Science.gov

Sample records for confined aquifer system

  1. How to Recharge a Confined Alluvial Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maples, S.; Fogg, G. E.; Liu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Greater water storage capacity is needed to offset future decreases in snowpack-water storage in California. Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) in California's Central Valley aquifer system is a promising alternative to new surface reservoir storage because it has the potential to both reduce overdraft conditions observed in many Central Valley groundwater basins and offset continued decreases in snowpack storage. MAR to the Central Valley's productive confined-aquifer system remains a challenge because, like most alluvial aquifer systems, it is composed mostly of silt and clay sediments that form nearly ubiquitous, multiple confining layers that inhibit direct recharge of the interconnected sand and gravel body networks. Several studies have mapped surficial soil types in the Central Valley that are conducive to MAR, but few studies have evaluated how subsurface geologic heterogeneity controls recharge to the confined aquifer system. Here, we use a transition probability Markov-chain geostatistical model conditioned with 1200 well logs to create a physically-realistic representation of the subsurface geologic heterogeneity in the American and Cosumnes River watersheds on the east side of the Sacramento Valley, CA, where studies have shown the presence of massive, interconnected, highly-permeable gravel deposits that are potentially conducive to considerably higher rates of regional recharge than would be possible over the rest of the landscape. Such localized stratigraphic features to support accelerated recharge occur throughout the Central Valley, but are mostly still undiscovered. A variably-saturated, fully-integrated, groundwater/surface-water code, ParFlow, was used to simulate MAR dynamics in this system. Results show the potential for (1) accelerated, high-volume recharge through interconnected gravels where they outcrop at land surface, and (2) regional repressurization of the deeper confined aquifer system. These findings provide insight into the critical

  2. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  3. Upper Basalt-Confined Aquifer System in the Southern Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, P.

    1999-01-04

    The 1990 DOE Tiger Team Finding GW/CF-202 found that the hydrogeologic regime at the Hanford Site was inadequately characterized. This finding also identified the need for completing a study of the confined aquifer in the central and southern portions of the Hanford Site. The southern portion of the site is of particular interest because hydraulic-head patterns in the upper basalt-confined aquifer system indicate that groundwater from the Hanford central plateau area, where contaminants have been found in the aquifer, flows southeast toward the southern site boundary. This results in a potential for offsite migration of contaminants through the upper basalt-confined aquifer system. Based on the review presented in this report, available hydrogeologic characterization information for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system in this area is considered adequate to close the action item. Recently drilled offsite wells have provided additional information on the structure of the aquifer system in and near the southern part of the Hanford Site. Information on hydraulic properties, hydrochemistry, hydraulic heads and flow directions for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system has been re-examined and compiled in recent reports including Spane and Raymond (1993), Spane and Vermeul ( 1994), and Spane and Webber (1995).

  4. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  5. Groundwater residence time and aquifer recharge in multilayered, semi-confined and faulted aquifer systems using environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Banks, Eddie W.; Batelaan, Okke; Kipfer, Rolf; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Cook, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    The potential of environmental tracers (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C, 14C, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, N2) to assist our understanding of recharge processes, groundwater flow velocities and residence times in semi-confined, multilayered and faulted aquifer systems was tested in a coastal system with Quaternary sediments overlying Tertiary aquifers and fractured bedrock. Carbon-14 groundwater ages were found to increase with depth and distance (<1000 y near the recharge area to >30,000 y near the coast), confirming that the system is semi-confined and the palaeometeoric origin of groundwater as suggested by water stable isotopes. The presence of old groundwater near the top of deep semi-confined aquifers suggests that recharge mainly occurs in the ranges east of the basin. This is also supported by Cl concentrations, which are higher in the overlying Quaternary aquifers. Groundwater flow velocities between 0.3 and 1.8 m y-1 were estimated using 14C ages, resulting in basin recharge estimates between 0.3 × 107 and 2 × 107 m3 y-1. Radiocarbon and 4He-estimated flow velocities were generally in good agreement, although 4He accumulation rates ranging between 8 × 10-12 and 1 × 10-10 cm3 STP g-1 y-1 and 1.7-7.1 × 10-7 cm3 STP g-1 km-1 confirmed slower flow velocities in some areas. These areas could not be captured using 14C. Faults were found to play a paramount role on mixing old fluids rich in salts and 4He, although it was not possible to demonstrate the role of faults in changing flow velocities, this requiring a higher density of sampling points. Our study shows that environmental tracers have potential to study flow processes in semi-confined, faulted, multilayered aquifer systems, provided a high density of sampling points is available.

  6. Groundwater residence time and aquifer recharge in mutilayered, semi-confined and faulted aquifer systems using environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, J.; Banks, E.; Batelaan, O.; Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Cook, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    Population growth and ongoing climate change threatens the future of water supply in many regions. Therefore water resources need to be managed in a way such that water demands for industrial, agricultural, recreation and household uses are met in a sustainable approach. To do so, appropriate knowledge of groundwater residence time and aquifer recharge is paramount. But populations are largely concentrated on sedimentary basins where aquifers are often multi-layered, semi-confined and faulted, challenging the study of groundwater flow processes. The motivation of this work is to study the potential of environmental tracers (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C, 14C, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, N2) to assist our understanding of recharge processes and residence times in semi-confined, multilayered and faulted aquifer systems. For that purpose, the coastal aquifer system in the Adelaide Plains basin, South Australia, was studied. Carbon-14 groundwater ages were found to increase with depth and distance (<1000 years near the recharge area to >30,000 years near the coast), confirming the system is semi-confined and the palaeometeoric origin of groundwater, as suggested by water stable isotopes. The presence of old groundwater near the top of deep semi-confined aquifers suggested that recharge mainly occurs in the mountain ranges east of the basin, a finding which was supported by higher Cl concentrations in the overlying Quaternary aquifers. Mean groundwater flow velocity of 0.8 m y-1 was estimated using 14C ages, and confirmed with 4He estimations. However 4He accumulation rates ranging between 8×10-12 and 1×10-10 cm3 STP g-1 y-1 and 1.7-7.1×10-7 cm3 STP g-1 km-1 confirmed slower flow velocities in some areas, velocities that could not be captured using 14C. Faults were found to play a paramount role in mixing old fluids rich in salts and 4He, but it was not possible to demonstrate the role of faults in changing flow velocities, which requires a higher density of sampling points. Our study

  7. Summary and evaluation of hydraulic property data available for the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system. For the past 40 years, hydrologic testing of the upper basalt confined aquifer has been conducted by a number of Hanford Site programs. Hydraulic property estimates are important for evaluating aquifer flow characteristics (i.e., ground-water flow patterns, flow velocity, transport travel time). Presented are the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydraulic properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). Available hydrologic test data were reevaluated using recently developed diagnostic test analysis methods. A comparison of calculated transmissivity estimates indicates that, for most test results, a general correspondence within a factor of two between reanalysis and previously reported test values was obtained. For a majority of the tests, previously reported values are greater than reanalysis estimates. This overestimation is attributed to a number of factors, including, in many cases, a misapplication of nonleaky confined aquifer analysis methods in previous analysis reports to tests that exhibit leaky confined aquifer response behavior. Results of the test analyses indicate a similar range for transmissivity values for the various hydro-geologic units making up the upper basalt confined aquifer. Approximately 90% of the calculated transmissivity values for upper basalt confined aquifer hydrogeologic units occur within the range of 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}/d, with 65% of the calculated estimate values occurring between 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}d. These summary findings are consistent with the general range of values previously reported for basalt interflow contact zones and sedimentary interbeds within the Saddle Mountains Basalt.

  8. Low velocity non-Darcian flow to a well fully penetrating a confined aquifer in the first kind of leaky aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xianmeng; Shao, Junyu; Yin, Maosheng; Liu, Dengfeng; Xue, Xianwu

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use a finite difference method to solve low velocity non-Darcian flow to a well in the first kind of leaky aquifer system. Flow in the confined aquifer is assumed to be Darcian and horizontal, whereas flow in the aquitard is assumed to be non-Darcian and vertical. The threshold hydraulic gradient existence of non-Darcian flow in low permeability porous media is employed to describe the non-Darcian flow in the aquitard. A numerical solution has been obtained by using a finite difference method. This solution is compared with the previous solution for Darcian flow case in leaky aquifer system. The error has been analyzed. The comparison of this study and Darcian flow case (Hantush and Jacob, 1955) in leaky aquifer system indicates that the error is very small and can be neglected. However, the hydrogeological parameter calculation of leaky aquifer system is remarkably influenced by low velocity non-Darcian flow in aquitard. For the inflection point method (Hantush, 1956), the absolute values of estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility of confined aquifer and vertical hydraulic conductivity of aquitard show negative relationship with the pumping rate. For the type curve-fitting method (Walton, 1962), the estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility and elastic drainable porosity of confined aquifer are very small under small pumping rate. In general, the estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility and elastic drainable porosity of confined aquifer can be controlled under certain level through adjusting pumping rate. The estimated error of vertical hydraulic conductivity of aquitard is quite large no matter which method is used, even up to nearly 300%.

  9. Confined aquifers as viral reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee J; Jeffries, Thomas C; Roudnew, Ben; Seymour, Justin R; Fitch, Alison J; Simons, Keryn L; Speck, Peter G; Newton, Kelly; Brown, Melissa H; Mitchell, James G

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about viral diversity and abundance in deep groundwater reserves is limited. We found that the viral community inhabiting a deep confined aquifer in South Australia was more similar to reclaimed water communities than to the viral communities in the overlying unconfined aquifer community. This similarity was driven by high relative occurrence of the single-stranded DNA viral groups Circoviridae, Geminiviridae and Microviridae, which include many known plant and animal pathogens. These groups were present in a 1500-year-old water situated 80 m below the surface, which suggests the potential for long-term survival and spread of potentially pathogenic viruses in deep, confined groundwater. Obtaining a broader understanding of potentially pathogenic viral communities within aquifers is particularly important given the ability of viruses to spread within groundwater ecosystems.

  10. Hydrogeologic framework and geologic structure of the Floridan aquifer system and intermediate confining unit in the Lake Okeechobee area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    The successful implementation of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) as a water-management tool requires detailed information on the hydrologic and hydraulic properties of the potential water storage zones. This report presents stratigraphic and hydrogeologic sections of the upper part of the Floridan aquifer system and the overlying confining unit or aquifer system in the Lake Okeechobee area, and contour maps of the upper contacts of the Ocala Limestone and the Arcadia Formation, which are represented in the sections. The sections and maps illustrate hydrogeologic factors such as confinement of potential storage zones, the distribution of permeability within the zones, and geologic features that may control the efficiency of injection, storage, and recovery of water, and thus may influence decisions on ASR activities in areas of interest to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

  11. The effect of artesian-pressure decline on confined aquifer systems and its relation to land subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, J.H.

    1964-01-01

    Ground water in the Southwestern United States is derived chiefly from unconsolidated to semiconsolidated alluvial deposits. Where these deposits contain confined water, they may be susceptible to compaction and related land- surface subsidence, if artesian pressures are reduced. Compaction of artesian-aquifer systems can be estimated from core tests if the artesian-pressure decline is known. Compaction occurs chiefly in the finer grained deposits ; porosity decrease is greater near the top of the confined aquifer than near the bottom. Because most of the compaction of these aquifer systems is permanent, the storage coefficient during the initial decline of artesian pressure greatly exceeds the storage coefficient during a subsequent pressure decline through the same depth range, after an intervening period of pressure recovery.

  12. The effect of a confining unit on the geochemical evolution of ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicks, C.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    In west-central Florida, sections of the Upper Floridan aquifer system range in character from confined to leaky to unconfined. The confining unit is the Hawthorn Formation, a clay-rich sequence. The presence or absence of the Hawthorn Formation affects the geochemical evolution of the ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer system. Mass-balance and mass-transfer models suggest that, in unconfined areas, the geochemical reactions are dolomite dissolution, ion exchange (Mg for Na, K), sulfate reduction, calcite dissolution, and CO2 exchange. In the areas in which the Hawthorn Formation is leaky, the evolution of the ground water is accounted for by ion exchange, sulfate reduction, calcite dissolution, and CO2 exchange. In the confined areas, no ion exchange and only limited sulfate reduction occur, and the chemical character of the ground water is consistent with dolomite and gypsum dissolution, calcite precipitation, and CO2 ingassing. The Hawthorn Formation acts both as a physical barrier to the transport of CO2 and organic matter and as a source of ion-exchange sites, but the carbonate-mineral reactions are largely unaffected by the extent of confinement of the Upper Floridan aquifer. ?? 1994.

  13. Chlorine stable isotope evidence for salinization processes of confined groundwater in southwestern Nobi Plain aquifer system, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masaru; Bottrell, Simon H.; Wu, Jiahong; Kumagai, Yoshihiro; Mori, Kazuki; Satake, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    A confined aquifer system, isolated from modern seawater, is developed in argillaceous marine and freshwater sediments of Pliocene-Holocene age in southwestern Nobi Plain (SWNP), central Japan. A tongue of brackish confined groundwater (Cl- >1000 mg/L), which extends from the shoreline of Ise Bay inland, mostly has negative δ37Cl values with -0.90‰ to 0.21‰. The Cl isotopic compositions are negatively correlated with paleo seawater Cl- concentrations discriminated by a Rayleigh distillation model with δ34S values, while they are not correlated with either total Cl- concentrations or δ34S values. Furthermore, Cl- concentrations from modern seawater are positively correlated with δ37Cl values. In addition to these observations, diffusion model calculations suggest that paleo seawater Cl- has diffused out from argillaceous marine sediments whereas modern seawater Cl- has not been affected by preferential diffusion of Cl isotopes because it has migrated by advection via both an unconfined aquifer and non-pumping wells. Moreover, the brackish groundwater is characterized by an excess of Na/Cl ratio and deficits of Mg/Cl and Ca/Cl ratios compared to those predicted from simple mixing of freshwater with seawater. This would be caused by cation exchange reactions in the confined aquifer system in which groundwater is freshening after salinization by both paleo seawater and/or modern seawater.

  14. Time trends of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene in confined and unconfined aquifers of a groundwater system in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Altissimo, Lorenzo; Andreoli, Elisa; Giacometti, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene were recorded in a groundwater system of Northern Italy over the period 1985-1997. In the unconfined recharging aquifer these chemicals showed a remarkable overall decline which was accompanied by a five-fold reduction in their consumption (from approx. 250 to approx. 50 tons year-1) over the same period. The time trends for the confined aquifers indicated a steady decline for 1,1,1-trichloroethane which was accompanied by a constant concentration of trichloroethylene and an increasing presence of perchloroethylene. It is suggested that the confined aquifers are recording a contamination which took place in the unconfined recharging aquifer before monitoring period (1982) started. At present, in most of the study area 1,1,1-trichloroethane contamination is below the detection limit (0.1 microgram/L). For trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene, the average unconfined aquifer contamination accounts for approx. 1 +/- 1 and approx. 4 +/- 3 micrograms/L, respectively, while in the confined aquifers the average concentrations are approx. 8 +/- 3 and approx. 35 +/- 5 micrograms/L, respectively.

  15. Geohydrologic systems in Kansas; physical framework of the confining unit in the Western Interior Plains aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.V.; Wolf, R.J.; Spinazola, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this Hydrologic Investigations Atlas is to provide a description of the geohydrologic systems in Upper Cambrian through Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas. This investigation was made as part of the Central Midwest Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (CMRASA). The CMRASA is one of several major investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of regional aquifer systems in the United States. These regional investigations are designed to increase knowledge of the flow regime and hydrologic properties of major aquifer systems and to provide quantitative information for the assessment, development, and management of water supplies. The CMRASA study area includes all or parts of 10 Central Midwestern States (Jorgensen and Signor, 1981), as shown on the envelope cover.

  16. Influence of confining layers' heterogeneity on the barometric response functions in semi-confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redaelli, Marco; Perulero Serrano, Raul

    2017-04-01

    It has been shown that Barometric Response Functions (BRFs) can provide a useful tool for detecting the occurrence of highly conducive bodies which span across aquifer confining layers and can potentially give rise to pathways for pollutant migration (Hussein et al 2013, Odling et al 2015). Analytical models employed to estimate BRFs from geological system properties assume homogeneity within the aquifer and its confining layer. These assumptions are rarely satisfied in practice. Our study focusses on the impact on predicted BRFs of heterogeneous distribution of high conductivity geomaterials within the confining layer. The work is grounded on a suite of three-dimensional, transient numerical computations of groundwater flow in a confining layer-aquifer system for i) a perfectly homogeneous two-layer setting where a single highly conducive block is fully penetrating the confining layer and ii) a heterogeneous two-layer system where hydraulic conductivity in the confining layer is modelled as a stochastic process. Our numerical results are interpreted through a comparison against those associated with an analytical model which assumes system homogeneity. Monitoring points located in the middle of the modelled aquifer domain, mimicking screened boreholes in field conditions, are used to extract water level records. The output is used to obtain the corresponding BRFs (in terms of gain and phase components) and compared vis-a-vis the selected analytical solution. The results show a wide variety of BRF responses, especially in the gain component, which vary from almost confined to unconfined scenarios. Our simulations show that the BRFs are a viable tool to improve understanding of the degree of spatial continuity within low permeability heterogeneous geological materials such as glacial till which is frequently found overlying water bearing units across the UK and other localities worldwide. As such, it has the potential to improve groundwater vulnerability assessment

  17. Hydrogeologic characteristics and water quality of a confined sand unit in the surficial aquifer system, Hunter Army Airfield, Chatham County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An 80-foot-deep well (36Q397, U.S. Geological Survey site identification 320146081073701) was constructed at Hunter Army Airfield to assess the potential of using the surficial aquifer system as a water source to irrigate a ballfield complex. A 300-foot-deep test hole was drilled beneath the ballfield complex to characterize the lithology and water-bearing characteristics of sediments above the Upper Floridan aquifer. The test hole was then completed as well 36Q397 open to a 19-foot-thick shallow, confined sand unit contained within the surficial aquifer system. A single-well, 24-hour aquifer test was performed by pumping well 36Q397 at a rate of 50 gallons per minute during July 13-14, 2011, to characterize the hydrologic properties of the shallow, confined sand unit. Two pumping events prior to the aquifer test affected water levels. Drawdown during all three pumping events and residual drawdown during recovery periods were simulated using the Theis formula on multiple changes in discharge rate. Simulated drawdown and residual drawdown match well with measured drawdown and residual drawdown using values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity and specific storage, which are typical for a confined sand aquifer. Based on the hydrologic parameters used to match simulated drawdown and residual drawdown to measured drawdown and residual drawdown, the transmissivity of the sand was determined to be about 400 feet squared per day. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the sand was determined to be about 20 feet per day. Analysis of a water-quality sample indicated that the water is suitable for irrigation. Sample analysis indicated a calcium-carbonate type water having a total dissolved solids concentration of 39 milligrams per liter. Specific conductance and concentrations of all analyzed constituents were below those that would be a concern for irrigation, and were below primary and secondary water-quality criteria levels.

  18. Mixing in confined stratified aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolster, Diogo; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; LeBorgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus

    2011-03-01

    Spatial variability in a flow field leads to spreading of a tracer plume. The effect of microdispersion is to smooth concentration gradients that exist in the system. The combined effect of these two phenomena leads to an 'effective' enhanced mixing that can be asymptotically quantified by an effective dispersion coefficient (i.e. Taylor dispersion). Mixing plays a fundamental role in driving chemical reactions. However, at pre-asymptotic times it is considerably more difficult to accurately quantify these effects by an effective dispersion coefficient as spreading and mixing are not the same (but intricately related). In this work we use a volume averaging approach to calculate the concentration distribution of an inert solute release at pre-asymptotic times in a stratified formation. Mixing here is characterized by the scalar dissipation rate, which measures the destruction of concentration variance. As such it is an indicator for the degree of mixing of a system. We study pre-asymptotic solute mixing in terms of explicit analytical expressions for the scalar dissipation rate and numerical random walk simulations. In particular, we divide the concentration field into a mean and deviation component and use dominant balance arguments to write approximate governing equations for each, which we then solve analytically. This allows us to explicitly evaluate the separate contributions to mixing from the mean and the deviation behavior. We find an approximate, but accurate expression (when compared to numerical simulations) to evaluate mixing. Our results shed some new light on the mechanisms that lead to large scale mixing and allow for a distinction between solute spreading, represented by the mean concentration, and mixing, which comes from both the mean and deviation concentrations, at pre-asymptotic times.

  19. Apparatus for Demonstrating Confined and Unconfined Aquifer Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Robert W.; O'Hannesin, Stephanie F.

    1984-01-01

    Students in hydrogeology classes commonly have difficulty appreciating differences between the mechanisms of water release from confined and unconfined aquifers. Describes a simple and inexpensive laboratory model for demonstrating the hydraulic responses of confined and unconfined aquifers to pumping. Includes a worked example to demonstrate the…

  20. Apparatus for Demonstrating Confined and Unconfined Aquifer Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Robert W.; O'Hannesin, Stephanie F.

    1984-01-01

    Students in hydrogeology classes commonly have difficulty appreciating differences between the mechanisms of water release from confined and unconfined aquifers. Describes a simple and inexpensive laboratory model for demonstrating the hydraulic responses of confined and unconfined aquifers to pumping. Includes a worked example to demonstrate the…

  1. Aquifers switched from confined to semiconfined by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheming; Wang, Guangcai

    2016-11-01

    Earthquake-induced aquifer parameter changes (e.g., permeability and hydraulic diffusivity) have been documented in many studies. However, changes in the confinement of an aquifer from confined to semiconfined following an earthquake have not been reported. Here we focus on the tidal response of the water level in four wells following the 2008 Wenchuan Mw 7.9 and 2013 Lushan Mw 6.6 earthquakes to show that earthquakes can change confined aquifers to semiconfined aquifers by reopening of preexisting vertical fractures (and later healing). This study has important implications because a switch from confined to semiconfined means a change of vertical hydraulic connection, which may affect the vulnerability of an aquifer, the integrity of underground waste repositories, and the safety of groundwater supplies.

  2. Wellhead protection in confined, semi-confined, fractured and karst aquifer settings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Protection areas around wells producing from confined, fractured, and karst aquifers are, because of their complex hydrogeology, more difficult to define than protection areas for wells in porous media settings. The factsheet provides background information explaining the need to define protection areas for wells that draw public drinking water from several complex hydrogeologic settings: confined, semi-confined, fractured, and karst aquifers. These settings include aquifers in which the ground water is not open to the atmosphere, or the aquifer does not consist of unconsolidated porous media. Several figures illustrate these settings in a general way.

  3. The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

  4. The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

  5. Human enteric viruses in groundwater from a confined bedrock aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borchardt, M. A.; Bradbury, K.R.; Gotkowitz, M.B.; Cherry, J.A.; Parker, B.L.

    2007-01-01

    Confined aquifers are overlain by low-permeability aquitards that are commonly assumed to protect underlying aquifers from microbial contaminants. However, empirical data on microbial contamination beneath aquitards is limited. This study determined the occurrence of human pathogenic viruses in well water from a deep sandstone aquifer confined by a regionally extensive shale aquitard. Three public water-supply wells were each sampled 10 times over 15 months. Samples were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for several virus groups and by cell culture for infectious enteroviruses. Seven of 30 samples were positive by RT-PCR for enteroviruses; one of these was positive for infectious echovirus 18. The virus-positive samples were collected from two wells cased through the aquitard, indicating the viruses were present in the confined aquifer. Samples from the same wells showed atmospheric tritium, indicating water recharged within the past few decades. Hydrogeologic conditions support rapid porous media transport of viruses through the upper sandstone aquifer to the top of the aquitard 61 m below ground surface. Natural fractures in the shale aquitard are one possible virus transport pathway through the aquitard; however, windows, cross-connecting well bores, or imperfect grout seals along well casings also may be involved. Deep confined aquifers can be more vulnerable to contamination by human viruses than commonly believed. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  6. Hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina Coastal Plain aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D.; Coble, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina Coastal Plain aquifer system consists of ten aquifers separated by nine confining units. From top to bottom the aquifers are: the surficial aquifer, Yorktown aquifer, Pungo River aquifer, Castle Hayne aquifer, Beaufort aquifer, Peedee aquifer, Black Creek aquifer, upper Cape Fear aquifer, lower Cape Fear aquifer, and the Lower Cretaceous aquifer. The uppermost aquifer (the surficial aquifer in most places) is a water-table aquifer and the bottom of the system is underlain by crystalline bedrock. The sedimentary deposits forming the aquifers are of Holocene to Cretaceous age and are composed mostly of sand with lesser amounts of gravel and limestone. Confining units between aquifers are composed primarily of clay and silt. The thickness of the aquifers ranges from zero along the Fall Line to more than 10,000 feet at Cape Hatteras. Prominent structural features are the increasing easterly homoclinal dip of the sediments and the Cape Fear arch, the axis of which trends in a southeast direction. The stratigraphic continuity is determined from correlations of 161 geophysical logs along with data from drillers' and geologists' logs. Aquifers were defined by means of these logs plus water-level and water-quality data and evidence of the continuity of pumping effects. Eighteen hydrogeologic sections depict the correlation of these aquifers throughout the Coastal Plain.

  7. Inter-aquifer Dynamics in and Near a Confining Unit Window in Shelby County, Tennessee, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, R. W.; McKay, L. D.; Larsen, D.; Carmichael, J. K.; Solomon, D. K.; Thonnard, N.; Anderson, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    An interdisplinary research team is investigating the interaction between the surficial alluvial aquifer and the deeper confined Memphis aquifer in the Memphis area, Shelby County, Tennessee. Previous research has identified a window in the clay-rich, upper Claiborne confining unit that separates the two aquifers near a closed municipal landfill in east-central Shelby County, an area undergoing rapid urbanization. For this investigation, a combination of environmental tracers (tritium/helium-3), major and trace ion geochemistry, hydraulic response testing, measurement of hydraulic gradients, and groundwater flow modeling is being used to quantify recharge of young water from the alluvial aquifer through the window to the Memphis aquifer. The research will provide results to better understand how windows were formed and how they influence recharge and water quality in otherwise confined parts of the Memphis aquifer downdip of its outcrop/subcrop area. Examination of continuous core samples and geophysical logs from wells installed for the study using Rotasonic drilling methods confirmed the existence of a sand-dominated window that may be as much as 1 km in diameter in the upper Claiborne confining unit. The upper Claiborne confining unit is 15 to 20 m thick in most of the study area and is overlain by a 10 to 12 m thick alluvial aquifer. The window is interpreted to have formed as a result of depositional and incisional processes in an Eocene-age deltaic system. Hydraulic gradients of several feet exist vertically between the alluvial and Memphis aquifers within the window, indicating downward flow. Groundwater age-dates from tritium/helium-3 analyses indicate that groundwater in the window at the depth of the base of the surrounding confining unit (approximately 30 m) has an apparent age of 19.8 years, which confirms the occurrence of downward flow. Young groundwater age dates (less than 32 years) also were obtained from wells in the Memphis aquifer at confined

  8. Dolomitization of the Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien Group in southern Wisconsin and southeastern Minnesota: A case for confined and unconfined aquifer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien Group overlies the Cambrian-Ordovician Jordan Formation and underlies the Middle Ordovician St Peter Formation. The Prairie du Chien Group contains the Oneota Formation and the New Richmond and Willow River Members of the Shakopee Formation. The Prairie du Chien Group and associated formations form a repetitive sequence of alternating dolomites and sandstones: Jordan (sand), Oneota (dolomite), New Richmond (sand/dolomite), Willow River (dolomite), St. Peter (sand), and Platteville/Galena (dolomite/limestone). Prairie du Chien and Platteville/Galena carbonates thin over the Wisconsin arch and thicken eastward and westward. Petrography, cathodoluminescence, and electron microprobe analysis were used to identify and differentiate dolomite zones. The Oneota contains dolomite zones 1 to 3; the Shakopee contains zones 2 and 3; the Platteville/Galena only contains zone 3. Electron microprobe analysis of zone 3 reveals systematic decreases in dolomite stoichiometry and increases in iron and manganese trace-element composition along a transect from the Wisconsin arch to southeastern Minnesota. Zone 3 probably precipitated within a confined aquifer with recharge on the Wisconsin arch and flow toward southeastern Minnesota. In analogous modern systems, pore waters become progressively more reducing downflow, favoring trace-element enrichment. Zone 2 dolomites have low, uniform iron and manganese contents and uniform stoichiometries. Zone 2 compositions are consistent with precipitation in an unconfined and/or well-mixed aquifer associated with a continent-wide pre-St. Peter sea level drawdown and paleokarsting. Trace-element distributions within zone 1 dolomites are intermediate, suggesting precipitation within a semiconfined aquifer during pre-New Richmond exposure.

  9. Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Kanehiro, B.Y.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-03-10

    The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot directly estimate S/sub s/from earth tide response. Except for the fact that barometric changes act both on the water surface in the well and on the aquifer as a whole while stress changes associated with earth tides act only in the aquifer, the two phenomena influence the confined aquifer in much the same way. In other words, barometric response contains only as much information on the elastic properties of the aquifer as the earth tide response does. Factors such as well bore storage, aquifer transmissivity, and storage coefficient contribute to time lag and damping of the aquifer response as observed in the well. Analysis shows that the observation of fluid pressure changes alone, without concurrent measurement of external stress changes, is sufficient to interpret uniquely earth tide response. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from dilatation by assuming a reasonable value for bulk modulus. Earth tide response of geothermal aquifers from Marysville, Montana. East Mesa, California; and Raft River Valley, Idaho, were analyzed, and the ratio of S/sub 3/ to porosity was estimated. Comparison of these estimates with independent pumping tests show reasonable agreement.

  10. Metagenomic comparison of microbial communities inhabiting confined and unconfined aquifer ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee J; Jeffries, Thomas C; Roudnew, Ben; Fitch, Alison J; Seymour, Justin R; Delpin, Marina W; Newton, Kelly; Brown, Melissa H; Mitchell, James G

    2012-01-01

    A metagenomic analysis of two aquifer systems located under a dairy farming region was performed to examine to what extent the composition and function of microbial communities varies between confined and surface-influenced unconfined groundwater ecosystems. A fundamental shift in taxa was seen with an overrepresentation of Rhodospirillales, Rhodocyclales, Chlorobia and Circovirus in the unconfined aquifer, while Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridiales were overrepresented in the confined aquifer. A relative overrepresentation of metabolic processes including antibiotic resistance (β-lactamase genes), lactose and glucose utilization and DNA replication were observed in the unconfined aquifer, while flagella production, phosphate metabolism and starch uptake pathways were all overrepresented in the confined aquifer. These differences were likely driven by differences in the nutrient status and extent of exposure to contaminants of the two groundwater systems. However, when compared with freshwater, ocean, sediment and animal gut metagenomes, the unconfined and confined aquifers were taxonomically and metabolically more similar to each other than to any other environment. This suggests that intrinsic features of groundwater ecosystems, including low oxygen levels and a lack of sunlight, have provided specific niches for evolution to create unique microbial communities. Obtaining a broader understanding of the structure and function of microbial communities inhabiting different groundwater systems is particularly important given the increased need for managing groundwater reserves of potable water.

  11. Regional flow in the Dakota aquifer; a study of the role of confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bredehoeft, John D.; Neuzil, C.E.; Milly, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Dakota Sandstone in South Dakota is one of the classic artesian aquifers; it was first studied by N. H. Darton at the turn of the century. Since then, hydrogeologists have debated the source of the large quantities of water which have been discharged by artesian flow from the Dakota. Among suggestions for the source of this water are (1) recharge of the aquifer at outcrops in the Black Hills, (2) compaction and compressive storage within the aquifer, (3)leakage through confining layers, and (4) upward flow from the underlying Madison Group limestones. A series of increasingly refined models of the aquifer system in South Dakota have been developed and used for numerical simulations of the ground-water flow. The simulations have provided estimates of leakage through the confining layers. The results indicate that, before development, most of the flow into and out of the Dakota Sandstone occurred as leakage through confining layers and, since development, most of the water released from storage has come from the confining layers. In situ and laboratory hydraulic conductivity measurements have been made for the Cretaceous shale confining layer which overlies the Dakota. These data indicate hydraulic conductivities which are one to three orders of magnitude lower than the conductivities indicated by the numerical analyses; this suggests that the leakage through the confining layer is largely through fractures. The fractures apparently did not influence the laboratory and in situ measurements. To test the conception of flow in the aquifer-confining layer system derived from our analyses, the transport of sulfate in the system was simulated. Simulations using a numerical ground-water transport model were reasonably successful in explaining the present distribution of sulfate in the system. This result increases confidence in the flow system implied by the flow simulations in which leakage through confining layers is dominant.

  12. Performance evaluation testing of wells in the gradient control system at a federally operated Confined Disposal Facility using single well aquifer tests, East Chicago, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lampe, David C.; Unthank, Michael D.

    2016-12-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed tests to evaluate the hydrologic connection between the open interval of the well and the surrounding Calumet aquifer in response to fouling of extraction well pumps onsite. Two rounds of air slug testing were performed on seven monitoring wells and step drawdown and subsequent recovery tests on three extraction wells on a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Confined Disposal Facility (CDF) in East Chicago, Indiana. The wells were tested in 2014 and again in 2015. The extraction and monitoring wells are part of the gradient control system that establishes an inward gradient around the perimeter of the facility. The testing established a set of protocols that site personnel can use to evaluate onsite well integrity and develop a maintenance procedure to evaluate future well performance.The results of the slug test analysis data indicate that the hydraulic connection of the well screen to the surrounding aquifer material in monitoring wells on the CDF and the reliability of hydraulic conductivity estimates of the surrounding geologic media could be increased by implementing well development maintenance. Repeated air slug tests showed increasing hydraulic conductivity until, in the case of the monitoring wells located outside of the groundwater cutoff wall (MW–4B, MW–11B, MW–14B), the difference in hydraulic conductivity from test to test decreased, indicating the results were approaching the optimal hydraulic connection between the aquifer and the well screen. Hydraulic conductivity values derived from successive tests in monitoring well D40, approximately 0.25 mile south of the CDF, were substantially higher than those derived from wells on the CDF property. Also, values did not vary from test to test like those measured in monitoring wells located on the CDF property, which indicated that a process may be affecting the connectivity of the wells on the CDF property to the Calumet aquifer. Derived hydraulic conductivity

  13. Water levels in, extent of freshwater in, and water withdrawal from eight major confined aquifers, New Jersey Coastal Plain, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacombe, Pierre J.; Rosman, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Water levels in 722 wells in the Coastal Plain of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and northeastern Delaware were measured during October and November 1993 and were used to define the potentiometric surface of the eight major confined aquifers of the area. Isochlors (lines of equal chloride concentration) for 250 and 10,000 milligrams per liter are included to show the extent of freshwater in each of the aquifers. Estimated water withdrawals from the eight major confined aquifers are reported for 1978-94. Water-withdrawal and water-level maps including isochlors were constructed for the Cohansey aquifer of Cape May County, the Atlantic City 800-foot sand, the Piney Point aquifer, the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer, the Englishtown aquifer system, the Upper Potomac-Raritan-Magothy, the Middle and undifferentiated Potomac-Raritan-Magothy, and the Lower Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifers. From 1988 to 1993, water levels near the center of the large cones of depression in the Middlesex-Monmouth County area rose as much as 120 ft in the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer and Englishtown aquifer system, 40 ft in the Upper Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer, and 96 ft in the Middle and undifferentiated Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifers. Large cones of depression in the potentiometric surface of aquifers of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in the Burlington-Camden-Gloucester area remained at about the same altitude; that is, the potentiometric surface neither rose nor fell in the aquifers by more than 5 feet. In the same area, water levels in the Englishtown aquifer system were static, whereas the water levels in the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer declined 5 to 20 feet, forming an expanded cone of depression. Water levels in the Cohansey, Atlantic City 800-foot sand, and Piney Point aquifers declined by 1 to 10 feet during 1988?93.

  14. New solutions for the confined horizontal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, Evangelos; Gravanis, Elias

    2016-04-01

    The Boussinesq equation is a dynamical equation for the free surface of saturated subsurface flows over an impervious bed. Boussinesq equation is non-linear. The non-linearity comes from the reduction of the dimensionality of the problem: The flow is assumed to be vertically homogeneous, therefore the flow rate through a cross section of the flow is proportional to the free surface height times the hydraulic gradient, which is assumed to be equal to the slope of the free surface. In the present work we consider the case of the subsurface flow with horizontal bed. This is a case with an infinite Henderson and Wooding parameter, that is, it is the limiting case where the non-linear term is present in the Boussinesq equation while the linear spatial derivative term vanishes. Nonetheless, no analogue of the kinematic wave exists in this case as there is no exact solution for the build-up phase. Neither is there an exact recession-phase solution that holds in early times, as the Boussinesq separable solution is actually an asymptotic solution for large times. We construct approximate solutions for the horizontal aquifer which utilize directly the dynamical content of the non-linear Boussinesq equation. The approximate character of the solution lies in the fact that we start with a pre-supposed form for the solution, an educated guess, based on the nature of the initial condition as well as empirical observations from the numerical solution of the problem. The forms we shall use are power series of the location variable x along the bed with time-dependent coefficients. The series are not necessarily analytic. The boundary conditions are incorporated in the structure of the series from the beginning. The time-dependent coefficients are then determined by applying the Boussinesq equation and its spatial derivatives at the end-points of the aquifer. The forms are chosen also on the basis of their solubility; we would like to be able to construct explicitly the approximate

  15. Effect of natural gas exsolution on specific storage in a confined aquifer undergoing water level decline.

    PubMed

    Yager, R M; Fountain, J C

    2001-01-01

    The specific storage of a porous medium, a function of the compressibility of the aquifer material and the fluid within it, is essentially constant under normal hydrologic conditions. Gases dissolved in ground water can increase the effective specific storage of a confined aquifer, however, during water level declines. This causes a reduction in pore pressure that lowers the gas solubility and results in exsolution. The exsolved gas then displaces water from storage, and the specific storage increases because gas compressibility is typically much greater than that of water or aquifer material. This work describes the effective specific storage of a confined aquifer exsolving dissolved gas as a function of hydraulic head and the dimensionless Henry's law constant for the gas. This relation is applied in a transient simulation of ground water discharge from a confined aquifer system to a collapsed salt mine in the Genesee Valley in western New York. Results indicate that exsolution of gas significantly increased the effective specific storage in the aquifer system, thereby decreasing the water level drawdown.

  16. Effect of natural gas exsolution on specific storage in a confined aquifer undergoing water level decline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.; Fountain, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    The specific storage of a porous medium, a function of the compressibility of the aquifer material and the fluid within it, is essentially constant under normal hydrologic conditions. Gases dissolved in ground water can increase the effective specific storage of a confined aquifer, however, during water level declines. This causes a reduction in pore pressure that lowers the gas solubility and results in exsolution. The exsolved gas then displaces water from storage, and the specific storage increases because gas compressibility is typically much greater than that of water or aquifer material. This work describes the effective specific storage of a confined aquifer exsolving dissolved gas as a function of hydraulic head and the dimensionless Henry's law constant for the gas. This relation is applied in a transient simulation of ground water discharge from a confined aquifer system to a collapsed salt mine in the Genesee Valley in western New York. Results indicate that exsolution of gas significantly increased the effective specific storage in the aquifer system, thereby decreasing the water level drawdown.

  17. Long-term geochemical and hydraulic measurements in a characteristic confined/unconfined aquifer system of the younger Pleistocene in northeast Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, C.; Steidl, J.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a data base of hydrochemical and hydraulic groundwater measurements of a younger Pleistocene multilayered, unconfined/confined aquifer system in NE Germany. The Institute of Landscape Hydrology of the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) e. V. operates seven groundwater monitoring wells in the Quillow catchment located in the Uckermark region (Federal State of Brandenburg, Germany). From July 2000 to March 2014, water samples were collected periodically on different days of the year and at depths between 3 and 5 m (shallow wells) and 20 and 25 m (deeper wells) below the surface. The parameters pH value, redox potential, electric conductivity, water temperature, oxygen content, spectral absorption coefficient and concentration of hydrogen carbonate, ammonium, phosphate, chloride, bromite, nitrite, sulfate, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcite, dissolved organic carbon, iron(II) and manganese were determined for each sample (doi:10.4228/ZALF.2000.266). The measurements, taken over a period of 14 years, include a high variation of hydraulic situations represented by a corresponding database of detected groundwater heads. The hydraulic head was measured between 2000 and 2014 (doi:10.4228/ZALF.2000.272).

  18. A confined-unconfined aquifer model for subglacial hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Sebastian; Kleiner, Thomas; Humbert, Angelika

    2017-04-01

    Modeling the evolution of subglacial channels underneath ice sheets is an urgent need for ice sheet modellers, as channels affect sliding velocities and hence ice discharge. Owing to very limited observations of the subglacial hydraulic system, the development of physical models is quite restricted. Subglacial hydrology models are currently taking two different approaches: either modeling the development of a network of individual channels or modeling an equivalent porous layer where the channels are not resolved individually but modeled as a diffusive process, adjusted to reproduce the characteristic of an efficient system. Here, we use the latter approach, improving it by using a confined-unconfined aquifer model (CUAS), that allows the system to run dry in absence of sufficient water input. This ensures physical values for the water pressure. Channels are represented by adjusting the permeability and storage of the system according to projected locations of channels. The evolution of channel positions is governed by a reduced complexity model that computes channel growths according to simple rules (weighted random walks descending the hydraulic potential). As a proof of concept we present the results of the evolution of the hydrological system over time for a simple artificial glacier geometry.

  19. Thickness and hydrogeology of aquifers and confining units below the upper glacial aquifer on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soren, Julian; Simmons, Dale L.

    1987-01-01

    Three extensive unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifers on Long Island lie between the island 's upper glacial aquifer and its southward-dipping crystalline bedrock surface. The island 's aquifers have been heavily pumped, mainly for public-water supply, but most of this pumpage since the 1960 's has come from below the upper glacial aquifer because the upper aquifer has been increasingly contaminated by substances introduced through the land surface. In 1984, an average of 370 million gal/day (gpd) was pumped from the groundwater reservoir, 80% (298 million gpd) of which was from aquifers below the upper glacial aquifer. The artesian Lloyd aquifer, confined between bedrock and the overlying Raritan clay, is the basal unit in Long Island 's groundwater reservoir. The Lloyd underlies nearly all of the island and has a maximum thickness of about 550 ft. It is a minor aquifer; public-supply pumpage from the Lloyd in 1984 averaged 18 million gpd. The Magothy aquifer overlies the Raritan clay beneath most of the island and attains a maximum thickness of 1,050 ft. The Magothy has been the principal source of public water supply since 1960's, and public-supply pumpage in 1984 averaged 278 million gpd. The Jameco aquifer occurs only in buried valleys that were cut into the Magothy deposits in the extreme western part of Long Island; thus, the aquifer has good lateral and vertical hydraulic continuity with the Magothy. The Jameco attains a maximum thickness of 200 ft. Jameco deposits have greater average hydraulic conductivity than the Magothy and are considered to form a broad, highly conductive local stringer in the upper part of the Magothy. The Jameco is a minor aquifer; in 1984, average public-supply pumpage was 2 million gpd. In the southern part of the island, the Magothy-Jameco system is artesian, overlain by the Gardiners Clay in the western part of the island, and by the Gardiners Clay and the Monmouth greensand in the eastern two thirds. North of the Gardiners

  20. Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) of chlorinated municipal drinking water in a confined aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Petersen, Christen E.; Glotzbach, Kenneth J.; Metzger, Loren F.; Christensen, Allen H.; Smith, Gregory A.; O'Leary, David R.; Fram, Miranda S.; Joseph, Trevor; Shannon, Heather

    2010-01-01

    About 1.02 x 106 m3 of chlorinated municipal drinking water was injected into a confined aquifer, 94-137 m below Roseville, California, between December 2005 and April 2006. The water was stored in the aquifer for 438 days, and 2.64 x 106 m3 of water were extracted between July 2007 and February 2008. On the basis of Cl data, 35% of the injected water was recovered and 65% of the injected water and associated disinfection by-products (DBPs) remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction. About 46.3 kg of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) entered the aquifer with the injected water and 37.6 kg of TTHM were extracted. As much as 44 kg of TTHMs remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction because of incomplete recovery of injected water and formation of THMs within the aquifer by reactions with freechlorine in the injected water. Well-bore velocity log data collected from the Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) well show as much as 60% of the injected water entered the aquifer through a 9 m thick, high-permeability layer within the confined aquifer near the top of the screened interval. Model simulations of ground-water flow near the ASR well indicate that (1) aquifer heterogeneity allowed injected water to move rapidly through the aquifer to nearby monitoring wells, (2) aquifer heterogeneity caused injected water to move further than expected assuming uniform aquifer properties, and (3) physical clogging of high-permeability layers is the probable cause for the observed change in the distribution of borehole flow. Aquifer heterogeneity also enhanced mixing of native anoxic ground water with oxic injected water, promoting removal of THMs primarily through sorption. A 3 to 4-fold reduction in TTHM concentrations was observed in the furthest monitoring well 427 m downgradient from the ASR well, and similar magnitude reductions were observed in depth-dependent water samples collected from the upper part of the screened interval in the ASR well near the end of the extraction

  1. Gulf Coast regional aquifer-system analysis; a Mississippi perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grubb, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis is a study of regional aquifers in sediments of mostly Cenozoic age in an area of about 230,000 sq mi in the Central Plain of Alabama, Arkansas , Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas, and an additional 60,000 sq mi offshore. Three aquifer systems have been identified: the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system, and the coastal lowlands aquifer system. These aquifer systems thicken from < 100 ft near their updip limit to thousands of ft gulfward toward their downdip limits. The Mississippi embayment aquifer system exceeds 5,000 ft in thickness in central Louisiana and in southwestern Mississippi. The thickest area in southwestern Mississippi underlies most of the six Mississippi counties, centered around Jefferson County. The greatest thickness of the coastal lowlands aquifer system in Mississippi occurs in southern Hancock County where the system is composed of several individual aquifers and confining units. There are seven aquifers and three confining units in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, five aquifers and two confining units in the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system, and five aquifers and two confining units in the coastal lowlands aquifer system. Most of the thicker parts of each aquifer system contain moderately saline to very saline water. Water in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system is moderately saline to very saline in most of a seven county area in southwestern Mississippi. About 9,600 million gal/day (gpd) of ground water was pumped from the aquifers in the study area during 1980. About 15% of that pumpage (or about 1,400 million gpd was in Mississippi, mostly from the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. About 10% of the Mississippi pumpage, or 140 million gpd, was from the coastal lowlands aquifer system. Preliminary results from simulation of

  2. The active bacterial community in a pristine confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Theodore M.; Sanford, Robert A.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Levine, Audrey D.; Bethke, Craig M.

    2012-09-01

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sediment and used molecular techniques to examine the bacterial populations. We used multivariate statistics to compare the composition of bacterial communities among the wells with respect to the chemistry of the groundwater. We found groundwater at each well was considerably richer in ferrous iron than sulfide, indicating iron-reducing bacteria should, by established criteria, dominate the sulfate reducers. Our results show, however, that areas where groundwater contains more than a negligible amount of sulfate (>0.03 mM), populations related to sulfate reducers of the generaDesulfobacter and Desulfobulbus were of nearly equal abundance with putative iron reducers related to Geobacter, Geothrix, and Desulfuromonas. Whereas sulfate is a key discriminant of bacterial community structure, we observed no statistical relationship between the distribution of bacterial populations in this aquifer and the concentration of either ferrous iron or dissolved sulfide. These results call into question the validity of using the relative concentration of these two ions to predict the nature of bacterial activity in an aquifer. Sulfate reducers and iron reducers do not appear to be segregated into discrete zones in the aquifer, as would be predicted by the theory of competitive exclusion. Instead, we find the two groups coexist in the subsurface in what we suggest is a mutualistic relationship.

  3. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  4. WTAQ - A computer program for aquifer-test analysis of confined and unconfined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.M.; Moench, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    Computer program WTAQ was developed to implement a Laplace-transform analytical solution for axial-symmetric flow to a partially penetrating, finite-diameter well in a homogeneous and anisotropic unconfined (water-table) aquifer. The solution accounts for wellbore storage and skin effects at the pumped well, delayed response at an observation well, and delayed or instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone. For the particular case of zero drainage from the unsaturated zone, the solution simplifies to that of axial-symmetric flow in a confined aquifer. WTAQ calculates theoretical time-drawdown curves for the pumped well and observation wells and piezometers. The theoretical curves are used with measured time-drawdown data to estimate hydraulic parameters of confined or unconfined aquifers by graphical type-curve methods or by automatic parameter-estimation methods. Parameters that can be estimated are horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and specific yield. A sample application illustrates use of WTAQ for estimating hydraulic parameters of a hypothetical, unconfined aquifer by type-curve methods. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  5. Sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in anoxic confined aquifers in the northeastern Osaka Basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masaru; Nakano, Takanori; Tase, Norio

    2007-03-01

    SummaryWe used δ 34S values and chemical compositions of groundwater to investigate the influence of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation processes in a confined aquifer system in the northeastern Osaka Basin (NEOB), central Japan. Shallow confined groundwater (<100 m) in the basin is recharged mainly from mountainous areas to the north, and flows south and southwest through the aquifer system. Anion composition of the groundwater is dominated by HCO3- throughout the basin. However, concentrations of redox-sensitive species such as dissolved oxygen, NO3-, Fe 2+, and Mn 2+ show that groundwater conditions become increasingly anoxic along the flowpaths. Moreover, SO 4/(SO 4 + 2HCO 3) molar ratios decrease with increasing δ 34S along the flowpaths, which demonstrates that sulfate is reduced in the NEOB aquifer system. Groundwater with both high total dissolved solids and high SO 4 content was observed mainly in areas down-flow from faults. Because of the high SO 4 content, the anion composition of this groundwater cannot be adequately explained by a simple sulfate reduction process. A Rayleigh distillation model with ɛ = -20‰, which allows for sulfide oxidation within marine sediments in proximity to faults, explains the chemistry of all groundwater samples, including those with high SO 4 content. The model demonstrates that 76% of initial sulfate is reduced at maximum, and that reduced SO42- content is up to 48.5 mg/L after sulfide oxidation in the NEOB aquifer system.

  6. Position of the freshwater-saltwater interface in a coastal confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. B.; White, S. M.; Wilson, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    transport freshwater significant distances. Freshwater could exist in analogous confined aquifers at shallow depths under the seafloor in other coastal systems.

  7. Formation of Martian flood features by release of water from confined aquifers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    It is proposed that the rapid release of water under great pressure from deeply buried aquifers is responsible for the formation of the Martian channels suggestive of catastrophic flooding (outflow channels). Fine channels in the Martian surface suggest the presence of surface water early in the history of the planet, which would have entered the ground water system through the porous near-surface rocks. Subsequent global cooling would have trapped the ground water under a thick permafrost layer and formed a system of confined aquifers. High pore pressures within the aquifers are considered to have triggered the breakout of water from the aquifers at rates of from 10 to the 5th to 10 to the 7th cu m/sec, which would be prevented from reentering the ground water system by the layer of permafrost. Outflow from the aquifer is also considered to have caused the undermining of adjacent areas and the collapse of the surface to form areas of chaos, often associated with channels.

  8. Formation of Martian flood features by release of water from confined aquifers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    It is proposed that the rapid release of water under great pressure from deeply buried aquifers is responsible for the formation of the Martian channels suggestive of catastrophic flooding (outflow channels). Fine channels in the Martian surface suggest the presence of surface water early in the history of the planet, which would have entered the ground water system through the porous near-surface rocks. Subsequent global cooling would have trapped the ground water under a thick permafrost layer and formed a system of confined aquifers. High pore pressures within the aquifers are considered to have triggered the breakout of water from the aquifers at rates of from 10 to the 5th to 10 to the 7th cu m/sec, which would be prevented from reentering the ground water system by the layer of permafrost. Outflow from the aquifer is also considered to have caused the undermining of adjacent areas and the collapse of the surface to form areas of chaos, often associated with channels.

  9. Dynamic data integration and stochastic inversion of a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Zhang, Y.; Irsa, J.; Huang, H.; Wang, L.

    2013-12-01

    Much work has been done in developing and applying inverse methods to aquifer modeling. The scope of this paper is to investigate the applicability of a new direct method for large inversion problems and to incorporate uncertainty measures in the inversion outcomes (Wang et al., 2013). The problem considered is a two-dimensional inverse model (50×50 grid) of steady-state flow for a heterogeneous ground truth model (500×500 grid) with two hydrofacies. From the ground truth model, decreasing number of wells (12, 6, 3) were sampled for facies types, based on which experimental indicator histograms and directional variograms were computed. These parameters and models were used by Sequential Indicator Simulation to generate 100 realizations of hydrofacies patterns in a 100×100 (geostatistical) grid, which were conditioned to the facies measurements at wells. These realizations were smoothed with Simulated Annealing, coarsened to the 50×50 inverse grid, before they were conditioned with the direct method to the dynamic data, i.e., observed heads and groundwater fluxes at the same sampled wells. A set of realizations of estimated hydraulic conductivities (Ks), flow fields, and boundary conditions were created, which centered on the 'true' solutions from solving the ground truth model. Both hydrofacies conductivities were computed with an estimation accuracy of ×10% (12 wells), ×20% (6 wells), ×35% (3 wells) of the true values. For boundary condition estimation, the accuracy was within × 15% (12 wells), 30% (6 wells), and 50% (3 wells) of the true values. The inversion system of equations was solved with LSQR (Paige et al, 1982), for which coordinate transform and matrix scaling preprocessor were used to improve the condition number (CN) of the coefficient matrix. However, when the inverse grid was refined to 100×100, Gaussian Noise Perturbation was used to limit the growth of the CN before the matrix solve. To scale the inverse problem up (i.e., without smoothing

  10. Ground-water ages in confined and unconfined aquifers beneath the High Plains, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, A.R. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Ages of confined and unconfined ground waters beneath the High Plains must be better known to evaluate water resources, explain differences in delta D and delta O-18 between the unconfined and confined aquifers, and help interpret Pleistocene and Holocene hydrologic history of the continental interior. Eighteen water samples were collected from a confined aquifer in Dockum Group (Triassic) sandstones beneath the southern High Plains in TX and NM from a confined aquifer in Dakota Formation (Cretaceous) sandstones beneath the central High Plains in southwestern KS, and from a sequence of confined aquifers in Upper Cretaceous to Tertiary rocks beneath the northern Great Plains in eastern WY and western NE. Seven samples were collected from the unconfined High Plains aquifer in the Ogallala Formation (Neogene) beneath the central and northern High Plains. Preliminary calculated ages suggest that waters in the High Plains aquifer are very young, probably less than 1,000 yr, and locally as young as 25 yr. Age of ground water in the deep confined aquifers appears to be 20,000 to 32,000 yr in the different study areas. Age of confined ground water appears to increase with predominant direction of ground-water flow beneath the central and northern High Plains but not beneath the southern High Plains, possibly reflecting greater downward leakage from the unconfined aquifer in the latter area.

  11. Hydrogeology of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system at a test well in northeastern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholas, J.R.; Sherrill, M.G.; Young, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    A 3,475-ft-deep test well was drilled in northeastern Illinois near Lake Michigan and the Illinois-Wisconsin State line as part of a regional hydrologic study of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer. The well penetrates the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system and 40 ft of Precambrian granite. From oldest to youngest the aquifer system consists of the lower Mount Simon aquifer, Mount Simon confining unit, Elmhurst-Mount Simon aquifer, Eau Claire confining unit, Ironton-Galesville aquifer, Franconia confining unit, St. Peter aquifer, and an upper confining unit composed of the Glenwood Formation, Galena Dolomite and Platteville Limestone, and Maquoketa Shale. Aquifer tests were performed on hydrogeologic units that were isolated with inflatable packers. Results indicate that the Ironton-Galesville aquifer has the highest hydraulic conductivity - 10 ft/day. The St. Peter and Elmhurst-Mount Simon aquifers have hydraulic conductivities of 1.8 and 1.5 ft/day, respectively. The Mount Simon confining bed has a hydraulic conductivity of 1.3 ft/day. The Mount Simon confining unit confines saline water present in the lower Mount Simon aquifer. The dissolved solids concentration in water from this aquifer is > than 55,000 mg/L, and the head is at least 50 ft higher than heads in any of the overlying Cambrian and Ordovician aquifers. (USGS)

  12. Geophysical logging to determine construction, contributing zones, and appropriate use of water levels measured in confined-aquifer network wells, San Luis Valley, Colorado, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brendle, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Geophysical logs were recorded in 32 wells in the confined-aquifer monitoring well network maintained by the Rio Grande Water Conservation District. Logging results were used to determine well construction, zones contributing water to the wells, and the purposes for which the ground-water levels measured in the wells can be used. The confined-aquifer well network consists of 42 flowing and nonflowing wells. This network consists of wells used to supply water for irrigation, household use, wildlife refuge supply, and stock use, and wells for water-level monitoring. Geophysical logs recorded in the wells included video, caliper, water specific conductance, water temperature, and water flow. Most wells in the confined-aquifer well network yield a composite water level representing water levels in multiple permeable zones in the confined-aquifer system of the San Luis Valley. A potentiometric-surface map constructed using November 2000 water levels indicates that water levels from most wells in the network are correlated with water levels from nearby network wells. Potentiometric-surface maps that are constructed from water levels measured in most of the wells in the network can be used to understand long-term local and regional changes in water levels in the confined-aquifer system. Water levels measured in 8 of the 42 wells in the confined-aquifer network are not representative of water levels in the confined-aquifer system.

  13. Preliminary delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee : the Highland Rim aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee is primarily composed of Mississippian carbonates and occurs west of the Valley and Ridge Province. It crops out in the Highland Rim and the Sequatchie Valley. It has been removed by erosion from the Central Basin. Groundwater in the Highland Rim aquifer system occurs primarily in secondary openings including solution openings, joints, and faults. The Chattanooga Shale is the lower confining layer for the Highland Rim aquifer system. Under the Cumberland plateau, this aquifer system is separated from the overlying Pennsylvanian formations by the Pennington Shale. The Highland Rim aquifer system is an important source of drinking water. It supplies most of the rural, domestic, and many public supplies of drinking water in the Highland Rim. Where there is a dynamic flow system, dissolved solids concentrations are less than 500 mg/L. However, isolated cells may exist where the groundwater has dissolved solids concentrations of more than 1 ,000 mg/L. (USGS)

  14. Hydrogeologic framework of the Michigan Basin regional aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westjohn, David B.; Weaver, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Mississippian and younger geologic units form a regional system of aquifers and confining units in the central Lower Peninsula of Michigan. The area of the regional aquifer system is about 22,000 square miles. The aquifer system consists of three bedrock aquifers, which are separated by confining units. Bedrock aquifers and confining units are overlain by surficial glaciofluvial aquifers, which are complexly intercalated with confining beds composed of glacial till and fine-grained lacustrine deposits.Geophysical and geologic logs were used to characterize the hydrogeologic framework of this regional aquifer system and to delineate and map boundaries of aquifers and confining units. Geophysical logs and water-quality data were used to delineate the base of freshwater within the aquifer system and to determine geologic controls on the distribution of freshwater in the aquifer-system units.Pleistocene glaciofluvial deposits are the largest reservoir of fresh ground water in the mapped region, and the thickness of this aquifer unit exceeds 900 feet in some areas. The Saginaw aquifer, the composite of sandstones of Pennsylvanian age, typically ranges in thickness from 100 to 350 feet in areas where this unit is used for water supply. In the western part of the aquifer system, the Saginaw aquifer is separated from glacial deposits by 100 to 150 feet of Jurassic "red beds." "Red beds" are a confining unit, and the Saginaw aquifer contains saline water where it is overlain by these deposits. The Saginaw confining unit, which is principally shale, separates the Saginaw aquifer from the underlying Parma-Bayport aquifer. Thickness of the Saginaw confining unit is about 50 feet in the eastern and the southern parts of the aquifer system, about 100 feet in the north, and 100 to 250 feet in the west. The Parma-Bayport aquifer, which consists mostly of permeable sandstones and carbonates, is 100 to 150 feet thick in most areas. The ParmaBayport aquifer contains freshwater only

  15. Effect of an offshore sinkhole perforation in a coastal confined aquifer on submarine groundwater discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fratesi, S.E.; Leonard, V.; Sanford, W.E.

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore submarine groundwater discharge in the vicinity of karst features that penetrate the confining layer of an offshore, partially confined aquifer, we constructed a three-dimensional groundwater model using the SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated TRAnsport) variable-density groundwater flow model. We ran a parameter sensitivity analysis, testing the effects of recharge rates, permeabilities of the aquifer and confining layer, and thickness of the confining layer. In all simulations, less than 20% of the freshwater recharge for the entire model exits through the sinkhole. Recirculated seawater usually accounts for 10-30% of the total outflow from the model. Often, the sinkhole lies seaward of the transition zone and acts as a recharge feature for recirculating seawater. The permeability ratio between aquifer and confining layer influences the configuration of the freshwater wedge the most; as confining layer permeability decreases, the wedge lengthens and the fraction of total discharge exiting through the sinkhole increases. Copyright ?? 2007 IAHS Press.

  16. Radiocarbon dating of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater from confined parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Sprinkle, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical reaction models were evaluated to improve radiocarbon dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in groundwater from confined parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer in central and northeastern Florida, USA. The predominant geochemical reactions affecting the 14C activity of DIC include (1) dissolution of dolomite and anhydrite with calcite precipitation (dedolomitization), (2) sulfate reduction accompanying microbial degradation of organic carbon, (3) recrystallization of calcite (isotopic exchange), and (4) mixing of fresh water with as much as 7% saline water in some coastal areas. The calculated cumulative net mineral transfers are negligibly small in upgradient parts of the aquifer and increase significantly in downgradient parts of the aquifer, reflecting, at least in part, upward leakage from the Lower Floridan aquifer and circulation that contacted middle confining units in the Floridan aquifer system. The adjusted radiocarbon ages are independent of flow path and represent travel times of water from the recharge area to the sample point in the aquifer. Downgradient from Polk City (adjusted age 1.7 ka) and Keystone Heights (adjusted age 0.4 ka), 14 of the 22 waters have adjusted 14C ages of 20-30 ka, indicating that most of the fresh-water resource in the Upper Floridan aquifer today was recharged during the last glacial period. All of the paleowaters are enriched in 18O and 2H relative to modern infiltration, with maximum enrichment in ??18O of approximately 2.0%o.

  17. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  18. Sources of water, travel times and protection areas for wells in semi-confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yangxiao

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents new findings in interpreting analytical solutions of steady radial flow to a well in a semi-confined aquifer (overlain by a phreatic aquifer and aquitard), and demonstrates that 95% of pumped water is derived from leakage water within a radius of 4 times the leakage factor. The travel times of the leakage water from the radii of influence to the well are usually much longer than those derived from the travel time criteria currently used to delineate the well protection areas. The delineation of well protection zones based on the travel time criteria will not properly protect the source of water to the well. Therefore, the percentage of leakage water to the well is used as a new criterion to define the well protection areas. Within each well protection area, the mean residence time is used as an indicator of the renewable period of the aquifer system. Leakage-rate weighted residence times are used to calculate the mean residence time. For the safety and sustainability of drinking water supplies, groundwater in the phreatic aquifer within the radius of influence should be protected.

  19. Delineation and description of the regional aquifer systems of Tennessee; Cumberland Plateau aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Macy, J.A.; Mulderink, Dolores; Zemo, Dawn

    1986-01-01

    The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system consists of Pennsylvanian sandstones, conglomerates, shales, and coals which underlie the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. Major water-bearing zones occur within the sandstones and conglomerates in interconnected fractures. The water-bearing formations are separated by shale and siltstone that retard the vertical circulation of ground water, The Pennington Formation serves as the base of this aquifer system and is an effective confining unit, The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is an important water source for the Cumberland Plateau, wells and springs from the aquifer system supply most of the rural domestic and public drinking-water supplies, water from wells drilled into the Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is generally of good to excellent quality. Of the 32 water-quality analyses on file from this aquifer. only 2 had dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 500 milligrams per liter, and about three-fourths had less than 200 milligrams per liter dissolved solids, However, no samples from depths greater than 300 feet below land surface have been recorded. Ground water from locations where the sandstones are buried deeply, such as the Wartburg basin, may contain dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter.

  20. Generalized thickness of the confining bed overlying the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buono, Anthony; Spechler, R.M.; Barr, G.L.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    This map presents the thickness of the confining bed overlying the Floridan aquifer in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas. The bed separates the surficial aquifer from the underlying Floridan aquifer. Lithologic logs and information from quarries were used in conjunction with an unpublished map to compile this map at 1:250,000 scale. Units included in the confining bed are: clay, sandy clay and marl, undifferentiated with respect to age, the Hawthorn Formation, and the unconsolidated sections of the Tampa Limestone. (Kosco-USGS)

  1. The hydrogeologic framework for the southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Tertiary and Cretaceous age sand aquifers of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain constitute a distinct multistate hydrogeologic regime informally defined as the southeastern sand aquifer. Seven regional hydrogeologic units are defined; four regional aquifer units and three regional confining beds. Sand aquifers of this system consist of quartzose, feldspathic, and coarse to fine sand and sandstone and minor limestone; confining beds are composed of clay, shale, chalk, and marl. Three hydrogeologic units of Cretaceous to Holocene age overlie the sand system: the surficial aquifer, upper confining unit, and Floridan aquifer system. These three units are not part of the southeastern sand aquifer, but are an integral element of the total hydrogeologic system, and some act as a source of recharge to, or discharge from the underlying clastic sediments. Low-permeability strata of Paleozoic to early Mesozoic age form the base off the total system. (USGS)

  2. Hydrogeology of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Sarasota and adjacent counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    From 1991 to 1995, the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system and the major permeable zones and confining units of the intermediate aquifer system in southwest Florida was studied. The study area is a 1,400-square-mile area that includes Sarasota County and parts of Manatee, De Soto, Charlotte, and Lee Counties. Lithologic, geophysical, hydraulic property, and water-level data were used to correlate the hydrogeology and map the extent of the aquifer systems. Water chemistry was evaluated in southwest Sarasota County to determine salinity of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems. The surficial aquifer is an unconfined aquifer system that overlies the intermediate aquifer system and ranges from a few feet to over 60 feet in thickness in the study area. Hydraulic properties of the surficial aquifer system determined from aquifer and laboratory tests, and model simulations vary considerably across the study area. The intermediate aquifer system, a confined aquifer system that lies between the surficial and the Upper Floridan aquifers, is composed of alternating confining units and permeable zones. The intermediate aquifer system has three major permeable zones that exhibit a wide range of hydraulic properties. Horizontal flow in the intermediate aquifer system is northeast to southwest. Most of the study area is in a discharge area of the intermediate aquifer system. Water ranges naturally from fresh in the surficial aquifer system and upper permeable zones of the intermediate aquifer system to moderately saline in the lower permeable zone. Water-quality data collected in coastal southwest Sarasota County indicate that ground-water withdrawals from major pumping centers have resulted in lateral seawater intrusion and upconing into the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems.

  3. Hydrologeology and water quality of the Floridan aquifer system and effect of Lower Floridan aquifer pumping on the Upper Floridan aquifer, Pooler, Chatham County, Georgia, 2011–2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Two test wells were completed in Pooler, Georgia, in 2011 to investigate the potential of using the Lower Floridan aquifer as a source of water for municipal use. One well was completed in the Lower Floridan aquifer at a depth of 1,120 feet (ft) below land surface; the other well was completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer at a depth of 486 ft below land surface. At the Pooler test site, the U.S. Geological Survey performed flowmeter surveys, packer-isolated slug tests within the Lower Floridan confining unit, slug tests of the entire Floridan aquifer system, and aquifer tests of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. Drill cuttings, geophysical logs, and borehole flowmeter surveys indicate that the Upper Floridan aquifer extends 333 –515 ft below land surface, the Lower Floridan confining unit extends 515–702 ft below land surface, and the Lower Floridan aquifer extends 702–1,040 ft below land surface. Flowmeter surveys indicate that the Upper Floridan aquifer contains two water-bearing zones at depth intervals of 339 –350 and 375–515 ft; the Lower Floridan confining unit contains one zone at a depth interval of 550–620 ft; and the Lower Floridan aquifer contains five zones at depth intervals of 702–745, 745–925, 925–984, 984–1,015, and 1,015–1,040 ft. Flowmeter testing of the test borehole open to the entire Floridan aquifer system indicated that the Upper Floridan aquifer contributed 92.4 percent of the total flow rate of 708 gallons per minute; the Lower Floridan confining unit contributed 3.0 percent; and the Lower Floridan aquifer contributed 4.6 percent. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Lower Floridan confining unit derived from slug tests within three packer-isolated intervals ranged from 0.5 to 10 feet per day (ft/d). Aquifer-test analyses yielded values of transmissivity for the Upper Floridan aquifer, Lower Floridan confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer of 46,000, 700, and 4,000 feet squared per day (ft2/d

  4. Contribution of the aquitard to the regional groundwater hydrochemistry of the underlying confined aquifer in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Cherry, John A; Lee, Chun Ming

    2013-09-01

    Aquitards are capable of generating and preserving large amounts of chemicals. The release of the chemicals from the aquitards poses a potential contamination risk to groundwater that may be used as a drinking water source. This work aimed to identify the contribution of hydrogeochemical processes in the aquitards to groundwater hydrochemistry in the underlying confined basal aquifer by studying the coastal Quaternary aquifer-aquitard system of the Pearl River Delta, China. The system was submerged by paleo-seawater in the early Holocene and mainly receives infiltration of precipitation at present, as indicated by investigations on stable isotopes (δ(2)H, δ(18)O), water chemistry (SO4(2-) and Cl(-)) and salinity. Significant correlations between total dissolved solids in the basal aquifer and the thickness of the overlying aquitard further suggested the contribution of the aquitard to the groundwater hydrochemistry in the aquifer. Significant correlations between the chloride concentrations in aquitard porewater and that in groundwater in the aquifer, and between the thickness of the aquitard and the chloride concentrations in groundwater indicated the strong influence of the aquitard on the chloride in the aquifer. This is probably because the low-permeability aquitard is capable of preserving the paleo-seawater in the aquifer and releasing the salinity from the aquitard down to the aquifer via downward flow or diffusion. Isotopic and geochemical studies revealed that the aquitard is also responsible for generating and preserving large amounts of naturally occurring ammonium. Analysis between the concentrations of ammonium in groundwater in the basal aquifer and the total available ammonium in aquitard sediments suggested that the former is significantly controlled by the latter.

  5. Can Remote Sensing Detect Aquifer Characteristics?: A Case Study in the Guarani Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, A. S.; Thomas, B.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global water supply resiliency depends on groundwater, especially regions threatened by population growth and climate change. Aquifer characteristics, even as basic as confined versus unconfined, are necessary to prescribe regulations to sustainably manage groundwater supplies. A significant barrier to sustainable groundwater management exists in the difficulties associated with mapping groundwater resources and characteristics at a large spatial scale. This study addresses this challenge by investigating if remote sensing, including with NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), can detect and quantify key aquifer parameters and characteristics. We explore this through a case study in the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) of South America, validating our remote sensing-based findings against the best available regional estimates. The use of remote sensing to advance the understanding of large aquifers is beneficial to sustainable groundwater management, especially in a trans-boundary system, where consistent information exchange can occur within hydrologic boundaries instead of political boundaries.

  6. Geohydrologic units of the Mississippi embayment and Texas coastal uplands aquifer systems, south-central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosman, R.L.; Weiss, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program, the Gulf Coast RASA was initiated to investigate all Tertiary and Quaternary aquifers underlying the Coastal Plain in the south-central United States. Geohydrologic units that make up two of the three regional aquifer systems Mississippi embayment and Texas coastal uplands in the area are described in this report. The gulfward boundary of the outcrop of the two aquifer systems is the southernmost outcrop or subcrop of the Vicksburg-Jackson confining unit, and the updip boundary is the contact between Cretaceous and Tertiary deposits, extending northward to the southern tip of Illinois. The uppermost Cretaceous aquifer, the McNairy-Nacatoch aquifer in the northern part of the Mississippi embayment, is also included where it may be hydraulically connected to the younger sediments. Major regional geohydrologic units generally are coincident with previously defined geologic units. Most of the geohydrologic units consist of alternating sand and clay; however, the entire sequence becomes a clay and carbonate facies gulfward. The regional geohydrologic units delineated in this study, from youngest to oldest, are (1) Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, (2) Vicksburg-Jackson confining unit, (3) upper Claiborne aquifer, (4) middle Claiborne confining unit, (5) middle Claiborne aquifer, (6) lower Claiborne confining unit, (7) lower Claiborne-upper Wilcox aquifer, (8) middle Wilcox aquifer, (9) lower Wilcox aquifer, (10) Midway confining unit, and (11) McNairy-Nacatoch aquifer. The Mississippi embayment aquifer system contains all of these units and has a maximum thickness of about 5,000 feet. The Texas coastal uplands aquifer system, which is contiguous with the Mississippi embayment aquifer system and extends westward and southwestward from the Sabinc uplift, contains all of the foregoing geohydrologic units except the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, the lower Wilcox

  7. In-situ air sparging under confined aquifer conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, L.B.; Swartz, T.E.; Pringle, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    In the summer of 1993, an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air sparging (IAS) and soil vapor extraction (SVE) to remedy jet fuel condition found in Colorado River Terrace deposits was initiated by the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence. Preliminary field tests were performed to develop air injection flow rates, IAS radius of influence, air entry pressure requirements, SVE radii of influence, SVE well head vacuum requirements, and SVE air extraction flow rates. In addition to the field tests, soil samples were, collected for formal geotechnical laboratory analysis. The information gathered from these preliminary field investigations were then used to design and install a pilot scale ground-water remediation system. The pilot scale system represents a modified version of the traditional IAS/SVE approach. Due to the presence of an overlying low permeability confining layer, the system was modified to inject and extract air from the phreatic zone. The vapor extraction wells are screened down into the saturated interval to provide an escape route for the air injected by the sparging system. This system is intended to trigger two remedial processes. The first is the physical stripping of dissolved phase volatile petroleum constituents as ground water contacts air channels forming around each sparge point. The second remedial process which may be activated by this system is enhanced aerobic biodegradation of organics due to the oxygenation of the saturated interval.

  8. Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer: Second Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Parr, A. D.; Andersen, P. F.

    1981-06-01

    During the first 6-month injection-storage-recovery cycle of the Auburn University Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Project, water pumped from an upper supply aquifer was heated to an average temperature of 55°C with an oil-fired boiler and then injected into a lower storage aquifer. Injection and recovery temperatures, flow rates, and temperatures at six depths in 10 observation wells and hydraulic heads in seven wells were recorded twice daily. The second-cycle injection, which was performed in a manner similar to the first, began on September 23, 1978, and continued until November 25, 1978, when 58,010 m3 of water had been pumped into the storage aquifer. The major problem experienced during the first cycle, a clogging injection well, was reduced by regular backwashing. This was done 8 times during injection and resulted in a 24% average injection rate increase compared to the first cycle. A 63-day storage period ended on January 27, 1979, and production of hot water began with an initial temperature of 54°C. By March 23 this temperature had dropped to 33°C, with 66,400 m3 of water and 76% of the injected thermal energy recovered. This compares to 66% recovery during the first cycle over the same drop in production temperature. Production of hot water continued until April 20, at which time 100,100 m3 of water and 89% of the injected thermal energy was recovered at a final production temperature of 27.5°C. During the second cycle, measurements were made of relative land subsidence and rebound to a precision approaching 0.1 mm. The surface elevation near the injection well rose 4 mm during injection, fell during storage, and fell more rapidly toward its original elevation during production. This movement was due to thermal expansion and contraction rather than to effects caused by head changes in the storage aquifer.

  9. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkart, M.R.; Stoner, J.D.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  10. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  11. Preliminary delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee : Cumberland Plateau aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Macy, Jo Ann; Mulderink, Dolores; Zemo, Dawn

    1986-01-01

    The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system consists of Pennsylvanian sandstones, conglomerates, shales, and coals which underlie the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. Major water-bearing zones occur within the sandstones and conglomerates in interconnected fractures. The water-bearing formations are separated by shale and siltstone that retard the vertical circulation of ground water. The Pennington Formation serves as the base of this aquifer system and is an effective confining unit. The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is an important water source for the Cumberland Plateau. Wells and springs from the aquifer system supply most of the rural domestic and public drinking-water supplies. Water from wells drilled into the Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is generally of good to excellent quality. Of the 32 water-quality analyses on file from this aquifer, only 2 had dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 500 milligrams per liter, and about three-fourths had less than 200 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. However, no samples from depths greater than 300 feet below land surface have been recorded. Ground water from locations where the sandstones are buried deeply, such as the Wartburg basin, may contain dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter.

  12. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkart, M.R.; Stoner, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWOA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and shallow carbonate aquifers provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The agricultural system of corn, soybeans, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems, although mean nitrate concentrations in counties with dairy, poultry, cattle and grains, and horticulture systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as in Asia, may experience the greatest impact of

  13. Hydrogeological framework of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Ardis, Ann F.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer system underlies about 42,000 square miles of west-central Texas, where mostly gently dipping Lower Cretaceous strata comprise three regional aquifers and two regional confining units. The aquifers are the Edwards Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone, the Trinity Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone and Hill County, and the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer of the Edwards Plateau and Trans-Pecos. The Navarro-Del Rio confining unit confines the downdip part of the Edwards Aquifer, and the Hammett confining unit confines the updip, basal part of the Trinity Aquifer and a small southeastern fringe of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer. Transmissivity averages less than 10,000 feet squared per day throughout more than 90 percent of the study area as the result of widespread cementation and secondary mineral growth. However, in fractured and leached rocks in the Balcones fault zone, transmissivity averages about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the area.

  14. A hydrogeological study of the confined aquifers below the Boom Clay in NE-Belgium: combining a piezometric analysis with groundwater modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersteen, Katrijn; Gedeon, Matej

    2013-04-01

    For more than 35 years, SCKCEN has been investigating the possibility of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste disposal in the Boom Clay in north-eastern Belgium. This research, defined in the long term management programme for high-level and/or long-lived waste of ONDRAF/NIRAS, includes studying the regional hydrogeology of the aquifer systems surrounding the Boom Clay. In this context, a hydrogeological study of the confined aquifers below the Boom Clay was performed. To properly address the conceptual uncertainties related to the poorly characterized domain featuring large uncertainty in the forcing data, a combination of a piezometric data analysis and hydrogeological modelling was used. The study area represents the confined part of the groundwater system located stratigraphically below the Boom Clay in NE-Belgium. This so-called deep aquifer system includes, with increasing depth, parts of the Oligocene aquifer, the Bartoon aquitard system and the Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian aquifer. Due to the considerable pumping from these aquifers in combination with a limited recharge to the deep aquifer system, a gradual decrease in groundwater levels has been observed in more than 30-year piezometric records. The analysis of the piezometry of the confined deep aquifer system allowed gaining more insight on the system response to the intensive pumping. Since the Oligocene aquifer has a significantly lower permeability compared to the Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian aquifer, the Oligocene pumping triggers only local effects on groundwater levels. Hence, the regional effects (constant decrease of groundwater levels) in the Oligocene aquifer are presumably caused by pumping in the Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian aquifer, whereby the hydraulically isolating Maldegem Formation (Bartoon aquitard) dampens these effects. The amount of this dampening is given by the spatial distribution of the hydraulic properties of the Maldegem Formation and/or its variable thickness. For the

  15. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2002-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWOA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and shallow carbonate aquifers provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems, although mean nitrate concentrations in counties with dairy, poultry, cattle and grains, and horticulture systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as in Asia, may experience the greatest impact of this practice.

  16. Water-Level Conditions in Selected Confined Aquifers of the New Jersey and Delaware Coastal Plain, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    dePaul, Vincent T.; Rosman, Robert; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2009-01-01

    The Coastal Plain aquifers of New Jersey provide an important source of water for more than 2 million people. Steadily increasing withdrawals from the late 1800s to the early 1990s resulted in declining water levels and the formation of regional cones of depression. In addition to decreasing water supplies, declining water levels in the confined aquifers have led to reversals in natural hydraulic gradients that have, in some areas, induced the flow of saline water from surface-water bodies and adjacent aquifers to freshwater aquifers. In 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began mapping the potentiometric surfaces of the major confined aquifers of New Jersey every 5 years in order to provide a regional assessment of ground-water conditions in multiple Coastal Plain aquifers concurrently. In 1988, mapping of selected potentiometric surfaces was extended into Delaware. During the fall of 2003, water levels measured in 967 wells in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, northeastern Delaware, and northwestern Maryland were used estimate the potentiometric surface of the principal confined aquifers in the Coastal Plain of New Jersey and five equivalent aquifers in Delaware. Potentiometric-surface maps and hydrogeologic sections were prepared for the confined Cohansey aquifer of Cape May County, the Rio Grande water-bearing zone, the Atlantic City 800-foot sand, the Vincentown aquifer, and the Englishtown aquifer system in New Jersey, as well as for the Piney Point aquifer, the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer, and the Upper Potomac-Raritan-Magothy, the Middle and undifferentiated Potomac-Raritan-Magothy, and the Lower Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifers in New Jersey and their equivalents in Delaware. From 1998 to 2003, water levels in many Coastal Plain aquifers in New Jersey remained stable or had recovered, but in some areas, water levels continued to decline as a result of pumping. In the Cohansey aquifer in Cape May County, water levels near the center of the cone of depression

  17. A Microcomputer Program for Evaluating Pumping Test Results for Confined Aquifers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephen M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an interactive, self-prompting BASIC program that can be incorporated in introductory and intermediate hydrology courses. Exlains how the program can be used to evaluate pumping test data and also to calculate transmissivity and storativity values of confined aquifers. The program is written for the IBM PC. (ML)

  18. A Microcomputer Program for Evaluating Pumping Test Results for Confined Aquifers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephen M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an interactive, self-prompting BASIC program that can be incorporated in introductory and intermediate hydrology courses. Exlains how the program can be used to evaluate pumping test data and also to calculate transmissivity and storativity values of confined aquifers. The program is written for the IBM PC. (ML)

  19. Analysis of steady ground water flow toward wells in a confined-unconfined aquifer.

    PubMed

    Chong-Xi, Chen; Li-Tang, Hu; Xu-Sheng, Wang

    2006-01-01

    A confined aquifer may become unconfined near the pumping wells when the water level falls below the confining unit in the case where the pumping rate is great and the excess hydraulic head over the top of the aquifer is small. Girinskii's potential function is applied to analyze the steady ground water flow induced by pumping wells with a constant-head boundary in a mixed confined-unconfined aquifer. The solution of the single-well problem is derived, and the critical radial distance at which the flow changes from confined to unconfined condition is obtained. Using image wells and the superposition method, an analytic solution is presented to study steady ground water flow induced by a group of pumping wells in an aquifer bounded by a river with constant head. A dimensionless function is introduced to determine whether a water table condition exists or not near the pumping wells. An example with three pumping wells is used to demonstrate the patterns of potentiometric surface and development of water table around the wells.

  20. Inferring spatial distribution of the radially integrated transmissivity from pumping tests in heterogeneous confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copty, Nadim K.; Trinchero, Paolo; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2011-05-01

    Hydrologists routinely analyze pumping test data using conventional interpretation methods that are based on the assumption of homogeneity and that, consequently, yield single estimates of representative flow parameters. However, natural subsurface formations are intrinsically heterogeneous, and hence, the flow parameters influencing the drawdown vary as the cone of depression expands in time. In this paper a novel procedure for the analysis of pumping tests in heterogeneous confined aquifers is developed. We assume that a given heterogeneous aquifer can be represented by a homogeneous system whose flow parameters evolve in time as the pumping test progresses. At any point in time, the interpreted flow parameters are estimated using the ratio of the drawdown and its derivative observed at that particular time. The procedure is repeated for all times, yielding time-dependent estimates of transmissivity Ti(t) and storativity, Si(t). Based on the analysis of the sensitivity of drawdown to inhomogeneities in the T field, the time-dependent interpreted transmissivity values are found to be a good estimate of Tg(r), the geometric mean of the transmissivity values encompassed within a progressively increasing radius r from the well. The procedure is illustrated for Gaussian heterogeneous fields with ln(T) variances up to a value of 2. The impact of the separation distance between the pumping well and observation point on data interpretation is discussed. The results show that information about the spatial variability of the transmissivity field can be inferred from time-drawdown data collected at a single observation point.

  1. High-resolution Electrical Resistivity Tomography monitoring of a tracer test in a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Meldrum, P. I.; Kuras, O.; Chambers, J. E.; Holyoake, S. J.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-04-01

    A permanent geoelectrical subsurface imaging system has been installed at a contaminated land site to monitor changes in groundwater quality after the completion of a remediation programme. Since the resistivities of earth materials are sensitive to the presence of contaminants and their break-down products, 4-dimensional resistivity imaging can act as a surrogate monitoring technology for tracking and visualising changes in contaminant concentrations at much higher spatial and temporal resolution than manual intrusive investigations. The test site, a municipal car park built on a former gasworks, had been polluted by a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dissolved phase contaminants. It was designated statutory contaminated land under Part IIA of the UK Environmental Protection Act due to the risk of polluting an underlying minor aquifer. Resistivity monitoring zones were established on the boundaries of the site by installing vertical electrode arrays in purpose-drilled boreholes. After a year of monitoring data had been collected, a tracer test was performed to investigate groundwater flow velocity and to demonstrate rapid volumetric monitoring of natural attenuation processes. A saline tracer was injected into the confined aquifer, and its motion and evolution were visualised directly in high-resolution tomographic images in near real-time. Breakthrough curves were calculated from independent resistivity measurements, and the estimated seepage velocities from the monitoring images and the breakthrough curves were found to be in good agreement with each other and with estimates based on the piezometric gradient and assumed material parameters.

  2. Thickness of the upper and lower confining units of the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer in northwestern Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, J. Kerry

    1994-01-01

    The thickness of the upper and lower confining units of the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer in north- western Mississippi (the Delta) has a significant influence on the vertical recharge and contamination susceptibility of the aquifer. The upper confining unit is thicker in the southern part of the Delta, the upper confining unit is less than 10 feet thick in small areas in Bolivar, Coahoma, Sunflower, Quit- man, and Tallahatchie Counties. The lower confining units are characterized by the geologic units directly underlying the alluvial aquifer. The geologic units directly underlying the aquifer, from youngest to oldest, are the Jackson Group, Cockfield Formation, Cook Mountain Formation, Sparta Sand, and Zilpha Clay. The lower confining unit thickness is greatest (greater than 250 feet) in southern Issaquena and northwestern Warren Counties. The largest area where the lower confining unit is less than 10 feet thick is Quitman, southern Coahoma, western Panola, southern Tunica, and the northern one-half of Sunflower Counties.

  3. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  4. The Impact of the Degree of Aquifer Confinement and Anisotropy on Tidal Pulse Propagation.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Pin; Knappett, Peter S K; Hossain, Saddam; Hosain, Alamgir; Rhodes, Kimberly; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Cardenas, M Bayani

    2017-03-08

    Oceanic tidal fluctuations which propagate long distances up coastal rivers can be exploited to constrain hydraulic properties of riverbank aquifers. These estimates, however, may be sensitive to degree of aquifer confinement and aquifer anisotropy. We analyzed the hydraulic properties of a tidally influenced aquifer along the Meghna River in Bangladesh using: (1) slug tests combined with drilling logs and surface resistivity to estimate Transmissivity (T); (2) a pumping test to estimate T and Storativity (S) and thus Aquifer Diffusivity (DPT ); and (3) the observed reduction in the amplitude and velocity of a tidal pulse to calculate D using the Jacob-Ferris analytical solution. Average Hydraulic Conductivity (K) and T estimated with slug tests and borehole lithology were 27.3 m/d and 564 m(2) /d, respectively. Values of T and S determined from the pumping test ranged from 400 to 500 m(2) /d and 1 to 5 × 10(-4) , respectively with DPT ranging from 9 to 40 × 10(5)  m(2) /d. In contrast, D estimated from the Jacob-Ferris model ranged from 0.5 to 9 × 10(4)  m(2) /d. We hypothesized this error resulted from deviations of the real aquifer conditions from those assumed by the Jacob-Ferris model. Using a 2D numerical model tidal pulses were simulated across a range of conditions and D was calculated with the Jacob-Ferris model. Moderately confined (Ktop /Kaquifer  < 0.01) or anisotropic aquifers (Kx /Kz  > 10) yield D within a factor of 2 of the actual value. The order of magnitude difference in D between pumping test and Jacob-Ferris model at our site argues for little confinement or anisotropy.

  5. Groundwater availability of the Denver Basin aquifer system, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2011-01-01

    The Denver Basin aquifer system is a critical water resource for growing municipal, industrial, and domestic uses along the semiarid Front Range urban corridor of Colorado. The confined bedrock aquifer system is located along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountain Front Range where the mountains meet the Great Plains physiographic province. Continued population growth and the resulting need for additional water supplies in the Denver Basin and throughout the western United States emphasize the need to continually monitor and reassess the availability of groundwater resources. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated large-scale regional studies to provide updated groundwater-availability assessments of important principal aquifers across the United States, including the Denver Basin. This study of the Denver Basin aquifer system evaluates the hydrologic effects of continued pumping and documents an updated groundwater flow model useful for appraisal of hydrologic conditions.

  6. Type curves for selected problems of flow to wells in confined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents type curves and related material for 11 conditions of flow to wells m confined aquifers. These solutions, compiled from hydrologic literature, span an interval of time from Theis (1935) to Papadopulos, Bredehoeft, and Cooper (1973). Solutions are presented for constant discharge, constant drawdown, and variable discharge for pumping wells that fully penetrate leaky and nonleaky aquifers. Solutions for wells that partially penetrate leaky and nonleaky aquifers are included. Also, solutions are included for the effect of finite well radius and the sudden injection of a volume of water for nonleaky aquifers. Each problem includes the partial differential equation, boundary and initial conditions, and solutions. Programs in FORTRAN for calculating additional function values are included for most of the solutions.

  7. An objective frequency domain method for quantifying confined aquifer compressible storage using Earth and atmospheric tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Bernardi, Tony L.

    2016-11-01

    The groundwater hydraulic head response to the worldwide and ubiquitous atmospheric tide at 2 cycles per day (cpd) is a direct function of confined aquifer compressible storage. The ratio of the responses of hydraulic head to the atmospheric pressure change is a measure of aquifer barometric efficiency, from which formation compressibility and aquifer specific storage can be determined in situ rather than resorting to laboratory or aquifer pumping tests. The Earth tide also impacts the hydraulic head response at the same frequency, and a method is developed here to quantify and remove this interference. As a result, the barometric efficiency can be routinely calculated from 6-hourly hydraulic head, atmospheric pressure, and modeled Earth tide records where available for a minimum of 15 days duration. This new approach will be of critical importance in assessing worldwide problems of land subsidence or groundwater resource evaluation that both occur due to groundwater abstraction.

  8. A three-dimensional ground-water-flow model modified to reduce computer-memory requirements and better simulate confining-bed and aquifer pinchouts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leahy, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    The Trescott computer program for modeling groundwater flow in three dimensions has been modified to (1) treat aquifer and confining bed pinchouts more realistically and (2) reduce the computer memory requirements needed for the input data. Using the original program, simulation of aquifer systems with nonrectangular external boundaries may result in a large number of nodes that are not involved in the numerical solution of the problem, but require computer storage. (USGS)

  9. Facies distributions, recharge-discharge relations, and aquifer sensitivity in a glacial aquifer system, northeastern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, A.H. ); Yarling, M. )

    1994-04-01

    The Huntertown aquifer system underlies about 650 km[sup 2] in the interlobate region of northeastern Indiana and corresponds to a sequence of Saginaw Lobe deposits sandwiched between two Erie Lobe till sheets. The northern part of the system typically consists of a 3 to 10 m thick basal outwash apron composed chiefly of sand and capped by a discontinuous sheet of sandy till. Several small to medium-sized (5 to 30km[sup 2]) ice-contact fans are superposed on this sequence and result in thick (15 to 30 m), transmissive sections of sand and gravel. To the southeast, these sediments grade into finer-grained fan-delta and slackwater facies associated with ancestral Lake Erie. Facies distributions, and thus aquifer connectivity, are related to topographic characteristics of the underlying till sheet, which controlled Saginaw Lobe meltwater drainage. The aquifer system is variably confined by a younger sequence of clayey tills and lacustrine mud. The degree of confinement is related to terrain characteristics, with the thickest till (15 to 25 m) being associated with ridged and moraines in the southern and central parts of the system. These features are characteristic of a regional discharge area and suggest a relatively longer residence time. Sensitivity of aquifers in this part of the system may thus be correspondingly less. The distribution of geochemical facies is much less predictable, however, and may be affected by several independent variables.

  10. Effects of unsaturated zone on aquifer test analysis in a shallow-aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between two hypothetical flow models of an unconfined aquifer, one saturated and the other variably saturated, indicates that the variably saturated model which explicitly models drainage from the unsaturated zone provides a better conceptual framework for analyzing unconfined aquifer test data and better estimates of the lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivity in fine-grained sands. Explicitly accounting for multiple aquifers, well-bore storage, and the effects of delayed drainage from the unsaturated zone increases confidence in aquifer property estimates by removing some assumptions and allowing for the inclusion of early time data and water-table observations in an aquifer test analysis. The inclusion of the unsaturated zone expands the number of parameters to be estimated, but reasonable estimates of lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of the unconfined aquifer can be obtained. For the cases examined, only the van Genuchten parameter ?? needed to be determined by the test, because the parameters n and ??(r) had a minimal effect on the estimates of hydraulic conductivities, and literature values could be used for these parameters. Estimates of lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivity using MODFLOW were not as good as the VS2DT based estimates and differed from the known values by as much as 30 percent. The hydraulic properties of a surficial aquifer system were estimated through a series of aquifer tests conducted at Cecil Field Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida. Aquifer test results were analyzed by calibrating a variably saturated, radial flow model to the measured drawdowns. Parameter estimation was performed by minimizing the difference between simulated and measured drawdowns with an optimization routine coupled to VS2DT and was constrained by assuming that the hydraulic properties of each aquifer or confining unit were homogeneous. Given the hydrogeologic conditions at the field site, estimating

  11. Altitudes and thicknesses of hydrogeologic units of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westerman, Drew A.; Gillip, Jonathan A.; Richards, Joseph M.; Hays, Phillip D.; Clark, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    A hydrogeologic framework of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system was constructed as the base for a groundwater flow model developed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Water Availability and Use Science Program to aid in the understanding of groundwater availability in select aquifer systems of the United States.  The Ozark Plateaus aquifer system study area (hereinafter referred to as the “Ozark system”) is nearly 70,000 square miles and includes parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma.  A hydrogeologic framework was constructed to represent the altitudes and thicknesses of nine hydrogeologic units within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system - . the Western Interior Plains confining system, Springfield Plateau aquifer, the Ozark confining unit, Ozark aquifer (divided into the upper, middle, and lower Ozark aquifers to better capture the spatial variation in the hydrologic properties), the St. Francois confining unit, the St. Francois aquifer, and the Basement confining unit. The formations that make up the hydrogeologic units of the Ozark system range from Pennsylvanian to Cambrian age. The scope of effort included the compilation and interpretation of hydrogeologic altitudes from geophysical, lithologic driller description, and well cutting logs. The final compiled dataset included more than 23,000 individual altitude points (excluding synthetic points) representing the nine hydrogeologic units. Shorthand names were used to identify points, extents, and raster surfaces corresponding to each hydrogeologic unit. WIPCS = Western Interior Plains confining system SPA = Springfield Plateau aquifer OCU = Ozark confining unit UOA = upper Ozark aquifer MOA = middle Ozark aquifer LOA = lower Ozark aquifer SFCU = St. Francois confining unit SFA = St. Francois aquifer BCU = Basement confining unit 

  12. Experimental study of the storage of thermal energy in confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Parr, A. D.; Andersen, P. F.

    1980-05-01

    A two cycle experiment was performed in which heated water was stored in a confined aquifer and then recovered. During the first cycle, 54,784 cubic meters of water were pumped from a shallow supply aquifer, heated to an average temperature of 55 C, and injected into a deeper confined aquifer where the ambient temperature was 20 C. After a storage period of 51 days, 55, 345 cubic meters of water were produced from the confined aquifer. Throughout the first cycle, which lasted approximately six months, ground water temperatures were recorded at six depths in each of ten observation wells, and hydraulic heads were recorded in five observation wells. During the 41 day production period, the temperature of the produced water varied from 55 C to 33 C, and 66 percent of the injected thermal energy was recovered. The second cycle injection began on 9/23/78 and continued until 11/25/78 when 58,010 cubic meters of water had been recovered. The major problem experienced during the first cycle, a clogging injection well, was reduced by regular backwashing.

  13. Analytical solutions of seawater intrusion in sloping confined and unconfined coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Xin, Pei; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Sloping coastal aquifers in reality are ubiquitous and well documented. Steady state sharp-interface analytical solutions for describing seawater intrusion in sloping confined and unconfined coastal aquifers are developed based on the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation. Specifically, analytical solutions based on the constant-flux inland boundary condition are derived by solving the discharge equation for the interface zone with the continuity conditions of the head and flux applied at the interface between the freshwater zone and the interface zone. Analytical solutions for the constant-head inland boundary are then obtained by developing the relationship between the inland freshwater flux and hydraulic head and combining this relationship with the solutions of the constant-flux inland boundary. It is found that for the constant-flux inland boundary, the shape of the saltwater interface is independent of the geometry of the bottom confining layer for both aquifer types, despite that the geometry of the bottom confining layer determines the location of the interface tip. This is attributed to that the hydraulic head at the interface is identical to that of the coastal boundary, so the shape of the bed below the interface is irrelevant to the interface position. Moreover, developed analytical solutions with an empirical factor on the density factor are in good agreement with the results of variable-density flow numerical modeling. Analytical solutions developed in this study provide a powerful tool for assessment of seawater intrusion in sloping coastal aquifers as well as in coastal aquifers with a known freshwater flux but an arbitrary geometry of the bottom confining layer.

  14. Hydrogeology of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system consists of a thick sequence of unconsolidated to poorly consolidated Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks that extend from Mississippi to South Carolina. Four regional sand and gravel aquifers are separated by three regional confining units of clay, shale, and chalk that do not conform everywhere to stratigraphic boundaries. The change in geologic facies is the most important factor controlling the distribution of transmissivity within the aquifer system.

  15. Hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, J.E.; Stewart, M.T.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the surficial aquifer system in Dade County, begun in 1983, is part of a regional study of the aquifer system in southeastern Florida. Test drilling for lithologic samples, flow measurements during drilling, aquifer testing, and analyses of earlier data permitted delineation of the hydraulic conductivity distribution (on hydrogeologic sections), the aquifers in the system, the generalized transmissivity distribution, and interpretation of the ground-water flow system. The surficial aquifer system, in which an unconfined ground-water flow system exists, is composed of the sediments from land surface downward to the top of a regionally extensive zone of sediments of low permeability called the intermediate confining unit. The aquifer system units, which vary in composition from clay-size sediments to cavernous limestone, are hydro stratigraphically divided into the Biscayne aquifer at the top; an intervening semiconfining unit that consists principally of clayey sand; a predominantly gray limestone aquifer in the Tamiami Formation in western and west-central Dade County; and sand or clayey sand near the base of the surficial aquifer system. The base of the surficial aquifer system ranges from a depth of about 175 to 210 feet below land surface in westernmost Dade County to greater than 270 feet in northeastern Dade County. Test drilling and aquifer-test data indicate a complex hydraulic conductivity distribution. Hydraulic conductivities of the very highly permeable zone of the Biscayne aquifer commonly exceed 10,000 feet per day; in the gray limestone aquifer, they range from 210 to 780 feet per day. Transmissivities of the surficial aquifer system vary locally but have a recognizable areal trend. Estimated values generally are about 300,000 feet squared per day or greater in nearly all of central and eastern Dade County. Transmissivity is lower to the west, decreasing to less than 75,000 feet squared per day in western Dade County. High

  16. Geohydrologic systems in Kansas, geohydrology of the upper aquifer unit in the western interior plains aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, J.F.; Wolf, R.J.; Hansen, Cristi V.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation is to provide a description of the principal geohydrologic systems in Upper Cambrian through Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas. This investigation was made as part of the Central Midwest Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (CMRASA). The CMRASA is one of several major investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of regional aquifer systems in the United States. These regional investigations are designed to increase knowledge of the flow regime and hydrologic properties of major aquifer systems and to provide quantitative information for the assessment, development, and management of water supplies. The CMRASA study area includes all or parts of 10 Central Midwestern States (Jorgensen and Signor, 1981), as shown of the envelope cover,This Hydrologic Investigations Atlas, which consists of a series of chapters, presents a description of the physical framework and geohydrology of principal aquifers and confining systems in Kansas. Chapter H presents the geohydrology of the upper aquifer unit in the Western Interior Plains aquifer system. The physical framework of the aquifer system in relation to other systems is described by maps and sections showing areal extent and the thickness of rocks that compose the unit. The physical framework of the upper aquifer unit is described in detail in chapter D of the atlas (Hansen and others, in press). The hydrology of the system in relation to that of other systems is described in this chapter by maps showing the altitude of fluid levels and the direction of water movement within the unit. The chemical composition of water in the system is described by maps that show the distribution of dissolved-solids concentrations and the differences in water types on the basis of principal chemical constituents. Chapter A of this atlas series (Wolf and others, 1990) describes the relation of principal geohydrologic systems in Kansas and presents a more detailed discussion of the methods and data used to prepare

  17. Potentiometric surface of the intermediate aquifer system, west- central Florida, May 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewelling, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    The intermediate aquifer system within the Southwest Florida Water Management District underlies a 5,000 sq mi area of De Soto, Sarasota, Hardee, Manatee, and parts of Charlotte, Hillsborough, Highlands, and Polk Counties. The intermediate aquifer system occurs between the overlying surficial aquifer system and the underlying Floridan aquifer system, and consists of layers of sand, shell, clay, marl, limestone, and dolom of the Tamiami, Hawthorn, and Tampa Formations of late Tertiary age. The intermediate aquifer system contains one or more water-bearing units separated by discontinuous confining units. This aquifer system is the principal source of potable water in the southwestern part of the study area and is widely used as a source of water in other parts where wells are open to the intermediate aquifer system or to both the intermediate and Floridan aquifer systems. Yields of individual wells open to the intermediate aquifer system range from a few gallons to several hundred gallons per minute. The volume of water withdrawn from the intermediate aquifer system is considerably less than that withdrawn from the Floridan aquifer system in the study area. The surface was mapped by determining the altitude of water levels in a network of wells and is represented on maps by contours that connect points of equal altitude. The compos potentiometric surface of all water-bearing units within the intermediate aquifer system is shown. In areas where multiple aquifers exist, wells open to all aquifers were selected for water level measurements whenever possible. In the southwestern and lower coastal region of the study area, two aquifers and confining units are described for the intermediate aquifer system: the Tamiami-upper Hawthorn aquifer and the underlying lower Hawthorn-upper Tampa aquifer. The potentiometric surface of the Tamiami-upper Hawthorn aquifer is also shown. Water levels are from wells drilled and open exclusively to that aquifer. The exact boundary for the

  18. Radiocarbon dating of groundwater in a confined aquifer in southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, F.N.

    1992-01-01

    Groundwater ages, after correcting for chemistry, are greater than 10 ka BP. The groundwater ages do not increase in a downvalley direction, the assumed direction of groundwater movement in most intermontane basins in the region, but along general flow paths normal to the mountains toward the center of the basin. Recharge to the confined aquifer originates from infiltration of precipitation and runoff near the alluvium-mountain contact along the Galiuro Mountains and is discharged by evapotranspiration along the center of the basin. The hydrogeological concept of the 14C model is supported by the water chemistry and by the mass transfer defined by the chemical model. Weathering of primary silicate minerals in the confined aquifer does not occur downvalley, but only along the direction of flow. Hydraulic conductivities calculated for the aquifer from 14C velocities are about an order of magnitude slower than those determined through hydrological methods. The lower hydraulic-conductivity values are attributed to a thick confining layer overlying the discharge area along the San Pedro River. -from Author

  19. Flow regime analysis for fluid injection into a confined aquifer: implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Zheng, Z.; Celia, M. A.; Stone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide injection into a confined saline aquifer may be modeled as an axisymmetric two-phase flow problem. Assuming the two fluids segregate in the vertical direction due to strong buoyancy, and neglecting capillary pressure and miscibility, the lubrication approximation leads to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors in the system are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of the displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ , the gravity number, which represents the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. Four different analytical solutions can be derived as the asymptotic approximations, representing specific values of the parameter pairs. The four solutions correspond to: (1) Γ << 1, M <1; (2) Γ << 1, M =1; (3) Γ << 1, M >1; and (4) Γ >> 1, any M values. The first two of these solutions are new, while the third corresponds to the solution of Nordbotten and Celia (2006) for confined injections and the fourth corresponds to the solution of (Lyle et al., 2005) for gravity currents in an unconfined aquifer. Overall, the various axisymmetric flows can be summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime (Fig. 1). Data from a number of CO2 injection sites around the world can be used to compute the two dimensionless groups Γ and M associated with each injection. When plotted on the regime diagram, these values show the flow behavior for each injection and how the values vary from site to site. For all the CO2 injections, M is always larger than 1, while Γ can range from 0.01 up to 100. The pairs of (Γ, M) with lower Γ values correspond to solution (3), while the ones with higher Γ values can move up to the intermediate regime and the flow regime for solution (4). The higher values of Γ correspond to pilot-scale injections with low

  20. Characteristics of Southern California coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, B.D.; Hanson, R.T.; Reichard, E.G.; Johnson, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    , litany of names for the various formations, lithofacies, and aquifer systems identified within these basins. Despite these nomenclatural problems, available data show that most basins contain similar sequences of deposits and share similar geologic histories dominated by glacio-eustatic sea-level fluctuations, and overprinted by syndepositional and postdepositional tectonic deformation. Impermeable, indurated mid-Tertiary units typically form the base of each siliciclastic groundwater basin. These units are overlain by stacked sequences of Pliocene to Holocene interbedded marine, paralic, fluvial, and alluvial sediment (weakly indurated, folded, and fractured) that commonly contain the historically named "80-foot sand," "200-foot sand," and "400-foot gravel" in the upper part of the section. An unconformity, cut during the latest Pleistocene lowstand (??18O stage 2; ca. 18 ka), forms a major sequence boundary that separates these units from the overlying Holocene fluvial sands and gravels. Unconfined aquifers occur in amalgamated coarse facies near the bounding mountains (forebay area). These units are inferred to become lithologically more complex toward the center of the basins and coast line, where interbedded permeable and low-permeability alluvial, fluvial, paralic, and marine facies contain confined aquifers (pressure area). Coastal bounding faults limit intrabasin and/or interbasin flow in parts of many basins. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  1. Water-level conditions in the confined aquifers of the New Jersey Coastal Plain, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Depaul, Vincent T.; Rosman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    From 1998 to 2008, downward water-level trends were observed at 22 wells (29 percent), upward trends were observed at 21 wells (27 percent), and insubstantial trends at 34 wells (44 percent). Downward trends were detected most often at wells open to the Piney Point aquifer and the Atlantic City 800-foot sand. Upward water-level trends were most frequent in wells open to the Englishtown aquifer system in Critical Area 1 and in wells within the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in southern New Jersey.

  2. Concurrent Salinization and Development of Anoxic Conditions in a Confined Aquifer, Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Burg, Avihu; Gavrieli, Ittai; Guttman, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    An ancient, brackish, anoxic, and relatively hot water body exists within the Yarqon-Tanninim Aquifer in southern Israel. A hydrogeological-geochemical conceptual model is presented, whereby the low water quality is the outcome of three conditions that are met simultaneously: (1) Presence of an organic-rich unit with low permeability that overlies and confines the aquifer; the confining unit contains perched horizons with relatively saline water. (2) Local phreatic/roofed conditions within the aquifer that enable seepage of the organic-rich brackish water from above. The oxidation of the dissolved organic matter in the seeping water consumes the dissolved oxygen and continues through bacterial sulfate reduction, with H2 S as a product. These exothermic reactions result in some heating. (3) The seeping water comprises a relatively large portion of the water volume. In the presented case study, the latter condition first developed in the Late Pleistocene following climate change, which led to a dramatic decline in recharge. Consequently, water flow in the local basin has nearly ceased, as evident by old water ages, specific isotopic composition, and nearly equipotential water levels. The continuous seepage from above into the almost stagnant water body has resulted in degraded water quality. Seepages of organic-rich brackish water exist at other sites throughout the aquifer but have limited impact on the salinity and redox conditions due to the dynamic water flow, which flushes the seeping water, that is, the third condition is not met. The coexistence of the above three conditions may explain the development of anoxic and saline groundwater in other aquifers worldwide.

  3. On the aquitard-aquifer interface flow and the drawdown sensitivity with a partially penetrating pumping well in an anisotropic leaky confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinggao; Zhan, Hongbin

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model for describing groundwater flow to a partially penetrating pumping well of a finite diameter in an anisotropic leaky confined aquifer is developed. The model accounts for the jointed effects of aquitard storage, aquifer anisotropy, and wellbore storage by treating the aquitard leakage as a boundary condition at the aquitard-aquifer interface rather than a volumetric source/sink term in the governing equation, which has never developed before. A new semi-analytical solution for the model is obtained by the Laplace transform in conjunction with separation of variables. Specific attention was paid on the flow across the aquitard-aquifer interface, which is of concern if aquitard and aquifer have different pore water chemistry. Moreover, Laplace-domain and steady-state solutions are obtained to calculate the rate and volume of (total) leakage through the aquitard-aquifer interface due to pump in a partially penetrating well, which is also useful for engineers to manager water resources. The sensitivity analyses for the drawdown illustrate that the drawdown is most sensitive to the well partial penetration. It is apparently sensitive to the aquifer anisotropic ratio over the entire time of pumping. It is moderately sensitive to the aquitard/aquifer specific storage ratio at the intermediate times only. It is moderately sensitive to the aquitard/aquifer vertical hydraulic conductivity ratio and the aquitard/aquifer thickness ratio with the identical influence at late times.

  4. Aquifer-test analysis of the upper aquifer of the Potomac-Raritan- Magothy aquifer system, Union Beach Borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A.; Pope, D.A.; Ivahnenko, Tamara

    1989-01-01

    The hydraulic properties of the upper aquifer of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system and of the overlying and underlying confining units were determined from and aquifer test in the vicinity of Union Beach Borough, New Jersey, near Raritan Bay. The April 1986 test included the pumping of 2 test wells for 72 hours at a combined discharge rate of 1,375 gal/min, and the measurement of water levels in 10 observation wells. No lateral recharge boundary in Raritan Bay affected the observed water-level changes. Assuming leaky artesian conditions, the average transmissivity and storage coefficient of the upper aquifer are 7,754 sq ft/day and 0.00044 respectively. The leakance of the combined confining units ranges from 0.000030 to 0.000076/day/ft. On the basis of lithologic samples from a nearby well, the overlying and underlying confining units were assumed to have similar hydraulic properties. By using this assumption, the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining units ranges from 0.010 to 0.027 ft/day. (USGS)

  5. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G. F.)

    2016-05-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films.

  6. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G.F.)

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  7. The Sparta aquifer system in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newcome, Roy

    1976-01-01

    A large amount of information is available on the aquifers of Mississippi.  Reports resulting from various areal studies have described the ground-water resources of the areas concerned, but no reports dealing specifically with the entire Mississippi occurrence of individual aquifer systems have previously been prepared.  A series of "aquifer atlases" was deemed the most effective way to describe the character, the potential, and the extent of development of the aquifers and thereby provide water managers with data needed for efficient utilization of available resources.  This report on the Sparta aquifer system is the third in the series.  Information on the aquifers was obtained in the cooperative programs of the U.S. Geological Survey with the Mississippi Board of Water Commissioners and other State and Federal agencies.

  8. Behavior of TOC in a Deep Confined Aquifer During Groundwater Artificial Recharge Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; He, H.; Shi, X.

    2013-12-01

    , J6 monitoring well was about 2.54, 2.43, 2.22 mg/L, respectively. All of that showed the farther distance from the recharge well to monitoring wells, the smaller change in the value of DO. It suggested that biodegradation function was in a relative weakening trend away from the recharge position. Based on the complete control of geological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conditions of the test site, GMS (groundwater modelling system) was used to simulate and forecast the TOC changing trend in the deep confined aquifer. The numerical results indicated the radius of influence (over 1.6mg/L) was 170m, 220m and 270m respectively after continuous recharge during 1 year, 2 year and 5 year.

  9. Hydraulic properties of the Madison aquifer system in the western Rapid City area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, Earl A.

    1993-01-01

    Available information on hydrogeology, data from borehole geophysical logs, and aquifer tests were used to determine the hydraulic properties of the Madison aquifer. From aquifer-test analysis, transmissivity and storage coefficient were determined for the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers, and vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv') along with specific storage (Ss') for the Minnelusa confining bed. Borehole geophysical well logs were used to determine the thickness and location of the Minnelusa aquifer, the lower Minnelusa confining bed, and the Madison aquifer within the Madison Limestone. Porosity values determined from quantitative analysis of borehole geophysical well logs were used in analyzing the aquifer-test data. The average porosity at the two aquifer-test sites is about 10 percent in the Minnelusa aquifer, 5 percent in the lower Minnelusa confining bed, and 35 percent in the Madison aquifer. The first aquifer test, which was conducted at Rapid City production well #6, produced measured drawdown in the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers. Neuman and Witherspoon's method of determining the hydraulic properties of leaky two-aquifer systems was used to evaluate the aquifer-test data by assuming the fracture and solution-opening network is equivalent to a porous media. Analysis of the aquifer test for the Minnelusa aquifer yielded a transmissivity value of 12,000 feet squared per day and a storage coefficient of 3 x 10-3. The specific storage of the Minnelusa confining bed was 2 x 10-7 per foot, and its vertical hydraulic conductivity was 0.3 foot per day. The transmissivity of the Madison aquifer at this site was 17,000 feet squared per day, and the storage coefficient was 2 x 10-3. The second aquifer test, which was conducted at Rapid City production well #5 (RC-5) produced measured drawdown only in the Madison aquifer. Hantush and Jacob's method of determining the hydraulic properties of leaky confined aquifers with no storage in the confining bed was used to

  10. Hydrology of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, south- central United States; a preliminary assessment of the regional flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Data describing the aquifer framework and steady-state regional flow were assembled for the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer north of Vicksburg, Mississippi. The aquifer is part of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. The 60 to 140 ft thick alluvial aquifer grades from gravel at the bottom to fine sand near the top. It is overlain by the Mississippi River Valley confining unit, which consists of 10 to 50 ft of silts, clays, and fine-grained sands. Underlying units consist of alternating sands and clays corresponding to regional hydrogeologic units of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. The three-layer finite difference model was used to simulate two-dimensional confined or unconfined steady-state flow for predevelopment and 1972. Preliminary analysis of predevelopment flow indicates that recharge to the alluvial aquifer was from underlying aquifers and the confining unit. Rivers accounted for almost all discharge. Pumpage from the alluvial aquifer for irrigation substantially changed regional flow direction toward depressions in the potentiometric surface. Recharge from rivers and the confining unit increased and recharge from underlying aquifers decreased. Discharge to underlying aquifers increased and discharge to rivers decreased. Recharge from the confining unit reached a maximum of 1.3 inch/year for large parts of the aquifer. Nearly all drawdown exceeding 20 ft was at two locations in Arkansas--the Grande Prairie region, and west of Crowleys Ridge. Model results indicate the importance of leakage from rivers and the confining unite to providing recharge to sustain large amounts of pumpage from the alluvial aquifer. (USGS)

  11. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and

  12. Can the Maximum Power Principle predict Effective Conductivities of a Confined Aquifer? A Lab Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhoff, M.; Erpicum, S.; Archambeau, P.; Pirotton, M.; Zehe, E.; Dewals, B.

    2015-12-01

    Power can be performed by a system driven by a potential difference. From a given potential difference, the power that can be subtracted is constraint by the Carnot limit, which follows from the first and second laws of thermodynamics. If the system is such that the flux producing power (with power being the flux times its driving potential difference) also influences the potential difference, a maximum in power can be obtained as a result of the trade-off between the flux and the potential difference. This is referred to as the maximum power principle. It has already been shown that the atmosphere operates close to this maximum power limit when it comes to heat transport from the Equator to the poles, or vertically, from the surface to the atmospheric boundary layer. To reach this state of maximum power, the effective thermal conductivity of the atmosphere is adapted by the creation of convection cells. The aim of this study is to test if the soil's effective hydraulic conductivity also adapts in such a way that it produces maximum power. However, the soil's hydraulic conductivity adapts differently; for example by the creation of preferential flow paths. Here, this process is simulated in a lab experiment, which focuses on preferential flow paths created by piping. In the lab, we created a hydrological analogue to the atmospheric model dealing with heat transport between Equator and poles, with the aim to test if the effective hydraulic conductivity of the sand bed can be predicted with the maximum power principle. The experimental setup consists of two freely draining reservoir connected with each other by a confined aquifer. By adding water to only one reservoir, a potential difference will build up until a steady state is reached. The results will indicate whether the maximum power principle does apply for groundwater flow and how it should be applied. Because of the different way of adaptation of flow conductivity, the results differ from that of the

  13. Regeneration of a confined aquifer after redevelopment and decommission of artesian wells, example from Grafendorf aquifer (Styria, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedovski, Nudzejma; Winkler, Gerfried

    2016-04-01

    Water is essential for life and it is therefore necessary to protect drinking water sustainably. Compared to shallow groundwater, deeper groundwater is especially important due to its characteristic tendency to remain extensively unaffected by environmental impacts. Thus, the uncontrolled waste of this valuable resource has to be avoided. A lot of artesian wells have been established in Grafendorf bei Hartberg (Styria, Austria). Almost all wells were not state-of-the art. As a result the different aquifer horizons began to intermix. Additionally some of the artesian wells had a permanent free overflow and the water was not even used. Consequently, since 1950, where the mean discharge of 37 wells was 0,334 l/s per well, the discharge has decreased to 0,090 l/s until 2013, which means a decline of about 75 %. As a reaction to these declines a decommissioning campaign was conducted where 69 artesian wells have been closed by injecting a cement-bentonite suspension (ratio 3:1). The Grafendorf aquifer is situated in the Styrian Basin and consists of 5 separated artesian horizons in Neogene sediments. These artesian horizons range from 42 m (1st horizon) to 176 m (5th horizon) and mostly consist of sand, partly of fine/medium/coarse gravel and partially with minor clay content. In order to analyse the reaction of the Grafendorf aquifer to these redevelopments, 5 monitoring wells could be used for the analysis. Some monitoring wells include different aquifer horizons and hydraulically short cut them. Thus, in this work the analysis focus on the general trend of the whole aquifer system neglecting the individual interactions between the different aquifers. In a first investigation step the hydraulic properties of the aquifer system has been determined using pumping tests which were analysed with different analytical solutions with the software AQTESOLV. Overall the pumping test solutions hardly differ in the transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity. On the contrary the

  14. Geohydrologic systems in Kansas physical framework of the upper aquifer unit in the western interior plains aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Cristi V.; Spinazola, Joseph M.; Underwood, E.J.; Wolf, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this Hydrologic Investigations Atlas is to provide a description of the principal geohydrologic systems in Upper Cambrian through Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas. This investigation was made as part of the Central Midwest Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (CMRASA). The CMRASA is one of several major investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of regional aquifer systems in the United States. These regional investigations are designed to increase knowledge of the flow regime and hydrologic properties of major aquifer systems and to provide quantitative information for the assessment, development, and management water supplies. The CMRASA study area includes all or parts of 10 Central Midwestern States (Jorgensen and Signor, 1981), as shown on the envelope cover.This Hydrologic Investigations Atlas, which consists of a series of nine chapters, presents a description of the physical framework and the geohydrology of principal aquifers and confining systems in Kansas. Chapter D presents maps that show the areal extent, altitude and configuration of the top, and thickness of Mississippian rocks that compose the upper aquifer unit of the Western Interior Plains aquifer system in Kansas, The chapter is limited to the presentation of the physical framework of the upper aquifer unit. The interpretation of the physical framework of the upper aquifer unit is based on selected geophysical and lithologic logs and published maps of stratigraphically equivalent units. Maps indicating the thickness and the altitude and configuration of the top of the upper aquifer unit in the Western Interior Plains aquifer system have been prepared as part of a series of interrelated maps that describe the stratigraphic interval from the Precambrian basement through Lower Cretaceous rocks. A concerted effort was made to ensure that maps of each geohydrologic unit are consistent with the maps of underlying and overlying units. Chapter A of this atlas series (Wolf and others, 1990

  15. Hydrogeology of the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús

    1995-01-01

    The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico is composed of three regional hydrogeologic units: an upper aquifer that contains an underlying saltwater zone near the coast, a middle confining unit, and a lower aquifer. The upper aquifer is unconfined, except in coastal areas where it is locally confined by fine-grained surficial deposits. The upper aquifer is mostly absent in the Rio Piedras area of northeastern Puerto Rico. The confining unit is composed of calcareous claystone, marl, chalky and silicified limestone, and locally clayey fine-grained sandstone. Test hole data indicate that the confining unit is locally leaky in the San Juan metropolitan area. An artesian zone of limited areal extent exists within the middle confining unit, in the central part of the study area. The lower aquifer mostly contains ground water under confined conditions except in the outcrop areas, where it is unconfined. The lower aquifer is thickest and most transmissive in the north-central part of the study area. Water in the lower aquifer is fresh throughout much of the area, but is brackish in some areas near San Juan and Guaynabo. West of the Rio Grande de Arecibo, the extent of the lower aquifer is uncertain. Data are insufficient to determine whether or not the existing multiple water-bearing units in this area are an extension of the more productive lower aquifer in the Manati to Arecibo area. Zones of moderate permeability exist within small lenses of volcanic conglomerate and sandstone of the San Sebastian Formation, but in general this formation is not a productive aquifer. Transmissivity values for the upper aquifer range from 200 to more than 280,000 feet squared per day. The transmissivity values for the upper aquifer generally are highest in the area between the Rio de la Plata and Rio Grande de Arecibo, where transmissivity values have been reported to exceed 100,000 feet squared per day in six locations. Transmissivity estimates for the lower aquifer are

  16. Investigation on the Reciprocity Principle with In-Situ Pumping Test in Confined Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-Lin; Lin, Hong-Ru; Huang, Shao-Yang; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Wen, Jet-Chau

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the pumping test of reciprocity between wells is developed for 11 wells located on campus of NYUST. The reciprocity analysis is conducted with the heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions of the site. The mathematical theory of reciprocity implies that choose one as stimulation point and the other as observed response point in two known points at the same random field. Repeat the above action, the response behavior should have the reciprocity between the two points. However, the lack of literature with the field experiment to prove that reciprocity principle. Therefore, this study is expected to investigate the reciprocity of drawdown with the pumping test which will have heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions obtained by inverse process. In general, there are two ways to investigate the reciprocity of pumping tests of two wells. One way is to evaluate the drawdown reciprocity of two sequential wells. From the evaluation the reciprocity of the drawdown behavior during the sequential pumping wells, the reciprocity of the drawdown behavior is investigated. The other one is to estimate cross-correlation between the drawdown behavior of the sequential pumping wells and heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions. The reciprocity of between the drawdown and the heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions is therefore can be investigated. This study proved the reciprocity of drawdown with the sequential pumping test and heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions obtained by inverse method. Meanwhile, we proved the reciprocity is existed during the pumping test in the confined aquifer. Keywords: Reciprocity, Cross-correlation, Confined aquifer, Stimulation, Response

  17. Geochemical and isotopic composition of ground water with emphasis on sources of sulfate in the upper Floridan Aquifer and intermediate aquifer system in southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sacks, Laura A.; Tihansky, Ann B.

    1996-01-01

    In southwest Florida, sulfate concentrations in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer and overlying intermediate aquifer system are commonly above 250 milligrams per liter (the drinking water standard), particularly in coastal areas. Possible sources of sulfate include dissolution of gypsum from the deeper part of the Upper Floridan aquifer or the middle confining unit, saltwater in the aquifer, and saline waters from the middle confining unit and Lower Floridan aquifer. The sources of sulfate and geochemical processes controlling ground-water composition were evaluated for the Peace and Myakka River Basins and adjacent coastal areas of southwest Florida. Samples were collected from 63 wells and a saline spring, including wells finished at different depth intervals of the Upper Floridan aquifer and intermediate aquifer system at about 25 locations. Sampling focused along three ground-water flow paths (selected based on a predevelopment potentiometric-surface map). Ground water was analyzed for major ions, selected trace constituents, dissolved organic carbon, and stable isotopes (delta deuterium, oxygen-18, carbon-13 of inorganic carbon, and sulfur-34 of sulfate and sulfide); the ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86 was analyzed for waters along one of the flow paths. Chemical and isotopic data indicate that dedolomitization reactions (gypsum and dolomite dissolution and calcite precipitation) control the chemical composition of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer in inland areas. This is confirmed by mass-balance modeling between wells in the shallowest interval in the aquifer along the flow paths. However, gypsum occurs deeper in the aquifer than these wells. Upwelling of sulfate-rich water that previously dissolved gypsum in deeper parts of the aquifer is a more likely source of sulfate than gypsum dissolution in shallow parts of the aquifer. This deep ground water moves to shallower zones in the aquifer discharge area. Saltwater from the Upper Floridan aquifer

  18. Long-term groundwater dynamics in the coastal confined aquifers of Venice (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Lio, Cristina; Tosi, Luigi; Zambon, Giuseppe; Vianello, Andrea; Baldin, Giorgio; Lorenzetti, Giuliano; Manfè, Giorgia; Teatini, Pietro

    2013-12-01

    A more than 40-year monitoring effort has allowed assessment of the long-term evolution of the piezometric levels in the coastal multi-aquifer system of Venice, Italy. We collected, homogenized, and analyzed piezometric data recorded since the early 1970s in wells almost homogeneously distributed in the lagoon area and the adjacent inland. Both the long-term yearly trend and the seasonal evolution of the hydraulic heads of the main artesian aquifers were investigated. It has been observed that the recovering of the water levels has continued over the last decades in the zones affected by aquifer overexploitation mainly during the 1960s. However, the records show that, up till now, the water levels have not grown to the natural values measured in the beginning of the past century. The superposition of a few factors accounts for this. First, the groundwater withdrawals resumed since the 1990s in some areas; then, a reduction of the natural aquifer recharge due to climatic variations. Lastly, the leakage from approximately 400 deep abandoned boreholes in the industrial area, improperly plugged in the 1970s, that are likely to be preferential conduits for groundwater flow toward the shallowest phreatic aquifers.

  19. Hydrogeology of the Western Amazon Aquifer System (WAAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosário, Fátima Ferreira do; Custodio, Emilio; Silva, Gerson Cardoso da, Jr.

    2016-12-01

    The Western Amazon Aquifer System (WAAS), as defined and proposed in the present work, encompasses an area of about 2.0·106 km2 located in the northwestern portion of South America. Published and unpublished data were used to define WAAS boundaries and main hydrogeologic characteristics. Petroleum industry data, environmental data, and other diverse thematic data were compiled for this study according to the data's origin. The analysis, treatment and integration of available data allowed us to define the WAAS as a multilayered aquifer system comprised of the Tertiary Solimões Aquifer System (SAS) and the Cretaceous Tikuna Aquifer System (TAS). The thick clay-rich basal strata of the SAS appear to confine the TAS. The SAS is widely used for both domestic and industrial purposes, providing good quality freshwater. The TAS has varying water quality: it contains freshwater near its recharge areas in the Sub-Andean fault belt zone, brackish to brine water in the Sub-Andean basins, and salty water in the Solimões Basin (Brazil). The interpretation and conclusions provided by an increasing understanding of the area's hydrogeology resulting from this work made it possible to propose an improved and new WAAS regional hydrogeologic conceptual model with data and descriptions not previously available. Some surprising results have been later confirmed as true by looking at unpublished reports, logs and field notes. Therefore, this work resulted in new findings and settled the basis for future works, especially for the poorly understood TAS.

  20. Distribution of volatile organic compounds in a New Jersey coastal plain aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fusillo, T.V.; Hochreiter, J.J.; Lord, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds were collected from 315 wells in the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in southwestern New Jersey and a small adjacent area in Pennsylvania during 1980-82. Volatile organic compounds were detected in all three aquifer units of the Potomac-Raritan-Magoth aquifer system in the study area. Most of the contamination appears to be confined to the outcrop area at present. Low levels of contamination, however, were found downdip of the outcrop area in the upper and middle aquifers. Trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and benzene were the most frequently detected compounds. Differences in the areal distributions of light chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as trichloroethylene, and aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, were noted and are probably due to differences in the uses of the compounds and the distribution patterns of potential contamination sources. The distribution patterns of volatile organic compounds differed greatly among the three aquifer units. The upper aquifer, which crops out mostly in less-developed areas, had the lowest percentage of wells with volatile organic compounds detected (10 percent of wells sampled). The concentrations in most wells in the upper aquifer which had detectable levels were less than 10 ??g/l. In the middle aquifer, which crops out beneath much of the urban and industrial area adjacent to the Delaware River, detectable levels of volatile organic compounds were found in 22 percent of wells sampled, and several wells contained concentrations above 100 ??g/l. The lower aquifer, which is confined beneath much of the outcrop area of the aquifer system, had the highest percentage of wells (28 percent) with detectable levels. This is probably due to (1) vertical leakage of contamination from the middle aquifer, and (2) the high percentage of wells tapping the lower aquifer in the most heavily developed areas of the outcrop.

  1. Identifying aquifer type in fractured rock aquifers using harmonic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Khayyun A; Halihan, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Determining aquifer type, unconfined, semi-confined, or confined, by drilling or performing pumping tests has inherent problems (i.e., cost and complex field issues) while sometimes yielding inconclusive results. An improved method to cost-effectively determine aquifer type would be beneficial for hydraulic mapping of complex aquifer systems like fractured rock aquifers. Earth tides are known to influence water levels in wells penetrating confined aquifers or unconfined thick, low-porosity aquifers. Water-level fluctuations in wells tapping confined and unconfined aquifers are also influenced by changes in barometric pressure. Harmonic analyses of water-level fluctuations of a thick (~1000 m) carbonate aquifer located in south-central Oklahoma (Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer) were utilized in nine wells to identify aquifer type by evaluating the influence of earth tides and barometric-pressure variations using signal identification. On the basis of the results, portions of the aquifer responded hydraulically as each type of aquifer even though there was no significant variation in lithostratigraphy. The aquifer type was depth dependent with confined conditions becoming more prevalent with depth. The results demonstrate that harmonic analysis is an accurate and low-cost method to determine aquifer type.

  2. Hydrology of the Texas Gulf Coast aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Paul D.; Ardis, Ann F.

    1991-01-01

    A complex, multilayered ground-water flow system exists in the Coastal Plain sediments of Texas. The Tertiary and Quaternary clastic deposits have an areal extent of 114,000 square miles onshore and in the Gulf of Mexico. Two distinct aquifer systems are recognized within the sediments, which range in thickness from a few feet to more than 12,000 feet The older system--the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system-consists of four aquifers and two confining units in the Claiborne and Wilcox Groups. It is underlain by the practically impermeable Midway confining unit or by the top of the geopressured zone. It is overlain by the nearly impermeable Vicksburg-Jackson confining unit, which separates it from the younger coastal lowlands aquifer system. The coastal lowlands aquifer system consists of five permeable zones and two confining units that range in age from Oligocene to Holocene. The hydrogeologic units of both systems are exposed in bands that parallel the coastline. The units dip and thicken toward the Gulf. Quality of water in the aquifer systems is highly variable, with dissolved solids ranging from less than 500 to 150,000 milligrams per liter.Substantial withdrawal from the aquifer systems began in the early 1900's and increased nearly continuously into the 1970's. The increase in withdrawal was relatively rapid from about 1940 to 1970. Adverse hydrologic effects, such as saltwater encroachment in coastal areas, land-surface subsidence in the Houston-Galveston area, and long-term dewatering in the Whiter Garden area, were among some of the factors that caused pumping increases to slow or to cease in the 1970's and 1980's.Ground-water withdrawals in the study area in 1980 were about 1.7 billion gallons per day. Nearly all of the withdrawal was from four units: Permeable zones A, B, and C of Miocene age and younger, and the lower Claiborae-upper Wilcox aquifer. Ground-water levels have declined hundreds of feet in the intensively pumped areas of Houston

  3. Summary of hydrologic testing of the Floridan aquifer system at Hunter Army Airfield, Chatham County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Lester J.

    2010-01-01

    A 1,168-foot deep test well was completed at Hunter Army Airfield in the summer of 2009 to investigate the potential of using the Lower Floridan aquifer as a source of water supply to satisfy increased needs as a result of base expansion and increased troop levels. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted hydrologic testing at the test site including flowmeter surveys, packer-slug tests, and aquifer tests of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. Flowmeter surveys were completed at different stages of well construction to determine the depth and yield of water-bearing zones and to identify confining beds that separate the main producing aquifers. During a survey when the borehole was open to both the upper and lower aquifers, five water-bearing zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer supplied 83.5 percent of the total pumpage, and five water-bearing zones in the Lower Floridan aquifer supplied the remaining 16.5 percent. An upward gradient was indicated from the ambient flowmeter survey: 7.6 gallons per minute of groundwater was detected entering the borehole between 750 and 1,069 feet below land surface, then moved upward, and exited the borehole into lower-head zones between 333 and 527 feet below land surface. During a survey of the completed Lower Floridan well, six distinct water-producing zones were identified; one 17-foot-thick zone at 768-785 feet below land surface yielded 47.9 percent of the total pumpage while the remaining five zones yielded between 2 and 15 percent each. The thickness and hydrologic properties of the confining unit separating the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers were determined from packer tests and flowmeter surveys. This confining unit, which is composed of rocks of Middle Eocene age, is approximately 160 feet thick with horizontal hydraulic conductivities determined from four slug tests to range from 0.2 to 3 feet per day. Results of two separate slug tests within the middle confining unit were both 2 feet per day. Aquifer testing

  4. Ground-water flow directions and estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley aquifer system, Hamilton Area, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, Rodney A.; Bossenbroek, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System is one of the most productive sources of potable water in the Midwest, yielding as much as 3,000 gallons per minute to wells. Many water-supply wells tapping this aquifer system are purposely placed near rivers to take advantage of induced infiltration from the rivers. The City of Hamilton's North Well Field consists of 10 wells near the Great Miami River, all completed in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. A well-drilling program and a multiple-well aquifer test were done to investigate ground-water flow directions and to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower part of the Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. Descriptions of lithology from 10 well borings indicate varying amounts and thickness of clay or till, and therefore, varying levels of potential aquifer confinement. Borings also indicate that the aquifer properties can change dramatically over relatively short distances. Grain-size analyses indicate an average bulk hydraulic conductivity value of aquifer materials of 240 feet per day; the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer material was 89 feet per day. Median grain sizes of aquifer material and clay units were 1.3 millimeters and 0.1 millimeters, respectively. Water levels in the Hamilton North Well Field are affected by stream stage in the Great Miami River and barometric pressure. Bank storage in response to stream stage is evident. Results from a multiple-well aquifer test at the well field indicate, as do the lithologic descriptions, that the aquifer is semiconfined in some areas and unconfined in others. Transmissivity and storage coefficient of the semiconfined part of the aquifer were 50,000 feet squared per day and 5x10-4, respectively. The average hydraulic conductivity (450 feet per day) based on the aquifer test is reasonable for glacial outwash but is higher than calculated from grain-size analyses, implying a scale effect

  5. Physical-Based Inversion of Confined and Unconfined Aquifers under Unknown Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2013-12-01

    An inverse method is developed to simultaneously estimate multiple hydraulic conductivities, source/sink strengths, and boundary conditions (BC), for two-dimensional confined and unconfined aquifers under non-pumping or pumping conditions (Jiao & Zhang, 2013). The method is successfully tested on problems with regular and irregular geometries, different heterogeneity variances (maximum Kmax/Kmin is 10,000), and error magnitudes. Under non-pumping conditions, when error-free observed data are used to condition the inversion, the estimated conductivities and recharge rates are accurate within 8% of the true values. When data contain increasing errors, the estimated parameters become less accurate. For problems where the underlying parameter variation is unknown, equivalent conductivities and average recharge rates can be determined. Under pumping (and/or injection) conditions, a hybrid formulation is developed to address local source/sink effects as well as the impact of different types of BCs on drawdowns. Accurate results can be gained without local grid refinement at wells, inversion is thus successful with coarse grids leading to high computation efficiency. Flux measurements are not needed for the inversion to succeed; data requirement of the method is not much different from that of interpreting classic well tests. Finally, inversion accuracy is not sensitive to the degree of nonlinearity of the flow equations. Performance of the inverse method for confined and unconfined aquifer problems is similar in terms of the accuracy of the estimated parameters, the recovered head field (includling the BC), and the speed of the nonlinear solver. A select problem is presented in a set of figures (all relevant quantities have a consistent set of units). J Jiao and Y Zhang (2013) Physical-Based Inversion of Confined and Unconfined Aquifers under Unknown Boundary Conditions, Advances in Water Resources, in review. Unconfined problem with a pair of pumping and injection wells

  6. Deuterium and oxygen-18 diffusion in a confined aquifer: a numerical model of stable isotope diffusion across aquitard-aquifer boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currens, B. J.; Sawyer, A. H.; Fryar, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Deuterium and oxygen-18, combined with noble gases and radioisotopes (e.g., 3H, 14C, 36Cl), are routinely used to infer climate during recharge and groundwater age. However, along flow paths on the order of 10 - 103 km long, groundwater velocities may be low enough to allow diffusion of 2H and 18O between a confined aquifer and bounding aquitards, which could alter isotope concentrations and the inferred temperature of recharge. While the need to account for 14C diffusion between aquifer waters and confining layers has been suggested by a prior model (Sudicky and Frind, 1981), a literature review revealed no similar study of stable water isotopes. Based on the geologic and hydraulic properties of the confined Wilcox aquifer in the middle Mississippi Valley, we are constructing a numerical model to determine whether, and to what degree, diffusion can influence 2H and 18O concentrations in regional aquifers with residence times on the order of 104 - 105 y. This model combines solutions for a 1D forward-in-time, finite-difference groundwater flow equation and a combined explicit-implicit, advection-diffusion Crank-Nicholson algorithm to solve for flow velocity and isotope concentration.

  7. Altitudes and thicknesses of hydrogeologic units of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westerman, Drew A.; Gillip, Jonathan A.; Richards, Joseph M.; Hays, Phillip D.; Clark, Brian R.

    2016-09-29

    A hydrogeologic framework was constructed to represent the altitudes and thicknesses of hydrogeologic units within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system as part of a regional groundwater-flow model supported by the U.S. Geological Survey Water Availability and Use Science Program. The Ozark Plateaus aquifer system study area is nearly 70,000 square miles and includes parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. Nine hydrogeologic units were selected for delineation within the aquifer system and include the Western Interior Plains confining system, the Springfield Plateau aquifer, the Ozark confining unit, the Ozark aquifer, which was divided into the upper, middle, and lower Ozark aquifers to better capture the spatial variation in the hydrologic properties, the St. Francois confining unit, the St. Francois aquifer, and the basement confining unit. Geophysical and well-cutting logs, along with lithologic descriptions by well drillers, were compiled and interpreted to create hydrologic altitudes for each unit. The final compiled dataset included more than 23,000 individual altitude points (excluding synthetic points) representing the nine hydrogeologic units within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system.

  8. Predicting impacts of CO2 intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Zheng, L.; Lawter, A.; Wang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding on how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from a confined sandstone aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, were used to represent a generic sandstone aquifer. The sediments originated from different wells and depths within the central portion of the High Plains aquifer. A series of batch and column experiments were conducted to study time-dependent release of major, minor and trace elements when the sediments were exposed to the CO2 gas stream. Pre- and post-treatment solid phase characterization studies and wet chemical extractions have also been conducted or are underway. Major variables tested included reaction time (0-336 hours), CO2 flow rate (50 to 350 ml/min), brine concentration (0.1 and 1 M NaCl), and sediment type. Additional experiments are being conducted to determine the fate of contaminants, such as As, Pb and Cd, when they are present in the initial contacting solution. The XRD results showed that the < 2 mm size-fraction of the High Plains aquifer sediments was abundant in quartz and feldspars, and also contained 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some sediments contained up to 7 wt% calcite. Results from acid extractions demonstrated that the solid phase had appreciable amounts of potential contaminants (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn). However, results from the batch and column experiments demonstrated that few trace elements were released into the aqueous phase and their concentrations were close to or

  9. Regional geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin; Part II, Geohydrologic maps of the Tertiary aquifers and related confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Regional geohydrologic maps show the altitude of the base and the thickness of the aquifers of Tertiary age and related confining layers in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. The limit of freshwater in aquifers is also shown. The basin has an area of about 3,000 square miles, and four geologic units of Tertiary age contain regional aquifers. From oldest (deepest) to youngest, the aquifers are in the Wilcox Group, Carrizo Sand, Sparta Sand, and Cockfield Formation. As the Wilcox is hydraulically interconnected with the overlying Carrizo, they are treated as one hydrologic unit, the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer. The aquifers are separated by confining layers that retard water movement. In the northwestern part of the area, the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer is separated from the underlying sand facies of the Nacatoch Sand (Cretaceous age) by a confining layer composed of the Midway Group (Tertiary age) and the underlying Arkadelphia Marl and an upper clay and marl facies of the Nacatoch Sand (both of Cretaceous age). In the remainder of the area, the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer is separated from an underlying Cretaceous aquifer comprised of the Tokio Formation and Brownstown Marl by the Midway Group and several underlying Cretaceous units which in order of increasing age are the Arkadelphia Maril, Nacatoch Sand, Saratoga Chalk, Marlbrook Marl , and Annona Chalk. The Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer is separated from the Sparta aquifer by the overyling Cane River Formation. The Sparta aquifer is separated from the Cockfield aquifer by the overlying Cook Mountain Formation. (USGS)

  10. Groundwater Chemistry and Hydrogeology of the Upper Saddle Mountains Basalt-Confined Aquifer South and Southeast of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R. ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Liikala, Terry L. )

    2002-11-20

    This report describes groundwater monitoring within the upper basalt-confined aquifer in areas bordering the Hanford Site to the south and southeast. The purpose of the sample was to demonstrate that constituents analyzed were within the range of background concentrations and to evaluate any potential connection between groundwater on and off the Hanford Site.

  11. WTAQ: A Computer Program for Calculating Drawdowns and Estimating Hydraulic Properties for Confined and Water-Table Aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Paul M.; Moench, Allen F.

    1999-01-01

    The computer program WTAQ calculates hydraulic-head drawdowns in a confined or water-table aquifer that result from pumping at a well of finite or infinitesimal diameter. The program is based on an analytical model of axial-symmetric ground-water flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic aquifer. The program allows for well-bore storage and well-bore skin at the pumped well and for delayed drawdown response at an observation well; by including these factors, it is possible to accurately evaluate the specific storage of a water-table aquifer from early-time drawdown data in observation wells and piezometers. For water-table aquifers, the program allows for either delayed or instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone. WTAQ calculates dimensionless or dimensional theoretical drawdowns that can be used with measured drawdowns at observation points to estimate the hydraulic properties of confined and water-table aquifers. Three sample problems illustrate use of WTAQ for estimating horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and specific yield of a water-table aquifer by type-curve methods and by an automatic parameter-estimation method.

  12. Subsurface storage of liquids in the Floridan aquifer system in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system in south Florida is composed chiefly of carbonate rocks that range in age from early Miocene to Paleocene. The top of the Floridian aquifer system generally occurs at depths ranging from 500 to 1,000 ft, and the average thickness is about 3,000 ft. It is divided into three general hydrogeologic units that include Upper Floridan aquifer, the middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. Groundwater movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer is generally from the area of highest head in central Florida, eastward to the Straits of Florida, westward to the Gulf of Mexico, and, to a much lesser extent, southward. Injection of nontoxic liquid wastes into deep, saline parts of the Floridan aquifer system as a pollution-control measure began in 1943 with injection of oilfield brine in southwest Florida. Since then, the practice has quickly expanded, and many high capacity municipal and industrial injection wells are now in operation in southeast Florida. The principal use of the Floridan aquifer system in south Florida is for subsurface storage of liquid waste. The Boulder Zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer is extensively used as a receptacle for injected treated municipal wastewater, oilfield brine and, to a lesser extent, industrial wastewater. Pilot studies indicate a potential for cyclic storage of freshwater in the Upper Floridan aquifer in south Florida. (USGS)

  13. Hydrogeologic framework and geochemistry of the intermediate aquifer system in parts of Charlotte, De Soto, and Sarasota counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, A.E.; Sacks, L.A.; Yobbi, D.K.; Knochenmus, L.A.; Katz, B.G.

    2001-01-01

    the thinnest and generally, the least productive zone in the intermediate aquifer system. The Upper Arcadia zone (PZ2) is the middle zone and productivity is generally higher than the overlying permeable zone. The Lower Arcadia zone (PZ3) is the lowermost permeable zone and is the most productive zone in the intermediate aquifer system. The intermediate aquifer system is underlain by the Upper Floridan aquifer, which consists of a thick, stratified sequence of limestone and dolomite. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the most productive aquifer in the study area; however, its use is generally restricted because of poor water quality. Interbedded clays and fine-grained clastics separate the aquifer systems and permeable zones. The hydraulic properties of the three aquifer systems are spatially variable. Estimated trans-missivity and horizontal hydraulic conductivity varies from 752 to 32,900 feet squared per day and from 33 to 1,490 feet per day, respectively, for the surficial aquifer system; from 47 to 5,420 feet squared per day and from 2 to 102 feet per day, respectively, for the Tamiami/Peace River zone (PZ1); from 258 to 24,633 feet squared per day and from 2 to 14 feet per day, respectively, for the Upper Arcadia zone (PZ2); from 766 to 44,900 feet squared per day and from 10 to 201 feet per day, respectively, for the Lower Arcadia zone (PZ3); and from 2,350 to 7,640 feet squared per day and from 10 to 41 feet per day, respectively, for the Upper Floridan aquifer. Confining units separating the aquifer systems have leakance coefficients estimated to range from 2.3 x 10-5 to 5.6 x 10-3 feet per day per foot. Strata composing the confining unit separating the Upper Floridan aquifer from the intermediate aquifer system are substantially more permeable than confining units separating the permeable zones in the intermediate aquifer system or separating the surficial aquifer and intermediate aquifer systems. In Charlotte, Sarasota, and western De Soto Counties, hydraulic

  14. Selected hydrologic data for Salt Lake Valley, Utah, 1990-92, with emphasis on data from the shallow unconfined aquifer and confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrologic data were collected from wells in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, from 1990 to 1992, to better understand the hydrologic system in the valley. Most of the data collected are from 36 monitoring wells drilled in June and July 1990 and March and May 1991 using a hollow-stem auger. These wells range from 15.0 to 129.5 feet deep and are completed in the shallow unconfined aquifer, an underlying confining layer, or both. Data from public supply wells and other existing wells completed in aquifers below the confining layers near these monitoring wells are presented in order to compare data from those wells with data from the shallow unconfined aquifer and the underlying confining layers.Field data collected from selected wells and drill holes include well-completion information, lithologic logs, and water-level and field water-quality measurements. Water samples collected from monitoring wells drilled in 1990 and 1991 and from selected existing wells were analyzed for inorganic constituents, trace metals in unfiltered water, volatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. Core samples were collected from selected monitoring wells drilled in 1990 and 1991 and analyzed for geochemical and geotechnical properties. Cation exchange capacity, carbon concentration, and the concentration of selected elements in core material are presented. Particle size, dry density, moisture content, porosity, hydraulic conductivity, initial void ratio, specific storage, and other properties determined for material in cores from selected monitoring wells also are listed.

  15. Hydrochemistry of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, M.P.; Katz, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrochemistry of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Florida reflects the lithology and mineralogy of units within each aquifer and sources of water to each aquifer. The surficial aquifer system consists of sand, sandstone, clay, limestone, and shell units that are recharged primarily by precipitation. Calcium bicarbonate was the major-ion water type for 53 percent of the surficial aquifer determinations; a mixed water type (no dominant ions) accounted for 37 percent of the determinations. The median dissolved-solids concentration for the surficial aquifer system was 341 milligrams per liter. The intermediate aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomite, sand, and sandstone, and sources of water include downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system and, in some areas, upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer. In northeastern and panhandle areas of Florida, water from the intermediate aquifer system had major-ion and dissolved-solids concentrations similar to water from the surficial aquifer system. In southwestern Florida, the water type in 67 percent of analyses was mixed, and the median dissolved-solids concentration was 642 milligrams per liter. In a northern area of southwestern Florida, hydrochemistry in the limestone aquifer of the intermediate aquifer system is similar to downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system. In a southern area, downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system has calcium and bicarbonate concentrations five times higher than in the northern area, and upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer contains sodium chloride type water from mixing with seawater. In southern southwest Florida, both the limestone aquifer and the overlying sandstone aquifer within the intermediate aquifer system had higher calcium, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate concentrations than the limestone aquifer in northern southwest Florida.

  16. Simulation of ground-water flow in the coastal plain aquifer system of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giese, G.L.; Eimers, J.L.; Coble, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    A 3-D finite difference digital model was used to simulate groundwater flow in the 25,000 sq mi aquifer system of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. The model was developed from a geohydrologic framework that is based on an alternating sequence of 10 aquifers and 9 confining units, which comprise a seaward-thickening wedge of sediments that form the Coastal Plain aquifer system in North Carolina. The model was calibrated by comparing observed and simulated water levels. The maximum transmissivity of an individual aquifer in the calibrated model is 200,000 sq ft/d in a part of the Castle Hayne aquifer, which is composed predominately of limestone. The maximum simulated vertical hydraulic conductivity in a confining unit was 2.5 ft/d in a part of the confining unit overlying the upper Cape Fear aquifer. Analysis indicated the model is highly sensitive to changes in transmissivity and leakage near pumping centers; away from pumping centers, the model is only slightly sensitive to changes in transmissivity but is moderately sensitive to changes in leakance. Recharge from precipitation to the surficial aquifer ranges from about 12 in/yr in areas having clay at the surface, to about 20 in/yr in areas having sand at the surface. Most of this recharge moves laterally to streams, with only about 1 in/yr moving down to the confined parts of the aquifer system. Groundwater level declines, which are the result of water taken from storage, are extensive in some area and minimal in others. Water level declines exceeding 100 ft have occurred in the Beaufort County area because of withdrawals for a mining operation and water supplies for a chemical plant. Head declines have been less than 10 ft in the shallow surficial and Yorktown aquifers and in the updip parts of the major confined aquifers distant from areas of major withdrawals. A water-budget analysis using the model simulations indicates that much of the water removed from the groundwater system by pumping ultimately is made

  17. Radiocarbon dating of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater from confined parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Niel; Sprinkle, Craig

    2001-03-01

    Geochemical reaction models were evaluated to improve radiocarbon dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in groundwater from confined parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer in central and northeastern Florida, USA. The predominant geochemical reactions affecting the 14C activity of DIC include (1) dissolution of dolomite and anhydrite with calcite precipitation (dedolomitization), (2) sulfate reduction accompanying microbial degradation of organic carbon, (3) recrystallization of calcite (isotopic exchange), and (4) mixing of fresh water with as much as 7% saline water in some coastal areas. The calculated cumulative net mineral transfers are negligibly small in upgradient parts of the aquifer and increase significantly in downgradient parts of the aquifer, reflecting, at least in part, upward leakage from the Lower Floridan aquifer and circulation that contacted middle confining units in the Floridan aquifer system. The adjusted radiocarbon ages are independent of flow path and represent travel times of water from the recharge area to the sample point in the aquifer. Downgradient from Polk City (adjusted age 1.7 ka) and Keystone Heights (adjusted age 0.4 ka), 14 of the 22 waters have adjusted 14C ages of 20-30 ka, indicating that most of the fresh-water resource in the Upper Floridan aquifer today was recharged during the last glacial period. All of the paleowaters are enriched in 18O and 2H relative to modern infiltration, with maximum enrichment in δ18O of approximately 2.0‰. Résumé. Les modèles de réactions géochimiques ont été évalués afin de tester la datation par le radiocarbone du carbone minéral dissous (CMD) des eaux souterraines dans les parties captives de la nappe supérieure de Floride, en Floride centrale et nord-orientale (États-Unis). Les réactions géochimiques prédominantes affectant l'activité en 14C du CMD comprennent (1) la dissolution de la dolomite et de l'anhydrite accompagnée de la précipitation de la calcite (d

  18. Hydrogeology, ground-water movement, and subsurface storage in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system of southern Florida is composed chiefly of carbonate rocks that range in age from early Miocene to Paleocene. The top of the aquifer system in southern Florida generally is at depths ranging from 500 to 1,000 feet, and the average thickness is about 3,000 feet. It is divided into three general hydrogeologic units: (1) the Upper Floridan aquifer, (2) the middle confining unit, and (3) the Lower Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer contains brackish ground water, and the Lower Floridan aquifer contains salty ground water that compares chemically to modern seawater. Zones of high permeability are present in the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. A thick, cavernous dolostone in the Lower Floridan aquifer, called the Boulder Zone, is one of the most permeable carbonate units in the world (transmissivity of about 2.5 x 107 feet squared per day). Ground-water movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer is generally southward from the area of highest head in central Florida, eastward to the Straits of Florida, and westward to the Gulf of Mexico. Distributions of natural isotopes of carbon and uranium generally confirm hydraulic gradients in the Lower Floridan aquifer. Groundwater movement in the Lower Floridan aquifer is inland from the Straits of Florida. The concentration gradients of the carbon and uranium isotopes indicate that the source of cold saltwater in the Lower Floridan aquifer is seawater that has entered through the karat features on the submarine Miami Terrace near Fort Lauderdale. The relative ages of the saltwater suggest that the rate of inland movement is related in part to rising sea level during the Holocene transgression. Isotope, temperature, and salinity anomalies in waters from the Upper Floridan aquifer of southern Florida suggest upwelling of saltwater from the Lower Floridan aquifer. The results of the study support the hypothesis of circulating relatively modern seawater and cast doubt on the theory that the

  19. Historical saturated thickness of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and selected contiguous hydraulically connected units, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ardis, Ann F.; Barker, Rene A.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of this report are to illustrate the historical distribution of saturated thickness (hereafter referred to as the saturated thickness) in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, summarize the reasons for the variation in the saturated thickness, and relate the regional effects of this variation to the distribution of transmissivity. The saturated thickness map (sheet 2) was determined for most of the area by subtracting the altitude of the base of the aquifer system (Barker and Ardis, 1992) from the altitude of the historical potentiometric surface (Bush and others, 1993). Where the Edwards and Trinity aquifers are confined in the Balcones fault zone, the saturated thickness is defined by the thickness of the aquifer system, which was determined by subtracting the altitude of the base of the aquifer system from the altitude of the base of the Navarro-Del Rio confining unit (G.E. Groschen and W.G. Stein, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun, 1990).

  20. Conceptual hydrogeologic framework of the shallow aquifer system at Virginia Beach, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.; Harlow,, George E.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the shallow aquifer system at Virginia Beach was revised to provide a better understanding of the distribution of fresh ground water, its potential use, and its susceptibility to contamination. The revised conceptual framework is based primarily on analyses of continuous cores and downhole geophysical logs collected at 7 sites to depths of approximately 200 ft.The shallow aquifer system at Virginia Beach is composed of the Columbia aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown-East-over aquifer. The shallow aquifer system is separated from deeper units by the continuous St. Marys confining unit.The Columbia aquifer is defined as the predominantly sandy surficial deposits above the Yorktown confining unit. The Yorktown confining unit is composed of a series of very fine sandy to silty clay units of various colors at or near the top of the Yorktown Formation. The Yorktown confining unit varies in thickness and in composition, but on a regional scale is a leaky confining unit. The Yorktown-Eastover aquifer is defined as the predominantly sandy deposits of the Yorktown Formation and the upper part of the Eastover Formation above the confining clays of the St. Marys Formation. The limited areal extent of highly permeable deposits containing freshwater in the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer precludes the installation of highly productive freshwater wells over most of the city. Some deposits of biofragmental sand or shell hashes in the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer can support high-capacity wells.A water sample was collected from each of 10 wells installed at 5 of the 7 core sites to determine the basic chemistry of the aquifer system. One shallow well and one deep well was installed at each site. Concentrations of chloride were higher in the water from the deeper well at each site. Concentrations of dissolved iron in all of the water samples were higher than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Regulations

  1. Conceptual hydrogeologic framework of the shallow aquifer system at Virginia Beach, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.; Harlow, George E.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the shallow aquifer system at Virginia Beach was revised to provide a better understanding of the distribution of fresh ground water, its potential use, and its susceptibility to contamination. The revised conceptual framework is based primarily on analyses of continuous cores and downhole geophysical logs collected at 7 sites to depths of approximately 200 ft.The shallow aquifer system at Virginia Beach is composed of the Columbia aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown-East-over aquifer. The shallow aquifer system is separated from deeper units by the continuous St. Marys confining unit.The Columbia aquifer is defined as the predominantly sandy surficial deposits above the Yorktown confining unit. The Yorktown confining unit is composed of a series of very fine sandy to silty clay units of various colors at or near the top of the Yorktown Formation. The Yorktown confining unit varies in thickness and in composition, but on a regional scale is a leaky confining unit. The Yorktown-Eastover aquifer is defined as the predominantly sandy deposits of the Yorktown Formation and the upper part of the Eastover Formation above the confining clays of the St. Marys Formation. The limited areal extent of highly permeable deposits containing freshwater in the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer precludes the installation of highly productive freshwater wells over most of the city. Some deposits of biofragmental sand or shell hashes in the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer can support high-capacity wells.A water sample was collected from each of 10 wells installed at 5 of the 7 core sites to determine the basic chemistry of the aquifer system. One shallow well and one deep well was installed at each site. Concentrations of chloride were higher in the water from the deeper well at each site. Concentrations of dissolved iron in all of the water samples were higher than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Regulations

  2. What explains the sulfur isotope fractionation observed in the aquifer system of Puebla Valley, Mexico?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez-Oliman, G.; Perry, E. C.; Leal-Bautista, R. M.; Lenczewski, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    Puebla Valley, Mexico is located in the central part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt and is surrounded by 3 large volcanoes: Popocatepetl (active since 1994), Iztaccihuatl (extinct), and Malinche (dormant). The aquifer system of the Valley contains at least two productive units: an unconfined aquifer formed mainly of alluvial and volcanic deposits and a second, confined aquifer, which has chemically distinct water that is sulfur-rich, high in CO2, and high in alkalinity. There is a current debate about the origin of the sulfur-rich water, which is being used, after treatment, to lessen the deficit of water supply to the city of Puebla (with a population of approximately 1.5 million). Sulfate and sulfide species in water from the confined aquifer have an average sulfur isotope fractionation difference of 24.6 %. This fractionation is, at least in part, the result of bacterial sulfate reduction as evidenced by testing for bacteria with BART kits. Molecular analysis to identify the specific bacteria is underway. However, analysis of carbon isotopes of dissolved CO2 (with average delta 13C of 4.4%) and 3He/4He with average ratios of 2.1 for specific wells, located in the upper aquifer and characterized by having low sulfate but also rich in CO2 and alkalinity, suggest a possible magmatic component. The carbon and helium isotope analysis of water from the confined aquifer is currently underway.

  3. System Description for the Double Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System

    SciTech Connect

    ROSSI, H.

    2000-01-12

    This document provides a description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System. This description will provide a basis for developing functional, performance and test requirements (i.e., subsystem specification), as necessary, for the DST Confinement System.

  4. Ground-water flow in the shallow aquifer system at the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Directorate of the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia, is concerned about possible contamination of ground water at the Station. Ground water at the Station flows through a shallow system of layered aquifers and leaky confining units. The units of the shallow aquifer system are the Columbia aquifer, the Cornwallis Cave confining unit, the Cornwallis Cave aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer. The Eastover-Calvert confining unit separates the shallow aquifer system from deeper confined aquifers beneath the Station. A three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model was used to simulate steady-state ground-water flow of the shallow aquifer system in and around the Station. The model simulated ground-water flow from the peninsular drainage divide that runs across the Lackey Plain near the southern end of the Station north to King Creek and the York River and south to Skiffes Creek and the James River. The model was calibrated by minimizing the root mean square error between 4 7 measured and corresponding simulated water levels. The calibrated model was used to determine the ground-water budget and general directions of ground-water flow. A particle-tracking routine was used with the calibrated model to estimate groundwater flow paths, flow rates, and traveltimes from selected sites at the Station. Simulated ground-water flow velocities of the Station-area model were small beneath the interstream areas of the Lackey Plain and Croaker Flat, but increased outward toward the streams and rivers where the hydraulic gradients are larger. If contaminants from the land surface entered the water table at or near the interstream areas of the Station, where hydraulic gradients are smaller, they would migrate more slowly than if they entered closer to the streams or the shores of the rivers where gradients commonly are larger. The ground-water flow simulations indicate that some ground water leaks downward from

  5. Plasma confinement system and methods for use

    DOEpatents

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Sutherland, Derek

    2017-09-05

    A plasma confinement system is provided that includes a confinement chamber that includes one or more enclosures of respective helicity injectors. The one or more enclosures are coupled to ports at an outer radius of the confinement chamber. The system further includes one or more conductive coils aligned substantially parallel to the one or more enclosures and a further set of one or more conductive coils respectively surrounding portions of the one or more enclosures. Currents may be provided to the sets of conductive coils to energize a gas within the confinement chamber into a plasma. Further, a heat-exchange system is provided that includes an inner wall, an intermediate wall, an outer wall, and pipe sections configured to carry coolant through cavities formed by the walls.

  6. Geohydrologic systems in Kansas, geohydrology of the Great Plains aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGovern, Harold E.; Wolf, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks of Late Cambrian through Early Cretaceous age in Kansas are part of a regional flow system of hydraulically connected aquifers and confining units. Future demands for water require that these deeply buried rocks be studied to describe hydrologic properties and ground-water-flow conditions and to provide information that will serve as the basis for decisions concerning the protection and the management of the water resources contained therein, Toward this end, the U.S. Geological Survey, as a part of its Central Midwest Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (CMRASA), began a 5-year hydrologic investigation of this regional flow system in Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas (Jorgensen and Signor, 1981).This chapter is one of nine contained in Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-722, which present a description of the physical framework (Chapters B-F) and the geohydrology (Chapters G-I} of principal aquifers and confining systems in Upper Cambrian through Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas; the stratigraphic relations of these geohydrologic systems are discussed in detail in Chapter A (Wolf and others, 1990). This chapter (G) describes the geohydrology of the Great Plains aquifer system; the physical framework of the Great Plains aquifer system is presented in Chapter B (Spinazola and others, 1992).The maps in this chapter are based on existing data from selected geophysical and lithologic logs, drill-stem tests, water-level measurements, water-quality analyses, and published maps of stratigraphically equivalent units. An index to the geohydrologic data compiled for the CMRASA in Kansas is presented in Spinazola and others (1987). For the most part, data used to construct the maps were collected over many years and do not reflect aquifer conditions for any specific time period.

  7. Digital model of the unconsolidated aquifer system in the Modesto area, Stanislaus and San Joaquin Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Londquist, Clark J.

    1981-01-01

    A digital mathematical model of the unconsolidated alluvial aquifer system in the Modesto area, Calif., has been developed which can be used to determine the effects of increased pumping and water use of future water levels in the aquifer system. The model is divided into two units. The lower unit is confined in the western part of the study area by a confining clay bed; elsewhere in this unit the aquifer is unconfined. The upper unit represents an unconfined aquifer and lies above the clay bed or its extension. Where the clay bed is absent the upper and lower units are considered as a single aquifer. The model, as calibrated, can evaluate with reasonable accuracy the effects on water levels of changing stresses and stress patterns only within the area of primary interest for the upper unit. In other areas of the upper unit and for the lower unit, predicted changes should be looked upon as, at best, representing only general trends. (USGS)

  8. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 1. Sulfate from confining beds as an oxidant in microbial CO2 production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; McMahon, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    A primary source of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina is carbon dioxide produced by microbially mediated oxidation of sedimentary organic matter. Groundwater chemistry data indicate, however, that the available mass of inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, Fe(III), and sulfate) and observed methane production is inadequate to account for observed CO2 production. Although sulfate concentrations are low (approximately 0.05-0.10 mM) in aquifer water throughout the flow system, sulfate concentrations are greater in confining-bed pore water (0.4-20 mM). The distribution of culturable sulfate-reducing bacteria in these sediments suggests that this concentration gradient is maintained by greater sulfate-reducing activity in sands than in clays. Calculations based on Fick's Law indicate that possible rates of sulfate diffusion to aquifer sediments are sufficient to explain observed rates of CO2 production (about 10-5 mmoll-1 year-1), thus eliminating the apparent electron-acceptor deficit. Furthermore, concentrations of dissolved hydrogen in aquifer water are in the range characteristic of sulfate reduction (2-6 nM), which provides independent evidence that sulfate reduction is the predominant terminal electron-accepting process in this system. The observed accumulation of pyrite- and calcite-cemented sandstones at sand-clay interfaces is direct physical evidence that these processes have been continuing over the history of these sediments. ?? 1991.

  9. A finite-element model for simulation of two-dimensional steady-state ground-water flow in confined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer program based on the Galerkin finite-element method was developed to simulate two-dimensional steady-state ground-water flow in either isotropic or anisotropic confined aquifers. The program may also be used for unconfined aquifers of constant saturated thickness. Constant head, constant flux, and head-dependent flux boundary conditions can be specified in order to approximate a variety of natural conditions, such as a river or lake boundary, and pumping well. The computer program was developed for the preliminary simulation of ground-water flow in the Edwards-Trinity Regional aquifer system as part of the Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis Program. Results of the program compare well to analytical solutions and simulations .from published finite-difference models. A concise discussion of the Galerkin method is presented along with a description of the program. Provided in the Supplemental Data section are a listing of the computer program, definitions of selected program variables, and several examples of data input and output used in verifying the accuracy of the program.

  10. Hydrogeologic framework of the uppermost principal aquifer systems in the Williston and Powder River structural basins, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, Joanna N.; LeCain, Gary D.; Ryter, Derek W.; Sando, Roy; Long, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Regionally, water in the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer systems flows in a northerly or northeasterly direction from the Powder River structural basin to the Williston structural basin. Groundwater flow in the Williston structural basin generally is easterly or northeasterly. Flow in the uppermost hydrogeologic units generally is more local and controlled by topography where unglaciated in the Williston structural basin than is flow in the glaciated part and in underlying aquifers. Groundwater flow in the Powder River structural basin generally is northerly with local variations greatest in the uppermost aquifers. Groundwater is confined, and flow is regional in the underlying aquifers.

  11. Rapid computation of directional wellbore drawdown in a confined aquifer via Poisson resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Benjamin J.; Zhan, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    We have derived a rapidly computed analytical solution for drawdown caused by a partially or fully penetrating directional wellbore (vertical, horizontal, or slant) via Green's function method. The mathematical model assumes an anisotropic, homogeneous, confined, box-shaped aquifer. Any dimension of the box can have one of six possible boundary conditions: 1) both sides no-flux; 2) one side no-flux - one side constant-head; 3) both sides constant-head; 4) one side no-flux; 5) one side constant-head; 6) free boundary conditions. The solution has been optimized for rapid computation via Poisson Resummation, derivation of convergence rates, and numerical optimization of integration techniques. Upon application of the Poisson Resummation method, we were able to derive two sets of solutions with inverse convergence rates, namely an early-time rapidly convergent series (solution-A) and a late-time rapidly convergent series (solution-B). From this work we were able to link Green's function method (solution-B) back to image well theory (solution-A). We then derived an equation defining when the convergence rate between solution-A and solution-B is the same, which we termed the switch time. Utilizing the more rapidly convergent solution at the appropriate time, we obtained rapid convergence at all times. We have also shown that one may simplify each of the three infinite series for the three-dimensional solution to 11 terms and still maintain a maximum relative error of less than 10-14.

  12. Hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, James A.

    1986-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system of the Southeastern United States is comprised of a thick sequence of carbonate rocks that are mostly of Paleocene to early Miocene age and that are hydraulically connected in varying degrees. The aquifer system consists of a single vertically continuous permeable unit updip and of two major permeable zones (the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers) separated by one of seven middle confining units downdip. Neither the boundaries of the aquifer system or of its component high- and low-permeability zones necessarily conform to either formation boundaries or time-stratigraphic breaks. The rocks that make up the Floridan aquifer system, its upper and lower confining units, and a surficial aquifer have been separated into several chronostratigraphic units. The external and internal geometry of these stratigraphic units is presented on a series of structure contour and isopach maps and by a series of geohydrologic cross sections and a fence diagram. Paleocene through middle Eocene units consist of an updip clastic facies and a downdip carbonate bank facies, that extends progressively farther north and east in progressively younger units. Upper Eocene and Oligocene strata are predominantly carbonate rocks throughout the study area. Miocene and younger strata are mostly clastic rocks. Subsurface data show that some modifications in current stratigraphic nomenclature are necessary. First, the middle Eocene Lake City Limestone cannot be distinguished lithologically or faunally from the overlying middle Eocene Avon Park 'Limestone.' Accordingly, it is proposed that the term Lake City be abandoned and the term Avon Park Formation be applied to the entire middle Eocene carbonate section of peninsular Florida and southeastern Georgia. A reference well section in Levy County, Fla., is proposed for the expanded Avon Park Formation. The Avon Park is called a 'formation' more properly than a 'limestone' because the unit contains rock types other than

  13. WTAQ version 2-A computer program for analysis of aquifer tests in confined and water-table aquifers with alternative representations of drainage from the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Paul M.; Moench, Allen F.

    2011-01-01

    The computer program WTAQ simulates axial-symmetric flow to a well pumping from a confined or unconfined (water-table) aquifer. WTAQ calculates dimensionless or dimensional drawdowns that can be used with measured drawdown data from aquifer tests to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Version 2 of the program, which is described in this report, provides an alternative analytical representation of drainage to water-table aquifers from the unsaturated zone than that which was available in the initial versions of the code. The revised drainage model explicitly accounts for hydraulic characteristics of the unsaturated zone, specifically, the moisture retention and relative hydraulic conductivity of the soil. The revised program also retains the original conceptualizations of drainage from the unsaturated zone that were available with version 1 of the program to provide alternative approaches to simulate the drainage process. Version 2 of the program includes all other simulation capabilities of the first versions, including partial penetration of the pumped well and of observation wells and piezometers, well-bore storage and skin effects at the pumped well, and delayed drawdown response of observation wells and piezometers.

  14. The Maryland Coastal Plain Aquifer Information System: A GIS-based tool for assessing groundwater resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreasen, David C.; Nardi, Mark R.; Staley, Andrew W.; Achmad, Grufron; Grace, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the source of drinking water for ∼1.4 million people in the Coastal Plain Province of Maryland (USA). In addition, groundwater is essential for commercial, industrial, and agricultural uses. Approximately 0.757 × 109 L d–1 (200 million gallons/d) were withdrawn in 2010. As a result of decades of withdrawals from the coastal plain confined aquifers, groundwater levels have declined by as much as 70 m (230 ft) from estimated prepumping levels. Other issues posing challenges to long-term groundwater sustainability include degraded water quality from both man-made and natural sources, reduced stream base flow, land subsidence, and changing recharge patterns (drought) caused by climate change. In Maryland, groundwater supply is managed primarily by the Maryland Department of the Environment, which seeks to balance reasonable use of the resource with long-term sustainability. The chief goal of groundwater management in Maryland is to ensure safe and adequate supplies for all current and future users through the implementation of appropriate usage, planning, and conservation policies. To assist in that effort, the geographic information system (GIS)–based Maryland Coastal Plain Aquifer Information System was developed as a tool to help water managers access and visualize groundwater data for use in the evaluation of groundwater allocation and use permits. The system, contained within an ESRI ArcMap desktop environment, includes both interpreted and basic data for 16 aquifers and 14 confining units. Data map layers include aquifer and ­confining unit layer surfaces, aquifer extents, borehole information, hydraulic properties, time-series groundwater-level data, well records, and geophysical and lithologic logs. The aquifer and confining unit layer surfaces were generated specifically for the GIS system. The system also contains select groundwater-quality data and map layers that quantify groundwater and surface-water withdrawals. The aquifer

  15. An analytical approach for the simulation of flow in a heterogeneous confined aquifer with a parameter zonation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ching-Sheng; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-11-01

    This study introduces an analytical approach to estimate drawdown induced by well extraction in a heterogeneous confined aquifer with an irregular outer boundary. The aquifer domain is divided into a number of zones according to the zonation method for representing the spatial distribution of a hydraulic parameter field. The lateral boundary of the aquifer can be considered under the Dirichlet, Neumann or Robin condition at different parts of the boundary. Flow across the interface between two zones satisfies the continuities of drawdown and flux. Source points, each of which has an unknown volumetric rate representing the boundary effect on the drawdown, are allocated around the boundary of each zone. The solution of drawdown in each zone is expressed as a series in terms of the Theis equation with unknown volumetric rates from the source points. The rates are then determined based on the aquifer boundary conditions and the continuity requirements. The estimated aquifer drawdown by the present approach agrees well with a finite element solution developed based on the Mathematica function NDSolve. As compared with the existing numerical approaches, the present approach has a merit of directly computing the drawdown at any given location and time and therefore takes much less computing time to obtain the required results in engineering applications.

  16. Summary of ground-water hydrology of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in the northern Midwest, United States: A in Regional aquifer system analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    Development of the aquifer system began in various parts of the northern Midwest in the 1860's and 1870's with the drilling of deep, generally flowing artesian wells near Lake Michigan in eastern Wisconsin and northeastern Illinois and along the valleys of the Mississippi River and its tributaries. Initial heads of 186 and 130 feet above Lake Michigan at Milwaukee and Chicago, respectively, have been reported. Large-scale pumping has produced cones of depression in these two areas, with respective head declines of as much as 375 and 900 feet. Other major pumping centers generally have had much smaller declines. The largest withdrawals from the aquifer system were about 180 million gallons per day in each of the major metropolitan areas of Chicago and Minneapolis-St. Paul (Twin Cities). However, the total decline in head in the St. Peter-Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer in the Twin Cities by 1980 was only 90 feet because the aquifer is unconfined. Most of the eastern two-thirds of Iowa, where the aquifer system is tightly confined, is characterized by more than 50 feet of head decline, with 200 feet or more at Mason City and the Quad Cities. Pumpage from the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system throughout the study area averaged 683 million gallons per day for the period 1976-80. Results of a transient-model simulation show that recharge increased over predevelopment recharge by 447 million gallons per day. Natural discharge decreased by 99 million gallons per day, and 137 million gallons per day was released from aquifer storage. Mineralization of ground water in the aquifer system increases from slightly mineralized calcium magnesium bicarbonate water in the northern recharge areas, through more mineralized, mixed water types with increased sodium and sulfate, to highly mineralized sodium chloride brines in the deeper parts of the structural basins.

  17. Summary of the Oahu, Hawaii, Regional Aquifer-System Analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, William D.; Shade, Patricia J.; Hunt, Charles D.

    1996-01-01

    island. A regional aquifer system composed of the Waianae aquifer in the Waianae Volcanics and the Koolau aquifer in the Koolau Basalt is subdivided into well-defined areas by geohydrologic barriers. The aquifers are separated by the Waianae confining unit formed by weathering along the Waianae-Koolau unconformity. In some coastal areas, a caprock of sedimentary deposits overlies and confines the aquifers. The island of Oahu has been divided into seven major ground-water areas delineated by deep-seated structural geohydrologic barriers; these areas are further subdivided by shallower internal barriers to ground-water flow. The Koolau rift zone along the eastern (windward) side of the island and the Waianae rift zone to the west (Waianae area) constitute two of the major ground-water areas. North-central Oahu is divided into three smaller ground-water areas, Mokuleia, Waialua, and Kawailoa. The Schofield ground-water area encompasses much of the Schofield Plateau of central Oahu. Southern Oahu is divided into six areas, Ewa, Pearl Harbor, Moanalua, Kalihi, Beretania, and Kaimuki. Southeastern Oahu is divided into the Waialae and Wailupe-Hawaii Kai areas. Along the northeast coast of windward Oahu is the Kahuku ground-water area. The aquifers of Oahu contain shallow freshwater and deeper saltwater flow systems. There are five fresh ground-water flow systems: meteoric freshwater flow diverges from ground-water divides that lie somewhere within the Waianae and Koolau rift zones, forming an interior flow system in central Oahu (which is divided into the northern and southern Oahu flow systems) and exterior flow systems in western (Waianae area) Oahu, eastern (windward) Oahu, and southeastern Oahu. Development of the ground-water resources on Oahu began when the first well was drilled near Honouliuli in the summer of 1879. By 1890, 86 wells had been drilled on the island. From about 1891 to about 1910, development increased rapidly with the drilling of a

  18. Summary of hydrologic testing of the Floridan aquifer system at Fort Stewart, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Flowmeter surveys at the study site indicate several permeable zones within the Floridan aquifer system. The Upper Floridan aquifer is composed of two water-bearing zones-the upper zone and the lower zone. The upper zone extends from 520 to 650 feet below land surface, contributes 96 percent of the total flow, and is more permeable than the lower zone, which extends from 650 to 705 feet below land surface and contributes the remaining 4 percent of the flow. The Lower Floridan aquifer consists of three zones at depths of 912-947, 1,090-1,139, and 1,211-1,250 feet below land surface that are inter-layered with three less-permeable zones. The Lower Floridan confining unit includes a permeable zone that extends from 793 to 822 feet below land surface. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity values of the Lower Floridan confining unit derived from slug tests within four packer-isolated intervals were from 2 to 20 feet per day, with a high value of 70 feet per day obtained for one of the intervals. Aquifer testing, using analytical techniques and model simulation, indicated the Upper Floridan aquifer had a transmissivity of about 100,000 feet squared per day, and the Lower Floridan aquifer had a transmissivity of 7,000 feet squared per day. Flowmeter surveys, slug tests within packer-isolated intervals, and parameter-estimation results indicate that the hydraulic properties of the Lower Floridan confining unit are similar to those of the Lower Floridan aquifer. Water-level data, for each aquifer test, were filtered for external influences such as barometric pressure, earth-tide effects, and long-term trends to enable detection of small water-level responses to aquifer-test pumping of less than 1 foot. During a 72-hour aquifer test of the Lower Floridan aquifer, a drawdown response of 0.3 to 0.4 foot was observed in two Upper Floridan aquifer wells, one of which was more than 1 mile away from the pumped well.

  19. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I.; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-07-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le}100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

  20. Hydrogeophysical methods for analyzing aquifer storage and recovery systems.

    PubMed

    Minsley, Burke J; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Morgan, Frank Dale

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogeophysical methods are presented that support the siting and monitoring of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems. These methods are presented as numerical simulations in the context of a proposed ASR experiment in Kuwait, although the techniques are applicable to numerous ASR projects. Bulk geophysical properties are calculated directly from ASR flow and solute transport simulations using standard petrophysical relationships and are used to simulate the dynamic geophysical response to ASR. This strategy provides a quantitative framework for determining site-specific geophysical methods and data acquisition geometries that can provide the most useful information about the ASR implementation. An axisymmetric, coupled fluid flow and solute transport model simulates injection, storage, and withdrawal of fresh water (salinity ∼500 ppm) into the Dammam aquifer, a tertiary carbonate formation with native salinity approximately 6000 ppm. Sensitivity of the flow simulations to the correlation length of aquifer heterogeneity, aquifer dispersivity, and hydraulic permeability of the confining layer are investigated. The geophysical response using electrical resistivity, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM), and seismic methods is computed at regular intervals during the ASR simulation to investigate the sensitivity of these different techniques to changes in subsurface properties. For the electrical and electromagnetic methods, fluid electric conductivity is derived from the modeled salinity and is combined with an assumed porosity model to compute a bulk electrical resistivity structure. The seismic response is computed from the porosity model and changes in effective stress due to fluid pressure variations during injection/recovery, while changes in fluid properties are introduced through Gassmann fluid substitution.

  1. Hydrogeophysical methods for analyzing aquifer storage and recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Minsley, B.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Morgan, F.D.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogeophysical methods are presented that support the siting and monitoring of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems. These methods are presented as numerical simulations in the context of a proposed ASR experiment in Kuwait, although the techniques are applicable to numerous ASR projects. Bulk geophysical properties are calculated directly from ASR flow and solute transport simulations using standard petrophysical relationships and are used to simulate the dynamic geophysical response to ASR. This strategy provides a quantitative framework for determining site-specific geophysical methods and data acquisition geometries that can provide the most useful information about the ASR implementation. An axisymmetric, coupled fluid flow and solute transport model simulates injection, storage, and withdrawal of fresh water (salinity {approx}500 ppm) into the Dammam aquifer, a tertiary carbonate formation with native salinity approximately 6000 ppm. Sensitivity of the flow simulations to the correlation length of aquifer heterogeneity, aquifer dispersivity, and hydraulic permeability of the confining layer are investigated. The geophysical response using electrical resistivity, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM), and seismic methods is computed at regular intervals during the ASR simulation to investigate the sensitivity of these different techniques to changes in subsurface properties. For the electrical and electromagnetic methods, fluid electric conductivity is derived from the modeled salinity and is combined with an assumed porosity model to compute a bulk electrical resistivity structure. The seismic response is computed from the porosity model and changes in effective stress due to fluid pressure variations during injection/recovery, while changes in fluid properties are introduced through Gassmann fluid substitution.

  2. Geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.J.; Londquist, C.J.; Laudon, Julie; Mitten, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater development has resulted in lowered water levels and seawater intrusion in the Pajaro Valley, California. An investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the groundwater flow system and to evaluate the response of the system to pumping stresses by using a mathematical model. The aquifer system consists of three aquifers. The lower aquifer is in fluvial sequences of Quaternary Aromas Sand below interbedded clay layers. The middle aquifer is in upper fluvial and lower eolian sequence of Aromas Sand, and in overlying basal gravels in terrace deposits and alluvium. Weathered soil zones in the Aromas Sand, and clay layers in the terrace deposits and alluvium overlie the middle aquifer. The upper aquifer is actually many discontinuous water bearing zones in the Aromas Sand, terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. The three aquifers are represented in the mathematical model by three model layers separated by two confining layers. Model-generated water budgets for the 11-year simulation period show that storage decreased by 23,000 acre-ft, mostly during the 1976-77 drought. The calibrated model can simulate, with acceptable accuracy, both semiannual and long-term trends of potentiometric heads in parts of the lower and middle layers. (USGS)

  3. Field experiments and numerical simulations of confined aquifer response to multi-cycle recharge-recovery process through a well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiu; Wu, Yuanbin; Zhang, Xingsheng; Liu, Yan; Yang, Tianliang; Feng, Bo

    2012-09-01

    SummaryShanghai is one of the cities suffering from land subsidence in China. Land subsidence has caused serious financial losses. Thus, artificial recharge measures have been adopted to compensate the drawdown in shallow, confined aquifers and thereby control land subsidence. In this study, a multi-cycle recharge-recovery field experiment was performed to investigate the response of a shallow, confined aquifer to artificial recharge through a well. In the experiment, a series of recharge-recovery cycles with different recharge volumes and durations, with and without artificial pressure, were performed. The water levels monitored in the recharge and observation wells indicated the response of the aquifer to the multi-cycle recharge-recovery process. Meanwhile, a finite-difference method (FDM) numerical model was established, and its parameters were obtained via a reversed numerical analysis on the experimental data. The responses of the shallow, confined aquifer to the multi-cycle recharge-recovery process were simulated in detail using the model. The calculation results showed that the water level dropped significantly when the recharge ended. Moreover, the efficiency of a multi-cycle recharge was found to be higher than that of a concentrated one under the same recharge volume and time. The relationship between recharge frequency and efficiency, expressed as H = 0.29498 f0.40163 and R2 = 0.97264, respectively, was obtained through the FDM numerical simulation. In the recharge intervals, the optimal recharge efficiency was achieved when the water level rose to 40% of the peak.

  4. Simulation of Groundwater Flow in the Coastal Plain Aquifer System of Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.; Pope, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    The groundwater model documented in this report simulates the transient evolution of water levels in the aquifers and confining units of the Virginia Coastal Plain and adjacent portions of Maryland and North Carolina since 1890. Groundwater withdrawals have lowered water levels in Virginia Coastal Plain aquifers and have resulted in drawdown in the Potomac aquifer exceeding 200 feet in some areas. The discovery of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater and a revised conceptualization of the Potomac aquifer are two major changes to the hydrogeologic framework that have been incorporated into the groundwater model. The spatial scale of the model was selected on the basis of the primary function of the model of assessing the regional water-level responses of the confined aquifers beneath the Coastal Plain. The local horizontal groundwater flow through the surficial aquifer is not intended to be accurately simulated. Representation of recharge, evapotranspiration, and interaction with surface-water features, such as major rivers, lakes, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean, enable simulation of shallow flow-system details that influence locations of recharge to and discharge from the deeper confined flow system. The increased density of groundwater associated with the transition from fresh to salty groundwater near the Atlantic Ocean affects regional groundwater flow and was simulated with the Variable Density Flow Process of SEAWAT (a U.S. Geological Survey program for simulation of three-dimensional variable-density groundwater flow and transport). The groundwater density distribution was generated by a separate 108,000-year simulation of Pleistocene freshwater flushing around the Chesapeake Bay impact crater during transient sea-level changes. Specified-flux boundaries simulate increasing groundwater underflow out of the model domain into Maryland and minor underflow from the Piedmont Province into the model domain. Reported withdrawals accounted for approximately

  5. Revised hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Lester J.; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2015-04-08

    The hydrogeologic framework for the Floridan aquifer system has been revised throughout its extent in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina. The updated framework generally conforms to the original framework established by the U.S. Geological Survey in the 1980s, except for adjustments made to the internal boundaries of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers and the individual higher and contrasting lower permeability zones within these aquifers. The system behaves as one aquifer over much of its extent; although subdivided vertically into two aquifer units, the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. In the previous framework, discontinuous numbered middle confining units (MCUI–VII) were used to subdivide the system. In areas where less-permeable rocks do not occur within the middle part of the system, the system was previously considered one aquifer and named the Upper Floridan aquifer. In intervening years, more detailed data have been collected in local areas, resulting in some of the same lithostratigraphic units in the Floridan aquifer system being assigned to the Upper or Lower Floridan aquifer in different parts of the State of Florida. Additionally, some of the numbered middle confining units are found to have hydraulic properties within the same order of magnitude as the aquifers. A new term “composite unit” is introduced for lithostratigraphic units that cannot be defined as either a confining or aquifer unit over their entire extent. This naming convention is a departure from the previous framework, in that stratigraphy is used to consistently subdivide the aquifer system into upper and lower aquifers across the State of Florida. This lithostratigraphic mapping approach does not change the concept of flow within the system. The revised boundaries of the Floridan aquifer system were mapped by considering results from local studies and regional correlations of lithostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units or zones. Additional zones within

  6. Hydrogeo-chemical impacts of air sparging remediation on a semi-confined aquifer: evidences from field monitoring and modeling.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Yang, Y S; Lu, Y; Du, X Q; Zhang, G X

    2013-01-01

    Air sparging (AS) was explored for remediation of a petroleum contaminated semi-confined groundwater system in NE China. Physical, hydro-chemical and hydraulic behaviors in subsurface environment during AS were investigated with support of modeling to understand the hydrogeo-chemical impacts of AS on the aquifer. The responses of groundwater, dissolved oxygen and temperature indicated that the radius of influence of AS was up to 8-9 m, and a 3D boundary of the zone of influence (ZOI) was accordingly obtained with volume of 362 m(3). Water mounding unlike normal observations was featured by continuous up-lift and blocked dissipation. AS induced water displacement was calculated showing no obvious spreading of contaminant plume under this AS condition. Slug tests were employed before and after AS to reveal that the physical perturbation led to sharp increase in permeability and porosity. Modeling indicated that the regional groundwater flow field was not affected by AS except the physical perturbation in ZOI. Hydro-chemically increase of pH and Eh, and reduction of TDS, electrical conductivity and bicarbonate were observed in ZOI during AS. PHREEQC modeling inferred that these chemical phenomena were induced by the inorganic carbon transfer during air mixing.

  7. Inverse modeling and uncertainty analysis of potential groundwater recharge to the confined semi-fossil Ohangwena II Aquifer, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Markus; Houben, Georg; Lohe, Christoph; Quinger, Martin; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    The identification of potential recharge areas and estimation of recharge rates to the confined semi-fossil Ohangwena II Aquifer (KOH-2) is crucial for its future sustainable use. The KOH-2 is located within the endorheic transboundary Cuvelai-Etosha-Basin (CEB), shared by Angola and Namibia. The main objective was the development of a strategy to tackle the problem of data scarcity, which is a well-known problem in semi-arid regions. In a first step, conceptual geological cross sections were created to illustrate the possible geological setting of the system. Furthermore, groundwater travel times were estimated by simple hydraulic calculations. A two-dimensional numerical groundwater model was set up to analyze flow patterns and potential recharge zones. The model was optimized against local observations of hydraulic heads and groundwater age. The sensitivity of the model against different boundary conditions and internal structures was tested. Parameter uncertainty and recharge rates were estimated. Results indicate that groundwater recharge to the KOH-2 mainly occurs from the Angolan Highlands in the northeastern part of the CEB. The sensitivity of the groundwater model to different internal structures is relatively small in comparison to changing boundary conditions in the form of influent or effluent streams. Uncertainty analysis underlined previous results, indicating groundwater recharge originating from the Angolan Highlands. The estimated recharge rates are less than 1% of mean yearly precipitation, which are reasonable for semi-arid regions.

  8. Potentiometric map of the Sparta aquifer system in Mississippi, fall, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wasson, B.E.

    1980-01-01

    This potentiometric map of the Sparta aquifer system is the tenth in a series of maps, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Land and Water Resources, delineating the potentiometric surfaces of the major aquifers in Mississippi. In the outcrop area of the Sparta, the potentiometric surface is strongly affected by recharge from precipitation, by topography, and by drainage of the aquifer into streams. The potentiometric surface slopes downward generally to the west away from the area of outcrop and is strongly affected by large ground-water withdrawals in the Jackson, Yazoo City, Cleveland, Clarksdale, and Memphis areas. Historically, water levels in or near the outcrop of the Sparta have shown little or no long-term changes, but during the past 20 years, in much of the confined part of the aquifer, water levels have declined from 1 to 3 feet per year. (USGS)

  9. Aquifer Heterogeneity and Solute-Transport Modeling in the Floridan Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Maliva, R. G.; Missimer, T. M.

    2008-05-01

    The Floridan Aquifer System (FAS) is one of the most prolific aquifers in the world and is widely used for public and irrigation water supply. The FAS is also increasingly being used as a storage zone for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems, including a 333-well system that is planned as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The FAS is highly heterogeneous with respect to hydraulic conductivity, with meter- scale inter-bed variation exceeding seven orders of magnitude in some cases, even in South Florida where mega-karst is not well developed. Aquifer heterogeneity can have a major impact on ASR system performance because of its affects on the movement and mixing of stored water. Aquifer heterogeneity poses challenges for accurate modeling of the FAS, including solute transport modeling of ASR systems and variable density flow modeling of the freshwater/saltwater interface along coastal areas. Dispersivity is an important parameter in solute transport modeling, which is associated with aquifer heterogeneity. Commonly the values of dispersivity used in solute-transport modeling are derived from literature review and adjusted during model calibration process. Artificially large dispersivity values are often used in solute-transport models of ASR systems as a "fudge factor" to simulate the apparent greater mixing caused by inter-bed heterogeneity. This approach is problematic because the use of artificial hydraulic parameters for calibration opens the results of predictive simulations to question. The use of large dispersivity values to simulate aquifer heterogeneity also does not incorporate other impacts of aquifer heterogeneity, such as differential flow rates and migration distances between beds. The technical challenge is to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity into groundwater models at a scale that is sufficient to adequately simulate its effect on ASR system performance and coastal groundwater flow, while maintaining acceptable

  10. Processes affecting geochemistry and contaminant movement in the middle Claiborne aquifer of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Brian G.; Kingsbury, James A.; Welch, Heather L.; Tollett, Roland W.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater chemistry and tracer-based age data were used to assess contaminant movement and geochemical processes in the middle Claiborne aquifer (MCA) of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. Water samples were collected from 30 drinking-water wells (mostly domestic and public supply) and analyzed for nutrients, major ions, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and transient age tracers (chlorofluorocarbons, tritium and helium-3, and sulfur hexafluoride). Redox conditions are highly variable throughout the MCA. However, mostly oxic groundwater with low dissolved solids is more vulnerable to nitrate contamination in the outcrop areas east of the Mississippi River in Mississippi and west Tennessee than in mostly anoxic groundwater in downgradient areas in western parts of the study area. Groundwater in the outcrop area was relatively young (apparent age of less than 40 years) with significantly (p 50 m depth) indicated contaminant movement from shallow parts of the aquifer into deeper oxic zones. Given the persistence of nitrate in young oxic groundwater that was recharged several decades ago, and the lack of a confining unit, the downward movement of young contaminated water may result in higher nitrate concentrations over time in deeper parts of the aquifer containing older oxic water.

  11. Effect of faults on fluid flow and chloride contamination in a carbonate aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maslia, M.L.; Prowell, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A unified, multidiscipline hypothesis is proposed to explain the anomalous pattern by which chloride has been found in water of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia. Analyses of geophysical, hydraulic, water chemistry, and aquifer test data using the equivalent porous medium (EPM) approach are used to support the hypothesis and to improve further the understanding of the fracture-flow system in this area. Using the data presented herein we show that: (1) four major northeast-southwest trending faults, capable of affecting the flow system of the Upper Floridan aquifer, can be inferred from structural analysis of geophysical data and from regional fault patterns; (2) the proposed faults account for the anomalous northeastward elongation of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer; (3) the faults breach the nearly impermeable units that confine the Upper Floridan aquifer from below, allowing substantial quantities of water to leak vertically upward; as a result, aquifer transmissivity need not be excessively large (as previously reported) to sustain the heavy, long-term pumpage at Brunswick without developing a steep cone of depression in the potentiometric surface; (4) increased fracturing at the intersection of the faults enhances the development of conduits that allow the upward migration of high-chloride water in response to pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer; and (5) the anomalous movement of the chloride plume is almost entirely controlled by the faults. ?? 1990.

  12. Monitoring and modelling of pumping-induced self-potentials for transmissivity estimation within a heterogeneous confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DesRoches, Aaron J.; Butler, Karl E.

    2016-12-01

    Variations in self-potentials (SP) measured at surface during pumping of a heterogeneous confined fractured rock aquifer have been monitored and modelled in order to investigate capabilities and limitations of SP methods in estimating aquifer hydraulic properties. SP variations were recorded around a pumping well using an irregular grid of 31 non-polarizing Pb-PbCl2 that were referenced to a remote electrode and connected to a commercial multiplexer and digitizer/data logger through a passive lowpass filter on each channel. The lowpass filter reduced noise by a factor of 10 compared to levels obtained using the data logger's integration-based sampling method for powerline noise suppression alone. SP signals showed a linear relationship with water levels observed in the pumping and monitoring wells over the pumping period, with an apparent electrokinetic coupling coefficient of -3.4 mV · m-1. Following recent developments in SP methodology, variability of the SP response between different electrodes is taken as a proxy for lateral variations in hydraulic head within the aquifer and used to infer lateral variations in the aquifer's apparent transmissivity. In order to demonstrate the viability of this approach, SP is modelled numerically to determine its sensitivity to (i) lateral variations in the hydraulic conductivity of the confined aquifer and (ii) the electrical conductivity of the confining layer and conductive well casing. In all cases, SP simulated on the surface still varies linearly with hydraulic head modelled at the base on the confining layer although the apparent coupling coefficient changes to varying degrees. Using the linear relationship observed in the field, drawdown curves were inferred for each electrode location using SP variations observed over the duration of the pumping period. Transmissivity estimates, obtained by fitting the Theis model to inferred drawdown curves at all 31 electrodes, fell within a narrow range of (2.0-4.2) × 10-3 m2

  13. Confined aquifer head measurements and storage properties in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, from spaceborne InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a remote sensing technique for measuring centimeter-level surface deformation, is used to estimate hydraulic head in the confined aquifer of the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. Reconstructing head measurements from InSAR in agricultural regions can be difficult, as InSAR phase data are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. Analysis of 17 L-band ALOS PALSAR scenes, acquired between January 2007 and March 2011, demonstrates that comprehensive InSAR deformation measurements can be recovered over the vegetated groundwater basin with an improved processing strategy. Local skeletal storage coefficients and time delays between the head change and deformation are estimated through a joint InSAR-well data analysis. InSAR subsidence estimates are transformed to head changes with finer temporal and spatial resolution than is possible using existing well records alone. Both InSAR and well data suggest that little long-term water-storage loss occurred in the SLV over the study period and that inelastic compaction was negligible. The seasonal head variations derived from InSAR are consistent with the existing well data at most locations where confined aquifer pumping activity dominates. Our results demonstrate the advantages of InSAR measurements for basin-wide characterization of aquifer storage properties and groundwater levels over agricultural regions.

  14. Hydrogeology and water quality of the shallow aquifer system at the Mainside, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlow, G.E.; Bell, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    Lithologic and geophysical logs of boreholes at 29 sites show that the hydrogeologic framework of the Mainside of the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site at Dahlgren, Virginia, consists of un-consolidated sedimentary deposits of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. The upper 220 feet of these sediments are divided into five hydrogeologic units, including the (1) Columbia (water-table) aquifer, (2) upper confining unit, (3) upper confined aquifer, (4) Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit, and (5) Aquia aquifer. The Columbia aquifer in the study area is a local system that is not affected by regional pumping. Ground-water recharge occurs at topographic highs in the northern part of the Mainside, and ground-water discharge occurs at topographic lows associated with adjacent surface-water bodies. Regionally, the direction of ground-water flow in the upper confined and Aquia aquifers is toward the southwest and southeast, respectively. A downward hydraulic gradient exists between the aquifers in the shallow system, and stresses on the Aquia aquifer are indicated by heads that range between 2 and 12 feet below sea level. The ratio of median horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Columbia aquifer to median vertical hydraulic con-ductivity of the upper confining unit, however, is approximately 2,600:1; therefore, under natural- flow conditions, most water in the Columbia aquifer probably discharges to adjacent surface- water bodies. The composition and distribution of major ions vary in the Columbia aquifer. In general, water samples from wells located along the inland perimeter roads of the study area have chloride or a combination of chloride and sulfate as the dominant anions, and water samples from wells located in the interior of the study area have bicarbonate or a combination of bicarbonate and sulfate as the dominant anions. Sodium and calcium were the dominant cations in most samples. Dissolved solids and four inorganic constituents are present in water from the

  15. Analysis of an anisotropic coastal aquifer system using variable-density flow and solute transport simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Souza, W.R.; Voss, C.I.

    1987-01-01

    The groundwater system in southern Oahu, Hawaii consists of a thick, areally extensive freshwater lens overlying a zone of transition to a thick saltwater body. This system is analyzed in cross section with a variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport model on a regional scale. The simulation is difficult, because the coastal aquifer system has a saltwater transition zone that is broadly dispersed near the discharge area, but is very sharply defined inland. Steady-state simulation analysis of the transition zone in the layered basalt aquifer of southern Oahu indicates that a small transverse dispersivity is characteristic of horizontal regional flow. Further, in this system flow is generally parallel to isochlors and steady-state behavior is insensitive to the longitudinal dispersivity. Parameter analysis identifies that only six parameters control the complex hydraulics of the system: horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity of the basalt aquifer; hydraulic conductivity of the confining "caprock" layer; leakance below the caprock; specific yield; and aquifer matrix compressibility. The best-fitting models indicate the horizontal hydraulic conductivity is significantly greater than the vertical hydraulic conductivity. These models give values for specific yield and aquifer compressibility which imply a considerable degree of compressive storage in the water table aquifer. ?? 1987.

  16. A Note on the Fractal Behavior of Hydraulic Conductivity and Effective Porosity for Experimental Values in a Confined Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    De Bartolo, Samuele; Fallico, Carmine; Veltri, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity values for the confined sandy loam aquifer of the Montalto Uffugo (Italy) test field were obtained by laboratory and field measurements; the first ones were carried out on undisturbed soil samples and the others by slug and aquifer tests. A direct simple-scaling analysis was performed for the whole range of measurement and a comparison among the different types of fractal models describing the scale behavior was made. Some indications about the largest pore size to utilize in the fractal models were given. The results obtained for a sandy loam soil show that it is possible to obtain global indications on the behavior of the hydraulic conductivity versus the porosity utilizing a simple scaling relation and a fractal model in coupled manner. PMID:24385876

  17. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    DOE PAGES

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; ...

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1more » into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.« less

  18. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.

  19. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    One important issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine the resulting field-scale-induced displacements and consequences of overpressures on the mechanical integrity of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated for the first time on an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3 year-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells are accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area shows sub- centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with ASR cycle. Deformations are found to be temporally out phased with the injection and recovery events due to complex groundwater flow. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections.

  20. Hydrogeologic sections of the Edwards Aquifer and its confining units in the San Antonio area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, Ted A.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-seven geohydrology sections illustrate structural and stratigraphic relationships within the 180-mi-long Edwards aquifer. These sections were used to interpret the location of barriers within the Edwards aquifer. The sections are oriented generally south-southeast, which is approximately normal to both the east-northeast trending Edwards aquifer and the strike of the major faults of the Balcones fault zone. Section lengths represent the distance necessary to cross the aquifer, which is 5 to 40 mi wide. The updip (north) end of the sections are drawn to indicate exposures of the Glen Rose Formation; from there the sections indicate downdip geologic conditions within the freshwater zone and the saline water zone. The sections are approximately parallel and illustrate geologic conditions at 5- to 10-mile intervals. The sections indicate the geologic conditions from near the eastern boundary of the aquifer in Hays County to near the western boundary of the aquifer in Uvalde County. Several sections show places where faults have sufficient vertical displacement to offset the entire, or almost entire, thickness of the aquifer. At these places the faults are barriers to groundwater flow directly downdip across the fault. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Research on the deformation of a confined aquifer based on Cosserat continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. S.; Zhang, N.; Yuan, Y.; Shen, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Recent monitoring of land subsidence and soil deformation indicates a new phenomenon where excessive and continuous deformation occurs in the sandy aquifers in Shanghai and the Su-Xi-Chang region of China. It is hard to explain factors contributing to this phenomenon with traditional Cauchy continuum mechanics in which low normal stress in the ground could not cause such large deformation. Steep hydraulic gradient would be formed in the aquifer if groundwater is pumped from densely distributed wells, and shear stresses would develop then. Accumulated shear stress could then lead to deformation of the aquifer or even land subsidence. Accumulated shear stress due to the drawdown of groundwater level is one of the main factors that contribute to deformation within an aquifer. Traditional Cauchy continuum mechanics cannot consider this shear stress because of the hypothesis of equal shear stress in the aquifer unit. Cosserat continuum mechanics can be applied to analyse the mechanism of aquifer deformation controlled by accumulated shear stress by considering the scale effect and the asymmetric distribution of shear stress in the aquifer unit.

  2. Groundwater response to tidal fluctuations in wedge-shaped confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuello, Julián E.; Guarracino, Luis; Monachesi, Leonardo B.

    2017-08-01

    Most of the analytical solutions to describe tide-induced head fluctuations assume that the coastal aquifer has a constant thickness. These solutions have been applied in many practical problems ignoring possible changes in aquifer thickness, which may lead to wrong estimates of the hydraulic parameters. In this study, a new analytical solution to describe tide-induced head fluctuations in a wedge-shaped coastal aquifer is presented. The proposed model assumes that the aquifer thickness decreases with the distance from the coastline. A closed-form analytical solution is obtained by solving a boundary-value problem with both a separation of variables method and a change of variables method. The analytical solution indicates that wedging significantly enhances the amplitude of the induced heads in the aquifer. However, the effect on time lag is almost negligible, particularly near the coast. The slope factor, which quantifies the degree of heterogeneity of the aquifer, is obtained and analyzed for a number of hypothetical scenarios. The slope factor provides a simple criterion to detect a possible wedging of the coastal aquifer.

  3. Hydrogeology and water quality of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia, which is located on the Potomac River in the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. The study provides a description of the hydrogeologic units, directions of ground-water flow, and back-ground water quality in the study area to a depth of about 100 feet. Lithologic, geophysical, and hydrologic data were collected from 28 wells drilled for this study, from 3 existing wells, and from outcrops. The shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area consists of two fining-upward sequences of Pleistocene fluvial-estuarine deposits that overlie Paleocene-Eocene marine deposits of the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. The surficial hydrogeologic unit is the Columbia aquifer. Horizontal linear flow of water in this aquifer generally responds to the surface topography, discharging to tidal creeks, marshes, and the Potomac River, and rates of flow in this aquifer range from 0.003 to 0.70 foot per day. The Columbia aquifer unconformably overlies the upper confining unit 12-an organic-rich clay that is 0 to 55 feet thick. The upper confining unit conformably overlies the upper confined aquifer, a 0- to 35-feet thick unit that consists of interbedded fine-grained to medium-grained sands and clay. The upper confined aquifer probably receives most of its recharge from the adjacent and underlying Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. Water in the upper confined aquifer generally flows eastward, northward, and northeastward at about 0.03 foot per day toward the Potomac River and Machodoc Creek. The Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit consists of glauconitic, fossiliferous silty fine-grained sands of the Nanjemoy Formation. Where the upper confined system is absent, the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit is directly overlain by the Columbia aquifer. In some parts of

  4. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2001-08-29

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

  5. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vince R; Cole, Charles R; Bergeron, Marcel P; Thorne, Paul D; Wurstner, Signe K

    2001-08-29

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty.

  6. Temperature change affected groundwater quality in a confined marine aquifer during long-term heating and cooling.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Ueki, Takashi; Ohkubo, Satoshi; Moldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2016-05-01

    Global warming and urbanization together with development of subsurface infrastructures (e.g. subways, shopping complexes, sewage systems, and Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems) will likely cause a rapid increase in the temperature of relatively shallow groundwater reservoirs (subsurface thermal pollution). However, potential effects of a subsurface temperature change on groundwater quality due to changed physical, chemical, and microbial processes have received little attention. We therefore investigated changes in 34 groundwater quality parameters during a 13-month enhanced-heating period, followed by 14 months of natural or enhanced cooling in a confined marine aquifer at around 17 m depth on the Saitama University campus, Japan. A full-scale GSHP test facility consisting of a 50 m deep U-tube for circulating the heat-carrying fluid and four monitoring wells at 1, 2, 5, and 10 m from the U-tube were installed, and groundwater quality was monitored every 1-2 weeks. Rapid changes in the groundwater level in the area, especially during the summer, prevented accurate analyses of temperature effects using a single-well time series. Instead, Dual-Well Analysis (DWA) was applied, comparing variations in subsurface temperature and groundwater chemical concentrations between the thermally-disturbed well and a non-affected reference well. Using the 1 m distant well (temperature increase up to 7 °C) and the 10 m distant well (non-temperature-affected), the DWA showed an approximately linear relationships for eight components (B, Si, Li, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Mg(2+), NH4(+), Na(+), and K(+)) during the combined 27 months of heating and cooling, suggesting changes in concentration between 4% and 31% for a temperature change of 7 °C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature Distribution and Thermal Performance of an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sayantan

    2017-04-01

    Energy conservation and storage has become very crucial to make use of excess energy during times of future demand. Excess thermal energy can be captured and stored in aquifers and this technique is termed as Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Storing seasonal thermal energy in water by injecting it into subsurface and extracting in time of demand is the principle of an ATES system. Using ATES systems leads to energy savings, reduces the dependency on fossil fuels and thus leads to reduction in greenhouse gas emission. This study numerically models an ATES system to store seasonal thermal energy and evaluates the performance of it. A 3D thermo-hydrogeological numerical model for a confined ATES system is presented in this study. The model includes heat transport processes of advection, conduction and heat loss to confining rock media. The model also takes into account regional groundwater flow in the aquifer, geothermal gradient and anisotropy in the aquifer. Results show that thermal injection into the aquifer results in the generation of a thermal-front which grows in size with time. Premature thermal-breakthrough causes thermal interference in the system when the thermal-front reaches the production well and consequences in the fall of system performance and hence should be avoided. This study models the transient temperature distribution in the aquifer for different flow and geological conditions. This may be effectively used in designing an efficient ATES project by ensuring safety from thermal-breakthrough while catering to the energy demand. Based on the model results a safe well spacing is proposed. The thermal energy discharged by the system is determined and strategy to avoid the premature thermal-breakthrough in critical cases is discussed. The present numerical model is applied to simulate an experimental field study which is found to approximate the field results quite well.

  8. Hydrogeology of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in the northern Midwest: B in Regional aquifer-system analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.L.; Siegel, D.I.

    1992-01-01

    The underlying Eau Claire Formation and its partial equivalent to the southwest, the Bonneterre Formation, form an important confining unit above the Mount Simon aquifer throughout much of the study area. Siltstone and shale are fairly common in the upper part of the Eau Claire Formation but less so in its northernmost extent in Wiscon

  9. Potentiometric surface and water-level difference maps of selected confined aquifers in Southern Maryland and Maryland’s Eastern Shore, 1975-2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtin, Stephen E.; Staley, Andrew W.; Andreasen, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Key Results This report presents potentiometric-surface maps of the Aquia and Magothy aquifers and the Upper Patapsco, Lower Patapsco, and Patuxent aquifer systems using water levels measured during September 2015. Water-level difference maps are also presented for these aquifers. The water-level differences in the Aquia aquifer are shown using groundwater-level data from 1982 and 2015, while the water-level differences are shown for the Magothy aquifer using data from 1975 and 2015. Water-level difference maps for both the Upper Patapsco and Lower Patapsco aquifer systems are shown using data from 1990 and 2015. The water-level differences in the Patuxent aquifer system are shown using groundwater-level data from 2007 and 2015. The potentiometric surface maps show water levels ranging from 53 feet above sea level to 164 feet below sea level in the Aquia aquifer, from 86 feet above sea level to 106 feet below sea level in the Magothy aquifer, from 115 feet above sea level to 115 feet below sea level in the Upper Patapsco aquifer system, from 106 feet above sea level to 194 feet below sea level in the Lower Patapsco aquifer system, and from 165 feet above sea level to 171 feet below sea level in the Patuxent aquifer system. Water levels have declined by as much as 116 feet in the Aquia aquifer since 1982, 99 feet in the Magothy aquifer since 1975, 66 and 83 feet in the Upper Patapsco and Lower Patapsco aquifer systems, respectively, since 1990, and 80 feet in the Patuxent aquifer system since 2007.

  10. Numerical study on the responses of groundwater and strata to pumping and recharge in a deep confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang-Qing; Wang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Jin-Jian; Li, Ming-Guang

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater drawdown and strata settlements induced by dewatering in confined aquifers can be relieved by artificial recharge. In this study, numerical simulations of a field multi-well pumping-recharge test in a deep confined aquifer are conducted to analyze the responses of groundwater and strata to pumping and recharge. A three-dimensional numerical model is developed in a finite-difference software, which considers the fluid-mechanical interaction using the Biot consolidation theory. The predicted groundwater drawdown and ground settlements are compared to the measured data to confirm the validation of the numerical analysis of the pumping and recharge. Both numerical results and measured data indicate that the effect of recharge on controlling the groundwater drawdown and strata settlements correlates with the injection rate and well arrangements. Since the groundwater drawdown induced by pumping can be controlled by artificial recharge, soil compression can be relieved by reducing the changes of effective stress of the soils. Consequently, strata settlement induced by pumping can be relieved by artificial recharge and ground settlements can be eliminated if an appropriate injection rate and well arrangement are being determined. Moreover, the changes of the pore pressure and seepage force induced by pumping and recharge will also result in significant horizontal deformations in the strata near the recharge wells.

  11. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the

  12. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    DOE PAGES

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; ...

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnershipmore » Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However

  13. Artificial Injection of Fresh Water into a Confined Saline Aquifer: A Case Study at the Nakdong River Delta Area, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. Y.; Senapathi, V.; Rajendran, R.; Khakimov, E.

    2015-12-01

    Injection test in a confined saline aquifer was performed to assess the potential of artificial recharge as a means of replacing saline water with fresh water, thereby securing fresh groundwater resources for the Nakdong Delta area of Busan City, Korea. The study area comprises a confined aquifer, in which a 10~21m thick clay layer overlies 31.5~36.5 m thick of sand and a 2.8~11m thick layer of gravel. EC logging of five monitoring wells yielded a value of 7~44 mS/cm, with the transition between saline and fresh water occurring at a depth of 15-38 m. Above 5 m depth, water temperature was 10~15.5°C, whereas between 5 and 50 m depth, the temperature was 15.5~17℃ and pH was 7.15~7.49. The quality of injected fresh water was 388 μS/cm with the temperature of 6.2℃, and pH was 7.70. Approximately 950 m3 of fresh water was injected into the OW-5 injection well at a rate of 370 m3/day for 62 hours, after which the fresh water zone was detected by a CTD Diver installed at a depth of 40 m. The persistence of the fresh water zone was determined via EC and temperature logging at 1 day, 21 days, 62days and 95 days after injection. The contact between fresh and saline water in the injection well was represented by a sharp boundary rather than a transitional boundary. It was concluded that the injected fresh water occupied a specific space and served to maintain the original water quality throughout the observation period. Moreover, we suggest that artificial recharge via long-term injection could help secure a new alternative water resource in this saline coastal aquifer.

  14. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems at Waynesboro, Burke County, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were characterized in the City of Waynesboro area in Burke County, Georgia, based on geophysical and drillers’ logs, flowmeter surveys, a 24-houraquifer test, and the collection and chemical analysis of water samples in a newly constructed well. At the test site, the Dublin aquifer system consists of interlayered sands and clays between depths of 396 and 691 feet, and the Midville aquifer system consists of a sandy clay layer overlying a sand and gravel layer between depths of 728 and 936 feet. The new well was constructed with three screened intervals in the Dublin aquifer system and four screened intervals in the Midville aquifer system. Wellbore-flowmeter testing at a pumping rate of 1,000 gallons per minute indicated that 52.2 percent of the total flow was from the shallower Dublin aquifer system with the remaining 47.8 percent from the deeper Midville aquifer system. The lower part of the lower Midville aquifer (900 to 930 feet deep), contributed only 0.1 percent of the total flow. Hydraulic properties of the two aquifer systems were estimated using data from two wellbore-flowmeter surveys and a 24-hour aquifer test. Estimated values of transmissivity for the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were 2,000 and 1,000 feet squared per day, respectively. The upper and lower Dublin aquifers have a combined thickness of about 150 feet and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Dublin aquifer system averages 10 feet per day. The upper Midville aquifer, lower Midville confining unit, and lower Midville aquifer have a combined thickness of about 210 feet, and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Midville aquifer system averages 6 feet per day. Storage coefficient of the Dublin aquifer system, computed using the Theis method on water-level data from one observation well, was estimated to be 0.0003. With a thickness of about 150 feet, the specific storage of the Dublin aquifer

  15. An evaluation of the bedrock aquifer system in northeastern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmons, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Model simulations indicate that, by 1914, ground-water withdrawals from the aquifer system had already impacted the study area. Pumping in the Green Bay metropolitan area had lowered the potentiometric heads in aquifer 1 by 69 feet and in aquifer 2 by 55 feet. Model simulations indicate that, by 1981, ground-water withdrawals have caused a cone of depression centered in the city of De Pere area. The influence of the cone affects almost the entire study area and has significantly altered the horizontal and vertical flow regimes in the aquifer system. In 1981, computed drawdowns below the prepumping potentiometric surface of aquifer 1 range from 0 feet on the western side of the study area to 330 feet in the center of the cone of depression. In aquifer 2, the computed drawdown ranges from 0 feet on the western side of the study area to 253 feet in the center of the cone.

  16. Coastal aquifer groundwater dynamics and salt intrusion: Monitoring system of river Neretva delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srzić, Veljko; Vranješ, Mijo; Deković, Jure; Romić, Davor; Zovko, Monika; Milin, Marin

    2017-04-01

    River Neretva delta is located in southern part of Croatia and creates a complex surface- groundwater system influenced by tidal forces characteristic for Adriatic Sea and river Neretva whose discharge varies from 70 - 2700 m3/s over the year. From agricultural point of view, area is used widely for fruit production which implies existence and functionality of complex drainage system consisted of a net of lateral channels and pumping station plants with the capacity of app. 25 m3/s. Area of interest covers app 3500 ha and is bounded by river Neretva from North and Adriatic sea from West. Southern and eastern boundaries are dominantly karstic hills. Lover aquifer is confined with app depth of 65 m, made of fine gravel. Aquitard is a 15 m height layer of clay. Upper aquifer in unconfined with depth of app 10-20 m. Inside the area of interest there are 8 wells installed (each aquifer 4) measuring piezometric head on hourly/daily temporal scale. Sea level measurements are also made capturing for long term tidal oscillations. Discharge measurements are made few km downstream from hydropower plant Mostar (Bosnia and Herzegovina), while three meteorological stations for rainfall measurements are located at the area boundaries. Salt water concentration, pH and resistivity values have been measured locally, app 6 times per year for last 10 years. Results imply confined aquifer is dominantly influenced by the sea level while tidal effects are noticed 9 km upstream the river Neretva with delay of 9-12 minutes compared to sea level. Salt water cline inside the river is related to tidal effects and river discharge, with potential presence at distances of more than 15 km upstream from the sea. Salt water intrusion dominantly occurs through confined aquifer while vertical transport of salt is supposed to be enhanced by the effects of drainage system.

  17. Hydrogeologic framework and salinity distribution of the Floridan aquifer system of Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    transmissivity, so that the occurrence of perched saline water in the system may be the consequence of incompletely flushed connate water or intruded seawater. A seismic reflection profile along the Hillsboro Canal, at the northern edge of the study area, shows seven seismic-sag structures that are interpreted as downward deformation of overlying strata into collapsed deep cave systems. These structures may compromise the integrity of the confinement created by the underlying strata by allowing upconing of saline water from depth, which has implications for successful application of ASR and use of the Floridan aquifer system as an alternative water supply.

  18. Geochemistry of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprinkle, Craig L.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical quality of the ground water in the Floridan aquifer system is determined primarily by mineral-water interaction. However, some changes in water quality have been imposed by development, particularly near coastal pumping centers. A total of 601 chemical analyses, all from different wells, most completed in the upper part of the aquifer system, were used to describe the variations in water chemistry and to study the processes responsible for observed changes. The Floridan aquifer system is a vertically continuous sequence of Tertiary carbonate rocks that are of generally high permeability and are hydraulically connected in varying degrees. The rocks are principally limestone and dolomite, but they grade into limy sands and clays near the aquifer system's updip limits. Major minerals in the aquifer system are calcite, dolomite, and, locally, gypsum or quartz; minor minerals include apatite, glauconite, and clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. Trace amounts of metallic oxides or sulfides are present in some areas. The aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers, separated in most places by a less permeable confining unit that has highly variable hydraulic properties. Only the Upper Floridan aquifer is present throughout the study area. Freshwater enters the aquifer system in outcrop areas located primarily in central Georgia and north-central Florida. Discharge occurs chiefly to streams and springs and, to a lesser extent, directly into the sea. Most of the flow into and out of the system takes place where it is unconfined or where the upper confining unit is thin. Secondary permeability developed by dissolution of aquifer material is most prominent in these areas of dynamic flow. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer generally range from less than 25 milligrams per liter near outcrops to more than 25,000 milligrams per liter along the coasts. The dominant cations in the ground water

  19. Potentiometric surface and water-level difference maps of selected confined aquifers in Southern Maryland and Maryland’s Eastern Shore, 1975-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Andrew W.; Andreasen, David C.; Curtin, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The potentiometric surface maps show water levels ranging from 165 feet above sea level to 199 feet below sea level. Water levels have declined by as much as 113 feet in the Aquia aquifer since 1982, 81 feet in the Magothy aquifer since 1975, and 61 and 95 feet in the Upper Patapsco and Lower Patapsco aquifer systems, respectively, since 1990.

  20. Seawater intrusion in the gravelly confined aquifer of the coastal Pisan Plain (Tuscany): hydrogeological and geochemical investigation to assess causes and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveri, M.; Giannecchini, R.; Butteri, M.

    2012-12-01

    The gravelly horizon of the Pisa plain multilayered system is a confined aquifer tapped by a large number of wells. It hosts a very important water resource for drinking, industrial and irrigable uses, but may be affected by seawater intrusion coming from the coastal area; most wells is distributed inland, anyway a significant exploitation along the coastal area is also present to supply farms and tourist services. Previous hydrogeological and geochemical investigations carried out in coastal area stated maximum percentage of seawater in gravelly aquifer of about 7-9% and suggested the presence of two different mechanisms (Doveri et alii, 2010): i) a direct seawater intrusion from the zone where the gravelly aquifer is in contact with the sea floor; ii) a mixing process between freshwater and seawater, the latter deriving from the Arno river-shallow sandy aquifer system. Basing on these results, since January 2012 a new two-year project was financed by the MSRM Regional Park. Major aims are a better definition of such phenomena and their distribution on the territory, and an assessing of the seawater intrusion trend in relation to groundwater exploitation. Eleven piezometers were realised during first semester of 2012, thus improving the measurement network, which is now made up by 40 wells/piezometers distributed on about 60 km^2. Comparing new and previous borehole data a general confinement of the gravelly aquifer is confirmed, excepting in the northern part where the aquifer is in contact with the superficial sandy one. Preliminary field measurement was performed in June 2012, during which water level (WL) and electrical conductivity (EC) data were collected. WLs below the sea-level were observed on most of the studied area, with a minimum value of about -5 m a.s.l. in the inner part of the northern zone, where major exploitation is present. Moreover, a relative minimum of WL (about -2 m a.s.l.) is present near the shoreline in the southern zone. In the latter

  1. Hydrogeology and ground-water quality of confined aquifers in buried valleys in Rock County, Minnesota and Minnehaha County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The predominant ions in water from two wells screened in confined drift aquifers in Rock County were calcium and bicarbonate and in water from a third well were calcium and sulfate. The predominant ions in water from one well screened in an undifferentiated Cretaceous aquifer in Rock County were calcium and bicarbonate and in water from a second well were calcium and sulfate. The predominant ions in water from two wells screened in the Split Rock Creek aquifer in Rock County were calcium and bicarbonate and in water from a third well were calcium and sulfate.

  2. Capture zone of a multi-well system in bounded peninsula-shaped aquifers.

    PubMed

    Zarei-Doudeji, Somayeh; Samani, Nozar

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we present the equation of capture zone for multi-well system in peninsula-shaped confined and unconfined aquifers. The aquifer is rectangular in plan view, bounded along three sides, and extends to infinity at the fourth side. The bounding boundaries are either no-flow (impervious) or in-flow (constant head) so that aquifers with six possible boundary configurations are formed. The well system is consisted of any number of extraction or injection wells or combination of both with any flow rates. The complex velocity potential equations for such a well-aquifer system are derived to delineate the capture envelop. Solutions are provided for the aquifers with and without a uniform regional flow of any directions. The presented equations are of general character and have no limitations in terms of well numbers, positions and types, extraction/injection rate, and regional flow rate and direction. These solutions are presented in form of capture type curves which are useful tools in hands of practitioners to design in-situ groundwater remediation systems, to contain contaminant plumes, to evaluate the surface-subsurface water interaction and to verify numerical models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multi-component transport and transformation in deep confined aquifer during groundwater artificial recharge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing

    2015-04-01

    Taking an artificial groundwater recharge site in Shanghai, China as an example, this study employed a combination of laboratory experiment and numerical modeling to investigate the transport and transformation of major solutes, as well as the mechanism of associated water-rock interactions in groundwater during artificial groundwater recharge. The results revealed that: (1) Major ions in groundwater were mainly affected by mixing, ion exchanging (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)), as well as dissolution of Calcite, Dolomite. Dissolution of carbonate minerals was not entirely dependent on the pattern of groundwater recharge, the reactivity of the source water itself as indicated by the sub-saturation with respect to the carbonate minerals is the primary factor. (2) Elemental dissolution of As, Cr and Fe occurred in aquifer was due to the transformation of subsurface environment from anaerobic to aerobic systems. Different to bank filtration recharge or pond recharge, the concentration of Fe near the recharge point was mainly controlled by oxidation dissolution of Siderite, which was followed by a release of As, Cr into groundwater. (3) Field modeling results revealed that the hydro chemical type of groundwater gradually changed from the initial Cl-HCO3-Na type to the Cl-HCO3-Na-Ca type during the recharge process, and its impact radius would reach roughly 800 m in one year. It indicated that the recharge pressure (approx. 0.45 Mpa) would enlarge the impact radius under deep well recharge conditions. According to different recharge modes, longer groundwater resident time will associate with minerals' fully reactions. Although the concentrations of major ions were changing during the artificial recharge process, it did not pose a negative impact on the environmental quality of groundwater. The result of trace elements indicated that controlling the environment factors (especially Eh, DO, flow rate) during the recharge was effective to reduce the potential threats to

  4. Whipple's disease confined to the nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, S; Lewis, P D; Kendall, B

    1981-01-01

    Whipple's disease confined to the nervous system occurred in a 36-year old woman who presented with grand mal seizures and dementia. There was no evidence of extracerebral involvement and the jejunal biopsy was negative before treatment. Multiple enhancing lesions on CT scan progressed despite therapy with minocycline and prednisone, but resolved on treatment with tetracycline. The dementia did not progress while she was on antibiotic therapy. Whipple's disease should be considered as a treatable cause of progressive dementia even in the absence of an abnormal jejunal biopsy. Images PMID:6174699

  5. Confined systems within arbitrary enclosed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, B. L.; Cohen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of electronic confinement in atoms and molecules is presented. This is based on the electronic flux J which is assumed to vanish on some notional bounding surface of arbitrary shape. J is necessarily calculated using an approximate wave-function, whose parameters are chosen to satisfy the required surface conditions. This model embraces the results of all previous calculations for which the wave-functions or their derivatives vanish on conveniently shaped surfaces, but now extends the theory to more general surfaces. Examples include one-centre hydrogen-like atoms, the valence state of Li and the two centre molecular systems {{{H}}}2+ and {{HeH}}++.

  6. Simulation of ground-water flow in the Coastal Plain aquifer system of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giese, G.I.; Eimers, J.L.; Coble, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference digital model was used to simulate ground-water flow in the 25,000-square-mile aquifer system of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. The model was developed from a hydrogeologic framework that is based on an alternating sequence of 10 aquifers and 9 confining units, which make up a seaward-thickening wedge of sediments that form the Coastal Plain aquifer system in the State of North Carolina. The model was calibrated by comparing observed and simulated water levels. The model calibration was achieved by adjusting model parameters, primarily leakance of confining units and transmissivity of aquifers, until differences between observed and simulated water levels were within acceptable limits, generally within 15 feet. The maximum transmissivity of an individual aquifer in the calibrated model is 200,000 feet squared per day in a part of the Castle Hayne aquifer, which consists predominantly of limestone. The maximum value for simulated vertical hydraulic conductivity in a confining unit was 2.5 feet per day, in a part of the confining unit overlying the upper Cape Fear aquifer. The minimum value was 4.1x10-6 feet per day, in part of the confining unit overlying the lower Cape Fear aquifer. Analysis indicated the model is highly sensitive to changes in transmissivity and leakance near pumping centers; away from pumping centers, the model is only slightly sensitive to changes in transmissivity but is moderately sensitive to changes in leakance. Recharge from precipitation to the surficial aquifer ranges from about 12 inches per year in areas having clay at the surface to about 20 inches per year in areas having sand at the surface. Most of this recharge moves laterally to streams, and only about 1 inch per year moves downward to the confined parts of the aquifer system. Under predevelopment conditions, the confined aquifers were generally recharged in updip interstream areas and discharged through streambeds and in downdip coastward

  7. Application of geophysical methods to the delineation of paleochannels and missing confining units above the Castle Hayne Aquifer at US Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel, C. C.; Miller, R.D.; Wrege, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina, is underlain by four freshwater-bearing aquifers--the surficial, Yorktown, and upper and lower Castle Hayne. The upper and lower Castle Hayne aquifers serve as the principal supply of freshwater for the Air Station. The potential for movement of contaminated water from the surficial aquifer downward to the water-supply aquifer is greatest in areas where clay confining units are missing. Missing confining units may indicate the presence of paleochannels filled with permeable material. Seismic-reflection techniques were successful in delinea- ting paleochannels of Quaternary and Tertiary age within unconsoli- dated sediments less than 180 feet deep at several locations. Continuous single-channel marine seismic-reflection profiling in the Neuse River was effective in delineating a large paleochannel complex consisting of at least two superimposed paleochannels within hydrogeologic units overlying the upper Castle Hayne aquifer. The complex was found immediately north of the Air Station and is thought to continue south beneath the Air Station. Shallow high-resolution land seismic-reflection techniques were used at the Air Station to delineate structures and correlate strati- graphy between the limestone of the upper Castle Hayne aquifer and the Yorktown confining unit. Three different land seismic-reflection techniques proved effective for the horizontal extrapolation of geo- logic features and identification of paleochannels at several locations. The northeastern margin of a large paleochannel was identified beneath the southern part of the Air Station. This feature strikes northwest to southeast and cuts through the Yorktown and upper Castle Hayne aquifer confining units.

  8. Large sedimentary aquifer system and sustainable management: investigations of hydrogeological and geochemical variations in Eocene sand aquifer, south western France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcuit, E.; Negrel, P. J.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Durst, P.

    2010-12-01

    In the sedimentary Aquitaine Basin, the Eocene Sand Aquifer system, mostly confined, represents strategic resources for drinking water, irrigation, gas storage and geothermal resources. Therefore, its quantity and quality issues are essential for the sustainable management in this large region that extends over 116,000 km2 (i.e. one-fifth of the French territory). The Eocene Sand Aquifer system comprises at least five aquifers: Paleocene, Eocene infra-molassic sands, early Eocene, middle Eocene, and late Eocene. The extension and thickness of Eocene aquifer layers and negative confined layers vary throughout the basin, from several tens of metres to a hundred metres. The deposit sequences characterizing the Eocene Aquifer System are progradational westward from detrital deposits to carbonates. Eocene sands and Eocene limestones are hydraulically connected and covered by an aquiclude of up to several hundred metres thick of molassic sediments. The groundwater recharge is assumed to occur through the Eocene outcrops located in the north and north-east, and in the south east in contact with the Montagne Noire as well as by vertical leakage from the upper and lower aquifers. Another recharge is suspected in the south near the Petites Pyrenees. According to isotopic data, both present-day recharge and old recharge (16-35 ky) can be evidenced. The north and south evolutions of the piezometric surface are different. In the north, because of years of pumping, a trough in the potentiometric surface has been formed. The piezometric decline is roughly one meter per year in the depression centre. In the south, the decline of the water table is roughly half a meter per year. Furthermore, in the south part, around two sites of gas storage, significant fluctuations of the potentiometric surface are superimposed to the variations resulting from water abstraction, due to the injection and abstraction of gas. However, a major difficulty for the sustainable management is the lack of

  9. Application of the top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approximation to initial characterization of an inland aquifer mineralization: 2. Seepage of saltwater through semi-confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized basic study that addresses practical needs for an understanding of the major mechanisms involved in the mineralization of groundwater in the Great Bend Prairie aquifer in south- central Kansas. This Quaternary alluvial aquifer and associated surface waters are subject to contamination by saltwater, which in some areas seeps from the deeper Permian bedrock formation into the overlying freshwater aquifer through semiconfining layers. A simplified conceptual model is adopted. It incorporates the freshwater aquifer whose bottom is comprised of a semiconfining layer through which a hydrologically minor but geochemically important saline water discharge seeps into the aquifer. A hierarchy of approximate approaches is considered to analyze the mineralization processes taking place in the aquifer. The recently developed top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approach is very convenient to use for the initial characterization of these processes, and is further adapted to characterization of head-driven seepage through semi-confining layers. TSBL calculations indicate that the seeping saline water may create two distinct new zones in the aquifer: (1) a completely saline zone (CSZ) adjacent to the semiconfining bottom of the aquifer, and (2) a transition zone (TZ) which develops between the CSZ and the freshwater zone. Some possible scenarios associated with the various mineralization patterns are analyzed and discussed.

  10. Geochemistry of water in aquifers and confining units of the Northern Great Plains in parts of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busby, J.F.; Kimball, B.A.; Downey, J.S.; Peter, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The geochemistry of water in five aquifers and two confining units in the Williston Basin of the Northern Great Plains is similar and is controlled by halite dissolution. In areas outside the Williston Basin ground-water is fresh and controlled by the solution chemistry of carbonate and sulfate minerals.

  11. Hydrogeochemical features of groundwater of semi-confined coastal aquifer in Amol-Ghaemshahr plain, Mazandaran Province, Northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Houshang; Janardhana, M R

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogeochemical data of groundwater from the semi-confined aquifer of a coastal two-tier aquifer in Amol-Ghaemshahr plain, Mazandaran Province, Northern Iran reveal salinization of the fresh groundwater (FGW). The saline groundwater zone is oriented at an angle to both Caspian Sea coastline and groundwater flow direction and extends inland from the coastline for more than 40 km. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient matrices, factor analysis data, and values of C ratio, chloro-alkaline indices, and Na(+)/Cl(-) molar ratio indicate that the ionic load in the FGW is derived essentially from carbonic acid-aided weathering of carbonates and aluminosilicate minerals, relict connate saline water, and ion exchange reactions. Saline groundwater samples (SGWS) (n = 20) can be classified into two groups. SGWS of group 1 (n = 17) represent the saline groundwater zone below the Caspian Sea level, and salinization is attributed essentially to (1) lateral intrusion of Caspian seawater as a consequence of (a) excessive withdrawal of groundwater from closely spaced bore wells located in the eastern part of the coastal zone and (b) imbalance between recharge and discharge of the two-tier aquifer and (2) upconing of paleobrine (interfaced with FGW) along deep wells. SGWS of this group contain, on average, 7.9% of saltwater, the composition of which is similar to that of Caspian seawater. SGWS of group 2 (n = 3) belong to the saline groundwater zone encountered above the Caspian Sea level, and salinization of the groundwater representing these samples is attributed to irrigation return flow (n = 2) and inflow of saline river water (n = 1).

  12. A Numerical Model of Deuterium and Oxygen-18 Diffusion in the Confined Lower Wilcox Aquifer of the Lower Mississippi Valley (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currens, B. J.; Sawyer, A. H.; Fryar, A. E.; Parris, T. M.; Zhu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Deuterium and oxygen-18 are routinely used with noble gases and radioisotopes (e.g., 2H, 14C, 36Cl) to infer climate during groundwater recharge. However, diffusion of 2H and 18O between a confined aquifer and bounding aquitards could alter total isotope concentrations and the inferred temperature during recharge if groundwater flow is sufficiently slow. Hendry and Schwartz (WRR 24(10), 1988) explained anomalous 2H and 18O enrichment in the Milk River aquifer of Alberta by analytically modeling isotope diffusion between the lower bounding aquitard and the aquifer. Haile (PhD dissertation, U. Kentucky, 2011) inferred the same mechanism to explain 2H and 18O enrichment along a flowpath in the confined Lower Wilcox aquifer of the northern Gulf Coastal Plain in Missouri and Arkansas. Based on the geologic and hydraulic properties of the Lower Wilcox aquifer, a numerical model has been constructed to determine how diffusion may influence 2H and 18O concentrations in regional aquifers with residence times on the order of 104 to 105 years. The model combines solutions for a 1D forward-in-time, finite-difference groundwater flow equation with an explicit-implicit Crank-Nicholson algorithm for advection and diffusion to solve for flow velocity and isotope concentration. Initial results are consistent with the analytical solution of Hendry and Schwartz (1988), indicating diffusion as a means of isotopic enrichment along regional groundwater flowpaths.

  13. Conceptual and numerical models of the glacial aquifer system north of Aberdeen, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marini, Katrina A.; Hoogestraat, Galen K.; Aurand, Katherine R.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey report documents a conceptual and numerical model of the glacial aquifer system north of Aberdeen, South Dakota, that can be used to evaluate and manage the city of Aberdeen's water resources. The glacial aquifer system in the model area includes the Elm, Middle James, and Deep James aquifers, with intervening confining units composed of glacial till. The Elm aquifer ranged in thickness from less than 1 to about 95 feet (ft), with an average thickness of about 24 ft; the Middle James aquifer ranged in thickness from less than 1 to 91 ft, with an average thickness of 13 ft; and the Deep James aquifer ranged in thickness from less than 1 to 165 ft, with an average thickness of 23 ft. The confining units between the aquifers consisted of glacial till and ranged in thickness from 0 to 280 ft. The general direction of groundwater flow in the Elm aquifer in the model area was from northwest to southeast following the topography. Groundwater flow in the Middle James aquifer was to the southeast. Sparse data indicated a fairly flat potentiometric surface for the Deep James aquifer. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity for the Elm aquifer determined from aquifer tests ranged from 97 to 418 feet per day (ft/d), and a confined storage coefficient was determined to be 2.4x10-5. Estimates of the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments separating the Elm River from the Elm aquifer, determined from the analysis of temperature gradients, ranged from 0.14 to 2.48 ft/d. Average annual precipitation in the model area was 19.6 inches per year (in/yr), and agriculture was the primary land use. Recharge to the Elm aquifer was by infiltration of precipitation through overlying outwash, lake sediments, and glacial till. The annual recharge for the model area, calculated by using a soil-water-balance method for water year (WY) 1975-2009, ranged from 0.028 inch in WY 1980 to 4.52 inches in WY 1986, with a mean of 1.56 inches. The annual potential

  14. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C; Bourne, Mark M; Crooks, William J; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R; Miko, David K; Salazar, William R; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I; Vigil, Georgiana M

    2012-07-13

    Waste will be removed from confinement vessels remaining from 1970s-era experiments. Los Alamos has 9+ spherical confinement vessels remaining from experiments. Each vessel contains {approx} 500 lbs of radioactive debris such as actinide metals and oxides, metals, powdered silica, graphite, and wires and hardware. In order to dispose of the vessels, debris and contamination must be removed. Neutron assay system was designed to assay vessels before and after cleanout. System requirements are: (1) Modular and moveable; (2) Capable of detecting {approx}100g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a 2-inch thick steel sphere with 6 foot diameter; and (3) Capable of safeguards-quality assays. Initial design parameters arethe use of 4-atm {sup 3}He tubes with length of 6 feet, and {sup 3}He tubes embedded in polyethelene for moderation. This paper describes the calibration of the Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) and quantification of its uncertainties. Assay uncertainty depends on five factors: (1) Statistical uncertainty in the assay measurement; (2) Statistical uncertainty in the background measurement; (3) Statistical uncertainty in the isotopics determination - This should be much smaller than the other uncertainties; (4) Systematic uncertainty due to position bias; and (5) Systematic uncertainty due to fluctuations in cosmic ray spallation. This one can be virtually eliminated by performing the background measurement with an empty vessel - but that may not be possible. We used modeling and experiments to quantify the systematic uncertainties. The calibration assumes a uniform distribution of material, but reality will be different. MCNPX modeling was used to quantify the positional bias. The model was benchmarked to build confidence in its results. Material at top of vessel is 44% greater than amount assayed, according to singles. Material near 19-tube detector is 38% less than amount assayed, according to singles. Cosmic ray spallation contributes significantly to the

  15. Optimized System to Improve Pumping Rate Stability During Aquifer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. H.; Rasmussen, T. C.; Lyons, C.; Pennell, K. D.

    2001-12-01

    Aquifer hydraulic properties are commonly estimated using aquifer tests, which are based on an assumption of a uniform and constant pumping rate. Uncertainties in the flow rate across the borehole-formation interface can be caused by rapid changes in borehole water levels early in an aquifer test, increasing the dynamic head losses. A system is presented that substantially reduces these sources of uncertainty by explicitly accounting for dynamic head losses. The system optimizes the flow rate at the borehole-formation interface, lending it suitable for any type of aquifer test, including constant, step, or ramped withdrawal and injection, as well as sinusoidal. The system was demonstrated for both withdrawal and injection tests in three aquifers at the Savannah River Site. It employs commonly available components (e.g., datalogger, pressure transducers, a variable-speed pump motor, a flow controller, and flow meters), and is inexpensive, highly mobile, and easily set up. No modifications to the control system were required, though a small number of characteristics of the pumping and monitoring system were added to the operating program. The pumping system provided a statistically-significant, constant flow rate with time. The range in pumping variability (95 percent CI) was from +/-0.0041 gpm to +/-0.0144 gpm, across a wide range in field conditions. Additional analyses show that errors in early time pumping rates cause errors in aquifer property estimates, and that optimizing the pumping rates would provide a more error-free data set for estimating aquifer hydraulic properties.

  16. Aquifer-nomenclature guidelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.; Davidson, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines and recommendations for naming aquifers are presented to assist authors of geohydrological reports in the United States Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. The hierarchy of terms that is used for water- yielding rocks from largest to smallest is aquifer system, aquifer, and zone. If aquifers are named, the names should be derived from lithologic terms, rock-stratigraphic units, or geographic names. The following items are not recommended as sources of aquifer names: time-stratigraphic names, relative position, alphanumeric designations, depositional environment, depth of occurrence, acronyms, and hydrologic conditions. Confining units should not be named unless doing so clearly promotes understanding of a particular aquifer system. Sources of names for confining units are similar to those for aquifer names, i.e. lithologic terms, rock-stratigraphic units or geographic names. Examples of comparison charts and tables that are used to define the geohydrologic framework are included. Aquifers are defined in 11 hypothetical examples that characterize geohydrologic settings throughout the country. (Author 's abstract)

  17. Revised hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system in the northern coastal area of Georgia and adjacent parts of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Lester J.; Gill, Harold E.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework for the Floridan aquifer system has been revised for eight northern coastal counties in Georgia and five coastal counties in South Carolina by incorporating new borehole geophysical and flowmeter log data collected during previous investigations. Selected well logs were compiled and analyzed to determine the vertical and horizontal continuity of permeable zones that make up the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers and to define more precisely the thickness of confining beds that separate these aquifers. The updated framework generally conforms to the original framework established by the U.S. Geological Survey in the 1980s except for adjustments made to the internal boundaries of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers and the individual permeable zones that compose these aquifers. The revised boundaries of the Floridan aquifer system were mapped by taking into account results from local studies and regional correlations of geologic and hydrogeologic units. Because the revised framework does not match the previous regional framework along all edges, additional work will be needed to expand the framework into adjacent areas. The Floridan aquifer system in the northern coastal region of Georgia and parts of South Carolina can be divided into the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers, which are separated by a middle confining unit of relatively lower permeability. The Upper Floridan aquifer includes permeable and hydraulically connected carbonate rocks of Oligocene and upper Eocene age that represent the most transmissive part of the aquifer system. The middle confining unit consists of low permeability carbonate rocks that lie within the lower part of the upper Eocene in Beaufort and Jasper Counties, South Carolina, and within the upper to middle parts of the middle Eocene elsewhere. Locally, the middle confining unit contains thin zones that have moderate to high permeability and can produce water to wells that tap them. The Lower Floridan aquifer

  18. Hydraulic conductivity of a firn aquifer system in southeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Olivia L.; Solomon, D. Kip; Miège, Clément; Koenig, Lora S.; Forster, Richard R.; Montgomery, Lynn N.; Schmerr, Nicholas; Ligtenberg, Stefan R. M.; Legchenko, Anatoly; Brucker, Ludovic

    2017-05-01

    Some regions of the Greenland ice sheet, where snow accumulation and melt rates are high, currently retain substantial volumes of liquid water within the firn pore space throughout the year. These firn aquifers, found between 10-30 m below the snow surface, may significantly affect sea level rise by storing or draining surface meltwater. The hydraulic gradient and the hydraulic conductivity control flow of meltwater through the firn. Here we describe the hydraulic conductivity of the firn aquifer estimated from slug tests and aquifer tests at six sites located upstream of Helheim Glacier in southeastern Greenland. We conducted slug tests using a novel instrument, a piezometer with a heated tip that melts itself into the ice sheet. Hydraulic conductivity ranges between 2.5x10-5 and 1.1x10-3 m/s. The geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is 2.7x10-4 m/s with a geometric standard deviation of 1.4 from both depth specific slug tests (analyzed using the Hvorslev method) and aquifer tests during the recovery period. Hydraulic conductivity is relatively consistent between boreholes and only decreases slightly with depth. The hydraulic conductivity of the firn aquifer is crucial for determining flow rates and patterns within the aquifer, which inform hydrologic models of the aquifer, its relation to the broader glacial hydrologic system, and its effect on sea level rise.

  19. Large sedimentary aquifer systems functioning. Constraints by classical isotopic and chemical tools, and REE in the Eocene sand aquifer, SW France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelet-Giraud, E.; Negrel, P. J.; Millot, R.; Guerrot, C.; Brenot, A.; Malcuit, E.

    2010-12-01

    Large sedimentary aquifer systems often constitute strategic water resources for drinking water supply, agriculture irrigation and industry, but can also represent an energetic resource for geothermal power. Large water abstractions can induce complete modification of the natural functioning of such aquifer systems, e.g. with seepage between aquifer layers that can lead to water quality degradation. These large aquifer systems thus require rational water management at the sedimentary basin scale in order to preserve both water quantity and quality. In addition to hydrogeological modelling mainly dealing with water quantity, chemical and isotopic methods were applied to evidence the spatial variability of water characteristics and to turn this into better understanding of hydrosystems functioning. The large Eocene Sand aquifer system of the Adour-Garonne sedimentary basin was studied through various hydrological, chemical and isotopic tools. This system extends over 116,000 km2 (one-fifth of the French territory, located in the South west part). The aquifer being artesian in the west of the district and confined with piezometric levels around 250-m depth in the east. The ‘Eocene Sands’, composed of sandy Tertiary sediments alternating with carbonate deposits, is a multi-layer system with high permeability and a thickness of several tens of metres to a hundred metres..The Eocene Sand aquifer system comprises at least five aquifers: Paleocene, Eocene infra-molassic sands (IMS), early Eocene, middle Eocene, and late Eocene. According to δ18O and δ2H values and estimated 14C ages, both present-day recharge (mainly located in the north of the area) and old recharge (16-35 ky) can be evidenced. High spatial variability was evidenced within a same aquifer layer, with temporal variability over one hydrological cycle limited to a few points located in the recharge areas. These results and especially the very old waters recharged under colder climate combined with the

  20. Surficial aquifer system in eastern Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, D.H.; Watkins, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system in eastern Lee County consists of an upper water bearing unit, which is generally unconfined, and a lower water bearing unit, which is confined and is the major source tapped by most wells. The top of the lower unit, which is of primary interest in this report, ranges in depth from 40 to 60 ft below land surface in the east-central part of the county to more than 120 ft in the southern part. In the extreme southern part of the county, a middle water bearing unit also contains water under artesian pressure. Recharge to the lower unit occurs primarily by leakage from the overlying saturated section through the confining beds. Water levels in the lower unit fluctuate similarly to those in the upper (unconfined) unit. Groundwater in the lower unit moves from areas of highest water level in the south part of Lehigh acres, northward toward the Caloosahatchee River, and toward the coast. The lower unit contains freshwater throughout much of its extent and is the source of public water supply at Lehigh Acres and Green Meadows where an average of about 3 mil gal/day was withdrawn in 1980. In several areas, the concentrations of chlorides and dissolved solids exceed drinking water standards. Yields of wells that tap the lower unit range from 10 to 1,100 gal/min. Transmissivities ranging from about 17,700 to 7,750 sq ft/day were determined for different areas of the unit. Storage coefficients range from 0.0001 to 0.0003. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Development of a Unified Hydrostratigraphic Framework for the Floridan Aquifer System in Central and Southern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, R. S.

    2008-05-01

    The mostly carbonate Floridan aquifer system (FAS) of central and southern Florida is a widely used resource with a complex hydrostratigraphic framework that is managed primarily in a subregional context according to water management jurisdictional boundaries. As use of the FAS increases, a consistent regional hydrostratigraphic framework is needed for effective management across these boundaries. Stratigraphic marker horizons within and near the top of FAS were delineated and mapped to develop a preliminary, correlative stratigraphic framework. This framework was used to identify and determine aquifers, subaquifers, and confining units and map their spatial distribution. These horizons are based on lithologic changes and geophysical log signatures identified in previous studies, and they were extended throughout the study area primarily by correlation of natural gamma-ray logs. The FAS consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer. A regional, productive zone is delineated and informally referred to as the Avon Park permeable zone. This zone is present over most of the study area and is characterized by thick units of dolostone with interbedded limestone and high fracture permeability. The zone has been identified in different regions in previous studies, either as the upper part of the Lower Floridan aquifer or as the lower part of the Upper Floridan aquifer. In this study it is generally considered to be within the middle confining unit. Transmissivity of the Avon Park permeable zone, a major source of water supply, generally ranges from less than 1x104 up to 1.6x106 ft2/day, and is greatest in central Florida where dolomite is developed as a major component of the zone. A large area of low transmissivity (less than 105 ft2/day) in southern Florida coincides with an area where limestone is the predominant lithology within the zone. Major uses of the FAS now include withdrawal for public and agricultural supply

  2. Simulation of ground-water flow in the Intermediate and Floridan aquifer systems in Peninsular Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model of the intermediate and Floridan aquifer systems in peninsular Florida was used to (1) test and refine the conceptual understanding of the regional ground-water flow system; (2) develop a data base to support subregional ground-water flow modeling; and (3) evaluate effects of projected 2020 ground-water withdrawals on ground-water levels. The four-layer model was based on the computer code MODFLOW-96, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The top layer consists of specified-head cells simulating the surficial aquifer system as a source-sink layer. The second layer simulates the intermediate aquifer system in southwest Florida and the intermediate confining unit where it is present. The third and fourth layers simulate the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers, respectively. Steady-state ground-water flow conditions were approximated for time-averaged hydrologic conditions from August 1993 through July 1994 (1993-94). This period was selected based on data from Upper Floridan a quifer wells equipped with continuous water-level recorders. The grid used for the ground-water flow model was uniform and composed of square 5,000-foot cells, with 210 columns and 300 rows.

  3. Sustainable Capture: Concepts for Managing Stream-Aquifer Systems.

    PubMed

    Davids, Jeffrey C; Mehl, Steffen W

    2015-01-01

    Most surface water bodies (i.e., streams, lakes, etc.) are connected to the groundwater system to some degree so that changes to surface water bodies (either diversions or importations) can change flows in aquifer systems, and pumping from an aquifer can reduce discharge to, or induce additional recharge from streams, springs, and lakes. The timescales of these interactions are often very long (decades), making sustainable management of these systems difficult if relying only on observations of system responses. Instead, management scenarios are often analyzed based on numerical modeling. In this paper we propose a framework and metrics that can be used to relate the Theis concepts of capture to sustainable measures of stream-aquifer systems. We introduce four concepts: Sustainable Capture Fractions, Sustainable Capture Thresholds, Capture Efficiency, and Sustainable Groundwater Storage that can be used as the basis for developing metrics for sustainable management of stream-aquifer systems. We demonstrate their utility on a hypothetical stream-aquifer system where pumping captures both streamflow and discharge to phreatophytes at different amounts based on pumping location. In particular, Capture Efficiency (CE) can be easily understood by both scientists and non-scientist alike, and readily identifies vulnerabilities to sustainable stream-aquifer management when its value exceeds 100%.

  4. Ground-water flow and saline water in the shallow aquifer system of the southern watersheds of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.

    2003-01-01

    Population and tourism continues to grow in Virginia Beach, Virginia, but the supply of freshwater is limited. A pipeline from Lake Gaston supplies water for northern Virginia Beach, but ground water is widely used to water lawns in the north, and most southern areas of the city rely solely on ground water. Water from depths greater than 60 meters generally is too saline to drink. Concentrations of chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Virginia Beach, Department of Public Utilities, investigated the shallow aquifer system of the southern watersheds to determine the distribution of fresh ground water, its potential uses, and its susceptibility to contamination. Aquifers and confining units of the southern watersheds were delineated and chloride concentrations in the aquifers and confining units were contoured. A ground-water-flow and solute-transport model of the shallow aquifer system reached steady state with regard to measured chloride concentrations after 31,550 years of freshwater recharge. Model simulations indicate that if freshwater is found in permeable sediments of the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer, such a well field could supply freshwater, possibly for decades, but eventually the water would become more saline. The rate of saline-water intrusion toward the well field would depend on the rate of pumping, aquifer properties, and on the proximity of the well field to saline water sources. The steady-state, ground-water-flow model also was used to simulate drawdowns around two hypothetical well fields and drawdowns around two hypothetical open-pit mines. The chloride concentrations simulated in the model did not approximate the measured concentrations for some wells, indicating sites where local hydrogeologic units or unit properties do not conform to the simple hydrogeology of the model. The Columbia aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown

  5. A conservative evaluation of the transport of TCE from the confined aquifer beneath J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to a hypothetical receptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, L. E.; Patton, T. L.; Quinn, J. J.

    1999-01-04

    Past disposal operations at the Toxic Burn Pits (TBP) area of J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, have resulted in volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination of groundwater. Although the contaminant concentration is highest in the surficial aquifer, VOCs are also present in the confined aquifer, which is approximately 30 m (100 ft) deep at the TBP area. This study focuses on the confined aquifer, a sandy valley-fill Pleistocene unit in a paleochannel cut into Cretaceous sands and clays. This report documents the locations of the region's pumping wells, which are over 6 km (4 mi) away from the TBP. The distances to the pumping wells and the complex stratigraphy limit the likelihood of any contamination reaching a receptor well. Nonetheless, a worst-case scenario was evaluated with a model designed to simulate the transport of trichloroethylene (TCE), the main chemical of concern, from the confined aquifer beneath the TBP along a hypothetical, direct flowpath to a receptor well. The model was designed to be highly conservative (i.e., based on assumptions that promote the transport of contaminants). In addition to the direct flowpath assumption, the model uses the lowest literature value for the biodegradation rate of TCE, a low degree of sorption, a continuous-strength source, and a high flow velocity. Results from this conservative evaluation indicate that the simulated contaminant plume extends into areas offshore from J-Field, but decays before reaching a receptor well. The 5-ppb contour, for example, travels approximately 5 km (3 mi) before stagnating. Recent field analyses have documented that complete biodegradation of TCE to ethene and ethane is occurring directly below the TBP; therefore, the likelihood of TCE or its daughter products reaching a pumping well appears negligible. Thus, the model results may be useful in proposing either a no action or a natural attenuation alternative for the confined aquifer.

  6. Hydrology of aquifer systems in the Memphis area, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criner, James H.; Sun, P-C. P.; Nyman, Dale J.

    1964-01-01

    The Memphis area as described in .this report comprises about 1,300 square miles of the Mississippi embayment part of the Gulf Coastal Plain. The area is underlain by as much as 3,000 feet of sediments ranging in age from Cretaceous through Quaternary. In 1960, 150 mgd (million gallons per day) of water was pumped from the principal aquifers. Municipal pumpage accounted for almost half of this amount, and industrial pumpage a little more than half. About 90 percent of the water used in the area is derived from the '500-foot' sand, and most of the remainder is from the ?400-foot' sand; both sands are of Eocene age. A small amount of water for domestic use is pumped from the terrace deposits of Pliocene and Pleistocene age. Both the '500-foot' and the '1,400-foot' sands are artesian aquifers except in the southeastern part of the area; there the water level in wells in the '500-foot' sand is now below the overlying confining clay. Water levels in both aquifers have declined almost continuously since pumping began, but the rate of decline has increased rapidly since 1940. Water-level decline in the '1,400-foot' sand has been less pronounced since 1956. The cones of depression in both aquifers have expanded and deepened as a result of the annual increases in pumping, and an increase in hydraulic gradients has induced a greater flow of water into the area. Approximately 135 mgd entered the Memphis area through the '500-foot' sand aquifer in 1960, and, of this amount, 60 mgd originated as inflow from the east and about 75 mgd was derived from leakage from the terrace deposits, from the north, south, and west and from other sources. Of the water entering the '1,400-foot' sand, about 5 mgd was inflow from the east, and about half that amount was from each of the north, south, and west directions. The average rate of movement of water outside the area of heavy withdrawals is about 70 feet per year in the '500-foot' sand and about 40 feet per year in the '1,400-foot' sand

  7. Optimized system to improve pumping rate stability during aquifer tests.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael H; Rasmussen, Todd C; Lyons, F Comer; Pennell, Kurt D

    2002-01-01

    Aquifer hydraulic properties are commonly estimated using aquifer tests, which are based on an assumption of a uniform and constant pumping rate. Substantial uncertainties in the flow rate across the borehole-formation interface can be induced by dynamic head losses, caused by rapid changes in borehole water levels early in an aquifer test. A system is presented that substantially reduces these sources of uncertainty by explicitly accounting for dynamic head losses. The system which employs commonly available components (including a datalogger, pressure transducers, a variable-speed pump motor, a flow controller, and flowmeters), is inexpensive, highly mobile, and easily set up. It optimizes the flow rate at the borehole-formation interface, making it suitable for any type of aquifer test, including constant, step, or ramped withdrawal and injection, as well as sinusoidal. The system was demonstrated for both withdrawal and injection tests in three aquifers at the Savannah River Site. No modifications to the control system were required, although a small number of characteristics of the pumping and monitoring system were added to the operating program. The pumping system provided a statistically significant, constant flow rate with time. The range in pumping variability (95% confidence interval) was from +/- 2.58 x 10(-4) L/sec to +/- 9.07 x 10(-4) L/sec, across a wide range in field and aquifer conditions.

  8. Confinement and Tritium Stripping Systems for APT Tritium Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.; Heung, L.K.

    1997-10-20

    This report identifies functions and requirements for the tritium process confinement and clean-up system (PCCS) and provides supporting technical information for the selection and design of tritium confinement, clean-up (stripping) and recovery technologies for new tritium processing facilities in the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT). The results of a survey of tritium confinement and clean-up systems for large-scale tritium handling facilities and recommendations for the APT are also presented.

  9. Groundwater withdrawal rates from the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, 1900 to 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knierim, Katherine J.; Nottmeier, Anna M.; Worland, Scott C.; Westerman, Drew A.; Clark, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is an often overlooked freshwater resource compared to surface water, but groundwater is used widely across the United States, especially during periods of drought. If groundwater models can successfully simulate past conditions, they may be used to evaluate potential future pumping scenarios or climate conditions, thus providing a valuable planning tool for water-resource managers. Quantifying the groundwater-use component for a groundwater model is a vital but often challenging endeavor. This dataset includes groundwater withdrawal rates modeled for the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system (Ozark system) from 1900 to 2010 by groundwater model cell (2.6 square kilometers) for five water-use divisions—agriculture (including irrigation and aquaculture), livestock, public supply (including municipal and rural water districts), and non-agriculture (including thermoelectric power generation, mining, commercial, and industrial)—and by country for domestic (self-supplied) use. Two child items are included with the dataset: “Domestic groundwater withdrawal rates from the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, 1900 to 2010” and “Public supply, non-agriculture, livestock, and agriculture groundwater withdrawal rates from the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, 1900 to 2010”. The Ozark system is located in the central United States and is composed of interbedded Cambrian to Pennsylvanian clastic and carbonate lithologies. In stratigraphic order, the Ozark system includes the Basement confining unit, St. Francois aquifer, St. Francois confining unit, Ozark aquifer, Ozark confining unit, Springfield Plateau aquifer, and Western Interior Plains confining system. Generally, the lower portion of the Ozark aquifer is the primary source of groundwater across much of Missouri and the Springfield Plateau aquifer is used across northern Arkansas. A full description of the methods used to model groundwater withdrawal rates from the Ozark system are available in Knierim et al., IN

  10. Hydrogeology and the Distribution and Origin of Salinity in the Floridan Aquifer System, Southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    1994-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system in southeastern Florida consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, the middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. An upper zone of brackish water and a lower zone of water with a salinity similar to that of seawater are present in the Floridan aquifer system. The brackish-water zone is defined as that in which water has a dissolved-solids concentration of less than 10,000 milligrams per liter (chloride concentration less than about 5,240 milligrams per liter), and water in the the saline-water zone has a dissolved solids concentration of about 35,000 milligrams per liter (about 18,900 milligrams per liter chloride concentration). The brackish-water and saline-water zones are separated by a transitional zone, typically 100 feet thick, in which salinity increases abruptly with depth. The base of the brackish-water zone lies within the Upper Floridan aquifer along the coast but extends into the middle confining unit inland. The brackish- water zone is as much as 1,200 feet thick inland, whereas the Upper Floridart aquifer is typically 500 to 600 feet thick. Changes in lithology or permeability do not usually control the position of the boundary between the brackish-water and saline-water zones. Calculations of the depth of a brackish-water and saline-water interface using the Ghyben-Herzberg relation show good agreement between calculated and actual positions of the interface, indicating equilibrium between the zones. Several areas of high salinity with chloride concentrations greater than 3,000 milligrams per liter are present in the upper interval of the brackish-water zone near the coast, and in one of these areas in northeastern Broward County, salinity decreases with depth from the upper to lower interval. The high salinities could be a result of seawater preferentially encroaching into zones of higher permeability in the Upper Flofidan aquifer during Pleistocene high stands of sea level and incomplete flushing of the seawater

  11. Fraction of young water as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability along two regional flow paths in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, southeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Barlow, Jeannie R. B.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Carmichael, John K.

    2017-04-01

    Wells along two regional flow paths were sampled to characterize changes in water quality and the vulnerability to contamination of the Memphis aquifer across a range of hydrologic and land-use conditions in the southeastern United States. The flow paths begin in the aquifer outcrop area and end at public supply wells in the confined parts of the aquifer at Memphis, Tennessee. Age-date tracer (e.g. SF6, 3H, 14C) data indicate that a component of young water is present in the aquifer at most locations along both flow paths, which is consistent with previous studies at Memphis that documented leakage of shallow water into the Memphis aquifer locally where the overlying confining unit is thin or absent. Mixtures of young and old water were most prevalent where long-term pumping for public supply has lowered groundwater levels and induced downward movement of young water. The occurrence of nitrate, chloride and synthetic organic compounds was correlated to the fraction of young water along the flow paths. Oxic conditions persisted for 10 km or more down dip of the confining unit, and the presence of young water in confined parts of the aquifer suggest that contaminants such as nitrate-N have the potential for transport. Long-term monitoring data for one of the flow-path wells screened in the confined part of the aquifer suggest that the vulnerability of the aquifer as indicated by the fraction of young water is increasing over time.

  12. Fraction of young water as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability along two regional flow paths in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, southeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Barlow, Jeannie R. B.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Carmichael, John K.

    2017-09-01

    Wells along two regional flow paths were sampled to characterize changes in water quality and the vulnerability to contamination of the Memphis aquifer across a range of hydrologic and land-use conditions in the southeastern United States. The flow paths begin in the aquifer outcrop area and end at public supply wells in the confined parts of the aquifer at Memphis, Tennessee. Age-date tracer (e.g. SF6, 3H, 14C) data indicate that a component of young water is present in the aquifer at most locations along both flow paths, which is consistent with previous studies at Memphis that documented leakage of shallow water into the Memphis aquifer locally where the overlying confining unit is thin or absent. Mixtures of young and old water were most prevalent where long-term pumping for public supply has lowered groundwater levels and induced downward movement of young water. The occurrence of nitrate, chloride and synthetic organic compounds was correlated to the fraction of young water along the flow paths. Oxic conditions persisted for 10 km or more down dip of the confining unit, and the presence of young water in confined parts of the aquifer suggest that contaminants such as nitrate-N have the potential for transport. Long-term monitoring data for one of the flow-path wells screened in the confined part of the aquifer suggest that the vulnerability of the aquifer as indicated by the fraction of young water is increasing over time.

  13. Hydrogeology and the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, R.S.; Memberg, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The virtually untapped Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a supplemental source of water for public use in the highly populated coastal area of Palm Beach County. A recent study was conducted to delineate the distribution of salinity in relation to the local hydrogeology and assess the potential processes that might control (or have affected) the distribution of salinity in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system in the study area consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer and ranges in age from Paleocene to Oligocene. Included at its top is part of a lowermost Hawthorn Group unit referred to as the basal Hawthorn unit. The thickness of this basal unit is variable, ranging from about 30 to 355 feet; areas where this unit is thick were paleotopographic lows during deposition of the unit. The uppermost permeable zones in the Upper Floridan aquifer occur in close association with an unconformity at the base of the Hawthorn Group; however, the highest of these zones can be up in the basal unit. A dolomite unit of Eocene age generally marks the top of the Lower Floridan aquifer, but the top of this dolomite unit has a considerable altitude range: from about 1,200 to 2,300 feet below sea level. Additionally, where the dolomite unit is thick, its top is high and the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system, as normally defined, probably is not present. An upper zone of brackish water and a lower zone of water with salinity similar to that of seawater (saline-water zone) are present in the Floridan aquifer system. The brackish-water and saline-water zones are separated by a transition zone (typically 100 to 200 feet thick) in which salinity rapidly increases with depth. The transition zone was defined by using a salinity of 10,000 mg/L (milligrams per liter) of dissolved-solids concentration (about 5,240 mg/L of chloride concentration) at its top and 35,000 mg/L of dissolved

  14. Temporal response of hydraulic head, temperature, and chloride concentrations to sea-level changes, Floridan aquifer system, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.D.; Vacher, H.L.; Sanford, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional density-dependent flow and transport modeling of the Floridan aquifer system, USA shows that current chloride concentrations are not in equilibrium with current sea level and, second, that the geometric configuration of the aquifer has a significant effect on system responses. The modeling shows that hydraulic head equilibrates first, followed by temperatures, and then by chloride concentrations. The model was constructed using a modified version of SUTRA capable of simulating multi-species heat and solute transport, and was compared to pre-development conditions using hydraulic heads, chloride concentrations, and temperatures from 315 observation wells. Three hypothetical, sinusoidal sea-level changes occurring over 100,000 years were used to evaluate how the simulated aquifer responds to sea-level changes. Model results show that hydraulic head responses lag behind sea-level changes only where the Miocene Hawthorn confining unit is thick and represents a significant restriction to flow. Temperatures equilibrate quickly except where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick and the duration of the sea-level event is long (exceeding 30,000 years). Response times for chloride concentrations to equilibrate are shortest near the coastline and where the aquifer is unconfined; in contrast, chloride concentrations do not change significantly over the 100,000-year simulation period where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick. ?? US Government 2008.

  15. Temporal response of hydraulic head, temperature, and chloride concentrations to sea-level changes, Floridan aquifer system, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. D.; Vacher, H. L.; Sanford, Ward E.

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional density-dependent flow and transport modeling of the Floridan aquifer system, USA shows that current chloride concentrations are not in equilibrium with current sea level and, second, that the geometric configuration of the aquifer has a significant effect on system responses. The modeling shows that hydraulic head equilibrates first, followed by temperatures, and then by chloride concentrations. The model was constructed using a modified version of SUTRA capable of simulating multi-species heat and solute transport, and was compared to pre-development conditions using hydraulic heads, chloride concentrations, and temperatures from 315 observation wells. Three hypothetical, sinusoidal sea-level changes occurring over 100,000 years were used to evaluate how the simulated aquifer responds to sea-level changes. Model results show that hydraulic head responses lag behind sea-level changes only where the Miocene Hawthorn confining unit is thick and represents a significant restriction to flow. Temperatures equilibrate quickly except where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick and the duration of the sea-level event is long (exceeding 30,000 years). Response times for chloride concentrations to equilibrate are shortest near the coastline and where the aquifer is unconfined; in contrast, chloride concentrations do not change significantly over the 100,000-year simulation period where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick.

  16. Stochastic modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes preliminary three-dimensional geostatistical modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system using a multiple-point geostatistical model. The purpose of this study is to provide a proof-of-concept for this modeling approach. An example of the method is demonstrated using a subset of borehole geologic data and aquifer test data from a portion of the Calico Hills Formation, a lava-flow aquifer system that partially underlies Pahute Mesa, Nevada. Groundwater movement in this aquifer system is assumed to be controlled by the spatial distribution of two geologic units—rhyolite lava flows and zeolitized tuffs. The configuration of subsurface lava flows and tuffs is largely unknown because of limited data. The spatial configuration of the lava flows and tuffs is modeled by using a multiple-point geostatistical simulation algorithm that generates a large number of alternative realizations, each honoring the available geologic data and drawn from a geologic conceptual model of the lava-flow aquifer system as represented by a training image. In order to demonstrate how results from the geostatistical model could be analyzed in terms of available hydrologic data, a numerical simulation of part of an aquifer test was applied to the realizations of the geostatistical model.

  17. Technical Note: Approximate solution of transient drawdown for constant-flux pumping at a partially penetrating well in a radial two-zone confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Yang, S.-Y.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2015-06-01

    An aquifer consisting of a skin zone and a formation zone is considered as a two-zone aquifer. Existing solutions for the problem of constant-flux pumping in a two-zone confined aquifer involve laborious calculation. This study develops a new approximate solution for the problem based on a mathematical model describing steady-state radial and vertical flows in a two-zone aquifer. Hydraulic parameters in these two zones can be different but are assumed homogeneous in each zone. A partially penetrating well may be treated as the Neumann condition with a known flux along the screened part and zero flux along the unscreened part. The aquifer domain is finite with an outer circle boundary treated as the Dirichlet condition. The steady-state drawdown solution of the model is derived by the finite Fourier cosine transform. Then, an approximate transient solution is developed by replacing the radius of the aquifer domain in the steady-state solution with an analytical expression for a dimensionless time-dependent radius of influence. The approximate solution is capable of predicting good temporal drawdown distributions over the whole pumping period except at the early stage. A quantitative criterion for the validity of neglecting the vertical flow due to a partially penetrating well is also provided. Conventional models considering radial flow without the vertical component for the constant-flux pumping have good accuracy if satisfying the criterion.

  18. Assessment of groundwater availability in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system From Long Island, New York, to North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Pope, Jason P.; Fienen, Michael N.; Monti, Jr., Jack; Nardi, Mark R.; Finkelstein, Jason S.

    2016-08-31

    Executive SummaryThe U.S. Geological Survey began a multiyear regional assessment of groundwater availability in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain (NACP) aquifer system in 2010 as part of its ongoing regional assessments of groundwater availability of the principal aquifers of the Nation. The goals of this national assessment are to document effects of human activities on water levels and groundwater storage, explore climate variability effects on the regional water budget, and provide consistent and integrated information that is useful to those who use and manage the groundwater resource. As part of this nationwide assessment, the USGS evaluated available groundwater resources within the NACP aquifer system from Long Island, New York, to northeastern North Carolina.The northern Atlantic Coastal Plain physiographic province depends heavily on groundwater to meet agricultural, industrial, and municipal needs. The groundwater assessment of the NACP aquifer system included an evaluation of how water use has changed over time; this evaluation primarily used groundwater budgets and development of a numerical modeling tool to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate trends.This assessment focused on multiple spatial and temporal scales to examine changes in groundwater pumping, storage, and water levels. The regional scale provides a broad view of the sources and demands on the system with time. The sub-regional scale provides an evaluation of the differing response of the aquifer system across geographic areas allowing for closer examination of the interaction between different aquifers and confining units and the changes in these interactions under pumping and recharge conditions in 2013 and hydrologic stresses as much as 45 years in the future. By focusing on multiple scales, water-resource managers may utilize this study to understand system response to changes as they affect the system as a whole.The NACP aquifer system extends from

  19. Application of isotopic tracers as a tool for understanding hydrodynamic behavior of the highly exploited Diass aquifer system (Senegal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madioune, Diakher Hélène; Faye, Serigne; Orban, Philippe; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain; Mudry, Jacques; Stumpp, Christine; Maloszewski, Piotr

    2014-04-01

    The Diass horst aquifer system located 50 km east of Dakar (Senegal) is exploited in two main aquifers covered by a sandy superficial aquifer: the confined/unconfined Palaeocene karstic limestone and the confined Maastrichtian sandstone aquifer underneath. This system has experienced intensive groundwater abstraction during the last 50 years to supply increasing water demand, agricultural and industrial needs. The high abstraction rate from 1989 to 2009 (about 109,000 m3/d) has caused a continuous groundwater level decline (up to 30 m), a modification of the groundwater flow and salinization in parts of the aquifers. The objective of the study is to improve our understanding of the system functioning with regards to high pumping, identify the geochemical reactions that take place in the system, infer origin and timing of recharge by using mainly stable (δ18O, δ2H, 13C) and radioactive (3H and 14C) isotopes. Water types defined in the Piper diagram vary in order of abundance from Ca-HCO3 (65%), Ca/Na-Cl (20%), Na-HCO3 (3%) and Na-Cl (12%). Values of δ18O and δ2H for the superficial aquifer range between -5.8 and -4.2‰ and between -42 and -31‰, respectively. For the Palaeocene aquifer they range from -5.8 to -5.0‰ and from -38 to -31‰, respectively; values in the Maastrichtian aquifer are between -5.9 and -4.3‰ for δ18O and -38 to -26‰ for δ2H. Plotted against the conventional δ18O vs δ2H diagram, data from the upper aquifer exhibit a dispersed distribution with respect to isotopic fractionation while those of the Palaeocene and Maastrichtian aquifers are aligned parallel and slightly below/or on the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) evidencing ancient waters which had evaporated during infiltration. The low tritium (generally <0.7 TU) and 14C (0.7-57.2 pmc) contents indicate predominance of older water being recharged during the Pleistocene and Holocene periods. However, few boreholes which exhibit high tritium (1.2-4.3 TU) and 14C (65.7-70.8 pmc

  20. Well hydraulics in pumping tests with exponentially decayed rates of abstraction in confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhang; Zhan, Hongbin; Wang, Quanrong; Liang, Xing; Ma, Teng; Chen, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Actual field pumping tests often involve variable pumping rates which cannot be handled by the classical constant-rate or constant-head test models, and often require a convolution process to interpret the test data. In this study, we proposed a semi-analytical model considering an exponentially decreasing pumping rate started at a certain (higher) rate and eventually stabilized at a certain (lower) rate for cases with or without wellbore storage. A striking new feature of the pumping test with an exponentially decayed rate is that the drawdowns will decrease over a certain period of time during intermediate pumping stage, which has never been seen before in constant-rate or constant-head pumping tests. It was found that the drawdown-time curve associated with an exponentially decayed pumping rate function was bounded by two asymptotic curves of the constant-rate tests with rates equaling to the starting and stabilizing rates, respectively. The wellbore storage must be considered for a pumping test without an observation well (single-well test). Based on such characteristics of the time-drawdown curve, we developed a new method to estimate the aquifer parameters by using the genetic algorithm.

  1. Plutonium Finishing Plant assessment of confinement system bypass leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document walk-through`s of the safety class confinement systems at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In addition this document outlines the actions taken to assess the confinement system for bypass leakage as well as establishing disposition for discovered deficiencies at the PFP.

  2. Simulation of groundwater flow in the shallow aquifer system of the Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Pope, Jason P.; Selnick, David L.; Stumvoll, Ryan F.

    2012-01-01

    Estimating future loadings of nitrogen to the Chesapeake Bay requires knowledge about the groundwater flow system and the traveltime of water and chemicals between recharge at the water table and the discharge to streams and directly to the bay. The Delmarva Peninsula has a relatively large proportion of its land devoted to agriculture and a large associated nitrogen load in groundwater that has the potential to enter the bay in discharging groundwater. To better understand the shallow aquifer system with respect to this loading and the traveltime to the bay, the U.S. Geological Survey constructed a steady-state groundwater flow model for the region. The model is based on estimates of recharge calculated using recently developed regression equations for evapotranspiration and surface runoff. The hydrogeologic framework incorporated into the model includes unconfined surficial aquifer sediments, as well as subcropping confined aquifers and confining beds down to 300 feet below land surface. The model was calibrated using 48 water-level measurements and 24 tracer-based ages from wells located across the peninsula. The resulting steady-state flow solution was used to estimate ages of water in the shallow aquifer system through the peninsula and the distribution and magnitude of groundwater traveltime from recharge at the water table to discharge in surface-water bodies (referred to as return time). Return times vary but are typically less than 10 years near local streams and greater than 100 years near the stream divides. The model can be used to calculate nitrate transport parameters in various local watersheds and predict future trends in nitrate loadings to Chesapeake Bay for different future nitrogen application scenarios.

  3. Non-Darcian flow to a partially penetrating well in a confined aquifer with a finite-thickness skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinggao; Wen, Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Non-Darcian flow to a partially penetrating well in a confined aquifer with a finite-thickness skin was investigated. The Izbash equation is used to describe the non-Darcian flow in the horizontal direction, and the vertical flow is described as Darcian. The solution for the newly developed non-Darcian flow model can be obtained by applying the linearization procedure in conjunction with the Laplace transform and the finite Fourier cosine transform. The flow model combines the effects of the non-Darcian flow, partial penetration of the well, and the finite thickness of the well skin. The results show that the depression cone spread is larger for the Darcian flow than for the non-Darcian flow. The drawdowns within the skin zone for a fully penetrating well are smaller than those for the partially penetrating well. The skin type and skin thickness have great impact on the drawdown in the skin zone, while they have little influence on drawdown in the formation zone. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the drawdown in the formation zone is sensitive to the power index ( n), the length of well screen ( w), the apparent radial hydraulic conductivity of the formation zone ( K r2), and the specific storage of the formation zone ( S s2) at early times, and it is very sensitive to the parameters n, w and K r2 at late times, especially to n, while it is not sensitive to the skin thickness ( r s).

  4. A hybrid optimization approach to the estimation of distributed parameters in two-dimensional confined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Ranjithan, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    In using non-linear optimization techniques for estimation of parameters in a distributed ground water model, the initial values of the parameters and prior information about them play important roles. In this paper, the genetic algorithm (GA) is combined with the truncated-Newton search technique to estimate groundwater parameters for a confined steady-state ground water model. Use of prior information about the parameters is shown to be important in estimating correct or near-correct values of parameters on a regional scale. The amount of prior information needed for an accurate solution is estimated by evaluation of the sensitivity of the performance function to the parameters. For the example presented here, it is experimentally demonstrated that only one piece of prior information of the least sensitive parameter is sufficient to arrive at the global or near-global optimum solution. For hydraulic head data with measurement errors, the error in the estimation of parameters increases as the standard deviation of the errors increases. Results from our experiments show that, in general, the accuracy of the estimated parameters depends on the level of noise in the hydraulic head data and the initial values used in the truncated-Newton search technique.In using non-linear optimization techniques for estimation of parameters in a distributed ground water model, the initial values of the parameters and prior information about them play important roles. In this paper, the genetic algorithm (GA) is combined with the truncated-Newton search technique to estimate groundwater parameters for a confined steady-state ground water model. Use of prior information about the parameters is shown to be important in estimating correct or near-correct values of parameters on a regional scale. The amount of prior information needed for an accurate solution is estimated by evaluation of the sensitivity of the performance function to the parameters. For the example presented here, it is

  5. Hydrogeologic framework of the Boise Aquifer system, southwestern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, E.; Wood, S.H. ); Osiensky, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The City of Boise relies upon the underlying groundwater resource (38,000 acre-feet/year) for 90% of its public water-supply. Basin-fill sediments which comprise this system of aquifers are divisible into five distinct hydrogeologic settings which differ on the basis of sediment type, geophysical log character, and hydraulic properties. A large buried alluvial-fan/fan-delta complex (the Boise Fan) occupies the eastern head of the basin. Down-valley gradations in sediment type show a general increase in unit thickness and sediment color more typically gray; reflecting transition to the lake environment of deposition. Basinward (northwestward), the ancient fan materials grade into lake/fan transitional sediments which grade to predominantly lake sediment which grade to gray mudstones and fine sand layers of the deep lake environment. The depth to which drinking-water aquifers extend is limited by an underlying sequence of relatively impermeable volcanic rocks. Specific capacities of efficient wells, 400--1,200 feet deep and open to 80--100 feet of sand are highest in the lake/fan transition and the lacustrine aquifers of central Boise, lowest for the Boise Fan and intermediate for the deep artesian sand aquifers of west Boise. As a result of screen and filter-pack design based upon attention to sampling drill cuttings, sieve analysis of sands, and geophysical log location of aquifers, efficiency and productivity of new wells has been greatly increased. Groundwater recharge to the deeper aquifers is via permeable surface gravels. Increased groundwater withdrawals have possibly accelerated recharge by increasing vertical hydraulic gradients. Overbored wells with continuous surface-to-depth gravel packs, wells open to multiple aquifers, and improperly abandoned wells with deteriorating casing are also conduits for polluted shallow groundwater to enter the deeper aquifers.

  6. Aquifer storage and recovery: recent hydrogeological advances and system performance.

    PubMed

    Maliva, Robert G; Guo, Weixing; Missimer, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is part of the solution to the global problem of managing water resources to meet existing and future freshwater demands. However, the metaphoric "ASR bubble" has been burst with the realization that ASR systems are more physically and chemically complex than the general conceptualization. Aquifer heterogeneity and fluid-rock interactions can greatly affect ASR system performance. The results of modeling studies and field experiences indicate that more sophisticated data collection and solute-transport modeling are required to predict how stored water will migrate in heterogeneous aquifers and how fluid-rock interactions will affect the quality of stored water. It has been well-demonstrated, by historic experience, that ASR systems can provide very large volumes of storage at a lesser cost than other options. The challenges moving forward are to improve the success rate of ASR systems, optimize system performance, and set expectations appropriately.

  7. Source and mobility of Rare Earth Elements in a sedimentary aquifer system: Aquitaine basin (Southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrel, P. J.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Millot, R.; Malcuit, E.

    2011-12-01

    The study of rare earth elements (REEs) in natural waters initially involved an examination of their occurrence and behavior in seawater and coastal waters such as estuaries. Since the 1990s, REE geochemistry has been applied to continental waters such as rivers and lakes and groundwaters. Rare earth elements) are of great interest because of their unique characteristics and have been used in the study of many geological processes like weathering and water-rock interaction processes, provenance of sediments, etc... With the evolution of analytical techniques like new generation ICP-MS, much attention had been paid towards the water geochemistry of REEs. However, there is a need of more investigations devoted to REEs in large groundwater systems, especially on the understanding of the distribution of REEs and their evolution in such systems. In this frame, large sedimentary aquifer systems often constitute strategic water resources for drinking water supply, agriculture irrigation and industry, but can also represent an energetic resource for geothermal power. Large water abstractions can induce complete modification of the natural functioning of such aquifer systems. These large aquifer systems thus require water management at the basin scale in order to preserve both water quantity and quality. The large Eocene Sand aquifer system of the Aquitaine sedimentary basin was studied through various hydrological, chemical and isotopic tools. This system extends over 116,000 km2 in the South west part of the French territory. The aquifer being artesian in the west of the district and confined with piezometric levels around 250-m depth in the east. The 'Eocene Sands', composed of sandy Tertiary sediments alternating with carbonate deposits, is a multi-layer system with high permeability and a thickness of several tens of metres to a hundred metres. The Eocene Sand aquifer system comprises at least five aquifers: Paleocene, Eocene infra-molassic sands (IMS), early Eocene

  8. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Floridan Aquifer System Near Tampa, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Katz, Brian G.; Crandall, Christy A.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    radon that occurs when water from the surficial aquifer flows downward through the confining unit and then through the Upper Floridan aquifer matrix. Roughly 50 percent of the simulated flow to the public-supply well consists of water less than about 10 years old, thus making the well vulnerable to contamination from human activities. Sampling at various depths in the public-supply well during pumping and nonpumping conditions showed that water entering the well from the cavernous zone had much higher arsenic concentrations during pumping conditions (18.9 ug/L) than during nonpumping conditions (4.2 ug/L). This implies that movement of arsenic to the public-supply well from the cavernous zone is enhanced by pumping. One possible explanation is that pumping increases the movement of water with elevated dissolved oxygen content through the cavernous zone, which causes dissolution of arsenic associated with pyrite. All public-supply wells in the area may not have the same level of vulnerability as the well studied - many of the public-supply wells in the region have lower pumping rates and longer open intervals that may draw in a larger proportion of old water that predates anthropogenic influences. Determining the similarity of water produced by various public-supply wells in the region to that of the surficial aquifer system is one measure of well vulnerability that could be used to prioritize monitoring and land-use planning efforts to protect the most vulnerable wells.

  9. Monitoring technologies for the evaluation of a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment system in coastal aquifer environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallioras, Andreas; Tsertou, Athanasia; Foglia, Laura; Bumberger, Jan; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Schüth, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater has an important role to play in water reuse. Treated sewage effluent can be infiltrated into the ground for recharge of aquifers. As the effluent water moves through the soil and the aquifer, it undergoes significant quality improvements through physical, chemical, and biological processes in the underground environment. Collectively, these processes and the water quality improvement obtained are called soil-aquifer-treatment (SAT) or geopurification. Recharge systems for SAT can be designed as infiltration-recovery systems, where all effluent water is recovered as such from the aquifer, or after blending with native groundwater. SAT typically removes essentially all suspended solids, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and pathogens (viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and helminthic eggs). Concentrations of synthetic organic carbon, phosphorous, and heavy metals are greatly reduced. The pilot site of LTCP will involve the employment of infiltration basins, which will be using waters of impaired quality as a recharge source, and hence acting as a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment, SAT, system. T he LTCP site will be employed as a pilot SAT system complemented by new technological developments, which will be providing continuous monitoring of the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of infiltrating groundwater through all hydrologic zones (i.e. surface, unsaturated and saturated zone). This will be achieved through the development and installation of an integrated system of prototype sensors, installed on-site, and offering a continuous evaluation of the performance of the SAT system. An integrated approach of the performance evaluation of any operating SAT system should aim at parallel monitoring of all hydrologic zones, proving the sustainability of all involved water quality treatment processes within unsaturated and saturated zone. Hence a prototype system of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensors will be developed, in order to achieve

  10. Hydrogeology and hydrologic conditions of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, Phillip D.; Knierim, Katherine J.; Breaker, Brian K.; Westerman, Drew A.; Clark, Brian R.

    2016-11-23

    The hydrogeology and hydrologic characteristics of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system were characterized as part of ongoing U.S. Geological Survey efforts to assess groundwater availability across the Nation. The need for such a study in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province (Ozark Plateaus) is highlighted by increasing demand on groundwater resources by the 5.3 million people of the Ozark Plateaus, water-level declines in some areas, and potential impacts of climate change on groundwater availability. The subject study integrates knowledge gained through local investigation within a regional perspective to develop a regional conceptual model of groundwater flow in the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system (Ozark system), a key phase of groundwater availability assessment. The Ozark system extends across much of southern Missouri and northwestern and north-central Arkansas and smaller areas of southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma. The region is one of the major karst landscapes in the United States, and karst aquifers are predominant in the Ozark system. Groundwater flow is ultimately controlled by aquifer and confining unit lithologies and stratigraphic relations, geologic structure, karst development, and the character of surficial lithologies and regolith mantle. The regolith mantle is a defining element of Ozark Plateaus karst, affecting recharge, karst development, and vulnerability to surface-derived contaminants. Karst development is more advanced—as evidenced by larger springs, hydraulic characteristics, and higher well yields—in the Salem Plateau and in the northern part of the Springfield Plateau (generally north of the Arkansas-Missouri border) as compared with the southern part of the Springfield Plateau in Arkansas, largely due to thinner, less extensive regolith and purer carbonate lithology.Precipitation is the ultimate source of all water to the Ozark system, and the hydrologic budget for the Ozark system includes inputs from recharge

  11. Confinement-induced resonance in quasi-one-dimensional systems under transversely anisotropic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Bohloul, Seyyed S.; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui; Drummond, Peter D.

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the confinement-induced resonance for quasi-one-dimensional quantum systems under transversely anisotropic confinement, using a two-body s-wave-scattering model in the zero-energy collision limit. We predict a single resonance for any transverse anisotropy, whose position shows a slight downshift with increasing anisotropy. We compare our prediction with the recent experimental result by Haller [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.153203 104, 153203 (2010)], in which two resonances are observed in the presence of transverse anisotropy. The discrepancy between theory and experiment remains to be resolved.

  12. Hydraulic behavior of two areas of the Floridan aquifer system characterized by complex hydrogeologic settings and large groundwater withdrawals

    SciTech Connect

    Maslia, M.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Two areas of the Florida aquifer system (FAS) that are characterized by complex hydrogeologic settings and exceedingly large ground-water withdrawals are the Dougherty Plain area of southwest GA and the Glynn County area of southeast GA. In southwest GA, large scale withdrawals of ground water for agricultural and livestock irrigation amounted to about 148 million gallons per day (mg/d) during 1990. Large scale pumping in Glynn County, primarily used for industrial purposes and centered in the City of Brunswick, amounted to about 88 mg/d during 1990. In southwest GA, the FAS consists primarily of the Ocala Limestone (OL) of late Eocene age. Confining the aquifer from above is a residual layer (50 ft thick) of sand and clay containing silicified boulders which is derived from the chemical weathering of the OL. This area is characterized by karst topography marked by numerous depressions and sinkholes, high transmissivity (generally greater than 50,000 feet squared per day), and significant hydraulic connections to overlying streams and lakes. These characteristics, along with the seasonal nature of pumping and mean annual recharge of about 10 inches per year have prevented permanent, long-term water-level declines. In the Glynn County area, the FAS can be more than 2,600 ft thick, consisting of a sequence of calcareous and dolomitic rocks that are of Late Cretaceous to early Miocene in age. The aquifer system is confined above by clastic rocks of Middle Miocene age, having an average thickness of 400 ft. This area is characterized by post-depositional tectonic modification of the subsurface as opposed to simple karst development, thick confinement of the aquifer system, and significant amounts of vertical leakage of water from below. These characteristics and heavy-long term pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) have caused a broad, shallow cone of depression to develop and the upward migration of saltwater to contaminate the freshwater zones of the UFA.

  13. Groundwater vulnerability mapping in Guadalajara aquifers system (Western Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizo-Decelis, L. David; Marín, Ana I.; Andreo, Bartolomé

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater vulnerability mapping is a practical tool to implement strategies for land-use planning and sustainable socioeconomic development coherent with groundwater protection. The objective of vulnerability mapping is to identify the most vulnerable zones of catchment areas and to provide criteria for protecting the groundwater used for drinking water supply. The delineation of protection zones in fractured aquifers is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivities, which makes difficult prediction of groundwater flow organization and flow velocities. Different methods of intrinsic groundwater vulnerability mapping were applied in the Atemajac-Toluquilla groundwater body, an aquifers system that covers around 1300 km2. The aquifer supplies the 30% of urban water resources of the metropolitan area of Guadalajara (Mexico), where over 4.6 million people reside. Study area is located in a complex neotectonic active volcanic region in the Santiago River Basin (Western Mexico), which influences the aquifer system underneath the city. Previous works have defined the flow dynamics and identified the origin of recharge. In addition, the mixture of fresh groundwater with hydrothermal and polluted waters have been estimated. Two main aquifers compose the multilayer system. The upper aquifer is unconfined and consists of sediments and pyroclastic materials. Recharge of this aquifer comes from rainwater and ascending vertical fluids from the lower aquifer. The lower aquifer consists of fractured basalts of Pliocene age. Formerly, the main water source has been the upper unit, which is a porous and unconsolidated unit, which acts as a semi-isotropic aquifer. Intense groundwater usage has resulted in lowering the water table in the upper aquifer. Therefore, the current groundwater extraction is carried out from the deeper aquifer and underlying bedrock units, where fracture flow predominates. Pollution indicators have been reported in

  14. Hydrostratigraphy characterization of the Floridan aquifer system using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Stephanie; Screaton, Elizabeth; Russo, Raymond; Panning, Mark; Bremner, Paul; Stanciu, Christian; Torpey, Megan; Hongsresawat, Sutatcha; Farrell, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    We investigated a new technique for aquifer characterization that uses cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise to determine seismic velocity structure of the Floridan aquifer system. Accurate characterization of aquifer systems is vital to hydrogeologic research and groundwater management but is difficult due to limited subsurface data and heterogeneity. Previous research on the carbonate Floridan aquifer system found that confining units and high permeability flow zones have distinct seismic velocities. We deployed an array of 9 short period seismometers from 11/2013 to 3/2014 in Indian Lake State Forest near Ocala, Florida, to image the hydrostratigraphy of the aquifer system using ambient seismic noise. We find that interstation distance strongly influences the upper and lower frequency limits of the dataset. Seismic waves propagating within 1.5 and 7 wavelengths between stations were optimal for reliable group velocity measurements and both an upper and lower wavelength threshold was used. A minimum of 100-250 hours of signal was needed to maximize signal to noise ratio and to allow cross-correlation convergence. We averaged measurements of group velocity between station pairs at each frequency band to create a network average dispersion curve. A family of 1-D shear-wave velocity profiles that best represents the network average dispersion was then generated using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The MCMC algorithm was implemented with either a fixed number of layers, or as transdimensional in which the number of layers was a free parameter. Results from both algorithms require a prominent velocity increase at ∼200 m depth. A shallower velocity increase at ∼60 m depth was also observed, but only in model ensembles created by collecting models with the lowest overall misfit to the observed data. A final round of modeling with additional prior constraints based on initial results and well logs produced a mean shear-wave velocity profile taken

  15. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Floridan aquifer system and effects of Lower Floridan aquifer pumping on the Upper Floridan aquifer at Fort Stewart, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Cherry, Gregory C.; Gonthier, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    constituent concentrations increased with depth, and water from all permeable zones contained sulfate at concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level of 250 milligrams per liter. A 72-hour aquifer test pumped LFA well 33P028 at 740 gallons per minute (gal/min), producing about 39 ft of drawdown in the pumped well and about 0.4 foot in nearby UFA well 33P029. Simulation using the U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference code MODFLOW was used to determine long-term, steady-state flow in the Floridan aquifer system, assuming the LFA well was pumped continuously at a rate of 740 gal/min. Simulated steady-state drawdown in the LFA was identical to that observed in pumped LFA well 33P028 at the end of the 72-hour test, with values larger than 1 ft extending 4.4 square miles symmetrically around the pumped well. Simulated steady-state drawdown in the UFA resulting from pumping in LFA well 33P028 exceeded 1 ft within a 1.4-square-mile circular area, and maximum drawdown in the UFA was 1.1 ft. Leakage from the UFA through the Lower Floridan confining unit contributed about 98 percent of the water to the well; lateral flow from specified-head model boundaries contributed about 2 percent. About 80 percent of the water supplied to LFA well 33P028 originated from within 1 mile of the well, and 49 percent was derived from within 0.5 mile of the well. Vertical hydraulic gradients and vertical leakage are progressively higher near the LFA pumped well which results in a correspondingly higher contribution of water from the UFA to the pumped well at distances closer to the pumped well. Simulated pumping-induced interaquifer leakage from the UFA to the LFA totaled 725 gal/min (1.04 million gallons per day), whereas simulated pumping at 205 gal/min (0.3 million gallons per day) from UFA well 33P029 produced the equivalent maximum drawdown as pumping LFA well 33P028 at 740 gal/min during the aquifer test. This equivalent pumpin

  16. A method to estimate groundwater depletion from confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Neuzil, C.E.

    2007-01-01

    Although depletion of storage in low-permeability confining layers is the source of much of the groundwater produced from many confined aquifer systems, it is all too frequently overlooked or ignored. This makes effective management of groundwater resources difficult by masking how much water has been derived from storage and, in some cases, the total amount of water that has been extracted from an aquifer system. Analyzing confining layer storage is viewed as troublesome because of the additional computational burden and because the hydraulic properties of confining layers are poorly known. In this paper we propose a simplified method for computing estimates of confining layer depletion, as well as procedures for approximating confining layer hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss) using geologic information. The latter makes the technique useful in developing countries and other settings where minimal data are available or when scoping calculations are needed. As such, our approach may be helpful for estimating the global transfer of groundwater to surface water. A test of the method on a synthetic system suggests that the computational errors will generally be small. Larger errors will probably result from inaccuracy in confining layer property estimates, but these may be no greater than errors in more sophisticated analyses. The technique is demonstrated by application to two aquifer systems: the Dakota artesian aquifer system in South Dakota and the coastal plain aquifer system in Virginia. In both cases, depletion from confining layers was substantially larger than depletion from the aquifers.

  17. Saltwater intrusion in the Floridan aquifer system near downtown Brunswick, Georgia, 1957–2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, Gregory S.; Peck, Michael

    2017-02-16

    IntroductionThe Floridan aquifer system (FAS) consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA), an intervening confining unit of highly variable properties, and the Lower Floridan aquifer (LFA). The UFA and LFA are primarily composed of Paleocene- to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that include, locally, Upper Cretaceous rocks. The FAS extends from coastal areas in southeastern South Carolina and continues southward and westward across the coastal plain of Georgia and Alabama, and underlies all of Florida. The thickness of the FAS varies from less than 100 feet (ft) in aquifer outcrop areas of South Carolina to about 1,700 ft near the city of Brunswick, Georgia.Locally, in southeastern Georgia and the Brunswick– Glynn County area, the UFA consists of an upper water-bearing zone (UWBZ) and a lower water-bearing zone (LWBZ), as identified by Wait and Gregg (1973), with aquifer test data indicating the upper zone has higher productivity than the lower zone. Near the city of Brunswick, the LFA is composed of two permeable zones: an early middle Eocene-age upper permeable zone (UPZ) and a highly permeable lower zone of limestone (LPZ) of Paleocene and Late Cretaceous age that includes a deeply buried, cavernous, saline water-bearing unit known as the Fernandina permeable zone. Maslia and Prowell (1990) inferred the presence of major northeast–southwest trending faults through the downtown Brunswick area based on structural analysis of geophysical data, northeastward elongation of the potentiometric surface of the UFA, and breaches in the local confining unit that influence the area of chloride contamination. Pronounced horizontal and vertical hydraulic head gradients, caused by pumping in the UFA, allow saline water from the FPZ to migrate upward into the UFA through this system of faults and conduits.Saltwater was first detected in the FAS in wells completed in the UFA near the southern part of the city of Brunswick in late 1957. By the 1970s, a plume of groundwater

  18. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow and land-surface subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf Coast aquifer system, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    As a part of the Texas Water Development Board Ground- Water Availability Modeling program, the U.S. Geological Survey developed and tested a numerical finite-difference (MODFLOW) model to simulate ground-water flow and land-surface subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Texas from predevelopment (before 1891) through 2000. The model is intended to be a tool that water-resource managers can use to address future ground-water-availability issues. From land surface downward, the Chicot aquifer, the Evangeline aquifer, the Burkeville confining unit, the Jasper aquifer, and the Catahoula confining unit are the hydrogeologic units of the Gulf Coast aquifer system. Withdrawals of large quantities of ground water have resulted in potentiometric surface (head) declines in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and land-surface subsidence (primarily in the Houston area) from depressurization and compaction of clay layers interbedded in the aquifer sediments. In a generalized conceptual model of the aquifer system, water enters the ground-waterflow system in topographically high outcrops of the hydrogeologic units in the northwestern part of the approximately 25,000-square-mile model area. Water that does not discharge to streams flows to intermediate and deep zones of the system southeastward of the outcrop areas where it is discharged by wells and by upward leakage in topographically low areas near the coast. The uppermost parts of the aquifer system, which include outcrop areas, are under water-table conditions. As depth increases in the aquifer system and as interbedded sand and clay accumulate, water-table conditions evolve into confined conditions. The model comprises four layers, one for each of the hydrogeologic units of the aquifer system except the Catahoula confining unit, the assumed no-flow base of the system. Each layer consists of 137 rows and 245 columns of uniformly spaced grid blocks, each block representing 1 square mile

  19. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  20. Technical Note: Approximate solution of transient drawdown for constant-flux pumping at a partially penetrating well in a radial two-zone confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Yang, S.-Y.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2015-03-01

    An aquifer consisting of a skin zone and a formation zone is considered as a two-zone aquifer. Existing solutions for the problem of constant-flux pumping (CFP) in a two-zone confined aquifer involve laborious calculation. This study develops a new approximate solution for the problem based on a mathematical model including two steady-state flow equations with different hydraulic parameters for the skin and formation zones. A partially penetrating well may be treated as the Neumann condition with a known flux along the screened part and zero flux along the unscreened part. The aquifer domain is finite with an outer circle boundary treated as the Dirichlet condition. The steady-state drawdown solution of the model is derived by the finite Fourier cosine transform. Then, an approximate transient solution is developed by replacing the radius of the boundary in the steady-state solution with an analytical expression for a dimensionless time-dependent radius of influence. The approximate solution is capable of predicting good temporal drawdown distributions over the whole pumping period except at the early stage. A quantitative criterion for the validity of neglecting the vertical flow component due to a partially penetrating well is also provided. Conventional models considering radial flow without the vertical component for the CFP have good accuracy if satisfying the criterion.

  1. A general analytical model for pumping tests in radial finite two-zone confined aquifers with Robin-type outer boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ye-Chen; Yang, Shaw-Yang; Fen, Chiu-Shia; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This study develops a general analytical model for describing transient drawdown distribution induced by pumping at a finite-radius well in a radial two-zone confined aquifer of finite areal extent with Robin-type condition at both inner and outer boundaries. This model is also applicable to heat conduction problems for a composite hollow cylinder on the basis of the analogy between heat flow and groundwater flow. The time-domain solution of the model is derived by the methods of Laplace transform, Bromwich integral, and residue theorem. This new solution can reduce to the solution for constant-head test (CHT) or constant-rate test (CRT) problem by specifying appropriate coefficients at the Robin inner boundary condition. The solution describing the flow rate across the wellbore due to CHT is further developed by applying Darcy's law to the new solution. In addition, steady-state solutions for both CHT and CRT are also developed based on the approximation for Bessel functions with very small argument values. Many existing solutions for transient flow in homogeneous or two-zone finite aquifers with Dirichlet or no-flow condition at the outer boundary are shown to be special cases of the present solution. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis is also performed to investigate the behaviors of the wellbore flow due to CHT and the aquifer drawdown induced by CRT in response to the change in each of aquifer parameters.

  2. Summary of the hydrology of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Richard H.; Bush, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system is one of the major sources of ground-water supplies in the United States. This highly productive aquifer system underlies all of Florida, southern Georgia, and small parts of adjoining Alabama and South Carolina, for a total area of about 100,000 square miles. About 3 billion gallons of water per day is withdrawn from the aquifer for all uses, and, in many areas, the Floridan is the sole source of freshwater. The aquifer system is a sequence of hydraulically connected carbonate rocks (principally limestone and some dolomite) that generally range in age from Late Paleocene to Early Miocene. The rocks vary in thickness from a featheredge where they crop out to more than 3,500 ft where the aquifer is deeply buried. The aquifer system generally consists of an upper aquifer and a lower aquifer, separated by a less permeable confining unit of highly variable properties. In parts of north Florida and southwest Georgia, there is little permeability contrast within the aquifer system. Thus in these areas the Floridan is effectively one continuous aquifer. The upper and lower aquifers are defined on the basis of permeability, and their boundaries locally do not coincide with those for either time-stratigraphic or rock-stratigraphic units. Low-permeability clastic rocks overlie much of the Floridan aquifer system. The lithology, thickness, and integrity of these low-permeability rocks have a controlling effect on the development of permeability and ground-water flow in the Floridan locally. The Floridan aquifer system derives its permeability from openings that vary from fossil hashes and networks of many solution-widened joints to large cavernous openings in karst areas. Diffuse flow pre-dominates where the small openings occur, whereas conduit flow may occur where there are large cavernous openings. For the Upper Floridan aquifer, transmissivities are highest (greater than 1,000,000 ft squared per day) in the unconfined karst areas of central

  3. Investigation of sustainable development potential for Ulubey Aquifer System, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcu, U.; Hasan, Y.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates sustainable development potential for Ulubey aquifer system which serves as an important water supply for Usak province (Turkey). In recent years, growing population, accelerating industrial activities and decreasing rainfall, as well as contamination of the surface water resources, made groundwater indispensable to meet the freshwater demands of Usak province. Therefore, a sustainable groundwater development plan has to be set up by determining the sustainable yield of the system, which is the aim of this study. To achieve this goal, a mathematical groundwater flow model is constructed in order to test the alternative development scenarios. Results show that the system preserves equilibrium conditions under present stresses. The future effects of possible increases in stresses are also simulated and based on the dynamic responses of the system to changing stresses; sustainable yield and sustainable pumping rate of the aquifer are determined and compared with the safe yield of the system.

  4. Dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes and heat as tracers of preferential fluid flow along faults in unconsolidated sedimentary aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater in shallow unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers close to the Bornheim fault in the Lower Rhine Embayment (LRE), Germany, has relatively low δ2H and δ18O values in comparison to regional modern groundwater recharge and 4He concentrations up to 1.7×10-4 cm³ (STP) gˉ¹ ± 2.2% which is approximately four orders of magnitude higher than expected due to solubility equilibrium with the atmosphere. Groundwater age-dating based on estimated in situ production and terrigenic flux of helium provides a groundwater residence time of 107 years. Although fluid exchange between the deep basal aquifer system and the upper aquifer layers is generally impeded by confining clay layers and lignite, our geochemical data suggest for the first time that deep circulating fluids penetrate shallow aquifers in the locality of fault zones and that sub-vertical fluid flow occurs along faults in the LRE. Large hydraulic head gradients observed across many faults in the LRE, but which is a global phenomenon, suggest that they act as barriers to lateral groundwater flow. Therefore, the geochemical data reported here also substantiate the previously proposed conduit-barrier model of fault zone hydrogeology in unconsolidated sedimentary deposits, as well as corroborating the concept that faults in unconsolidated aquifer systems can act as loci for hydraulic connectivity between deep and shallow aquifers. The implications of fluid flow along faults in sedimentary basins worldwide are far reaching and of particular concern for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) programmes, impacts of deep shale gas recovery for shallow groundwater aquifers, and nuclear waste storage sites where fault zones could act as potential leakage pathways for hazardous fluids.

  5. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Floridan aquifer system and effect of Lower Floridan aquifer pumping on the Upper Floridan aquifer at Hunter Army Airfield, Chatham County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Williams, Lester J.; Cherry, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    Test drilling and field investigations, conducted at Hunter Army Airfield (HAAF), Chatham County, Georgia, during 2009, were used to determine the geologic, hydraulic, and water-quality characteristics of the Floridan aquifer system and to evaluate the effect of Lower Floridan aquifer (LFA) pumping on the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA). Field investigation activities included (1) constructing a 1,168-foot (ft) test boring and well completed in the LFA, (2) collecting drill cuttings and borehole geophysical logs, (3) collecting core samples for analysis of vertical hydraulic conductivity and porosity, (4) conducting flowmeter and packer tests in the open borehole within the UFA and LFA, (5) collecting depth-integrated water samples to assess basic ionic chemistry of various water-bearing zones, and (6) conducting aquifer tests in the new LFA well and in an existing UFA well to determine hydraulic properties and assess interaquifer leakage. Using data collected at the site and in nearby areas, model simulation was used to quantify the effects of interaquifer leakage on the UFA and to determine the amount of pumping reduction required in the UFA to offset drawdown resulting from the leakage. Borehole-geophysical and flowmeter data indicate the LFA at HAAF consists of limestone and dolomitic limestone between depths of 703 and 1,080 ft, producing water from six major permeable zones: 723-731; 768-785; 818-837; 917-923; 1,027-1,052; and 1,060-1,080 ft. Data from a flowmeter survey, conducted at a pumping rate of 748 gallons per minute (gal/min), suggest that the two uppermost zones contributed 469 gal/min or 62.6 percent of the total flow during the test. The remaining four zones contributed from 1.7 to 18 percent of the total flow. Grab water samples indicate that with the exception of fluoride, constituent concentrations in the LFA increased with depth; water from the deepest interval (1,075 ft) contained chloride and sulfate concentrations of 480 and 240 milligrams per

  6. Ground-water resources of the uppermost confined aquifers, southern Wadena County and parts of Ottertail, Todd, and Cass Counties, central Minnesota, 1997–2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Model results indicate that greater than anticipated increases in withdrawals during periods of normal precipitation will have minimal effects on ground-water levels and streamflow in the area. In the uppermost confined aquifers, for example, water levels may decline an average of 0.13 ft regionally, with maximum declines of 0.8 to 2.1 ft near Wadena and Verndale. Greater than anticipated increases in withdrawals would cause decreases in ground-water discharge to streams of about 1.4 percent (2.5 ft3 /s) of 1998-99 steady-state conditions.

  7. Geologic framework of the Edwards Aquifer and upper confining unit, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer, south-central Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Small, Ted A.

    1997-01-01

    The stratigraphic units of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County generally are porous and permeable. The stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County are the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend; and the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick Basin. The Balcones fault zone is the principal structural feature in Uvalde County; however, the displacement along the fault zone is less in Uvalde County than in adjacent Medina and Bexar Counties to the east. The Uvalde Salient is a structural high in south-central Uvalde County, and consists of several closely connected crustal uplifts that bring Edwards aquifer strata to the surface generally forming prominent hills. The crustal uplifts forming this structural high are the remnants of intrusive and extrusive magnatic activity. Six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—cross the length of the study area from the southwest to the northeast juxtaposing the Lower Cretaceous Salmon Peak Formation at the surface in the northwestern part of the study area against Upper Cretaceous formations in the central part of the study area. In the study area, the porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. The middle 185 feet of the lower part of the Devils River Formation, the upper part of the Devils River Formation, and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation probably are the most porous and permeable stratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County.

  8. Simulation of ground-water flow in the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system, Pennsauken Township and vicinity, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Daryll A.; Watt, Martha K.

    2004-01-01

    simulated to evaluate model performance in relation to changing stresses. The Delaware River contributes appreciable-flow to the ground-water system from areas where the Middle and Lower aquifers crop out beneath the river. A transient simulation of an aquifer test near the Delaware River was run to help characterize the hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed sediments represented in the model. Vertical flow across confining units between the aquifers is highly variable and is important in the movement of water and associated contaminants through the flow system. The model was imbedded within a regional model of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in Camden County. In general, a simulation of baseline conditions, which can provide a representation on which simulations of various alternatives can be based for the feasibility study, incorporated average conditions from 1998 to 2000. Ground-water withdrawals within the model area during this period averaged about 14 Mgal/d. Regional ground-water flow is from recharge areas and from the Delaware River to downgradient pumped wells located just east of the model area in central Camden County. Simulation results show an important connection between the Intermediate sand and the Lower aquifer of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in the vicinity of the chromium-contaminated area. The Delaware River contributes nearly 10 Mgal/d to the flow system, whereas recharge contributes about 6 Mgal/d. Ground-water withdrawals within the model area account for nearly 14 Mgal/d (mostly from the Lower aquifer of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system).

  9. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Yakima River Basin Aquifer System, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, J.J.; Jones, M.A.; Ely, D.M.; Keys, M.E.; Olsen, T.D.; Welch, W.B.; Cox, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Yakima River basin aquifer system underlies about 6,200 square miles in south-central Washington. The aquifer system consists of basin-fill deposits occurring in six structural-sedimentary basins, the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and generally older bedrock. The basin-fill deposits were divided into 19 hydrogeologic units, the CRBG was divided into three units separated by two interbed units, and the bedrock was divided into four units (the Paleozoic, the Mesozoic, the Tertiary, and the Quaternary bedrock units). The thickness of the basin-fill units and the depth to the top of each unit and interbed of the CRBG were mapped. Only the surficial extent of the bedrock units was mapped due to insufficient data. Average mapped thickness of the different units ranged from 10 to 600 feet. Lateral hydraulic conductivity (Kh) of the units varies widely indicating the heterogeneity of the aquifer system. Average or effective Kh values of the water-producing zones of the basin-fill units are on the order of 1 to 800 ft/d and are about 1 to 10 ft/d for the CRBG units as a whole. Effective or average Kh values for the different rock types of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary units appear to be about 0.0001 to 3 ft/d. The more permeable Quaternary bedrock unit may have Kh values that range from 1 to 7,000 ft/d. Vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of the units is largely unknown. Kv values have been estimated to range from about 0.009 to 2 ft/d for the basin-fill units and Kv values for the clay-to-shale parts of the units may be as small as 10-10 to 10-7 ft/d. Reported Kv values for the CRBG units ranged from 4x10-7 to 4 ft/d. Variations in the concentrations of geochemical solutes and the concentrations and ratios of the isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon in groundwater provided information on the hydrogeologic framework and groundwater movement. Stable isotope ratios of water (deuterium and oxygen-18) indicated dispersed sources of groundwater recharge to

  10. Ground-water flow analysis of the Mississippi Embayment aquifer system, South-Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, J.K.; Taylor, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Mississippi Embayment aquifer system is composed of six regional aquifers covering about 160,000 square miles in parts of Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee. The flow analysis presented in this report as part of the Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis study pertains to five aquifers in sediments of the Wilcox and Claiborne groups of Tertiary age. In descending order, the aquifers are (1) the upper Claiborne, (2) the middle Claiborne, (3) the lower Claiborne-upper Wilcox, (4) the middle Wilcox, and (5) the lower Wilcox. The flow analysis of the sixth aquifer in the aquifer system, the Mississippi River valley alluvial aquifer in sediments of Holocene and Pleistocene age, is presented in chapter D of this Professional Paper.

  11. Understanding Kendal aquifer system: a baseline analysis for sustainable water management proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukman, A.; Aryanto, M. D.; Pramudito, A.; Andhika, A.; Irawan, D. E.

    2017-07-01

    North coast of Java has been grown as the center of economic activities and major connectivity hub for Sumatra and Bali. Sustainable water management must support such role. One of the basis is to understand the baseline of groundwater occurrences and potential. However the complex alluvium aquiver system has not been well-understood. A geoelectric measurements were performed to determine which rock layer has a good potential as groundwater aquifers in the northern coast of Kaliwungu Regency, Kendal District, Central Java province. Total of 10 vertical electrical sounding (VES) points has been performed, using a Schlumberger configuration with the current electrode spacing (AB/2) varies between 200 - 300 m and the potential difference electrode spacing (MN/2) varies between 0.5 to 20 m with depths target ranging between 150 - 200 m. Geoelectrical data processing is done using Ip2win software which generates resistivity value, thickness and depth of subsurface rock layers. Based on the correlation between resistivity value with regional geology, hydrogeology and local well data, we identify three aquifer layers. The first layer is silty clay with resistivity values vary between 0 - 10 ohm.m, then the second layer is tuffaceous claystone with resistivity value between 10 - 60 ohm.m. Both layers serve as impermeable layer. The third layer is sandy tuff with resistivity value between 60 - 100 ohm.m which serves as a confined aquifer layer located at 70 - 100 m below surface. Its thickness is vary between 70 to 110 m. The aquifer layer is a mixing of volcanic and alluvium sediment, which is a member of Damar Formation. The stratification of the aquifer system may change in short distance and depth. This natural setting prevent us to make a long continuous correlation between layers. Aquifer discharge is estimated between 5 - 71 L/s with the potential deep well locations lies in the west and southeast part of the study area. These hydrogeological settings should be used

  12. Summary of hydraulic properties of the Floridan Aquifer system in coastal Georgia and adjacent parts of South Carolina and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Leeth, David C.; Taylor-Harris, DaVette; Painter, Jaime A.; Labowski, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Hydraulic-property data for the Floridan aquifer system and equivalent clastic sediments in a 67-county area of coastal Georgia and adjacent parts of South Carolina and Florida were evaluated to provide data necessary for development of ground-water flow and solute-transport models. Data include transmissivity at 324 wells, storage coefficient at 115 wells, and vertical hydraulic conductivity of 72 core samples from 27 sites. Hydraulic properties of the Upper Floridan aquifer vary greatly in the study area due to the heterogeneity (and locally to anisotropy) of the aquifer and to variations in the degree of confinement provided by confining units. Prominent structural features in the areathe Southeast Georgia Embayment, the Beaufort Arch, and the Gulf Troughinfluence the thickness and hydraulic properties of the sediments comprising the Floridan aquifer system. Transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer and equivalent updip units was compiled for 239 wells and ranges from 530 feet squared per day (ft2/d) at Beaufort County, South Carolina, to 600,000 ft2/d in Coffee County, Georgia. In carbonate rock settings of the lower Coastal Plain, transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer generally is greater than 20,000 ft2/d, with values exceeding 100,000 ft2/d in the southeastern and southwestern parts of the study area (generally coinciding with the area of greatest aquifer thickness). Transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer generally is less than 10,000 ft2/d in and near the upper Coastal Plain, where the aquifer is thin and consists largely of clastic sediments, and in the vicinity of the Gulf Trough, where the aquifer consists of low permeability rocks and sediments. Large variability in the range of transmissivity in Camden and Glynn Counties, Georgia, and Nassau County, Florida, demonstrates the anisotropic distribution of hydraulic properties that may result from fractures or solution openings in the carbonate rocks. Storage coefficient of the Upper

  13. Modelling the salinization of a coastal lagoon-aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, N.; Mastrocicco, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a coastal area constituted by alternations of saline-brackish lagoons and freshwater bodies was studied and modelled to understand the hydrological processes occurring between the lagoons, the groundwater system of the Po River Delta (Italy) and the Adriatic Sea. The contribution of both evaporation and anthropogenic factors on groundwater salinization was assessed by means of soil, groundwater and surface water monitoring. Highresolution multi-level samplers were used to capture salinity gradients within the aquifer and surface water bodies. Data were employed to calibrate a density-dependent numerical transport model implemented with SEAWAT code along a transect perpendicular to the coast line. The results show that the lagoon is hydraulically well connected with the aquifer, which provides the major source of salinity because of the upcoming of paleo-seawater from the aquitard laying at the base of the unconfined aquifer. On the contrary, the seawater (diluted by the freshwater river outflow) creates only a limited saltwater wedge. The increase in groundwater salinity could be of serious concern, especially for the pinewood located in the dune near the coast, sensitive to salinity increases. This case study represents an interesting paradigm for other similar environmental setting, where the assumption of classical aquifer salinization from a saltwater wedge intruding from the sea is often not representative of the actual aquifer’s salinization mechanisms.

  14. Hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Adkins, Candice B.

    2012-01-01

    The Wood River Valley contains most of the population of Blaine County and the cities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, Hailey, and Bellevue. This mountain valley is underlain by the alluvial Wood River Valley aquifer system, which consists primarily of a single unconfined aquifer that underlies the entire valley, an underlying confined aquifer that is present only in the southernmost valley, and the confining unit that separates them. The entire population of the area depends on groundwater for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, and rapid population growth since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the groundwater resource. As part of an ongoing U.S. Geological Survey effort to characterize the groundwater resources of the Wood River Valley, this report describes the hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system. Although most of the Wood River Valley aquifer system is composed of Quaternary-age sediments and basalts of the Wood River Valley and its tributaries, older igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic rocks that underlie these Quaternary deposits also are used for water supply. It is unclear to what extent these rocks are hydraulically connected to the main part of Wood River Valley aquifer system and thus whether they constitute separate aquifers. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in and near the study area that produce water to wells and springs are the Phi Kappa and Trail Creek Formations (Ordovician and Silurian), the Milligen Formation (Devonian), and the Sun Valley Group including the Wood River Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) and the Dollarhide Formation (Permian). These sedimentary rocks are intruded by granitic rocks of the Late Cretaceous Idaho batholith. Eocene Challis Volcanic Group rocks overlie all of the older rocks (except where removed by erosion). Miocene Idavada Volcanics are found in the southern part of the study area. Most of these rocks have been folded, faulted, and

  15. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow and land-surface subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf Coast aquifer system, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    As a part of the Texas Water Development Board Ground- Water Availability Modeling program, the U.S. Geological Survey developed and tested a numerical finite-difference (MODFLOW) model to simulate ground-water flow and land-surface subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Texas from predevelopment (before 1891) through 2000. The model is intended to be a tool that water-resource managers can use to address future ground-water-availability issues.From land surface downward, the Chicot aquifer, the Evangeline aquifer, the Burkeville confining unit, the Jasper aquifer, and the Catahoula confining unit are the hydrogeologic units of the Gulf Coast aquifer system. Withdrawals of large quantities of ground water have resulted in potentiometric surface (head) declines in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and land-surface subsidence (primarily in the Houston area) from depressurization and compaction of clay layers interbedded in the aquifer sediments. In a generalized conceptual model of the aquifer system, water enters the ground-waterflow system in topographically high outcrops of the hydrogeologic units in the northwestern part of the approximately 25,000-square-mile model area. Water that does not discharge to streams flows to intermediate and deep zones of the system southeastward of the outcrop areas where it is discharged by wells and by upward leakage in topographically low areas near the coast. The uppermost parts of the aquifer system, which include outcrop areas, are under water-table conditions. As depth increases in the aquifer system and as interbedded sand and clay accumulate, water-table conditions evolve into confined conditions.The model comprises four layers, one for each of the hydrogeologic units of the aquifer system except the Catahoula confining unit, the assumed no-flow base of the system. Each layer consists of 137 rows and 245 columns of uniformly spaced grid blocks, each block representing 1 square mile

  16. Characterization of Carbonate Hydrostratigraphy Using Ambient Seismic Noise: A Pilot Study in the Floridan Aquifer System, Ocala, FL, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S.; Screaton, E.; Russo, R. M.; Panning, M. P.; Bremner, P. M.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; Farrell, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Defining zones of high and low hydraulic conductivity within aquifers is vital to hydrogeologic research and groundwater management. Carbonate aquifers are particularly difficult to characterize due to dissolution and dolomitization. We investigated a new imaging technique for aquifer characterization that uses cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise to determine seismic velocity structure. Differences in densities between confining units and high permeability flow zones can produce distinct seismic velocities in the correlated signals. We deployed an array of 9 short period geophones from 11/2013 to 3/2014 in Indian Lake State Forest, Florida, to determine if the high frequency diffusive seismic wavefield can be used for imaging hydrostratigraphy. Here, a thin surficial layer of siliciclastic deposits overlie a ~ 0.6 km sequence of Cenozoic limestone and dolomite units that comprise the Floridan Aquifer System (FAS). A low permeability dolomite unit vertically divides the FAS throughout most of Florida. Deep boreholes surrounding the site constrain hydrostratigraphy, however the horizontal continuity of the middle dolomite unit as well as its effectiveness as a confining unit in the study area are not well known. The stations were spaced at distances ranging from 0.18 to 2.6 km, and yielded 72 cross-correlation Green's functions for Rayleigh wave propagation at frequencies between 0.2 and 40 Hz, with dominant peaks around 0.8 Hz, 3 Hz and 13 Hz. Local vehicle traffic did interfere to a degree with the correlation of the diffuse waves, but was minimized by using only nighttime data. At the lowest frequencies (greatest depths) investigated, velocities increase with depth; however, correlations become less coherent at higher frequencies, perhaps due to shallow complex scattering. Comparison of cross-correlations for all station pairs also indicates spatial variations in velocity. Thus, the method shows promise for characterization of the heterogeneity of the

  17. Hydrostratigraphy characterization of the Floridan aquifer system using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Stephanie R.; Screaton, Elizabeth J.; Russo, Raymond M.; Panning, Mark P.; Bremner, Paul M.; Stanciu, A. Christian; Torpey, Megan E.; Hongsresawat, Sutatcha; Farrell, Matthew E.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated a new technique for aquifer characterization that uses cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise to determine seismic velocity structure of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS). Accurate characterization of aquifer systems is vital to hydrogeological research and groundwater management but is difficult due to limited subsurface data and heterogeneity. Previous research on the carbonate FAS found that confining units and high permeability flow zones have distinct seismic velocities. We deployed an array of 9 short period seismometers from 11/2013 to 3/2014 in Indian Lake State Forest near Ocala, Florida, to image the hydrostratigraphy of the aquifer system using ambient seismic noise. We find that interstation distance strongly influences the upper and lower frequency limits of the data set. Seismic waves propagating within 1.5 and 7 wavelengths between stations were optimal for reliable group velocity measurements and both an upper and lower wavelength threshold was used. A minimum of 100-250 hr of signal was needed to maximize signal-to-noise ratio and to allow cross-correlation convergence. We averaged measurements of group velocity between station pairs at each frequency band to create a network average dispersion curve. A family of 1-D shear-wave velocity profiles that best represents the network average dispersion was then generated using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The MCMC algorithm was implemented with either a fixed number of layers, or as transdimensional in which the number of layers was a free parameter. Results from both algorithms require a prominent velocity increase at ˜200 m depth. A shallower velocity increase at ˜60 m depth was also observed, but only in model ensembles created by collecting models with the lowest overall misfit to the observed data. A final round of modelling with additional prior constraints based on initial results and well logs produced a mean shear-wave velocity profile taken as the preferred

  18. Geohydrology of deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site at Marina, Monterey County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Everett, Rhett; Newhouse, Mark W.; Crawford, Steven M.; Pimentel, M. Isabel; Smith, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, a deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site (DMW1) was completed at Marina, California to provide basic geologic and hydrologic information about the deep-aquifer system in the coastal region of the Salinas Valley. The monitoring-well site contains four wells in a single borehole; one completed from 930 to 950 feet below land surface (bls) in the Paso Robles Formation (DMW1-4); one 1,040 to 1,060 feet below land surface in the upper Purisima Formation (DMW1-3); one from 1,410 to 1,430 feet below land surface in the middle Purisima Formation (DMW1-2); and one from 1,820 to 1,860 feet below land surface in the lower Purisima Formation (DMW1-1). The monitoring site is installed between the coast and several deep-aquifer system supply wells in the Marina Coast Water District, and the completion depths are within the zones screened in those supply wells. Sediments below a depth of 955 feet at DMW1 are Pliocene age, whereas the sediments encountered at the water-supply wells are Pleistocene age at an equivalent depth. Water levels are below sea level in DMW1 and the Marina Water District deep-aquifer system supply wells, which indicate that the potential for seawater intrusion exists in the deep-aquifer system. If the aquifers at DMW1 are hydraulically connected with the submarine outcrops in Monterey Bay, then the water levels at the DMW1 site are 8 to 27 feet below the level necessary to prevent seawater intrusion. Numerous thick fine-grained interbeds and confining units in the aquifer systems retard the vertical movement of fresh and saline ground water between aquifers and restrict the movement of seawater to narrow water-bearing zones in the upper-aquifer system.Hydraulic testing of the DMW1 and the Marina Water District supply wells indicates that the tested zones within the deep-aquifer system are transmissive water-bearing units with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 2 to 14.5 feet per day. The hydraulic properties of the supply wells and monitoring

  19. The influence of fish ponds and salinization on groundwater quality in the multi-layer coastal aquifer system in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, A.; Weinstein, Y.; Yechieli, Y.; Borisover, M.

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on the impact of surface reservoirs (fish ponds) on a multi aquifer coastal system, and the relation between the aquifer and the sea. The study was conducted in an Israeli Mediterranean coastal aquifer, which includes a sandy phreatic unit and two confined calcareous sandstone units. The geological description is based on 52 wells, from which 33 samples were collected for stable isotope analysis and 25 samples for organic and inorganic parameters. Hydraulic head and chemical measurements suggest that there is an hydraulic connection between the fish ponds above the aquifer and the phreatic unit, whereas the connection with the confined units is very limited. The phreatic unit is characterized by a low concentration of oxygen and high concentrations of ammonium and phosphate, while the confined units are characterized by higher oxygen and much lower ammonium and phosphate concentrations. Organic matter fluorescence was found to be a tool to distinguish the contribution of the pond waters, whereby a pond water signature (characterized by proteinaceous (tryptophan-like) and typical humic-matter fluorescence) was found in the phreatic aquifer. The phreatic unit is also isotopically enriched, similar to pond waters, with δ18O of -1‰ and δD of -4.6‰, indicating enhanced evaporation of the pond water before infiltration, whereas there is a depleted isotopic composition in the confined units (δ18O = -4.3‰, δD = -20.4‰), which are also OM-poor. The Phreeqc model was used for quantitative calculation of the effect of pond losses on the different units. The Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen (DIN) in the upper unit increases downstream from the ponds toward the sea, probably due to organic matter degradation, suggesting contribution of DIN from shallow groundwater flow to the sea. 87Sr/86Sr and Mg/Ca in the brackish and saline groundwater of the lower confined units increase toward seawater value, suggesting that the salinization process in the region

  20. Multiparameter deformation theory for quantum confined systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aleixo, A. N. F.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2009-11-15

    We introduce a generalized multiparameter deformation theory applicable to all supersymmetric and shape-invariant systems. Taking particular choices for the deformation factors used in the construction of the deformed ladder operators, we show that we can generalize the one-parameter quantum-deformed harmonic oscillator models and build alternative multiparameter deformed models that are also shape invariant like the primary undeformed system.

  1. Scaling anomalies in reaction front dynamics of confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Mariela; Larralde, Hernan; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1993-11-01

    We study the kinetics of the reaction front for diffusion-reaction systems of the form A+B-->C which are confined to one dimension, and in which the reactants are initially separated. For the case in which both A and B diffuse, the spatial moments of the reaction front are characterized by a hierarchy of exponents, bounded by the exponents, σ=1/4 and δ=3/8 characterizing the asymptotic time dependence of the distance lAB(t) between nearest neighbor A and B particles and the fluctuations of the midpoint m(t) between them, respectively. We argue that this behavior arises from confinement effects and will appear in other confined systems.

  2. Distribution and origin of salinity in the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems, southwestern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmerge, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Chloride concentrations in the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in southwestern Florida indicate a general trend of increasing salinity coastward and with depth. There are some notable exceptions to this trend. Brackish water is present in the sandstone and mid-Hawthorn aquifers in several inland areas in Lee County. In an area near the coast in Collier County, the lower Tamiami aquifer contains freshwater, with brackish water present farther inland. Saline water is present in the lower Tamiami aquifer along the coast in Collier County, but water is brackish in the underlying mid-Hawthorn and Upper Floridan aquifers. The analyses of major ions, hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, and strontium isotopes indicate the primary sources of salinity are underlying aquifers and the Gulf of Mexico. Based on these data, much of the salinity is from upward leakage of brackish water from underlying aquifers. Discharge as diffuse upward leakage and artesian wells are two possible pathways of saltwater intrusion from underlying aquifers. Artesian wells open to multiple aquifers have been pathways of saltwater intrusion in the sandstone and mid-Hawthorn aquifers in much of Lee County. The source of brackish water in the lower Tamiami and mid-Hawthorn aquifers in Collier County may be natural diffuse leakage from underlying aquifers. The source of the saline water in the lower Tamiami aquifer in Collier County is apparently the Gulf of Mexico; it is unclear however, whether this saline water is residual water from former Pleistocene sea invasions or recent saltwater intrusion.

  3. Surface area and travel time relationships in aquifer treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Fox, Peter; Makam, Roshan

    2009-11-01

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) and bank filtration use natural attenuation processes to purify water for subsequent use. Soil aquifer treatment may constitute both unsaturated and saturated flow conditions, while bank filtration systems are primarily saturated flow. This analysis focuses on the saturated zone, where the majority of residence time occurs, in both SAT and bank filtration systems. Sustainable removal mechanisms during subsurface flow are primarily surface-mediated and therefore depend on surface area. By analyzing saturated subsurface flow hydraulics in granular media, a relationship between surface area and travel time was developed. For saturated subsurface flow, the ratio of surface area-to-travel time varied by approximately a factor of 3, for common aquifer materials subject to identical hydraulic gradients. Because travel time criteria often are used to regulate SAT and bank filtration systems, these criteria also may determine the surface area and associated surface-mediated reactions for water purification. The ratio of surface area-to-travel time increases with increasing hydraulic gradient, implying that surface area is relatively constant for specific travel times, even if the hydraulic gradient changes; however, the increasing hydraulic gradient will increase the distance from the recharge zone to the recovery well. Therefore, travel time assessments based on maximum possible hydraulic gradients increase surface area and could provide a conservative limit for surface-mediated reactions. This analysis demonstrates that travel time criteria for SAT and bank filtration systems indirectly provide a minimum surface area that may support sustainable removal mechanisms.

  4. Hydrochemical zonation of the western part of Göksu Delta aquifer system, Southern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuz, U. E.; Çelik, M.; Arslan, Ş.; Engin, H.

    2012-04-01

    In general, coastal areas are preferred places for human settlement, especially at places where infrastructure routes benefit from rivers, streets, or harbours. As a result, these areas usually suffer from rising population and endure increasingly high demand on natural resources like water. Göksu Delta, located in southern Turkey, is one of the important wetland areas of Turkey at the Mediterranean coast. It is divided into two parts by Göksu River. The western part of the delta, which is the subject matter of this study, hosts fertile agricultural fields, touristic places and a Special Environmental Protection Area. These properties of the region lead to a water-dependent ecosystem where groundwater has widely been used for agricultural and domestic purposes. When the exploitation of groundwater peaked in the middle of 1990s, the groundwater levels dropped and seawater intruded. General Directorate of State Hydraulic Works tried to stop seawater intrusion by building irrigation channels connected to Göksu River and banned drilling of new wells for groundwater exploitation, although it is hard to control the drilling of wells without official permit. Geological studies show that the delta is composed of terrestrial sediments including clay to coarse sand deposited during Quaternary. The heterogeneous sediments of Göksu Delta cause hydrogeological features of the aquifer systems to be heterogeneous and anisotropic. Hydrogeological investigations, therefore, indicate mainly two different aquifers, shallow and deep, separated by an aquitard. The shallow aquifer is under unconfined to confined conditions from north to south while the deep aquifer is under confined conditions. This study focuses on hydrogeochemical zonation in terms of hydrochemical processes that affect the Göksu Delta aquifer systems. For this purpose, hydrogeochemical and isotopic studies are conducted to understand the salinisation and softening processes of groundwater. The physicochemical

  5. Geostatistical analysis of effective vertical hydraulic conductivity and presence of confining layers in the Shallow Glacial Drift Aquifer, Oakland County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bissell, E.G.; Aichele, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    About 400,000 residents of Oakland County, Mich., rely on ground water for their primary drinking-water supply. More than 90 percent of these residents draw ground water from the shallow glacial drift aquifer. Understanding the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the shallow glacial drift aquifer is important both in identifying areas of ground-water recharge and in evaluating susceptibility to contamination. The geologic environment throughout much of the county, however, is poorly understood and heterogeneous, making conventional aquifer mapping techniques difficult. Geostatistical procedures are therefore used to describe the effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the top 50 ft of the glacial deposits and to predict the probability of finding a potentially protective confining layer at a given location. The results presented synthesize the available well-log data; however, only about 40 percent of the explainable variation in the dataset is accounted for, making the results more qualitative than quantitative. Most of the variation in the effective vertical hydraulic conductivity cannot be explained with the well-log data currently available (as of 2004). Although the geologic environment is heterogeneous, the quality-assurance process indicated that more than half of the wells in the county’s Wellkey database (statewide database for monitoring drinking-water wells) had inconsistent identifications of lithology.

  6. Hydrogeologic framework and simulation of ground-water flow and travel time in the shallow aquifer system in the area of Naval Support Activity Memphis, Millington, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.; Carmichael, John K.; Halford, Keith J.; Ladd, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Naval Support Activity (NSA) Memphis is a Department of the Navy facility located at the City of Millington, Tennessee, about 5 miles north of Memphis. Contaminants have been detected in surface-water, sediment, and ground-water samples collected at the facility. As part of the Installation Restoration Program, the Navy is considering remedial-action options to prevent or lessen the effect of ground-water contamination at the facility and to control the movement and discharge of contaminants. A numerical model of the ground-water-flow system in the area of NSA Memphis was constructed and calibrated so that quantifiable estimates could be made of ground-water-flow rates, direction, and time-of-travel. The sediments beneath NSA Memphis, to a depth of about 200 feet, form a shallow aquifer system. From youngest to oldest, the stratigraphic units that form the shallow aquifer system are alluvium, loess, fluvial deposits, and the Cockfield and Cook Mountain Formations. The shallow aquifer system is organized into five hydrogeologic units: (1) a confining unit composed of the relatively low permeability sediments of the upper alluvium and the loess; (2) the A1 aquifer comprising sand and gravel of the lower alluvium and the fluvial deposits, and sand lenses in the upper part of the preserved section of the Cockfield Formation; (3) a confining unit composed of clay and silt within the upper part of the Cockfield Formation; (4) the Cockfield aquifer comprising sand lenses within the lower part of the preserved section of the Cockfield Formation; and (5) a confining unit formed by low permeability sediments of the Cook Mountain Formation that composes the upper confining unit for the Memphis aquifer. Thicknesses of individual units vary considerably across the facility. Structural and depositional features that affect the occurrence of ground water in the shallow aquifer system include faulting, an erosional scarp, and 'windows' in the confining units. Underlying the

  7. Monitoring and modeling of the correlation between surface self-potentials (SP) and drawdown during pumping of a heterogeneous confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K. E.; DesRoches, A.

    2016-12-01

    Variations in the self-potential (SP) field generated at surface by pumping of a heterogeneous confined bedrock aquifer have been monitored and modeled to investigate capabilities and limitations of SP methods in estimating aquifer hydraulic properties. Monitoring was carried out around a municipal pumping well penetrating a fractured sandstone and shale aquifer at Springdale, NB, Canada, using an irregular grid of 31 Pb-PbCl2 electrodes referenced to a remote electrode. SP measurements were recorded using a commercial multiplexer and data logger employing a 0.7 Hz passive lowpass filter on each channel, which reduced noise by a factor of 10 compared to levels obtained using the data logger's integration-based sampling method for powerline noise suppression alone. SP measured by an electrode adjacent to a monitoring well showed a linear relationship with drawdown, with an apparent electrokinetic coupling coefficient of -3.4 mV·m-1. Following recent developments in SP methodology, variability of the SP response between different electrodes was taken as a proxy for lateral variations in hydraulic head within the aquifer and used to infer lateral variations in apparent transmissivity that proved consistent with estimates based on actual drawdown measurements. We have investigated the robustness of the drawdown-SP relationship through numerical modeling to determine its sensitivity to (i) hydraulic heterogeneity that is strongly two-dimensional (in the form of a hydraulically conductive sandstone channel), (ii) electrical heterogeneity that is predominantly one-dimensional (in the form of an electrically conductive confining layer), and (iii) conductive well casing. In all cases, SP simulated on the surface still varies linearly with hydraulic head modeled at the base on the confining layer although the apparent coupling coefficient changes to varying degrees. In contrast with some previous studies, modelling predicted that the effect of conductive steel casing would

  8. Potential effects of deepening the St. Johns River navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system, Jacksonville, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellino, Jason C.; Spechler, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    section near River Mile 8. Salinity increases of up to 4.0 parts per thousand (ppt) were indicated by the model incorporating hydrogeologic conceptualizations with both a semiconfining bed over the limestone unit and a preferential flow layer within the limestone along the cross section near River Mile 8. Simulated increases in salinity greater than 0.2 ppt in this area were generally limited to portions of the limestone unit within about 75 feet of the channel on the north side of the river. The potential for saltwater to move from the river channel to the surficial aquifer system is limited, but may be present in areas where the head gradient from the aquifer to the river is small or negative and the salinity of the river is sufficient to induce density-driven advective flow into the aquifer. In some areas, simulated increases in salinity were exacerbated by the presence of laterally extensive semiconfining beds in combination with a high-conductivity preferential flow zone in the limestone unit of the surficial aquifer system and an upgradient source of saline water, such as beneath the salt marshes near Fanning Island. The volume of groundwater pumped in these areas is estimated to be low; therefore, saltwater intrusion will not substantially affect regional water supply, although users of the surficial aquifer system east of Dames Point along the northern shore of the river could be affected. Proposed dredging operations pose no risk to salinization of the Floridan aquifer system; in the study area, the intermediate confining unit ranges in thickness from more than 300 to about 500 feet and provides sufficient hydraulic separation between the surficial and Floridan aquifer systems.

  9. Aquifer thermal-energy-storage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzle, W. J.; Lecroy, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    A model aquifer was constructed to simulate the operation of a full size aquifer. Instrumentation to evaluate the water flow and thermal energy storage was installed in the system. Numerous runs injecting warm water into a preconditioned uniform aquifer were made. Energy recoveries were evaluated and agree with comparisons of other limited available data. The model aquifer is simulated in a swimming pool, 18 ft by 4 ft, which was filled with sand. Temperature probes were installed in the system. A 2 ft thick aquifer is confined by two layers of polyethylene. Both the aquifer and overburden are sand. Four well configurations are available. The system description and original tests, including energy recovery, are described.

  10. Ground-water flow in the Gulf Coast aquifer systems, south central United States; a preliminary analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, A.K.; Grubb, H.F.; Weiss, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    A major objective of the Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis is to use digital models of regional groundwater flow systems to develop better understanding and to improve management of the resource. Modeling is used to synthesize information about the aquifer systems and to test hypotheses about the relative importance of the components of the systems. The 290,000-sq mile study area in the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain includes the Mississippi embayment, Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas, and the Continental Shelf that are underlain by deposits of Tertiary and younger age, which contain fresh and saline water. A 10-layer, finite-difference, variable density model, with blocks 10 miles on a side, was used to simulate groundwater flow before development and in 1980, assuming steady- state conditions. Preliminary results indicate that the major factors controlling predevelopment regional flow are the topography, land-surface outcrop pattern, and geometry of aquifers and confining units. Geologic structure and the distribution of precipitation were less significant factors. The density of saline water in the deeper parts of the aquifer system probably has a substantial effect on regional groundwater flow that extends into the freshwater part of the system. Variable water density may be a significant driving force that transports salt great distances in many directions, including updip. The distribution and rates of regional recharge and discharge have been substantially changed by development. Groundwater pumpage in 1980 was about five times the value of predevelopment regional recharge. About 80% of the pumpage was supplied from increased regional recharge. Also resistance to vertical flow caused by many fine-grained beds within the permeable zones can be as important as resistance caused by regional confining units. (USGS)

  11. Ground-water flow in the Gulf Coast aquifer systems, south-central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, A.K.; Grubb, H.F.

    2001-01-01

    The Gulf Coast regional aquifer systems constitute one of the largest, most complicated, and most interdependent aquifer systems in the United States. Ground-water flow in a 230,000-square-mile area of the south-central United States was modeled for the effect of withdrawing freshwater at the rate of nearly 10 billion gallons per day in 1985 from regional aquifers in the Mississippi Embayment, the Texas coastal uplands, and the coastal lowlands aquifer systems. The 1985 rate of pumping was three times the average rate of recharge to the aquifers before development. The report also estimates the effects of even greater withdrawal rates in the aquifer systems. About two-thirds of the water in the aquifers is saline to brine, which complicates the modeling. Land subsidence due to water withdrawal also was modeled.

  12. Energy Gaps and Interaction Blockade in Confined Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, K.; Borgh, M.; Kaerkkaeinen, K.; Reimann, S. M.

    2007-07-06

    We investigate universal properties of strongly confined particles that turn out to be dramatically different from what is observed for electrons in atoms and molecules. For a large class of harmonically confined systems, such as small quantum dots and optically trapped atoms, many-body particle addition and removal energies, and energy gaps, are accurately obtained from single-particle eigenvalues. Transport blockade phenomena are related to the derivative discontinuity of the exchange-correlation functional. This implies that they occur very generally, with Coulomb blockade being a particular realization of a more general phenomenon. In particular, we predict a van der Waals blockade in cold atom gases in traps.

  13. Magnetic confinement system using charged ammonia targets

    DOEpatents

    Porter, Gary D.; Bogdanoff, Anatoly

    1979-01-01

    A system for guiding charged laser targets to a predetermined focal spot of a laser along generally arbitrary, and especially horizontal, directions which comprises a series of electrostatic sensors which provide inputs to a computer for real time calculation of position, velocity, and direction of the target along an initial injection trajectory, and a set of electrostatic deflection means, energized according to a calculated output of said computer, to change the target trajectory to intercept the focal spot of the laser which is triggered so as to illuminate the target of the focal spot.

  14. Synthesis of the Hydrogeologic Framework of the Floridan Aquifer System and Delineation of a Major Avon Park Permeable Zone in Central and Southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Richardson, Emily

    2008-01-01

    The carbonate Floridan aquifer system of central and southern Florida (south of a latitude of about 29 degrees north) is an invaluable resource with a complex framework that has previously been mapped and managed primarily in a subregional context according to geopolitical boundaries. As interest and use of the Floridan aquifer system in this area increase, a consistent regional hydrogeologic framework is needed for effective management across these boundaries. This study synthesizes previous studies on the Floridan aquifer system and introduces a new regional hydrogeologic conceptual framework, linking physical relations between central and southern Florida and between the west and east coastal areas. The differences in hydrogeologic nomenclature and interpretation across the study area from previous studies were identified and resolved. The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer. This study introduces and delineates a new major, regional productive zone or subaquifer, referred to as the Avon Park permeable zone. This zone is contained within the middle confining unit and synthesizes an extensive zone that has been referred to differently in different parts of the study area in previous studies. The name of this zone derives from the description of this zone as the ?Avon Park highly permeable zone? in west-central Florida in a previous study. Additionally, this zone has been identified previously in southeastern Florida as the ?middle Floridan aquifer.? An approximately correlative or approximate time-stratigraphic framework was developed and was used to provide guidance in the identification and determination of aquifers, subaquifers, and confining units within the Floridan aquifer system and to determine their structural relations. Two stratigraphic marker horizons within the Floridan aquifer system and a marker unit near the top of the aquifer system were delineated or mapped. The marker

  15. Lithological and hydrological influences on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous carbonate-clay aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauffman, S.J.; Herman, J.S.; Jones, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of clay units on ground-water composition was investigated in a heterogeneous carbonate aquifer system of Miocene age in southwest Florida, known as the Intermediate aquifer system. Regionally, the ground water is recharged inland, flows laterally and to greater depths in the aquifer systems, and is discharged vertically upward at the saltwater interface along the coast. A depth profile of water composition was obtained by sampling ground water from discrete intervals within the permeable carbonate units during coring and by squeezing pore water from a core of the less-permeable clay layers. A normative salt analysis of solute compositions in the water indicated a marine origin for both types of water and an evolutionary pathway for the clay water that involves clay diagenesis. The chemical composition of the ground water in the carbonate bedrock is significantly different from that of the pore water in the clay layers. Dissolution of clays and opaline silica results in high silica concentrations relative to water in other parts of the Intermediate aquifer system. Water enriched in chloride relative to the overlying and underlying ground water recharges the aquifer inland where the confining clay layer is absent, and it dissolves carbonate and silicate minerals and reacts with clays along its flow path, eventually reaching this coastal site and resulting in the high chloride and silica concentrations observed in the middle part of the Intermediate aquifer system. Reaction-path modeling suggests that the recharging surficial water mixes with sulfate-rich water upwelling from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and carbonate mineral dissolution and precipitation, weathering and exchange reactions, clay mineral diagenesis, clay and silica dissolution, organic carbon oxidation, and iron and sulfate reduction result in the observed water compositions.A study was conducted to clarify the influence of clay units on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous

  16. An electrostatically and a magnetically confined electron gun lens system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T.; Man, Kin F.; Chutjian, Ara

    1988-01-01

    Focal properties, electron trajectory calculations, and geometries are given for two electron 'gun' lens systems that have a variety of applications in, for example, electron-neutral and electron-ion scattering experiments. One nine-lens system utilizes only electrostatic confinement and is capable of focusing electrons onto a fixed target with extremely small divergence angles, over a range of final energies 1-790 eV. The second gun lens system is a simpler three-lens system suitable for use in a uniform, solenoidal magnetic field. While the focusing properties of such a magnetically confined lens systenm are simpler to deal with, the system does illustrate features of electron extraction and Brillouin flow that have not been suitably emphasized in the literature.

  17. An electrostatically and a magnetically confined electron gun lens system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T.; Man, Kin F.; Chutjian, Ara

    1988-01-01

    Focal properties, electron trajectory calculations, and geometries are given for two electron 'gun' lens systems that have a variety of applications in, for example, electron-neutral and electron-ion scattering experiments. One nine-lens system utilizes only electrostatic confinement and is capable of focusing electrons onto a fixed target with extremely small divergence angles, over a range of final energies 1-790 eV. The second gun lens system is a simpler three-lens system suitable for use in a uniform, solenoidal magnetic field. While the focusing properties of such a magnetically confined lens systenm are simpler to deal with, the system does illustrate features of electron extraction and Brillouin flow that have not been suitably emphasized in the literature.

  18. Ground-water quality of the surficial aquifer system and the upper Floridan Aquifer, Ocala National Forest and Lake County, Florida, 1990-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamski, J.C.; Knowles, Leel

    2001-01-01

    Data from 217 ground-water samples were statistically analyzed to assess the water quality of the surficial aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer in the Ocala National Forest and Lake County, Florida. Samples were collected from 49 wells tapping the surficial aquifer system, 141 wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, and from 27 springs that discharge water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. A total of 136 samples was collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1995 through 1999. These data were supplemented with 81 samples collected by the St. Johns River Water Management District and Lake County Water Resources Management from 1990 through 1998. In general, the surficial aquifer system has low concentrations of total dissolved solids (median was 41 milligrams per liter) and major ions. Water quality of the surficial aquifer system, however, is not homogeneous throughout the study area. Concentrations of total dissolved solids, many major ions, and nutrients are greater in samples from Lake County outside the Ocala National Forest than in samples from within the Forest. These results indicate that the surficial aquifer system in Lake County outside the Ocala National Forest probably is being affected by agricultural and (or) urban land-use practices. High concentrations of dissolved oxygen (less than 0.1 to 8.2 milligrams per liter) in the surficial aquifer system underlying the Ocala National Forest indicate that the aquifer is readily recharged by precipitation and is susceptible to surface contamination. Concentrations of total dissolved solids were significantly greater in the Upper Floridan aquifer (median was 182 milligrams per liter) than in the surficial aquifer system. In general, water quality of the Upper Floridan aquifer was homogeneous, primarily being a calcium or calciummagnesium- bicarbonate water type. Near the St. Johns River, the water type of the Upper Floridan aquifer is sodium-chloride, corresponding to an increase in total dissolved

  19. Integrating borehole logs and aquifer tests in aquifer characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Reese, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Integration of lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and hydraulic tests is critical in characterizing heterogeneous aquifers. Typically only a limited number of aquifer tests can be performed, and these need to be designed to provide hydraulic properties for the principle aquifers in the system. This study describes the integration of logs and aquifer tests in the development of a hydrostratigraphic model for the surficial aquifer system in and around Big Cypress National Preserve in eastern Collier County, Florida. Borehole flowmeter tests provide qualitative permeability profiles in most of 26 boreholes drilled in the Study area. Flow logs indicate the depth of transmissive units, which are correlated across the study area. Comparison to published studies in adjacent areas indicates that the main limestone aquifer of the 000000Tamiami Formation in the study area corresponds with the gray limestone aquifer in western Dade County and the water table and lower Tamiami Aquifer in western Collier County. Four strategically located, multiwell aquifer tests are used to quantify the qualitative permeability profiles provided by the flowmeter log analysis. The hydrostratigraphic model based on these results defines the main aquifer in the central part of the study area as unconfined to semiconfined with a transmissivity as high as 30,000 m2/day. The aquifer decreases in transmissivity to less than 10,000 m2/day in some parts of western Collier County, and becomes confined to the east and northeast of the study area, where transmissivity decreases to below 5000 m2/day.Integration of lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and hydraulic tests is critical in characterizing heterogeneous aquifers. Typically only a limited number of aquifer tests can be performed, and these need to be designed to provide hydraulic properties for the principle aquifers in the system. This study describes the integration of logs and aquifer tests in the development of a hydrostratigraphic model for the

  20. Groundwater Flow Model of Göksu Delta Coastal Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem Dokuz, Uǧur; Çelik, Mehmet; Arslan, Şebnem; Engin, Hilal

    2016-04-01

    the conceptual hydrogeological model of Göksu Delta coastal aquifer system, Göksu Delta is restricted by limestones from north and northwest and reaches up to 250 m in thickness in the southern part. Moreover, a combined aquifer system of confined and unconfined layers has been developed within the delta. The groundwater flow direction is towards south and southeast to the Mediterranean Sea. Data from this study were used to calibrate the flow model under steady-state and transient conditions by using MOFLOW. According to the calibrated model, alluvium aquifer is primarily recharged by limestone aquifer and partially by Göksu River. Discharge from the aquifer is generally towards the Mediterranean Sea and in part to Göksu River in the southern part of the delta. Transient calibration of the model for the year 2012 indicates that Göksu Delta groundwater system is extremely sensitive for groundwater exploitation for agricultural purposes.

  1. Impact of production systems on swine confinement buildings bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Valérie; Nehmé, Benjamin; Mériaux, Anne; Massé, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline

    2010-02-01

    Hog production has been substantially intensified in Eastern Canada. Hogs are now fattened in swine confinement buildings with controlled ventilation systems and high animal densities. Newly designed buildings are equipped with conventional manure handling and management systems, shallow or deep litter systems, or source separation systems to manage the large volumes of waste. However, the impacts of those alternative production systems on bioaerosol concentrations within the barns have never been evaluated. Bioaerosols were characterized in 18 modern swine confinement buildings, and the differences in bioaerosol composition in the three different production systems were evaluated. Total dust, endotoxins, culturable actinomycetes, fungi, and bacteria were collected with various apparatuses. The total DNA of the air samples was extracted, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assess the total number of bacterial genomes, as a total (culturable and nonculturable) bacterial assessment. The measured total dust and endotoxin concentrations were not statistically different in the three studied production systems. In buildings with sawdust beds, actinomycetes and molds were found in higher concentrations than in the conventional barns. Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Penicillium, and Scopulariopsis species were identified in all the studied swine confinement buildings. A. flavus, A. terreus, and A. versicolor were abundantly present in the facilities with sawdust beds. Thermotolerant A. fumigatus and Mucor were usually found in all the buildings. The culturable bacteria concentrations were higher in the barns with litters than in the conventional buildings, while real-time PCR revealed nonstatistically different concentrations of total bacteria in all the studied swine confinement buildings. In terms of workers' respiratory health, barns equipped with a solid/liquid separation system may offer better air quality than conventional buildings or barns with

  2. MISSISSIPPI EMBAYMENT AQUIFER SYSTEM IN MISSISSIPPI: GEOHYDROLOGIC DATA COMPILATION FOR FLOW MODEL SIMULATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, J.K.; Taylor, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer System Analysis (GC RASA) study, data from 184 geophysical well logs were used to define the geohydrologic framework of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system in Mississippi for flow model simulation. Five major aquifers of Eocene and Paleocene age were defined within this aquifer system in Mississippi. A computer data storage system was established to assimilate the information obtained from the geophysical logs. Computer programs were developed to manipulate the data to construct geologic sections and structure maps. Data from the storage system will be input to a five-layer, three-dimensional, finite-difference digital computer model that is used to simulate the flow dynamics in the five major aquifers of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system.

  3. Evaluation of mechanisms that might control transport of wastewater contaminants in bedrock multi-aquifer systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ongoing research has identified infectious human enteric viruses in the Madison, Wisconsin, public supply wells that draw water from a deep, confined sandstone aquifer. These viruses most likely originate from leaking sanitary sewers and are a potential human health risk. Due to a relatively short (...

  4. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Floridan aquifer system and effect of Lower Floridan aquifer withdrawals on the Upper Floridan aquifer at Barbour Pointe Community, Chatham County, Georgia, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard; Clarke, John S.

    2016-06-02

    Two test wells were completed at the Barbour Pointe community in western Chatham County, near Savannah, Georgia, in 2013 to investigate the potential of using the Lower Floridan aquifer as a source of municipal water supply. One well was completed in the Lower Floridan aquifer at a depth of 1,080 feet (ft) below land surface; the other well was completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer at a depth of 440 ft below land surface. At the Barbour Pointe test site, the U.S. Geological Survey completed electromagnetic (EM) flowmeter surveys, collected and analyzed water samples from discrete depths, and completed a 72-hour aquifer test of the Floridan aquifer system withdrawing from the Lower Floridan aquifer.Based on drill cuttings, geophysical logs, and borehole EM flowmeter surveys collected at the Barbour Pointe test site, the Upper Floridan aquifer extends 369 to 567 ft below land surface, the middle semiconfining unit, separating the two aquifers, extends 567 to 714 ft below land surface, and the Lower Floridan aquifer extends 714 to 1,056 ft below land surface.A borehole EM flowmeter survey indicates that the Upper Floridan and Lower Floridan aquifers each contain four water-bearing zones. The EM flowmeter logs of the test hole open to the entire Floridan aquifer system indicated that the Upper Floridan aquifer contributed 91 percent of the total flow rate of 1,000 gallons per minute; the Lower Floridan aquifer contributed about 8 percent. Based on the transmissivity of the middle semiconfining unit and the Floridan aquifer system, the middle semiconfining unit probably contributed on the order of 1 percent of the total flow.Hydraulic properties of the Upper Floridan and Lower Floridan aquifers were estimated based on results of the EM flowmeter survey and a 72-hour aquifer test completed in Lower Floridan aquifer well 36Q398. The EM flowmeter data were analyzed using an AnalyzeHOLE-generated model to simulate upward borehole flow and determine the transmissivity of

  5. Radiation and confinement in 0D fusion systems codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lux, H.; Kemp, R.; Fable, E.; Wenninger, R.

    2016-07-01

    In systems modelling for fusion power plants, it is essential to robustly predict the performance of a given machine design (including its respective operating scenario). One measure of machine performance is the energy confinement time {τ\\text{E}} that is typically predicted from experimentally derived confinement scaling laws (e.g. IPB98(y,2)). However, the conventionally used scaling laws have been derived for ITER which—unlike a fusion power plant—will not have significant radiation inside the separatrix. In the absence of a new high core radiation relevant confinement scaling, we propose an ad hoc correction to the loss power {{P}\\text{L}} used in the ITER confinement scaling and the calculation of the stored energy {{W}\\text{th}} by the radiation losses from the ‘core’ of the plasma {{P}\\text{rad,\\text{core}}} . Using detailed ASTRA / TGLF simulations, we find that an appropriate definition of {{P}\\text{rad,\\text{core}}} is given by 60% of all radiative losses inside a normalised minor radius {ρ\\text{core}}=0.75 . We consider this an improvement for current design predictions, but it is far from an ideal solution. We therefore encourage more detailed experimental and theoretical work on this issue.

  6. Confinement Vessel Assay System: Design and Implementation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Gomez, Cipriano D.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-07-18

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1- to 2-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. We have developed a neutron assay system for the purposes of Materials Control and Accountability (MC&A) measurements of the vessel prior to and after cleanout. We present our approach to confronting the challenges in designing, building, and testing such a system. The system was designed to meet a set of functional and operational requirements. A Monte Carlo model was developed to aid in optimizing the detector design as well as to predict the systematic uncertainty associated with confinement vessel measurements. Initial testing was performed to optimize and determine various measurement parameters, and then the system was characterized using {sup 252}Cf placed a various locations throughout the measurement system. Measurements were also performed with a {sup 252}Cf source placed inside of small steel and HDPE shells to study the effect of moderation. These measurements compare favorably with their MCNPX model equivalent, making us confident that we can rely on the Monte Carlo simulation to predict the systematic uncertainty due to variations in response to material that may be localized at different points within a vessel.

  7. Confinement Vessel Assay System: Calibration and Certification Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Gomez, Cipriano; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-07-17

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of SNM in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le} 100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The system was calibrated in three different mass regions (low, medium, and high) to cover the entire plutonium mass range that will be assayed. The low mass calibration and medium mass calibration were verified for material positioned in the center of an empty vessel. The systematic uncertainty due to position bias was estimated using an MCNPX model to simulate the response of the system to material localized at various points along the inner surface of the vessel. The background component due to cosmic ray spallation was determined by performing measurements of an empty vessel and comparing to measurements in the same location with no vessel present. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements of CVs before and after cleanout.

  8. Nature of ordering in confined crystalline ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    Simulations continued studying the properties of systems of ions confined in ion traps or storage rings and cooled to very low temperatures, forming a strongly correlated non-neutral plasma. In particular the computer simulation of a large system of 20000 ions in isotropic confinement was continued to investigate whether a transition to the body-centered cubic order that is characteristic of infinite systems might occur. The simulations so far have not provided a conclusive answer. The systems show a characteristic shell structure, 18 spherical shells, very similar to what was seen in smaller simulations. Simulations were also done with the same number of ions in anisotropic confinement. Here a surprising result is seen -- instead of forming a series of spheroidal shells, the anisotropy causes the outer shell to be spheroidal -- but the inner ones are formed at a fixed distance from the outermost shell -- giving shapes that are not spheroids and exhibit discontinuous edges. The relevance of these phenomena to ion traps needs to be investigated.

  9. Dynamics of harmonically-confined systems: Some rigorous results

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhigang Zaremba, Eugene

    2014-03-15

    In this paper we consider the dynamics of harmonically-confined atomic gases. We present various general results which are independent of particle statistics, interatomic interactions and dimensionality. Of particular interest is the response of the system to external perturbations which can be either static or dynamic in nature. We prove an extended Harmonic Potential Theorem which is useful in determining the damping of the centre of mass motion when the system is prepared initially in a highly nonequilibrium state. We also study the response of the gas to a dynamic external potential whose position is made to oscillate sinusoidally in a given direction. We show in this case that either the energy absorption rate or the centre of mass dynamics can serve as a probe of the optical conductivity of the system. -- Highlights: •We derive various rigorous results on the dynamics of harmonically-confined atomic gases. •We derive an extension of the Harmonic Potential Theorem. •We demonstrate the link between the energy absorption rate in a harmonically-confined system and the optical conductivity.

  10. Monitoring induced denitrification in an artificial aquifer recharge system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau-Martinez, Alba; Torrentó, Clara; Folch, Albert; Domènech, Cristina; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-05-01

    literature ɛN values of -4o and -22o respectively (Aravena and Robertson, 1998; Pauwels et al., 2000). Ongoing denitrification batch experiments will allow us to determine the specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic fractionation induced by the organic reactive layer, in order to estimate more precisely the extent of denitrification during artificial aquifer recharge. These results confirmed that the reactive layer induces denitrification in the recharge ponds area, proving the usefulness of an isotopic approach to characterize water quality improvement occurring during artificial aquifer recharge. References 1. Aravena, R., Robertson, W.D., 1998. Use of multiple isotope tracers to evaluate denitrification in ground water: Study of nitrate from a large-flux septic system plume. Ground Water, 36(6): 975-982. 2. Pauwels, H., J.C., Kloppmann, W., 2000. Denitrification and mixing in a schist aquifer: Influence on water chemistry and isotopes. Chemical Geology, 168(3-4): 307-324. Acknowledgment This study was supported by the projects CGL2011-29975-C04-01 from the Spanish Government, 2009SGR-00103 from the Catalan Government and ENPI/2011/280-008 from the European Commission. Please fill in your abstract text.

  11. Review: Groundwater flow and transport modeling of karst aquifers, with particular reference to the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Hellweger, Ferdinand; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Field, Malcolm; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2013-01-01

    Karst systems have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy, which makes them behave very differently from other aquifers. Slow seepage through the rock matrix and fast flow through conduits and fractures result in a high variation in spring response to precipitation events. Contaminant storage occurs in the rock matrix and epikarst, but contaminant transport occurs mostly along preferential pathways that are typically inaccessible locations, which makes modeling of karst systems challenging. Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers. This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems. The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA) is introduced as a case study to illustrate and discuss the application of groundwater models in karst aquifer systems to evaluate aquifer contamination. PMID:23645996

  12. Review: Groundwater flow and transport modeling of karst aquifers, with particular reference to the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Hellweger, Ferdinand; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Field, Malcolm; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2012-12-01

    Karst systems have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy, which makes them behave very differently from other aquifers. Slow seepage through the rock matrix and fast flow through conduits and fractures result in a high variation in spring response to precipitation events. Contaminant storage occurs in the rock matrix and epikarst, but contaminant transport occurs mostly along preferential pathways that are typically inaccessible locations, which makes modeling of karst systems challenging. Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers. This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems. The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA) is introduced as a case study to illustrate and discuss the application of groundwater models in karst aquifer systems to evaluate aquifer contamination.

  13. Open-ended magnetic confinement systems for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-05-01

    Magnetic confinement systems that use externally generated magnetic fields can be divided topologically into two classes: ``closed`` and `open``. The tokamak, the stellarator, and the reversed-field-pinch approaches are representatives of the first category, while mirror-based systems and their variants are of the second category. While the recent thrust of magnetic fusion research, with its emphasis on the tokamak, has been concentrated on closed geometry, there are significant reasons for the continued pursuit of research into open-ended systems. The paper discusses these reasons, reviews the history and the present status of open-ended systems, and suggests some future directions for the research.

  14. "Groundwater ages" of the Lake Chad multi-layer aquifers system inferred from 14C and 36Cl data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, Camille; Deschamps, Pierre; Goncalves, Julio; Hamelin, Bruno; Seidel, Jean-Luc; Doumnang, Jean-Claude

    2014-05-01

    high 36Cl/Cl ratio (>1000.10-15 at/at) very likely linked to the bomb pulse. These high 36Cl/Cl ratios are in the same order than the 36Cl/Cl signature of surface waters active modern recharge in this area. In the other part of the Quaternary Aquifer, waters are Na-HCO3-SO4-Cl type and are characterized by lower 36Cl/Cl ratios (around 200.10-15 at/at), suggesting longer residence time of the groundwaters. The 14C contents of the unconfined aquifer waters are all above 50 pmc, suggesting recent or Holocene recharge of this system. In contrast, the confined aquifer has a more homogeneous geochemical signature. The 14C contents are below all 0.5 pmc and mainly below detection level. 36Cl/Cl ratios are

  15. Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Aquifer recharge (AR) is a technical method being utilized to enhance groundwater resources through man-made replenishment means, such as infiltration basins and injections wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) furthers the AR techniques by withdrawal of stored groundwater at a later time for beneficial use. It is a viable adaptation technique for water availability problems. Variants of the water storage practices include recharge through urban green infrastructure and the subsurface injection of reclaimed water, i.e., wastewater, which has been treated to remove solids and impurities. In addition to a general overview of ASR variations, this report focuses on the principles and technical basis for an ASR decision support system (DSS), with the necessary technical references provided. The DSS consists of three levels of tools and methods for ASR system planning and assessment, design, and evaluation. Level 1 of the system is focused on ASR feasibility, for which four types of data and technical information are organized around: 1) ASR regulations and permitting needs, 2) Water demand projections, 3) Climate change and water availability, and 4) ASR sites and technical information. These technical resources are integrated to quantify water availability gaps and the feasibility of using ASR to meet the volume and timing of the water resource shortages. A systemic analysis of water resources was conducted for sustainable water supplies in Las Vegas, Nevada f

  16. Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Aquifer recharge (AR) is a technical method being utilized to enhance groundwater resources through man-made replenishment means, such as infiltration basins and injections wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) furthers the AR techniques by withdrawal of stored groundwater at a later time for beneficial use. It is a viable adaptation technique for water availability problems. Variants of the water storage practices include recharge through urban green infrastructure and the subsurface injection of reclaimed water, i.e., wastewater, which has been treated to remove solids and impurities. In addition to a general overview of ASR variations, this report focuses on the principles and technical basis for an ASR decision support system (DSS), with the necessary technical references provided. The DSS consists of three levels of tools and methods for ASR system planning and assessment, design, and evaluation. Level 1 of the system is focused on ASR feasibility, for which four types of data and technical information are organized around: 1) ASR regulations and permitting needs, 2) Water demand projections, 3) Climate change and water availability, and 4) ASR sites and technical information. These technical resources are integrated to quantify water availability gaps and the feasibility of using ASR to meet the volume and timing of the water resource shortages. A systemic analysis of water resources was conducted for sustainable water supplies in Las Vegas, Nevada f

  17. Implications of the change in confinement status of a heterogeneous aquifer for scale-dependent dispersion and mass-transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, D.; Molinari, A.; Fallico, C.; Guzzi, S.

    2016-10-01

    A series of experimental tracer tests were performed to explore the implications of the change in the pressure status of a heterogeneous bimodal aquifer for scale-dependent dispersion and mass-transfer processes. The sandbox was filled with sands and gravel channels and patches to form an alluvial-like bimodal aquifer. We performed multiple injections of a conservative tracer from 26 different locations of the sandbox and interpreted the resulting depth-integrated breakthrough curves (BTCs) at the central pumping well to obtain a scale-dependent distribution of local and field-integrated apparent longitudinal dispersivity (respectively, αLloc and αLapp). We repeated the experiments under confined (CS) and unconfined (UNS) pressure status, keeping the same heterogeneous configuration. Results showed that αLloc(associated with transport through gravel zones) was poorly influenced by the change in aquifer pressure and the presence of channels. Instead, αLapp(i.e. macrodispersion) strongly increased when changing from CS to UNS. In specific, we found αLapp ≈ 0.03 r for the CS and αLapp ≈ 0.15 r for the UNS (being r the distance from the well). Second-to-fourth-order temporal moments showed strong spatial dependence in the UNS and no spatial dependence in the CS. These results seem consistent with a "vadose-zone-driven" kinetic mass-transfer process occurring in the UNS but not in the CS. The vadose zone enhances vertical flow due to the presence of free surface and large contrasts in hydraulic conductivity triggered by the desaturation of gravel channels nearby the pumping well. The vadose zone enhances vertical mixing between gravel and sands and generates BTC tailing. In the CS vertical mixing is negligible and anomalous transport is not observed.

  18. Summary of hydrologic testing of the Floridan aquifer system at Fort Stewart, coastal Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerald J.

    2011-01-01

    Two test wells were completed at Fort Stewart, coastal Georgia, to investigate the potential for using the Lower Floridan aquifer as a source of water to satisfy anticipated, increased water needs. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army, completed hydrologic testing of the Floridan aquifer system at the study site, including flowmeter surveys, slug tests, and 24- and 72-hour aquifer tests by mid-March 2010. Analytical approaches and model simulation were applied to aquifer-test results to provide estimates of transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity of the multilayered Floridan aquifer system. Data from a 24-hour aquifer test of the Upper Floridan aquifer were evaluated by using the straight-line Cooper-Jacob analytical method. Data from a 72-hour aquifer test of the Lower Floridan aquifer were simulated by using axisymmetric model simulations. Results of aquifer testing indicated that the Upper Floridan aquifer has a transmissivity of 100,000 feet-squared per day, and the Lower Floridan aquifer has a transmissivity of 7,000 feet-squared per day. A specific storage for the Floridan aquifer system as a result of model calibration was 3E-06 ft–1. Additionally, during a 72-hour aquifer test of the Lower Floridan aquifer, a drawdown response was observed in two Upper Floridan aquifer wells, one of which was more than 1 mile away from the pumped well.

  19. Simulation of the regional geohydrology of the Tesuque aquifer system near Santa Fe, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, D.P.; Wasiolek, Maryann

    1988-01-01

    Declining groundwater levels resulting from groundwater withdrawals in the Santa Fe, New Mexico, area have caused concern about the future availability of water in the Tesuque aquifer system. This report describes the geohydrology of the Tesuque aquifer system in the Santa Fe area and presents a three-dimensional regional groundwater flow model which assesses the effects of existing and possible future groundwater withdrawals on the regional aquifer system. The model was calibrated using simulations of the predevelopment steady-state condition and the 1947-82 historical period. The response of the aquifer to two scenarios of future groundwater withdrawals from 1983 to 2020 was simulated. (USGS)

  20. [Dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in karst aquifer systems].

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Zou, Sheng-Zhang; Xia, Ri-Yuan; Xu, Dan-Dan; Yao, Min

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nutrients have a unique way of producing, decomposing and storing in southwest karst water systems. To understand the biogeochemical cycle of DOM in karst aquifer systems, we investigated the behavioral changes of DOM fluorescence components in Zhaidi karst river system. Two humic-like components (C1 and C2), and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component (C4) were identified using the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model. Compared with the traditional physical and chemical indicators, spatial heterogeneity of DOM was more obvious, which can reflect the subtle changes in groundwater system. Traditional indicators mainly reflect the regional characteristics of karst river system, while DOM fluorescence components reflect the attribute gaps of sampling types.

  1. Hydrogeology in the area of a freshwater lens in the Floridan aquifer system, northeast Seminole County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.; Rohrer, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    Northeast Seminole County, Florida, contains an isolated recharge area of the Floridan aquifer system that forms a freshwater lens completely surrounded by saline water. The freshwater lens covers an area of about 22 sq mi surrounding the town of Geneva, and generally is enclosed by the 25 ft land surface altitude contour. Thickness of the lens is about 350 ft in the center of the recharge area. The geohydrologic units in descending order consist of the post-Miocene sand and shell of the surficial aquifer; Miocene clay, sand, clay, and shell that form a leaky confining bed; and permeable Eocene limestones of the Floridan aquifer system. The freshwater lens is the result of local rainfall flushing ancient seawater from the Floridan aquifer system. Sufficient quantities of water for domestic and small public supply systems are available from the Floridan aquifer system in the Geneva area. The limiting factor for water supply in the area is the chemical quality of the water. Chloride concentrations range from < 20 mg/L in the center of the recharge area to about 5,100 mg/L near the St. Johns River southeast of Geneva. Constituents analyzed included sulfate (range 1 to 800 mg/L), hardness (range 89 to 2,076 mg/L), and iron (range 34 to 6,600 mg/L). Because the freshwater lens results entirely from local recharge, the long-term sustained freshwater yield of the aquifer in the Geneva area depends on the local recharge rate. In 1982, recharge was about 13 inches (13.8 million gal/day). Average recharge for 1941 through 1970 was estimated to be about 11 inches (11.3 million gal/day). Freshwater that recharges the aquifer in the Geneva area is either pumped out or flows north and northeast to discharge near or in the St. Johns River. Average annual outflow from the lens is about 10 in/yr. No measurable change in the size or location of the freshwater lens has occurred since studies in the early 1950's. (Lantz-PTT)

  2. Lithology and base of the surficial aquifer system, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1987-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system is a major source of freshwater in Palm Beach County. In 1982, public supply withdrawals from the aquifer system totaled 33,543 million gallons, 77.5% of total public supply withdrawals. To evaluate the aquifer system and its geologic framework, a cooperative study with Palm Beach County was begun in 1982 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County is composed primarily of sand, sandstone, shell, silt, calcareous clay (marl), and limestone deposited during the Pleistocene and Pliocene epochs. In the western two-thirds of Palm Beach County, sediments in the aquifer system are poorly consolidated sand, shell, and sandy limestone. Owing to interspersed calcareous clays and silt and very poorly sorted materials, permeabilities in this zone of the aquifer system are relatively low. Two other zones of the aquifer system are found in the eastern one-third of the county where the sediments are appreciably more permeable than in the west due to better sorting and less silt and clay content. The location of more detailed lithologic logs for wells in these sections, along with data from nearby wells, allowed enhanced interpretation and depiction of the lithology which had previously been generalized. The most permeable zone of the aquifer system in this area is characterized by highly developed secondary porosity where infiltrating rainwater and solution by groundwater have removed calcitic-cementing materials from the sediments to produce interconnected cavities. Increased permeability in the aquifer system is generally coincident with the eastern boundary of the overlying organic soils and Lake Flirt Marl. Lithologic logs of wells in Palm Beach County indicate that sediments forming the aquifer system were deposited directly on the erosional surface of the Hawthorn Formation in some areas. In other locations in the county, lithologic logs indicate that the base of the aquifer system was formed by fluvial

  3. Regional evaluation of the hydrogeologic framework, hydraulic properties, and chemical characteristics of the intermediate aquifer system underlying southern west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, Lari A.

    2006-01-01

    Three major aquifer systems-the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system, and the Floridan aquifer system-are recognized in the approximately 5,100-square-mile southern west-central Florida study area. The principal source of freshwater for all uses is ground water supplied from the three aquifer systems. Ground water from the intermediate aquifer system is considered only moderately abundant compared to the Upper Floridan aquifer, but it is an important source of water where the Upper Floridan aquifer contains water too mineralized for most uses. In the study area, the potential ground-water resources of the intermediate aquifer system were evaluated by regionally assessing the vertical and lateral distribution of hydrogeologic, hydraulic, and chemical characteristics. Although the intermediate aquifer system is considered a single entity, it is composed of multiple water-bearing zones separated by confining units. Deposition of a complex assemblage of carbonate and siliciclastic sediments during the late Oligocene to early Pliocene time resulted in discontinuities that are reflected in transitional and abrupt contacts between facies. Discontinuous facies produce water-bearing zones that may be locally well-connected or culminate abruptly. Changes in the depositional environment created the multilayered intermediate aquifer system that contains as many as three zones of enhanced water-bearing capacity. The water-bearing zones consist of indurated limestone and dolostone and in some places unindurated sand, gravel, and shell beds, and these zones are designated, in descending order, as Zone 1, Zone 2, and Zone 3. Zone 1 is thinnest (<80 feet thick) and is limited to <20 percent (southern part) of the study area. Zone 2, the only regionally extensive zone, is characterized by moderately low permeability. Zone 3 is found in about 50 percent of the study area, has the highest transmissivities, and generally is in good hydraulic connection with the

  4. Geochemical Evolution of Induced Infiltration in a River-Recharged Aquifer System: Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al, T.; Amskold, L.

    2004-05-01

    The city of Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada relies on groundwater from a glacial aquifer in the Saint John River valley. The aquifer is a semi-confined esker discontinuously overlain by clay/silt of glacio-lacustrine and/or marine origin. Recharge to the well field occurs partly from the adjacent river where a discontinuity in the confining layer allows for hydraulic connection with the river. It has been suggested that elevated Mn concentrations in the groundwater supply are related to reductive dissolution of Mn-oxide minerals in the aquifer as a result of the infiltration of dissolved organic carbon from the river. A detailed hydrogeochemical study has been conducted to investigate redox conditions along a flow path from the river bed to a nearby water-supply well. Aqueous geochemical data from multi-level piezometers along the flow path display variations in redox-sensitive solutes (O2, NO3, Mn, Fe, SO4 and HS) in space and time. The redox conditions cycle on a seasonal time scale, likely in response to temperature changes in the infiltrating river water. In the spring and early summer the conditions are relatively oxidizing with elevated concentrations of dissolved O2 and NO3, and low concentrations of Mn and Fe. Toward late summer, and into the fall, the system tends toward more reducing conditions, with concentrations of dissolved O2 and NO3 declining, and concentrations of Mn and Fe increasing. Localized zones of elevated HS concentrations suggest that SO4 reduction occurs, however, the seasonal trend toward reducing conditions is not manifest by a widespread decline in SO4 concentrations as it is for O2 and NO3. The data are generally consistent with trends that are expected based on thermodynamics, with O2 reduction followed by NO3, MnIV, FeIII and SO4 reduction, however, in some locations these respective redox zones are superimposed. The observed overlap of redox zones is likely attributable to a combination of variable reaction kinetics (probably

  5. Preliminary evaluation of the Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA has authority under the Safe Drinking Water Act to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination by deep well injection. An aquifer, however, may be exempted from protection and used for injected wastes where the aquifer meets criteria established in the Agency 's Underground Injection Control program. The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee consists of Mississippian age carbonate rocks and occurs from the Valley and Ridge of East Tennessee to west of the Tennessee River. This aquifer contains potable water and is an important source of drinking water for municipal and domestic supplies on the Highland Rim. The Highland Rim aquifer system under parts of the Cumberland Plateau is not currently used as a source of drinking water and is not expected to be used in the future. These areas meet parts of the EPA 's Underground Injection Control criteria for exempting aquifers to receive injected waste. (Author 's abstract)

  6. A groundwater extraction system to control VOCs in a bedrock aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Wessley, D.J.; Weber, R.H.; Otzelberger, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater quality in the bedrock aquifer at a solid waste landfill has been evaluated since 1984. Since that time, several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been detected in various bedrock monitoring wells at the site. Continued detection of VOCs in the bedrock aquifer led to an investigation and design of a remediation system to address the contaminated aquifer. This paper discusses the site background, geology, hydrogeology, and landfill characteristics; the methods and results of the landfill monitoring and investigations performed; and the groundwater extraction system which was designed and constructed to control further off-site migration of contaminants in the bedrock aquifer.

  7. Tabulated Transmissivity and Storage Properties of the Floridan Aquifer System in Florida and Parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Bellino, Jason C.

    2012-04-19

    A goal of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program is to assess the availability of fresh water within each of the principal aquifers in the United States with the greatest groundwater withdrawals. The Floridan aquifer system (FAS), which covers an area of approximately 100,000 square miles in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and South Carolina, is one such principal aquifer, having the fifth largest groundwater withdrawals in the Nation, totaling 3.64 billion gallons per day in 2000. Compilation of FAS hydraulic properties is critical to the development and calibration of groundwater flow models that can be used to develop water budgets spatially and temporally, as well as to evaluate resource changes over time. Wells with aquifer test data were identified as Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA), Lower Floridan aquifer (LFA), Floridan aquifer system (FAS, Upper Floridan with some middle and/or Lower Floridan), or middle Floridan confining unit (MCU), based on the identification from the original database or report description, or comparison of the open interval of the well with previously published maps.This report consolidates aquifer hydraulic property data obtained from multiple databases and reports of the U.S. Geological Survey, various State agencies, and the Water Management Districts of Florida, that are compiled into tables to provide a single information source for transmissivity and storage properties of the FAS as of October 2011. Transmissivity calculated from aquifer pumping tests and specific-capacity data are included. Values for transmissivity and storage coefficients are intended for use in regional or sub regional groundwater flow models; thus, any tests (aquifer pumping tests and specific capacity data) that were conducted with packers or for open intervals less than 30 feet in length are excluded from the summary statistics and tables of this report, but are included in the database.The transmissivity distribution

  8. Two particle system in spherically confined plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munjal, Dipti; Sen, K. D.; Prasad, Vinod

    2017-03-01

    Energy eigenvalues of Harmonium atom are reported for the first time under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential. Energy of different states of Harmonium is analyzed as a function of confinement radius and Debye screening length. Comparison of radial matrix elements of Harmonium atom under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential is done. Interesting results are obtained.

  9. Quantifying spatio-temporal stream-aquifer water exchanges along a multi-layer aquifer system using LOMOS and hydro-thermo modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhri, Amer; flipo, Nicolas; Rejiba, Fayçal; Bodet, Ludovic; Jost, Anne; Goblet, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the spatial and temporal variability of stream-aquifer water exchanges along a 6 km-stream network in a multi-layer aquifer system using both LOcal MOnitoring Stations (LOMOSs) coupled with the optimization of a hydro-thermo model per LOMOS. With an area of 45 km2, the Orgeval experimental basin is located 70 km east from Paris. It drains a multi-layer aquifer system, which is composed of two main geological formations: the Oligocene (upper aquifer unit) and the Eocene (lower aquifer unit). These two aquifer units are separated by a clayey aquitard. The connectivity status between streams and aquifer units has been evaluated using near surface geophysical investigations as well as drill cores. Five LOMOSs of the stream-aquifer exchanges have been deployed along the stream-network to monitor stream-aquifer exchanges over years, based on continuous pressure and temperature measurements (15 min-time step). Each LOMOS is composed of one or two shallow piezometers located 2 to 3 m away from the river edge; one surface water monitoring system; two hyporheic zone temperature profiles located close to each river bank. The five LOMOSs are distributed in two upstream, two intermediate, and one downstream site. The two upstream sites are connected to the upper aquifer unit, and the downstream one is connected to the lower aquifer unit. The 2012-April - 2013-december period of hydrological data are hereafter analyzed. We first focus on the spatial distribution of the stream-aquifer exchanges along the multi-layer aquifer system during the low flow period. Results display an upstream-downstream functional gradient, with upstream gaining stream and downstream losing stream. This spatial distribution is due to the multi-layer nature of the aquifer system, whose lower aquifer unit is depleted. Then it appears that the downstream losing streams temporally switch into gaining ones during extreme hydrological events, while the upstream streams

  10. Groundwater-Flow Model of the Ozark Plateaus Aquifer System, Northwestern Arkansas, Southeastern Kansas, Southwestern Missouri, and Northeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, John B.; Gillip, Jonathan A.; Jones, Perry M.; Yeatts, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effect that increased water use is having on the long-term availability of groundwater within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, a groundwater-flow model was developed using MODFLOW 2000 for a model area covering 7,340 square miles for parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. Vertically the model is divided into five units. From top to bottom these units of variable thickness are: the Western Interior Plains confining unit, the Springfield Plateau aquifer, the Ozark confining unit, the Ozark aquifer, and the St. Francois confining unit. Large mined zones contained within the Springfield Plateau aquifer are represented in the model as extensive voids with orders-of-magnitude larger hydraulic conductivity than the adjacent nonmined zones. Water-use data were compiled for the period 1960 to 2006, with the most complete data sets available for the period 1985 to 2006. In 2006, total water use from the Ozark aquifer for Missouri was 87 percent (8,531,520 cubic feet per day) of the total pumped from the Ozark aquifer, with Kansas at 7 percent (727,452 cubic feet per day), and Oklahoma at 6 percent (551,408 cubic feet per day); water use for Arkansas within the model area was minor. Water use in the model from the Springfield Plateau aquifer in 2005 was specified from reported and estimated values as 569,047 cubic feet per day. Calibration of the model was made against average water-level altitudes in the Ozark aquifer for the period 1980 to 1989 and against waterlevel altitudes obtained in 2006 for the Springfield Plateau and Ozark aquifers. Error in simulating water-level altitudes was largest where water-level altitude gradients were largest, particularly near large cones of depression. Groundwater flow within the model area occurs generally from the highlands of the Springfield Plateau in southwestern Missouri toward the west, with localized flow occurring towards rivers and pumping centers including the five largest pumping centers near Joplin

  11. Groundwater-flow model of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, northwestern Arkansas, southeastern Kansas, southwestern Missouri, and northeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, John B.; Gillip, Jonathan A.; Jones, Perry M.; Yeatts, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effect that increased water use is having on the long-term availability of groundwater within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, a groundwater-flow model was developed using MODFLOW 2000 for a model area covering 7,340 square miles for parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. Vertically the model is divided into five units. From top to bottom these units of variable thickness are: the Western Interior Plains confining unit, the Springfield Plateau aquifer, the Ozark confining unit, the Ozark aquifer, and the St. Francois confining unit. Large mined zones contained within the Springfield Plateau aquifer are represented in the model as extensive voids with orders-of-magnitude larger hydraulic conductivity than the adjacent nonmined zones. Water-use data were compiled for the period 1960 to 2006, with the most complete data sets available for the period 1985 to 2006. In 2006, total water use from the Ozark aquifer for Missouri was 87 percent (8,531,520 cubic feet per day) of the total pumped from the Ozark aquifer, with Kansas at 7 percent (727,452 cubic feet per day), and Oklahoma at 6 percent (551,408 cubic feet per day); water use for Arkansas within the model area was minor. Water use in the model from the Springfield Plateau aquifer in 2005 was specified from reported and estimated values as 569,047 cubic feet per day. Calibration of the model was made against average water-level altitudes in the Ozark aquifer for the period 1980 to 1989 and against waterlevel altitudes obtained in 2006 for the Springfield Plateau and Ozark aquifers. Error in simulating water-level altitudes was largest where water-level altitude gradients were largest, particularly near large cones of depression. Groundwater flow within the model area occurs generally from the highlands of the Springfield Plateau in southwestern Missouri toward the west, with localized flow occurring towards rivers and pumping centers including the five largest pumping centers near Joplin

  12. Estimation of transit times in a Karst Aquifer system using environmental tracers: Application on the Jeita Aquifer system-Lebanon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doummar, Joanna; Hamdan, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Estimating transit times is essential for the assessment of aquifer vulnerability to contaminants. Groundwater in karst aquifer is assumed to be relatively young due to fast preferential pathways; slow flow components are present in water stored in the fissured matrix. Furthermore, transit times are site specific as they depend on recharge rates, temperatures, elevation, and flow media; saturated and unsaturated zones. These differences create significant variation in the groundwater age in karst systems as the water sampled will be a mix of different water that has been transported through different flow pathways (fissured matrix and conduits). Several methods can be applied to estimate water transit time of an aquifer such as artificial tracers, which provide an estimate for fast flow velocities. In this study, groundwater residence times in the Jeita spring aquifer (Lebanon) were estimated using several environmental tracers such as Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Helium-Tritium (3H, 3H- 3He). Additional stable isotope and major ion analysis was performed to characterize water types. Groundwater samples were collected from six different wells in the Jeita catchment area (Jurassic Kesrouane aquifer) as well as from the spring and cave itself. The results are reproducible for the Tritium-Helium method, unlike for the CFC/SF6 methods that yielded poor results due to sampling problems. Tritium concentrations in all groundwater samples show nearly the same concentration (~2.73 TU) except for one sample with relatively lower tritium concentration (~2.26 TU). Ages ranging from 0.07 ± 0.07 years to 23.59 ± 0.00 years were obtained. The youngest age is attributed to the spring/ cave while the oldest ages were obtained in wells tapping the fissured matrix. Neon in these samples showed considerable variations and high delta Ne in some samples indicating high excess air. Four (4) samples showed extreme excess air (Delta-Ne is greater than 70 %) and

  13. Potentiometric surface of the upper Floridan Aquifer, west-central Florida, May 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.; Stelman, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by a middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer generally contain highly mineralized water. In most reports on the hydrology of southwest Florida, the term "Floridan aquifer" has been applied to the water-bearing rocks, herin referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is a productive aquifer and supplies more than 10 times the amount of water pumped from either the surfical aquifer system of the intermediate aquifer system in most of the study area (Duerr and other, 1988). This map report depicts the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in May 1995. The potentipmetric surface represents to the level to which water will rise in tightly cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system. The surface is mapped by determining the altitude of water levels in a network of wells and is represented on maps by contours that connect point of equal altitude. This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season when ground-water withdrawals for agricultural use are usually high. The cumulative rainfall for the study area was 2.98 inches above average for the period from June 1994 through May 1995 (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 1995)

  14. Contaminant attenuation by shallow aquifer systems under steady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, S. S.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2017-10-01

    We present a framework for analyzing advection-dominated solute transport and transformation in aquifer systems of boreal catchments that are typically shallow and rest on crystalline bedrock. A methodology is presented for estimating tracer discharge based on particle trajectories from recharge to discharge locations and computing their first passage times assuming that the flow pattern is approximately steady-state. Transformation processes can be included by solving one-dimensional reactive transport with randomized water travel time as the independent variable; the distribution of the travel times incorporates morphological dispersion (due to catchment geometry/topography) as well as macro-dispersion (due to heterogeneity of underlying hydraulic properties). The implementation of the framework is illustrated for the well characterized coastal catchment of Forsmark (Sweden). We find that macro-dispersion has a notable effect on attenuation even though the morphological dispersion is significantly larger. Preferential flow on the catchment scale is found to be considerable with only 5% of the Eulerian velocities contributing to transport over the simulation period of 375 years. Natural attenuation is illustrated as a simple (linear decay) transformation process. Simulated natural attenuation can be estimated analytically reasonably well by using basic hydrological and structural information, the latter being the pathway length distribution and average aquifer depth to the bedrock.

  15. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  16. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida (Published Proceedings)

    EPA Science Inventory

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  17. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida (Published Proceedings)

    EPA Science Inventory

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  18. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  19. Geohydrologic systems in Kansas physical framework of the western interior plains confining system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, R.J.; McGovern, Harold E.; Spinazola, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this Hydrologic Investigations Atlas is to provide a description of the principal geohydrologic systems in the Upper Cambrian through Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas.  This investigation was made as part of the Central Midwest Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (CMRASA). The CMRASA is one of several major investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of regional aquifer systems in the United States. These regional investigations are designed to increase knowledge of the flow regime and hydrologic properties of major aquifer systems and to provide quantitative information for assessing, developing, and managing water supplies.  The CMRASA study area includes all or parts of 10 Central Midwestern States (Jorgensen and Signor, 1981) as shown on the envelope cover.

  20. Solute geochemistry of the Snake River plain regional aquifer system, Idaho and eastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Low, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    Three geochemical methods were used to determine chemical reactions that control solute concentrations in the Snake River Plain regional aquifer system: (1) calculation of a regional solute balance within the aquifer and of mineralogy in the aquifer framework to identify solute reactions, (2) comparison of thermodynamic mineral saturation indices with plausible solute reactions, and (3) comparison of stable isotope ratios of the groundwater with those in the aquifer framework. The geothermal groundwater system underlying the main aquifer system was examined by calculating thermodynamic mineral saturation indices, stable isotope ratios of geothermal water, geothermometry, and radiocarbon dating. Water budgets, hydrologic arguments, and isotopic analyses for the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer system demonstrate that most, if not all, water is of local meteoric and not juvenile or formation origin. Solute balance, isotopic, mineralogic, and thermodynamic arguments suggest that about 20% of the solutes are derived from reactions with rocks forming the aquifer framework. Solute reactions indicate that calcite and silica are precipitated in the aquifer. Large amounts of sodium and chloride, relative to their concentration in the igneous rock, are being removed from the aquifer. Release of fluids from inclusions in the igneous rocks, and initial flushing of grain boundaries and pores of detrital marine sediments in interbeds are believed to be the source of the sodium chloride. Identification and quantification of reactions controlling solute concentrations in groundwater in the eastern plain indicate that the aquifer is not a large mixing vessel that simply stores and transmits water and solutes but is undergoing diagenesis and is both a source and sink for solutes. Reactions controlling solutes in the western Snake River basin are believed to be similar to those in the eastern basin but the regional geothermal system that underlies the Snake River Plain contains

  1. Hydrology of the southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in South Carolina and parts of Georgia and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aucott, Walter R.

    1996-01-01

    Transmissivity values used in the flow simulation range from less than 1,000 feet squared per day near the updip limit of most aquifers to about 30,000 feet squared per day in the Middendorf aquifer in the Savannah River Plant area. Vertical hydraulic conductivity values used in simulation of confining units range from about 6x10-7 feet per day for the confining unit between the Middendorf and Black Creek aquifers in coastal areas to 3x10-2 feet per day for most of the confining units near their updip limits. Storage coefficients used in transient simulations were 0.15 where unconfined conditions exist and 0.0005 where confined conditions exist.

  2. Dynamical Density Functional Theory and Hydrodynamic Interactions in Confined Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Benjamin; Nold, Andreas; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Colloidal systems consist of nano- to micrometer-sized particles suspended in a bath of many more, much smaller and much lighter particles. Motion of the colloidal particles through the bath, e.g. when driven by external forces such as gravity, induces flows in the bath. These flows in turn impart forces on the colloid particles. These bath-mediated forces, known as Hydrodynamic Interactions (HIs) strongly influence the dynamics of the colloid particles. This is particularly true in confined systems, in which the presence of walls substantially modifies the HIs compared to unbounded geometries. For many-particle systems, the many of degrees of freedom prohibit a direct solution of the underlying stochastic equations and a reduced model is necessary. We employ elements from the statistical mechanics of classical fluids, namely Dynamical Density Functional Theory (DDFT), the computational complexity of which is independent of the number of particles to include both inter-particle and particle-wall HI and demonstrate the physical importance of using the correct description of HIs in confined systems. In addition, DDFT allows us to isolate and investigate different components of HIs. Supported by EPSRC Grant EP/L025159.

  3. Descriptions and characterizations of water-level data and groundwater flow for the Brewster Boulevard and Castle Hayne Aquifer Systems and the Tarawa Terrace Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Jones, L. Elliott; Suárez-Soto, René J.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement of Chapter A (Supplement 3) summarizes results of analyses of groundwater-level data and describes corresponding elements of groundwater flow such as vertical hydraulic gradients useful for groundwater-flow model calibration. Field data as well as theoretical concepts indicate that potentiometric surfaces within the study area are shown to resemble to a large degree a subdued replica of surface topography. Consequently, precipitation that infiltrates to the water table flows laterally from highland to lowland areas and eventually discharges to streams such as Northeast and Wallace Creeks and New River. Vertically downward hydraulic gradients occur in highland areas resulting in the transfer of groundwater from shallow relatively unconfined aquifers to underlying confined or semi-confined aquifers. Conversely, in the vicinity of large streams such as Wallace and Frenchs Creeks, diffuse upward leakage occurs from underlying confined or semi-confined aquifers. Point water-level data indicating water-table altitudes, water-table altitudes estimated using a regression equation, and estimates of stream levels determined from a digital elevation model (DEM) and topographic maps were used to estimate a predevelopment water-table surface in the study area. Approximate flow lines along hydraulic gradients are shown on a predevelopment potentiometric surface map and extend from highland areas where potentiometric levels are greatest toward streams such as Wallace Creek and Northeast Creek. The distribution of potentiometric levels and corresponding groundwater-flow directions conform closely to related descriptions of the conceptual model.

  4. Solute geochemistry of the Snake River Plain regional aquifer system, Idaho and eastern Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.W.; Low, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    Three geochemical methods were used to determine chemical reactions that control solute concentrations in the Snake River Plain regional aquifer system: (1) calculation of a regional solute balance within the aquifer and of mineralogy in the aquifer framework to identify solute reactions, (2) comparison of thermodynamic mineral saturation indices with plausible solute reactions, and (3) comparison of stable isotope ratios of the groundwater with those in the aquifer framework. The geothermal groundwater system underlying the main aquifer system was examined by calculating thermodynamic mineral saturation indices, stable isotope ratios of geothermal water, geothermometry, and radiocarbon dating. Water budgets, hydrologic arguments, and isotopic analyses for the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer system demonstrate that most, if not all, water is of local meteoric and not juvenile or formation origin. Solute balance, isotopic, mineralogic, and thermodynamic arguments suggest that about 20% of the solutes are derived from reactions with rocks forming the aquifer framework. Reactions controlling solutes in the western Snake river basin are believed to be similar to those in the eastern basin but the regional geothermal system that underlies the Snake river Plain contains total dissolved solids similar to those in the overlying Snake River Plain aquifer system but contains higher concentrations of sodium, bicarbonate, silica, fluoride, sulfate, chloride, arsenic, boron, and lithium, and lower concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen. 132 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. A special planning technique for stream-aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, C.T.; Taylor, O. James

    1974-01-01

    The potential effects of water-management plans on stream-aquifer systems in several countries have been simulated using electric-analog or digital-computer models. Many of the electric-analog models require large amounts of hardware preparation for each problem to be solved and some become so bulky that they present serious space and access problems. Digital-computer models require no special hardware preparation but often they require so many repetitive solutions of equations that they result in calculations that are unduly unwieldy and expensive, even on the latest generation of computers. Further, the more detailed digital models require a vast amount of core storage, leaving insufficient storage for evaluation of the many possible schemes of water-management. A concept introduced in 1968 by the senior author of this report offers a solution to these problems. The concept is that the effects on streamflow of ground-water withdrawal or recharge (stress) at any point in such a system can be approximated using two classical equations and a value of time that reflects the integrated effect of the following: irregular impermeable boundaries; stream meanders; aquifer properties and their areal variations; distance of the point from the stream; and imperfect hydraulic connection between the stream and the aquifer. The value of time is called the stream depletion factor (sdf). Results of a relatively few tests on detailed models can be summarized on maps showing lines through points of equal sdf. Sensitivity analyses of models of two large stream-aquifer systems in the State of Colorado show that the sdf technique described in this report provides results within tolerable ranges of error. The sdf technique is extremely versatile, allowing water managers to choose the degree of detail that best suits their needs and available computational hardware. Simple arithmetic, using, for example, only a slide rule and charts or tables of dimensionless values, will be sufficient

  6. A nonlocal contact formulation for confined granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M.

    2012-02-01

    We present a nonlocal formulation of contact mechanics that accounts for the interplay of deformations due to multiple contact forces acting on a single particle. The analytical formulation considers the effects of nonlocal mesoscopic deformations characteristic of confined granular systems and, therefore, removes the classical restriction of independent contacts. This is in sharp contrast to traditional contact mechanics theories, which are strictly local and assume that contacts are independent regardless the confinement of the particles. For definiteness, we restrict attention to elastic spheres in the absence of gravitational forces, adhesion or friction. Hence, a notable feature of the nonlocal formulation is that, when nonlocal effects are neglected, it reduces to Hertz theory. Furthermore, we show that, under the preceding assumptions and up to moderate macroscopic deformations, the predictions of the nonlocal contact formulation are in remarkable agreement with detailed finite-element simulations and experimental observations, and in large disagreement with Hertz theory predictions—supporting that the assumption of independent contacts only holds for small deformations. The discrepancy between the extended theory presented in this work and Hertz theory is borne out by studying periodic homogeneous systems and disordered heterogeneous systems.

  7. Non-unique monopole oscillations of harmonically confined Yukawa systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducatman, Samuel; Henning, Christian; Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Recently it was shown that the Breathing Mode (BM), the mode of uniform radial expansion and contraction, which is well known from harmonically confined Coulomb systems [1], does not exist in general for other systems [2]. As a consequence the monopole oscillation (MO), the radial collective excitation, is not unique, but there are several MO with different frequencies. Within this work we show simulation results of those monopole oscillations of 2-dimensional harmonically confined Yukawa systems, which are known from, e.g., dusty plasma crystals [3,4]. We present the corresponding spectrum of the particle motion, including analysis of the frequencies found, and compare with theoretical investigations.[1] D.H.E. Dubin and J.P. Schiffer, Phys. Rev. E 53, 5249 (1996)[2] C. Henning at al., accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. Lett. (2008)[3] A. Melzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 115002 (2001)[4] M. Bonitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006)

  8. Quench dynamics in confined 1 + 1-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-03-01

    We present a framework for investigating the response of conformally invariant confined 1 + 1-dimensional systems to a quantum quench. While conformal invariance is generally destroyed in a global quantum quench, systems that can be described as or mapped to integrable deformations of a CFT may present special instances where a conformal field theory-based analysis could provide useful insight into the non-equilibrium dynamics. We investigate this possibility by considering a quench analogous to that of the quantum Newton’s Cradle experiment (Kinoshita et al 2006 Nature 440 900) and demonstrating qualitative agreement between observables derived in the CFT framework and those of the experimental system. We propose that this agreement may be a feature of the proximity of the experimental system to an integrable deformation of a c = 1 CFT.

  9. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  10. Estimating Hydraulic Properties of the Floridan Aquifer System by Analysis of Earth-Tide, Ocean-Tide, and Barometric Effects, Collier and Hendry Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Aquifers are subjected to mechanical stresses from natural, non-anthropogenic, processes such as pressure loading or mechanical forcing of the aquifer by ocean tides, earth tides, and pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere. The resulting head fluctuations are evident even in deep confined aquifers. The present study was conducted for the purpose of reviewing the research that has been done on the use of these phenomena for estimating the values of aquifer properties, and determining which of the analytical techniques might be useful for estimating hydraulic properties in the dissolved-carbonate hydrologic environment of southern Florida. Fifteen techniques are discussed in this report, of which four were applied. An analytical solution for head oscillations in a well near enough to the ocean to be influenced by ocean tides was applied to data from monitor zones in a well near Naples, Florida. The solution assumes a completely non-leaky confining unit of infinite extent. Resulting values of transmissivity are in general agreement with the results of aquifer performance tests performed by the South Florida Water Management District. There seems to be an inconsistency between results of the amplitude ratio analysis and independent estimates of loading efficiency. A more general analytical solution that takes leakage through the confining layer into account yielded estimates that were lower than those obtained using the non-leaky method, and closer to the South Florida Water Management District estimates. A numerical model with a cross-sectional grid design was applied to explore additional aspects of the problem. A relation between specific storage and the head oscillation observed in a well provided estimates of specific storage that were considered reasonable. Porosity estimates based on the specific storage estimates were consistent with values obtained from measurements on core samples. Methods are described for determining aquifer diffusivity by comparing the

  11. Properties and chemical constituents in ground water from the lower Wilcox Aquifer, Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System, south-central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettijohn, Robert A.; Busby, John F.; Beckman, Jeffery D.

    1993-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis is a study of regional aquifers composed of sediments of mostly Cenozoic age that underlie about 230,000 sq mi of the Gulf Coastal Plain. These regional aquifers are part of three aquifer systems: (1) the Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System, (2) the Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System, and (3) the Coastal Lowlands Aquifer System. The water chemistry of the Lower Wilcox Aquifer, which is part of the Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System is presented by a series of maps. These maps show the areal distribution of (1) the concentration of dissolved solids and temperature, (2) the primary water types and pH, (3) the concentration of major ions and silica, and (4) the milliequivalent ratios of selected ions. Dissolved constituents, pH, temperature, and ratios are based on the median values of all samples in each 100-sq-mi area. The concentration of dissolved solids in water from the Lower Wilcox Aquifer ranges from 18 mg/L near the outcrop in western Tennessee to 122,000 mg/L in a down-dip area in southern Mississippi. The primary water type is calcium bicarbonate in the outcrop area and sodium bicarbonate in all other areas of the aquifer within the limits of available data. The concentrations of major ions generally increase from the outcrop area to the down-dip limit of the data in the southern part of the aquifer area east of the Mississippi River. The milliequivalent ratio maps of selected ions in water from the Lower Wilcox Aquifer indicate some trends. The milliequivalent ratio of magnesium plus calcium to bicarbonate ranges from less than 0.1 to 40.4 and generally decreases from outcrop to down-dip limit of the data in the southern part of the aquifer area east of the Mississippi River. The milliequivalent ratio of bicarbonate to chloride ranges from 0.01 in southern Mississippi to 52.3 in northwestern Mississippi. This ratio increases from the outcrop toward the Mississippi River and from north to south in the

  12. Geology of the surficial aquifer system, Broward County, Florida; lithologic logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causaras, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The geologic framework of the surficial aquifer system, of which the Biscayne aquifer is the major component in Broward County, Florida, is presented in eight geologic cross sections. The cross sections are based on detailed lithologic logs of 27 test wells that were drilled, in the summer of 1981, through the sediments overlying the relatively impermeable units of the Hawthorn Formation, of Miocene age. The cross sections show the aquifer system as a wedge-shaped sequence of Cenozoic sediments. The aquifer thickness gradually decreases from more than 400 feet along the coast to about 160 feet in the west and southwest parts of Broward County. The sediments that comprise the aquifer system range in age from Pliocene to Pleistocene and are assigned to the following stratigraphic units from bottom to top: Tamiami Formation, Caloosahatchee Marl, Fort Thompson Formation, Key Largo Limestone, Anastasia Formation, Miami Oolite, and Pamlico Sand. (USGS)

  13. A groundwater extraction system to control VOCs in a bedrock aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Wessley, D.J.; Weber, R.H.; Otzelberger, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    Groundwater quality in the bedrock aquifer at a solid waste landfill has been evaluated since 1984. Since that time, several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been detected in various bedrock monitoring wells at the site. Continued detection of VOCs in the bedrock aquifer led to an investigation and design of a remediation system to address the contaminated aquifer. This paper discusses the site background, geology, hydrogeology, and landfall characteristics; the methods and results of the landfill monitoring and investigations performed; and the groundwater extraction system which was designed and constructed to control further off-site migration of contaminants in the bedrock aquifer. A groundwater extraction system has been designed in a bedrock aquifer at a closed landfill in Southeastern Wisconsin.

  14. Conceptual model of the uppermost principal aquifer systems in the Williston and Powder River structural basins, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Aurand, Katherine R.; Bednar, Jennifer M.; Davis, Kyle W.; McKaskey, Jonathan D.R.G.; Thamke, Joanna N.

    2014-01-01

    includes parts of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming in the United States and Manitoba and Saskatchewan in Canada. The glacial aquifer system is contained within glacial drift consisting primarily of till, with smaller amounts of glacial outwash sand and gravel deposits. The lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer systems are contained within several formations of the Tertiary and Cretaceous geologic systems, which are hydraulically separated from underlying aquifers by a basal confining unit. The lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer systems each were divided into three hydrogeologic units that correspond to one or more lithostratigraphic units. The period prior to 1960 is defined as the predevelopment period when little groundwater was extracted. From 1960 through 1990, numerous flowing wells were installed near the Yellowstone, Little Missouri and Knife Rivers, resulting in local groundwater declines. Recently developed technologies for the extraction of petroleum resources, which largely have been applied in the study area since about 2005, require millions of gallons of water for construction of each well, with additional water needed for long-term operation; therefore, the potential for an increase in groundwater extraction is high. In this study, groundwater recharge and discharge components were estimated for the period 1981–2005. Groundwater recharge primarily occurs from infiltration of rainfall and snowmelt (precipitation recharge) and infiltration of streams into the ground (stream infiltration). Total estimated recharge to the Williston and Powder River control volumes is 4,560 and 1,500 cubic feet per second, respectively. Estimated precipitation recharge is 26 and 15 percent of total recharge for the Williston and Powder River control volumes, respectively. Estimated stream infiltration is 71 and 80 percent of total recharge for the Williston and Powder River control volumes, respectively. Groundwater discharge primarily is to

  15. Water-quality assessment of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in the northern Midwest, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John T.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a regional assessment of groundwater quality of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system, based primarily on raw water samples collected by the NAWQA Program during 1995 through 2007. The NAWQA Program has published findings in local study-unit reports encompassing parts of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system. Data collected from the aquifer system were used in national synthesis reports on selected topics such as specific water-quality constituent classes, well type, or aquifer material; however, a synthesis of groundwater quality at the principal aquifer scale has not been completed and is therefore the major purpose of this report. Water samples collected by the NAWQA Program were analyzed for various classes of characteristics including physical properties, major ions, trace elements, nutrients and dissolved organic carbon, radionuclides (tritium, radon, and radium), pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Subsequent sections of this report provide discussions on these classes of characteristics. The assessment objectives of this report are to (1) summarize constituent concentrations and compare them to human-health benchmarks and non-health guidelines; (2) determine the geographic distribution of constituent concentrations and relate them to various factors such as confining conditions, well type, land use, and groundwater age; and (3) evaluate near-decadal-scale changes in nitrate concentrations and pesticide detections. The most recent sample collected from each well by the NAWQA Program was used for most analyses. Near-decadal-scale changes in nitrate concentrations and pesticide detections were evaluated for selected well networks by using the most recent sample from each well and comparing it to the results from a sample collected 7 or 11 years earlier. Because some of the NAWQA well networks provide a limited areal coverage of the aquifer system, data for raw water samples from other USGS sources and state agencies were included

  16. Quality of groundwater in the Denver Basin aquifer system, Colorado, 2003-5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Beck, Jennifer A.; Paschke, Suzanne; Bauch, Nancy J.; Mashburn, Shana L.

    2014-01-01

    Water-quality data were synthesized to evaluate factors that affect spatial and depth variability in water quality and to assess aquifer vulnerability to contaminants from geologic materials and those of human origin. The quality of shallow groundwater in the alluvial aquifer and shallow bedrock aquifer system has been adversely affected by development of agricultural and urban areas. Land use has altered the pattern and composition of recharge. Increased recharge from irrigation water has mobilized dissolved constituents and increased concentrations in the shallow groundwater. Concentrations of most constituents associated with poor or degraded water quality in shallow groundwater decreased with depth; many of these constituents are not geochemically conservative and are affected by geochemical reactions such as oxidation-reduction reactions. Groundwater age tracers provide additional insight into aquifer vulnerability and help determine if young groundwater of potentially poor quality has migrated to deeper parts of the bedrock aquifers used for drinking-water supply. Age-tracer results were used to group samples into categories of young, mixed, and old groundwater. Groundwater ages transitioned from mostly young in the water-table wells to mostly mixed in the shallowest bedrock aquifer, the Dawson aquifer, to mostly old in the deeper bedrock aquifers. Although the bedrock aquifers are mostly old groundwater of good water quality, several lines of evidence indicate that young, contaminant-bearing recharge has reached shallow to moderate depths in some areas of the bedrock aquifers. The Dawson aquifer is the most vulnerable of the bedrock aquifers to contamination, but results indicate that the older (deeper) bedrock aquifers are also vulnerable to groundwater contamination and that mixing with young recharge has occurred in some areas. Heavy pumping has caused water-level declines in the bedrock aquifers in some parts of the Denver Basin, which has the potential

  17. Hydrogeology and the distribution of salinity in the Floridan Aquifer system, southwestern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    modern freshwater flow system. In an area in north-central Collier County, the altitude of the base of the brackish-water zone is anomalously deep given the position of this area relative to the coast. In this area, the base extends as deep as 2,090 feet below sea level, and the salinity transition zone is not present or is poorly defined. The origin of this anomalous area is interpreted to be related to the development of a unit containing thick dolomite and evaporite beds high in the middle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system. The top of this dolomite-evaporite unit, which probably has very low permeability, occurs at the base of the brackish-water zone in this area. The axis of a high area mapped at the top of the unit trends to the northwest from central Collier County into north-central Lee County. This axis parallels and lies just to the west of the anomalous area, and it could have acted as an impermeable sill, preventing saline water from moving in laterally from the coast to the southwest and up from the Lower Floridan aquifer. Locating a Floridan aquifer system well field in or near this anomalous area could be optimal because of the lack of a salinity interface at depth.

  18. Carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  19. MODFLOW-2000 Ground-Water Model?User Guide to the Subsidence and Aquifer-System Compaction (SUB) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, Jorn; Leake, S.A.; Galloway, D.L.; Wilson, Alicia M.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents a computer program, the Subsidence and Aquifer-System Compaction (SUB) Package, to simulate aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. The SUB Package simulates elastic (recoverable) compaction and expansion, and inelastic (permanent) compaction of compressible fine-grained beds (interbeds) within the aquifers. The deformation of the interbeds is caused by head or pore-pressure changes, and thus by changes in effective stress, within the interbeds. If the stress is less than the preconsolidation stress of the sediments, the deformation is elastic; if the stress is greater than the preconsolidation stress, the deformation is inelastic. The propagation of head changes within the interbeds is defined by a transient, one-dimensional (vertical) diffusion equation. This equation accounts for delayed release of water from storage or uptake of water into storage in the interbeds. Properties that control the timing of the storage changes are vertical hydraulic diffusivity and interbed thickness. The SUB Package supersedes the Interbed Storage Package (IBS1) for MODFLOW, which assumes that water is released from or taken into storage with changes in head in the aquifer within a single model time step and, therefore, can be reasonably used to simulate only thin interbeds. The SUB Package relaxes this assumption and can be used to simulate time-dependent drainage and compaction of thick interbeds and confining units. The time-dependent drainage can be turned off, in which case the SUB Package gives results identical to those from IBS1. Three sample problems illustrate the usefulness of the SUB Package. One sample problem verifies that the package works correctly. This sample problem simulates the drainage of a thick interbed in response to a step change in head in the adjacent aquifer and closely matches the analytical solution. A second sample problem

  20. Ground-water flow in the surficial aquifer system and potential movement of contaminants from selected waste-disposal sites at Naval Station Mayport, Florida. Water-resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Halford, K.J.

    1998-11-01

    Ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer system at Naval Station Mayport near Jacksonville, Florida, was simulated with a two-layer finite-difference model as part of an investigation conducted by the US Geological Survey. A quantifiable understanding of ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer was needed to evaluate remedial-action alternatives under consideration by the Naval Station Mayport to control the possible movement of contaminants from sites on the station. Multi-well aquifer tests, single-well tests, and slug tests were conducted to estimate the hydraulic properties of the surficial aquifer system, which was divided into three geohydrologic units--an S-zone and an I-zone separated by a marsh-muck confining unit.

  1. The importance of shallow confining units to submarine groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bratton, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to variable density flow, the lateral and vertical heterogeneity of submarine sediments creates important controls on coastal aquifer systems. Submarine confining units produce semi-confined offshore aquifers that are recharged on shore. These low-permeability deposits are usually either late Pleistocene to Holocene in age, or date to the period of the last interglacial highstand. Extensive confining units consisting of peat form in tropical mangrove swamps, and in salt marshes and freshwater marshes and swamps at mid-latitudes. At higher latitudes, fine-grained glaciomarine sediments are widespread. The net effect of these shallow confining units is that groundwater from land often flows farther offshore before discharging than would normally be expected. In many settings, the presence of such confining units is critical to determining how and where pollutants from land will be discharged into coastal waters. Alternatively, these confining units may also protect fresh groundwater supplies from saltwater intrusion into coastal wells.

  2. Water-level surface in the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomaszewski, Dan J.

    2011-01-01

    The Chicot equivalent aquifer system is an important source of freshwater in southeastern Louisiana. In 2005, about 47 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Livingston, Tangipahoa, St. Helena, St. Tammany, Washington, and West Feliciana Parishes. Concentrated withdrawals exceeded 5 Mgal/d in Bogalusa, the city of Baton Rouge, and in northwestern East Baton Rouge Parish. In the study area, about 30,000 wells screened in the Chicot equivalent aquifer system were registered with the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (LaDOTD). These wells were constructed for public-supply, industry, irrigation, and domestic uses. Most of the wells were registered as domestic-use wells and are small-diameter, low-yielding wells. Total withdrawal from the Chicot equivalent aquifer system for domestic use was estimated to be 12 Mgal/d in 2005. This report documents the 2009 water-level surface of the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana. The report also shows differences in water-level measurements for the years 1991 and 2009 at selected sites. Understanding changes and trends in water levels is important for continued use, planning, and management of groundwater resources. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, conducted this study of the water-level surface of the Chicot equivalent aquifer system as part of an ongoing effort to monitor groundwater levels in aquifers in Louisiana.

  3. Geospatial compilation of historical water-level altitudes in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers 1977-2013 and Jasper aquifer 2000-13 in the Gulf Coast aquifer system, Houston-Galveston Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Ellis, Robert H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Maps were georeferenced and digitized where existing geographic information system (GIS) data were unavailable (1977–89, 1991, 1995–99). Existing GIS data available for 1990, 1992–94, and 2000–13 were included in the geodatabase. The feature classes were organized into three feature datasets by principal aquifer: Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers.

  4. Approximate potentiometric surface for the aquifer unit A3, southeastern coastal plain aquifer system of the United States, prior to development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    A generalized potentiometric surface map prepared as part of the southeastern United States, Regional Sand Aquifer-System Analysis defines the altitude of water levels under conditions prior to development for aquifer unit A3, the middle group of aquifers in the sand aquifer system. Aquifer unit A3, consisting of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary sands, is under artesian conditions except locally in the recharge areas. The regional flow direction is to the rivers in the area where the unit outcrops, west toward the Mississippi River in Mississippi, and southward to the Gulf of Mexico in Alabama and West Georgia. In eastern Georgia, the flow is southeast toward the Atlantic Ocean , and in South Carolina, the direction of flow is southeast toward the Pee Dee River. (USGS)

  5. Relative Recovery of Thermal Energy and Fresh Water in Aquifer Storage and Recovery Systems.

    PubMed

    Miotliński, K; Dillon, P J

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between thermal energy and fresh water recoveries from an aquifer storage recovery (ASR) well in a brackish confined aquifer. It reveals the spatial and temporal distributions of temperature and conservative solutes between injected and recovered water. The evaluation is based on a review of processes affecting heat and solute transport in a homogeneous aquifer. In this simplified analysis, it is assumed that the aquifer is sufficiently anisotropic to inhibit density-affected flow, flow is axisymmetric, and the analysis is limited to a single ASR cycle. Results show that the radial extent of fresh water at the end of injection is greater than that of the temperature change due to the heating or cooling of the geological matrix as well as the interstitial water. While solutes progress only marginally into low permeability aquitards by diffusion, conduction of heat into aquitards above and below is more substantial. Consequently, the heat recovery is less than the solute recovery when the volume of the recovered water is lower than the injection volume. When the full volume of injected water is recovered the temperature mixing ratio divided by the solute mixing ratio for recovered water ranges from 0.95 to 0.6 for ratios of maximum plume radius to aquifer thickness of 0.6 to 4.6. This work is intended to assist conceptual design for dual use of ASR for conjunctive storage of water and thermal energy to maximize the potential benefits.

  6. Characterizating Multi-layered Coastal Aquifer using Pneumatic Slug Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.; Abere, M.; Mikenna, M.

    2016-12-01

    Results of pneumatic slug tests conducted in a monitoring wells of a shallow aquifer on the California Central Coast are presented. The aquifer is in the Los Osos groundwater basin on the California Central Coast, a semi-closed near-triangular groundwater basin bounded to the north and south by impermeable igneousbed rock and to the west by the Pacific Ocean. The groundwater basin is a multi-layered system comprising a perched, near-surface semi-confined, and a deep confined aquifer. The unincorporated community of Los Osos is wholly dependent on the groundwater basin that is threatened with seawater intrusion and nitratecontamination. The slug tests reported here were performed in the perched and semi-confined aquifers as part of a seawater intrusion characterization study. The semi-confined and confined aquifers show evidence of seawater intrusion with upconing in some deep aquifer municipal wells. The upconing has beeninterpreted by previous studies as evidence of preferential flow through a high permeability channel. The objective of the work was to test this hypothesis by mapping the horizontal and vertical spatial variability of hydraulic parameters across the basin and establish the extent of the high permeability unit.Here only preliminary results of slug tests conducted across the basin for vertically averaged hydraulic parameters are reported. The results provide an indication of the horizontal variability of hydraulic parameters. An additional study will be performed to characterize the vertical variability to investigate the probableexistsence of a high permeability channel.

  7. Geospatial compilation of historical water-level changes in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers 1977-2013 and Jasper aquifer 2000-13, Gulf Coast aquifer system, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Linard, Joshua I.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, and Brazoria County Groundwater Conservation District has produced an annual series of reports that depict water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers of the Gulf Coast aquifer system in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas, from 1977 to 2013. Changes are determined from water-level measurements between December and March of each year from groundwater wells screened in one of the three aquifers. Existing published maps and unpublished geographic information system (GIS) datasets were compiled into a comprehensive geodatabase of all water-level-change maps produced as part of this multiagency effort. Annual water-level-change maps were georeferenced and digitized where existing GIS data were unavailable (1979–99). Existing GIS data available for 2000–13 were included in the geodatabase. The compilation contains 121 datasets showing water-level changes for each primary aquifer of the Gulf Coast aquifer system: 56 for the Chicot aquifer (1977; 1979–2013 and 1990; 1993–2013), 56 for the Evangeline aquifer (1977; 1979–2013 and 1990; 1993–2013), and 9 for the Jasper aquifer (2000; 2005–13).

  8. Hydraulic response of an unconfined-fractured two-aquifer system driven by dual tidal or stream fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedghi, Mohammad M.; Zhan, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    Many islands consist of limestone sedimentary deposits that are better described as a two-aquifer system consisting of an unconfined aquifer (Quaternary sediments) above a fractured aquifer (fractured limestone) in which groundwater heads are closely regulated by tidal fluctuations on both sides of the islands (dual tides). Propagation of tidal signal, reflected in hydraulic head fluctuation in such a two-aquifer system is significantly different from that in a single aquifer system that is often assumed. The Laplace domain solution of the head fluctuation in such a two-aquifer system subjected to dual tides is obtained first and subsequently inverted to yield real-time solution. Unlike previous solutions, Fourier series with complex variables are avoided and Fourier sine transform is used instead. The solution takes into account an instantaneously drainable water table, hydraulic conductivity anisotropy and arbitrary time-dependent tidal fluctuations. The hydraulic connection of the underlying fractured aquifer and the overlying unconfined aquifer is explored in details. The presented solution can be used to evaluate the head fluctuations and the aquifer parameter estimation of the two-aquifer system underneath a strip-shape island subjected to dual tides. The results can be used to determine the optimum piezometer location to estimate hydraulic parameters of the two-aquifer system using groundwater head fluctuation data. Stream-aquifer interaction is similar to the tidal-aquifer interaction if the chemical difference of the salt water and fresh water is not a concern. The developed solution for tidal-aquifer interaction here can also be used to investigate the aquifer response to stream stage variations in river basin aquifers.

  9. A reactive transport model for the geochemical response, detection and potential mitigation of CO2 leakage into a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.; Druhan, J. L.; Vialle, S.; Benson, S. M.; Agarwal, A.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface generally assumes that caprock formations will serve as physical barriers to upward migration of CO2. Stability and coherence of the caprocks are thus important criteria for site selection, but caprock integritycannot be guaranteed with total certainty over the lifetime of the project. As a result, carbon capture and storage projects require reliable techniques to monitor geologic storage sites for newly formed leaks, and the ability to rapidly deploy mitigation measures should leakage occur. Here, we present two-dimensional reactive transport simulations to evaluate the hydrogeochemical characteristics of a newly formed CO2 leak into an overlying reservoir. Simulations use the ToughReact multi-component reactive transport code and hypothetical reservoir characteristics. We focus on the comparatively short time period of days to months following formation of the leak to consider (1) geochemical shifts in formation water indicative of the leak, (2) hydrodynamics of pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak, and (3) delivery of a sealant to the leak through an adjacent well bore. Our results suggest that characteristic shifts in pH and dissolved inorganic carbon might be detected in down-gradient mentoring wells prior to the breakthrough of CO2, and could offer a potential means of identifying small and newly formed leaks. Injecting water into the aquifer through pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak provides a hydrodynamic control that can prevent CO2 from reaching the top of the reservoir, but this action will likely have only minor influence on the rate of leakage through the caprock defect. Injection of a hypothetical sealant through an adjacent pumping well is considered using an aqueous solute with pH-dependent equilibrium constraints such that the species is soluble in the basic pH range but forms a precipitate at neutral to acidic pH conditions associated with CO2-rich water. Injection of this

  10. Flow-system analysis of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Rapid City area, South Dakota--conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual model of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Rapid City area synthesizes the physical geography, hydraulic properties, and ground-water flow components of these important aquifers. The Madison hydrogeologic unit includes the karstic Madison aquifer, which is defined as the upper, more permeable 100 to 200 ft of the Madison Limestone, and the Madison confining unit, which consists of the lower, less permeable part of the Madison Limestone and the Englewood Formation. Overlying the Madison hydrogeologic unit is the Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit, which includes the Minnelusa aquifer in the upper, more permeable 200 to 300 ft and the Minnelusa confining unit in the lower, less permeable part. The Madison and Minnelusa hydrogeologic units outcrop in the study area on the eastern flank of the Black Hills where recharge occurs from streamflow losses and areal recharge. The conceptual model describes streamflow recharge, areal recharge, ground-water flow, storage in aquifers and confining units, unsaturated areas, leakage between aquifers, discharge from artesian springs, and regional outflow. Effective transmissivities estimated for the Madison aquifer range from 500 to 20,000 ft2/d and for the Minnelusa aquifer from 500 to 10,000 ft2/d. Localized anisotropic transmissivity in the Madison aquifer has tensor ratios as high as 45:1. Vertical hydraulic conductivities for the Minnelusa confining unit determined from aquifer tests range from 1.3x10-3 to 3.0x10-1 ft/d. The confined storage coefficient of the Madison and Minnelusa hydrogeologic units was estimated as 3x10-4 ft/d. Specific yield was estimated as 0.09 for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers and 0.03 for the Madison and Minnelusa confining units. Potentiometric surfaces for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers have a general easterly gradient of about 70 ft/mi with local variations. Temporal change in hydraulic head in the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers ranged from about 5 to 95 ft in water years

  11. Geohydrology of the stratified-drift aquifer system in the lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough, Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.; Karig, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Planning Department began a series of studies of the stratified-drift aquifers in Tompkins County to provide geohydrologic data for planners to develop a strategy to manage and protect their water resources. This aquifer study in lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough is the second in a series of aquifer studies in Tompkins County. The study area is within the northern area of the Appalachian Plateau and extends about 9 miles from the boundary between Tompkins County and Tioga County in the south to just south of the City of Ithaca in the north. In lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough, confined sand and gravel aquifers comprise the major water-bearing units while less extensive unconfined units form minor aquifers. About 600 people who live in lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough rely on groundwater from the stratified-drift aquifer system. In addition, water is used by non-permanent residents such as staff at commercial facilities. The estimated total groundwater withdrawn for domestic use is about 45,000 gallons per day (gal/d) or 0.07 cubic foot per second (ft3/s) based on an average water use of 75 gal/d per person for self-supplied water systems in New York. Scouring of bedrock in the preglacial lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek valleys by glaciers and subglacial meltwaters truncated hillside spurs, formed U-shaped, transverse valley profiles, smoothed valley walls, and deepened the valleys by as much as 300 feet (ft), forming a continuous trough. The unconsolidated deposits in the study area consist mostly of glacial drift, both unstratified drift (till) and stratified drift (laminated lake, deltaic, and glaciofluvial sediments), as well as some post-glacial stratified sediments (lake-bottom sediments that were deposited in reservoirs, peat and muck that were deposited in wetlands, and alluvium deposited by streams). Multiple advances and

  12. Plan of study for the northern Midwest regional aquifer-system analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinhilber, W.L.; Young, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age form a major aquifer system in most of Wisconsin and Iowa, northern Illinois, northwestern Indiana, southeastern Minnesota, and northern Missouri. Many metropolitan areas depend on the aquifer for all or part of their water supplies. Declines in potentiometric head have been large in the most heavily pumped areas, most notably Chicago, Milwaukee-Waukesha, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Des Moines. A thorough understanding of the aquifer system is needed for sound management decisions. Thus, a 4-year study of the aquifer, beginning in October 1978, is included in the U.S. Geological Survey 's program of Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. The study will evaluate the aquifer 's water-supply potential, describe its water quality, and, through computer models of the ground-water flow system, provide the means to evaluate regional aquifer response to different patterns of ground-water development. This report describes the objectives, work plan, and organization of this study. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Hydrogeology, Water Quality, and Distribution and Sources of Salinity in the Floridan Aquifer System, Martin and St. Lucie Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2004-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system is considered to be a valuable source for agricultural and municipal water supply in Martin and St. Lucie Counties, despite its brackish water. Increased withdrawals, however, could increase salinity and threaten the quality of withdrawn water. The Floridan aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomitic limestone, and dolomite and is divided into three hydrogeologic units: the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. An informal geologic unit at the top of the Upper Floridan aquifer, referred to as the basal Hawthorn/Suwannee unit, is bound above by a marker unit in the Hawthorn Group and at its base by the Ocala Limestone; a map of this unit shows an area where substantial eastward thickening begins near the coast. This change in thickness is used to divide the study area into inland and coastal areas. In the Upper Floridan aquifer, an area of elevated chloride concentration greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter and water temperature greater than 28 degrees Celsius exists in the inland area and trends northwest through north-central Martin County and western St. Lucie County. A structural feature coincides with this area of greater salinity and water temperature; this feature is marked by a previously mapped northwest-trending basement fault and, based on detailed mapping in this study of the structure at the top of the basal Hawthorn/Suwannee unit, an apparent southeast-trending trough. Higher hydraulic head also has been mapped in this northwest-trending area. Another area of high chloride concentration in the Upper Floridan aquifer occurs in the southern part of the coastal area (in eastern Martin County and northeastern Palm Beach County); chloride concentration in this area is more than 2,000 milligrams per liter and is as great as 8,000 milligrams per liter. A dissolved-solids concentration of less than 10,000 milligrams per liter defines the brackish-water zone in the Floridan aquifer

  14. Summary of the San Juan structural basin regional aquifer-system analysis, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, G.W.; Kernodle, J.M.; Thorn, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    northwestern part of the study area. Results of this study indicate that water chemistry changed in individual wells over short periods of time, not expected in a regional flow system. The chemistry of the water is affected by mixing of recharge, ion filtrate, or very dilute ancient water, and by leakage of saline water. The entire system of ground-water flow and its controlling factors has been defined as the conceptual model. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water flow model was constructed to simulate modern predevelopment flow in the post-Jurassic rocks of the regional flow system. In the ground-water flow model, 14 geologic units or combinations of geologic units were considered to be regional aquifers, and 5 geologic units or combinations of geologic units were considered to be regional confining units. The model simulated flow in 12 layers (hydrostratigraphic units) and used harmonic-mean vertical leakance to indirectly simulate aquifer connection across 3 other hydrostratigraphic confining units in addition to coupling the 12 units.

  15. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. )

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  16. Hydrostratigraphic modeling of a complex, glacial-drift aquifer system for importation into MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Beverly L; Larson, David R; Abert, Curtis C; Wilson, Steven D; Roadcap, George S

    2003-01-01

    Deposition from at least three episodes of glaciation left a complex glacial-drift aquifer system in central Illinois. The deepest and largest of these aquifers, the Sankoty-Mahomet Aquifer, occupies the lower part of a buried bedrock valley and supplies water to communities throughout central Illinois. Thin, discontinuous aquifers are present within glacial drift overlying the Sankoty-Mahomet Aquifer. This study was commissioned by local governments to identify possible areas where a regional water supply could be obtained from the aquifer with minimal adverse impacts on existing users. Geologic information from more than 2,200 existing water well logs was supplemented with new data from 28 test borings, water level measurements in 430 wells, and 35 km of surface geophysical profiles. A three-dimensional (3-D) hydrostratigraphic model was developed using a contouring software package, a geographic information system (GIS), and the 3-D geologic modeling package, EarthVision. The hydrostratigraphy of the glacial-drift sequence was depicted as seven uneven and discontinuous layers, which could be viewed from an infinite number of horizontal and vertical slices and as solid models of any layer. Several iterations were required before the 3-D model presented a reasonable depiction of the aquifer system. Layers from the resultant hydrostratigraphic model were imported into MODFLOW, where they were modified into continuous layers. This approach of developing a 3-D hydrostratigraphic model can be applied to other areas where complex aquifer systems are to be modeled and is also useful in helping lay audiences visualize aquifer systems.

  17. Hydrostratigraphic modeling of a complex, glacial-drift aquifer system for importation into MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, B.L.; Larson, D.R.; Abert, C.C.; Wilson, S.D.; Roadcap, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Deposition from at least three episodes of glaciation left a complex glacial-drift aquifer system in central Illinois. The deepest and largest of these aquifers, the Sankoty-Mahomet Aquifer, occupies the lower part of a buried bedrock valley and supplies water to communities throughout central Illinois. Thin, discontinuous aquifers are present within glacial drift overlying the Sankoty-Mahomet Aquifer. This study was commissioned by local governments to identify possible areas where a regional water supply could be obtained from the aquifer with minimal adverse impacts on existing users. Geologic information from more than 2200 existing water well logs was supplemented with new data from 28 test borings, water level measurements in 430 wells, and 35 km of surface geophysical profiles. A three-dimensional (3-D) hydrostratigraphic model was developed using a contouring software package, a geographic information system (GIS), and the 3-D geologic modeling package, EarthVision??. The hydrostratigraphy of the glacial-drift sequence was depicted as seven uneven and discontinuous layers, which could be viewed from an infinite number of horizontal and vertical slices and as solid models of any layer. Several iterations were required before the 3-D model presented a reasonable depiction of the aquifer system. Layers from the resultant hydrostratigraphic model were imported into MODFLOW, where they were modified into continuous layers. This approach of developing a 3-D hydrostratigraphic model can be applied to other areas where complex aquifer systems are to be modeled and is also useful in helping lay audiences visualize aquifer systems.

  18. Factors controlling elevated lead concentrations in water samples from aquifer systems in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, B.G.; Berndt, M.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Hansard, P.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents results of detailed statistical analyses of total and dissolved Pb concentrations in water samples collected from the major aquifer systems in Florida for the FGWQMN [Florida Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network] to determine the influence of anthropogenic factors on elevated Pb concentrations. In addition, Pb isotopic data are presented for water samples collected from a subset of 13 wells in the monitoring network, samples of aquifer material, rainfall, and Pb counterweights. The Pb-isotope data provide a better understanding of the relative contributions of anthropogenic and natural sources of Pb in ground water samples from Florida`s major aquifer systems.

  19. Preliminary assessment of water quality and its relation to hydro-geology and land use: Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, C.; Vowinkel, E.F.; Nawyn, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The relation of water quality to hydrogeology and land use was evaluated using analysis of water samples from 71 wells in the northern part of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in New Jersey. The sampling network was evaluated for variations in hydrogeology. Well depths, pumping rates, and the number of wells in the confined and unconfined parts of the aquifer system did not differ among land-use groups. The influences of hydrogeologic factors on water quality were evaluated without considering land use. Shallow wells had the highest specific conductance and major ion concentrations. Water from wells in the unconfined part of the aquifer system had the highest dissolved organic carbon concentration. Dissolved oxygen and nitrate concentrations were lowest, trace metals concentrations were highest, and phenols were detected most frequently in groundwater from undeveloped land. Major ions and trace metals concentrations were lowest, dissolved oxygen and copper concentrations were highest, and pesticides were most frequently detected in groundwater from agricultural land. Nitrate concentrations were highest and orthophosphate, nitrite, and purgeable organics were detected most frequently in groundwater from urban land. These water quality data were compared to data from the same aquifer system in southern New Jersey. Frequencies of detection of purgeable organics among land-use groups were similar in the northern and southern areas. 69 refs., 23 figs., 16 tab.

  20. Preliminary assessment of water quality and its relation to hydrogeology and land use; Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Cynthia; Vowinkel, E.F.; Nawyn, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The relation of water quality to hydrogeology and land use was evaluated using analysis of water samples from 71 wells in the northern part of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in New Jersey. The sampling network was evaluated for variations in hydrogeology. Well depths, pumping rates, and the number of wells in the confined and unconfined parts of the aquifer system did not differ among land-use groups. The influences of hydrogeologic factors on water quality were evaluated without considering land use. Shallow wells had the highest specific conductance and major ion concentrations. Water from wells in the unconfined part of the aquifer system had the highest dissolved organic carbon concentration. Dissolved oxygen and nitrate concentrations were lowest, trace metals concentrations were highest, and phenols were detected most frequently in groundwater from undeveloped land. Major ions and trace metals concentrations were lowest, dissolved oxygen and copper concentrations were highest, and pesticides were most frequently detected in groundwater from agricultural land. Nitrate concentrations were highest and orthophosphate, nitrite, and purgeable organics were detected most frequently in groundwater from urban land. These water quality data were compared to data from the same aquifer system in southern New Jersey. Frequencies of detection of purgeable organics among land-use groups were similar in the northern and southern areas. (USGS)

  1. Recovery of injected freshwater from a brackish aquifer with a multiwell system.

    PubMed

    Miotliński, Konrad; Dillon, Peter J; Pavelic, Paul; Barry, Karen; Kremer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Herein we propose a multiple injection and recovery well system strategically operated for freshwater storage in a brackish aquifer. With the system we call aquifer storage transfer and recovery (ASTR) by using four injection and two production wells, we are capable of achieving both high recovery efficiency of injected freshwater and attenuation of contaminants through adequately long residence times and travel distances within the aquifer. The usual aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) scheme, in which a single well is used for injection and recovery, does not warrant consistent treatment of injected water due to the shorter minimum residence times and travel distances. We tested the design and operation of the system over 3 years in a layered heterogeneous limestone aquifer in Salisbury, South Australia. We demonstrate how a combination of detailed aquifer characterization and solute transport modeling can be used to maintain acceptable salinity of recovered water for its intended use along with natural treatment of recharge water. ASTR can be used to reduce treatment costs and take advantage of aquifers with impaired water quality that might locally not be otherwise beneficially used.

  2. Electron Recirculation in Electrostatic Multicusp Systems: 1. Confinement and Losses in Simple Power Law Wells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-19

    ELECTROSTATIC MULTICUSP SYSTEMS: I - CONFINEMENT AND LOSSES IN SIMPLE POWER LAW WELLSt Robert W. Bussard and Accesion For Katherine E. King NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB...9100 A Center Street, Manassas, VA 22110, (703) 330-7990 92-’ 9 q2-f- ,f ELECTRON RECIRCULATION IN ELECTROSTATIC MULTICUSP SYSTEMS: I - CONFINEMENT AND...confinement in Polywellt*-type multicusp systems. These are special polyhedral configurations 6 . 7 that allow formation of stable deep electrostatic

  3. Geology of the surficial aquifer system, Dade County, Florida; lithologic logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causaras, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The geologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Dade County, Florida, was investigated as part of a longterm study by the USGS in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, to describe the geology, hydrologic characteristics, and groundwater quality of the surficial aquifer system. Thirty-three test wells were drilled completely through the surficial aquifer system and into the underlying, relatively impermeable units of the Tamiami and Hawthorn Formations. Detailed lithologic logs were made from microscopic examination of rock cuttings and cores obtained from these wells. The logs were used to prepare geologic sections that show the lithologic variations, thickness of the lithologic units, and different geologic formations that comprise the aquifers system. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Hydrogeology and ground-water flow of the drift and Platteville aquifer system, St Louis Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Model simulations indicate that vertical ground-water flow from the drift aquifers and from the Platteville aquifer to underlying bedrock aquifers is greatest through bedrock valleys. The convergence of flow paths near bedrock valleys and the greater volume of water moving through the valleys would likely result in both increased concentrations and greater vertical movement of contaminants in areas underlain by bedrock valleys as compared to areas not underlain by bedrock valleys. Model results also indicate that field measurements of hydraulic head might not help locate discontinuities in confining units and additional test drilling to locate discontinuities might be necessary.

  5. Hydrogeology of the Susquehanna River valley-fill aquifer system and adjacent areas in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer system along a 32-mile reach of the Susquehanna River valley and adjacent areas was evaluated in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York. The surficial geology, inferred ice-marginal positions, and distribution of stratified-drift aquifers were mapped from existing data. Ice-marginal positions, which represent pauses in the retreat of glacial ice from the region, favored the accumulation of coarse-grained deposits whereas more steady or rapid ice retreat between these positions favored deposition of fine-grained lacustrine deposits with limited coarse-grained deposits at depth. Unconfined aquifers with thick saturated coarse-grained deposits are the most favorable settings for water-resource development, and three several-mile-long sections of valley were identified (mostly in Broome County) as potentially favorable: (1) the southernmost valley section, which extends from the New York–Pennsylvania border to about 1 mile north of South Windsor, (2) the valley section that rounds the west side of the umlaufberg (an isolated bedrock hill within a valley) north of Windsor, and (3) the east–west valley section at the Broome County–Chenango County border from Nineveh to East of Bettsburg (including the lower reach of the Cornell Brook valley). Fine-grained lacustrine deposits form extensive confining units between the unconfined areas, and the water-resource potential of confined aquifers is largely untested. Recharge, or replenishment, of these aquifers is dependent not only on infiltration of precipitation directly on unconfined aquifers, but perhaps more so from precipitation that falls in adjacent upland areas. Surface runoff and shallow groundwater from the valley walls flow downslope and recharge valley aquifers. Tributary streams that drain upland areas lose flow as they enter main valleys on permeable alluvial fans. This infiltrating water also recharges valley aquifers. Current (2012) use of

  6. Hydrogeology, water quality, and simulated effects of ground-water withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer system, Seminole County and vicinity, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.; Halford, Keith J.

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogeology and ground-water quality of Seminole County in east-central Florida was evaluated. A ground-water flow model was developed to simulate the effects of both present day (September 1996 through August 1997) and projected 2020 ground-water withdrawals on the water levels in the surficial aquifer system and the potentiometric surface of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers in Seminole County and vicinity. The Floridan aquifer system is the major source of ground water in the study area. In 1965, ground-water withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer system in Seminole County were about 11 million gallons per day. In 1995, withdrawals totaled about 69 million gallons per day. Of the total ground water used in 1995, 74 percent was for public supply, 12 percent for domestic self-supplied, 10 percent for agriculture self-supplied, and 4 percent for recreational irrigation. The principal water-bearing units in Seminole County are the surficial aquifer system and the Floridan aquifer system. The two aquifer systems are separated by the intermediate confining unit, which contains beds of lower permeability sediments that confine the water in the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system has two major water-bearing zones (the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Lower Floridan aquifer), which are separated by a less-permeable semiconfining unit. Upper Floridan aquifer water levels and spring flows have been affected by ground-water development. Long-term hydrographs of four wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer show a general downward trend from the early 1950's until 1990. The declines in water levels are caused predominantly by increased pumpage and below average annual rainfall. From 1991 to 1998, water levels rose slightly, a trend that can be explained by an increase in average annual rainfall. Long-term declines in the potentiometric surface varied throughout the area, ranging from about 3 to 12 feet. Decreases in spring discharge also have been

  7. Characterization of flow dynamics and vulnerability in a coastal aquifer system.

    PubMed

    Murgulet, Dorina; Tick, Geoffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Traditional aquifer vulnerability techniques primarily rely on spatial property data for a region and are limited by their ability to directly or indirectly assess flow and transport processes occurring from the surface to depth within an aquifer system. The main objective of this study was to investigate groundwater vulnerability in terms of aquifer interconnectivity and flow dynamics. A combination of stable isotopes, groundwater age-dating (radiocarbon), and geomorphic/geogenic spatial analyses was applied to a regional, highly developed coastal aquifer to explain the presence of nitrate at depth. The average δ(13) C value (-17.3 ± 2‰ VPDB, n = 27) is characteristic of groundwater originating from locally infiltrated precipitation through extensively cultivated soils. The average δ(18) O and δD values (-4.0 ± 0.1‰ VSMOW, n = 27; δD: -19.3 ± 1‰ VSMOW, n = 27, respectively) are similar to precipitation water derived from maritime sources feeding the region's surface water and groundwater. Stable and radioactive isotopes reveal significant mixing between shallow and deep aquifers due to high velocities, hydraulic connection, and input of local recharge water to depths. Groundwater overdevelopment enhances deeper and faster modern water downward flux, amplifying aquifer vulnerability. Therefore, aquifer vulnerability is a variable, dependent on the type and degree of stress conditions experienced by a groundwater system as well as the geospatial properties at the near surface.

  8. Hydrogeologic framework of the Willamette Lowland aquifer system, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, D.G.; Gannett, Marshall W.; Vaccaro, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the hydraulic characteristics of the materials that make up the Willamette Lowland aquifer system, ground-water movement in the aquifer system, estimates of ground-water recharge, ground-water quality characteristics, construction and use of cross-sectional numerical ground-water flow models, hydrologic controls on ground-water movement, water budgets and flow paths, and a description and application of a conceptual model.

  9. Integrating hydrogeochemical, hydrogeological, and environmental tracer data to understand groundwater flow for a karstified aquifer system.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskiy, Igor; Selle, Benny

    2015-04-01

    For karstified aquifer systems, numerical models of groundwater flow are difficult to setup and parameterize. However, a system understanding useful for groundwater management may be obtained without applying overly complicated models. In this study, we demonstrate for a karstified carbonate aquifer in south-western Germany that a combination of methods with moderate data requirements can be used to infer flowpaths and transit times of groundwater to production wells.

  10. Geochemistry of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system in the northern midwest, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    The geochemistry of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system was modified during the Pleistocene by large-scale emplacement of glacial meltwater, as indicated by large-scale emplacement of glacial meltwater, as indicated by the investigation of stable isotopes of water, and a plume of dilute water that trends perpendicular to the direction of ground-water flow in Iowa and Missouri. Ground water in this part of the aquifer system could be hundreds of thousands of years old.

  11. Digital model evaluation of the predevelopment flow system of the Tertiary limestone aquifer, Southeast Georgia, Northeast Florida, and South South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krause, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    A computer model using finite-difference techniques was used successfully to simulate the predevelopment flow regime within the multilayered Tertiary limestone aquifer system in Southeastern Georgia, Northeastern Florida, and Southern South Carolina as part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Tertiary Limestone Regional Aquifer System analysis. The aquifer, of early Eocene to Miocene age, ranges from thin interbedded clastics and marl in the updip area to massive limestone and dolomite 1,500 feet thick in the downdip area. The aquifer is confined above by Miocene clay beds, and terminates at depth in low-permeability rocks or the saltwater interface. Model-simulated transmissivity of the upper permeable zone ranged from about 1 x 10 super 3 foot squared per day in the updip area and within parts of the Gulf Trough (a series of alinement basins filled by fine clastic in material) to about 1 x 10 super 6 foot squared per day in South Georgia, and area having large secondarily developed solution channels. The model results indicate that only about 540 cubic feet per second of water flowed through the predeveloped system, from the updip highland area of high altitude and in the areas north of Valdosta and southwest of Jacksonville, to discharge along streams in the updip area and diffuse upward leakage in the downdip area near the coast and offshore. (USGS)

  12. Interaction of various flow systems in small alpine catchments: conceptual model of the upper Gurk Valley aquifer, Carinthia, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilberg, Sylke; Riepler, Franz

    2016-08-01

    Small alpine valleys usually show a heterogeneous hydraulic situation. Recurring landslides create temporal barriers for the surface runoff. As a result of these postglacial processes, temporal lakes form, and thus lacustrine fine-grained sedimentation intercalates with alluvial coarse-grained layers. A sequence of alluvial sediments (confined and thus well protected aquifers) and lacustrine sediments (aquitards) is characteristic for such an environment. The hydrogeological situation of fractured hard-rock aquifers in the framing mountain ranges is characterized by superficially high hydraulic conductivities as the result of tectonic processes, deglaciation and postglacial weathering. Fracture permeability and high hydraulic gradients in small-scaled alpine catchments result in the interaction of various flow systems in various kinds of aquifers. Spatial restrictions and conflicts between the current land use and the requirements of drinking-water protection represent a special challenge for water resource management in usually densely populated small alpine valleys. The presented case study describes hydrogeological investigations within the small alpine valley of the upper Gurktal (Upper Carinthia, Austria) and the adjacent Höllenberg Massif (1,772 m above sea level). Hydrogeological mapping, drilling, and hydrochemical and stable isotope analyses of springs and groundwater were conducted to identify a sustainable drinking-water supply for approximately 1,500 inhabitants. The results contribute to a conceptual hydrogeological model with three interacting flow systems. The local and the intermediate flow systems are assigned to the catchment of the Höllenberg Massif, whereas the regional flow system refers to the bordering Gurktal Alps to the north and provides an appropriate drinking water reservoir.

  13. Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

    1988-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Hydrogeologic framework and hydrologic budget components of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, S.C.; Morgan, D.S.; Welch, W.B.; Ely, D.M.; Hinkle, S.R.; Vaccaro, J.J.; Orzol, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers an area of about 44,000 square miles in a structural and topographic basin within the drainage of the Columbia River in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The primary aquifers are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying sediment. Eighty percent of the groundwater use in the study area is for irrigation, in support of a $6 billion per year agricultural economy. Water-resources issues in the Columbia Plateau include competing agricultural, domestic, and environmental demands. Groundwater levels were measured in 470 wells in 1984 and 2009; water levels declined in 83 percent of the wells, and declines greater than 25 feet were measured in 29 percent of the wells. Conceptually, the system is a series of productive basalt aquifers consisting of permeable interflow zones separated by less permeable flow interiors; in places, sedimentary aquifers overly the basalts. The aquifer system of the CPRAS includes seven hydrogeologic units-the overburden aquifer, three aquifer units in the permeable basalt rock, two confining units, and a basement confining unit. The overburden aquifer includes alluvial and colluvial valley-fill deposits; the three basalt units are the Saddle Mountains, Wanapum, and Grande Ronde Basalts and their intercalated sediments. The confining units are equivalent to the Saddle Mountains-Wanapum and Wanapum-Grande Ronde interbeds, referred to in this study as the Mabton and Vantage Interbeds, respectively. The basement confining unit, referred to as Older Bedrock, consists of pre-CRBG rocks that generally have much lower permeabilities than the basalts and are considered the base of the regional flow system. Based on specific-capacity data, median horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh) values for the overburden, basalt units, and bedrock are 161, 70, and 6 feet per day, respectively. Analysis of oxygen isotopes in water and carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon from

  15. Potentiometric surfaces of the intermediate aquifer system, west-central Florida, May, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mularoni, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The intermediate aquifer system underlies a 5000-sq-mi area including De Soto, Sarasota, Hardee, Manatee, and parts of Charlotte, Hillsborough, Highlands, and Polk Counties, Florida. It is overlain by the surf@cial aquifer system and underlain by the Floridan aquifer system. The potentiometric surface of the intermediate aquifer system was mapped by determining the altitude of water levels in a network of wells and represented on a map by contours that connect points of equal altitude. This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the spring dry season when ground- water withdrawals for agricultural use were high. The cumulative rainfall for the study area was 4.84 inches above normal for the period from June 1992 to May 1993. Hydrographs for selected wells indicated that the annual and seasonal fluctuations of the water levels were generally large (greater than 15 feet) in the central interior region where water demand for irrigation is high during the fall and spring. Seasonal fluctuations were smaller in the northern recharge area where water use is predominantly for public supply. Water levels measured in May 1993 for the composite intermediate aquifer potentiometric surface were lower than those measured in May or September 1992. A cone of depression exists in the potentiometric surface for the composite aquifer system at Warm Mineral Springs, which is a natural discharge point from this system.

  16. The Sparta Aquifer: A Sustainable Water Resource?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Paul W.; Hays, Phillip D.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Sparta aquifer is an aquifer of regional importance within the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. It consists of varying amounts of unconsolidated sand, inter-stratified with silt and clay lenses within the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group. It extends from south Texas, north into Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and eastward into Mississippi and Alabama (fig. 1). On both the west and east sides of the Mississippi embayment, the Sparta aquifer is exposed at the surface (outcrops) and is locally unconfined; it becomes confined as it dips toward the axis of the embayment, (generally corresponding with the Mississippi River) and southward toward the Gulf of Mexico where it is deeply buried in the subsurface (Hosman, 1968). Generalized ground-water flow in the Sparta aquifer is from the outcrop areas to the axis (center) of the embayment (fig. 2). In Arkansas, the Sparta aquifer outcrops parallel to the Fall Line at the western extreme of the Mississippi embayment (the Fall Line is a line dividing the mountainous highlands of Arkansas from the lowland area); and the formation dips from its outcrop area to the southeast. The Sparta aquifer supplies water for municipalities, industries such as paper production, and to a lesser degree, irrigation of agricultural crops (fig. 3). This report highlights hydrologic conditions of the aquifer in Arkansas County as an example of how water use is affecting water levels.

  17. A critical evaluation of combined engineered and aquifer treatment systems in water recycling.

    PubMed

    Dillon, P; Page, D; Vanderzalm, J; Pavelic, P; Toze, S; Bekele, E; Sidhu, J; Prommer, H; Higginson, S; Regel, R; Rinck-Pfeiffer, S; Purdie, M; Pitman, C; Wintgens, T

    2008-01-01

    Australian experience at five research sites where stormwater and reclaimed water have been stored in aquifers prior to reuse, have yielded valuable information about water treatment processes in anaerobic and aerobic aquifers. One of these sites is the stormwater to potable water ASTR project at the City of Salisbury, a demonstration project within the broader EC project 'RECLAIM WATER'. A framework for characterising the effectiveness of such treatment for selected organic chemicals, natural organic matter, and pathogens is being developed for inclusion in new Australian Guidelines for Management of Aquifer Recharge. The combination of pre-treatments (including passive systems such as reed beds) and aquifer treatment effectiveness in relation to source waters and intended uses of recovered water will be described. Advantages and disadvantages of various types of pre-treatments in relation to effectiveness and sustainability of managed aquifer recharge will be discussed taking account of aquifer characteristics. These observations will be consolidated into a draft set of principles to assist in selection of engineered treatments compatible with passive treatment in aquifers.

  18. Hydrogeology and preliminary assessment of regional flow in the upper Cretaceous and adjacent aquifers in the northern Mississippi embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Mesko, T.O.

    1988-01-01

    On a regional scale, the groundwater system of the northern Mississippi embayment is composed of a series of nonindurated clastic sediments that overlie a thick sequence of Paleozoic carbonate, sandstones, and shales. The units that comprise the geohydrologic framework of this study are the alluvium-lower Wilcox Aquifer the Midway confining unit, the Upper Cretaceous aquifer, the Cretaceous-Paleozoic confining unit, and the Ozark-St. Francois aquifer. The Upper Cretaceous aquifer of Late Cretaceous age is the primary focus of this investigation; the study is part of the Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. A four layer finite-difference groundwater flow model enabled testing of alternative boundary concepts and provide a refined definition of the hydrologic budget of the deep aquifers. The alluvium-lower Wilcox aquifer, the Upper Cretaceous aquifer, and the Ozark-St. Francois aquifer form layers 2 through 4, respectively. Layer 1 is an inactive layer of constant heads representing shallow water levels, which are a major control on recharge to and discharge from the regional system. A matrix of leakance values simulates each confining unit, allowing vertical interchange of water between different aquifers. The model was calibrated to 1980 conditions by using the assumption that 1980 was near steady-state conditions; it was calibrated to simulate observed heads were found to be most sensitive to pumping, and least sensitive to the leakance. By using all available water quality and water level data, alternative boundary conditions were tested by comparing model simulated heads to observed heads. The results of the early modeling effort also contribute to a better understanding of the regional hydrologic budget, indicating that: upward leakage from the Ozark-St. Francois aquifer to the Upper Cretaceous aquifer is about 43 cu ft/sec; upward recharge of about 68 cu ft/sec occurs to the lower Wilcox-alluvium aquifer from the Upper Cretaceous aquifer; and the

  19. Bibliography on ground water in glacial-aquifer systems in the Northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltshire, Denise A.; Lyford, Forest P.; Cohen, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey established the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program to evaluate major interconnected aquifers or groups of aquifers that share similar characteristics within a region. One of the objectives of the Northeastern Glacial RASA is to provide information on the occurrence and quality of ground water in glacial deposits in ten States: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. To help meet the objectives of the RASA program, an automated bibliographic data base was developed. The data base contains references to ground-water resources of glacial-aquifer systems in the ten States listed above. This bibliography contains more than 700 ground-water related references that date from 1839 through 1984. The bibliography lists books, journal articles, conference proceedings, government and other technical reports, theses, and maps. Unpublished manuscripts, publications in press, newspaper articles, and book reviews are omitted from the bibliography.

  20. Glacial aquifer systems in the northeastern United States; a plan for study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, F.P.; Dysart, J.E.; Randall, A.D.; Kontis, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey project designed to study the availability and quality of water in glacial aquifers in the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Ohio is scheduled for completion in 1986. It will focus on general principles that define aquifer geometry, hydraulic properties of sediments, recharge, discharge, physical-chemical properties of water, rock and water-rock interactions, and mechanisms for mixing of water from multiple sources. Planned project activities include compilation and analysis of available data for a regionwide analysis of glacial-aquifer systems, studies of selected system components such as recharge and chemical processes, classification of aquifers with regard to water-supply potential, and construction of generalized ground-water models to predict responses of types of aquifer systems to pumping and climatic stress. This report describes the general characteristics of glacial aquifer systems in the Northeastern United States and of planned work elements of the study. (USGS)

  1. Transverse ion loss in the end mirror systems of an ambipolar confinement system (tandem mirror)

    SciTech Connect

    Pekker, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    This paper analyzes the transverse loss of the ''central'' ions confined by the end mirror systems of a tendem mirror system. This loss results from the pronounced elongation of the drift trajectories in the transverse direction and can substantially shorten the plasma confinement time in the system, tau/sub c/. A classification of the drift surfaces of the trapped ions is offered. The current of these ions drawn by the limiter is calculated. The effect of the ''inverse-loss-cone'' instability and of the radial electric field on tau/sub c/ is also discussed.

  2. Response to Comment by H. Lough, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, on the Paper " Stream Depletion Predictions using Pumping Test Data from A Heterogeneous Stream-Aquifer System (A Case Study from the Gr

    SciTech Connect

    Kollet, S J; Zlotnik, V A

    2004-12-20

    We thank H. Lough for her interest in our data set and the attempt to re-analyze our results (Kollet and Zlotnik, 2003) using the recent model by Hunt (2003). We welcome others to share our unique data set of the pumping test from the Prairie Creek site, Nebraska, USA. Nevertheless we believe that this particular attempt failed, because H. Lough selected a wrong model of semi-confined aquifer conditions for the interpretation of the pumping test data, which was collected in an unconfined aquifer. H. Lough based her selection on the three distinct drawdown segments observed during the test. It is well known that geologically distinct aquifers can yield a three-segment drawdown response under pumping conditions (e.g., Streltsova, 1988). Examples include unconfined aquifers (e.g., Neuman, 1972; Moench, 1997), aquifers with double porosity or fractures (e.g., Barenblatt et al., 1960; Boulton and Streltsova-Adams, 1978), and (semi-) confined aquifers in contact with aquitards (e.g. Cooley and Case, 1973; Moench, 1985). At the Prairie Creek site the aquifer is unconfined. The interpretation of the pumping test data collected at the site using type curves that are valid for an aquifer-aquitard system is a mistake. In fact, this approach illustrates a typical problem associated with inverse modeling: drastically different models can closely reproduce a system response and yield some parameter estimates, although the models do not represent the real system adequately. Here, the improper model yields some parameter estimates for an aquitard, although the aquitard does not exist at the Prairie Creek test site. We must also unequivocally state that the model by Hunt (2003) is clearly formulated and correct for stream-aquifer-aquitard systems within the stated limitations (pumping wells screened only in the lowest stratigraphic layer, etc.). However, the Hunt (1999) or BZT (Butler et al., 2001) models should be used for interpreting pumping tests near streams in non

  3. Hubbard Models in Confined Geometries: Statistical Mechanics of Inhomogeneous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, James David

    Optical lattice experiments (OLE) with cold atoms provide an exciting new testing ground for quantum many body models, like the fermion Hubbard model. The conditions of OLE experiments, however, differ in significant ways from our current theoretical models- such as 1) the use of an inhomogeneous potential for trapping atoms and 2) an environment characterized by constant entropy, rather than constant temperature. For experimenters, these differences complicate the identification of phase transitions and comparisons of experimental results with numerical simulations. This research simulates the effects of these experimental constraints with current numerical models and analyzes the impact of these effects on identifying critical phases and phase transitions in OLEs. The results provide potential guidance for OLE experimenters in the exploration of important theoretical questions like the nature and onset of Mott insulating or d-wave super-conducting phases. For the 2D fermion Hubbard model, the research analyzes the impact of several current and proposed methods for trapping atoms in OLEs. Using Quantum Monte Carlo results under constant entropy, we evaluate the effects of these trapping methods on magnetic order and d-wave pairing correlations for the resulting inhomogeneous systems. The goal is to identify the confinement techniques which maximize the likelihood for observing magnetic order or superconductivity in optical lattices

  4. Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC) for toroidal confinement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Kolemen, Egemen; Lazerson, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Because of intrinsic anisotropy of high temperature plasma with respect to magnetic field, use of proper coordinates is of high priority for both theory and numerical methods. While in axisymmetric case, the poloidal flux function Y(r,z)=const determines proper flux coordinates, in 3-D, such a function does not exist. The destruction of nested magnetic surfaces even by small 3-D perturbations leads to a sudden change of topology of magnetic field. As a result, the coordinate systems can no longer be based on tracing the magnetic field lines resulting in difficulties for theory and 3-D numerical simulations. The RMC coordinates a,θ,ζ presented here (introduced in 1998 but not really used) are nested toroidal coordinates, which are best aligned with an ergodic confinement fields. In particular, in RMC the vector potential of the magnetic field has an irreducible form A = φ00(a)∇θ +[Y00(a) +ψ^*(a,θ,ζ)]∇ζ , where 3-D function ψ^* contains only resonant Fourier harmonics of angle coordinates. RMC can be generated and advanced using a fast (Newton) algorithm not involving the field line tracing.

  5. Framework for regional synthesis of water-quality data for the glacial aquifer system in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Kelly L.; Arnold, Terri L.

    2005-01-01

    The glacial aquifer system is the largest principal aquifer in aerial extent and ground-water use for public supply in the United States. A principal aquifer is defined as a regionally extensive aquifer or aquifer system that has the potential to be used as a source of potable water (U.S. Geological Survey, 2003). Multiple aquifers often are grouped into large, extensive aquifer systems such as the glacial aquifer system. The glacial aquifer system is considered here to include all unconsolidated aquifers above bedrock north of the line of continental glaciation throughout the country (fig. 1). Total withdrawals from the glacial aquifer system were 3,560 million gallons per day in 2000, which constitutes almost 5 percent of total withdrawals from all aquifers in the United States (Maupin and Barber, 2005). Approximately 41 million people relied on the glacial aquifer for public supply and domestic use in 2000. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program began assessing the glacial aquifer system in 1991. The assessment of water-quality data on a regional scale, such as the glacial aquifer system, is coincident with the regional framework established by the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program (RASA) (Sun and others, 1997). From 1978 to 1995, the RASA Program systematically evaluated 25 of the Nation's most important groundwater systems including studies in the glacial aquifer system in the northeast, Midwest, and northern Midwest United States. The NAWQA Program is building on the work of the RASA Program to study the water quality of 16 of the most important ground-water systems (Lapham and others, 2005). Over 1,700 water-quality samples have been collected by the NAWQA Program from 1991 to 2004 to assess the glacial aquifer system. This large data set is unique in that the samples have been collected using a consistent sampling protocol, and multiple nested samples. The nested samples address the recently recharged shallow

  6. Observation of a Distinct Transition in Transport Response to Injection Stress in the Floridan Aquifer System, Southeastern Florida, U.S.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. N.; Cunningham, K. J.; Foster, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (MDWASD) injects effluent approximately one km below land surface into the Boulder Zone (BZ) at the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant (NDWWTP). The BZ is highly conductive and composed of fractured dolomite. MDWASD monitors upward effluent migration 450 m below land surface in the Avon Park Permeable Zone (APPZ). The BZ and APPZ---units within the Floridan aquifer system---are separated by a series of inter-bedded aquifers and leaky confining units with hydraulic conductivities that are orders of magnitude smaller than the BZ. MDWASD injected effluent at the NDWWTP during two distinct periods: (1) July 1997 to September 1999, and (2) August 2004 to January 2011. No effluent was injected between October 1999 and July 2004. A few months after the July 1997 injection, MDWASD observed effluent constituents in the APPZ (Figure 1). Some confinement bypass feature permits effluent constituents to be transported from the BZ to the APPZ. Bypass features may include poorly-cased wells, or natural conduits such as fractures, faults, or karst collapse systems. It is possible to describe confinement bypass features with conductance KA/L, where K is hydraulic conductivity, A is cross-sectional area, and L is length. MDWASD observed a distinct transition in the transport response to injection stress of total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration in the APPZ. The conductance required to describe early system response (1997-1999) is one order-of-magnitude larger than the conductance required to describe late system response (2004-2011). Hypotheses to explain transient conductance include clogging of bypass features by some geochemical or biological process that results from the mixing of effluent with groundwater; dissolution or precipitation; or changes in bypass-feature geometry forced by cyclical changes in aquifer-fluid pressure associated with injection. Hypotheses may be tested with geochemical analyses, tracer tests, hydraulic

  7. Factors controlling elevated lead concentrations in water samples from aquifer systems in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Bullen, M.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Hansard, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of total lead (Pb) and dissolved Pb exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level of 15 micrograms per liter (mg/L) in approximately 19 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively, of ground-water samples collected during 1991-96 from a statewide network of monitoring wells designed to delineate background water quality of Florida's major aquifer systems. Differences in total Pb concentrations among aquifer systems reflect the combined influence of anthropogenic sources and chemical conditions in each system. A highly significant (p<0.001) difference in median total Pb concentrations was found for water samples from wells with water-level recording devices that contain Pb-counterweights (14 mg/L) compared to non-recorder wells (2 mg/L). Differences between total Pb concentrations for recorder and non-recorder wells are even more pronounced when compared for each aquifer system. The largest differences for recorder status are found for the surficial aquifer system, where median total Pb concentrations are 44 and 2.4 mg/L for recorder wells and non-recorder wells, respectively. Leaching of Pb from metal casing materials is another potential source of Pb in ground water samples. Median total Pb concentrations in water samples from the surficial, intermediate, and Floridan aquifer systems are higher from recorder wells cased with black iron than for recorder wells with steel and PVC casing material. Stable isotopes of Pb were used in this study to distinguish between anthropogenic and natural sources of Pb in ground water, as Pb retains the isotopic signature of the source from which it is derived. Based on similarities between slopes and intercepts of trend lines for various sample types (plots of 206Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb) the predominant source of total Pb in water samples from the surficial aquifer system is corrosion of Pb counterweights. It is likely that only ground-water samples, not the aquifer

  8. Redox processes and water quality of selected principal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    Reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions in 15 principal aquifer (PA) systems of the United States, and their impact on several water quality issues, were assessed from a large data base collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the USGS. The logic of these assessments was based on the observed ecological succession of electron acceptors such as dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate and threshold concentrations of these substrates needed to support active microbial metabolism. Similarly, the utilization of solid-phase electron acceptors such as Mn(IV) and Fe(III) is indicated by the production of dissolved manganese and iron. An internally consistent set of threshold concentration criteria was developed and applied to a large data set of 1692 water samples from the PAs to assess ambient redox conditions. The indicated redox conditions then were related to the occurrence of selected natural (arsenic) and anthropogenic (nitrate and volatile organic compounds) contaminants in ground water. For the natural and anthropogenic contaminants assessed in this study, considering redox conditions as defined by this framework of redox indicator species and threshold concentrations explained many water quality trends observed at a regional scale. An important finding of this study was that samples indicating mixed redox processes provide information on redox heterogeneity that is useful for assessing common water quality issues. Given the interpretive power of the redox framework and given that it is relatively inexpensive and easy to measure the chemical parameters included in the framework, those parameters should be included in routine water quality monitoring programs whenever possible.

  9. Carbon-14 age and chemical evolution of Ca(HCO3)2-type groundwater of age less than 8,000 years in a confined sandy and muddy Pleistocene aquifer, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Isao; Suzuki, Yohey; Takeuchi, Mio

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene Kimitsu aquifer was selected for examination of the relationship between groundwater age and chemical evolution of Ca(HCO3)2-type groundwater. For the most part, the aquifer is confined and composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with a small amount of calcite. The groundwater ages calculated by 14C were adjusted by using a carbon mass-balance method and corrected for effects of 14C diffusion. Groundwater ages in the Kimitsu aquifer vary from modern (upgradient) to approximately 2,400 years at 4.4 km from the edge of the recharge area. The 14C age was verified by groundwater velocity calculated from the hydraulic gradient and hydraulic conductivity. The confined groundwater evolved to Ca(HCO3)2-type around 50 years after recharge and this has been maintained for more than 8,300 years due to low chemical reactivity, derived from equilibrium with calcite, kaolinite and Ca-montmorillonite. In addition, high pH prevents the dissolution of Fe and Mn. Consequently, the rate of increase in electrical conductivity ranges from 10 to 30 μS/cm per 1,000 years. On the other hand, leakage from the deep region, which is recognized from high Cl- levels, causes remarkable increases in CH4 and HCO3 - concentrations, resulting in an apparent sulfidic zone at 500-m depth in most downgradient regions.

  10. Quality of Shallow Groundwater and Drinking Water in the Mississippi Embayment-Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System and the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, South-Central United States, 1994-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Heather L.; Kingsbury, James A.; Tollett, Roland W.; Seanor, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system is an important source of drinking water, providing about 724 million gallons per day to about 8.9 million people in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and Alabama. The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer ranks third in the Nation for total withdrawals of which more than 98 percent is used for irrigation. From 1994 through 2004, water-quality samples were collected from 169 domestic, monitoring, irrigation, and public-supply wells in the Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system and the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in various land-use settings and of varying well capacities as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Groundwater samples were analyzed for physical properties and about 200 water-quality constituents, including total dissolved solids, major inorganic ions, trace elements, radon, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, pesticide degradates, and volatile organic compounds. The occurrence of nutrients and pesticides differed among four groups of the 114 shallow wells (less than or equal to 200 feet deep) in the study area. Tritium concentrations in samples from the Holocene alluvium, Pleistocene valley trains, and shallow Tertiary wells indicated a smaller component of recent groundwater than samples from the Pleistocene terrace deposits. Although the amount of agricultural land overlying the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer was considerably greater than areas overlying parts of the shallow Tertiary and Pleistocene terrace deposits wells, nitrate was rarely detected and the number of pesticides detected was lower than other shallow wells. Nearly all samples from the Holocene alluvium and Pleistocene valley trains were anoxic, and the reducing conditions in these aquifers likely result in denitrification of nitrate. In contrast, most samples from the

  11. Hydrogeology and simulation of flow between the alluvial and bedrock aquifers in the upper Black Squirrel Creek basin, El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    Anticipated increases in pumping from the bedrock aquifers in El Paso County potentially could affect the direction and rate of flow between the alluvial and bedrock aquifers and lower water levels in the overlying alluvial aquifer. The alluvial aquifer underlies about 90 square miles in the upper Black Squirrel Creek Basin of eastern El Paso County. The alluvial aquifer consists of unconsolidated alluvial deposits that unconformably overlie siltstones, sandstones, and conglomerate (bedrock aquifers) and claystone, shale, and coal (bedrock confining units) of the Denver Basin. The bedrock aquifers (Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers) are separated by confining units (upper and lower Denver and the Laramie confining units) and overlie a relatively thick and impermeable Pierre confining unit. The Pierre confining unit is assumed to be a no-flow boundary at the base of the alluvial/ bedrock aquifer system. During 1949-90, substantial water-level declines, as large as 50 feet, in the alluvial aquifer resulted from withdrawals from the alluvial aquifer for irrigation and municipal supplies. Average recharge to the alluvial aquifer from infiltration of precipitation and surface water was an estimated 11.97 cubic feet per second and from the underlying bedrock aquifers was an estimated 0.87 cubic foot per second. Water-level data from eight bedrock observation wells and eight nearby alluvial wells indicate that, locally, the alluvial and bedrock aquifers probably are hydraulically connected and that the alluvial aquifer in the upper Black Squirrel Creek Basin receives recharge from the Denver and Arapahoe aquifers but-locally recharges the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer. Subsurface-temperature profiles were evaluated as a means of estimating specific discharge across the bedrock surface (the base of the alluvial aquifer). However, assumptions of the analytical method were not met by field conditions and, thus, analyses of subsurface-temperature profiles

  12. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1994 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Vermeul, V.R.; Macdonald, Q.C.; Schubert, S.E.

    1994-11-01

    This report documents work conducted during the fiscal year 1994 to development an improved three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system across the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, which is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The main objective of the ongoing effort to develop an improved conceptual model of ground-water flow is to provide the basis for improved numerical report models that will be capable of accurately predicting the movement of radioactive and chemical contaminant plumes in the aquifer beneath Hanford. More accurate ground-water flow models will also be useful in assessing the impacts of changes in facilities and operations. For example, decreasing volumes of operational waste-water discharge are resulting in a declining water table in parts of the unconfined aquifer. In addition to supporting numerical modeling, the conceptual model also provides a qualitative understanding of the movement of ground water and contaminants in the aquifer.

  13. Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, R.W.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industr