n, a quadratic form and the DNA forms a closed, 150 base-pair, minicircle that can be called a DNA o-ring because it has a nearly circular stress-free configuration. Examples are given of noncircular equilibrium configurations of naked DNA o-rings and of cases in which the interaction with ligands induces changes in configuration that are markedly different from those undergone by a minicircle of intrinsically straight DNA. When a minicircle of intrinsically straight DNA interacts with an intercalating agent that upon binding to DNA causes a local reduction of intrinsic twist, the configuration that minimizes elastic energy depends on the number of intercalated molecules, but is independent of the spatial distribution of those molecules along the minicircle. In contrast, it is shown here that the configuration and elastic energy of a DNA o-ring can depend strongly on the spatial distribution of

  6. Non stationary pair model in blazar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Henri, Gilles; Renaud, Nicolas

    2001-09-01

    This article shortly present an improved version of pair models for X and gamma-ray emission from blazar jets. The radiations are generated through external and synchrotron Inverse Compton mechanisms in the vicinity of a super-massive black hole by an ultra-relativistic electron-positron pair plasma pervading a non-relativistic electron-proton jet (two-flow model). Non stationary solutions are found by solving simultaneously pair creation/annihilation, soft photon absorption and particle acceleration processes along the jet. The power supply necessary to re-accelerate particles is not treated in a self-consistent procedure but parametrised. Pair creation opacity effects can lead to interesting variability effects depending on the X-ray emission regimes. Multi-wavelength observations by INTEGRAL will provide tests for the model, and also for the matter content and variability mechanisms in compact sources.

  7. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the

  8. SIM Configuration Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Kim M.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based 10 m baseline Michelson interferometer. Planned for launch in 2005 aboard a Delta III launch vehicle, or equivalent, its primary objective is to measure the positions of stars and other celestial objects with an unprecedented accuracy of 4 micro arc seconds. With such an instrument, tremendous advancement can be expected in our understanding of stellar and galactic dynamics. Using triangulation from opposite sides of the orbit around the sun (i.e. by using parallax) one can measure the distance to any observable object in our galaxy. By directly measuring the orbital wobble of nearby stars, the mass and orbit of planets can be determined over a wide range of parameters. The distribution of velocity within nearby galaxies will be measurable. Observations of these and other objects will improve the calibration of distance estimators by more than an order of magnitude. This will permit a much better determination of the Hubble Constant as well as improving our overall understanding of the evolution of the universe. SIM has undergone several transformations, especially over the past year and a half since the start of Phase A. During this phase of a project, it is desirable to perform system-level trade studies, so the substantial evolution of the design that has occurred is quite appropriate. Part of the trade-off process has addressed two major underlying architectures: SIM Classic; and Son of SIM. The difference between these two architectures is related to the overall arrangement of the optical elements and the associated metrology system. Several different configurations have been developed for each architecture. Each configuration is the result of design choices that are influenced by many competing considerations. Some of the more important aspects will be discussed. The Space Interferometry Mission has some extremely challenging goals: millikelvin thermal stability, nanometer stabilization of optics

  9. Stereo Pair: Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, near El Cain, Argentina shows complexly eroded volcanic terrain, with basalt mesas, sinkholes, landslide debris, playas, and relatively few integrated drainage channels. Surrounding this site (but also extending far to the east) is a broad plateau capped by basalt, the Meseta de Somuncura. Here, near the western edge of the plateau, erosion has broken through the basalt cap in a variety of ways. On the mesas, water-filled sinkholes (lower left) are most likely the result of the collapse of old lava tubes. Along the edges of the mesas (several locations) the basalt seems to be sliding away from the plateau in a series of slices. Water erosion by overland flow is also evident, particularly in canyons where vegetation blankets the drainage channels (green patterns, bottom of image). However, overland water flow does not extend very far at any location. This entire site drains to local playas, some of which are seen here (blue). While the water can reach the playas and then evaporate, what becomes of the eroded rock debris? Wind might excavate some of the finer eroded debris, but the fate of much of the missing bedrock remains mysterious.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7 satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The

  10. Stereo Pair, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, at Los Menucos, Argentina shows remnants of relatively young volcanoes built upon an eroded plain of much older and contorted volcanic, granitic, and sedimentary rocks. The large purple, brown, and green 'butterfly' pattern is a single volcano that has been deeply eroded. Large holes on the volcano's flanks indicate that they may have collapsed soon after eruption, as fluid molten rock drained out from under its cooled and solidified outer shell. At the upper left, a more recent eruption occurred and produced a small volcanic cone and a long stream of lava, which flowed down a gully. At the top of the image, volcanic intrusions permeated the older rocks resulting in a chain of small dark volcanic peaks. At the top center of the image, two halves of a tan ellipse pattern are offset from each other. This feature is an old igneous intrusion that has been split by a right-lateral fault. The apparent offset is about 6.6 kilometers (4 miles). Color, tonal, and topographic discontinuities reveal the fault trace as it extends across the image to the lower left. However, young unbroken basalt flows show that the fault has not been active recently.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive

  11. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  12. Grazing incidence toroidal mirror pairs in imaging and spectroscopic applications.

    PubMed

    Malvezzi, A M; Tondello, G

    1983-08-15

    The optical performance of pairs of toroidal mirrors in grazing incidence has been studied analytically and numerically. Two types of toroidal surface are possible: football and bicycle tire. In grazing incidence and for configurations that compensate up to second-order aberrations, there are significant differences in performance between the two types. For football-type tori the best configuration appears to be Z-shaped with tangential and sagittal foci at the middle point between the mirrors. For bicycle tire-type tori the best configuration is U-shaped with the tangential focus at the middle point and the sagittal at infinity.

  13. Dynamics and Instabilities of Vortex Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leweke, Thomas; Le Dizès, Stéphane; Williamson, Charles H. K.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the characteristics and behavior of counter-rotating and corotating vortex pairs, which are seemingly simple flow configurations yet immensely rich in phenomena. Since the reviews in this journal by Widnall (1975) and Spalart (1998) , who studied the fundamental structure and dynamics of vortices and airplane trailing vortices, respectively, there have been many analytical, computational, and experimental studies of vortex pair flows. We discuss two-dimensional dynamics, including the merging of same-sign vortices and the interaction with the mutually induced strain, as well as three-dimensional displacement and core instabilities resulting from this interaction. Flows subject to combined instabilities are also considered, in particular the impingement of opposite-sign vortices on a ground plane. We emphasize the physical mechanisms responsible for the flow phenomena and clearly present the key results that are useful to the reader for predicting the dynamics and instabilities of parallel vortices.

  14. Effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive sources on radiation intensity in beta-voltaic nuclear battery system: A preliminary result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basar, Khairul; Riupassa, Robi D.; Bachtiar, Reza; Badrianto, Muldani D.

    2014-09-01

    It is known that one main problem in the application of beta-voltaic nuclear battery system is its low efficiency. The efficiency of the beta-voltaic nuclear battery system mainly depends on three aspects: source of radioactive radiation, interface between materials in the system and process of converting electron-hole pair to electric current in the semiconductor material. In this work, we show the effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive sources on radiation intensity of beta-voltaic nuclear battery system.

  15. Competing mechanisms of plasma transport in inhomogeneous configurations with velocity shear: the solar-wind interaction with earth's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Faganello, M; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F

    2008-01-11

    Two-dimensional simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an inhomogeneous compressible plasma with a density gradient show that, in a transverse magnetic field configuration, the vortex pairing process and the Rayleigh-Taylor secondary instability compete during the nonlinear evolution of the vortices. Two different regimes exist depending on the value of the density jump across the velocity shear layer. These regimes have different physical signatures that can be crucial for the interpretation of satellite data of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheric plasma.

  16. Competing mechanisms of plasma transport in inhomogeneous configurations with velocity shear: the solar-wind interaction with earth's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Faganello, M; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F

    2008-01-11

    Two-dimensional simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an inhomogeneous compressible plasma with a density gradient show that, in a transverse magnetic field configuration, the vortex pairing process and the Rayleigh-Taylor secondary instability compete during the nonlinear evolution of the vortices. Two different regimes exist depending on the value of the density jump across the velocity shear layer. These regimes have different physical signatures that can be crucial for the interpretation of satellite data of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheric plasma. PMID:18232777

  17. Stability and size of particle pairs in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Kompaneets, R.; Morfill, G.

    2014-11-15

    Particle pairing in a complex plasma was experimentally studied with the emphasis on pair spatial extent and stability. Micron-size particles were suspended in the (pre)sheath area above the lower electrode in a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge in argon. They formed vertical pairs due to the ion wakes created by the flow of ions past particles. We discuss the confinement mechanism for the lower particle, resulting from a combination of the wake field and the field of non-uniform sheath. A model of particle pairs is proposed, which provides good description for the dependence of pair size and stability on experimental parameters.

  18. Power converter connection configuration

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2008-11-11

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  19. Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Cornelius, Harold; Hickling, Ron; Brooks, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Emerging test instrumentation and test scenarios increasingly require network communication to manage complexity. Adapting wireless communication infrastructure to accommodate challenging testing needs can benefit from reconfigurable radio technology. A fundamental requirement for a software-definable radio system is independence from carrier frequencies, one of the radio components that to date has seen only limited progress toward programmability. This paper overviews an ongoing project to validate the viability of a promising chipset that performs conversion of radio frequency (RF) signals directly into digital data for the wireless receiver and, for the transmitter, converts digital data into RF signals. The Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver (SCMT) enables four transmitters and four receivers in a single unit the size of a commodity disk drive, programmable for any frequency band between 1 MHz and 6 GHz.

  20. SASSI system software configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.O.

    1994-08-01

    The SASSI (System for Analysis for Soil-Structure Interaction) computer program was obtained by WHC from the University of California at Berkeley for seismic structural analysis of complex embedded building configurations. SASSI was developed in the 1980`s by a team of doctoral students under the direction of Prof. J. Lysmer. The program treats three-dimensional soil-structure interaction problems with the flexible volume substructuring method. In the 1970`s, the same organization developed the FLUSH program, which has achieved widespread international usage in the seismic analysis of structures. SASSI consists of nine modules, each of which are to be run as a separate execution. The SASSI source code, dated 1989 and identified as a Cray version, was put up on the RL Cray XM/232 Unicos system in 1991. That system was removed at the end of 1993, and SASSI is now installed on the LANL Cray YMP systems.

  1. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  2. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-01

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  3. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-15

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  4. A 0.35 μm sub-ns wake-up time ON-OFF switchable LVDS driver-receiver chip I/O pad pair for rate-dependent power saving in AER bit-serial links.

    PubMed

    Zamarreño-Ramos, Carlos; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a low power switchable current mode driver/receiver I/O pair for high speed serial transmission of asynchronous address event representation (AER) information. The sparse nature of AER packets (also called events) allows driver/receiver bias currents to be switched off to save power. The on/off times must be lower than the bit time to minimize the latency introduced by the switching mechanism. Using this technique, the link power consumption can be scaled down with the event rate without compromising the maximum system throughput. The proposed technique has been implemented on a typical push/pull low voltage differential signaling (LVDS) circuit, but it can easily be extended to other widely used current mode standards, such as current mode logic (CML) or low-voltage positive emitter-coupled logic (LVPECL). A proof of concept prototype has been fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS incorporating the proposed driver/receiver pair along with a previously reported switchable serializer/deserializer scheme. At a 500 Mbps bit rate, the maximum event rate is 11 Mevent/s for 32-bit events. In this situation, current consumption is 7.5 mA and 9.6 mA for the driver and receiver, respectively, while differential voltage amplitude is ±300 mV. However, if event rate is lower than 20-30 Kevent/s, current consumption has a floor of 270 μA for the driver and 570 μA for the receiver. The measured ON/OFF switching times are in the order of 1 ns. The serial link could be operated at up to 710 Mbps bit rate, resulting in a maximum 32-bit event rate of 15 Mevent/s . This is the same peak event rate as that obtained with the same SerDes circuits and a non-switched driver/receiver pair.

  5. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhter, R. I.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Jonson, M.; Aharony, A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals.

  6. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs.

    PubMed

    Shekhter, R I; Entin-Wohlman, O; Jonson, M; Aharony, A

    2016-05-27

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals. PMID:27284669

  7. Oscillatory pairing of fermions in spin-split traps

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Kuei; Vishveshwara, Smitha; Meyer, Julia S.; Sheehy, Daniel E.

    2011-03-15

    As a means of realizing oscillatory pairing between fermions, we study superfluid pairing between two fermion ''spin'' species that are confined to adjustable spin-dependent trapping potentials. Focusing on the one-dimensional limit, we find that with increasing separation between the spin-dependent traps, the fermions exhibit distinct phases, including a fully paired phase, a spin-imbalanced phase with oscillatory pairing, and an unpaired fully spin-polarized phase. We obtain the phase diagram of fermions in such a spin-split trap and discuss signatures of these phases in cold-atom experiments.

  8. Mean-field plus various types of pairing models and an exact boson mapping of the standard pairing model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Feng; Wang Yin; Guan Xin; Jia Lu; Chen Xiangrong; Draayer, J. P.

    2011-06-28

    Exact solutions of Nilsson mean-field with various pairing interactions are reviewed. Some even-odd mass differences and moments of inertia of low-lying states for rare earth and actinide nuclei are calculated for the nearest-orbit pairing approximation as well as for the extended pairing model and compared to available experimental data. An exact boson mapping of the standard pairing Hamiltonian is also reported. Under the mapping, fermion pair operators are mapped exactly onto corresponding bosons. The image of the mapping is a Bose-Hubbard model with orbit-dependent hopping.

  9. CMS - HLT Configuration Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daponte, Vincenzo; Bocci, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CMS High Level Trigger (HLT) is a collection of software algorithms that run using an optimized version of the CMS offline reconstruction software. The HLT uses Python configuration files each containing hundreds of "modules", organized in "sequences" and "paths". Each configuration usually uses an average of 2200 different modules and more than 400 independent trigger paths. The complexity of the HLT configurations and their large number require the design of a suitable data management system. The work presented here describes the solution designed to manage the considerable number of configurations developed and to assist the editing of new configurations.

  10. Existence of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Kyu; Lee, Kyoung Hee

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, using the fixed point theorem for Kakutani factorizable multifunctions, we shall prove new existence theorems of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs for free abstract economies, which include the previous fixed point theorems and equilibrium existence theorems.

  11. Configurationally exhaustive first-principles study of a quaternary superalloy with a vast configuration space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisel, S. B.; Höfler, M.; Müller, S.

    2016-07-01

    Exploration of the vast configuration space encountered in a multicomponent alloy is impossible without a suitable engine like the cluster-expansion (CE) method. While a CE ansatz can be formulated for an arbitrary number of components n , the combinatorial explosion of configuration space with increasing n can still be prohibitive. In this paper, we present a configurationally exhaustive study of a four-component nickel-based superalloy. We obtain all ground-state compounds, temperature- and concentration-dependent configurational energies, and micrographs of the γ /γ' microstructure of the γ'-strengthened superalloy Ni-Al-Ta-W. Several phenomena that cannot be studied from the binary building blocks Ni-Al, Ni-W, or Ni-Ta alone are discussed, e.g., the suppression of γ'' formation in Al-Ni-Ta-W, the effect of Ta on the γ' composition, and the tungsten partitioning ratio as a function of both temperature and bulk composition.

  12. Amphiphilic organic ion pairs in solution: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Vincent; Poteau, Romuald; Pimienta, Veronique

    2007-07-16

    The macroscopic manifestation of hydrophobic interactions for amphiphilic organic ion pairs (tetraalkylammonium-anion) has been shown experimentally by measuring their association constants and their affinity with the organic phase. Beyond a certain size, there is a direct relation between association constants and chain lengths in tetraalkylammonium ions. We propose to cast a bridge between these results and geometrical properties considered at the level of a single ion pair by means of quantum chemistry calculations performed on model systems: trimethylalkylammonium-pentyl sulfate instead of tetraalkylammonium-dodecyl sulfate. Two limiting cases are considered: head-to-head configurations, which yield an optimal electrostatic interaction between polar heads, and parallel configurations with a balance between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. All properties (geometries, complexation energies, and atomic charges) were obtained at the MP2 level of calculation, with water described by a continuum model (CPCM). Dispersion forces link hydrocarbon chains of tetraalkylammonium ions and pentyl sulfate, thus yielding (for the largest ion pairs) parallel configurations favored with respect to head-to-head geometries by solute-solvent electrostatic interactions. Given the small experimental association energies, we probe the accuracy limit of the MP2 and CPCM methods. However, clear trends are obtained as a function of chain length, which agree with the experimental observations. The calculated monotonic stabilization of ion pairs when the hydrocarbon chain increases in length is discussed in terms of electrostatic interactions (between ions and between ion pairs and water), dispersion forces, and cavitation energies.

  13. Spin polarization transfer by the radical pair mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Zarea, Mehdi Ratner, Mark A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-08-07

    In a three-site representation, we study a spin polarization transfer from radical pair spins to a nearby electron or nuclear spin. The quantum dynamics of the radical pair spins is governed by a constant exchange interaction between the radical pair spins which have different Zeeman frequencies. Radical pair spins can recombine to the singlet ground state or to lower energy triplet states. It is then shown that the coherent dynamics of the radical pair induces spin polarization on the nearby third spin in the presence of a magnetic field. The spin polarization transfer depends on the difference between Zeeman frequencies, the singlet and triplet recombination rates, and on the exchange and dipole-dipole interactions between the different spins. In particular, the sign of the polarization depends on the exchange coupling between radical pair spins and also on the difference between singlet and triplet recombination rate constants.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This image illustrates the overall Hubble Space Telescope (HST) configuration. The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is approximately the size of a railroad car, with two cylinders joined together and wrapped in a silvery reflective heat shield blanket. Wing-like solar arrays extend horizontally from each side of these cylinders, and dish-shaped anternas extend above and below the body of the telescope. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  15. Propulsive performance of unsteady tandem hydrofoils in a side-by-side configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Peter A.; Quinn, Daniel B.; Boschitsch, Birgitt M.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-04-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented on two identical bio-inspired hydrofoils oscillating in a side-by-side configuration. The time-averaged thrust production and power input to the fluid are found to depend on both the oscillation phase differential and the transverse spacing between the foils. For in-phase oscillations, the foils exhibit an enhanced propulsive efficiency at the cost of a reduction in thrust. For out-of-phase oscillations, the foils exhibit enhanced thrust with no observable change in the propulsive efficiency. For oscillations at intermediate phase differentials, one of the foils experiences a thrust and efficiency enhancement while the other experiences a reduction in thrust and efficiency. Flow visualizations reveal how the wake interactions lead to the variations in propulsive performance. Vortices shed into the wake from the tandem foils form vortex pairs rather than vortex streets. For in-phase oscillation, the vortex pairs induce a momentum jet that angles towards the centerplane between the foils, while out-of-phase oscillations produce vortex pairs that angle away from the centerplane between the foils.

  16. Backside configured surface plasmonic enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun; Vaillancourt, Jarrod

    2014-03-31

    In this work, we fabricated, measured and compared the quantum dots infrared photodetector enhancement by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures. The backside configured plasmonic structure can provide much higher device performance enhancement. Furthermore, the excitation of the surface plasmonic waves by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures was analyzed. Detailed simulation results of the electric field at different wavelength from top illumination and backside illumination were provided. The stronger electric field from the backside illumination attributed to the higher enhancement.

  17. Topological spectrum of classical configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Nettel, Francisco; Quevedo, Hernando

    2007-11-14

    For any classical field configuration or mechanical system with a finite number of degrees of freedom we introduce the concept of topological spectrum. It is based upon the assumption that for any classical configuration there exists a principle fiber bundle that contains all the physical and geometric information of the configuration. The topological spectrum follows from the investigation of the corresponding topological invariants. Examples are given which illustrate the procedure and the significance of the topological spectrum as a discretization relationship among the parameters that determine the physical meaning of classical configurations.

  18. Hard Photodisintegration of a Proton Pair

    DOE PAGES

    Pomerantz, Ishay; Bubis, Nathaniel; Allada, Kalyan; Beck, Arie; Beck, Sara; Berman, Barry L.; Boeglin, Werner U.; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Chirapatpimol, Khem; et al

    2010-01-08

    We present the first study of high energy photodisintegration of proton-pairs through the gamma + 3He -> p+p+n channel. Photon energies from 0.8 to 4.7 GeV were used in kinematics corresponding to a proton pair with high relative momentum and a neutron nearly at rest. An s^{-11} scaling of the cross section was observed, as predicted by the constituent counting rule. The onset of the scaling is at a higher energy and the cross section is significantly lower then for pn pair photodisintegration. For photon energies below the scaling region, the scaled cross section was found to present a strongmore » energy-dependent structure not observed in deuteron photodisintegration.« less

  19. Hadronic production of massive lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1982-12-01

    A review is presented of recent experimental and theoretical progress in studies of the production of massive lepton pairs in hadronic collisions. I begin with the classical Drell-Yan annihilation model and its predictions. Subsequently, I discuss deviations from scaling, the status of the proofs of factorization in the parton model, higher-order terms in the perturbative QCD expansion, the discrepancy between measured and predicted yields (K factor), high-twist terms, soft gluon effects, transverse-momentum distributions, implications for weak vector boson (W/sup + -/ and Z/sup 0/) yields and production properties, nuclear A dependence effects, correlations of the lepton pair with hadrons in the final state, and angular distributions in the lepton-pair rest frame.

  20. Reaction of the Co(II)-substrate radical pair catalytic intermediate in coenzyme B12-dependent ethanolamine ammonia-lyase in frozen aqueous solution from 190 to 217 K.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Warncke, Kurt

    2008-12-15

    The decay kinetics of the aminoethanol-generated Co(II)-substrate radical pair catalytic intermediate in ethanolamine ammonia-lyase from Salmonella typhimurium have been measured on timescales of <10(5) s in frozen aqueous solution from 190 to 217 K. X-band continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the disordered samples has been used to continuously monitor the full radical pair EPR spectrum during progress of the decay after temperature step reaction initiation. The decay to a diamagnetic state is complete and no paramagnetic intermediate states are detected. The decay exhibits three kinetic regimes in the measured temperature range, as follows. i), Low temperature range, 190 < or = T < or = 207 K: the decay is biexponential with constant fast (0.57 +/- 0.04) and slow (0.43 +/- 0.04) phase amplitudes. ii), Transition temperature range, 207 < T < 214 K: the amplitude of the slow phase decreases to zero with a compensatory rise in the fast phase amplitude, with increasing temperature. iii), High temperature range, T > or = 214 K: the decay is monoexponential. The observed first-order rate constants for the monoexponential (k(obs,m)) and the fast phase of the biexponential decay (k(obs,f)) adhere to the same linear relation on an lnk versus T(-1) (Arrhenius) plot. Thus, k(obs,m) and k(obs,f) correspond to the same apparent Arrhenius prefactor and activation energy (logA(app,f) (s(-1)) = 13.0, E(a,app,f) = 15.0 kcal/mol), and therefore, a common decay mechanism. We propose that k(obs,m) and k(obs,f) represent the native, forward reaction of the substrate through the radical rearrangement step. The slow phase rate constant (k(obs,s)) for 190 < or = T < or = 207 K obeys a different linear Arrhenius relation (logA(app,s) (s(-1)) = 13.9, E(a,app,s) = 16.6 kcal/mol). In the transition temperature range, k(obs,s) displays a super-Arrhenius increase with increasing temperature. The change in E(a,app,s) with temperature and the narrow range over

  1. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  2. Prospective very young asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galád, A.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Zizka, J.

    2014-07-01

    Several tens of asteroid pairs can be discerned from the background main-belt asteroids. The majority of them are thought to have formed within only the last few 10^6 yr. The youngest recognized pairs have formed more than ≈ 10 kyr ago. As some details of pair formation are still not understood well, the study of young pairs is of great importance. It is mainly because the conditions at the time of the pair formation could be deduced much more reliably for young pairs. For example, space weathering on the surfaces of the components, or changes in their rotational properties (in spin rates, tumbling, coordinates of rotational pole) could be negligible since the formation of young pairs. Also, possible strong perturbations by main-belt bodies on pair formation can be reliably studied only for extremely young pairs. Some pairs can quickly blend in with the background asteroids, so even the frequency of asteroid pair formation could be determined more reliably based on young pairs (though only after a statistically significant sample is at disposal). In our regular search for young pairs in the growing asteroid database, only multiopposition asteroids with very similar orbital and proper elements are investigated. Every pair component is represented by a number of clones within orbital uncertainties and drifting in semimajor axis due to the Yarkovsky effect. We found that, if the previously unrecognized pairs (87887) 2000 SS_{286} - 2002 AT_{49} and (355258) 2007 LY_{4} - 2013AF_{40} formed at the recent very close approach of their components, they could become the youngest known pairs. In both cases, the relative encounter velocities of the components were only ˜ 0.1 m s^{-1}. However, the minimum distances between some clones are too large and a few clones of the latter pair did not encounter recently (within ≈ 10 kyr). The age of some prospective young pairs cannot be determined reliably without improved orbital properties (e.g., the second component of a pair

  3. Electron Pairing, Repulsion, and Correlation: A Simplistic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Lars-Fride; Kloo, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The interplay between a nucleus and an electron pair is explained through a basic application of an electrostatic and balanced model to determine the correlated and repulsive movements of the electron pair. The stable correlation depends on the positive charge produced by the combined force, which in turn establishes a negative potential energy.

  4. Multiple origins of asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotationally fissioned asteroids produce unbound asteroid pairs that have very similar heliocentric orbits. Backward integration of their current heliocentric orbits provides an age of closest proximity that can be used to date the rotational fission event. Most asteroid pairs follow a predicted theoretical relationship between the primary spin period and the mass ratio of the two pair members that is a direct consequence of the YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis. If the progenitor asteroid has strength, asteroid pairs may have higher mass ratios or faster rotating primaries. However, the process of secondary fission leaves the originally predicted trend unaltered. We also describe the characteristics of pair members produced by four alternative routes from a rotational fission event to an asteroid pair. Unlike direct formation from the event itself, the age of closest proximity of these pairs cannot generally be used to date the rotational fission event since considerable time may have passed.

  5. Space Station reference configuration update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Tom F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The reference configuration of the NASA Space Station as of November 1985 is presented in a series of diagrams, drawings, graphs, and tables. The configurations for components to be contributed by ESA, Canada, and Japan are included. Brief captions are provided, along with answers to questions raised at the conference.

  6. Primordial nuggets survival and QCD pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugones, G.; Horvath, J. E.

    2004-03-01

    We reexamine the problem of boiling and surface evaporation of quark nuggets in the cosmological quark-hadron transition with the explicit consideration of pairing between quarks in a color-flavor locked state. Assuming that primordial quark nuggets are actually formed, we analyze the consequences of pairing on the rates of boiling and surface evaporation in order to determine whether they could have survived with substantial mass. We find a substantial quenching of the evaporation+boiling processes, which suggests the survival of primordial nuggets for the currently considered range of the pairing gap Δ. Boiling is shown to depend on the competition of an increased stability window and the suppression of the rate, and is not likely to dominate the destruction of the nuggets. If surface evaporation dominates, the fate of the nuggets depends on the features of the initial mass spectrum of the nuggets, their evaporation rate, and the value of the pairing gap, as shown and discussed in the text.

  7. Stereo Pair, Honolulu, Oahu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Honolulu, on the island of Oahu, is a large and growing urban area. This stereoscopic image pair, combining a Landsat image with topography measured by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), shows how topography controls the urban pattern. This color image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    Features of interest in this scene include Diamond Head (an extinct volcano near the bottom of the image), Waikiki Beach (just above Diamond Head), the Punchbowl National Cemetary (another extinct volcano, near the image center), downtown Honolulu and Honolulu harbor (image left-center), and offshore reef patterns. The slopes of the Koolau mountain range are seen in the right half of the image. Clouds commonly hang above ridges and peaks of the Hawaiian Islands, but in this synthesized stereo rendition appear draped directly on the mountains. The clouds are actually about 1000 meters (3300 feet) above sea level.

    This stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image collected at the same time as the SRTM flight. The topography data were used to create two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the

  8. Parametric analysis of ATT configurations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a Lockheed parametric analysis of the performance, environmental factors, and economics of an advanced commercial transport envisioned for operation in the post-1985 time period. The design parameters investigated include cruise speeds from Mach 0.85 to Mach 1.0, passenger capacities from 200 to 500, ranges of 2800 to 5500 nautical miles, and noise level criteria. NASA high performance configurations and alternate configurations are operated over domestic and international route structures. Indirect and direct costs and return on investment are determined for approximately 40 candidate aircraft configurations. The candidate configurations are input to an aircraft sizing and performance program which includes a subroutine for noise criteria. Comparisons are made between preferred configurations on the basis of maximum return on investment as a function of payload, range, and design cruise speed.

  9. Radiant-interchange Configuration Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D C :; Morgan, W R

    1952-01-01

    A study is presented of the geometric configuration factors required for computing radiant heat transfer between opaque surfaces separated by a nonabsorbing medium and various methods of determining the configuration factors are discussed. Configuration-factor solutions available in the literature have been checked and the more complicated equations are presented as families of curves. Cases for point, line, and finite-area sources are worked out over a wide range of geometric proportions. These cases include several new configurations involving rectangles, triangles, and cylinders of finite length which are integrated and tabulated. An analysis is presented, in which configuration factors are employed of the radiant heat transfer to the rotor blades of a typical gas turbine under different conditions of temperature and pressure. (author)

  10. Stereo Pair, Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This stereoscopic image pair is a perspective view that shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north toward the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada Flintridge are also shown. The cluster of large buildings left of center, at the base of the mountains, is the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Data shown in this image can be used to predict both how wildfires spread over the terrain and how mudflows are channeled down the canyons.

    The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation, U. S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provided the image detail, and the Landsat Thematic Mapper provided the color. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data and the aerial photography. The image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. Dynamics of a vortex pair in radial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikova, E. Yu. Kontorovich, V. M. Reznik, G. M.

    2007-10-15

    The problem of vortex pair motion in two-dimensional radial flow is solved. Under certain conditions for flow parameters, the vortex pair can reverse its motion within a bounded region. The vortex-pair translational velocity decreases or increases after passing through the source/sink region, depending on whether the flow is diverging or converging, respectively. The rotational motion of a corotating vortex pair in a quiescent environment transforms into motion along a logarithmic spiral in radial flow. The problem may have applications in astrophysics and geophysics.

  12. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence. PMID:17730606

  13. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence.

  14. Viscous Design of TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Steven E.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Campbell, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    The goal in this effort is to redesign the baseline TCA configuration for improved performance at both supersonic and transonic cruise. Viscous analyses are conducted with OVERFLOW, a Navier-Stokes code for overset grids, using PEGSUS to compute the interpolations between overset grids. Viscous designs are conducted with OVERDISC, a script which couples OVERFLOW with the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) inverse design method. The successful execution of any computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based aerodynamic design method for complex configurations requires an efficient method for regenerating the computational grids to account for modifications to the configuration shape. The first section of this presentation deals with the automated regridding procedure used to generate overset grids for the fuselage/wing/diverter/nacelle configurations analysed in this effort. The second section outlines the procedures utilized to conduct OVERDISC inverse designs. The third section briefly covers the work conducted by Dick Campbell, in which a dual-point design at Mach 2.4 and 0.9 was attempted using OVERDISC; the initial configuration from which this design effort was started is an early version of the optimized shape for the TCA configuration developed by the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (BCAG), which eventually evolved into the NCV design. The final section presents results from application of the Natural Flow Wing design philosophy to the TCA configuration.

  15. Spectra and symmetry in nuclear pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A. B.; Jesus, J. H. de; Pehlivan, Y.

    2007-06-15

    We apply the algebraic Bethe ansatz technique to the nuclear pairing problem with orbit dependent coupling constants and degenerate single particle energy levels. We find the exact energies and eigenstates. We show that for a given shell, there are degeneracies between the states corresponding to less than and more than half full shell. We also provide a technique to solve the equations of Bethe ansatz.

  16. Multiple cell configuration electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Anthony; Bressers, Scott; Priya, Shashank

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports the design of an electromagnetic vibration energy harvester that doubles the magnitude of output power generated by the prior four-bar magnet configuration. This enhancement was achieved with minor increase in volume by 23% and mass by 30%. The new 'double cell' design utilizes an additional pair of magnets to create a secondary air gap, or cell, for a second coil to vibrate within. To further reduce the dimensions of the device, two coils were attached to one common cantilever beam. These unique features lead to improvements of 66% in output power per unit volume (power density) and 27% increase in output power per unit volume and mass (specific power density), from 0.1 to 0.17 mW cm-3 and 0.41 to 0.51 mW cm-3 kg-1 respectively. Using the ANSYS multiphysics analysis, it was determined that for the double cell harvester, adding one additional pair of magnets created a small magnetic gradient between air gaps of 0.001 T which is insignificant in terms of electromagnetic damping. An analytical model was developed to optimize the magnitude of transformation factor and magnetic field gradient within the gap.

  17. Visual processing of configuration-dependent spatial characteristics of shapes and patterns. A model useful in the study of the role of the departure from circularity or dispersion of shapes in human visual perception.

    PubMed

    Bonciocat, C A; Grosu, G; Ghiţă, S

    1997-01-01

    In this work a theoretical model was used in combination with testings on normal subjects to get more insight in the role of the departure from circularity or dispersion of the shapes in visual perception. The model was inspired by the observation that the intensity of the effect of a given level of contrast of a shape usually increases, for the same area, with the shape being better concentrated around a center. The model introduces as a measurable characteristic the degree of concentration or dispersion of a shape with respect to a center. The measure was based on the maximum of the convolution integral of the characteristic function of the shape with the weighting function 1/2 pi r, r being the distance between the point of convolution and the surface element to be integrated. A program for the calculation of the degree of concentration of figures and other related processing operations was developed in Turbo Pascal language on a 486 PC. The program included the possibility to generate various figures and to operate on them various transformations such as strangulation, fragmentation with separation of fragments. The model introduces a center of the figure, the point best surrounded by the whole figure, with a geometric and visual significance, as resulting from the good concordance between its calculated and perceived positioning in different relatively simple shapes. In symmetrical compact figures subjected to a central separation or narrowing two centres appear entering the two resulting nuclear parts; a good concordance between model and perception was again observed in this transition to two centres and their subsequent positions in the two nuclear parts. In accord to model prediction, testings showed a very pronounced dependence of the summation efficiency over a contrasting area on the degree of dispersion of the area. This is reflected in the drastic decrease upon figure dispersion of the intensity with which a given brightness or colour contrast is

  18. Device configuration-management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowell, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Chamber System, a major component of the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility, contains several hundred devices which report status to the Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System for control and monitoring purposes. To manage the large number of diversity of devices represented, a device configuration management system was required and developed. Key components of this software tool include the MFTF Data Base; a configuration editor; and a tree structure defining the relationships between the subsystem devices. This paper will describe how the configuration system easily accomodates recognizing new devices, restructuring existing devices, and modifying device profile information.

  19. Pairs of promoter pairs in a web of transcription.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-30

    A new analysis has characterized a fundamental building block of complex transcribed loci. Constellations of core promoters can generally be reduced to pairs of divergent transcription units, where the distance between the pairs of transcription units correlates with constraints on genomic context, which in turn contribute to transcript fate. PMID:27573684

  20. Pairs of promoter pairs in a web of transcription.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-30

    A new analysis has characterized a fundamental building block of complex transcribed loci. Constellations of core promoters can generally be reduced to pairs of divergent transcription units, where the distance between the pairs of transcription units correlates with constraints on genomic context, which in turn contribute to transcript fate.

  1. Conveniently assembled multiple-electrode-pair CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lihua; Li, Xiangyen; He, Anzhi

    2000-04-01

    A conveniently assembled multiple-electrode-pair (MEP) transversely excited amplify (TEA) CO2 laser is introduced in this paper. The laser is described from the view of device configuration, power supply, control circuit, and etc. The laser output is variable from single pulse to double pulse and multiple pulse with different assembly. We adopt a new alignment method for cavity. The pulse time interval given by control system is continuously adjustable from 0 to 150 microseconds. Experiments prove that the pulse series property is stable and that the pulse parameters are perfect. The conveniently assembled laser lay a foundation for the industry application of multiple-electrode-pair CO2 laser.

  2. Configurational subdiffusion of peptides: A network study

    SciTech Connect

    Neusius, Thomas; Diadone, Isabella; Sokolov, Igor; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of linear peptides reveals configurational subdiffusion at equilibrium extending from 10-12 to 10-8 s. Rouse chain and continuous-time random walk models of the subdiffusion are critically discussed. Network approaches to analyzing MD simulations are shown to reproduce the time dependence of the subdiffusive mean squared displacement, which is found to arise from the fractal-like geometry of the accessible volume in the configuration space. Convergence properties of the simulation pertaining to the subdiffusive dynamics are characterized and the effect on the subdiffusive properties of representing the solvent explicitly or implicitly is compared. Non-Markovianity and other factors limiting the range of applicability of the network models are examined.

  3. ATLAS software configuration and build tool optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybkin, Grigory; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ATLAS software code base is over 6 million lines organised in about 2000 packages. It makes use of some 100 external software packages, is developed by more than 400 developers and used by more than 2500 physicists from over 200 universities and laboratories in 6 continents. To meet the challenge of configuration and building of this software, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) is used. CMT expects each package to describe its build targets, build and environment setup parameters, dependencies on other packages in a text file called requirements, and each project (group of packages) to describe its policies and dependencies on other projects in a text project file. Based on the effective set of configuration parameters read from the requirements files of dependent packages and project files, CMT commands build the packages, generate the environment for their use, or query the packages. The main focus was on build time performance that was optimised within several approaches: reduction of the number of reads of requirements files that are now read once per package by a CMT build command that generates cached requirements files for subsequent CMT build commands; introduction of more fine-grained build parallelism at package task level, i.e., dependent applications and libraries are compiled in parallel; code optimisation of CMT commands used for build; introduction of package level build parallelism, i. e., parallelise the build of independent packages. By default, CMT launches NUMBER-OF-PROCESSORS build commands in parallel. The other focus was on CMT commands optimisation in general that made them approximately 2 times faster. CMT can generate a cached requirements file for the environment setup command, which is especially useful for deployment on distributed file systems like AFS or CERN VMFS. The use of parallelism, caching and code optimisation significantly-by several times-reduced software build time, environment setup time, increased the efficiency of

  4. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.; Farrell, T.; Goodwin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  5. System Size and Energy Dependence of Jet-Induced Hadron Pair Correlation Shapes in Cu + Cu and Au + Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 and 62.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-06-01

    We present azimuthal angle correlations of intermediate transverse momentum (1-4 GeV/c) hadrons from dijets in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV. The away-side dijet induced azimuthal correlation is broadened, non-Gaussian, and peaked away from {Delta}{phi}={pi} in central and semicentral collisions in all the systems. The broadening and peak location are found to depend upon the number of participants in the collision, but not on the collision energy or beam nuclei. These results are consistent with sound or shock wave models, but pose challenges to Cherenkov gluon radiation models.

  6. Context based configuration management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Yuri O. (Inventor); Gurram, Mohana M. (Inventor); Maluf, David A. (Inventor); Mederos, Luis A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based system for configuring and displaying information on changes in, and present status of, a collection of events associated with a project. Classes of icons for decision events, configurations and feedback mechanisms, and time lines (sequential and/or simultaneous) for related events are displayed. Metadata for each icon in each class is displayed by choosing and activating the corresponding icon. Access control (viewing, reading, writing, editing, deleting, etc.) is optionally imposed for metadata and other displayed information.

  7. Space Station reference configuration description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The data generated by the Space Station Program Skunk Works over a period of 4 months which supports the definition of a Space Station reference configuration is documented. The data were generated to meet these objectives: (1) provide a focal point for the definition and assessment of program requirements; (2) establish a basis for estimating program cost; and (3) define a reference configuration in sufficient detail to allow its inclusion in the definition phase Request for Proposal (RFP).

  8. Local configuration measures for categorical spatial data: binary regular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boots, Barry

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the utility of a number of pattern measures for local exploratory analysis of binary spatial data. Based on a review of existing pattern measures in cartography, geography, image analysis, and landscape ecology, two fundamental classes of such measures, termed compositional and configurational, are identified. The paper focuses on configurational measures and it is suggested that as many as five such measures (join counts, patch numbers, patch sizes, patch proximity, and distribution of the classes relative to the focal cell of the window) are required to differentiate between all possible local categorical maps. This suggestion is explored by examining aspects of the statistical behaviour (probability distributions and correlations between extreme values of pairs of measures) of a set of 12 configurational measures. Their use is also demonstrated by means of an empirical example.

  9. A neurocomputational account of the face configural effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaokun; Biederman, Irving; Shah, Manan P

    2014-01-01

    A striking phenomenon in face perception is the configural effect in which a difference in a single part appears more distinct in the context of a face than it does by itself. The face context would be expected to increase search complexity, rendering discrimination more--not less--difficult. Remarkably, there has never been a biologically plausible explanation of this fundamental signature of face recognition.We show that the configural effect can be simply derived from a model composed of overlapping receptive fields (RFs) characteristic of early cortical simple-cell tuning but also present in face-selective areas. Because of the overlap in RFs, the difference in a single part is not only represented in the RFs centered on it but also propagated to larger RFs centered on distant parts of the face. Dissimilarity values computed from the model between pairs of faces and pairs of face parts closely matched the recognition accuracy of human observers who had learned a set of faces composed of composite parts and were tested on wholes (Which is Larry?) and parts (Which is Larry’s nose?). When stimuli were high versus low passed the contributions of different spatial frequency (SF) bands to the configural effect were largely comparable. Therefore, it was the larger RFs rather than the low SFs that accounted for most of the configural effect. The representation explains why, relative to objects, face recognition is so adversely affected by inversion and contrast reversal and why distinctions between similar faces are ineffable. PMID:25009359

  10. Assessment Strategies for Pair Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Jan Hendrik; Mentz, Elsa; Meyer, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    Although pair programming has proved its usefulness in teaching and learning programming skills, it is difficult to assess the individual roles and abilities of students whilst programming in pairs. (Note that within this manuscript, the term assessment refers to evaluating individual student performance.) Assessing only the outcomes of a pair…

  11. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  12. Nuclear pairing reduction due to rotation and blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zeng, J. Y.; Lei, Y. A.

    2011-03-15

    Nuclear pairing gaps of normally deformed and superdeformed nuclei are investigated using the particle-number-conserving (PNC) formalism for the cranked shell model, in which the blocking effects are treated exactly. Both rotational frequency {omega} dependence and seniority (number of unpaired particles) {nu} dependence of the pairing gap {Delta}-tilde are investigated. For the ground-state bands of even-even nuclei, PNC calculations show that, in general, {Delta}-tilde decreases with increasing {omega}, but the {omega} dependence is much weaker than that calculated by the number-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approach. For the multiquasiparticle bands (seniority {nu}>2), the pairing gaps stay almost {omega} independent. As a function of the seniority {nu}, the bandhead pairing gaps {Delta}-tilde({nu},{omega}=0) decrease slowly with increasing {nu}. Even for the highest seniority {nu} bands identified so far, {Delta}-tilde({nu},{omega}=0) remains greater than 70% of {Delta}-tilde({nu}=0,{omega}=0).

  13. Nuclear pairing reduction due to rotation and blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zeng, J. Y.; Lei, Y. A.

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear pairing gaps of normally deformed and superdeformed nuclei are investigated using the particle-number-conserving (PNC) formalism for the cranked shell model, in which the blocking effects are treated exactly. Both rotational frequency ω dependence and seniority (number of unpaired particles) ν dependence of the pairing gap Δ˜ are investigated. For the ground-state bands of even-even nuclei, PNC calculations show that, in general, Δ˜ decreases with increasing ω, but the ω dependence is much weaker than that calculated by the number-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approach. For the multiquasiparticle bands (seniority ν>2), the pairing gaps stay almost ω independent. As a function of the seniority ν, the bandhead pairing gaps Δ˜(ν,ω=0) decrease slowly with increasing ν. Even for the highest seniority ν bands identified so far, Δ˜(ν,ω=0) remains greater than 70% of Δ˜(ν=0,ω=0).

  14. Guanidinium Pairing Facilitates Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Allolio, Christoph; Baxova, Katarina; Vazdar, Mario; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2016-01-14

    Ab initio free energy calculations of guanidinium pairing in aqueous solution confirm the counterintuitive conjecture that the like-charge ion pair is thermodynamically stable. Transferring the guanidinium pair to the inside of a POPC lipid bilayer, like-charge ion pairing is found to occur also inside the membrane defect. It is found to contribute to the nonadditivity of ion transfer, thereby facilitating the presence of ions inside the bilayer. The effect is quantified by free energy decomposition and comparison with ammonium ions, which do not form a stable pair. The presence of two charges inside the center of the bilayer leads to the formation of a pore. Potential consequences for cell penetrating peptides and ion conduction are drawn.

  15. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  16. Regimes of Pulsar Pair Formation and Particle Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.; Zhang, Bing; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the conditions required for the production of electron-positron pairs above a pulsar polar cap (PC) and the influence of pair production on the energetics of the primary particle acceleration. Assuming space-charge limited flow acceleration including the inertial frame-dragging effect, we allow both one-photon and two-photon pair production by either curvature radiation (CR) photons or photons resulting from inverse-Compton scattering of thermal photons from the PC by primary electrons. We find that,, while only the younger pulsars can produce pairs through CR, nearly all known radio pulsars are capable of producing pairs through non-resonant inverse-Compton scatterings. The effect of the neutron star equations of state on the pair death lines is explored. We show that pair production is facilitated in more compact stars and more a massive stars. Therefore accretion of mass by pulsars in binary systems may allow pair production in most of the millisecond purser population. We also find that two-photon pair production may be important in millisecond pursers if their surface temperatures are above approx. or equal to three million degrees K. Pursers that produce pairs through CRT wilt have their primary acceleration limited by the effect of screening of the electric field. In this regime, the high-energy luminosity should follow a L(sub HE) proportional to dot-E(sup 1/2, sub rot) dependence. The acceleration voltage drop in pursers that produce pairs only through inverse-Compton emission will not be limited by electric field screening. In this regime, the high-energy luminosity should follow a L(sub HE) proportional to dot-E(sub rot) dependence. Thus, older pursers will have significantly lower gamma-ray luminosity.

  17. Pairing smoking-cessation services with lung cancer screening: A clinical guideline from the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence and the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Fucito, Lisa M; Czabafy, Sharon; Hendricks, Peter S; Kotsen, Chris; Richardson, Donna; Toll, Benjamin A

    2016-04-15

    Smoking cessation is crucial for reducing cancer risk and premature mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT), and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently approved lung screening as a benefit for patients ages 55 to 77 years who have a 30 pack-year history. The Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT) and the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence (ATTUD) developed the guideline described in this commentary based on an illustrative literature review to present the evidence for smoking-cessation health benefits in this high-risk group and to provide clinical recommendations for integrating evidence-based smoking-cessation treatment with lung cancer screening. Unfortunately, extant data on lung cancer screening participants were scarce at the time this guideline was written. However, in this review, the authors summarize the sufficient evidence on the benefits of smoking cessation and the efficacy of smoking-cessation interventions for smokers ages 55 to 77 years to provide smoking-cessation interventions for smokers who seek lung cancer screening. It is concluded that smokers who present for lung cancer screening should be encouraged to quit smoking at each visit. Access to evidence-based smoking-cessation interventions should be provided to all smokers regardless of scan results, and motivation to quit should not be a necessary precondition for treatment. Follow-up contacts to support smoking-cessation efforts should be arranged for smokers. Evidence-based behavioral strategies should be used at each visit to motivate smokers who are unwilling to try quitting/reducing smoking or to try evidence-based treatments that may lead to eventual cessation.

  18. Pairing smoking-cessation services with lung cancer screening: A clinical guideline from the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence and the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Fucito, Lisa M; Czabafy, Sharon; Hendricks, Peter S; Kotsen, Chris; Richardson, Donna; Toll, Benjamin A

    2016-04-15

    Smoking cessation is crucial for reducing cancer risk and premature mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT), and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently approved lung screening as a benefit for patients ages 55 to 77 years who have a 30 pack-year history. The Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT) and the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence (ATTUD) developed the guideline described in this commentary based on an illustrative literature review to present the evidence for smoking-cessation health benefits in this high-risk group and to provide clinical recommendations for integrating evidence-based smoking-cessation treatment with lung cancer screening. Unfortunately, extant data on lung cancer screening participants were scarce at the time this guideline was written. However, in this review, the authors summarize the sufficient evidence on the benefits of smoking cessation and the efficacy of smoking-cessation interventions for smokers ages 55 to 77 years to provide smoking-cessation interventions for smokers who seek lung cancer screening. It is concluded that smokers who present for lung cancer screening should be encouraged to quit smoking at each visit. Access to evidence-based smoking-cessation interventions should be provided to all smokers regardless of scan results, and motivation to quit should not be a necessary precondition for treatment. Follow-up contacts to support smoking-cessation efforts should be arranged for smokers. Evidence-based behavioral strategies should be used at each visit to motivate smokers who are unwilling to try quitting/reducing smoking or to try evidence-based treatments that may lead to eventual cessation. PMID:26916412

  19. Pairing in half-filled Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Mandal, Ipsita; Chung, Suk Bum; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2014-12-15

    Pairing of composite fermions in half-filled Landau level state is reexamined by solving the BCS gap equation with full frequency dependent current–current interactions. Our results show that there can be a continuous transition from the Halperin–Lee–Read state to a chiral odd angular momentum Cooper pair state for short-range contact interaction. This is at odds with the previously established conclusion of first order pairing transition, in which the low frequency effective interaction was assumed for the entire frequency range. We find that even if the low frequency effective interaction is repulsive, it is compensated by the high frequency regime, which is attractive. We construct the phase diagrams and show that ℓ=1 angular momentum channel is quite different from higher angular momenta ℓ≥3. Remarkably, the full frequency dependent analysis applied to the bilayer Hall system with a total filling fraction ν=1/2 +1/2 is quantitatively changed from the previously established results but not qualitatively.

  20. The coevolution of long-term pair bonds and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Feldman, M W

    2013-05-01

    The evolution of social traits may not only depend on but also change the social structure of the population. In particular, the evolution of pairwise cooperation, such as biparental care, depends on the pair-matching distribution of the population, and the latter often emerges as a collective outcome of individual pair-bonding traits, which are also under selection. Here, we develop an analytical model and individual-based simulations to study the coevolution of long-term pair bonds and cooperation in parental care, where partners play a Snowdrift game in each breeding season. We illustrate that long-term pair bonds may coevolve with cooperation when bonding cost is below a threshold. As long-term pair bonds lead to assortative interactions through pair-matching dynamics, they may promote the prevalence of cooperation. In addition to the pay-off matrix of a single game, the evolutionarily stable equilibrium also depends on bonding cost and accidental divorce rate, and it is determined by a form of balancing selection because the benefit from pair-bond maintenance diminishes as the frequency of cooperators increases. Our findings highlight the importance of ecological factors affecting social bonding cost and stability in understanding the coevolution of social behaviour and social structures, which may lead to the diversity of biological social systems. PMID:23496797

  1. Heterospecific pairing and hybridization between Nasutitermes corniger and N. ephratae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartke, Tamara R.; Rosengaus, Rebeca B.

    2011-09-01

    The sympatric neotropical termites Nasutitermes corniger and Nasutitermes ephratae are clearly distinguishable based on morphology, nest architecture, defensive secretion composition, and molecular markers. However, given the extensive ecological, geographical, and behavioral overlap of these closely related species, the potential for interbreeding may exist. To explore this possibility, heterospecific pairs were formed experimentally to examine courtship and colony-establishment behaviors, and reproductive potential. Courtship and nest construction behavior occurred in heterospecific pairs in a similar manner to that of conspecific pairs. Survival of pairs depended upon the species of the female partner. N. ephratae females paired with N. corniger males produced as many offspring as conspecific pairs. N. corniger females mated to N. ephratae males, however, produced significantly fewer offspring at 60 days post-establishment than the reciprocal cross or conspecific N. ephratae or N. corniger pairs. This was also the only pairing in which any aggression was observed. Heterospecific pairs and groups formed in mate choice mesocosms, suggesting that species recognition between these two termites is not an important aspect of mate choice. Overall, species mismatch tolerance and hybrid offspring viability are high. The present data, together with previous evidence from defensive secretions and isozyme analysis, suggest that hybridization may periodically occur in nature, and that reproductive barriers between these two species may be incomplete. Hybridization could provide a rare but important source of genetic diversity and may ensure mating opportunities for the more abundant sex of alates in each species.

  2. State recovery and lockstep execution restart in a system with multiprocessor pairing

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-01-21

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus. Each selectively paired processor core is includes a transactional execution facility, whereing the system is configured to enable processor rollback to a previous state and reinitialize lockstep execution in order to recover from an incorrect execution when an incorrect execution has been detected by the selective pairing facility.

  3. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  4. Low energy fission: dynamics and scission configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutte, H.; Berger, J.-F.; Gogny, D.; Younes, W.

    2005-11-01

    In the first part of this paper we recall a recent study concerning low energy fission dynamics. Propagation is made by use of the Time Dependent Generator Coordinate Method, where the basis states are taken from self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with the Gogny force. Theoretical fragment mass distributions are presented and compared with the evaluation made by Wahl. In the second part of this paper, new results concerning scission configurations are shown. Deviations of the fission fragment proton numbers from the Unchanged Charge Distribution prescription and fission fragment deformations are discussed.

  5. Configurational temperature profile in confined fluids. I. Atomic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhommelle, Jerome; Evans, Denis J.

    2001-04-01

    Two configurational expressions for the temperature are applied to the calculation of temperature profiles within a confined atomic fluid in a narrow slit pore. The configurational temperatures profiles so obtained are compared to the kinetic temperature, calculated from the equipartition principle, in equilibrium (EMD), and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of planar Poiseuille flow. We show that one of the configurational expressions exhibits a system-size dependence which prevents its application to the determination of high-resolution temperature profiles. The other expression yields good agreement with the kinetic temperature profile in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems.

  6. MAP, MAC, and vortex-rings configurations in the Weinberg-Salam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Rosy; Ng, Ban-Loong; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2015-11-01

    We report on the presence of new axially symmetric monopoles, antimonopoles and vortex-rings solutions of the SU(2)×U(1) Weinberg-Salam model of electromagnetic and weak interactions. When the ϕ-winding number n = 1, and 2, the configurations are monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and monopole-antimonopole chain (MAC) with poles of alternating sign magnetic charge arranged along the z-axis. Vortex-rings start to appear from the MAP and MAC configurations when the winding number n = 3. The MAP configurations possess zero net magnetic charge whereas the MAC configurations possess net magnetic charge of 4 πn / e. In the MAP configurations, the monopole-antimonopole pair is bounded by the Z0 field flux string and there is an electromagnetic current loop encircling it. The monopole and antimonopole possess magnetic charges ± 4πn/e sin2θW respectively. In the MAC configurations there is no string connecting the monopole and the adjacent antimonopole and they possess magnetic charges ± 4 πn/e respectively. The MAC configurations possess infinite total energy and zero magnetic dipole moment whereas the MAP configurations which are actually sphalerons possess finite total energy and magnetic dipole moment. The configurations were investigated for varying values of Higgs self-coupling constant 0 ≤ λ ≤ 40 at Weinberg angle θW = π/4.

  7. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  8. A study of paired necro kidney grafts.

    PubMed

    Lamm, L U

    1979-01-01

    The comparison of the fate of kidney pairs originating from the same donor offers an opportunity to control variability in primary kidney graft survival due to characteristics of the donor. The present study on 1,303 pairs was made possible by combining the information in the Scandiatransplant registry and the EDTA follow-up file. The analysis showed that, contrary to expectation, the main variability in kidney graft survival is not donor dependent but rather due to post-nephrectomy factors. By the present approach it was possible to demonstrate a significant effect of presensitisation, HLA-A,B matching and recipient age. In contrast, transportation, and differences in sex and ABO blood group combinations seem to be of no importance for kidney graft survival.

  9. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K; Persson, Kristin A

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg(2+) → Mg(+)), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI(-) exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg(+). In contrast, BH4(-) and BF4(-) are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  10. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohuui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K.; Persson, Kristin A.

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg2+ -> Mg+), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg+. In contrast, BH4 and BF4 are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  11. Topologies of velocity-field stagnation points generated by a single pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetic experiments.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, J M García; Vassilicos, J C; Rossi, L

    2014-10-01

    The velocity fields generated by a static pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetically forced flows are analyzed for different magnet attitudes, ionic currents, and brine depths. A wide range of laminar velocity fields is obtained despite the forcing simplicity. The velocity fields are classified according to their temporal mean flow topology, which strongly depends on the forcing geometry but barely on its strength, even through the bifurcation to unsteady regimes. The mean flow topology possesses a major influence on the critical Reynolds number Rec under which the steady velocity fields remain stable. The qualitative comparison of the dependence of Rec on the topology is in agreement with previous works. The unsteady configurations evidence the advection of smaller flow structures by the largest scales, commonly known as "sweeping."

  12. Topologies of velocity-field stagnation points generated by a single pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, J. M. García; Vassilicos, J. C.; Rossi, L.

    2014-10-01

    The velocity fields generated by a static pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetically forced flows are analyzed for different magnet attitudes, ionic currents, and brine depths. A wide range of laminar velocity fields is obtained despite the forcing simplicity. The velocity fields are classified according to their temporal mean flow topology, which strongly depends on the forcing geometry but barely on its strength, even through the bifurcation to unsteady regimes. The mean flow topology possesses a major influence on the critical Reynolds numberRec under which the steady velocity fields remain stable. The qualitative comparison of the dependence of Rec on the topology is in agreement with previous works. The unsteady configurations evidence the advection of smaller flow structures by the largest scales, commonly known as "sweeping."

  13. Spatial Distribution of Pair Production Over the Pulsar Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Parfrey, Kyle

    2016-10-01

    Using an analytic, axisymmetric approach that includes general relativity, coupled to a condition for pair production deduced from simulations, we derive general results about the spatial distribution of pair-producing field lines over the pulsar polar cap. In particular, we show that pair production on magnetic field lines operates over only a fraction of the polar cap for an aligned rotator for general magnetic field configurations, assuming the magnetic field varies spatially on a scale that is larger than the size of the polar cap. We compare our result to force-free simulations of a pulsar with a dipole surface field and find excellent agreement. Our work has implications for first-principles simulations of pulsar magnetospheres and for explaining observations of pulsed radio and high-energy emission.

  14. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  15. Configuration of the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. W.; Dessler, A. J.; Michel, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    A model is presented in which the Jovian magnetosphere is severely inflated by the centrifugal stress of partially corotating plasma streaming out along field lines from the ionosphere. The model is consistent with observations reported from the Pioneer 10 encounter, including the disk-like field configuration, the diurnal modulation of trapped-particle fluxes, and the inferred departure from rigid corotation in the outer magnetosphere. The field configuration is closed on the dayside, but on the nightside the plasma can force the magnetic field open to form a planetary wind flowing in the antisolar direction.

  16. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  17. Nonperturbative signatures in pair production for general elliptic polarization fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. L.; Lu, D.; Xie, B. S.; Shen, B. F.; Fu, L. B.; Liu, J.

    2015-06-01

    The momentum signatures in nonperturbative multiphoton pair production for general elliptic polarization electric fields are investigated by employing the real-time Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism. For a linearly polarized electric field we find that the positions of the nodes in momentum spectra of created pairs depend only on the electric-field frequency. The polarization of external fields could not only change the node structures or even make the nodes disappear but also change the thresholds of pair production. The momentum signatures associated to the node positions in which the even-number photon pair creation process is forbidden could be used to distinguish the orbital angular momentum of created pairs on the momentum spectra. These distinguishable momentum signatures could be relevant for providing the output information of created particles and also the input information of ultrashort laser pulses.

  18. Dynamical interactions of galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    1990-01-01

    Here the author briefly reviews the dynamics of sinking satellites and the effect of companions on elliptical galaxies. The author then discusses recent work on interacting disk systems, and finally focuses on a favorite interacting pair, NGC 5194/5195.

  19. Responses of neurons in the medial temporal lobe during encoding and recognition of face-scene pairs.

    PubMed

    Viskontas, Indre V; Knowlton, Barbara J; Fried, Itzhak

    2016-09-01

    Associations between co-occurring stimuli are formed in the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Here, we recorded from 508 single and multi-units in the MTL while participants learned and retrieved associations between unfamiliar faces and unfamiliar scenes. Participant's memories for the face-scene pairs were later tested using cued recall and recognition tests. The results show that neurons in the parahippocampal cortex are most likely to respond with changes from baseline firing to these stimuli during both encoding and recognition, and this region showed the greatest proportion of cells showing differential responses depending on the phase of the task. Furthermore, we found that cells in the parahippocampal cortex that responded during both encoding and recognition were more likely to show decreases from baseline firing than cells that were only recruited during recognition, which were more likely to show increases in firing. Since all stimuli shown during recognition were familiar to the patients, these findings suggest that with familiarity, cell responses become more sharply tuned. No neurons in this region, however, were found to be affected by recombining face/scene pairs. Neurons in other MTL regions, particularly the hippocampus, were sensitive to stimulus configurations. Thus, the results support the idea that neurons in the parahippocampal cortex code for features of stimuli and neurons in the hippocampus are more likely to represent their specific configurations.

  20. Antenna configurations provide polarization diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, C. N.

    1966-01-01

    Compact back-to-back trapezoidal tooth log-periodic /TTLP/ antenna with frequency-independent characteristics is formed by reducing the angle between the two elements of a basic TTLP to zero. The back-to-back antenna, arranged in various configurations, provides monopulse operations in one or two planes and in various polarizations.

  1. Configural Processing and Face Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKone, Elinor

    2008-01-01

    Configural/holistic processing, a key property of face recognition, has previously been examined only for front views of faces. Here, 6 experiments tested front (0 degree), three-quarter (45 degree), and profile views (90 degree), using composite and peripheral inversion tasks. Results showed an overall disadvantage in identifying profiles. This…

  2. A Communication Configuration of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Jim D.

    A study focused on the way that image, knowledge, behavioral intent, and communicative responsiveness are configured for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The classic model of the adoption process expects that knowledge about a subject will lead to a favorable evaluation of it, which in turn will lead to a decision to act. But the…

  3. NCCDS configuration management process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Kathy

    1993-01-01

    By concentrating on defining and improving specific Configuration Management (CM) functions, processes, procedures, personnel selection/development, and tools, internal and external customers received improved CM services. Job performance within the section increased in both satisfaction and output. Participation in achieving major improvements has led to the delivery of consistent quality CM products as well as significant decreases in every measured CM metrics category.

  4. Inversion and Configuration of Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, James C.; Searcy, Jean

    1993-01-01

    The Thatcher illusion, in which the inverted mouth and eyes of a face appear grotesque when upright, but not when the whole configuration is inverted, was studied in 3 experiments involving 89 undergraduates. Results suggest that the illusion represents a disruption of encoding of holistic information when faces are inverted. (SLD)

  5. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  6. ON THE POLAR CAP CASCADE PAIR MULTIPLICITY OF YOUNG PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Timokhin, A. N.; Harding, A. K.

    2015-09-10

    We study the efficiency of pair production in polar caps of young pulsars under a variety of conditions to estimate the maximum possible multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres. We develop a semi-analytic model for calculation of cascade multiplicity which allows efficient exploration of the parameter space and corroborate it with direct numerical simulations. Pair creation processes are considered separately from particle acceleration in order to assess different factors affecting cascade efficiency, with acceleration of primary particles described by recent self-consistent non-stationary model of pair cascades. We argue that the most efficient cascades operate in the curvature radiation/synchrotron regime, the maximum multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres is ∼few × 10{sup 5}. The multiplicity of pair plasma in magnetospheres of young energetic pulsars weakly depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of magnetic field lines and has a stronger dependence on pulsar inclination angle. This result questions assumptions about very high pair plasma multiplicity in theories of pulsar wind nebulae.

  7. Superconductivity: The persistence of pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, Alex; Littlewood, Peter

    2015-05-20

    Superconductivity stems from a weak attraction between electrons that causes them to form bound pairs and behave much like bosons. These so-called Cooper pairs are phase coherent, which leads to the astonishing properties of zero electrical resistance and magnetic flux expulsion typical of superconducting materials. This coherent state may be qualitatively understood within the Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) model, which predicts that a gas of interacting bosons will become unstable below a critical temperature and condense into a phase of matter with a macroscopic, coherent population in the lowest energy state, as happens in 4He or cold atomic gases. The successful theory proposed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) predicts that at the superconducting transition temperature Tc, electrons simultaneously form pairs and condense, with no sign of pairing above Tc. Theorists have long surmised that the BCS and BEC models are opposite limits of a single theory and that strong interactions or low density can, in principle, drive the system to a paired state at a temperature Tpair higher than Tc, making the transition to the superconducting state BEC-like (Fig. 1). Yet most superconductors to date are reasonably well described by BCS theory or its extensions, and there has been scant evidence in electronic materials for the existence of pairing independent of the full superconducting state (though an active debate rages over the cuprate superconductors). Writing in Nature, Jeremy Levy and colleagues have now used ingenious nanostructured devices to provide evidence for electron pairing1. Perhaps surprisingly, the material they have studied is a venerable, yet enigmatic, low-temperature superconductor, SrTiO3.

  8. Cooper pairs spintronics in triplet spin valves.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F; Citro, R

    2013-11-27

    We study a spin valve with a triplet superconductor spacer intercalated between two ferromagnets with noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the magnetoresistance of the triplet spin valve depends on the relative orientations of the d vector, characterizing the superconducting order parameter, and the magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers. For devices characterized by a long superconductor, the effects of a polarized current sustained by Cooper pairs only are observed. In this regime, a supermagnetoresistance effect emerges, and the chiral symmetry of the order parameter of the superconducting spacer is easily recognized. Our findings open new perspectives in designing spintronics devices based on the cooperation of ferromagnetic and triplet correlations.

  9. Cooper pairs spintronics in triplet spin valves.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F; Citro, R

    2013-11-27

    We study a spin valve with a triplet superconductor spacer intercalated between two ferromagnets with noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the magnetoresistance of the triplet spin valve depends on the relative orientations of the d vector, characterizing the superconducting order parameter, and the magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers. For devices characterized by a long superconductor, the effects of a polarized current sustained by Cooper pairs only are observed. In this regime, a supermagnetoresistance effect emerges, and the chiral symmetry of the order parameter of the superconducting spacer is easily recognized. Our findings open new perspectives in designing spintronics devices based on the cooperation of ferromagnetic and triplet correlations. PMID:24329463

  10. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use a recently developed model of relativistic meson-exchange currents to compute the neutron-proton and proton-proton yields in (νμ ,μ-) scattering from 12C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross sections with the relativistic Fermi gas model for different kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. In the case of charge-changing neutrino scattering the 2p-2h cross section of proton-proton emission (i.e., np in the initial state) is much larger than for neutron-proton emission (i.e., two neutrons in the initial state) by a (ω , q)-dependent factor. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the Δ isobar current. We also analyze other effects including exchange contributions and the effect of the axial and vector currents.

  11. Using the GVB Ansatz to develop ensemble DFT method for describing multiple strongly correlated electron pairs.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Martínez, Todd J; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-08-21

    Ensemble density functional theory (DFT) furnishes a rigorous theoretical framework for describing the non-dynamic electron correlation arising from (near) degeneracy of several electronic configurations. Ensemble DFT naturally leads to fractional occupation numbers (FONs) for several Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals, which thereby become variational parameters of the methodology. The currently available implementation of ensemble DFT in the form of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method was originally designed for systems with only two fractionally occupied KS orbitals, which was sufficient to accurately describe dissociation of a single chemical bond or the singlet ground state of biradicaloid species. To extend applicability of the method to systems with several dissociating bonds or to polyradical species, more fractionally occupied orbitals must be included in the ensemble description. Here we investigate a possibility of developing the extended REKS methodology with the help of the generalized valence bond (GVB) wavefunction theory. The use of GVB enables one to derive a simple and physically transparent energy expression depending explicitly on the FONs of several KS orbitals. In this way, a version of the REKS method with four electrons in four fractionally occupied orbitals is derived and its accuracy in the calculation of various types of strongly correlated molecules is investigated. We propose a possible scheme to ameliorate the partial size-inconsistency that results from perfect spin-pairing. We conjecture that perfect pairing natural orbital (NO) functionals of reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT) should also display partial size-inconsistency. PMID:26947515

  12. At the Crossroads: Does the Configuration of Roadside Vegetation Affect Woodland Bird Communities in Rural Landscapes?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Mark; Nimmo, Dale; Bennett, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    In agricultural regions worldwide, linear networks of vegetation such as hedges, fencerows and live fences provide habitat for plant and animal species in heavily modified landscapes. In Australia, networks of remnant native vegetation along roadsides are a distinctive feature of many rural landscapes. Here, we investigated the richness and composition of woodland-dependent bird communities in networks of eucalypt woodland vegetation along roadsides, in an agricultural region in which >80% of native woodland and forest vegetation has been cleared. We stratified sites in a) cross sections and b) linear strips of roadside vegetation, to test the influence on woodland birds of site location and configuration in the linear network (the ‘intersection effect’). We also examined the influence of tree size at the site, the amount of wooded vegetation surrounding the site, and the abundance of an aggressive native species, the noisy miner Manorina melanocephala. Birds were surveyed at 26 pairs of sites (cross section or linear strip) on four occasions. A total of 66 species was recorded, including 35 woodland species. The richness of woodland bird species was influenced by site configuration, with more species present at cross sections, particularly those with larger trees (>30 cm diameter). However, the strongest influence on species richness was the relative abundance of the noisy miner. The richness of woodland birds at sites where noisy miners were abundant was ~20% of that where miners were absent. These results recognise the value of networks of roadside vegetation as habitat for woodland birds in depleted agricultural landscapes; but highlight that this value is not realised for much of this vast vegetation network because of the dominance of the noisy miner. Nevertheless, roadside vegetation is particularly important where the configuration of networks create nodes that facilitate movement. Globally, the protection, conservation and restoration of such linear

  13. At the Crossroads: Does the Configuration of Roadside Vegetation Affect Woodland Bird Communities in Rural Landscapes?

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark; Nimmo, Dale; Bennett, Andrew F

    2016-01-01

    In agricultural regions worldwide, linear networks of vegetation such as hedges, fencerows and live fences provide habitat for plant and animal species in heavily modified landscapes. In Australia, networks of remnant native vegetation along roadsides are a distinctive feature of many rural landscapes. Here, we investigated the richness and composition of woodland-dependent bird communities in networks of eucalypt woodland vegetation along roadsides, in an agricultural region in which >80% of native woodland and forest vegetation has been cleared. We stratified sites in a) cross sections and b) linear strips of roadside vegetation, to test the influence on woodland birds of site location and configuration in the linear network (the 'intersection effect'). We also examined the influence of tree size at the site, the amount of wooded vegetation surrounding the site, and the abundance of an aggressive native species, the noisy miner Manorina melanocephala. Birds were surveyed at 26 pairs of sites (cross section or linear strip) on four occasions. A total of 66 species was recorded, including 35 woodland species. The richness of woodland bird species was influenced by site configuration, with more species present at cross sections, particularly those with larger trees (>30 cm diameter). However, the strongest influence on species richness was the relative abundance of the noisy miner. The richness of woodland birds at sites where noisy miners were abundant was ~20% of that where miners were absent. These results recognise the value of networks of roadside vegetation as habitat for woodland birds in depleted agricultural landscapes; but highlight that this value is not realised for much of this vast vegetation network because of the dominance of the noisy miner. Nevertheless, roadside vegetation is particularly important where the configuration of networks create nodes that facilitate movement. Globally, the protection, conservation and restoration of such linear

  14. At the Crossroads: Does the Configuration of Roadside Vegetation Affect Woodland Bird Communities in Rural Landscapes?

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark; Nimmo, Dale; Bennett, Andrew F

    2016-01-01

    In agricultural regions worldwide, linear networks of vegetation such as hedges, fencerows and live fences provide habitat for plant and animal species in heavily modified landscapes. In Australia, networks of remnant native vegetation along roadsides are a distinctive feature of many rural landscapes. Here, we investigated the richness and composition of woodland-dependent bird communities in networks of eucalypt woodland vegetation along roadsides, in an agricultural region in which >80% of native woodland and forest vegetation has been cleared. We stratified sites in a) cross sections and b) linear strips of roadside vegetation, to test the influence on woodland birds of site location and configuration in the linear network (the 'intersection effect'). We also examined the influence of tree size at the site, the amount of wooded vegetation surrounding the site, and the abundance of an aggressive native species, the noisy miner Manorina melanocephala. Birds were surveyed at 26 pairs of sites (cross section or linear strip) on four occasions. A total of 66 species was recorded, including 35 woodland species. The richness of woodland bird species was influenced by site configuration, with more species present at cross sections, particularly those with larger trees (>30 cm diameter). However, the strongest influence on species richness was the relative abundance of the noisy miner. The richness of woodland birds at sites where noisy miners were abundant was ~20% of that where miners were absent. These results recognise the value of networks of roadside vegetation as habitat for woodland birds in depleted agricultural landscapes; but highlight that this value is not realised for much of this vast vegetation network because of the dominance of the noisy miner. Nevertheless, roadside vegetation is particularly important where the configuration of networks create nodes that facilitate movement. Globally, the protection, conservation and restoration of such linear

  15. Genetic covariance between components of male reproductive success: within-pair vs. extra-pair paternity in song sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Reid, J M; Arcese, P; Losdat, S

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectories of reproductive systems, including both male and female multiple mating and hence polygyny and polyandry, are expected to depend on the additive genetic variances and covariances in and among components of male reproductive success achieved through different reproductive tactics. However, genetic covariances among key components of male reproductive success have not been estimated in wild populations. We used comprehensive paternity data from socially monogamous but genetically polygynandrous song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to estimate additive genetic variance and covariance in the total number of offspring a male sired per year outside his social pairings (i.e. his total extra-pair reproductive success achieved through multiple mating) and his liability to sire offspring produced by his socially paired female (i.e. his success in defending within-pair paternity). Both components of male fitness showed nonzero additive genetic variance, and the estimated genetic covariance was positive, implying that males with high additive genetic value for extra-pair reproduction also have high additive genetic propensity to sire their socially paired female's offspring. There was consequently no evidence of a genetic or phenotypic trade-off between male within-pair paternity success and extra-pair reproductive success. Such positive genetic covariance might be expected to facilitate ongoing evolution of polygyny and could also shape the ongoing evolution of polyandry through indirect selection. PMID:25186454

  16. Generalized Ellipsometry in Unusual Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Holcomb, David Eugene; Hunn, John D; Rouleau, Christopher M; Wright, Gomez W

    2006-01-01

    Most ellipsometry experiments are performed by shining polarized light onto a sample at a large angle of incidence, and the results are interpreted in terms of thin film thicknesses and isotropic optical functions of the film or substrate. However, it is possible to alter the geometrical arrangement, either by observing the sample in transmission or at normal-incidence reflection. In both cases, the experiment is fundamentally the same, but the interpretation of the results is considerably different. Both configurations can be used in conjunction with microscope optics, allowing for images to be made of the sample. The results of three examples of these different configurations using the two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) are reported: (1) spectroscopic birefringence measurements of ZnO, (2) electric field-induced birefringence (Pockels effect) in GaAs, and (3) normal-incidence reflection anisotropy of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG).

  17. Pair-Starved Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple analytic model for the innermost (within the light cylinder of canonical radius, approx. c/Omega) structure of open-magnetic-field lines of a rotating neutron star (NS) with relativistic outflow of charged particles (electrons/positrons) and arbitrary angle between the NS spin and magnetic axes. We present the self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations for the magnetic field and electric current in the pair-starved regime where the density of electron-positron plasma generated above the pulsar polar cap is not sufficient to completely screen the accelerating electric field and thus establish thee E . B = 0 condition above the pair-formation front up to the very high altitudes within the light cylinder. The proposed mode1 may provide a theoretical framework for developing the refined model of the global pair-starved pulsar magnetosphere.

  18. Solar disk sextant optical configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Sofia, S.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a plausible configuration for the solar disk sextant, an instrument to be used to monitor the solar diameter, is evaluated. Overall system requirements are evaluated, and tolerable uncertainties are obtained. It is concluded that by using a beam splitting wedge, a folded optics design can be used to measure the solar diameter to an accuracy of 10 to the -6th, despite the greater aberrations present in such optical systems.

  19. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  20. Analysis of Advanced Rotorcraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Advanced rotorcraft configurations are being investigated with the objectives of identifying vehicles that are larger, quieter, and faster than current-generation rotorcraft. A large rotorcraft, carrying perhaps 150 passengers, could do much to alleviate airport capacity limitations, and a quiet rotorcraft is essential for community acceptance of the benefits of VTOL operations. A fast, long-range, long-endurance rotorcraft, notably the tilt-rotor configuration, will improve rotorcraft economics through productivity increases. A major part of the investigation of advanced rotorcraft configurations consists of conducting comprehensive analyses of vehicle behavior for the purpose of assessing vehicle potential and feasibility, as well as to establish the analytical models required to support the vehicle development. The analytical work of FY99 included applications to tilt-rotor aircraft. Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) wind tunnel measurements are being compared with calculations performed by using the comprehensive analysis tool (Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD 11)). The objective is to establish the wing and wake aerodynamic models that are required for tilt-rotor analysis and design. The TRAM test in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) produced extensive measurements. This is the first test to encompass air loads, performance, and structural load measurements on tilt rotors, as well as acoustic and flow visualization data. The correlation of measurements and calculations includes helicopter-mode operation (performance, air loads, and blade structural loads), hover (performance and air loads), and airplane-mode operation (performance).

  1. Transonic empirical configuration design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    This lecture describes some of the experimental research pertaining to transonic configuration development conducted by the Transonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Discussions are presented of the following: use of florescent oil films for the study of surface boundary layer flows; the severe effect of wind tunnel wall interference on the measured configuration drag rise near the speed of sound as determined by a comparison between wind tunnel and free air results; the development of a near sonic transport configuration incorporating a supercritical wing and an indented fuselage, designed on the basis of the area rule with a modification to account for the presence of local supersonic flow above the wing; a device for improving the transonic pitch up of swept wings with very little added drag at the cruise condition; a means for reducing the large transonic aerodynamic interference between the wing, fuselage, nacelle and pylon for a for a fuselage mounted nacelle having the inlet above the wing; and methods for reducing the transonic interference between flows over a winglet and the wing.

  2. Selectivity evaluation for two experimental gill-net configurations used to sample Lake Erie walleyes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Brenden, Travis O.; Liu, Weihai

    2011-01-01

    We used length frequencies of captured walleyes Sander vitreus to indirectly estimate and compare selectivity between two experimental gill-net configurations used to sample fish in Lake Erie: (1) a multifilament configuration currently used by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) with stretched-measure mesh sizes ranging from 51 to 127 mm and a constant filament diameter (0.37 mm); and (2) a monofilament configuration with mesh sizes ranging from 38 to 178 mm and varying filament diameter (range = 0.20–0.33 mm). Paired sampling with the two configurations revealed that the catch of walleyes smaller than 250 mm and larger than 600 mm was greater in the monofilament configuration than in the multifilament configuration, but the catch of 250–600-mm fish was greater in the multifilament configuration. Binormal selectivity functions yielded the best fit to observed walleye catches for both gill-net configurations based on model deviances. Incorporation of deviation terms in the binormal selectivity functions (i.e., to relax the assumption of geometric similarity) further improved the fit to observed catches. The final fitted selectivity functions produced results similar to those from the length-based catch comparisons: the monofilament configuration had greater selectivity for small and large walleyes and the multifilament configuration had greater selectivity for mid-sized walleyes. Computer simulations that incorporated the fitted binormal selectivity functions indicated that both nets were likely to result in some bias in age composition estimates and that the degree of bias would ultimately be determined by the underlying condition, mortality rate, and growth rate of the Lake Erie walleye population. Before the ODNR switches its survey gear, additional comparisons of the different gill-net configurations, such as fishing the net pairs across a greater range of depths and at more locations in the lake, should be conducted to maintain congruence in

  3. Antiferromagnetic exchange and spin-fluctuation pairing in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2006-01-01

    A microscopic theory of superconductivity is formulated within an effective p-d Hubbard model for a CuO2 plane. By applying the Mori-type projection technique, the Dyson equation is derived for the Green functions in terms of Hubbard operators. The antiferromagnetic exchange caused by interband hopping results in pairing of all carries in the conduction subband and high Tc proportional to the Fermi energy. Kinematic interaction in intraband hopping is responsible for the conventional spin-fluctuation pairing. Numerical solution of the gap equation proves the d-wave gap symmetry and defines Tc doping dependence. Oxygen isotope shift and pressure dependence of Tc are also discussed.

  4. Missing energies at pair creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ela, A. A.; Hassan, S.; Bagge, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Wilson cloud chamber measurements of the separated spectra of positrons and electrons produced by gamma quanta of 6.14 MeV differ considerably from the theoretically predicted spectra by BETHE and HEITLER, but are in good agreement with those of a modified theory of pair creation.

  5. Cooper pair transfer in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, G.; Idini, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2013-10-01

    The second-order distorted wave Born approximation implementation of two-particle transfer direct reactions which includes simultaneous and successive transfer, properly corrected by non-orthogonality effects, is tested with the help of controlled nuclear structure and reaction inputs against data spanning the whole mass table, and showed to constitute a quantitative probe of nuclear pairing correlations.

  6. Pick a Pair. Being Bony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2004-01-01

    This column suggests pairings of fiction and nonfiction books to meet curricular needs and help students to compare/contrast the texts as they may be asked on state tests. The author of this paper focuses on activities surrounding Halloween. Since many schools are discouraged from teaching about Halloween, this can be a great time to investigate…

  7. Pairing Linguistic and Music Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiEdwardo, MaryAnn Pasda

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how music in the language classroom setting can be a catalyst for developing reading, writing, and understanding skills. Studies suggest that pairing music and linguistic intelligences in the college classroom improves students' grades and abilities to compose theses statements for research papers in courses that emphasize…

  8. Floquet theory of radical pairs in radiofrequency magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiscock, Hamish G.; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for calculating the product yield of a radical pair recombination reaction in the presence of a weak time-dependent magnetic field. This method successfully circumvents the computational difficulties presented by a direct solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation for a long-lived radical pair containing many hyperfine-coupled nuclear spins. Using a modified formulation of Floquet theory, treating the time-dependent magnetic field as a perturbation, and exploiting the slow radical pair recombination, we show that one can obtain a good approximation to the product yield by considering only nearly degenerate sub-spaces of the Floquet space. Within a significant parameter range, the resulting method is found to give product yields in good agreement with exact quantum mechanical results for a variety of simple model radical pairs. Moreover it is considerably more efficient than the exact calculation, and it can be applied to radical pairs containing significantly more nuclear spins. This promises to open the door to realistic theoretical investigations of the effect of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on the photochemically induced radical pair recombination reactions in the avian retina which are believed to be responsible for the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds.

  9. Competing pairing channels in the doped honeycomb lattice Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao Yan; Wessel, Stefan; Meng, Zi Yang

    2016-09-01

    Proposals for superconductivity emerging from correlated electrons in the doped Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice range from chiral d +i d singlet to p +i p triplet pairing, depending on the considered range of doping and interaction strength, as well as the approach used to analyze the pairing instabilities. Here, we consider these scenarios using large-scale dynamic cluster approximation (DCA) calculations to examine the evolution in the leading pairing symmetry from weak to intermediate coupling strength. These calculations focus on doping levels around the van Hove singularity (VHS) and are performed using DCA simulations with an interaction-expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo cluster solver. We calculated explicitly the temperature dependence of different uniform superconducting pairing susceptibilities and found a consistent picture emerging upon gradually increasing the cluster size: while at weak coupling the d +i d singlet pairing dominates close to the VHS filling, an enhanced tendency towards p -wave triplet pairing upon further increasing the interaction strength is observed. The relevance of these systematic results for existing proposals and ongoing pursuits of odd-parity topological superconductivity are also discussed.

  10. The effect of liquid configuration in porous gas electrodes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katan, T.; Grens, E. A., II

    1971-01-01

    Measurement of the influence of differential pressure on electrode activity in oxygen cathodes made up of beds of uniform silver spheres (156 micron diameter). The extent and nature of this dependence could be explained through use of the concept of pendular and funicular liquid configuration in the pore space of the electrode.

  11. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-20

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  12. Configurational diffusion of asphaltenes in fresh and aged catalyst extrudates

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1992-01-21

    The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between the size and shape of coal and petroleum macromolecules and their diffusion rates i.e., effective diffusivities, in catalyst pore structures. That is, how do the effective intrapore diffusivities depend on molecule configuration and pore geometry.

  13. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided. PMID:26805793

  14. Pairing gap in the inner crust of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.; Broglia, R.A.; Vigezzi, E.; Barranco, F.

    1995-08-01

    The pairing gap in the inner crust of a neutron star can be strongly affected by the presence of heavy nuclei. The effect is commonly estimated in a semiclassical description, using the local density approximation. It was found that the nuclear specific heat can become comparable to the electronic specific heat at certain densities and temperatures. The quantitative result depends critically upon the magnitude of the pairing gap. We therefore decided to assess the validity of the semiclassical approach. This is done by solving the quantal BCS pairing gap equation for neutrons that are confined to the Wigner-Seitz cell that surrounds a heavy nucleus. We performed calculations that are based on the Gogny pairing force. They are feasible for realistic densities of neutrons and heavy nuclei that are expected to be found in the inner crust of neutron stars. The results will be compared to the semiclassical predictions. This work is in progress.

  15. Behavior of entanglement and Cooper pairs under relativistic boosts

    SciTech Connect

    Palge, Veiko; Dunningham, Jacob A.; Vedral, Vlatko

    2011-10-15

    Recent work [J. A. Dunningham, V. Palge, and V. Vedral, Phys. Rev. A 80, 044302 (2009)] has shown how single-particle entangled states are transformed when boosted in relativistic frames for certain restricted geometries. Here we extend that work to consider completely general inertial boosts. We then apply our single-particle results to multiparticle entanglements by focusing on Cooper pairs of electrons. We show that a standard Cooper pair state consisting of a spin-singlet acquires spin-triplet components in a relativistically boosted inertial frame, regardless of the geometry. We also show that, if we start with a spin-triplet pair, two out of the three triplet states acquire a singlet component, the size of which depends on the geometry. This transformation between the different singlet and triplet superconducting pairs may lead to a better understanding of unconventional superconductivity.

  16. Empirical study of unipolar and bipolar configurations using high resolution single multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes for electrophysiological probing of electrically excitable cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asis, Edward D., Jr.; Leung, Joseph; Wood, Sally; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2010-03-01

    Identifying the neurophysiological basis underlying learning and memory in the mammalian central nervous system requires the development of biocompatible, high resolution, low electrode impedance electrophysiological probes; however, physically, electrode impedance will always be finite and, at times, large. Herein, we demonstrate through experiments performed on frog sartorius muscle that single multi-walled carbon nanotube electrode (sMWNT electrode) geometry and placement are two degrees of freedom that can improve biocompatibility of the probe and counteract the detrimental effects of MWNT/electrolyte interface impedance on the stimulation efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We show that high aspect ratio dependent electric field enhancement at the MWNT tip can boost stimulation efficiency. Derivation of the sMWNT electrode's electrical equivalent indicates that, at low stimulus voltage regimes below 1 V, current conduction is mediated by charge fluctuation in the double layer obviating electrolysis of water, which is potentially toxic to pH sensitive biological tissue. Despite the accompanying increase in electrode impedance, a pair of closely spaced sMWNT electrodes in a two probe (bipolar) configuration maintains biocompatibility and enhances stimulation efficiency and SNR compared to the single probe (unipolar) configuration. For stimulus voltages below 1 V, the electrical equivalent verifies that current conduction in the two probe configuration still proceeds via charge fluctuation in the double layer. As an extracellular stimulation electrode, the two sMWNT electrodes comprise a current dipole that concentrates the electric field and the current density in a smaller region of sartorius; consequently, the bipolar configuration can elicit muscle fiber twitching at low voltages that preclude electrolysis of water. When recording field potentials, the bipolar configuration subtracts the potential between two points allowing for the detection of

  17. Self-Configuring Network Monitor

    2004-05-01

    Self-Configuring Network Monitor (SCNM) is a passive monitoring that can collect packet headers from any point in a network path. SCNM uses special activation packets to automatically activate monitors deployed at the layer three ingress and egress routers of the wide-area network, and at critical points within the site networks. Monitoring output data is sent back to the application data source or destination host. No modifications are required to the application or network routing infrastructuremore » in order to activate monitoring of traffic for an application. This ensures that the monitoring operation does not add a burden to the networks administrator.« less

  18. Laser photography system: hardware configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piszczek, Marek; Rutyna, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Marcin; Zyczkowski, Marek

    2012-06-01

    Solution presented in this article is a system using image acquisition time gating method. The time-spatial framing method developed by authors was used to build Laser Photography System (LPS). An active vision system for open space monitoring and terrorist threats detection is being built as an effect of recent work lead in the Institute of Optoelectronics, MUT. The device is destined to prevent and recognize possible terrorist threats in important land and marine areas. The aim of this article is to discuss the properties and hardware configuration of the Laser Photography System.

  19. Configuration optimization of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos; Crivelli, Luis A.; Vandenbelt, David

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop a computer aid for the conceptual/initial design of aerospace structures, allowing configurations and shape to be apriori design variables. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Kikuchi's homogenization method; a classical shape design problem; homogenization method steps; a 3D mechanical component design example; forming a homogenized finite element; a 2D optimization problem; treatment of volume inequality constraint; algorithms for the volume inequality constraint; object function derivatives--taking advantage of design locality; stiffness variations; variations of potential; and schematics of the optimization problem.

  20. Interface Configuration Experiment: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1993-09-01

    The Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) was carried out on USML-1 to investigate liquid-gas interfaces in certain rotationally-symmetric containers having prescribed, mathematically derived shapes. These containers have the property that they admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium rotationally-symmetric interfaces for a given liquid volume and contact angle. Furthermore, it can be shown that none of these interfaces can be stable. It was found, after the containers were filled in orbit, that an initial equilibrium interface from the symmetric continuum reoriented, when perturbed, to a stable interface that was not rotationally symmetric, in accordance with the mathematical theory.

  1. Electromagnetic configurations of rail guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Ostashev, V. E.; Lopyrev, A. N.; Ul'Yanov, A. V.

    1993-06-01

    Some problems associated with the electromagnetic acceleration of macrobodies in a rail gun are examined. An approach to the design of rail gun configurations is proposed, and some basic rail gun schemes are synthesized. The alternative rail gun schemes are compared in terms of electrode potential and stability of the electrode gap with respect to parasitic current shunting. The effect of the ohmic resistance of the electrodes and of the additional magnetization field on the spatial structure of the discharge in the rail gun channel is discussed. A classification of rail gun modifications is presented.

  2. Interface Configuration Experiment: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Weislogel, Mark

    1994-01-01

    The Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) was carried out on USML-1 to investigate liquid-gas interfaces in certain rotationally-symmetric containers having prescribed, mathematically derived shapes. These containers have the property that they admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium rotationally-symmetric interfaces for a given liquid volume and contact angle. Furthermore, it can be shown that none of these interfaces can be stable. It was found, after the containers were filled in orbit, that an initial equilibrium interface from the symmetric continuum re-oriented, when perturbed, to a stable interface that was not rotationally symmetric, in accordance with the mathematical theory.

  3. Pairing Strengths for a Two Orbital Model of the Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Raghu, S.; Liu, Chao-Xing; Scalapino, D.J.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Using an RPA approximation, we have calculated the strengths of the singlet and triplet pairing interactions which arise from the exchange of spin and orbital fluctuations for a 2-orbital model of the Fe-pnictide superconductors. When the system is doped with F, the electron pockets become dominant and we find that the strongest pairing occurs in the singlet d-wave pairing and the triplet p-wave pairing channels, which compete closely. The pairing structure in the singlet d-wave channel corresponds to a superposition of near neighbor intra-orbital singlets with a minus sign phase difference between the d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} pairs. The leading pairing configuration in the triplet channel also involves a nearest neighbor intra-orbital pairing. We find that the strengths of both the singlet and triplet pairing grow, with the singlet pairing growing faster, as the onsite Coulomb interaction approaches the value where the S = 1 particle-hole susceptibility diverges.

  4. Time-dependent study of a black-hole laser in a flowing atomic condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nova, J. R. M.; Finazzi, S.; Carusotto, I.

    2016-10-01

    We numerically study the temporal evolution of a black-hole laser configuration displaying a pair of black- and white-hole horizons in a flowing atomic condensate. This configuration is initially prepared starting from a homogeneous flow via a suitable space-dependent change of the interaction constant and the evolution is then followed up to long times. Depending on the values of the system parameters, the system typically either converges to the lowest-energy solution by evaporating away the horizons or displays a continuous and periodic coherent emission of solitons. By making a physical comparison with optical laser devices, we identify the latter regime of continuous emission of solitons as the proper black-hole laser effect.

  5. Odd-paired controls frequency doubling in Drosophila segmentation by altering the pair-rule gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erik; Akam, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila embryo transiently exhibits a double-segment periodicity, defined by the expression of seven 'pair-rule' genes, each in a pattern of seven stripes. At gastrulation, interactions between the pair-rule genes lead to frequency doubling and the patterning of 14 parasegment boundaries. In contrast to earlier stages of Drosophila anteroposterior patterning, this transition is not well understood. By carefully analysing the spatiotemporal dynamics of pair-rule gene expression, we demonstrate that frequency-doubling is precipitated by multiple coordinated changes to the network of regulatory interactions between the pair-rule genes. We identify the broadly expressed but temporally patterned transcription factor, Odd-paired (Opa/Zic), as the cause of these changes, and show that the patterning of the even-numbered parasegment boundaries relies on Opa-dependent regulatory interactions. Our findings indicate that the pair-rule gene regulatory network has a temporally modulated topology, permitting the pair-rule genes to play stage-specific patterning roles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18215.001 PMID:27525481

  6. Stereo Pair: Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, is located on the shores of Port Nicholson, a natural harbor at the south end of North Island. The city was founded in 1840 by British emigrants and now has a regional population of more than 400,000 residents. As seen here, the natural terrain imposes strong control over the urban growth pattern (urban features generally appear gray or white in this view). Rugged hills generally rising to 300 meters (1,000 feet) help protect the city and harbor from strong winter winds

    New Zealand is seismically active and faults are readily seen in the topography. The Wellington Fault forms the straight northwestern (left) shoreline of the harbor. Toward the southwest (down) the fault crosses through the city, then forms linear canyons in the hills before continuing offshore at the bottom. Toward the northeast (upper right) the fault forms the sharp mountain front along the northern edge of the heavily populated Hutt Valley.

    This stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced true color Landsat7 satellite image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30 meter (99 foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and will provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data

  7. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, off-target mutations can be suppressed by using Cas9 paired nickases together with paired guide RNAs (gRNAs). However, the performance of Cas9 paired nickases has not yet been fully assessed in plants. Here, we analyzed on- and off-target mutation frequency in rice calli and regenerated plants using Cas9 nuclease or Cas9 nickase with paired gRNAs. When Cas9 paired nickases were used, off-target mutations were fully suppressed in rice calli and regenerated plants. However, on-target mutation frequency also decreased compared with that induced by the Cas9 paired nucleases system. Since the gRNA sequence determines specific binding of Cas9 protein–gRNA ribonucleoproteins at the targeted sequence, the on-target mutation frequency of Cas9 paired nickases depends on the design of paired gRNAs. Our results suggest that a combination of gRNAs that can induce mutations at high efficiency with Cas9 nuclease should be used together with Cas9 nickase. Furthermore, we confirmed that a combination of gRNAs containing a one nucleotide (1 nt) mismatch toward the target sequence could not induce mutations when expressed with Cas9 nickase. Our results clearly show the effectiveness of Cas9 paired nickases in delivering on-target specific mutations. PMID:26936792

  8. Superluminal Spot Pair Events in Astronomical Settings: Sweeping Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2015-02-01

    Sweeping beams of light can cast spots moving with superluminal speeds across scattering surfaces. Such faster-than-light speeds are well-known phenomena that do not violate special relativity. It is shown here that under certain circumstances, superluminal spot pair creation and annihilation events can occur that provide unique information to observers. These spot pair events are not particle pair events-they are the sudden creation or annihilation of a pair of relatively illuminated spots on a scattering surface. Real spot pair illumination events occur unambiguously on the scattering surface when spot speeds diverge, while virtual spot pair events are observer dependent and perceived only when real spot radial speeds cross the speed of light. Specifically, a virtual spot pair creation event will be observed when a real spot's speed toward the observer drops below c, while a virtual spot pair annihilation event will be observed when a real spot's radial speed away from the observer rises above c. Superluminal spot pair events might be found angularly, photometrically, or polarimetrically, and might carry useful geometry or distance information. Two example scenarios are briefly considered. The first is a beam swept across a scattering spherical object, exemplified by spots of light moving across Earth's Moon and pulsar companions. The second is a beam swept across a scattering planar wall or linear filament, exemplified by spots of light moving across variable nebulae including Hubble's Variable Nebula. In local cases where the sweeping beam can be controlled and repeated, a three-dimensional map of a target object can be constructed. Used tomographically, this imaging technique is fundamentally different from lens photography, radar, and conventional lidar.

  9. Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, J.M.

    1998-01-08

    The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents.

  10. Estimation of the temperature dependent interaction between uncharged point defects in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Vanhellemont, Jan; Sueoka, Koji

    2015-01-15

    A method is described to estimate the temperature dependent interaction between two uncharged point defects in Si based on DFT calculations. As an illustration, the formation of the uncharged di-vacancy V{sub 2} is discussed, based on the temperature dependent attractive field between both vacancies. For that purpose, all irreducible configurations of two uncharged vacancies are determined, each with their weight given by the number of equivalent configurations. Using a standard 216-atoms supercell, nineteen irreducible configurations of two vacancies are obtained. The binding energies of all these configurations are calculated. Each vacancy is surrounded by several attractive sites for another vacancy. The obtained temperature dependent of total volume of these attractive sites has a radius that is closely related with the capture radius for the formation of a di-vacancy that is used in continuum theory. The presented methodology can in principle also be applied to estimate the capture radius for pair formation of any type of point defects.

  11. Pair production in inhomogeneous fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, Holger; Klingmueller, Klaus

    2005-09-15

    We employ the recently developed worldline numerics, which combines string-inspired field theory methods with Monte Carlo techniques, to develop an algorithm for the computation of pair-production rates in scalar QED for inhomogeneous background fields. We test the algorithm with the classic Sauter potential, for which we compute the local production rate for the first time. Furthermore, we study the production rate for a superposition of a constant E field and a spatially oscillating field for various oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal that the approximation by a local derivative expansion already fails for frequencies small compared to the electron-mass scale, whereas for strongly oscillating fields a derivative expansion for the averaged field represents an acceptable approximation. The worldline picture makes the nonlocal nature of pair production transparent and facilitates a profound understanding of this important quantum phenomenon.

  12. One-dimensional Cooper pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, R.; Fortes, M.; de Llano, M.; Solís, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    We study electron pairing in a one-dimensional (1D) fermion gas at zero temperature under zero- and finite-range, attractive, two-body interactions. The binding energy of Cooper pairs (CPs) with zero total or center-of-mass momentum (CMM) increases with attraction strength and decreases with interaction range for fixed strength. The excitation energy of 1D CPs with nonzero CMM display novel, unique properties. It satisfies a dispersion relation with two branches: a phonon-like linear excitation for small CP CMM; this is followed by roton-like quadratic excitation minimum for CMM greater than twice the Fermi wavenumber, but only above a minimum threshold attraction strength. The expected quadratic-in-CMM dispersion in vacuo when the Fermi wavenumber is set to zero is recovered for any coupling. This paper completes a three-part exploration initiated in 2D and continued in 3D.

  13. A modified coupled pair functional approach. [for dipole moment calculation of metal hydride ground states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, D. P.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A modified coupled pair functional (CPF) method is presented for the configuration interaction problem that dramatically improves properties for cases where the Hartree-Fock reference configuration is not a good zeroth-order wave function description. It is shown that the tendency for CPF to overestimate the effect of higher excitations arises from the choice of the geometric mean for the partial normalization denominator. The modified method is demonstrated for ground state dipole moment calculations of the NiH, CuH, and ZnH transition metal hydrides, and compared to singles-plus-doubles configuration interaction and the Ahlrichs et al. (1984) CPF method.

  14. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  15. Non-empirical pairing energy functional in nuclear matter and finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hebeler, K.; Duguet, T.; Lesinski, T.; Schwenk, A.

    2009-10-15

    We study {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gaps in neutron and nuclear matter as well as T=1 pairing in finite nuclei on the basis of microscopic two-nucleon interactions. Special attention is paid to the consistency of the pairing interaction and normal self-energy contributions. We find that pairing gaps obtained from low-momentum interactions depend only weakly on approximation schemes for the normal self-energy, required in present energy-density functional calculations, while pairing gaps from hard potentials are very sensitive to the effective-mass approximation scheme.

  16. The forward-reverse shock pair at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1984-01-01

    An unsteady one-dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed in order to study the essential physical processes involved in the development of the forward-reverse shock pair in the heliosphere. In the model, MHD shocks are treated as boundary surfaces which divide the domain of interest in the r-t plane into several flow regions. The positions of the shock boundary surfaces between two neighboring flow regions are determined by shock speed. On the basis of integrations of the model, it is found that the strong MHD disturbances generated in a corotating interaction region (CIR) propagate at a fast speed relative to the moving material, and that the wave propagation speed is greater in CIR than in its surroundings. This causes disturbances in CIR to pile up and form a shock pair. The newly formed shock pair will in turn propagate outward from the leading edge to interact with ambient rarefaction regions. This interaction accounts for the double sawtooth configuration observed in velocity profiles of shock pairs. It is also demonstrated that the merging of two shocks produces a stronger shock and constant surface on its backside. Computer generated velocity profiles based on the model are presented.

  17. Spatial Patterns in Rydberg Excitations from Logarithmic Pair Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Zoller, Peter

    2015-09-18

    The collective excitations in ensembles of dissipative, laser driven ultracold atoms exhibit crystal-like patterns, a many-body effect of the Rydberg blockade mechanism. These crystalline structures are revealed in an experiment from a postselection of configurations with fixed numbers of excitations. Here, we show that these subensembles can be well represented by ensembles of effective particles that interact via logarithmic pair potentials. This allows one to study the emergent patterns with a small number of effective particles to determine the phases of Rydberg crystals and to systematically study contributions from N-body terms. PMID:26430998

  18. Flutter of pairs of aerodynamically interfering delta wings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.; Hess, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    To examine the effect on flutter of the aerodynamic interference between pairs of closely spaced delta wings, several structurally uncoupled 1/80th-scale models were studied by experiment and analysis. Flutter test boundaries obtained in NASA Langley's 26-in. transonic blowdown wind tunnel were compared with subsonic analytical results generated using the doublet lattice method. Trends for several combinations of vertical and longitudinal wing separation were determined, showing flutter speed significantly affected in the closely spaced configurations. A new flutter mechanism coupling one wing's first bending mode with the other wing's first torsion mode was predicted and observed.

  19. Preliminary design study of lunar housing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design study assesses various configurations for habitation of the lunar surface. The study assumes an initial 4-man habitation module expandable to a 48-man concept. Through the numerous coupling combinations of identical modules, five basic configuration types are identified. A design model presents each configuration in light of certain issues. The issues include circulation, internal and external spatial characteristics, functional organizations, and future growth potential. The study discusses the attributes, potentials, and unique requirements of each configuration.

  20. PKC activators enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and paired-pulse facilitation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Liu, Q-Y; Alkon, D L

    2014-05-30

    Bryostatin-1, a potent agonist of protein kinase C (PKC), has recently been found to enhance spatial learning and long-term memory in rats, mice, rabbits and the nudibranch Hermissenda, and to exert profound neuroprotective effects on Alzheimer's disease (AD) in transgenic mice. However, details of the mechanistic effects of bryostatin on learning and memory remain unclear. To address this issue, whole-cell recording, a dual-recording approach and extracellular recording techniques were performed on young (2-4months) Brown-Norway rats. We found that bath-applied bryostatin-1 significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). The firing rate of GABAergic interneurons significantly was also increased as recorded with a loosely-attached extracellular recording configuration. Simultaneous recordings from communicating cell pairs of interneuron and pyramidal neuron revealed unique activity-dependent properties of GABAergic synapses. Furthermore, the bryostatin-induced increase of the frequency and amplitude of IPSCs was blocked by methionine enkephalin which selectively suppressed the excitability of interneurons. Pretreatment with RO-32-0432, a relatively specific PKCα antagonist, blocked the effect of bryostatin on sIPSCs. Finally, bryostatin increased paired-pulse ratio of GABAergic synapses that lasted for at least 20min while pretreatment with RO-32-0432 significantly reduced the ratio. In addition, 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a selective PKCε activator, also increased the frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that bryostatin enhances GABAergic neurotransmission in pyramidal neurons by activating the PKCα & ε-dependent pathway and by a presynaptic mechanism with excitation of GABAergic interneurons. These effects of bryostatin on GABAergic transmissions and modifiability may contribute to the improvement of learning and memory

  1. Species persistence in landscapes with spatial variation in habitat quality: a pair approximation model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinbao; Li, Zhenqing; Hiebeler, David E; Iwasa, Yoh; Bogaert, Jan; Nijs, Ivan

    2013-10-21

    Habitat degradation has become a major threat to species persistence. Although several models have explicitly integrated habitat quality into metapopulation dynamics, we still lack knowledge of the spatial variability of species persistence which may result from the clustering of habitat patches of differing quality. Here we construct both pair approximation (PA) and cellular automaton (CA) models for species persistence in homogeneous versus heterogeneous landscapes. Heterogeneous landscapes are generated by varying the orthogonal-neighbour correlation between two different-quality habitats. In our simulations, the PA model exhibits similar population dynamics to the CA model, though it overestimates species persistence due to the doublet approximation neglecting correlation beyond nearest neighbours. Generally, landscape heterogeneity enhances species persistence relative to landscape homogeneity, especially with enlarging habitat-quality difference. This indicates that models based on homogeneous landscapes may overestimate species extinction rate. In heterogeneous landscapes, habitat clumping does not influence global dispersers because of random establishment, although it does promote the persistence of local dispersers, especially under severe habitat degradation. However, habitat configurational fragmentation improves the persistence of global dispersers that are highly sensitive to local crowding, probably by reducing density dependence, but this positive fragmentation effect on local dispersers is overshadowed by the stronger negative border effect on impeding local extension. Furthermore, increasing density dependence promotes the extinction risk of local dispersers, while global dispersers are not influenced. For conservation and habitat management, our results suggest that minimising random anthropogenic disturbance should take priority over increasing the connectivity of good-quality habitat, as random habitat degradation poses a more serious threat to

  2. Randomly distilling W-class states into general configurations of two-party entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, W.; Chitambar, E.; Lo, H. K.

    2011-11-01

    In this article we obtain results for the task of converting a single N-qubit W-class state (of the form x0|00...0>+x1|10...0>+⋯+xN|00...1>) into maximum entanglement shared between two random parties. Previous studies in random distillation have not considered how the particular choice of target pairs affects the transformation, and here we develop a strategy for distilling into general configurations of target pairs. We completely solve the problem of determining the optimal distillation probability for all three-qubit configurations and most four-qubit configurations when x0=0. Our proof involves deriving new entanglement monotones defined on the set of four-qubit W-class states. As an additional application of our results, we present new upper bounds for converting a generic W-class state into the standard W state |WN>=(1)/(N)(|10...0>+⋯+|00...1>).

  3. Resolvability and the Tetrahedral Configuration of Carbon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses evidence for the tetrahedral configuration of the carbon atom, indicating that three symmetrical configurations are theoretically possible for coordination number four. Includes table indicating that resolvability of compounds of type CR'R"R"'R"" is a necessary but not sufficient condition for proving tetrahedral configuration. (JN)

  4. Molecular structure and absolute configuration of the diterpene lactone, praelolide.

    PubMed

    Dai, J B; Wan, Z L; Rao, Z H; Liang, D C; Fang, Z; Luo, Y K; Long, K H

    1985-11-01

    Praelolide is a new compound which was isolated out from the gorgonian, Menella praelonga (Ridley), collected from the South Sea of China at Zhanjiang, Guangdong. The molecular formula is C28H35O12Cl. The research result by X-ray diffraction method on the crystal structure is presented. The compound is orthorhombic with space group P2(1)2(1)2, cell dimensions a = 16.936, b = 16.709, c = 10.333 A, and Z = 4. The structure has been solved by direct method and refined to R = 0.055 for 2257 unique observable reflexions by least-squares. The molecule is composed of the major conformational isomer in which the three main rings (a six-membered ring, an eight-membered ring, a six-membered ring) take separately the form of chair-chairboat-chair, a five-membered actone ring, a C1 substitution, 4 acetate groups, and a three-membered epoxide ring. The absolute configuration of the molecule has also been determined by statistics (R factor ratio R = 1.012) and Bijvoet pairs observation. For 30 pairs of the greatest anomalous contributions the residuals are R'(+) = 0.057 for the first enantiomorph and R'(-) = 0.005 for the second one, so the latter should unambiguously correspond to the absolute configuration of the molecule.

  5. Microscopic description of 258Fm fission dynamic with pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric; Lacroix, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Fission dynamic remains a challenge for nuclear microscopic theories. In order to understand the dynamic of the last stage of the fission process, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with BCS pairing is applied to the describe the fission of the 258Fm. A good agreement is found for the one-body observables: the total kinetic energy and the average mass asymmetry. The non-physical dependence of two-body observables with the initial shape is discussed.

  6. Single molecule detection of direct, homologous, DNA/DNA pairing

    PubMed Central

    Danilowicz, C.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, K.; Hatch, K.; Coljee, V. W.; Kleckner, N.; Prentiss, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using a parallel single molecule magnetic tweezers assay we demonstrate homologous pairing of two double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules in the absence of proteins, divalent metal ions, crowding agents, or free DNA ends. Pairing is accurate and rapid under physiological conditions of temperature and monovalent salt, even at DNA molecule concentrations orders of magnitude below those found in vivo, and in the presence of a large excess of nonspecific competitor DNA. Crowding agents further increase the reaction rate. Pairing is readily detected between regions of homology of 5 kb or more. Detected pairs are stable against thermal forces and shear forces up to 10 pN. These results strongly suggest that direct recognition of homology between chemically intact B-DNA molecules should be possible in vivo. The robustness of the observed signal raises the possibility that pairing might even be the “default” option, limited to desired situations by specific features. Protein-independent homologous pairing of intact dsDNA has been predicted theoretically, but further studies are needed to determine whether existing theories fit sequence length, temperature, and salt dependencies described here. PMID:19903884

  7. Pairing of heterochromatin in response to cellular stress

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Halim, H.I.; Mullenders, L.H.F. . E-mail: L.Mullenders@lumc.nl; Boei, J.J.W.A.

    2006-07-01

    We previously reported that exposure of human cells to DNA-damaging agents (X-rays and mitomycin C (MMC)) induces pairing of the homologous paracentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9 (9q12-13). Here, we show that UV irradiation and also heat shock treatment of human cells lead to similar effects. Since the various agents induce very different types and frequencies of damage to cellular constituents, the data suggest a general stress response as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, local UV irradiation experiments revealed that pairing of heterochromatin is an event that can be triggered without induction of DNA damage in the heterochromatic sequences. The repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells (group F) previously shown to fail pairing after MMC displayed elevated pairing after heat shock treatment but not after UV exposure. Taken together, the present results indicate that pairing of heterochromatin following exposure to DNA-damaging agents is initiated by a general stress response and that the sensing of stress or the maintenance of the paired status of the heterochromatin might be dependent on DNA repair.

  8. Configuration Control Studies in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuuchi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Okada, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Hanatani, K.; Sano, F.; Yamamoto, S.; Motojima, G.; Watanabe, S.; Arimoto, H.; Murai, K.; Hamagami, F.; Katayama, D.; Matsuoka, H.; Nakajima, A.; Takahashi, H.; Yasuda, H.; Mukai, K.; Matsuyama, A.; Kowada, Y.

    2008-04-07

    Heliotron J is a flexible concept exploration facility for the helical-axis heliotron concept. One of the major objectives of the Heliotron J study is to experimentally confirm the effects of the new ideas introduced into this concept to improve the plasma performance. As a part of such experiments, the bumpiness ({epsilon}{sub b}) and rotational transform ({iota}/2{pi}) control studies have been performed. The {epsilon}{sub b}-control experiments have revealed the {epsilon}{sub b}-dependence of the fast ion confinement is qualitatively consistent with the drift optimization viewpoint. However, the bulk plasma confinement studies suggest that the low effective helical ripple configuration seems to be preferable for the confinement improvement for ECH-only plasma. The {iota}/2{pi}-control experiments for ECH-only and/or ECH+NBI plasmas have revealed the existence of windows in the vacuum {iota}(a)/2{pi} for the high quality H-mode. In NBI-only plasmas, it was found out that the transition in NBI-only plasma occurs at a certain toroidal current, which depends on the vacuum {iota}(a)/2{pi} and the bumpiness but is independent of P{sub inj}. This suggests the relation of the onset of the transition to the modification of the rotational transform caused by the plasma current.

  9. Database of non-canonical base pairs found in known RNA structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaswamy, U.; Voss, N.; Zhang, Z.; Fox, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic resolution RNA structures are being published at an increasing rate. It is common to find a modest number of non-canonical base pairs in these structures in addition to the usual Watson-Crick pairs. This database summarizes the occurrence of these rare base pairs in accordance with standard nomenclature. The database, http://prion.bchs.uh.edu/, contains information such as sequence context, sugar pucker conformation, anti / syn base conformations, chemical shift, p K (a)values, melting temperature and free energy. Of the 29 anticipated pairs with two or more hydrogen bonds, 20 have been encountered to date. In addition, four unexpected pairs with two hydrogen bonds have been reported bringing the total to 24. Single hydrogen bond versions of five of the expected geometries have been encountered among the single hydrogen bond interactions. In addition, 18 different types of base triplets have been encountered, each of which involves three to six hydrogen bonds. The vast majority of the rare base pairs are antiparallel with the bases in the anti configuration relative to the ribose. The most common are the GU wobble, the Sheared GA pair, the Reverse Hoogsteen pair and the GA imino pair.

  10. LDA optical setup using holographic imaging configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes one of the possible ways for improving fringe quality at LDA measuring volume using a holographic imaging configuration consisting of a single hololens. For its comparative study with a conventional imaging configuration, a complete characterization of fringes formed at the measurement volume by both the configuration is presented. Results indicate the qualitative as well as quantitative improvement of the fringes formed at measurement volume by the holographic imaging configuration. Hence it is concluded that use of holographic imaging configuration for making LDA optical setup is a better choice than the conventional one.

  11. Deformation of glass forming metallic liquids: Configurational changes and their relation to elastic softening

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, John S.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.; Tao, Min

    2007-03-26

    The change in the configurational enthalpy of metallic glass forming liquids induced by mechanical deformation and its effect on elastic softening is assessed. The acoustically measured shear modulus is found to decrease with increasing configurational enthalpy by a dependence similar to one obtained by softening via thermal annealing. This establishes that elastic softening is governed by a unique functional relationship between shear modulus and configurational enthalpy.

  12. Auto-configuration protocols in mobile ad hoc networks.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Luis Javier García; Matesanz, Julián García; Orozco, Ana Lucila Sandoval; Díaz, José Duván Márquez

    2011-01-01

    The TCP/IP protocol allows the different nodes in a network to communicate by associating a different IP address to each node. In wired or wireless networks with infrastructure, we have a server or node acting as such which correctly assigns IP addresses, but in mobile ad hoc networks there is no such centralized entity capable of carrying out this function. Therefore, a protocol is needed to perform the network configuration automatically and in a dynamic way, which will use all nodes in the network (or part thereof) as if they were servers that manage IP addresses. This article reviews the major proposed auto-configuration protocols for mobile ad hoc networks, with particular emphasis on one of the most recent: D2HCP. This work also includes a comparison of auto-configuration protocols for mobile ad hoc networks by specifying the most relevant metrics, such as a guarantee of uniqueness, overhead, latency, dependency on the routing protocol and uniformity.

  13. Noise Radiation from Single and Multiple Rod Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were performed on single and multiple rod configurations to study the effect of Reynolds number, surface roughness, freestream turbulence, proximity and wake interference on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 3.8 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 5). Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the different model configurations tested. The dependence of the peak Sound Pressure Level on velocity was also examined. Several concepts for the reduction of the noise radiating from cylindrical rods were tested. It was shown that wire wraps and collar distributions could be used to significantly reduce the noise radiating from rods in tandem configurations.

  14. Nonequilibrium dynamics of emergent field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Rafael Cassidy

    The processes by which nonlinear physical systems approach thermal equilibrium is of great importance in many areas of science. Central to this is the mechanism by which energy is transferred between the many degrees of freedom comprising these systems. With this in mind, in this research the nonequilibrium dynamics of nonperturbative fluctuations within Ginzburg-Landau models are investigated. In particular, two questions are addressed. In both cases the system is initially prepared in one of two minima of a double-well potential. First, within the context of a (2 + 1) dimensional field theory, we investigate whether emergent spatio-temporal coherent structures play a dynamcal role in the equilibration of the field. We find that the answer is sensitive to the initial temperature of the system. At low initial temperatures, the dynamics are well approximated with a time-dependent mean-field theory. For higher temperatures, the strong nonlinear coupling between the modes in the field does give rise to the synchronized emergence of coherent spatio-temporal configurations, identified with oscillons. These are long-lived coherent field configurations characterized by their persistent oscillatory behavior at their core. This initial global emergence is seen to be a consequence of resonant behavior in the long wavelength modes in the system. A second question concerns the emergence of disorder in a highly viscous system modeled by a (3 + 1) dimensional field theory. An integro-differential Boltzmann equation is derived to model the thermal nucleation of precursors of one phase within the homogeneous background. The fraction of the volume populated by these precursors is computed as a function of temperature. This model is capable of describing the onset of percolation, characterizing the approach to criticality (i.e. disorder). It also provides a nonperturbative correction to the critical temperature based on the nonequilibrium dynamics of the system.

  15. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  16. Cytoplasmic and genomic effects on meiotic pairing in Brassica hybrids and allotetraploids from pair crosses of three cultivated diploids.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Gautam, Mayank; Kang, Lei; Li, Zaiyun

    2012-07-01

    Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization contribute to the origin of many important crops. Synthetic Brassica is a widely used model for the study of genetic recombination and "fixed heterosis" in allopolyploids. To investigate the effects of the cytoplasm and genome combinations on meiotic recombination, we produced digenomic diploid and triploid hybrids and trigenomic triploid hybrids from the reciprocal crosses of three Brassica diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC). The chromosomes in the resultant hybrids were doubled to obtain three allotetraploids (B. juncea, AA.BB; B. napus, AA.CC; B. carinata, BB.CC). Intra- and intergenomic chromosome pairings in these hybrids were quantified using genomic in situ hybridization and BAC-FISH. The level of intra- and intergenomic pairings varied significantly, depending on the genome combinations and the cytoplasmic background and/or their interaction. The extent of intragenomic pairing was less than that of intergenomic pairing within each genome. The extent of pairing variations within the B genome was less than that within the A and C genomes, each of which had a similar extent of pairing. Synthetic allotetraploids exhibited nondiploidized meiotic behavior, and their chromosomal instabilities were correlated with the relationship of the genomes and cytoplasmic background. Our results highlight the specific roles of the cytoplasm and genome to the chromosomal behaviors of hybrids and allopolyploids.

  17. Cytoplasmic and Genomic Effects on Meiotic Pairing in Brassica Hybrids and Allotetraploids from Pair Crosses of Three Cultivated Diploids

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Gautam, Mayank; Kang, Lei; Li, Zaiyun

    2012-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization contribute to the origin of many important crops. Synthetic Brassica is a widely used model for the study of genetic recombination and “fixed heterosis” in allopolyploids. To investigate the effects of the cytoplasm and genome combinations on meiotic recombination, we produced digenomic diploid and triploid hybrids and trigenomic triploid hybrids from the reciprocal crosses of three Brassica diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC). The chromosomes in the resultant hybrids were doubled to obtain three allotetraploids (B. juncea, AA.BB; B. napus, AA.CC; B. carinata, BB.CC). Intra- and intergenomic chromosome pairings in these hybrids were quantified using genomic in situ hybridization and BAC-FISH. The level of intra- and intergenomic pairings varied significantly, depending on the genome combinations and the cytoplasmic background and/or their interaction. The extent of intragenomic pairing was less than that of intergenomic pairing within each genome. The extent of pairing variations within the B genome was less than that within the A and C genomes, each of which had a similar extent of pairing. Synthetic allotetraploids exhibited nondiploidized meiotic behavior, and their chromosomal instabilities were correlated with the relationship of the genomes and cytoplasmic background. Our results highlight the specific roles of the cytoplasm and genome to the chromosomal behaviors of hybrids and allopolyploids. PMID:22505621

  18. Cytoplasmic and genomic effects on meiotic pairing in Brassica hybrids and allotetraploids from pair crosses of three cultivated diploids.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Gautam, Mayank; Kang, Lei; Li, Zaiyun

    2012-07-01

    Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization contribute to the origin of many important crops. Synthetic Brassica is a widely used model for the study of genetic recombination and "fixed heterosis" in allopolyploids. To investigate the effects of the cytoplasm and genome combinations on meiotic recombination, we produced digenomic diploid and triploid hybrids and trigenomic triploid hybrids from the reciprocal crosses of three Brassica diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC). The chromosomes in the resultant hybrids were doubled to obtain three allotetraploids (B. juncea, AA.BB; B. napus, AA.CC; B. carinata, BB.CC). Intra- and intergenomic chromosome pairings in these hybrids were quantified using genomic in situ hybridization and BAC-FISH. The level of intra- and intergenomic pairings varied significantly, depending on the genome combinations and the cytoplasmic background and/or their interaction. The extent of intragenomic pairing was less than that of intergenomic pairing within each genome. The extent of pairing variations within the B genome was less than that within the A and C genomes, each of which had a similar extent of pairing. Synthetic allotetraploids exhibited nondiploidized meiotic behavior, and their chromosomal instabilities were correlated with the relationship of the genomes and cytoplasmic background. Our results highlight the specific roles of the cytoplasm and genome to the chromosomal behaviors of hybrids and allopolyploids. PMID:22505621

  19. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  20. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  1. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ling; Murray, Erica P

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Au)]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%-18% O₂ at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity. PMID:26404312

  2. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ling; Murray, Erica P.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Au)]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%–18% O2 at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity. PMID:26404312

  3. Emotion recognition: the role of featural and configural face information.

    PubMed

    Bombari, Dario; Schmid, Petra C; Schmid Mast, Marianne; Birri, Sandra; Mast, Fred W; Lobmaier, Janek S

    2013-01-01

    Several studies investigated the role of featural and configural information when processing facial identity. A lot less is known about their contribution to emotion recognition. In this study, we addressed this issue by inducing either a featural or a configural processing strategy (Experiment 1) and by investigating the attentional strategies in response to emotional expressions (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, participants identified emotional expressions in faces that were presented in three different versions (intact, blurred, and scrambled) and in two orientations (upright and inverted). Blurred faces contain mainly configural information, and scrambled faces contain mainly featural information. Inversion is known to selectively hinder configural processing. Analyses of the discriminability measure (A') and response times (RTs) revealed that configural processing plays a more prominent role in expression recognition than featural processing, but their relative contribution varies depending on the emotion. In Experiment 2, we qualified these differences between emotions by investigating the relative importance of specific features by means of eye movements. Participants had to match intact expressions with the emotional cues that preceded the stimulus. The analysis of eye movements confirmed that the recognition of different emotions rely on different types of information. While the mouth is important for the detection of happiness and fear, the eyes are more relevant for anger, fear, and sadness. PMID:23679155

  4. A program of generation and selection of configurations for the configuration interaction method in atomic calculations SELECTCONF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, P.; Karpuškienė, R.; Momkauskaitė, A.

    2005-11-01

    using the one-electron and two-electron virtual excitations. Then the averaged evaluation of their influence on the energy or wave function of the adjusted configuration is performed in the second order of perturbation theory. The results of this evaluation are used for the selection of admixed configurations. Restrictions onto the complexity of the problem:In the present version of the program the number of passive shells is restricted by MIUZ=20; the number of active shells by MIAT=10; the number of generated admixed configurations, by MECO=10000; the number of RO used, by MOR=MRO=99. All these limitations are not hard-coded and can be changed by substituting the values of the corresponding parameters. Unusual features of the program:The possibility of carrying out the averaged evaluation of the influence of admixed configurations in the second order of perturbation theory and to perform their selection on this ground. Typical running time:Several seconds. This time depends on the size of the problem: the computation time depends approximately linearly on the number of possible admixed configurations, which increases rapidly with a growing number of active shells and an extending RO basis set.

  5. Theory and computation of the attosecond dynamics of pairs of electrons excited by high-frequency short light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mercouris, Th.; Komninos, Y.; Nicolaides, C.A.

    2004-03-01

    By defining and solving from first principles, using the state-specific expansion approach, a time-dependent pump-probe problem with real atomic states, we show computationally that, if time resolution reaches the attosecond regime, strongly correlated electronic ''motion'' can be probed and can manifest itself in terms of time-dependent mixing of symmetry-adapted configurations. For the system that was chosen in this study, these configurations, the He 2s2p,2p3d, and 3s3p P{sup o1}, whose radials are computed by solving multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock equations, label doubly excited states (DES) of He inside the 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} scattering continuum and act as nonstationary states that mix, and simultaneously decay exponentially to 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} via the atomic Hamiltonian, H{sub A}. The herein presented theory and analysis permitted the computation of attosecond snapshots of pairs of electrons in terms of time-dependent probability distributions of the angle between the position vectors of the two electrons. The physical processes were determined by solving ab initio the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, using as initial states either the He 1s{sup 2} or the 1s2s S{sup 1} discrete states and two femtosecond Gaussian pulses of 86 fs full width at half-maximum, having frequencies in resonance with the energies of the correlated states represented by the 2s2p and 2p3d configurations. We calculated the probability of photoabsorption and of two-photon resonance ionization and of the simultaneous oscillatory mixing of the configurations 2s2p,2p3d,3s3p, and 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1}, within the attosecond scale, via the interactions present in H{sub A}. Among the possible channels for observing the attosecond oscillations of the occupation probabilities of the DES, is the de-excitation path of the transition to the He 1s3d D{sup 1} discrete state, which emits at 6680 A.

  6. Broadband photon pair generation at 3 ω/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowski, Haim; Bruner, Barry D.; Israel, Yonatan; Ganany-Padowicz, Ayelet; Arie, Ady; Silberberg, Yaron

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a method for creating broad bandwidth photon pairs in the visible spectral region, centered at a frequency that is higher than that of the initial pump source. Spontaneous down conversion of a narrowband 1053 nm pulsed Nd:YLF laser is followed by highly efficient upconversion in adiabatic nonlinear frequency-conversion process. Photon pairs are generated from 693 to 708 nm, and the complete conversion process occurs within a single monolithic 5-cm-long stoichiometric lithium tantalate nonlinear crystal. We have characterized the dependence of this structure with respect to pump intensity and crystal temperature.

  7. QCD Corrections to Higgs Pair Production in Bottom Quark Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Sally; Kao, Chung; Wang, Yili; Williams, Peter; /Oklahoma U.

    2006-10-01

    We present a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion (b{bar b} {yields} hh) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model. The NLO QCD corrections lead to less dependence on the renormalization scale ({mu}{sub R}) and the factorization scale ({mu}{sub F}) than the leading-order (LO) cross section, and they significantly increase the LO cross section. The rate for inclusive Higgs pair production is small in the Standard Model, but can be large in models with enhanced couplings of the b quark to the Higgs bosons.

  8. Non-linear dynamics of a spur gear pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, A.; Singh, R.

    1990-01-01

    The backlash nonlinearity excited primarily by transmission error between spur gear pairs is studied for both external and internal excitations. The digital simulation technique and the method of harmonic balance are used to develop steady state solutions for the internal sinuosidal excitations. The analytic predictions agreed well with available experimental data. Digital simulation is used to observe that at the chaotic and subharmonic resonances may exist in a gear pair depending on the mean or design load, mean to alternating force ratio, damping, and backlash.

  9. Landau-Zener Transitions in Frozen Pairs of Rydberg Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Saquet, Nicolas; Cournol, Anne; Beugnon, Jerome; Robert, Jacques; Pillet, Pierre; Vanhaecke, Nicolas

    2010-04-02

    We have induced adiabatic transitions in pairs of frozen Rydberg sodium atoms of a supersonic beam. The diatomic ns+ns{yields}np+(n-1)p transition takes place in a time-dependent electric field and originates from the adiabatic change of the internal state of the pair induced by the dipole-dipole interaction. This is experimentally achieved by sweeping an electric field across the energy degeneracy ns ns-np(n-1)p. Our results fully agree with a two-level Landau-Zener model in the diatom system.

  10. Photoassociative cooling and trapping of a pair of interacting atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subrata; Naskar, Somnath; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-08-01

    We show that it is possible to cool interacting pairs of atoms by a lin ⊥ lin Sisyphus-like laser cooling scheme using counterpropagating photoassociation (PA) lasers. It is shown that the center-of-mass (c.m.) motion of atom pairs can be trapped in molecular spin-dependent periodic potentials generated by the lasers. The proposed scheme is most effective for narrow-line PA transitions. We illustrate this with numerical calculations using fermionic 171Yb atoms as an example.

  11. Passive estimation of the waveguide invariant per pair of modes.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Yann; Bonnel, Julien

    2013-08-01

    In many oceanic waveguides, acoustic propagation is characterized by a parameter called waveguide invariant. This property is used in many passive and active sonar applications where knowledge of the waveguide invariant value is required. The waveguide invariant is classically considered as scalar but several studies show that it is better modeled by a distribution because of its dependence on frequency and mode pairs. This paper presents a new method for estimating the waveguide invariant distribution. Using the noise radiated by a distant ship and a single hydrophone, the proposed methodology allows estimating the waveguide invariant for each pair of modes in shallow water. Performance is evaluated on simulated data.

  12. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    It has been reported that the most predominant constituents of coal extract are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Yet the experimental values of diffusivity in ethyl acetate for the most of these materials were not available in the literature. Thus, the diffusion coefficients of some of these materials were measured to increase an understanding of the diffusional behavior of coal macromolecules. In an earlier quarterly report, the authors reported the diffusion coefficients of some model coal molecules determined using their diffusion cell with polycarbonate membranes. Subsequently, they have found that these polycarbonate membranes are semi-permeable to some of the model compounds, so that the measured diffusion flux was greater than that through the pores alone. This extra solute flux could result in over estimation of the diffusion coefficients, therefore, they have now re-measured these diffusivities using polyester, rather than polycarbonate, membranes. The polyester material is not permeable to the solute molecules, except through the open pore area. Thus the only diffusion flux is that through the pores, resulting in correct diffusion coefficients as reported herein. The detailed results are presented in the body of this report. Finally in the last section the authors discuss a slight departure in methodology of some of their earlier planned work. This change will have a positive beneficial impact on the results and speed-up the collection of configurational diffusion data in actual tortuous porous media. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Configurational forces in solid nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhigang Suo

    2006-06-12

    The DOE grant (DE-FG02-99ER45787) to Princeton University, entitled Configurational Forces in Solid Nanostructures, was intended to cover the four-year period from September 1999 to September 2003. Effective 1 July 2003, the PI will relocate from Princeton to join the Harvard faculty. Princeton University will submit the Final Financial Report, the Final Property Report, and the Final Patent Report. The expenditures to date are $261,513 with %8,487 remaining of the awarded amount of $320,000. Harvard University will submit a request for the remaining amount. This Final Technical Report covers from the period between September 1999 to June 2003. Three Ph.D. students, Wei Lu, Yanfei Gao and Wei Hong, admitted to Princeton in the fall of 1998, 1999, 2002, respectively, have been dedicated to this project. Wei Lu earned his Ph.D. in August 2001, and is now an assistant professor at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Yanfei Gao earned his Ph.D. in February 2003, and is now a post-doc at Brown University. The amount of funding covers one student at a time. All three students received first-year fellowships from Princeton University. In the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, to fulfill a doctoral degree requirement, every student serves as a teaching assistant for three semesters, for which the student is partially paid by the University.

  14. High Performance Field Reversed Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, Michl

    2014-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a prolate compact toroid with poloidal magnetic fields. FRCs could lead to economic fusion reactors with high power density, simple geometry, natural divertor, ease of translation, and possibly capable of burning aneutronic fuels. However, as in other high-beta plasmas, there are stability and confinement concerns. These concerns can be addressed by introducing and maintaining a significant fast ion population in the system. This is the approach adopted by TAE and implemented for the first time in the C-2 device. Studying the physics of FRCs driven by Neutral Beam (NB) injection, significant improvements were made in confinement and stability. Early C-2 discharges had relatively good confinement, but global power losses exceeded the available NB input power. The addition of axially streaming plasma guns, magnetic end plugs as well as advanced surface conditioning leads to dramatic reductions in turbulence driven losses and greatly improved stability. As a result, fast ion confinement significantly improved and allowed for build-up of a dominant fast particle population. Under such appropriate conditions we achieved highly reproducible, long-lived, macroscopically stable FRCs with record lifetimes. This demonstrated many beneficial effects of large orbit particles and their performance impact on FRCs Together these achievements point to the prospect of beam-driven FRCs as a path toward fusion reactors. This presentation will review and expand on key results and present context for their interpretation.

  15. Simulator sickness and HMD configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Jennifer A.

    1997-12-01

    The helmet-mounted display (HMD), often used in non-vehicle- based virtual environments (VEs), can be configured as either a stereoscopic or bi-ocular display. As a stereoscopic display the computer modeling the VE calculates two different views for each eye, based upon the views each eye normally receives due to their separation in the head. On the other hand, the same view can be presented to each eye, resulting in a bi- ocular display. The normally linked processes of accommodation and vergence must be decoupled when viewing through an HMD. This way of perceiving may lead to physiological problems. For example, a common problem with virtual environments (VE) is simulator sickness. Its symptoms are similar to those experienced in motion sickness, and include problems with eyestrain, disorientation, and nausea. A study was conducted in which both relative differences in simulator sickness and performance were examined for walking, tracking, distance estimation, and micromanipulation tasks. Using the self-report simulator sickness questionnaire (SSQ), data revealed that the stereoscopic condition was more nauseogenic. In addition, post-experimental disorientation, oculomotor discomfort and total severity measures correlated significantly with completion time on a task that required more near-far focal transitions within a short period of time than any other task.

  16. Absolute configuration of isovouacapenol C

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Yodsaoue, Orapun; Karalai, Chatchanok; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, C27H34O5 {systematic name: (4aR,5R,6R,6aS,7R,11aS,11bR)-4a,6-dihy­droxy-4,4,7,11b-tetra­methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,6a,7,11,11a,11b-dodeca­hydro­phenanthro[3,2-b]furan-5-yl benzoate}, is a cassane furan­oditerpene, which was isolated from the roots of Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The three cyclo­hexane rings are trans fused: two of these are in chair conformations with the third in a twisted half-chair conformation, whereas the furan ring is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.003 Å). An intra­molecular C—H⋯O inter­action generates an S(6) ring. The absolute configurations of the stereogenic centres at positions 4a, 5, 6, 6a, 7, 11a and 11b are R, R, R, S, R, S and R, respectively. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into infinite chains along [010] by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. C⋯O [3.306 (2)–3.347 (2) Å] short contacts and C—H⋯π inter­actions also occur. PMID:21588364

  17. Space Station-Baseline Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    In response to President Reagan's directive to NASA to develop a permanent marned Space Station within a decade, part of the State of the Union message to Congress on January 25, 1984, NASA and the Administration adopted a phased approach to Station development. This approach provided an initial capability at reduced costs, to be followed by an enhanced Space Station capability in the future. This illustration depicts the baseline configuration, which features a 110-meter-long horizontal boom with four pressurized modules attached in the middle. Located at each end are four photovoltaic arrays generating a total of 75-kW of power. Two attachment points for external payloads are provided along this boom. The four pressurized modules include the following: A laboratory and habitation module provided by the United States; two additional laboratories, one each provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Japan; and an ESA-provided Man-Tended Free Flyer, a pressurized module capable of operations both attached to and separate from the Space Station core. Canada was expected to provide the first increment of a Mobile Serving System.

  18. Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of FTEs Produced by Merging at an Isolated Point in a Sheared Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, J. C.; Sibeck, D. G.; Buchner, J.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Ferreira, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    We present predictions for the evolution of FTEs generated by localized bursts of reconnection on a planar magnetopause that separates a magnetosheath region of high densities and weak magnetic field from a magnetospheric region of low densities and strong magnetic field. The magnetic fields present a shear angle of 105 degrees. Reconnection forms a pair of FTEs each crossing the magnetopause in the field reversal region and bulging into the magnetosphere and magnetosheath. At their initial stage they can be characterized as flux tubes since the newly reconnected magnetic field lines are not twisted. Reconnection launches Alfvenic perturbations that propagate along the FTEs generating high-speed jets, which move the pair of FTEs in opposite directions. As the FTE moves, it displaces the ambient magnetic field and plasma producing bipolar magnetic field and plasma velocity signatures normal to the nominal magnetopause in the regions surrounding the FTE. The combination of the ambient plasma with the FTE flows generates a vortical velocity pattern around the reconnected field lines. During its evolution the FTE evolves to a flux rope configuration due to the twist of the magnetic field lines. The alfvenic perturbations propagate faster along the part of the FTE bulging into the magnetosphere than in the magnetosheath, and due to the differences between the plasma and magnetic field properties the perturbations have slightly different signatures in the two regions. As a consequence, the FTEs have different signatures depending on whether the satellite encounters the part bulging into the magnetosphere or into the magnetosheath.

  19. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-03-24

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO₂/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope. We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials.

  20. Is the whole the sum of its parts? Configural processing of headless bodies in the right fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Soria Bauser, Denise; Suchan, Boris

    2015-03-15

    The current study aimed to explore the functional magnetic resonance (fMR)-adaption effect by presenting intact and scrambled headless bodies and faces. This fMR-adaption paradigm allows investigating processing specificity in distinct brain areas by comparing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal related to the presentation of same or different pairs of bodies. There is clear evidence that we prefer whole bodies compared to the sum of their parts. This effect refers to a subtype of configural processing termed first-order relational information. The preference for whole bodies seems to be associated with activation pattern in body-sensitive brain regions. However, it remains unclear until now, which cortical area exactly mediates this preference. In the present study, we investigated whether there are neuronal populations that show a selective adaption to whole bodies compared to the sum of their parts. The right fusiform body area (FBA) showed a preference for whole bodies compared to the sum of their parts as the right and left fusiform face area showed a preference for whole faces compared to the sum of their parts. Thus, the present data support the idea that configural body and face processing is mediated by the fusiform gyrus. The current data further support the view that bodies are a special stimulus class with specific characteristics which are processed in body-sensitive brain areas.

  1. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-03-24

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO₂/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope.more » We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials.« less

  2. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO2/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope. We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25801337

  3. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO2/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope. We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25801337

  4. Bound Polaron Pair Formation in Poly (phenylenevinylenes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * PHOTOGENERATED YIELD OF SINGLET EXCITONS * AGGREGRATION EFFECTS ON EXCITED STATE PHOTO-GENERATION * ASSIGNMENT TO BOUND POLARON PAIRS AND DISCUSSION * PROBLEMS WITH THE BOUND POLARON PAIR PICTURE AND CONCLUSION * REFERENCES

  5. Pair bonds: arrival synchrony in migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, T G; Gill, J A; Sigurbjörnsson, T; Sutherland, W J

    2004-10-01

    Synchronous arrival of pairs of migratory birds at their breeding grounds is important for maintaining pair bonds and is achieved by pairs that remain together all year round. Here we show that arrival is also synchronized in paired individuals of a migratory shorebird, the black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa islandica), even though they winter hundreds of kilometres apart and do not migrate together. The mechanisms required to achieve this synchrony and prevent 'divorce' illustrate the complexity of migratory systems. PMID:15470417

  6. Isovector Pairing within the so(5) Richardson-Gaudin Exactly Solvable Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrova, S S; Dukelsky, J; Gueorguiev, V G; Van Isacker, P

    2005-10-10

    Properties of a nucleon system interacting via isovector proton-neutron pairing can be described within the so(5) generalized Richardson-Gaudin exactly-solvable model [1]. We present results for a system of 12 nucleon pairs within the full f{sub p} + g{sub 9/2} shell-model space. We discuss coupling constant dependence of the pair energies, total energy of the system, and the occupation numbers.

  7. Individuation of Pairs of Objects in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Alan M.; Chen, Marian L.

    2007-01-01

    Looking-time studies examined whether 11-month-old infants can individuate two pairs of objects using only shape information. In order to test individuation, the object pairs were presented sequentially. Infants were familiarized either with the sequential pairs, disk-triangle/disk-triangle (XY/XY), whose shapes differed within but not across…

  8. The Associability of CVC Pairs. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, William E.; Kiess, Harold O.

    To obtain an a priori estimate of natural language mediators (NLM's) 320 pairs of words with the consonant-vowel-consonant-pattern (CVC's) were broken into four series of 90 pairs and presented to 240 male and female undergraduates. Pairs were shown for 15 seconds while the subjects wrote down any associative device or NLM they could generate that…

  9. Plant-wide control: eco-efficiency and control loop configuration.

    PubMed

    Munir, M T; Yu, W; Young, B R

    2013-01-01

    Since the eco-efficiency of all industrial processes/plants has become increasingly important, engineers need to find a way to integrate the control loop configuration and the measurements of eco-efficiency. A new measure of eco-efficiency, the exergy eco-efficiency factor, for control loop configuration, is proposed in this paper. The exergy eco-efficiency factor is based on the thermodynamic concept of exergy which can be used to analyse a process in terms of its efficiency associated with the control configuration. The combination of control pairing configuration techniques (such as the relative gain array, RGA and Niederlinski index, NI) and the proposed exergy eco-efficiency factor will guide the process designer to reach the optimal control design with low operational cost (i.e., energy consumption). The exergy eco-efficiency factor is implemented in the process simulation case study and the reliability of the proposed method is demonstrated by dynamic simulation results.

  10. Automated verification of system configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, W. H., Jr.; Baker, S. P.; Blalock, A. V.

    1991-05-01

    Errors in field wiring can result in significant correction costs (if the errors are discovered prior to use), in erroneous or unusable data (if the errors are not discovered in time), or in serious accidents (if the errors corrupt critical data). Detailed field wiring checkout rework are tedious and expensive, but they are essential steps in the quality assurance process for large, complex instrumentation and control systems. A recent Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) development, the CONFiguration IDEnification System (CONFIDES) automates verification of field wiring. In CONFIDES, an identifier module is installed on or integrated into each component (e.g., sensor, actuator, cable, distribution panel) to be verified. Interrogator modules, controlled by a personal computer (PC), are installed at the connections of the field wiring to the inputs of the data acquisition and control system (DACS). Interrogator modules poll the components connected to each channel of the DACS and can determine the path taken by each channel's signal to or from the end device for that channel. The system will provide not only the identification (ID) code for the cables and patch panels in the path to a particular sensor or actuator but for individual cable conductor IDs as well. One version of the system uses existing signal wires for communications between CONFIDES modules. Another, more powerful version requires a single dedicated conductor in each cable. Both version can operate with or without instrument power applied and neither interferes with the normal operation of the DACS. Identifier modules can provide a variety of information including status and calibration data.

  11. Metrics for measuring distances in configuration spaces.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Ali; Ghasemi, S Alireza; Schaefer, Bastian; Mohr, Stephan; Lill, Markus A; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-11-14

    In order to characterize molecular structures we introduce configurational fingerprint vectors which are counterparts of quantities used experimentally to identify structures. The Euclidean distance between the configurational fingerprint vectors satisfies the properties of a metric and can therefore safely be used to measure dissimilarities between configurations in the high dimensional configuration space. In particular we show that these metrics are a perfect and computationally cheap replacement for the root-mean-square distance (RMSD) when one has to decide whether two noise contaminated configurations are identical or not. We introduce a Monte Carlo approach to obtain the global minimum of the RMSD between configurations, which is obtained from a global minimization over all translations, rotations, and permutations of atomic indices. PMID:24320265

  12. Metrics for measuring distances in configuration spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, Ali Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Schaefer, Bastian; Mohr, Stephan; Goedecker, Stefan; Lill, Markus A.

    2013-11-14

    In order to characterize molecular structures we introduce configurational fingerprint vectors which are counterparts of quantities used experimentally to identify structures. The Euclidean distance between the configurational fingerprint vectors satisfies the properties of a metric and can therefore safely be used to measure dissimilarities between configurations in the high dimensional configuration space. In particular we show that these metrics are a perfect and computationally cheap replacement for the root-mean-square distance (RMSD) when one has to decide whether two noise contaminated configurations are identical or not. We introduce a Monte Carlo approach to obtain the global minimum of the RMSD between configurations, which is obtained from a global minimization over all translations, rotations, and permutations of atomic indices.

  13. The role of close pair interactions in triggering stellar bars and rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Preethi; Ellison, Sara; Patton, David

    2015-03-01

    Recent works which have looked at bars in clusters versus the field have found no significant difference in bar fraction. However, other works (Nair & Abraham 2010, Lee et al. 2012) have found that bar fractions depend sensitively on the mass, morphology and color of the galaxy. In addition, simulations suggest that bar formation may depend on the merger ratio of close pair interactions as well as on the separation between the pairs. In this work, we analyze the bar fractions in a complete sample of ~23,000 close pairs derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We will present results illustrating the dependence of bar and ring fractions as a function of merger mass ratio, pair separation, galaxy morphology, and stellar mass. I will further compare the role of bars and close pairs in triggering central star formation and AGN.

  14. Topological superconductivity and unconventional pairing in oxide interfaces.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, Mathias S; Schmalian, Jörg

    2015-01-28

    Pinpointing the microscopic mechanism for superconductivity has proven to be one of the most outstanding challenges in the physics of correlated quantum matter. Thus far, the most direct evidence for an electronic pairing mechanism is the observation of a new symmetry of the order parameter, as done in the cuprate high-temperature superconductors. Alternatively, global, topological invariants allow for a sharp discrimination between states of matter that cannot be transformed into each other adiabatically. Here we propose an unconventional pairing state for the electron fluid in two-dimensional oxide interfaces and establish a direct link to the emergence of non-trivial topological invariants. Topological signatures, in particular Majorana edge states, can then be used to detect the microscopic origin of superconductivity. In addition, we show that also the density wave states that compete with superconductivity sensitively depend on the nature of the pairing interaction.

  15. Magnetosonic shock wave in collisional pair-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Sikdar, Arnab; Ghosh, Samiran; Khan, Manoranjan

    2016-06-01

    Nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic shock wave has been studied in collisional magnetized pair-ion plasma. The masses of both ions are same but the temperatures are slightly different. Two fluid model has been taken to describe the model. Two different modes of the magnetosonic wave have been obtained. The dynamics of the nonlinear magnetosonic wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers' equation. It has been shown that the ion-ion collision is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The numerical investigations reveal that the magnetosonic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the strength of the dissipation. The nonlinear wave exhibited the oscillatory shock wave for strong magnetic field (weak dissipation) and monotonic shock wave for weak magnetic field (strong dissipation). The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  16. Kappa statistic for clustered matched-pair data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Zhou, Ming

    2014-07-10

    Kappa statistic is widely used to assess the agreement between two procedures in the independent matched-pair data. For matched-pair data collected in clusters, on the basis of the delta method and sampling techniques, we propose a nonparametric variance estimator for the kappa statistic without within-cluster correlation structure or distributional assumptions. The results of an extensive Monte Carlo simulation study demonstrate that the proposed kappa statistic provides consistent estimation and the proposed variance estimator behaves reasonably well for at least a moderately large number of clusters (e.g., K ≥50). Compared with the variance estimator ignoring dependence within a cluster, the proposed variance estimator performs better in maintaining the nominal coverage probability when the intra-cluster correlation is fair (ρ ≥0.3), with more pronounced improvement when ρ is further increased. To illustrate the practical application of the proposed estimator, we analyze two real data examples of clustered matched-pair data.

  17. Topological superconductivity and unconventional pairing in oxide interfaces.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, Mathias S; Schmalian, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Pinpointing the microscopic mechanism for superconductivity has proven to be one of the most outstanding challenges in the physics of correlated quantum matter. Thus far, the most direct evidence for an electronic pairing mechanism is the observation of a new symmetry of the order parameter, as done in the cuprate high-temperature superconductors. Alternatively, global, topological invariants allow for a sharp discrimination between states of matter that cannot be transformed into each other adiabatically. Here we propose an unconventional pairing state for the electron fluid in two-dimensional oxide interfaces and establish a direct link to the emergence of non-trivial topological invariants. Topological signatures, in particular Majorana edge states, can then be used to detect the microscopic origin of superconductivity. In addition, we show that also the density wave states that compete with superconductivity sensitively depend on the nature of the pairing interaction. PMID:25629433

  18. Variational study of λ and N atomic configurations interacting with an electromagnetic field of two modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, S.; Castaños, O.; López-Peña, R.; Nahmad-Achar, E.

    2016-07-01

    A study of the λ and N atomic configurations under dipolar interaction with two modes of electromagnetic radiation is presented. The corresponding quantum phase diagrams are obtained by means of a variational procedure. Both configurations exhibit normal and collective (super-radiant) regimes. While the latter in the λ configuration divides itself into two subregions, corresponding to each of the modes, that in the N configuration may be divided into two or three subregions depending on whether the field modes divide the atomic system into two separate subsystems or not. Our variational procedure compares well with the exact quantum solution. The properties of the relevant field and matter observables are obtained.

  19. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  20. Peltier Current Leads with conical configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakimi, I.; Nikulshin, Y.; Wolfus, S.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Current leads in cryogenic systems are a major heat source which eventually affects the entire system. It has been shown in recent years that Peltier elements are useful in reducing incoming heat into the cold system. In this article we present a new tapered cone-like configuration of the Peltier Current Leads which increases the power saving. This configuration is compared to the standard cylindrical configuration utilizing advanced ANSYS simulations. The simulations show an additional power saving of 4% when using the tapered lead configuration.

  1. Stellar kinematics of elliptical galaxies in pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejsky, Rainer; Bender, Ralf

    1990-01-01

    In both galaxy pairs Arp 166 and 3C 278 the authors find radially increasing velocity dispersions indicating a perturbed, non-equilibrium state of the galaxies after the tidal interaction. In all galaxies, the increase is most pronounced in the regions which correspond to the centers of the outer isophotes. The authors suggest a scenario in which the galaxies are strongly decelerated on their orbits during the encounter. The deceleration depends on the radial position in the perturbed galaxy and vanishes in the center of the perturbed galaxy (Spitzer, 1958). In addition, the crossing time of the stars near the center is very short, implying that the tidal perturbations can be averaged over several orbital periods (e.g., Binney and Tremaine, 1987). In consequence, the central parts are not affected by the tidal interaction while the outer parts are strongly decelerated. This leads to a displacement of the central parts of the galaxies with respect to their envelopes in an anti-symmetrical way for the two components of each galaxy pair. The motions of the central parts subsequently are opposed by dynamical friction with the surrounding envelopes. Due to dynamical friction, the density of the stars increases in the wakes of the moving central parts (Mulder, 1983). The overdensity of stars in the wakes of the moving central parts efficiently decelerates the motions of the central parts. The reaction of the stars in the overdensity regions leads to an increase of the velocity dispersion mainly along the orbits of the moving central parts. The presented observations, especially the asymmetrical luminosity profiles and the radially increasing velocity dispersions support consistently the above scenario of tidal interaction between galaxies. Further spectroscopic observations are necessary in order to investigate the degree of anisotropy in the kinematically perturbed regions.

  2. Ideal teleradiology configuration from a physician's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckie, Robert G.; de Treville, Robert E.; Lyche, David K.; Norton, Gary S.; Goeringer, Fred; Willis, Charles E.; Cawthon, Michael A.; Smith, Donald V.; Hansen, Mark

    1993-09-01

    Teleradiology systems are being developed and implemented around the world. The ultimate success of these systems depends on the acceptance by the end users -- the physicians. From a physician's perspective, several major areas need to be addressed in the ideal situation. The areas include (1) image quality and ease of manipulation of images on a workstation; (2) expert interpretation by a specialist or sub-specialist; (3) good communication between the radiologist, radiology technologist, primary care physician, and the patient; (4) accessibility to images; (5) system reliability; (6) costs and assistance in balancing workloads; and (7) education and research. The Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support (MDIS) System is a large tri-service project to install picture archive and communication systems (PACS) and teleradiology at military medical treatment facilities across the United States and abroad. The first sites primarily involved with teleradiology will be installed in the summer of 1993. Ways in which the MDIS teleradiology system address the physicians' ideal configuration as well as possible future improvements are discussed.

  3. Pair Cascades in Blazars and Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustazadeh Sheikhyousefi, Parisa

    2012-05-01

    magnetic field in the AGN environment, secondary particles produced by gamma-gamma absorption can be isotropized. I suggested that the Compton emission from VHE gamma-ray induced pair cascades can explain the detection of radio galaxies as high energy sources. I presented fits to the the Fermi fluxes and spectra of the radio galaxies Cen A and NGC 1275. In the last part of my Ph. D. research work, I developed my Monte-Carlo code to include energy loss of particles by synchrotron radiation between to successive Compton scatterings and the angle dependence of the synchrotron output from the cascade. This can be important for situations when the magnetic field in the AGN environment is not negligible. I showed that the synchrotron radiation from the cascades in the radio galaxies NGC 1275 and Cen A with the parameters used in my first and second paper are much smaller than the synchrotron radiation from the jets and neglecting synchrotron radiation in those works is justified. I found that the magnetic field can not be determined from a fit of the cascade emission to the gamma-ray spectrum alone. I studied this scenario for the case of NGC 1275 and showed that the degeneracy of the magnetic field can only be lifted if the synchrotron emission from the cascade is observed as well. I suggest that the big blue bump (BBB) observed in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of several blazars can be due to the synchrotron radiation from cascades. This can be an alternative explanation of the BBB signature and I illustrate this idea on the blazar 3C 279. I have investigated the apparent absorption feature observed in the SEDs of some blazars such as W Comae and S5 0716+714 in the 10-100 GeV energy range and point out that this can be due to gamma-gamma absorption of primary gamma-ray photons by soft photons from the BLR or dust torus. During this study, I participated in three observing runs at the MDM observatory on Kitt Peak near Tucson, Arizona and I monitored the optical

  4. Pair Cascades in Blazars and Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustazadeh Sheikhyousefi, Parisa

    2012-05-01

    magnetic field in the AGN environment, secondary particles produced by gamma-gamma absorption can be isotropized. I suggested that the Compton emission from VHE gamma-ray induced pair cascades can explain the detection of radio galaxies as high energy sources. I presented fits to the the Fermi fluxes and spectra of the radio galaxies Cen A and NGC 1275. In the last part of my Ph. D. research work, I developed my Monte-Carlo code to include energy loss of particles by synchrotron radiation between to successive Compton scatterings and the angle dependence of the synchrotron output from the cascade. This can be important for situations when the magnetic field in the AGN environment is not negligible. I showed that the synchrotron radiation from the cascades in the radio galaxies NGC 1275 and Cen A with the parameters used in my first and second paper are much smaller than the synchrotron radiation from the jets and neglecting synchrotron radiation in those works is justified. I found that the magnetic field can not be determined from a fit of the cascade emission to the gamma-ray spectrum alone. I studied this scenario for the case of NGC 1275 and showed that the degeneracy of the magnetic field can only be lifted if the synchrotron emission from the cascade is observed as well. I suggest that the big blue bump (BBB) observed in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of several blazars can be due to the synchrotron radiation from cascades. This can be an alternative explanation of the BBB signature and I illustrate this idea on the blazar 3C 279. I have investigated the apparent absorption feature observed in the SEDs of some blazars such as W Comae and S5 0716+714 in the 10-100 GeV energy range and point out that this can be due to gamma-gamma absorption of primary gamma-ray photons by soft photons from the BLR or dust torus. During this study, I participated in three observing runs at the MDM observatory on Kitt Peak near Tucson, Arizona and I monitored the optical

  5. Resonance tunneling of cooper pairs in a superconductor-polymer-superconductor josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Ionov, A. I.

    2013-05-15

    It is shown that the superconducting current flowing though a polymer in a superconductor-polymer-superconductor Josephson structure is due to resonant tunneling of Cooper pairs. The critical current and the thickness of the polymer in which the superconducting current is observed depend on the coherence length of a Cooper pair in the superconductor contacting the polymer.

  6. Configurable Multi-Purpose Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencia, J. Emilio; Forney, Chirstopher; Morrison, Robert; Birr, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Advancements in technology have allowed the miniaturization of systems used in aerospace vehicles. This technology is driven by the need for next-generation systems that provide reliable, responsive, and cost-effective range operations while providing increased capabilities such as simultaneous mission support, increased launch trajectories, improved launch, and landing opportunities, etc. Leveraging the newest technologies, the command and telemetry processor (CTP) concept provides for a compact, flexible, and integrated solution for flight command and telemetry systems and range systems. The CTP is a relatively small circuit board that serves as a processing platform for high dynamic, high vibration environments. The CTP can be reconfigured and reprogrammed, allowing it to be adapted for many different applications. The design is centered around a configurable field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device that contains numerous logic cells that can be used to implement traditional integrated circuits. The FPGA contains two PowerPC processors running the Vx-Works real-time operating system and are used to execute software programs specific to each application. The CTP was designed and developed specifically to provide telemetry functions; namely, the command processing, telemetry processing, and GPS metric tracking of a flight vehicle. However, it can be used as a general-purpose processor board to perform numerous functions implemented in either hardware or software using the FPGA s processors and/or logic cells. Functionally, the CTP was designed for range safety applications where it would ultimately become part of a vehicle s flight termination system. Consequently, the major functions of the CTP are to perform the forward link command processing, GPS metric tracking, return link telemetry data processing, error detection and correction, data encryption/ decryption, and initiate flight termination action commands. Also, the CTP had to be designed to survive and

  7. Homologue pairing, recombination and segregation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zetka, M

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis in the free-living, hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is marked by the same highly conserved features observed in other sexually reproducing systems. Accurate chromosome segregation at the meiotic divisions depends on earlier landmark events of meiotic prophase, including the pairing of homologous chromosomes, synapsis between them, and the formation of crossovers. Dissection of these processes has revealed a unique simplification of meiotic mechanisms that impact the interpretation of meiotic chromosome behaviour in more complex systems. Chromosome sites required for chromosome pairing are consolidated to one end of each chromosome, the many sites of recombination initiation are resolved into a single crossover for each chromosome pair, and the diffuse (holocentric) kinetic activity that extends along the length of the mitotic chromosomes is reduced to a single end of each meiotic chromosome. Consequently, studies from the nematode have illuminated and challenged long-standing concepts of homologue pairing mechanisms, crossover interference, and kinetochore structure. Because chromosome pairing, synapsis, and recombination can proceed independently of one another, C. elegans has provided a simplified system for studying these processes and the mechanisms mediating their coordination during meiosis. This review covers the major features of C. elegans meiosis with emphasis on its contributions to understanding essential meiotic processes. PMID:18948706

  8. Pair truncation for rotational nuclei: j =(17/2 model

    SciTech Connect

    Halse, P.; Jaqua, L.; Barrett, B.R. )

    1989-08-01

    The suitability of the pair condensate approach for rotational states is studied in a single {ital j}=17/2 shell of identical nucleons interacting through a quadrupole-quadrupole Hamiltonian. The ground band and a {ital K}=2 excited band are both studied in detail. A direct comparison of the exact states with those constituting the {ital SD} and {ital SDG} subspaces is used to identify the important degrees of freedom for these levels. The range of pairs necessary for a good description is found to be highly state dependent; {ital S} and {ital D} pairs are the major constituents of the low-spin ground-band levels, while {ital G} pairs are needed for those in the {gamma} band. Energy spectra are obtained for each truncated subspace. {ital SDG} pairs allow accurate reproduction of the binding energy and {ital K}=2 excitation energy, but still give a moment of inertia which is about 30% too small even for the lowest levels.

  9. Modulated pair condensate of p-orbital ultracold fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zixu; Hung, Hsiang-Hsuan; Ho, Chiu Man; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2010-09-01

    We show that an interesting kind of pairing occurs for spin-imbalanced Fermi gases under a specific experimental condition—the spin up and spin down Fermi levels lying within the px and s orbital bands of an optical lattice, respectively. The pairs condense at a finite momentum equal to the sum of the two Fermi momenta of spin up and spin down fermions and form a p-orbital pair condensate. This 2kF momentum dependence has been seen before in spin- and charge-density waves, but it differs from the usual p-wave superfluids such as He3, where the orbital symmetry refers to the relative motion within each pair. Our conclusion is based on the density matrix renormalization group analysis for the one-dimensional (1D) system and mean-field theory for the quasi-1D system. The phase diagram of the quasi-1D system is calculated, showing that the p-orbital pair condensate occurs in a wide range of fillings. In the strongly attractive limit, the system realizes an unconventional BEC beyond Feynman’s no-node theorem. The possible experimental signatures of this phase in molecule projection experiment are discussed.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of homologous chromosome pairing and segregation in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Su, Handong; Birchler, James A; Han, Fangpu

    2014-03-20

    In most eukaryotic species, three basic steps of pairing, recombination and synapsis occur during prophase of meiosis I. Homologous chromosomal pairing and recombination are essential for accurate segregation of chromosomes. In contrast to the well-studied processes such as recombination and synapsis, many aspects of chromosome pairing are still obscure. Recent progress in several species indicates that the telomere bouquet formation can facilitate homologous chromosome pairing by bringing chromosome ends into close proximity, but the sole presence of telomere clustering is not sufficient for recognizing homologous pairs. On the other hand, accurate segregation of the genetic material from parent to offspring during meiosis is dependent on the segregation of homologs in the reductional meiotic division (MI) with sister kinetochores exhibiting mono-orientation from the same pole, and the segregation of sister chromatids during the equational meiotic division (MII) with kinetochores showing bi-orientation from the two poles. The underlying mechanism of orientation and segregation is still unclear. Here we focus on recent studies in plants and other species that provide insight into how chromosomes find their partners and mechanisms mediating chromosomal segregation. PMID:24656232

  11. New longitudinal mode and compression of pair ions in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Zahida; Tsintsadze, N. L.; Shah, H. A.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Imran, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    Positive and negative ions forming the so-called pair plasma differing in sign of their charge but asymmetric in mass and temperature support a new acoustic-like mode. The condition for the excitation of ion sound wave through electron beam induced Cherenkov instability is also investigated. This beam can generate a perturbation in the pair ion plasmas in the presence of electrons when there is number density, temperature, and mass difference in the two species of ions. Basic emphasis is on the focusing of ion sound waves, and we show how, in the area of localization of wave energy, the density of pair particles increases while electrons are pushed away from that region. Further, this localization of wave is dependent on the shape of the pulse. Considering the example of pancake and bullet shaped pulses, we find that only the former leads to compression of pair ions in the supersonic regime of the focusing region. Here, possible existence of regions where pure pair particles can exist may also be speculated which is not only useful from academic point of view but also to mimic the situation of plasma (electron positron asymmetric and symmetric) observed in astrophysical environment.

  12. Cylindrically confined pair-ion-electron and pair-ion plasmas having axial sheared flow and radial gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Saleem, H.

    2013-10-15

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of pair-ion (PI) and pair-ion-electron plasmas (PIE) have been investigated in a cylindrical geometry with a sheared plasma flow along the axial direction having radial dependence. The coupled linear dispersion relation of low frequency electrostatic waves has been presented taking into account the Guassian profile of density and linear gradient of sheared flow. It is pointed out that the quasi-neutral cold inhomogeneous pure pair ion plasma supports only the obliquely propagating convective cell mode. The linear dispersion relation of this mode has been solved using boundary conditions. The nonlinear structures in the form of vortices formed by different waves have been discussed in PI and PIE plasmas.

  13. Face features and face configurations both contribute to visual crowding.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hsin-Mei; Balas, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Crowding refers to the inability to recognize an object in peripheral vision when other objects are presented nearby (Whitney & Levi Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 15, 160-168, 2011). A popular explanation of crowding is that features of the target and flankers are combined inappropriately when they are located within an integration field, thus impairing target recognition (Pelli, Palomares, & Majaj Journal of Vision, 4(12), 12:1136-1169, 2004). However, it remains unclear which features of the target and flankers are combined inappropriately to cause crowding (Levi Vision Research, 48, 635-654, 2008). For example, in a complex stimulus (e.g., a face), to what extent does crowding result from the integration of features at a part-based level or at the level of global processing of the configural appearance? In this study, we used a face categorization task and different types of flankers to examine how much the magnitude of visual crowding depends on the similarity of face parts or of global configurations. We created flankers with face-like features (e.g., the eyes, nose, and mouth) in typical and scrambled configurations to examine the impacts of part appearance and global configuration on the visual crowding of faces. Additionally, we used "electrical socket" flankers that mimicked first-order face configuration but had only schematic features, to examine the extent to which global face geometry impacted crowding. Our results indicated that both face parts and configurations contribute to visual crowding, suggesting that face similarity as realized under crowded conditions includes both aspects of facial appearance.

  14. Experiment Configurations for the DAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This image shows three vehicle configurations considered for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center between 1977 and 1983. The DAST project planned for three wing configurations. These were the Instrumented Standard Wing (ISW), the Aeroelastic Research Wing-1 (ARW-1), and the ARW-2. After the DAST-1 crash, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II with a rebuilt ARW-1 wing. Due to the project's ending, it never flew the ARW-2 wing. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic

  15. Influence of side chain configuration on anti-inflammatory analgesic and anti-pyretic properties of 4-biphenylyl alkanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Tenconi, F; Barzaghi, F; Riva, M; Meli, A

    1976-04-01

    A study on the influence of the number of carbon atoms in the side chain as well as side chain configuration on some pharmacologic properties of 4-biphenylyl alkanoic acids is presented. Unlike the chemical structure dependent anti-inflammatory properties, mild analgesic and anti-pyretic properties were neither dependent upon number of carbon atoms nor side chain configuration. PMID:939325

  16. Multi-user distribution of polarization entangled photon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Trapateau, J.; Orieux, A.; Diamanti, E.; Zaquine, I.; Ghalbouni, J.

    2015-10-14

    We experimentally demonstrate multi-user distribution of polarization entanglement using commercial telecom wavelength division demultiplexers. The entangled photon pairs are generated from a broadband source based on spontaneous parametric down conversion in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal using a double path setup employing a Michelson interferometer and active phase stabilisation. We test and compare demultiplexers based on various technologies and analyze the effect of their characteristics, such as losses and polarization dependence, on the quality of the distributed entanglement for three channel pairs of each demultiplexer. In all cases, we obtain a Bell inequality violation, whose value depends on the demultiplexer features. This demonstrates that entanglement can be distributed to at least three user pairs of a network from a single source. Additionally, we verify for the best demultiplexer that the violation is maintained when the pairs are distributed over a total channel attenuation corresponding to 20 km of optical fiber. These techniques are therefore suitable for resource-efficient practical implementations of entanglement-based quantum key distribution and other quantum communication network applications.

  17. Stability Of Plasma Configurations During Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Ruden, E L; Hammer, J H

    2006-10-27

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) efforts are based on calculations showing that the addition of a closed magnetic field reduces the driver pressure and rise time requirements for inertial confinement fusion by reducing thermal conductivity. Instabilities that result in convective bulk transport at the Alphen time scale are of particular concern since they are much faster than the implosion time. Such instabilities may occur during compression due to, for example, an increase in the plasma-magnetic pressure ratio {beta} or, in the case of a rotating plasma, spin-up due to angular momentum conservation. Details depend on the magnetic field topology and compression geometry. A hard core z pinch with purely azimuthal magnetic field can theoretically be made that relaxes into a wall supported diffuse profile satisfying the Kadomtsev criterion for the stability of m = 0 modes, which is theoretically preserved during cylindrical outer wall compression. The center conductor radius and current must also be large enough to keep the {beta} below stability limits to stabilize modes with m > 0. The stability of m > 0 modes actually improves during compression. A disadvantage of this geometry, though, is plasma contact with the solid boundaries. In addition to the risk of high Z impurity contamination during the (turbulent) relaxation process, contact thereafter can cause plasma pressure near the outer surface to drop, violating the Kadomtsev criterion locally. The resultant m = 0 instability can then convect impurities inward. Also, the center conductor (which is not part of the Kadomtsev profile) can go m = 0 unstable, convecting impurities outward. One way to mitigate impurity convection is to instead use a Woltjer-Taylor minimum magnetic energy configuration (spheromak). The sheared magnetic field inhibits convection, and the need for the center conductor is eliminated. The plasma, however, would likely still have to be wall supported due to unfavorable {beta} scaling during

  18. Flammability Configuration Analysis for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David

    2004-01-01

    Flight hardware configuration flammability assessment will: a) evaluate the overall hardware configuration; b) evaluate the way in which the hardware will be used; c) identify the major materials to be assessed; d) determine fire propagation paths; and e) evaluate ability of containers to contain fire.

  19. Existence Regions of Shock Wave Triple Configurations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Chernyshev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to create the classification for shock wave triple configurations and their existence regions of various types: type 1, type 2, type 3. Analytical solutions for limit Mach numbers and passing shock intensity that define existence region of every type of triple configuration have been acquired. The ratios that conjugate…

  20. System for Configuring Modular Telemetry Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system for configuring telemetry transponder cards uses a database of error checking protocol data structures, each containing data to implement at least one CCSDS protocol algorithm. Using a user interface, a user selects at least one telemetry specific error checking protocol from the database. A compiler configures an FPGA with the data from the data structures to implement the error checking protocol.