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Sample records for confined plasma target

  1. Electromagnetic Confined Plasma Target for Interaction Studies with Intense Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zielbauer, B; Ursescu, U; Trotsenko, S; Spillmann, U; Schuch, R; Stohlker, T; Kuhl, T; Borneis, S; Schenkel, T; McDonald, J; Schneider, D

    2006-08-09

    The paper describes a novel application of an electron beam ion trap as a plasma target facility for intense laser-plasma interaction studies. The low density plasma target ({approx}10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}) is confined in a mobile cryogenic electromagnetic charged particle trap, with the magnetic confinement field of 1-3T maintained by a superconducting magnet. Ion plasmas for a large variety of ion species and charge states are produced and maintained within the magnetic field and the space charge of an energetic electron beam in the ''Electron Beam Ion Trap'' (EBIT) geometry. Intense laser beams (optical lasers, x-ray lasers and upcoming ''X-Ray Free Electron Lasers'' (XFEL)) provide strong time varying electromagnetic fields (>10{sup 12} V/cm in femto- to nano-sec pulses) for interactions with electromagnetically confined neutral/non-neutral plasmas. The experiments are aimed to gain understanding of the effects of intense photon fields on ionization/excitation processes, the ionization balance, as well as photon polarization effects. First experimental scenarios and tests with an intense laser that utilize the ion plasma target are outlined.

  2. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  3. Confinement effects of shock waves on laser-induced plasma from a graphite target

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Feiling; Liang, Peipei; Yang, Xu; Cai, Hua; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian

    2015-06-15

    The spatial confinement effects of shock waves on the laser-induced plasma (LIP) from a graphite target in air were studied by probe beam deflection (PBD) measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A clear relationship between the confinement of the LIP by the shock wave and the effects on the LIP emission was observed, and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. PBD monitoring revealed that the laser-ablation induced shock wave could be well analogized to the shock wave generated by a point explosion and would be reflected by a block. OES measurements indicated that the optical emission of the LIP exhibited significant variations with the block placement. A first enhancement and then a fast decay of CN molecular emission as well as a suppression of carbon atomic emission were observed in the presence of the block. The results revealed that the reflected shock wave spatially confined the expansion of the LIP and compressed the LIP after encountering it, pushing back the species of the LIP and changing the density of the LIP species including luminous carbon atoms and CN molecules. It is suggested that the change of the LIP emission is attributed to the density variation of the LIP species due to the compression of the LIP and the reactions occurring in the plasma.

  4. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  5. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  6. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  7. Special topics in plasma confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. B.; Newton, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    > These notes are based on lectures given by one of us (J.B.T.) at the University of Texas in Austin in 1991. Part I concerns some basic features of plasma confinement by magnetic fields as an introduction to an account of plasma relaxation in Part II. Part III discusses confinement by magnetic mirrors, especially minimum- systems. It also includes a general discussion of adiabatic invariants and of the principle of maximal ordering in perturbation theory. Part IV is devoted to the analysis of perturbations in toroidal plasmas and the stability of ballooning modes.

  8. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  9. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The potential applications of fusion reactors, the desirable properties of reactors intended for various applications, and the limitations of the Tokamak concept are discussed. The principles and characteristics of 20 distinct alternative confinement concepts are described, each of which may be an alternative to the Tokamak. The devices are classed as Tokamak-like, stellarator-like, mirror machines, bumpy tori, electrostatically assisted, migma concept, and wall-confined plasma.

  10. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-11-16

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  11. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  12. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  13. Plasma confinement. [Physics for magnetic geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1985-03-01

    The physics of plasma confinement by a magnetic field is developed from the basic properties of plasmas through the theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport in toroidal and open-ended configurations. The close relationship between the theory of plasma confinement and Hamiltonian mechanics is emphasized, and the modern view of macroscopic instabilities as three-dimensional equilibria is given.

  14. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  15. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  16. Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device

    DOEpatents

    Owen, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

  17. Fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2013-01-01

    Results of studies on fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are reviewed. The aspects of the fast ignition concept, which consists in the separation of the processes of target ignition and compression due to the synchronized action of different energy drivers, are considered. Criteria for the compression ratio and heating rate of a fast ignition target, the energy balance, and the thermonuclear gain are discussed. The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the heating of a compressed target by various types of igniting drivers, namely, beams of fast electrons and light ions produced under the action of a petawatt laser pulse on the target, a heavy-ion beam generated in the accelerator, an X-ray pulse, and a hydrodynamic flow of laser-accelerated matter, are analyzed. Requirements to the igniting-driver parameters that depend on the fast ignition criteria under the conditions of specific target heating mechanisms, as well as possibilities of practical implementation of these requirements, are discussed. The experimental programs of various laboratories and the prospects of practical implementation of fast ignition of ICF targets are reviewed. To date, fast ignition is the most promising method for decreasing the ignition energy and increasing the thermonuclear gain of an ICF plasma. A large number of publications have been devoted to investigations of this method and adjacent problems of the physics of igniting drivers and their interaction with plasma. This review presents results of only some of these studies that, in the author's opinion, allow one to discuss in detail the main physical aspects of the fast ignition concept and understand the current state and prospects of studies in this direction.

  18. Experimental Achievements on Plasma Confinement and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, A.

    2009-02-19

    This article presents a brief review of the experimental studies on turbulence and resultant transport in toroidal plasmas. The article focuses on two topics, physics of transport barrier and the role of mesoscale structure on plasma confinement, i.e. zonal flows. The two topics show the important roles of the mutual interactions between sheared flows, zonal flows and drift waves for plasma turbulence and transport. The findings can lead us to further generalized concept of the disparate scale interactions which could give a fundamental understanding of the plasma confinement from the first principle.

  19. Plasma confinement system and methods for use

    DOEpatents

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Sutherland, Derek

    2017-09-05

    A plasma confinement system is provided that includes a confinement chamber that includes one or more enclosures of respective helicity injectors. The one or more enclosures are coupled to ports at an outer radius of the confinement chamber. The system further includes one or more conductive coils aligned substantially parallel to the one or more enclosures and a further set of one or more conductive coils respectively surrounding portions of the one or more enclosures. Currents may be provided to the sets of conductive coils to energize a gas within the confinement chamber into a plasma. Further, a heat-exchange system is provided that includes an inner wall, an intermediate wall, an outer wall, and pipe sections configured to carry coolant through cavities formed by the walls.

  20. Microwave Reflectometry for Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is about microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for plasma density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves by a plasma cutoff. Both the theoretical foundations of reflectometry and its practical application to the study of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the role of short-scale density fluctuations is discussed at length, both as a unique diagnostic tool for turbulence studies in thermonuclear plasmas and for the deleterious effects that fluctuations may have on the measurement of the average plasma density with microwave reflectometry.

  1. PLASMA HEATING AND CONFINING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Bratenahl, Al.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1962-02-13

    ABS> A device is designed for generating, heating, and containing a very pure electrical plasma. Plasma purity is maintained by preventing the hot plasma from contacting insulators, which are a principal source of impurities in prior constructions. An insulator is disposed at each end of a pair of long coaxial cylinders forming an annular chamber therebetween. High voltage is applied between the cylinders and an axial magnetic field is created therethrough. At a middle position on the inner cylinder, a fastopening valve releases a quantity of gas into the chamber, and before the gas can diffuse to the distant insulators, a discharge occurs between the cylinders and plasma is formed in the central region of the chamber away from the insulators. (AEC)

  2. Confinement in Wendelstein 7-X limiter plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, M.; Dinklage, A.; Alonso, A.; Fuchert, G.; Bozhenkov, S.; Höfel, U.; Andreeva, T.; Baldzuhn, J.; Beurskens, M.; Bosch, H.-S.; Beidler, C. D.; Biedermann, C.; Blanco, E.; Brakel, R.; Burhenn, R.; Buttenschön, B.; Cappa, A.; Czarnecka, A.; Endler, M.; Estrada, T.; Fornal, T.; Geiger, J.; Grulke, O.; Harris, J. H.; Hartmann, D.; Jakubowski, M.; Klinger, T.; Knauer, J.; Kocsis, G.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krawczyk, N.; Krychowiak, M.; Kubkowska, M.; Ksiazek, I.; Langenberg, A.; Laqua, H. P.; Lazerson, S.; Maaßberg, H.; Marushchenko, N.; Marsen, S.; Moncada, V.; Moseev, D.; Naujoks, D.; Otte, M.; Pablant, N.; Pasch, E.; Pisano, F.; Rahbarnia, K.; Schröder, T.; Stange, T.; Stephey, L.; Szepesi, T.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Trimino Mora, H.; Thomsen, H.; Tsuchiya, H.; Turkin, Yu.; Wauters, T.; Weir, G.; Wenzel, U.; Werner, A.; Wolf, R.; Wurden, G. A.; Zhang, D.; the W7-X Team

    2017-08-01

    Observations on confinement in the first experimental campaign on the optimized Stellarator Wendelstein 7-X are summarized. In this phase W7-X was equipped with five inboard limiters only and thus the discharge length restricted to avoid local overheating. Stationary plasmas are limited to low densities  <2-3 · 1019 m-3. With the available 4.3 MW ECR Heating core T e ~ 8 keV, T i ~ 1-2 keV are achieved routinely resulting in energy confinement time τ E between 80 ms to 150 ms. For these conditions the plasmas show characteristics of core electron root confinement with peaked T e-profiles and positive E r up to about half of the minor radius. Profiles and plasma currents respond to on- and off-axis heating and co- and counter ECCD respectively.

  3. Confinement in Wendelstein 7-X Limiter Plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Hirsch, M.; Dinklage, A.; Alonso, A.; ...

    2017-06-14

    Observations on confinement in the first experimental campaign on the optimized Stellarator Wendelstein 7-X are summarized. In this phase W7-X was equipped with five inboard limiters only and thus the discharge length restricted to avoid local overheating. Stationary plasmas are limited to low densities <2–3 centerdot 1019 m-3. With the available 4.3 MW ECR Heating core Te ~ 8 keV, Ti ~ 1–2 keV are achieved routinely resulting in energy confinement time τE between 80 ms to 150 ms. For these conditions the plasmas show characteristics of core electron root confinement with peaked Te-profiles and positive Er up to aboutmore » half of the minor radius. Lastly, profiles and plasma currents respond to on- and off-axis heating and co- and counter ECCD respectively.« less

  4. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-08-10

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere.

  5. MHD Stability of Centrifugally Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min

    2003-10-01

    Centrifugally confined plasmas utilize centrifugal forces from plasma rotation to augment magnetic confinement, as an alternative approach to fusion. One magnetic geometry is mirror-type, with rotation about the axis induced from a central, biased core conductor. The outward centrifugal forces from the rotation have a component along the field lines, thus confining ions to the center. The immediate concern, of course, is that the system could be flute unstable to the interchange. The antidote here is that the radial shear in the rotation could stabilize the flute. Our 2D simulations show, first, that plasma pressure is highly peaked at the center away from the mirror end coils. Next, 3D simulations show unequivocally that velocity shear is providing the stability. Further study indicates that the flute stability is sensitive to the density profile. A favorable density profile could be achieved by judiciously placing the particle source, also necessary for a steady state centrifuge. As flows approach the Alfven speed, electromagnetic modes could be involved. The latter is motivated by the question of whether magnetorotational instability, thought to be an angular momentum transporter in accretion disks, could be found in centrifugal plasmas, since all the ingredients are there. We show that the MRI as understood should be stable; however, a related astrophysical instability, the Parker instability, could arise. The Parker instability results in plasma accumulating in regions of bent field lines, further accentuating the bending.

  6. Confinement of nonneutral plasma in unconventional geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.

    1990-01-01

    Our interest in efficient storage of cold, nonneutral plasma has been motivated by the elegant studies on cryogenic nonneutral electron plasmas at UCSD and by the remarkable results obtained from the laser-cooled ion plasmas at the NIST, Boulder, Colorado. Also motivating our study is the perceived need to develop the most expedient means of storing antimatter, whether it be antiprotons for gravitational studies or positrons for a variety of physics experiments and diagnostic purposes. One of the most explored technologies of confining nonneutral plasmas is the Penning trap. The maximum number density of cold nonneutral plasma that can be stored in such a trap is B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0}mc{sup 2}, in which B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0} is the (homogeneous) magnetic energy density and mc{sup 2} is the rest energy of the stored charges. In this paper, we shall present a synopsis of the results of our theoretical exploration of the effect on this hydrostatic limit, the so-called Brillouin'' limit, of altering the geometry of the confining vacuum magnetic field while maintaining the field's azimuthal symmetry. In particular, we shall analyze equilibrium confinement by, first, a poloidal magnetic field, B{sub 4}(r,z){cflx r} + B{sub z}(r,z){cflx z}, and second, a toroidal magnetic field, along with the concomitant electrostatic fields.

  7. Neoclassical transport in enhanced confinement toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    It has recently been reported that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas have been observed to fall below the irreducible minimum level predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system.

  8. Transitions Within a Vertically Confined Plasma Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Hyde, Truell

    2004-10-01

    Dusty plasmas consist of an ionized gas containing small (usually negatively charged) particles. Dusty plasmas are of interest in both astrophysics and space physics as well as in research in plasma processing and nanofabrication. In this work, the formation of plasma crystals confined in an external one-dimensional parabolic potential well is simulated for a normal experimental environment employing a computer code called BOX_TREE. Such crystals are layered systems, with each layer a 2D lattice composed of grain particles. The number of layers is dependent in part upon the external potential parameter. The transition from 1 to 2 layers is specifically analyzed with dispersion relations for the vertical dust lattice wave obtained at the transition point and the transition shown to be induced by the vertical dust lattice instability.

  9. Plasma dynamics of a confined extreme ultraviolet light source

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2010-09-15

    Laser plasmas were generated by ablation of aluminum targets via a Nd:YAG glass laser, of pulse energy 0.8 J, and duration 15 ns (full width at half maximum) at the fundamental wavelength (1.064 {mu}m). Emission lines in the wavelength range of 27-32 nm (45-37.8 eV) were mapped over a spatial range extending out 1.8 mm from the target surface and for a temporal range of 42 ns after the termination of the laser pulse. Two targets were utilized: a planar surface and a rectangular cavity. The latter was composed of a rectangular shaped cavity of depth 3 mm and height 1.2 mm, cut into an aluminum massive. An irradiance of I{sub p{approx}}10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} was delivered to both targets and the confining influence of the rectangular cavity upon plasma formation and expansion was studied. Diagnostics of the emitted spectra reveal the unique dynamics of restricted plasma plume expansion, which results in plasma-surface collisions and subsequent plasma rebound within the cavity. These effects give rise to strong enhancement of both continuum and line emission in the contained plasma plume. These enhancements are especially evident for the more highly charged ions. Superior emission from plasma-surface collisions are associated with ''forced recombination'' during early time scales, while enhanced emission at later stages are associated with plasma plume component rebound and collision.

  10. Stellarator approach to fusion plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The stellarator is a toroidal fusion plasma confinement device with nested magnetic flux surfaces. The required twist of the field lines is produced by external helical coils rather than by plasma current, as in a tokamak. Stellarator devices are attractive fusion reactor candidates precisely because they offer the prospect of steady-state operation without plasma current. In the last few years the excellent results achieved with currentless stellarator plasmas of modest minor radius (10 to 20 cm) at Kyoto University (Japan) and the Max Planck Institute (West Germany) have made the stellarator second only to the tokamak in its progress toward fusion breakeven, with temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/ approx. 1 KeV, Lawson products n tau approx. 2 to 5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/.s, and volume-averaged beta values approx. = 2%. The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), now under construction at Oak Ridge Natioal Laboratory (ORNL) and scheduled to operate in 1986, represents a significant advance in stellarator research, with a plasma major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a magnetic field of 2 T for 5 s or 1 T at steady state. ATF replaces the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B heating and diagnostic system.

  11. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  12. Micromachining of inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gobby, P.L.; Salzer, L.J.; Day, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Many experiments conducted on today`s largest inertial confinement fusion drive lasers require target components with sub-millimeter dimensions, precisions of a micron or less and surface finishes measured in nanometers. For metal and plastic, techniques using direct machining with diamond tools have been developed that yield the desired parts. New techniques that will be discussed include the quick-flip locator, a magnetically held kinematic mount that has allowed the direct machining of millimeter-sized beryllium hemishells whose inside and outside surface are concentric to within 0.25 micron, and an electronic version of a tracer lathe which has produced precise azimuthal variations of less than a micron.

  13. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Richeson, Jeff; Schmidt, George; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Turchi, Peter J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). For the successful implementation of the scheme, plasma jets of the requisite momentum flux density need to be produced. Their transport over sufficiently large distances (a few meters) needs to be assured. When they collide and merge into a liner, relative differences in velocity, density and temperature of the jets could give rise to instabilities in the development of the liner. Variation in the jet properties must be controlled to ensure that the growth rate of the instabilities are not significant over the time scale of the liner formation before engaging with the target plasma. On impact with the target plasma, some plasma interpenetration might occur between the liner and the target. The operating parameter space needs to be identified to ensure that a reasonably robust and conducting contact surface is formed between the liner and the target. A mismatch in the "impedance" between the liner and the target plasma could give rise to undesirable shock heating of the liner leading to increased entropy (thermal losses) in the liner. Any irregularities in the liner will accentuate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the compression of the target plasma by the liner.

  14. Theoretical studies on plasma heating and confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three principal topics are covered in this final report: Stabilization of low frequency modes of an axisymmetric compact torus plasma confinement system, such as, spheromaks and FRC'S, by a population of large orbit axis encircling energetic ions. Employing an extension of the energy principle' which utilizes a Vlasov description for the energetic 'ion component, it has been demonstrated that short wavelength MHD type modes are stabilized while the long wavelength tilt and precessional modes are marginally stable. The deformation of the equilibrium configuration by the energetic ions results in the stabilization of the tilt mode for spheromaks. Formation of Ion Rings and their coalescence with spheromaks. A two dimensional electromagnetic PIC codes has been developed for the study of ion ring formation and its propagation, deformation and slowing down in a cold plasma. It has been shown that a ring moving at a speed less than the Alfven velocity can merge with a stationary spheromak. Anomalous transport from drift waves in a Tokomak. The Direct Interaction Approximation in used to obtain incremental transport coefficients for particles and heat for drift waves in a Tokomak. It is shown that the transport matrix does not obey Onsager's principle.

  15. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  16. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  17. Plasma confinement by hemispherical cavity in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, L. B.; Li, C. M.; Hu, W.; Zhou, Y. S.; Zhang, B. Y.; Lu, Y. F.; Cai, Z. X.; Zeng, X. Y.

    2011-03-28

    An aluminum hemispherical cavity (diameter: 11.1 mm) was used to confine plasmas produced by a KrF excimer laser in air from a steel target with a low concentration manganese in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. A significant enhancement (factor >12) in the emission intensity of Mn lines was observed at a laser fluence of 7.8 J/cm{sup 2} when the plasma was confined by the hemispherical cavity, leading to an increase in plasma temperature about 3600 K. The maximum emission enhancement increased with increasing laser fluence. The spatial confinement mechanism was discussed using shock wave theory.

  18. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ..delta..W/..delta..P is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ..nu../sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Double-shell inertial confinement fusion target fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, C.W.; Lorensen, L.E.; Weinstein, B.W.

    1981-04-01

    Double-shell targets may be required for the next generation of inertial confinement fusion targets since the energy available for driving the implosion is limited with current drivers. The use of double-shell targets to provide a velocity multiplication driven implosion is an alternative to increased driver energy. First generation hemishells, from which spherical shells are constructed, were fabricated by micromachining coated mandrels and by molding. The remachining of coated mandrels will be described in detail in this article. Techniques were developed for coating the microsized mandrels with polymeric and metallic materials by methods including conformal coating, vapor deposition, plasma polymerization and thermoforming. Micropositioning equipment and bonding techniques have also been developed to assemble the hemishells about a fuel pellet maintaining a spherical concentricity of better than 2 mm and voids in the hemishell bonding line of a few hundred angstroms or less.

  20. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-15

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e}=3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e}=5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L{approx}2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I<2x10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e}=10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  1. Spatial confinement of laser-induced silicon plasma spectroscopy with cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Anmin; Jin, Mingxing

    2017-05-01

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a serious of cylindrical cavities are used to spatially confine the plasmas produced from silicon (Si) target by using a Nd:YAG laser in air. Time-resolved spectrum of Si plasma with different diameters of cylindrical spatial cavities is measured. Compared with the plasmas generated without the confined cavity, the spectral emission intensity of plasma generated with cylindrical cavity is enhanced at a certain delay time. As the diameter of cylindrical cavity increases, the spectral emission is enhanced later in time and the enhancement becomes weaker. The result shows that the presence of the confined cavity leads to an increase in the spectral emission of plasma which is attributed to compressed plasma by the reflected shockwave.

  2. Homeostasis in plasma confinement at beta close to unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Kei-Ichi

    1987-02-01

    A steady state solution to magnetic confinement system was studied self-consistently to find how energy confinement time is adjusted to meet required exact balancing of injected and flowing out fluxes of particles and energies. It is demonstrated that, in case high power input into a plasma is allowed to ensure beta close to unity state, homeostasis appears and confinement time becomes independent of any transport process.

  3. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized.

  4. Long ion plasma confinement times with a 'rotating wall'

    SciTech Connect

    Anderegg, F.; Huang, X.-P.; Driscoll, C. F.; Severn, G. D.; Sarid, E.

    1995-04-15

    Static field errors in a Penning-Malmberg trap exert a drag on confined non-neutral plasmas, causing radial expansion and loss. We suppress this transport by applying an electrostatic wall asymmetry rotating faster than the plasma. This results in inward radial transport and plasma compression. The experiments are performed on a magnesium ion plasma in a magnetic field of 4 Tesla, with in situ Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurement of density and temperature profiles. Confinement of ions for up to 10 days is routinely observed.

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  6. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  7. Physical investigation of a quad confinement plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Aaron; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Quad magnetic confinement plasma sources are novel magnetized DC discharges suitable for applications in a broad range of fields, particularly space propulsion, plasma etching and deposition. These sources contain a square discharge channel with magnetic cusps at the four lateral walls, enhancing plasma confinement and electron residence time inside the device. The magnetic field topology is manipulated using four independent electromagnets on each edge of the channel, tuning the properties of the generated plasma. We characterize the plasma ejected from the quad confinement sources using a combination of traditional electrostatic probes and non-intrusive laser-based diagnostics. Measurements show a strong ion acceleration layer located 8 cm downstream of the exit plane, beyond the extent of the magnetic field. The ion velocity field is investigated with different magnetic configurations, demonstrating how ion trajectories may be manipulated. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  8. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  9. Achieving Long Confinement in a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Smoniewski, J.; Ha Bao; Stoneking, M. R.

    2009-03-30

    We observe the m = 1 diocotron mode in a partial toroidal trap, and use it as the primary diagnostic for observing the plasma confinement. The frequency of the m = 1 mode, which is approximately proportional to the trapped charge, decays on a three second timescale. The confinement time exceeds, by at least an order of magnitude, the confinement observed in all other toroidal traps for non-neutral plasmas and approaches the theoretical limit set by magnetic pumping transport. Numerical simulations that include toroidal effects are employed to accurately extract plasma charge, equilibrium position and m = 1 mode amplitude from the experimental data. Future work will include attempts to withdraw the electron source in order to study confinement in a full torus.

  10. Plasma networking in magnetically confined plasmas and diagnostics of nonlocal heat transport in tokamak filamentary plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    1999-02-01

    The method of multilevel dynamical contrasting is applied to analyzing available data from tokamak plasmas. The results illustrate a possibility of extending the concept of the plasma percolating networks in dense Z pinches (and other inertially confined plasmas) to the case of magnetically confined plasmas. This extension suggests a necessity to append the conventional picture of the nonfilamentary plasma (which is nearly a fluid described by conventional magnetohydrodynamics) with a "network" component which is formed by the strongest long-living filaments of electric current and penetrate the "fluid" component. Signs of networking are found in visible light and soft x-ray images, and magnetic probing data. A diagnostic algorithm is formulated for identifying the role of plasma networking in observed phenomena of nonlocal (non-diffusive) heat transport in a tokamak.

  11. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  12. Theory for plasma confinement and momentum transport in snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.

    2005-07-15

    A theory for plasma confinement in snakes is developed based on the consequences of the momentum transport resulting from the symmetry-breaking-induced plasma viscosity in the vicinity of an m=1 magnetic island. Here, m is the poloidal mode number of the island. The symmetry-breaking mechanism is the distortion of the magnetic surface associated with the magnetic island embedded in the equilibrium magnetic field. It is demonstrated that a combination of the turbulence suppression and the effects of the orbit squeezing could be responsible for the observed improved plasma confinement in snakes.

  13. Laser Beam Propagation through Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; DIxit, S; Neumayer, P; Moody, J D; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-10-26

    A study of the relevant laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in long-scale length plasmas that emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Experiments in this high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 0.5 - 1 x 10{sup -3}) hohlraum plasma have demonstrated that blue 351-nm laser beams produce less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for ignition relevant laser intensities (I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}). The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows that these results are relevant for the outer beams in ignition hohlraum experiments corresponding to a gain threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering of 15. By increasing the gas fill density in these experiments further accesses inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes. They show that scattering is small for gains smaller than 20, which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  14. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1991-12-01

    Intensified studies of plasma transport in toroidal plasmas over the past three to five years have progressed through increased understanding in some areas and changed perceptions about the most important issues in other areas. Recent developments are reviewed for six selected topics: edge fluctuations and transport; L-H mode transition; core fluctuations; modern plasma turbulence theory; transient transport; and global scaling. Some of the developments that are highlighted include: the role of a strongly sheared poloidal flow in edge plasma turbulence, transport and the L-H transition; change of focus from {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {approximately} 1 to {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {much lt} 1 fluctuations in tokamak plasmas; modern Direct-Interaction-Approximation plasma turbulence and hybrid fluid/kinetic theoretical models; and transient transport experiments that are raising fundamental questions about our conceptions of local transport processes in tokamaks. 104 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1991-12-01

    Intensified studies of plasma transport in toroidal plasmas over the past three to five years have progressed through increased understanding in some areas and changed perceptions about the most important issues in other areas. Recent developments are reviewed for six selected topics: edge fluctuations and transport; L-H mode transition; core fluctuations; modern plasma turbulence theory; transient transport; and global scaling. Some of the developments that are highlighted include: the role of a strongly sheared poloidal flow in edge plasma turbulence, transport and the L-H transition; change of focus from {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {approximately} 1 to {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {much_lt} 1 fluctuations in tokamak plasmas; modern Direct-Interaction-Approximation plasma turbulence and hybrid fluid/kinetic theoretical models; and transient transport experiments that are raising fundamental questions about our conceptions of local transport processes in tokamaks. 104 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K. B.

    1998-11-01

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and pulse lengths and a

  17. Charge exchange cooling in the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Logan, B. Grant

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus for cooling a plasma of warm charged species confined in the center mirror cell of the tandem mirror apparatus by injecting cold neutral species of the plasma into at least one mirroring region of the center mirror cell, the cooling due to the loss of warm charged species through charge exchange with the cold neutral species with resulting diffusion of the warm neutral species out of the plasma.

  18. Probing cell migration in confined environments by plasma lithography.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-03-01

    Cellular processes are regulated by various mechanical and physical factors in their local microenvironment such as geometric confinements, cell-substrate interactions, and cell-cell contact. Systematic elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for fundamental understanding of cell biology and for rational design of biomedical devices and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a generally applicable plasma lithography technique, which performs selective surface functionalization on large substrate areas, for achieving long-term, stable confinements with length scales from 100 nm to 1 cm toward the investigation of cell-microenvironment interactions. In particular, we applied plasma lithography for cellular confinement of neuroblastomas, myoblasts, endothelial cells, and mammary gland epithelial cells, and examined the motion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts in directionality-confined environments for studying the effect of confinements on migratory behavior. In conjunction with live cell imaging, the distance traveled, velocity, and angular motion of individual cells and collective cell migration behaviors were measured in confined environments with dimensions comparable to a cell. A critical length scale that a cell could conceivably occupy and migrate to was also identified by investigating the behaviors of cells using confined environments with subcellular length scales. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Probing cell migration in confined environments by plasma lithography

    PubMed Central

    Junkin, Michael; Wong, Pak Kin

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes are regulated by various mechanical and physical factors in their local microenvironment such as geometric confinements, cell-substrate interactions, and cell-cell contact. Systematic elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for fundamental understanding of cell biology and for rational design of biomedical devices and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a generally applicable plasma lithography technique, which performs selective surface functionalization on large substrate areas, for achieving long-term, stable confinements with length scales from 100 nm to 1 cm toward the investigation of cell-microenvironment interactions. In particular, we applied plasma lithography for cellular confinement of neuroblastomas, myoblasts, endothelial cells, and mammary gland epithelial cells, and examined the motion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts in directionality-confined environments for studying the effect of confinements on migratory behavior. In conjunction with live cell imaging, the distance traveled, velocity, and angular motion of individual cells and collective cell migration behaviors were measured in confined environments with dimensions comparable to a cell. A critical length scale that a cell could conceivably occupy and migrate to was also identified by investigating the behaviors of cells using confined environments with subcellular length scales. PMID:21134692

  20. Laboratory-scale uranium RF plasma confinement experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater facilities to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into argon-confined, steady-state, RF-heated plasmas in different uranium plasma confinement tests to investigate the characteristics of plamas core nuclear reactors. The objectives were: (1) to confine as high a density of uranium vapor as possible within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition; (2) to develop and test materials and handling techniques suitable for use with high-temperature, high-pressure gaseous UF6; and (3) to develop complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma and residue deposited on the test chamber components. In all tests, the plasma was a fluid-mechanically-confined vortex-type contained within a fused-silica cylindrical test chamber. The test chamber peripheral wall was 5.7 cm ID by 10 cm long.

  1. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2016-07-05

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  2. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  3. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-10-31

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  4. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  5. Magnetic confinement system using charged ammonia targets

    DOEpatents

    Porter, Gary D.; Bogdanoff, Anatoly

    1979-01-01

    A system for guiding charged laser targets to a predetermined focal spot of a laser along generally arbitrary, and especially horizontal, directions which comprises a series of electrostatic sensors which provide inputs to a computer for real time calculation of position, velocity, and direction of the target along an initial injection trajectory, and a set of electrostatic deflection means, energized according to a calculated output of said computer, to change the target trajectory to intercept the focal spot of the laser which is triggered so as to illuminate the target of the focal spot.

  6. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; hide

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  7. Space charge neutralization in inertial electrostatic confinement plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Evstatiev, E. G.; Nebel, R. A.; Chacon, L.; Park, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2007-04-15

    A major issue for electron injected inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices is space charge neutralization. A new formalism is developed that will allow this neutralization to occur for both oscillating and steady-state IEC plasmas. Results indicate that there are limits on the amount of compression that can be achieved by oscillating plasmas while simultaneously maintaining space charge neutralization and parabolic background potential. For steady-state plasmas, there are no such limits and space charge neutralization can be achieved even when the plasma becomes quasineutral.

  8. Divertor plasma conditions and neutral dynamics in horizontal and vertical divertor configurations in JET-ILW low confinement mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Calabro, G.; Chankin, A.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Corrigan, G.; Drewelow, P.; Guillemaut, C.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Maviglia, F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Silva, C.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of the plasma conditions at the low field side target plate in JET ITER-like wall ohmic and low confinement mode plasmas show minor differences in divertor plasma configurations with horizontally and vertically inclined targets. Both the reduction of the electron temperature in the vicinity of the strike points and the rollover of the ion current to the plates follow the same functional dependence on the density at the low field side midplane. Configurations with vertically inclined target plates, however, produce twice as high sub-divertor pressures for the same upstream density. Simulations with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code package predict significantly lower plasma temperatures at the low field side target in vertical than in horizontal target configurations. Including cross-field drifts and imposing a pumping by-pass leak at the low-field side plate can still not recover the experimental observations.

  9. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  10. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field.

  11. Theoretical model of fishbone oscillations in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Porcelli, F.

    1986-11-03

    The onset of electromagnetic oscillations that are observed in magnetically confined plasmas where beams of fast neutrals are injected is associated with the excitation of a mode with poloidal wave number m/sup 0/ = 1 and phase velocity equal to the core-ion diamagnetic velocity. The resonant interaction of the mode with the beam ions is viewed as a form of dissipation that allows the release of the mode excitation energy, related to the gradient of the plasma pressure.

  12. High Efficiency Targets for High Gain Inertial Confinement Fusion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-19

    Inertial Confinement Fusion JOHN H. GARDNER AND STEPHEN E. BODNER Laboratory for Computational Physics DTIC CD ELECTEf OCT 241986 j NU Aproedfr...81425 " 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) High Efficiency Targets for High Gain Inertial Confinement Fusion 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Gardner, John ...ArearCod) 22c OFFICE SYMBOL % John H. Gardner (202) 767-3055 Code 4040 DO FORM 1473. 84 MAR 83 APR edtion may be used until exhausted SECURITY

  13. Confinement of electron plasma by levitating dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Yano, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Mizushima, T.; Kawai, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Mikami, H.

    2010-11-15

    A recent experiment on the Ring Trap 1 device has demonstrated long-term (exceeding 300 s) confinement of non-neutral (pure electron) plasma in a dipole magnetic field; particles diffuse inward, steepening the density gradient and self-organizing into a stable vortex structure [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004 (2010)]. In this study, the internal structures of the plasma are experimentally investigated, and it is shown that the observations are consistent with rigidly rotating charged particle clump. The radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density consistently show that the drift velocity has homogeneous angular frequency in the confinement region. The electrostatic fluctuations also rotate rigidly with a phase velocity that agrees with the drift velocity. The magnetospheric system should have a wide application in confining single-species and even multiple-species charged particles.

  14. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  15. Plasma confinement in a spindle cusp magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the confinement properties of a low (average) beta plasma in a spindle cusp magnetic field is described. An argon discharge plasma and a plasma produced by contact ionization of potassium were investigated. Electron and ion densities, space potentials, and plasma flow velocities were measured in the ring and point cusps. The leak width of the escaping plasma was measured over a wide range of magnetic field strengths and neutral gas pressures. The dependence of the leak width on neutral pressure and magnetic field strength is accounted for by a simple model is which plasma streams out of the cusps along the magnetic field lines while diffusing across the magnetic field due to the combined effects of neutral particle collisions and Bohm diffusion.

  16. Spatially Confined Propagation of Intense Ultraviolet Radiation in Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomei

    X-ray amplification requires a high energy deposition rate in a high aspect-ratio volume. High power lasers for x-ray laser pumping have become available with the development of the short pulse and high intensity laser technology capable of producing pulses with a peak power as high as 10^{12} watts. Short pulses of high intensity x-ray have been observed in laser -plasma interactions, which encurages many scientists actively pursuing the goal of constructing practical x-ray lasers. Our approach has concentrated on producing high aspect ratio x-ray amplifying medium by spatially confined propagation of high power laser pulse in plasmas. A high intensity laser beam induces nonlinear refractive index changes in plasma. In the case of subpicosecond ultrahigh power laser-plasma interaction, the dominant mechanisms responsible for the refractive index change in plasmas are: (1) the relativistic free electron mass increase due to the increase of electron oscillation velocity in the intense electromagnetic field of the laser pulses; and (2) displacement of free electrons out of the high intensity region of the laser beam by ponderomotive force. Both of the above effects lead to a refractive index change of the plasma, which in turn has a positive lensing effect on the beam. If the focusing effect is strong enough to overcome diffraction the beam will stay in a spatially confined mode of propagation. This confined propagation provides an effective method of concentrating energy. The field intensity associated with the confined propagation is so high that the highly excited medium with high aspect ratio suitable for x-ray amplification can be achieved. In this research we have successfully demonstrated spatially confined propagation of 500 GW subpicosecond laser pulse in laser induced plasma. The measured diameter of the propagation is less than 2 μm and the aspect ratio of the confined propagation is over 1000. The filed intensity associated with the propagation is

  17. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  18. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion using Helicon Injected Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Ahern, Drew; Bowman, Jaerd

    2016-10-01

    The use of an external plasma source with the IEC has the advantage that the background pressure in the IEC chamber can be low. This then enables a deep potential well formation for ion confinement. Also unit efficiency is increase due to minimization of ion losses through charge exchange. This technique is under study experimentally for use in a plasma jet propulsion unit and as an IEC type neutron source. Current work has studied the effect of locating the IEC grids off-center in the vacuum chamber, near the plasma entrance from the Helicon. With double grids, the relative potentials employed are also key factors in device performance. Electron emitters are added for space charge neutralization in the case of plasma jet propulsion. Plasma simulations are used to supplement the experiments. Specifically, the electric field and the magnetic field effects on energetic ion trajectories are examined for varying configurations. Funding by NASA, Air Force Research Lab and NPL Associates.

  19. Negative specific heat of a magnetically self-confined plasma torus

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.-H.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the thermodynamic maximum-entropy principle predicts negative specific heat for a stationary, magnetically self-confined current-carrying plasma torus. Implications for the magnetic self-confinement of fusion plasma are considered. PMID:12576553

  20. Confinement of Nonneutral Plasmas in the Prototype Ring Trap Device

    SciTech Connect

    Haruhiko Himura; Zensho Yoshida; Chihiro Nakashima; Junji Morikawa Hidekazu Kakuno; Shigeru Tahara; Norihisa Shibayama

    1999-12-31

    Recently, an internal-ring device named Proto-RT (Prototype Ring Trap) was constructed at University of Tokyo, and experiments on the device have been intensively conducted. The main goal of Proto-RT is to explore an innovative method to attain a plasma equilibrium with extremely high-{beta} ({beta} > 1) in a toroidal geometry using non-neutral condition. At the first series of the experiments, pure electron plasmas (n{sub e} {similar_to} 10{sup 13} m{sup {minus}3}) have been successfully confined inside a separatrix. No disruption is so far observed. The confinement time of the electron plasmas is of order 0.1 ms for an X point configuration. The non-neutrality of {triangle}n{sub e} {similar_to} 10{sup 13} m{sup -3} is already beyond the critical value which is required to produce enough self-electric field E in non-neutral plasmas with n{sub 0} {similar_to} 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, causing a strong E x B flow thoroughly over the plasmas where the hydrodynamic pressure of the flow is predicted to balance with the thermal pressure of the plasmas.

  1. Confinement of nonneutral plasmas in the Prototype Ring Trap device

    SciTech Connect

    Himura, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Nakashima, Chihiro; Morikawa, Junji; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Tahara, Shigeru; Shibayama, Norihisa

    1999-12-10

    Recently, an internal-ring device named Proto-RT (Prototype Ring Trap) was constructed at University of Tokyo, and experiments on the device have been intensively conducted. The main goal of Proto-RT is to explore an innovative method to attain a plasma equilibrium with extremely high-{beta}({beta}>1) in a toroidal geometry using non-neutral condition. At the first series of the experiments, pure electron plasmas (n{sub e}{approx}10{sup 13} m{sup -3}) have been successfully confined inside a separatrix. No disruption is so far observed. The confinement time of the electron plasmas is of order 0.1 ms for an X point configuration. The non-neutrality of {delta}n{sub e}{approx}10{sup 13} m{sup -3} is already beyond the critical value which is required to produce an enough self-electric field E in non-neutral plasmas with n{sub 0}{approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, causing a strong ExB flow thoroughly over the plasmas where the hydrodynamic pressure of the flow is predicted to balance with the thermal pressure of the plasmas.

  2. Compact Torus plasma ring accelerator: a new type driver for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Meeker, D.L.

    1986-08-22

    We discuss the acceleration of magnetically-confined plasma rings to provide a driver for ICF. The acceleration of plasma rings is predicted to be efficient and following focusing, to generate ion-bombardment power in the range 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/ at a total deposition energy of multimegajoules. The simplicity of plasma ring accelerator suggests that a 5 MJ (on target) driver would cost in the range 1 to 5 $/joule. First experimental tests of the accelerator are described.

  3. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2010-11-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  4. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  5. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma.

    PubMed

    Reale, Fabio

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  6. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  7. Structures and phase transitions of a vertically confined plasma crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, K.; Hyde, T. W.

    Dusty plasmas consist of an ionized gas containing small (usually negatively charged) particles. Dusty plasmas are of interest in both astrophysics and space physics as well as in research in plasma processing and nanofabrication. In this work, the formation of plasma crystals confined in an external one-dimensional parabolic potential well is simulated for a normal experimental environment employing a computer code called BOX_TREE. Such crystals are layered systems, with each layer a 2D lattice composed of grain particles. The number of layers is dependent in part upon the external potential parameter. The transition from 1 to 2 layers is specifically analyzed with dispersion relations for the vertical dust lattice wave obtained at the transition point and the transition shown to be induced by the vertical dust lattice instability.

  8. Theoretical study of plasma confinement by magnetic multicusp field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Forest, Cary

    2014-10-01

    Plasma confinement in a magnetic multicusp field is studied numerically using both collisional particle-in-cell and isothermal two-fluid MHD codes and tested against the empirical model. The simulation domain is two-dimensional, periodic in one direction and bounded by absorbing boundaries with multicups field in other direction. First, we study the dependence of plasma loss width on plasma parameters and field strength and compare the results with the well-known empirical formula w = 2√{ρeρi } (two hybrid gyro-radius). Our results show that the loss width has the same scaling with magnetic field w ~ 1 / B , but dependence on other plasma parameters does not agree with this formula. Second, we study the plasma flow drive in the cusp region due to electric field applied by discrete electrodes. The electrode positions are optimized for achieving the highest plasma flow. Comparison with available experimental data from Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is made. The work is supported by NSF and DoE.

  9. Fluid modes of a spherically confined Yukawa plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kählert, H.; Bonitz, M.

    2010-09-01

    The normal modes of a three-dimensional Yukawa plasma in an isotropic harmonic confinement are investigated by solving the linearized cold fluid equations. The eigenmodes are found analytically and expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions. It is found that the mode frequencies solely depend on the dimensionless plasma parameter ξ=κR , where R is the plasma radius and κ is the inverse screening length. The eigenfrequencies increase monotonically with ξ and saturate in the limit ξ→∞ . Compared with the results in the Coulomb limit [D. H. E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2076 (1991)10.1103/PhysRevLett.66.2076], we find an additional class of modes characterized by the number n which determines the number of radial nodes in the perturbed potential. These modes originate from the degenerate bulk modes of the Coulomb system. Analytical formulas for the eigenfrequencies are derived for limiting cases.

  10. Fluid Modes of a Spherically Confined Yukawa Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The normal modes of a three-dimensional Yukawa plasma in an isotropic, harmonic confinement are investigated by solving the linearized cold fluid equations. The eigenmodes are found analytically in terms of hypergeometric functions. The mode frequencies solely depend on the dimensionless plasma parameter ξ=κR, where R is the plasma radius and κ the inverse screening length. The eigenfrequencies increase monotonically with ξ and saturate in the limit ξ->∞. Compared with the results in the Coulomb limit [D. H. E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2076 (1991)], we find a new class of modes characterized by the number n which determines the number of radial nodes in the perturbed potential. We compare the fluid modes with molecular dynamics simulations and find good agreement for low order modes and weak to moderate screening.

  11. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  12. Polyvinyl alcohol coating of polystyrene inertial confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annamalai, P.; Lee, M. C.; Crawley, R. L.; Downs, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target made of polystyrene is first levitated in an acoustic field. The surface of the target is then etched using an appropriate solution (e.g., cyclohexane) to enhance the wetting characteristics. A specially prepared polyvinyl alcohol solution is atomized using an acoustic atomizer and deposited on the surface of the target. The solution is air dried to form a thin coating (2 microns) on the target (outside diameter of about 350-850 microns). Thicker coatings are obtained by repeated applications of the coating solutions. Preliminary results indicate that uniform coatings may be achievable on the targets with a background surface smoothness in the order of 1000 A.

  13. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  14. Self-confined particle pairs in complex plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lisina, I I; Lisin, E A; Vaulina, O S; Petrov, O F

    2017-01-01

    The liquid-crystal type of phase transition in complex plasmas has been observed repeatedly. However, more studies need to be done on the liquid-vapor transition in complex plasmas. In this paper, the phenomenon of coupling (condensation) of particles into self-confined particle pairs in an anisotropic plasma medium with ion flow is considered analytically and numerically using the Langevin molecular dynamics method. We obtain the stability conditions of the pair (bound) state depending on the interaction parameters and particle kinetic energy. It was shown that the breakup of the particle pair is very sensitive to the ratio of particle charges; for example, it is determined by the influence of the upper particle on the ion flow around the lower one. We also show that a self-confined pair of particles exists even if their total kinetic energy is much greater than the potential well depth for the pair state. This phenomenon occurs due to velocity correlation of particles, which arises with the nonreciprocity of interparticle interaction.

  15. Self-confined particle pairs in complex plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisina, I. I.; Lisin, E. A.; Vaulina, O. S.; Petrov, O. F.

    2017-01-01

    The liquid-crystal type of phase transition in complex plasmas has been observed repeatedly. However, more studies need to be done on the liquid-vapor transition in complex plasmas. In this paper, the phenomenon of coupling (condensation) of particles into self-confined particle pairs in an anisotropic plasma medium with ion flow is considered analytically and numerically using the Langevin molecular dynamics method. We obtain the stability conditions of the pair (bound) state depending on the interaction parameters and particle kinetic energy. It was shown that the breakup of the particle pair is very sensitive to the ratio of particle charges; for example, it is determined by the influence of the upper particle on the ion flow around the lower one. We also show that a self-confined pair of particles exists even if their total kinetic energy is much greater than the potential well depth for the pair state. This phenomenon occurs due to velocity correlation of particles, which arises with the nonreciprocity of interparticle interaction.

  16. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, M.R.

    1989-08-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  17. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  18. Confinement of complex plasmas by dielectric walls under microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Klindworth, M.; Arp, O.; Piel, A.

    2005-10-31

    Dusty plasmas have been confined by glass walls in order to generate void-free particle structures under microgravity conditions. Different types of clouds establish in the cuvette in dependence on the rf power and dc bias applied to the multi-electrode system of the discharge device. The observations can be basically understood when applying standard force models to discharge simulation results. The various dust topologies are proposed to result from a change in the direction of the ion drag - inwards or outwards the cuvette gap.

  19. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development, and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  1. Spectroscopic, imaging, and probe diagnostics of laser plasma plumes expanding between confining surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2010-11-01

    Laser plasma plumes were generated in aluminum rectangular cavities of fixed depth (6 mm) and varying height (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 mm). Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy, gated intensified visible imaging, and Langmuir probe diagnostics were utilized to diagnose the evolution of the confined plasma plumes in comparison to freely expanding plasma plume generated from ablation of a planar target. The constrained plasma behavior displayed a multiphase history. Early stage interactions (t <100 ns) resulted in enhanced continuum and line emission, shockwave formation and plasma plume rebound. Later phase, long duration plasma-surface interactions (t >160 ns) resulted in sustained "decay," i.e., a rapid termination of continuum emission, in concert with decreases in peak electron density (Ne) and plasma temperature (T). This later phase originates from loss mechanisms which bleed the plasma plume of thermal energy and charged particles. These loss mechanisms increase in magnitude as the duration of the plasma-surface interaction increases. The transition from enhancement phase, originating from hydrodynamic containment, and plasma-surface collisions, to decay phase is described and occurs for each cavity at a different point in the space time history.

  2. Spectroscopic, imaging, and probe diagnostics of laser plasma plumes expanding between confining surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2010-11-15

    Laser plasma plumes were generated in aluminum rectangular cavities of fixed depth (6 mm) and varying height (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 mm). Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy, gated intensified visible imaging, and Langmuir probe diagnostics were utilized to diagnose the evolution of the confined plasma plumes in comparison to freely expanding plasma plume generated from ablation of a planar target. The constrained plasma behavior displayed a multiphase history. Early stage interactions (t<100 ns) resulted in enhanced continuum and line emission, shockwave formation and plasma plume rebound. Later phase, long duration plasma-surface interactions (t>160 ns) resulted in sustained 'decay', i.e., a rapid termination of continuum emission, in concert with decreases in peak electron density (N{sub e}) and plasma temperature (T). This later phase originates from loss mechanisms which bleed the plasma plume of thermal energy and charged particles. These loss mechanisms increase in magnitude as the duration of the plasma-surface interaction increases. The transition from enhancement phase, originating from hydrodynamic containment, and plasma-surface collisions, to decay phase is described and occurs for each cavity at a different point in the space time history.

  3. Strong-coupling effects in a plasma of confining gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Su, Nan; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2016-12-01

    The plasma consisting of confining gluons resulting from the Gribov quantization of the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory is studied using non-equilibrium fluid dynamical framework. Exploiting the Bjorken symmetry and using linear response theory a general analytic expressions for the bulk, ζ, and shear, η, viscosity coefficients are derived. It is found that the considered system exhibits a number of properties similar to the strongly-coupled theories, where the conformality is explicitly broken. In particular, it is shown that, in the large temperature limit, ζ / η ratio, scales linearly with the difference 1 / 3 - cs2, where cs is the speed of sound. Results obtained from the analysis are in line with the interpretation of the quark-gluon plasma as an almost perfect fluid.

  4. Experiments on pure electron plasmas confined in a toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Chihiro; Yoshida, Zensho; Morikawa, Junji; Himura, Haruhiko; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Tahara, Shigeru; Shibayama, Norihisa

    1999-12-10

    The toroidal magnetic trap has an advantage in achieving long orbit lengths, which allows us to apply a slow process of energy reduction to the trapped particles. On Proto-RT (Prototype Ring Trap), we have demonstrated the confinement of a pure electron plasma without the help of external electric fields. We have injected electrons with the energy of 2 keV inside a separatrix. The electrostatic potential of the electron cloud is of order 100 V. The corresponding density of the electron plasma is calculated to be of order 10{sup 13} m{sup -3}. In order to modulate the kinetic energy of the electrons we are now planning RF assisted injection of electrons.

  5. Measurements of uranium mass confined in high density plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray absorption method for measuring the amount of uranium confined in high density, rf-heated uranium plasmas is described. A comparison of measured absorption of 8 keV X-rays with absorption calculated using Beer Law indicated that the method could be used to measure uranium densities from 3 times 10 to the 16th power atoms/cu cm to 5 times 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. Tests were conducted to measure the density of uranium in an rf-heated argon plasma with UF6 infection and with the power to maintain the discharge supplied by a 1.2 MW rf induction heater facility. The uranium density was measured as the flow rate through the test chamber was varied. A maximum uranium density of 3.85 times 10 to the 17th power atoms/cu cm was measured.

  6. Measurements of uranium mass confined in high density plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray absorption method for measuring the amount of uranium confined in high density, rf-heated uranium plasmas is described. A comparison of measured absorption of 8 keV X-rays with absorption calculated using Beer Law indicated that the method could be used to measure uranium densities from 3 times 10 to the 16th power atoms/cu cm to 5 times 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. Tests were conducted to measure the density of uranium in an rf-heated argon plasma with UF6 infection and with the power to maintain the discharge supplied by a 1.2 MW rf induction heater facility. The uranium density was measured as the flow rate through the test chamber was varied. A maximum uranium density of 3.85 times 10 to the 17th power atoms/cu cm was measured.

  7. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  8. Plasma confinement regimes and collective modes characterizing them

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-10-15

    A unified theory is presented for the modes that are excited at the edge of the plasma column and are important signatures of the advanced confinement regimes into which magnetically confined plasmas can be driven. In particular, the so-called EDA H-Regime, the Elmy H-Regime, and the I-Regime are considered. The modes that are identified theoretically have characteristics that are consistent with or have anticipated those of the modes observed experimentally for each of the investigated regimes. The phase velocities, the produced transport processes, the frequencies, the wavelengths, and the consistency with the direction of spontaneous rotation are the factors considered for comparison with the relevant experiments. The quasi-coherent mode [I. Cziegler, Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2011] that is present in the EDA H-Regime has a phase velocity in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma reference frame. Consequently, this is identified as a ballooning mode near finite Larmor radius marginal stability involving the effects of transverse ion viscosity and other dissipative effects. In this regime, impurities are driven outward by the combined effects of the local temperature gradients of the impurities and their thermal conductivity, while in the Elmy H-Regime impurities are driven toward the center of the plasma column. In the I-Regimes, the excited 'Heavy Particle' modes [B. Coppi and T. Zhou, Phys. Plasmas 19, 012302 (2012); Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)] are not of the ballooning kind and are shown to expel the impurities toward the plasma edge in the presence of significant fluctuations. These modes can have a finite frequency of oscillation with a phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity or they can be nearly purely growing, explaining why there are I-Regimes where fluctuations are not observed. Instead, the modes considered for the Elmy H-Regime are of the ballooning

  9. Alpha heating and burning plasmas in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  10. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  11. Hot Electron Instability in a Dipole Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, J.; Mauel, M. E.

    2005-10-01

    In plasma containing energetic electrons, two interacting collective modes, an MHD-like mode and a hot electron interchange (HEI) modeootnotetextN. A. Krall, Phys. Fluids, 9, 820 (1966)., may be present. The linear stability of interchange modes in a z-pinch at arbitrary beta, including a bulk and hot electron species was recently studiedootnotetextN. Krasheninnikova, P. J. Catto, Phys. Plasmas, 12, 32101 (2005).. Using the dispersion relation derived in this reference we show that when necessary conditions are satisfied the two modes may be present or absent in a closed-field line magnetic confinement geometry such as a hard core z-pinch or a dipole. The HEI instability and the MHD-like centrifugally-driven mode have been studied previouslyootnotetextB. Levitt, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 9, 2507 (2002), and 12, 055703 (2005)., including a comparison between the measured mode structure and the predictions of a global low-beta simulation. The radial eigenmode is seen to effect the saturation level of the mode. In the Levitated Dipole Experimenthttp://psfcwww2.psfc.mit.edu/ldx/ electron cyclotron resonance heating produces high beta plasmas containing hot electrons, and instability observations will be discussed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  12. New Scalings of Energy Confinement Time of RFP Plasmas and the Extrapolation to Reactor Relevant Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    Data bases of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma have been gradually accumulated by recent experiments of several RFP devices. New confinement scalings τX(X=RFPs1)E=0.024Aa2IP/P1/2heat, τX(X=RFPs2)E=0.04s(IN)Aa2I1.25P/P1/2heat which are consistent to the recent data are presented, where units are in [s], [m], [MA] and [MW] respectively and s(IN) is a correction function of IN≡IP/πa2‹ne›20). From the standpoint of new scalings, dependences among parameters of possible RFP reactors are analyzed to find the conditions for RFP reactors. Hs1 Hs2 are defined by the ratios of necessary energy confinement time for RFP reactors for burning against τX(X=RFPs1) and τX(X=RFPs2) respectively. When confinement time follows τX(X=RFPs1)E scaling, confinement enhancement factor of at least Hs1=23 is necessary for RFP reactors to be realistic. When confinement time follows τX(X=RFPs2)E scaling, data points in IP-a space of RFP reactors are within the region of target.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, D.

    1994-03-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities which took place under this contract during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. During this period, GA was assigned 18 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included 'Capabilities Activation' and 'Capabilities Demonstration' to enable us to begin production of glass and composite polymer capsules. Capsule delivery tasks included 'Small Glass Shell Deliveries' and 'Composite Polymer Capsules' for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We also were asked to provide direct 'Onsite Support' at LLNL and LANL. We continued planning for the transfer of 'Micromachining Equipment from Rocky Flats' and established 'Target Component Micromachining and Electroplating Facilities' at GA. We fabricated over 1100 films and filters of 11 types for Sandia National Laboratory and provided full-time onsite engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to make targets for the Naval Research Laboratory. We investigated spherical interferometry, built an automated capsule sorter, and developed an apparatus for calorimetric measurement of fuel fill for LLNL. We assisted LANL in the 'Characterization of Opaque b-Layered Targets.' We developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process.

  14. Ion flux enhancements and oscillations in spatially confined laser produced aluminum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Fallon, C.; Hayden, P.; Yeates, P.; Costello, J. T.; Mujawar, M.

    2014-09-15

    Ion signals from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) generated inside aluminum rectangular cavities at a fixed depth d = 2 mm and varying width, x = 1.0, 1.6, and 2.75 mm were obtained by spatially varying the position of a negatively biased Langmuir probe. Damped oscillatory features superimposed on Maxwellian distributed ion signals were observed. Depending on the distance of the probe from the target surface, three to twelve fold enhancements in peak ion density were observed via confinement of the LPP, generated within rectangular cavities of varying width which constrained the plasma plume to near one dimensional expansion in the vertical plane. The effects of lateral spatial confinement on the expansion velocity of the LPP plume front, the temperature, density and expansion velocity of ions, enhancement of ion flux, and ion energy distribution were recorded. The periodic behavior of ion signals was analyzed and found to be related to the electron plasma frequency and electron-ion collision frequency. The effects of confinement and enhancement of various ion parameters and expansion velocities of the LPP ion plume are explained on the basis of shock wave theory.

  15. Dynamic Fracture of Borosilicate Glass with Plasma Confinement geometry in Pure Water by Laser-induced Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    In order to characterize dynamic fracture of borosilicate glass, we performed laser-shock-experiments of both an aluminum-ablator mounted glass and a glass with plasma confinement geometry in pure water by Q-switched Nd3+:YAG laser. The incident beam with 440 mJ were focused onto the target approximately 300 μm in diameter. The dynamic fracture of the glass targets is observed with high-speed digital framing-camera photography. For the aluminum-ablator mounted glass, propagation of the shock wave in water was observed, and the shock-wave velocity is obtained to be 1.65 +/- 0.02 km/s using image processing. Shock-pressure applied the target is estimated to be 180 MPa by Hugoniot relation. For the glass with plasma confinement geometry, generation of the micro-fragments from the rear side of the target was observed. This result indicates that shock-induced fragmentation by laser irradiation is enhanced by the plasma confinement effect. The soft-recovered fragments are separated according the size with PET mesh having deferent mesh size. As a result, the glass with plasma confinement geometry generated smaller fragment than the aluminum-ablator mounted glass.

  16. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions.

  17. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions. 22 refs.

  18. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions.

  19. Plasma transport coefficients for nonsymmetric toroidal confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshman, S.P.; Shaing, K.C.; van Rij, W.I.; Beasley, C.O. Jr.; Crume, E.C. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    A variational principle is developed for computing accurate values of local plasma transport coefficients in nonsymmetric toroidal confinement configurations. Numerical solutions of the linearized drift Fokker-Planck equation are used to obtain the thermodynamic fluxes as functions of collision frequenty and the radial electric field. Effects resulting from the variation of the longitudinal adiabatic invariant J along an orbit (due to particle transitions from helically trapped to toroidally trapped orbits) are treated. The velocity-space distribution resulting from trapped, circulating, and transition particle orbits is well represented by a Legendre polynomial expansion in the pitch angle coordinate. The computational effort is significantly reduced from that required with Monte Carlo methods through use of an efficient treatment of the disparity between the time scales of collisionless and collisional particle dynamics. Numerical computations for a stellarator configuration are presented. 24 refs. 9 figs.

  20. Cryogenic DT and D2 Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.

    2006-10-01

    Nearly all inertial confinement fusion ignition target designs are based on a spherical ablator containing a solid, cryogenic-DT-fuel layer. The uniformity of the inner surface of this layer is a critical factor in determining target performance. This talk will describe how cryogenic targets are made, characterized, and imploded on the 60-beam OMEGA laser. While cryogenic D2 targets have been routinely imploded for several years, only recently have targets containing DT-fuel layers been possible. Several of these targets have been imploded on OMEGA and most have had inner-ice-surface uniformity between 1- and 2-μm rms (very close to the ignition specification). These are the first laser-imploded targets to be formed exclusively using beta layering. The creation of these high-uniformity DT layers depends on understanding and controlling many diverse physics processes. These include sublimation and condensation at the inner ice surface (the heart of the layering process), phase transitions of multi-isotopic hydrogen ice, heat flow in the ice, heat flow in the exchange gas surrounding the ice, the geometry of the layering sphere that surrounds the target, and the time that the target is exposed to ambient radiation before being irradiated. In addition, a unique optical shadowgraphic technique has been developed to accurately characterize the 3-D ice-layer-thickness distribution for model comparisons and input to multidimensional hydrocode simulations. The talk will be placed in a historical context, describing previous approaches that worked with smaller targets and, more importantly, the approach being followed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It will describe the mutual constraints that target-design requirements and cryogenic system practicalities impose upon each other, for both direct and indirect drive, and how lessons learned on OMEGA can be used to improve the prospects for a successful ignition campaign on the NIF. Finally, implosion results from

  1. Two particle system in spherically confined plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munjal, Dipti; Sen, K. D.; Prasad, Vinod

    2017-03-01

    Energy eigenvalues of Harmonium atom are reported for the first time under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential. Energy of different states of Harmonium is analyzed as a function of confinement radius and Debye screening length. Comparison of radial matrix elements of Harmonium atom under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential is done. Interesting results are obtained.

  2. Plasma confinement time in trimix-M galatea multipole magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bugrova, A. I.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sigov, A. S.; Kharchevnikov, V. K.

    2010-05-01

    The confinement time of hydrogen plasma trapped in a Trimix-M magnetic multipole galatea was studied in a range of plasma densities (1 × 1016 - 6 × 1018 m-3) and ion energies (˜100-300 eV). It is established that (i) the confinement time increases with decreasing plasma density in the trap and (ii) as the barrier magnetic field is increased, the plasma confinement time grows faster than according to a linear law. The obtained results are indicative of a collisional character of plasma diffusion through the barrier field in the trap.

  3. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, P; Chaland, F; Masse, L

    2004-11-01

    By means of highly resolved one-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, we provide an understanding of the burn process in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets. The cornerstone of the phenomenology of propagating burn in such laser-driven capsules is shown to be the transition from a slow unsteady reaction-diffusion regime of thermonuclear combustion (some sort of deflagration) to a fast detonative one. Remarkably, detonation initiation follows the slowing down of a shockless supersonic reaction wave driven by energy redeposition from the fusion products themselves. Such a route to detonation is specific to fusion plasmas.

  4. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, P.; Chaland, F.; Masse, L.

    2004-11-01

    By means of highly resolved one-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, we provide an understanding of the burn process in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets. The cornerstone of the phenomenology of propagating burn in such laser-driven capsules is shown to be the transition from a slow unsteady reaction-diffusion regime of thermonuclear combustion (some sort of deflagration) to a fast detonative one. Remarkably, detonation initiation follows the slowing down of a shockless supersonic reaction wave driven by energy redeposition from the fusion products themselves. Such a route to detonation is specific to fusion plasmas.

  5. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  6. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  7. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas in the nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2006-06-15

    A field theory approach to transport phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas is presented. The thermodynamic field theory (TFT), previously developed for treating the generic thermodynamic system out of equilibrium, is applied to plasmas physics. Transport phenomena are treated here as the effect of the field linking the thermodynamic forces with their conjugate flows combined with statistical mechanics. In particular, the Classical and the Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes are analyzed by solving the thermodynamic field equations of the TFT in the weak-field approximation. We found that, the TFT does not correct the expressions of the ionic heat fluxes evaluated by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes. On the other hand, the fluxes of matter and electronic energy (heat flow) is further enhanced in the nonlinear Classical and Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes. These results seem to be in line with the experimental observations. The complete set of the electronic and ionic transport equations in the nonlinear Banana regime, is also reported. A paper showing the comparison between our theoretic results and the experimental observations in the JET machine is currently in preparation.

  8. Plasma confinement calculations for TIBER-II: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, E.

    1987-10-14

    This paper compares the empirically based TIBER II design parameters against the reactor parameters of a tokamak based on a theoretical model of heat transport. The motivation behind this project is the following. The present TIBER-II design is based on an empirical scaling of confinement time tau/sub E/ known as Kaye-Goldston scaling. This empirical scaling is based on data from tokamak plasmas whose temperatures did not exceed a few keV, while the TIBER-II requires electron temperatures of 25 keV. The question, then, is whether the Kaye Goldston scaling is valid at temperatures above the range of empirical data. For this we must turn to theory. If a theoretical transport model is available that shows favorable correlation with the Kaye-Goldston scaling in the range of a few keV, then this scaling could be extrapolated to the 25 keV range required for TIBER-II. The project is divided into two parts. Part one of the project concerns the development of a transport model from plasma theory that has empirical support. Part two of the project consists of applying the transport model to the TIBER-II design. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Heavy ion plasma confinement in an RF quadrupole trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schermann, J.; Major, F. G.

    1971-01-01

    The confinement of an electron free plasma in a pure quadrupole RF electric trap was considered. The ultimate goal was to produce a large density of mercury ions, in order to realize a trapped ion frequency standard using the hyperfine resonance of 199 Hg(+) at 40.7 GHz. An attempt was made to obtain an iodine plasma consisting of equal numbers of positive and negative ions of atomic iodine, the positive iodine ions, being susceptible to charge-exchange with mercury atoms, will produce the desired mercury ions. The experiment showed that the photoproduction of ions pairs in iodine using the necessary UV radiation occurs with a small cross-section, making it difficult to demonstrate the feasibility of space charge neutralization in a quadrupole trap. For this reason it was considered expedient to choose thallium iodide, which has a more favorable absorption spectrum (in the region of 2000 to 2100 A). The results indicate that, although the ionic recombination is a serious limiting factor, a considerable improvement can be obtained in practice for the density of trapped ions, with a considerable advantage in lifetimes for spectroscopic purposes. The ion pair formation by photoionization is briefly reviewed.

  10. Angle of Observation Influence on Emission Signal from Spatially Confined Laser-Induced Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jiri; Cabalín, Luisa Maria; Laserna, J Javier

    2017-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of the angle of observation on the emission signal from copper plasmas. Plasma plumes have been generated inside a home-made chamber consisting of two parallel glass windows spaced by 2.5 mm. This chamber allows observing plasma plumes from different collection angles throughout their perimeter, spanning from 20° to 80° with respect to the surface of the Cu target. In order to minimize the observed volume of the plasma, measurements were made from the closest distance possible through a metallic hollow tube. Single-pulse and collinear double-pulse excitation schemes with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 5 ns) have been investigated. The results have shown that the selection of the best angle to collect light from the plasma is related to the excitation mode. On the other hand, the shot-to-shot signal variability has been found to depend on the shape of plasma plumes. In single-pulse excitation, a good correlation between the observed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emission (from spatially confined plumes) and their integrated signal of plasma image has been ascertained. However, this fact was less evident in double-pulse LIBS, which could be due to a different mechanism involved in the ablation process.

  11. Confinement physics for thermal, neutral, high-charge-state plasmas in nested-well solenoidal traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolliver, D. D.; Ordonez, C. A.

    1999-06-01

    A theoretical study is presented which indicates that it is possible to confine a neutral plasma using static electric and solenoidal magnetic fields. The plasma consists of equal temperature electrons and highly stripped ions. The solenoidal magnetic field provides radial confinement, while the electric field, which produces an axial nested-well potential profile, provides axial confinement. A self-consistent, multidimensional numerical solution for the electric potential is obtained, and a fully kinetic theoretical treatment on axial transport is used to determine an axial confinement time scale. The effect on confinement of the presence of a radial electric field is explored with the use of ion trajectory calculations. A thermal, neutral, high-charge-state plasma confined in a nested-well trap opens new possibilities for fundamental studies on plasma recombination and cross-field transport processes under highly controlled conditions.

  12. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 1011 cm-3 could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  13. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-Ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 10(11) cm(-3) could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  14. Experimental investigation of discharge plasma magnetic confinement in the NSTASR ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Fitzgerald, Dennis; Owens, Al

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic confinement studies were performed on the state-of-the-art NSTAR ion thruster. The goal of the experimental studies was determine the dependence of plasma confinement and plasma uniformity on the strength and shape of the imposed ring-cusp magnetic field.

  15. Status of target physics for inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-03-01

    A four day review to assess the status of target physics of inertial confinement fusion was held at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on November 14 to 17, 1988. This review completes the current series of reviews of the inertial fusion program elements to assess the status of the data base for a decision to proceed with the proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) that is being planned. In addition to target physics, the program elements that have been reviewed previously include the driver technology development for KrF and solid-state lasers, and the light-on beam pulsed power system. This series of reviews was undertaken for internal DOE assessment in anticipation of the ICF program review mandated by the Congress in 1988 to be completed in 1990 to assess the significance and implications of the progress that has been realized in the laboratory and the underground Halite/Centurion experiments. For this target physics review, both the direct and the indirect drive approaches were considered. The principal issues addressed in this review were: (1) the adequacy of the present target physics data base in making a decision to proceed with design and construction of LMF now as opposed to continuing planning activities at this time; (2) the desirability of specific additional target physics data in reducing the risk involved in a DOE decision to construct an LMF; (3) the continuing role of Halite/Centurion experiments; (4) the priority given to the direct drive approach; and (5) the optimal program-elements structure to resolve the critical issues of an LMF decision. Specific findings relating to these five issues are summarized.

  16. Role of Plasma Elongation on Turbulent Transport in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angelino, P.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Bottino, A.

    2009-05-15

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  17. Role of plasma elongation on turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas.

    PubMed

    Angelino, P; Garbet, X; Villard, L; Bottino, A; Jolliet, S; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V; McMillan, B F; Sarazin, Y; Dif-Pradalier, G; Tran, T M

    2009-05-15

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  18. Role of Plasma Elongation on Turbulent Transport in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelino, P.; Garbet, X.; Villard, L.; Bottino, A.; Jolliet, S.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; McMillan, B. F.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Tran, T. M.

    2009-05-01

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  19. The role of spatial confinement for improvement of laser-induced Mg plasma parameters and growth of surface features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Zaheer, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The role of spatial confinement for improvement of laser-induced Mg plasma parameters and growth of surface features is investigated by introducing a metallic blocker. Nd: YAG laser at various fluences ranging from 7 to 28 J cm-2 was employed as an irradiation source. All measurements were performed in the presence of Ar under different pressures. Confinement effects offered by metallic blocker are investigated by placing the blocker at different distances of 6, 8 and 10 mm from the target surface. It is revealed from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis that both plasma parameters, i.e., excitation temperature and electron number density initially increase with increasing laser fluence due to enhancement in energy deposition. With further increase in laser fluence, a decreasing trend followed by saturation is observed which is attributable to shielding effect and self-regulating regime. It is also observed that spatial confinement offered by metallic blocker is responsible for the significant enhancement of both electron temperature and electron number density of Mg plasma. This is true for all laser fluences and pressures of Ar. Maximum values of electron temperature and electron number density without blocker are 8335 K and 2.4 × 1016 cm-3, respectively, whereas these values are enhanced to 12,200 K and 4 × 1016 cm-3 in the presence of the blocker. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Mg plasma parameters are plasma compression, confinement and pronounced collisional excitations due to reflection of shock waves. Scanning electron microscope analysis was performed to explore the surface morphology of laser-ablated Mg. It reveals the formation of cones, cavities and ripples. These features become more distinct and well defined in the presence of the blocker due to plasma confinement. The optimum combination of blocker distance, fluence and Ar pressure can identify the suitable conditions for defining the role of plasma parameters

  20. Improvement of confinement times of lithium ion and electron plasmas in BX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Himura, H.; Noichi, T.; Nakata, S.; Kawai, S.; Sanpei, A.

    2015-06-29

    Confinements of both electron (e{sup −}) and Lithium ion (Li{sup +}) plasmas in the BX-U machine are improved experimentally. For the e{sup −} plasma, the longest confinement time so far has been ∼ 10 s, which is much longer than the classical electron-electron collision time: τ{sub ee} ∼ 0.6 s. On the other hand, for the Li{sup +} plasma, the longest confinement time has been about 0.5 s, which is still much shorter than the classical ion-ion collision time.

  1. A magnetic trap for simultaneous confinement of neutral atoms and a non-neutral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2002-01-01

    Three methods have been proposed for the simultaneous confinement of neutral atoms and a non-neutral plasma in close proximity [D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4331 (2001)]. This note discusses one of these methods, in which particles are trapped in an axially-symmetric static magnetic field with a magnetic minimum in a ring around the axis of symmetry. Axial symmetry is required for confinement of the rotating non-neutral plasma, and the magnetic minimum traps the neutral atoms. This trap design may be useful for the production and confinement of cold antihydrogen.

  2. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bers, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

  3. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

  4. Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic Dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.

    2005-05-06

    Centrifugally driven interchange instabilities are observed in a laboratory plasma confined by a dipole magnetic field. The instabilities appear when an equatorial mesh is biased to drive a radial current that causes rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities are quasicoherent in the laboratory frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures.

  5. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Andrei N. Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D.

    2014-02-15

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  6. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Andrei N.; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D.; Batha, Steven H.

    2014-02-01

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  7. Persistence of atomic spectral line on laser-induced Cu plasma with spatial confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Anmin; Sui, Laizhi; Li, Suyu; Liu, Dunli; Wang, Xiaowei; Jiang, Yuanfei; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2016-11-01

    This paper carries out the spatial confinement effect on laser-induced Cu breakdown spectroscopy in a cylindrical cavity via a nanosecond pulsed Q-switch Nd:YAG laser operating at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the laser-induced plasma spectroscopy is used to investigate the characteristics of spectral persistence. The atomic spectral persistence in plasma generated from Cu with spatial confinement is experimentally demonstrated, where the results indicate that the diameter of the confinement cavity plays a very important role in the persistence of an excited neutral Cu emission line, while the depth of the confinement cavity is almost independent of Cu (I) line persistence. As the diameter of the confinement cavity increases, the persistence of the Cu (I) line in the plasma grows longer under a certain limit. The likely reason for this phenomenon is that under spatial confinement, the reflected shockwave compresses the plasma and leads to an increase in the plasma temperature and density at a certain delay time, which causes further excitation of atomic population to higher excited levels. Finally, the collision rate between particles in the plasma plume is increased.

  8. Debye Layers in Plasmas Generalized to Hadron Confinement of Nuclei and Quark-Gluon-Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2005-10-01

    . A new theory for the nuclear forces for confining the hadrons in a nucleus has been derived from a generalization of the Debye layer as known from the plasma ablation at laser irradiation where the temperature is substituted by the Fermi energy of the nucleons [1]. The first convincing proof is by using the empirical density of the nucleons defining their Fermi energy to arrive at a Debye length of about 3 fm as measured by Hofstadter for the decay of the nucleon density at the surface of heavy nuclei. This decay is interpreted as Wigner scattering and the Goos-Haenchen effect. With the same steps of substitutions, the surface energy of nuclei is always too small against the nucleon enthalpy to confine the hadrons until the density reaches such high values reproducing the empirical known radii of nuclei. By this way nuclei are possible only until uranium or curium by a Boltzmann equilibrium process explaining the endothermic generation of heavy nuclei in the Universe [2]. At and about six times higher nucleon density, the Fermi statistics changes into its relativistic branch excluding nucleation in neutron stars and explaining the quark-gluon plasma. [1] Edward Teller Lectures, H. Hora and G.H. Miley eds. (Imperial College Press London 2005) p. 103. [2] H. Hora, G.H. Miley, F. Osman, Astrophysics and Space Science, 298, 247 (2005)

  9. The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion databasea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, S. C.; Bellei, C.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-05-01

    The generation of strong, self-generated electric fields (GV/m) in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsules has been reported [Rygg et al., Science 319, 1223 (2008); Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A candidate explanation for the origin of these fields based on charge separation across a plasma shock front was recently proposed [Amendt et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51 124048 (2009)]. The question arises whether such electric fields in imploding capsules can have observable consequences on target performance. Two well-known anomalies come to mind: (1) an observed ≈2× greater-than-expected deficit of neutrons in an equimolar D3He fuel mixture compared with hydrodynamically equivalent D [Rygg et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and DT [Herrmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuels, and (2) a similar shortfall of neutrons when trace amounts of argon are mixed with D in indirect-drive implosions [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. A new mechanism based on barodiffusion (or pressure gradient-driven diffusion) in a plasma is proposed that incorporates the presence of shock-generated electric fields to explain the reported anomalies. For implosions performed at the Omega laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], the (low Mach number) return shock has an appreciable scale length over which the lighter D ions can diffuse away from fuel center. The depletion of D fuel is estimated and found to lead to a corresponding reduction in neutrons, consistent with the anomalies observed in experiments for both argon-doped D fuels and D3He equimolar mixtures. The reverse diffusional flux of the heavier ions toward fuel center also increases the pressure from a concomitant increase in electron number density, resulting in lower stagnation pressures and larger imploded cores in agreement with gated, self-emission, x-ray imaging data.

  10. Improved confinement in high-density H-modes via modification of the plasma boundary with lower hybrid wavesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; Reinke, M. L.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Brunner, D.; Churchill, R. M.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Faust, I.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J.; Lin, Y.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Xu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Injecting Lower Hybrid Range of Frequency (LHRF) waves into Alcator C-Mod's high-density H-mode plasmas has led to enhanced global energy confinement by increasing pedestal temperature and pressure gradients, decreasing the separatrix density, modifying the pedestal radial electric field and rotation, and decreasing edge turbulence. These experiments indicate that edge LHRF can be used as an actuator to increase energy confinement via modification of boundary quantities. H98-factor increases of up to ˜35% (e.g., H98 from 0.75 to 1.0) are seen when moderate amounts of LH power (PLH/Ptot ˜ 0.15) are applied to H-modes of densities n ¯ e ˜ 3 × 1020 m-3, corresponding to values ˜0.5 of the Greenwald density. However, the magnitude of the improvement is reduced if the confinement quality of the target H-mode plasma is already good (i.e., H98target ˜ 1). Ray-tracing modeling and accessibility calculations for the LH waves indicate that they do not penetrate to the core. The LHRF power appears to be deposited in plasma boundary region, with a large fraction of the injected power increment appearing promptly on the outer divertor target. There is no evidence that the LH waves are driving current in these plasmas. The LHRF-actuated improvements are well correlated with suppressed pedestal density fluctuations in the 100-300 kHz range. There is also a correlation between the improved confinement and a drop in separatrix density, a correlation that is consistent with previous H-mode results with no LHRF.

  11. Studies of plasma confinement in linear and RACETRACK mirror configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuthi, A.; Wong, A.Y.

    1986-06-30

    This report discusses research on the following magnetic mirror configurations: Racetrack; ECRH generated plasmas; RF generated plasmas; potential structures; surface multipole fields, and lamex; hot electron physics; axial loss processes; and RF induced effects.

  12. Measurements Of Stellar And Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis Reactions Using Inertially-Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Kim, Yongho; Frenje, Johan; Hale, Gerry; Li, Chikang; Rubery, Mike; Paris, Mark; Bacher, Andy; Brune, Carl; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Janezic, Roger; McNabb, Dennis; Nikroo, Abbas; Pino, Jesse; Sangster, Craig; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Stoeckl, Christian; Petrasso, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The 3He+ 3He, T+3He, and p+D reactions directly relevant to either Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using inertially-confined plasmas, created using shock-driven `exploding pusher' implosions. These plasmas better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. A new measured S-factor for the T(3He, γ)6Li reaction rules out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. Our value is also inconsistent with values used in previous BBN calculations. Proton spectra from the 3He+3He and T+3He reactions are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling, and recent experiments have probed the p+D reaction for the first time in a plasma. This work was partially supported by the LDRD program at LANL, US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  13. Ion confinement and transport in a toroidal plasma with externally imposed radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, H. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Strong electric fields were imposed along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma by biasing it with electrodes maintained at kilovolt potentials. Coherent, low-frequency disturbances characteristic of various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were absent in the high-density, well-confined regime. High, direct-current radial electric fields with magnitudes up to 135 volts per centimeter penetrated inward to at least one-half the plasma radius. When the electric field pointed radially toward, the ion transport was inward against a strong local density gradient; and the plasma density and confinement time were significantly enhanced. The radial transport along the electric field appeared to be consistent with fluctuation-induced transport. With negative electrode polarity the particle confinement was consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions, in those sectors of the plasma not containing electrodes, that resulted from the radially inward fields; and ion losses to the electrodes, each of the which acted as a sink and drew ions out of the plasma. A simple model of particle confinement was proposed in which the particle confinement time is proportional to the plasma volume. The scaling predicted by this model was consistent with experimental measurements.

  14. Quantifying Fusion Born Ion Populations in Magnetically Confined Plasmas using Ion Cyclotron Emission

    DOE PAGES

    Carbajal, L.; Warwick Univ., Coventry; Dendy, R. O.; ...

    2017-03-07

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) offers unique promise as a diagnostic of the fusion born alpha-particle population in magnetically confined plasmas. Pioneering observations from JET and TFTR found that ICE intensity P ICE scales approximately linearly with the measured neutron flux from fusion reactions, and with the inferred concentration, n /n i , of fusion-born alpha-particles confined within the plasma. We present fully nonlinear self-consistent kinetic simulations that reproduce this scaling for the first time. This resolves a longstanding question in the physics of fusion alpha particle confinement and stability in MCF plasmas. It confirms the MCI as the likely emissionmore » mechanism and greatly strengthens the basis for diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future burning plasmas.« less

  15. MAGNETIC END CLOSURES FOR PLASMA CONFINING AND HEATING DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1963-08-20

    More effective magnetic closure field regions for various open-ended containment magnetic fields used in fusion reactor devices are provided by several spaced, coaxially-aligned solenoids utilized to produce a series of nodal field regions of uniform or, preferably, of incrementally increasing intensity separated by lower intensity regions outwardly from the ends of said containment zone. Plasma sources may also be provided to inject plasma into said lower intensity areas to increase plasma density therein. Plasma may then be transported, by plasma diffusion mechanisms provided by the nodal fields, into the containment field. With correlated plasma densities and nodal field spacings approximating the mean free partl cle collision path length in the zones between the nodal fields, optimum closure effectiveness is obtained. (AEC)

  16. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. APPARATUS FOR MINIMIZING ENERGY LOSSES FROM MAGNETICALLY CONFINED VOLUMES OF HOT PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1961-10-01

    An apparatus is described for controlling electron temperature in plasma confined in a Pyrotron magnetic containment field. Basically the device comprises means for directing low temperature electrons to the plasma in controlled quantities to maintain a predetermined optimum equilibrium electron temperature whereat minimum losses of plasma ions due to ambipolar effects and energy damping of the ions due to dynamical friction with the electrons occur. (AEC)

  19. Non-axisymmetric magnetic fields and toroidal plasma confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2015-02-01

    The physics of non-axisymmetry is a far more important topic in the theory of toroidal fusion plasmas than might be expected. (1) Even a small toroidal asymmetry in the magnetic field strength, δ ≡ ∂ln B/∂φ ˜ 10-4, can cause an unacceptable degradation in performance. (2) Nevertheless, asymmetries—even large asymmetries δ ˜ 1—can give beneficial plasma control and circumvent issues, such as magnetic-configuration maintenance and plasma disruptions, that make axisymmetric fusion devices problematic. Viewed from prospectives that are adequate for designing and studying axisymmetric plasmas, the physics of non-axisymmetric plasmas appears dauntingly difficult. Remarkably, Maxwell's equations provide such strong constraints on the physics of toroidal fusion plasmas that even a black-box model of a plasma answers many important questions. Kinetic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics provide further, but more nuanced, constraints. This paper is organized so these constraints can be used as a basis for the innovations and for the extrapolations that are required to go from existing experiments to fusion systems. Outlines are given of a number of calculations that would be of great importance to ITER and to the overall fusion program and that could be carried out now with limited resources.

  20. Monoenergetic ion beam acceleration from transversely confined near-critical plasmas by intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Shen, X. F.; Chang, H. X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2017-09-01

    An advanced target for production of high-energy monoenergetic ion beams by intense laser pulses is proposed, in which the near-critical plasma is transversely confined between the high-Z dense wires. It is found that the ion acceleration is significantly enhanced due to the strong magnetic dipole vortex formed at the rear of the target, where large electron current density gradients from the wires to the vacuum exist. The magnetic dipole vortex helps to realize the contraction of ion momentum phase spaces and reduction of the beam divergence so that monenergetic, highly directed, and collimated ion beams can be obtained. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have shown that monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 105 MeV and particle number about 2.2 × 1011 are produced by using the advanced target at a laser intensity of 2.7 × 1020 W/cm2 and a pulse duration of 0.65 ps.

  1. Observation of Confined Current Ribbon in JET Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, E. R.; Barrera, L.; Luna, E. de la; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Lomas, P. J.; Alper, B.; Andrew, Y.; Arnoux, G.; Boboc, A.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Gerasimov, S.; Giroud, C.; Howell, D.; Korotkov, A.; Saarelma, S.; Sirinelli, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Zabeo, L.

    2010-05-07

    We report the identification of a localized current structure inside the JET plasma. It is a field-aligned closed helical ribbon, carrying current in the same direction as the background current profile (cocurrent), rotating toroidally with the ion velocity (corotating). It appears to be located at a flat spot in the plasma pressure profile, at the top of the pedestal. The structure appears spontaneously in low density, high rotation plasmas, and can last up to 1.4 s, a time comparable to a local resistive time. It considerably delays the appearance of the first edge localized mode.

  2. The energy confinement response of DIII-D plasmas to Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, L.; Nazikian, Raffi; Grierson, B. A.; ...

    2017-07-11

    Here, Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) are a leading method for edge localized modes (ELMs) Control in fusion plasmas. However they can also cause a rapid degradation in energy confinement. In this paper we show that the energy confinement in low collisionality (v*e < 0.3) DIII-D ITER Similar Shape (ISS) plasmas often recovers after several energy confinement times for RMP amplitudes up to the threshold for ELM suppression. Immediately following the application of the RMP, the plasma stored energy decreases in proportion to the decrease in the line-averaged density during density "pump-out". Later in the discharge confinement recovery is observed inmore » the thermal ion channel and is correlated with the increase in the ion temperature at the top of the H-mode pedestal. A correlation between the inverse scale length of the ion temperature (α/LTi) and the E x B shearing rate at the top of the pedestal is seen during the confinement recovery phase. Transport analysis reveals that the confinement improvement in the ion channel results from the self-similarity in the ion temperature profiles in the plasma core combined with the observed increase in α/LTi in the plasma edge following density pump-out. In contrast the electron temperature scale length (α/LTi) remains essentially unchanged in response to the application of the RMP. At significantly higher RMP levels the edge EXB shearing rate and α/LTi does not increase and the confinement does not recover following density pump-out.« less

  3. Two-plasmon decay mitigation in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments using multilayer targets

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-04-15

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon-decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor of five reduction in hot-electron generation (> 50 keV) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (LPSE) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show excellent agreement with the measurements. As a result, the simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron production observed in the multilayer targets is primarily due to increased electron-ion collisional damping.

  4. Two-Plasmon Decay Mitigation in Direct-Drive Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Experiments Using Multilayer Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-04-01

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor-of-5 reduction in hot-electron generation (>50 keV ) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD-driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (lpse) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show good agreement with the measurements. The simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron production observed in the multilayer targets is primarily caused by increased electron-ion collisional damping.

  5. Two-plasmon decay mitigation in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments using multilayer targets

    DOE PAGES

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; ...

    2016-04-15

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon-decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor of five reduction in hot-electron generation (> 50 keV) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (LPSE) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show excellent agreement with the measurements. As a result, the simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron productionmore » observed in the multilayer targets is primarily due to increased electron-ion collisional damping.« less

  6. Computer models for kinetic equations of magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.; Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.; Mirin, A.A.; Horowitz, E.J.; Shumaker, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents four working computer models developed by the computational physics group of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center. All of the models employ a kinetic description of plasma species. Three of the models are collisional, i.e., they include the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in velocity space. The fourth model is collisionless and treats the plasma ions by a fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell method.

  7. Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts Basic Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton D. Schnack

    2002-12-09

    This is the final report for contract DE-FG03-99ER54528, ''Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts''. Progress was made in the following areas of investigation: (1) Extensive studies of the confinement properties of conventional Reversed-field Pinch (RFP) configurations (i.e., without current profile control) were performed in collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden. These studies were carried out using the full 3-dimensional, finite-{beta}, resistive MHD model in the DEBS code, including ohmic heating and anisotropic heat conduction, and thus for the first time included the self-consistent effects of the dynamo magnetic fluctuations on the confinement properties of the RFP. By using multi-variant regression analysis of these results, scaling laws for various properties characterizing the conventional RFP were obtained. In particular, it was found that the, for constant ratio of I/N (where I is the current and N = na{sup 2} is the line density), and over a range of Lundquist numbers S that approaches 10{sup 6}, the fluctuations scale as {delta}B/B {approx} S{sup -0.14}, the temperature scales as T {approx} I{sup 0.56}, the poloidal beta scales as {beta}{sub {theta}} {approx} I{sup -0.4}, and the energy confinement time scales as {tau}{sub E} {approx} I{sup 0.34}. The degradation of poloidal beta with current is a result of the weak scaling of the fluctuation level with the Lundquist number, and leads to the unfavorable scaling laws for temperature and energy confinement time. These results compare reasonably well with experimental data, and emphasize the need for external control of the dynamo fluctuations in the RFP. (2) Studies of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in the RFP were performed with the DEBS code in collaboration with the CNR/RFX group in Padua, Italy. The ideal growth rates are ''passively'' reduced by the presence of a resistive wall within the radius for perfectly conducting

  8. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-02-07

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  9. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2007-02-20

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  10. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-10-10

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  11. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-03-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  12. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-12-16

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  13. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2008-10-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  14. Turbulence and atomic physics in magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Nace, N.; Serre, E.; Tamain, P.; Valentinuzzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    An overview of issues related to the interplay between atomic process and turbulence in the peripheral regions of magnetically confined fusion devices is presented. Both atomic processes and turbulence play key roles for fusion, but have most of the time been treated separately. The effects of fluctuations on the time averaged ionization balance, on the transport of neutral particles (atoms and molecules) are discussed, using stochastic models to generate fluctuations with statistically relevant properties. Then applications to optical diagnostics of turbulence, namely gas puff imaging and beam emission spectroscopy are discussed.

  15. Laser absorption and electron propagation in rippled plasma targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-10-01

    Efficient absorption of laser energy and the collimated propagation of relativistic electron beams (generated by the laser target interaction) in plasma are two issues which are of significant importance for applications such as fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is shown with the help of 2-D Particle- In- Cell simulations that introducing density ripples transverse to the laser propagation direction enhances the efficiency of laser power absorption. Furthermore, the density ripples are also instrumental in suppressing the Weibel instability of the propagating electron beam (which is responsible for the divergence of the beam). A physical understanding of the two effects is also provided.

  16. Study of intermittent small-scale turbulence in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Confinement transitions in the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator [H. Renner et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 31, 1579 (1989)] can be induced by varying either the internal plasma current or the external magnetic field. In this paper we report on experiments where closely matched confinement states (good and bad) were constructed using the latter method. Analysis using the former scheme has been reported upon previously [S. Zoletnik et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 1581 (2002)]. The electron temperature, along with the major spectral characteristics of magnetic and small-scale electron density fluctuations, changes dramatically at the transition from good to bad confinement. The fluctuation power is intermittent, and core bursts traveling in the electron diamagnetic drift (DD) direction are correlated between the bottom and top of the plasma, especially during degraded confinement. A corresponding top-bottom correlation for the edge ion DD direction turbulence feature was not found. Strong correlations are observed both between the two density fluctuation signals and between magnetic and density fluctuations in bad compared to good confinement. The correlation time of the bursts is of order 100 {mu}s, similar to the lifetime observed during edge localized modes.

  17. Study of intermittent small-scale turbulence in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, N. P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, P. K.; W7-As Team

    2005-01-01

    Confinement transitions in the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator [H. Renner et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 31, 1579 (1989)] can be induced by varying either the internal plasma current or the external magnetic field. In this paper we report on experiments where closely matched confinement states (good and bad) were constructed using the latter method. Analysis using the former scheme has been reported upon previously [S. Zoletnik et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 1581 (2002)]. The electron temperature, along with the major spectral characteristics of magnetic and small-scale electron density fluctuations, changes dramatically at the transition from good to bad confinement. The fluctuation power is intermittent, and core bursts traveling in the electron diamagnetic drift (DD) direction are correlated between the bottom and top of the plasma, especially during degraded confinement. A corresponding top-bottom correlation for the edge ion DD direction turbulence feature was not found. Strong correlations are observed both between the two density fluctuation signals and between magnetic and density fluctuations in bad compared to good confinement. The correlation time of the bursts is of order 100μs, similar to the lifetime observed during edge localized modes.

  18. Formation of high-{beta} plasma and stable confinement of toroidal electron plasma in Ring Trap 1

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Furukawa, M.; Yano, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Vogel, G.; Mikami, H.

    2011-05-15

    Formation of high-{beta} electron cyclotron resonance heating plasma and stable confinement of pure electron plasma have been realized in the Ring Trap 1 device, a magnetospheric configuration generated by a levitated dipole field magnet. The effects of coil levitation resulted in drastic improvements of the confinement properties, and the maximum local {beta} value has exceeded 70%. Hot electrons are major component of electron populations, and its particle confinement time is 0.5 s. Plasma has a peaked density profile in strong field region [H. Saitoh et al., 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference EXC/9-4Rb (2010)]. In pure electron plasma experiment, inward particle diffusion is realized, and electrons are stably trapped for more than 300 s. When the plasma is in turbulent state during beam injection, plasma flow has a shear, which activates the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability. The canonical angular momentum of the particle is not conserved in this phase, realizing the radial diffusion of charged particles across closed magnetic surfaces. [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys Rev. Lett. 104, 235004 (2010); H. Saitoh et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 112111 (2010).].

  19. Confinement Time Exceeding One Second for a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Stoneking, M. R.

    2008-04-18

    Nearly steady-state electron plasmas are trapped in a toroidal magnetic field for the first time. We report the first results from a new toroidal electron plasma experiment, the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II, in which electron densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} are trapped in a 270 deg. toroidal arc (670 G toroidal magnetic field) by application of trapping potentials to segments of a conducting shell. The total charge inferred from measurements of the frequency of the m=1 diocotron mode is observed to decay on a 3 s time scale, a time scale that approaches the predicted limit due to magnetic pumping transport. Three seconds represents {approx_equal}10{sup 5} periods of the lowest frequency plasma mode, indicating that nearly steady-state conditions are achieved.

  20. Effects of low-Z and high-Z impurities on divertor detachment and plasma confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H. Q.; Guo, Houyang Y.; Petrie, Thomas W.; ...

    2017-03-18

    The impurity-seeded detached divertor is essential for heat exhaust in ITER and other reactor-relevant devices. Dedicated experiments with injection of N2, Ne and Ar have been performed in DIII-D to assess the impact of the different impurities on divertor detachment and confinement. Seeding with N2, Ne and Ar all promote divertor detachment, greatly reducing heat flux near the strike point. The upstream plasma density at the onset of detachment decreases with increasing impurity-puffing flow rates. For all injected impurity species, the confinement and pedestal pressure are correlated with the impurity content and the ratio of separatrix loss power to themore » L-H transition threshold power. As the divertor plasma approaches detachment, the high-Z impurity seeding tends to degrade the core confinement owing to the increased core radiation. In particular, Ar injection leads to an increase in core radiation, up to 50% of the injected power, and a reduction in pedestal temperature over 60%, thus significantly degrading the confinement, i.e., with H98 reducing from 1.1 to below 0.7. As for Ne seeding, H98 near 0.8 can be maintained during the detachment phase with the pedestal temperature being reduced by about 50%. In contrast, in the N2 seeded plasmas, radiation is predominately confined in the boundary plasma, with up to 50% of heating power being radiated in the divertor region and less than 25% in the core at the onset of detachment. In the case of strong N2 gas puffing, the confinement recovers during the detachment, from ~20% reduction at the onset of the detachment to greater than that before the seeding. The core and pedestal temperatures feature a reduction of 30% from the initial attached phase and remain nearly constant during the detachment phase. The improvement in confinement appears to arise from the increase in pedestal and core density despite the temperature reduction.« less

  1. Megajoule Dense Plasma Focus Solid Target Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podpaly, Y. A.; Falabella, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Shaw, B. H.; Cooper, C. M.; Chapman, S.; Bennett, N.; Sipe, N.; Olson, R.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) devices are plasma sources that can produce significant neutron yields from beam into gas interactions. Yield increases, up to approximately a factor of five, have been observed previously on DPFs using solid targets, such as CD2 and D2O ice. In this work, we report on deuterium solid-target experiments at the Gemini DPF. A rotatable target holder and baffle arrangement were installed in the Gemini device which allowed four targets to be deployed sequentially without breaking vacuum. Solid targets of titanium deuteride were installed and systematically studied at a variety of fill pressures, bias voltages, and target positions. Target holder design, experimental results, and comparison to simulations will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. [Analysis of Cr in soil by LIBS based on conical spatial confinement of plasma].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong-Zeng; Yao, Ming-Yin; Chen, Tian-Bing; Li, Wen-Bing; Zheng, Mei-Lan; Xu, Xue-Hong; Tu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Mu-Hua

    2013-11-01

    The present study is to improve the sensitivity of detection and reduce the limit of detection in detecting heavy metal of soil by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The Cr element of national standard soil was regarded as the research object. In the experiment, a conical cavity with small diameter end of 20 mm and large diameter end of 45 mm respectively was installed below the focusing lens near the experiment sample to mainly confine the signal transmitted by plasma and to some extent to confine the plasma itself in the LIBS setup. In detecting Cr I 425.44 nm, the beast delay time gained from experiment is 1.3 micros, and the relative standard deviation is below 10%. Compared with the setup of non-spatial confinement, the spectral intensity of Cr in the soil sample was enhanced more than 7%. Calibration curve was established in the Cr concentration range from 60 to 400 microg x g(-1). Under the condition of spatial confinement, the liner regression coefficient and the limit of detection were 0.997 71 and 18.85 microg x g(-1) respectively, however, the regression coefficient and the limit of detection were 0.991 22 and 36.99 microg x g(-1) without spatial confinement. So, this shows that conical spatial confinement can/improve the sensitivity of detection and enhance the spectral intensity. And it is a good auxiliary function in detecting Cr in the soil by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  3. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Kress, J. D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ˜20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  4. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Boehly, T R; Kress, J D; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ∼20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  5. Numerical study of structural phase transitions in a vertically confined plasma crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, K.; Hyde, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    Dusty plasmas consists of an ionized gas containing small (usually negatively charged) particles. Dusty plasmas are of interest in both astrophysics and space physics as well as in research in plasma processing and nanofabrication. In this work, the formation of plasma crystals confined in an external one-dimensional parabolic potential well is simulated for a normal experimental environment employing a computer code called BOX_TREE. Such crystals are layered systems, with each layer a two dimensional lattice composed of grain particles. The number of layers is dependent upon the external potential parameter. For constant layer number, the intralayer structure transits from a square lattice to a hexagonal (triangular) lattice as the confining potential decreases. For hexagonal lattices, both hcp and fcc characteristics were found but hcp structures dominate. The relative thickness of the system was also examined. The results were compared with previous experimental and theoretical results and found to agree.

  6. Observation of the hot electron interchange instability in a high beta dipolar confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Eugenio Enrique

    In this thesis the first study of the high beta, hot electron interchange (HEI) instability in a laboratory, dipolar confined plasma is presented. The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is a new research facility that explores the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. In initial experiments long-pulse, quasi-steady state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 sec have been produced with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Creation of high-pressure, high beta plasma is possible only when intense HEI instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. LDX plasma exist within one of three regimes characterized by its response to heating and fueling. The observed HEI instability depends on the regime and can take one of three forms: as quasiperiodic bursts during the low density, low beta plasma regime, as local high beta relaxation events in the high beta plasma regime, and as global, intense energy relaxation bursts, both in the high beta and afterglow plasma regimes. Measurements of the HEI instability are made using high-impedance, floating potential probes and fast Mirnov coils. Analysis of these signals reveals the extent of the transport during high beta plasmas. During intense high beta HEI instabilities, fluctuations at the edge significantly exceed the magnitude of the equilibrium field generated by the high beta electrons and energetic electron confinement ends in under 100 musec. For heated plasmas, one of the consequences of the observed high beta transport is the presence of hysteresis in the neutral gas fueling required to stabilize and maintain the high beta plasma. Finally, a nonlinear, self-consistent numerical simulation of the growth and saturation of the HEI instability has been adapted for LDX and compared to experimental observations.

  7. External Heat Transfer Coefficient Measurements on a Surrogate Indirect Inertial Confinement Fusion Target

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin; Havstad, Mark; LeBlanc, Mary; Golosker, Ilya; Chang, Allan; Rosso, Paul

    2015-09-15

    External heat transfer coefficients were measured around a surrogate Indirect inertial confinement fusion (ICF) based on the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) design target to validate thermal models of the LIFE target during flight through a fusion chamber. Results indicate that heat transfer coefficients for this target 25-50 W/m2∙K are consistent with theoretically derived heat transfer coefficients and valid for use in calculation of target heating during flight through a fusion chamber.

  8. External Heat Transfer Coefficient Measurements on a Surrogate Indirect Inertial Confinement Fusion Target

    DOE PAGES

    Miles, Robin; Havstad, Mark; LeBlanc, Mary; ...

    2015-09-15

    External heat transfer coefficients were measured around a surrogate Indirect inertial confinement fusion (ICF) based on the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) design target to validate thermal models of the LIFE target during flight through a fusion chamber. Results indicate that heat transfer coefficients for this target 25-50 W/m2∙K are consistent with theoretically derived heat transfer coefficients and valid for use in calculation of target heating during flight through a fusion chamber.

  9. Laser-Plasma Interaction Near the Quarter-Critical Density in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, A. V.; Wen, H.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Ren, C.

    2016-10-01

    The laser-plasma interaction (LPI) near the quarter-critical density in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas strongly influences the coupling of laser energy to the target and the generation of fast electrons capable of preheating the target fuel. The full modeling of LPI near the quarter-critical density includes the interplay between two-plasmon decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities as well as ion-acoustic perturbations. The results of the kinetic particle-in-cell simulations are in agreement with the simulation results from the fluid-type code. The fast-electron flux and the ω/2 half-omega light spectra are calculated for the parameters relevant to direct-drive ICF experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and at the National Ignition Facility. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Impeding hohlraum plasma stagnation in inertial-confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Town, R P J; Wilks, S C; Betti, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Hund, J; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2012-01-13

    This Letter reports the first time-gated proton radiography of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of how the fill gas compresses the wall blowoff, inhibits plasma jet formation, and impedes plasma stagnation in the hohlraum interior. The potential roles of spontaneously generated electric and magnetic fields in the hohlraum dynamics and capsule implosion are discussed. It is shown that interpenetration of the two materials could result from the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring as the lighter, decelerating ionized fill gas pushes against the heavier, expanding gold wall blowoff. This experiment showed new observations of the effects of the fill gas on x-ray driven implosions, and an improved understanding of these results could impact the ongoing ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  11. Electron Plasma Confinement in a Partially Toroidal Trap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-24

    2002 American Institute of Physics 0-7354-0050-4/02/$19.00 671 plane superimposed on the cross - field drifts can close the drift orbits. In the tokamak...equipotential contours. Because the plasma is nonneutral, the drift results in a current, J, which when crossed into the magnetic field , B, balances the...equilibrium momentum equation is evident, J x B = Vp. In MHD theory the diamagnetic current crossed into the magnetic field balances the pressure gradient

  12. On the magnetized disruption of inertially-confined plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Rasmus, Alexander; Klein, Sallee; MacDonald, Michael; Trantham, Matt; Fein, Jeff; Belancourt, Patrick; Young, Rachel; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul; Pollock, Brad; Park, Jaebum; Hazi, Andrew; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The creation and disruption of inertially-collimated plasma flows is investigated through experiment, simulation, and analytical modeling. Laser-generated plasma-jets are shown to be disrupted by an applied 5T B-field along the jet axis. An analytical model of the system describes the disruption mechanism through the competing effects of B-field advection and diffusion. These results indicate that for Rem 10-100, the ratio of inertial to magnetic pressures plays an important role in determining whether a jet is formed, but at high enough Rem , axial B-field amplification prevents inertial collimation altogether. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HED Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840 and in collaboration with LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Support for this work was provided by NASA, under contract NAS8-03060, through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship Grant Number PF3-140111. Software used in this work was developed in part by the DOE NNSA ASC- and DOE Office of Science ASCR-supported Flash Center.

  13. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field

  14. Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

    1984-06-01

    Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

  15. Bifurcation theory for the L-H transition in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weymiens, W.; Blank, H. J. de; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Valenca, J. C. de

    2012-07-15

    The mathematical field of bifurcation theory is extended to be applicable to 1-dimensionally resolved systems of nonlinear partial differential equations, aimed at the determination of a certain specific bifurcation. This extension is needed to be able to properly analyze the bifurcations of the radial transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. This is of special interest when describing the transition from the low-energy-confinement state to the high-energy-confinement state of the radial transport in fusion plasmas (i.e., the L-H transition), because the nonlinear dynamical behavior during the transition corresponds to the dynamical behavior of a system containing such a specific bifurcation. This bifurcation determines how the three types (sharp, smooth, and oscillating) of observed L-H transitions are organized as function of all the parameters contained in the model.

  16. Improved confinement in JET high β plasmas with an ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, C. D.; Garcia, J.; Beurskens, M.; Buratti, P.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Keeling, D.; King, D. B.; Maggi, C. F.; Mailloux, J.; Marchetto, C.; McDonald, D.; Nunes, I.; Pucella, G.; Saarelma, S.; Simpson, J.; Contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes. It was found that the power degradation of thermal energy confinement was weak with the ILW; much weaker than the IPB98(y,2) scaling and resulting in an increase in normalized confinement from H98 ˜ 0.9 at βN ˜ 1.5 to H98 ˜ 1.2-1.3 at βN ˜ 2.5 - 3.0 as the power was increased (where H98 = τE/τIPB98(y,2) and βN = βTBT/aIP in % T/mMA). This reproduces the general trend in JET of higher normalized confinement in the so-called ‘hybrid’ domain, where normalized β is typically above 2.5, compared with ‘baseline’ ELMy H-mode plasmas with βN ˜ 1.5 - 2.0. This weak power degradation of confinement, which was also seen with the C-wall experiments at low triangularity, is due to both increased edge pedestal pressure and core pressure peaking at high power. By contrast, the high triangularity C-wall plasmas exhibited elevated H98 over a wide power range with strong, IPB98(y,2)-like, power degradation. This strong power degradation of confinement appears to be linked to an increase in the source of neutral particles from the wall as the power increased, an effect that was not reproduced with the ILW. The reason for the loss of improved confinement domain at low power with the ILW is yet to be clarified, but contributing factors may include changes in the rate of gas injection, wall recycling, plasma composition and radiation. The results presented in this paper show that the choice of wall materials can strongly affect plasma performance, even changing confinement scalings that are relied upon for extrapolation to future devices.

  17. Energy Confinement Recovery in Low Collisionality ITER Shape Plasmas with Applied Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Grierson, B.; Logan, N.; Nazikian, R.

    2016-10-01

    Application of RMPs to low collisionality (ν*e < 0.4) ITER shape plasmas on DIII-D leads to a rapid reduction in stored energy due to density pumpout that is sometimes followed by a gradual recovery in the plasma stored energy. Understanding this confinement recovery is essential to optimize the confinement of RMP plasmas in present and future devices such as ITER. Transport modeling using TRANSP+TGLF indicates that the core a/LTi is stiff in these plasmas while the ion temperature gradient is much less stiff in the pedestal region. The reduction in the edge density during pumpout leads to an increase in the core ion temperature predicted by TGLF based on experimental data. This is correlated to the increase in the normalized ion heat flux. Transport stiffness in the core combined with an increase in the edge a/LTi results in an increase of the plasma stored energy, consistent with experimental observations. For plasmas where the edge density is controlled using deuterium gas puffs, the effect of the RMP on ion thermal confinement is significantly reduced. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Double-shell inertial confinement fusion target fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, C.W.; Lorensen, L.E.; Weinstein, B.W.

    1980-08-26

    First generation hemishells, from which spherical shells are constructed, were fabricated by micromachining coated mandrels and by molding. The remachining of coated mandrels are described in detail. Techniques were developed for coating the microsized mandrels with polymeric and metallic materials by methods including conformal coating, vapor deposition, plasma polymerization and thermoforming. Micropositioning equipment and bonding techniques have also been developed to assemble the hemishells about a fuel pellet maintaining a spherical concentricity of better than 2 ..mu..m and voids in the hemishell bonding line of a few hundred angstroms or less.

  19. Inward transport of a toroidally confined plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Hong, J.; Kim, Y. H.

    1977-01-01

    Digitally implemented spectral analysis techniques were used to investigate the frequency-dependent fluctuation-induced particle transport across a toroidal magnetic field. When the electric field pointed radially inward, the transport was inward and a significant enhancement of the plasma density and confinement time resulted.

  20. Production and study of high-beta plasma confined by a superconducting dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, D.T.; Hansen, A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ortiz, E.; Boxer, A.C.; Ellsworth, J.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.; Mahar, S.; Roach, A.

    2006-05-15

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [J. Kesner et al., in Fusion Energy 1998, 1165 (1999)] is a new research facility that is exploring the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. Unlike other configurations in which stability depends on curvature and magnetic shear, magnetohydrodynamic stability of a dipole derives from plasma compressibility. Theoretically, the dipole magnetic geometry can stabilize a centrally peaked plasma pressure that exceeds the local magnetic pressure ({beta}>1), and the absence of magnetic shear allows particle and energy confinement to decouple. In initial experiments, long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 s have been produced that are consistent with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Detailed measurements have been made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. In these initial experiments, the high-field superconducting floating coil was supported by three thin supports. The plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 and 6.4 GHz, and a population of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV, dominates the plasma pressure. Creation of high-pressure, high-beta plasma is possible only when intense hot electron interchange instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. A dramatic transition from a low-density, low-beta regime to a more quiescent, high-beta regime is observed when the plasma fueling rate and confinement time become sufficiently large.

  1. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 1, Magnetic confinement Fusion Plasma Theory. Annual progress report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on few tokamak plasma confinement issues: applications of our new Chapman-Enskog-like approach for developing hybrid fluid/kinetic descriptions of tokamak plasmas; multi-faceted studies as part of our development of a new interacting island paradigm for the tokamak equilibrium`` and transport; investigations of the resolution power of BES and ECE diagnostics for measuring core plasma fluctuations; and studies of net transport in the presence of fluctuating surfaces. Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the NERSC node and the fusion theory workstations are summarized briefly in this report.

  2. Xe capillary target for laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Takahiro; Okino, Hideyasu; Nica, Petru Edward; Amano, Sho; Miyamoto, Shuji; Mochizuki, Takayasu

    2007-10-15

    A cryogenic Xe jet system with an annular nozzle has been developed in order to continuously fast supply a Xe capillary target for generating a laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The cooling power of the system was evaluated to be 54 W, and the temperature stability was {+-}0.5 K at a cooling temperature of about 180 K. We investigated experimentally the influence of pressure loss inside an annular nozzle on target formation by shortening the nozzle length. Spraying caused by cavitation was mostly suppressed by mitigating the pressure loss, and a focused jet was formed. Around a liquid-solid boundary, a solid-Xe capillary target (100/70 {mu}m {phi}) was formed with a velocity of {<=}0.01 m/s. Laser-plasma EUV generation was tested by focusing a Nd:YAG laser beam on the target. The results suggested that an even thinner-walled capillary target is required to realize the inertial confinement effect.

  3. Study of plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus with a heavy-ion beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is generally strongly dependent on an ambipolar electric field. Spatially resolved measurements of the resulting electric space potential phi/sub sp/ have been made in a single plasma cross section by the heavy-ion beam probe. This diagnostic injects a 4-60-keV beam of (usually) Cs/sup +/ ions into the plasma. Measurement of the energy of Cs/sup 2 +/ secondary ions leaving the plasma gives a continuous monitor of the local space potential. In addition, the total detected Cs/sup 2 +/ ion current is proportional to the product of the local electron density and the ionization rate, which, in turn, is a function of the electron temperature. This signal, nf(T/sub e/), is sensitive to all three electron distributions found in EBT - those of the cold surface plasma, the warm core plasma, and the hot electron ring.

  4. Density distribution of a rotating plasma in Tornado magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.M.; Pakhomov, A.B.; Rusakov, A.I.

    1984-12-01

    The density distribution of a rotating plasma in a Tornado magnetic confinement system is calculated under the assumption that the plasma rotates at constant angular velocity throughout the region bounded by the separatrix. The component of the centrifugal inertial force parallel to the magnetic force lines is shown to pinch the plasma toward the equatorial plane of the system. The density distribution depends on the ratio v/T of the plasma drift velocity and temperature. The experimentally measured density distribution can be used to determine v/T and thus to analyze the rotating plasma. If v is known for the rotating plasma then T can be calculated from v, and vice versa.

  5. Stability of magnetohydrodynamic Dean Flow as applied to centrifugally confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, A.B.

    1999-10-01

    Dean Flow is the azimuthal flow of fluid between static concentric cylinders. In a magnetized plasma, there may also be radial stratification of the pressure. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of such a flow in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and an added radial gravitational force is examined. It is shown that both the Kelvin{endash}Helmholtz instability and pressure-gradient-driven interchanges can be stabilized if the flow is driven by a unidirectional external force and if the plasma annulus is sufficiently thin (large aspect ratio). These results find application in schemes using centrifugal confinement of plasma for fusion. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Hot-electron plasma formation and confinement in the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.B.

    1988-06-01

    The tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the first experiment to investigate the thermal-barrier tandem-mirror concept. One attractive feature of the tandem magnetic mirror as a commercial power reactor is that the fusion reactions occur in an easily accessible center-cell. On the other hand, complicated end-cells are necessary to provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and improved particle confinement of the center-cell plasma. In these end-cells, enhanced confinement is achieved with a particular axial potential profile that is formed with electron-cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ECRF heating, ECRH). By modifying the loss rates of electrons at spatially distinct locations within the end-cells, the ECRH can tailor the plasma potential profile in the desired fashion. Specifically, the thermal-barrier concept requires generation of a population of energetic electrons near the midplane of each end-cell. To be effective, the transverse (to the magnetic field) spatial structure of the hot-electron plasma must be fairly uniform. In this dissertation we characterize the spatial structure of the ECRH-generated plasma, and determine how the structure builds up in time. Furthermore, the plasma should efficiently absorb the ECRF power, and a large fraction of the electrons must be well confined near the end-cell midplane. Therefore, we also examine in detail the ECRH power balance, determining how the ECRF power is absorbed by the plasma, and the processes through which that power is confined and lost. 43 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Nonlinear competition of turbulent structures and improved confinement in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear competition of turbulent structures and their roles in transport are investigated by using three-dimensional simulation code of resistive drift wave turbulence in magnetized cylindrical plasmas. Selective formation of zonal flows and streamers has been obtained by controlling the strength of damping of the zonal flow. In addition, there is an energy path from the drift waves to a flute type structure, which is linearly stable, and it becomes effective just below the stability boundary of the zonal flow. The flute structure directly induces transport effectively, and affects the drift waves and the zonal flow. A large amplitude zonal flow is formed selectively even with existence of the flute structure. The property of the particle confinement is investigated by changing the particle source intensity, which controls the strength of driving of the drift waves. The characteristic of the particle confinement changes according to turbulent states, and an improved confinement regime is obtained in the zonal flow dominant state. Study on cylindrical plasmas reveals the fundamental mechanism of improved confinement in the magnetized plasma with influence of turbulent structural formation.

  8. Surface-confined activation of ultra low-k dielectrics in CO2 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiting; Krishtab, Mikhail; Mankelevich, Yuri; Zhang, Liping; De Feyter, Steven; Baklanov, Mikhail; Armini, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    An approach allowing surface-confined activation of porous organosilicate based low-k dielectrics is proposed and studied. By examining the plasma damage mechanism of low-k, we came up with an initial idea that the main requirements for the surface-confined modification would be the high reactivity and high recombination rate of the plasma species. Based on this concept, CO2 plasma was selected and benchmarked with several other plasmas. It is demonstrated that a short exposure of organosilicate low-k films to CO2 plasma enables high surface hydrophilicity with limited bulk modification. CO2+ ions predominantly formed in this plasma have high oxidation potential and efficiently remove surface -CH3 groups from low-k. At the same time, the CO2+ ions get easily discharged (deactivated) during their collisions with pore walls and therefore have very limited probability of penetration into the low-k bulk. Low concentration of oxygen radicals is another factor avoiding the bulk damage. The chemical reactions describing the interactions between CO2 plasma and low-k dielectrics are proposed.

  9. Plasma confinement experiments in the TMX tandem mirror. Paper IAEA-CN-38/F-1

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Anderson, C.A.; Casper, T.A.

    1980-05-22

    Results from the new Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) are described. Tandem-mirror density and potential profiles are produced using end-plug neutral-beam injection and central-cell gas-fueling. TMX parameters are near those predicted theoretically. The end-plug electron temperature is higher than in the comparably sized single-mirror 2XIIB. Axial confinement of the finite-beta central-cell plasma is improved by the end plugs by as much as a factor of 9. In TMX, end-plug microinstability limits central-cell confinement in agreement with theory.

  10. Particle Confinement Properties of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Plasma on the HL-1 Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuru; Yuan, Chengjie; Qian, Shangjie; Ding, Xuantong; Yuan, Bin; Yang, Guang; Diao, Guangyue

    1994-03-01

    The particle confinement property of LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) plasma on the HL-1 tokamak is mainly affected by the line-averaged density of electrons (ne). With ne < 2.0 × 1013 cm-3, the particle confinement time (τp) is improved with the suppression of Hα(Dα) fluctuation at the edge, and tends to increase with the power PLH. The peak of τp appears near the critical density (1.0×1013 cm-3). These results are not influenced by the current drive directions.

  11. Plasma Studies in the SPECTOR Experiment as Target Development for MTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Russ; Young, William; the Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    General Fusion (GF) is developing a Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) concept in which magnetized plasmas are adiabatically compressed to fusion conditions by the collapse of a liquid metal vortex. To study and optimize the plasma compression process, GF has a field test program in which subscale plasma targets are rapidly compressed with a moving flux conserver. GF has done many field tests to date on plasmas with sufficient thermal confinement but with a compression geometry that is not nearly self-similar. GF has a new design for our subscale plasma injectors called SPECTOR (for SPhErical Compact TORoid) capable of generating and compressing plasmas with a more spherical form factor. SPECTOR forms spherical tokamak plasmas by coaxial helicity injection into a flux conserver (a = 9 cm, R = 19 cm) with a pre-existing toroidal field created by 0.5 MA current in an axial shaft. The toroidal plasma current of 100 - 300 kA resistively decays over a time period of 1.5 msec. SPECTOR1 has an extensive set of plasma diagnostics including Thomson scattering and polarimetry. MHD stability and lifetime of the plasma was explored in different magnetic configurations with a variable safety factor q(Ψ) . Relatively hot (Te >= 350 eV) and dense ( 1020 m-3) plasmas have achieved energy confinement times τE >= 100 μsec and are now ready for field compression tests. russ.ivanov@generalfusion.com.

  12. Study on discharge plasma in a cylindrical inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzarbaruah, N.; Dutta, N. J.; Borgohain, D.; Mohanty, S. R.; Bailung, H.

    2017-08-01

    Deuterium plasma has been produced in a cylindrical inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device using hot and cold cathode discharges and the plasma parameters are determined by employing an electrostatic probe. The plasma temperature and density are estimated at optimum experimental conditions and it is noted that the plasma temperature is 3 eV in the case of hot cathode discharge whereas 10 eV in the case of the cold cathode discharge. The plasma density as determined is two orders more in the case of the hot cathode discharge than the other. The probe is also used to observe the ion oscillation in the negative potential well that is formed in between the cathode grid and chamber (anode). The observation of spontaneous oscillation along with the harmonics has been reported.

  13. Evidence for density-gradient-driven trapped-electron modes in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Chapman, Brett; Sarff, John; Terry, Paul; Williams, Zach; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Parke, Eli

    2015-11-01

    Density fluctuations in the large-density-gradient region of improved-confinement MST RFP plasmas exhibit features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when magnetic transport is reduced. In standard RFP plasmas, core transport is governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from current-driven tearing modes. Using inductive control, these tearing modes are reduced, improving confinement. The improved confinement is associated with substantial increases in the density and temperature gradients, and we present evidence for the onset of drift wave instability. Density fluctuations are measured with a multi-chord, laser-based interferometer. These fluctuations have wavenumbers kϕ *ρs <0.14, frequencies characteristic of drift waves (>50 kHz), and are clearly distinct from residual global tearing modes. Their amplitudes increase with the local density gradient, and require a critical density gradient. Gyrokinetic analysis provides supporting evidence of microinstability in these plasmas, in which the density-gradient-driven TEM is most unstable. The experimental threshold gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. Work supported by DOE.

  14. New Steady-State Quiescent High-Confinement Plasma in an Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.; Wang, H. Q.; Ding, S. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Liang, Y. F.; Mansfield, D. K.; Maingi, R.; Zou, X. L.; Wang, L.; Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Zhang, L.; Duan, Y. M.; Shi, T. H.; Hu, L. Q.; East Team

    2015-02-01

    A critical challenge facing the basic long-pulse high-confinement operation scenario (H mode) for ITER is to control a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability, known as the edge localized mode (ELM), which leads to cyclical high peak heat and particle fluxes at the plasma facing components. A breakthrough is made in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak in achieving a new steady-state H mode without the presence of ELMs for a duration exceeding hundreds of energy confinement times, by using a novel technique of continuous real-time injection of a lithium (Li) aerosol into the edge plasma. The steady-state ELM-free H mode is accompanied by a strong edge coherent MHD mode (ECM) at a frequency of 35-40 kHz with a poloidal wavelength of 10.2 cm in the ion diamagnetic drift direction, providing continuous heat and particle exhaust, thus preventing the transient heat deposition on plasma facing components and impurity accumulation in the confined plasma. It is truly remarkable that Li injection appears to promote the growth of the ECM, owing to the increase in Li concentration and hence collisionality at the edge, as predicted by GYRO simulations. This new steady-state ELM-free H -mode regime, enabled by real-time Li injection, may open a new avenue for next-step fusion development.

  15. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-01

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface Btw reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (-Btw)/Bpw, where Bpw is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  16. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  17. Population inversion and gain measurements for soft x-ray-laser development in a magnetically confined plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Voorhees, D.; Milchberg, H.; Keane, C.; Semet, A.

    1983-06-01

    We present population inversion and gain measurements from an experimental investigation of possibilities to obtain high gain and lasing action in the soft x-ray region. Our approach to soft x-ray-laser development is based on rapid plasma cooling after the laser pulse by radiation losses, leading to fast recombination and collisional cascade into upper excited levels of CVI, for example, while the lower excited levels depopulate rapidly by radiative transitions, thus creating population inversions and gain. A approx. = 0.5 kJ CO/sub 2/ laser was focused onto a target of solid carbon or teflon; or CO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, Ne gas, and the resulting plasma confined in a 50 to 90 kG magnetic field. Spectroscopic diagnostics with absolute intensity calibration were used to measure level populations.

  18. Confinement studies of reversed field pinch plasma on TPE-1RM20

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Yasuyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Maejima, Yoshiki; Shimada, Toshio; Hirota, Isao

    1995-04-01

    Confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP), TPE-1RM20, are intensively presented. Plasma current, I{sub p}, dependencies of confinement properties are particularly shown in comparison with the forerunner machine, TPE-1RM15. The results without any active density controls are presented in this paper. It is shown that both machines have almost the same, relatively high, I/N values (<= 12 x 10{sup -14} Am) and the poloidal beta, {Beta}{sub p} (= 0.1) and they do not change very much with I{sub p}, where N is the column density. The energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, linearly increases with I{sub p} and the behavior of the resistive part of the loop voltage has an important role to the I{sub p} dependence of {tau}{sub E}. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  20. The development of RF heating of magnetically confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J. C.; Bemabei, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson the TFTR Team, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q=0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  2. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei

    1999-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed.

  3. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  4. Fabrication of cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion targets using target free-fall technique. Report No. 2-82

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Murphy, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    Techniques for fabricating cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets (i.e., spherical shells containing a uniform layer of DT ice) are investigated using target free-fall concept. Detection and characterization of the moving targets are effected by optoelectronic means, of which the principal is an RF ac-interferometer. This interferometer system demonstrates, for the first time, the speed capabilities of the phase-modulation ac-interferometry. New techiques developed for handling, holding, launching, and transporting targets are also described. Results obtained at both room and cryogenic temperatures are presented.

  5. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-04-15

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as 'robustness' for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  6. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-04-01

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as "robustness" for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  7. Dipole configuration for confinement of positrons and electron-positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Saitoh, H.; Horn-Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Paschkowski, N.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Stoneking, M. R.; Dickmann, M.; Singer, M.; Vohburger, S.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory creation and confinement of electron-positron plasmas, which are expected to exhibit atypical plasma physics characteristics, would enable tests of many theory and simulation predictions (e.g., the stabilization of anomalous transport mechanisms). This is the goal of APEX/PAX (A Positron-Electron eXperiment/Positron Accumulation eXperiment). Following demonstration of efficient (38%) E ×B injection and subsequent confinement (τ = 3-5 ms) of cold positrons in a dipole magnetic field, the system is undergoing upgrades from a supported permanent magnet to a supported HTSC (high-temperature superconductor) coil, then to a levitated HTSC coil suitable for the simultaneous confinement of electrons and positrons. This contribution will report on the design and testing of the new systems and subsystems (e.g., for cooling, excitation, and levitation) and, if available, on results of upcoming experiments using a ``rotating wall'' to generate inward particle flux deeper into the confinement region. on behalf of the APEX/PAX team and collaborators.

  8. Is Onsager symmetry relevant in the transport equations for magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R. )

    1991-03-01

    A global, algebraic view of the transport processes in a magnetically confined plasma is developed. Both the neoclassical (banana) and the anomalous transport matrices are represented in a factorized form, thus separating the roles of the dynamics and of the geometric constraints. The self-adjointness of the collision operator (the sole condition for classical Onsager symmetry) is shown to be a necessary, but not sufficient condition for this symmetry in confined plasmas. The latter results for the banana transport matrix from a delicate relationship between dynamic and geometric components. This structure is not present in the anomalous transport matrix, and the Onsager symmetry is broken in this case. It is stressed that the symmetry breaking does not violate any general principles.

  9. Banana fluxes in the plateau regime for a nonaxisymmetrically confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R.; Fantechi, S. )

    1990-09-01

    The banana (or banana-plateau) fluxes, related to the generalized stresses {l angle}{bold B}{center dot}{del}{center dot}{pi}{sup {alpha}({ital n})}{r angle}, {l angle}{bold B}{sub {ital T}}{center dot}{del}{center dot}{pi}{sup {alpha}({ital n})}{r angle} have been determined in the plateau regime, for a plasma confined by a toroidal magnetic field of arbitrary geometry. The complete set of transport coefficients for both the parallel'' (ambipolar) and toroidal'' (nonambipolar) banana fluxes was obtained in the 13-moment (13M) approximation, going beyond the previously known expressions in the nonaxisymmetric case. The main emphasis is laid on the structure of the transport matrix and of its coefficients. It is shown that the Onsager symmetry of this matrix partly breaks down (for the mixed electron--ion coefficients) in a nonaxisymmetrically confined plasma.

  10. Thermal Phenomena in Gas Confinement Dielectric Tube of the VASIMR Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisford, Dan; Bengtson, R.; Raja, L.; Squire, J.; Cassidy, L.; Chauncery, J.; McCaskill, G.

    2007-11-01

    A quartz dielectric tube provides gas confinement in the helicon discharge of the VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) experiment. Despite highly aligned magnetic field lines to confine the plasma in the discharge, significant thermal heating of the dielectric tube occurs. We perform infrared camera imaging studies of heating of the tube with varying operational parameters of the experiment. Results show decreased heating of the tube as the plasma becomes more highly magnetized and less collisional. The data follows a trend that is well represented by a Bohm transport of ions perpendicular to the magnetic field lines suggesting that ion impact on the tube rather than radiation is the primary heating mechanism. Highly localized heating is also observed directly under the antenna in regions where the coils lie closest to the tube surface. This phenomenon is attributed to capacitive coupling effects that accelerate ions under the antenna coils, increasing the local energy flux to the tube surface.

  11. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    DOEpatents

    Motley, Robert W.; Glanz, James

    1985-01-01

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  12. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X. Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (κ{sub QMD}), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ∼2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro-simulations. The FP

  13. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; ...

    2015-04-20

    In this study, a comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximatelymore » taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of –2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  14. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militizer, B.

    2015-04-20

    In this study, a comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of –2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  15. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_s<0.14, and propagate in the electron drift direction. Their spectral emergence coincides with a sharp decrease in fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  16. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Hiroyuki Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  17. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  18. Scaling relations for a neutron yield in a plasma with inertial electrostatic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Kurilenkov, Yu. K.

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the possibilities of producing a high-power source of thermonuclear neutrons under inertial electrostatic confinement of a plasma in the process of periodic oscillations of hydrogen isotope nuclei in the field of a virtual cathode of an electrostatic trap. The investigations are performed using analytical scaling relations, which explicitly give the dependence of a neutron yield on the electrostatic trap parameters under various operating conditions. Presented at the ECLIM 2016 conference (Moscow, 18 - 23 September 2016).

  19. Neutron yield and Lawson criterion for plasma with inertial electrostatic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu; Kurilenkov, Yu K.

    2016-11-01

    The physics of plasma formation is discussed in the systems with inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) during the convergent to the axis of cylindrical geometry of the ion flow accelerated periodically in the field of virtual cathode, which is formed by the injected electrons. The ranges of plasma parameters and the resulting neutron yield are determined for different modes of ion flux formation. The requirements are formulated to the technical parameters of the system with IEC to create both a powerful neutron source with a rate of generation exceeding 1010-1012 particles/s and to achieve a positive energy output (analogue of Lawson criterion).

  20. A table top experiment to study plasma confined by a dipole magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Baitha, Anuj Ram

    2016-10-01

    There has been a long quest to understand charged particle generation, confinement and underlying complex processes in a plasma confined by a dipole magnet. Our earth's magnetosphere is an example of such a naturally occurring system. A few laboratory experiments have been designed for such investigations, such as the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) at MIT, the Terella experiment at Columbia university, and the Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) experiment at the University of Tokyo. However, these are large scale experiments, where the dipole magnetic field is created with superconducting coils, thereby, necessitating power supplies and stringent cryogenic requirements. We report a table top experiment to investigate important physical processes in a dipole plasma. A strong cylindrical permanent magnet, is employed to create the dipole field inside a vacuum chamber. The magnet is suspended and cooled by circulating chilled water. The plasma is heated by electromagnetic waves of 2.45 GHz and a second frequency in the range 6 - 11 GHz. Some of the initial results of measurements and numerical simulation of magnetic field, visual observations of the first plasma, and spatial measurements of plasma parameters will be presented.

  1. Stable confinement of electron plasma and initial results on positron injection in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Yano, Y.; Kasaoka, N.; Sakamoto, W.; Nogami, T.

    2013-03-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a dipole field configuration generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. It offers very interesting opportunities for research on the fundamental properties on non-neutral plasmas, such as self-organization of charged particles in the strongly positive and negative charged particles on magnetic surfaces. When strong positron sources will be available in the future, the dipole field configuration will be potentially applicable to the formation of an electron-positron plasma. We have realized stable, long trap of toroidal pure electron plasma in RT-1; Magnetic levitation of the superconducting magnet resulted in more than 300s of confinement for electron plasma of ˜ 1011 m-3. Aiming for the confinement of positrons as a next step, we started a positron injection experiment. For the formation of positron plasma in the closed magnetic surfaces, one of the key issues to be solved is the efficient injection method of positron across closed magnetic surfaces. In contrast to linear configurations, toroidal configurations have the advantage that they are capable of trapping high energy positrons in the dipole field configuration and consider the possibility of direct trapping of positrons emitted from a 22Na source.

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of magnetically confined laser induced vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Saba; Bashir, Shazia; Anjum, Safia; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Waheed, Sadia; Iftikhar, Hina; Dawood, Assadullah; Mahmood, Khaliq

    2017-08-01

    Optical emission spectra of a laser induced plasma of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns) in the presence and absence of the magnetic field of 0.45 T have been investigated. The effect of the magnetic field (B) on the V2O5 plasma at various laser irradiances ranging from 0.64 GW cm-2 to 2.56 GW cm-2 is investigated while keeping the pressure of environmental gases of Ar and Ne constant at 100 Torr. The magnetic field effect on plasma parameters of V2O5 is also explored at different delay times ranging from 0 μs to 10 μs for both environmental gases of Ar and Ne at the laser irradiance of 1.28 GW cm-2. It is revealed that both the emission intensity and electron temperature of the vanadium pentoxide plasma initially increase with increasing irradiance due to the enhanced energy deposition and mass ablation rate. After achieving a certain maximum, both exhibit a decreasing trend or saturation which is attributable to the plasma shielding effect. However, the electron density shows a decreasing trend with increasing laser irradiance. This trend remains the same for both cases, i.e., in the presence and in the absence of magnetic field and for both background gases of Ar and Ne. However, it is revealed that both the electron temperature and electron density of the V2O5 plasma are significantly enhanced in the presence of the magnetic field for both environments at all laser irradiances and delay times, and more pronounced effects are observed at higher irradiances. The enhancement in plasma parameters is attributed to the confinement as well as Joule heating effects caused by magnetic field employment. The confinement of the plasma is also confirmed by the analytically calculated value of magnetic pressure β, which is smaller than plasma pressure at all irradiances and delay times, and therefore confirms the validity of magnetic confinement of the V2O5 plasma.

  3. Population inversion and gain measurements for X-ray laser development in magnetically confined plasma column in fiscal year 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckewer, S.

    1985-03-01

    This report covers X-ray laser development in magnetically confined plasmas, as well as in expanding recombining plasma columns using time resolved soft X-ray monochromators. Experiments with both solid and gas targets resulted in gain measurements for hydrogen-like Carbon(6+) (CVI) ions and population inversion measurements for lithium-like Neon(8+) (NeVIII) ions. Our most recent results, involving carbon disc targets in a 90 k Gauss field with a 300 Joule carbon dioxide laser pulse, in which a one-pass gain of kl 6.5 (enhancement of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission about 100) was obtained for CVI 182A are presented. Results of a gain kl = 3.0 (k approx. 7.5/cm) for thick carbon fiber targets are also presented. Population inversions of NeVIII ions as a function of initial gas pressure are also discussed, as well as an overview of the instrumentation, experimental setup, and target configurations used.

  4. Two-fluid modeling of magnetic nozzle and FRC confined plasmas with the NIMROD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso

    2000-10-01

    MHD and two-fluid simulations with the NIMROD code [1] for studying plasma detachment in a magnetic nozzle and field reversed configuration (FRC) confined plasmas are reported. A new version of the code is used, featuring an improved finite element formulation that provides better spatial accuracy for a given grid resolution [2]. The code is also upgraded by adding the density equation, removing this way the assumption of incompressible plasma, and a provision for “open end” boundary conditions. The simulations of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle are performed in cylindrical geometry with an asymmetric magnetic mirror field along the axis, modeling the VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) experiment [3]. The goals are to assess critical problems like exhaust plasma detachment, the temperature spatial dependence in the plasma plume and the magnetic nozzle parameter optimization. The possible application of a FRC as a source for plasma propulsion is considered: FRC runs are first addressing the two-fluid stability against tilt modes [4]. Simulations are also tailored to model the integration of the FRC with a magnetic nozzle. [1] A. H. Glasser, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion , 41, A74 (1999). [2] C. R. Sovinec, Int. Sherwood Fusion Theory Conf., Los Angeles, CA (USA), March 2000. [3] F. R. Chang Diaz, Trans. Fus. Tech., 35, 87 (1999). [4] Ishida, et al., Phys. Fluids, 31, 3024 (1988).

  5. Measurement of RF electric field in high- β plasma using a Pockels detector in magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushiake, Toshiki; Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1 generates a dipole magnetic field that can confine high- β plasma by using a levitated superconducting coil. So far it is reported that high temperature electrons (up to 50keV) exist and that the local electron βe value exceeds more than 100%. However, the ion β value βi remains low in the present high- β state. To realize a high-βi state, we have started Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) experiments. For efficient ICH in a dipole topology, it is important to measure RF electric fields and characterize the propagation of RF waves in plasmas. On this viewpoint, we started direct measurement of local RF electric fields in RT-1 with a Pockels sensor system. A non-linear optical crystal in the Pockels sensor produces birefringence in an ambient electric field. The refractive index change of the birefringence is proportional to the applied electric field strength, which can be used to measure local electric fields. RF electric field distribution radiated from an ICH antenna was measured inside RT-1 in air, and was compared with numerical results calculated by TASK code. Results on the measurement of electric field distribution in high- β plasma and evaluation of the absorbed RF power into ions will be reported. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 23224014.

  6. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their role in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath ('scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital role in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei via

  7. Plasma confinement by magnetic field with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Krashevskaya, Galina V.; Prishvitsyn, Alexander S.

    2015-06-01

    It has been found that plasma confinement by the magnetic field of alternating-sign curvature with convex-concave field lines results in a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) perturbations. For simple combinations of axisymmetric mirrors and cusps the calculations according to the kinetic stability criterion give strongly, centrally peaked stable plasma pressure profiles instead of shallow ones. For the experimental research of this effect, a compact magnetic confinement device has been modified by adding of the external current coil to fulfil the field-line curvature requirements. The critical convectively-stable plasma pressure profiles calculation in this experimental geometry and the probe measurements of the spatial plasma distribution in the new magnetic configuration of alternating-sign curvature have been performed. The experimental results give some support for a conclusion that there is an increase in the ion saturation current at the region near the minimum of the specific volume min ∫dl/B. This region corresponds to the average minimum in the second adiabatic invariant, and the kinetic description predicts the stable pressure profile peaking here due to reduction of charge separation by particle drift in alternating-sign curvature.

  8. Plasma confinement improvement by RHF in IR-T1 Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Masnavi, M.; Khademian, A.; Salami, M.R.; Khorshid, P.

    1996-12-31

    It has been known that the tokamak plasma parameters and the energy confinement time may be reduced by plasma impurity radiation. The plasma MHD stabilities may also be influenced by the impurities. Experiments have been performed on the IR-T1 Tokamak to investigate the influence of magnetic perturbations and impurities radiation on confinement. The perturbations are either imposed, via external windings, or natural plasma fluctuations. For this purpose, L = 2 and L = 3 helical windings have been installed on the IR-T1 Tokamak. Diagnostic signals from MHD instabilities have been obtained and studied during discharges with resonant helical fields (RHFs). Both the L = 2 and L = 3 RHFs can suppress the corresponding 2/1 and 3/1 MHD modes and can simultaneously suppress all other modes, RHFs could increase the amplitude, ramp-up and collapse slopes of Sawtooth oscillation. Generally, the stability properties of the discharge are improved by RHFs and also by the suppression of modes signals at SXR diodes.

  9. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber.

    PubMed

    Dechana, A; Thamboon, P; Boonyawan, D

    2014-10-01

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al2O3 layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al2O3 films-analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques-will be discussed.

  10. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Dechana, A.; Thamboon, P.; Boonyawan, D.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films—analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques—will be discussed.

  11. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechana, A.; Thamboon, P.; Boonyawan, D.

    2014-10-01

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al2O3 layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al2O3 films—analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques—will be discussed.

  12. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plume rebound and shockwave dynamics of confined aluminum laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-06-15

    Generation and expansion dynamics of aluminum laser plasma plumes generated between parallel plates of varying separation ({Delta}Z = 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, and 5.6 mm), which confined plume expansion normal to the ablation surface, were diagnosed. Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy in the spectral range {lambda} = 355-470 nm and time gated visible imaging were employed to record emission spectra and plume dynamics. Space and time resolved profiles of N{sub e} (the electron density), T{sub e} (the electron temperature), and T{sub ionz} (the ionization temperature) were compared for different positions in the plasma plume. Significant modifications of the profiles of the above parameters were observed for plasma-surface collisions at the inner surface of the front plate, which formed a barrier to the free expansion of the plasma plume generated by the laser light on the surface of the back plate. Shockwave generation at the collision interface resulted in delayed compression of the low-density plasma plume near the inner ablation surface, at late stages in the plasma history. Upon exiting the cavity formed by the two plates, through an aperture in the front plate, the plasma plume underwent a second phase of free expansion.

  13. Searching target sites on DNA by proteins: Role of DNA dynamics under confinement

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Anupam; Bhattacherjee, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) rapidly search and specifically bind to their target sites on genomic DNA in order to trigger many cellular regulatory processes. It has been suggested that the facilitation of search dynamics is achieved by combining 3D diffusion with one-dimensional sliding and hopping dynamics of interacting proteins. Although, recent studies have advanced the knowledge of molecular determinants that affect one-dimensional search efficiency, the role of DNA molecule is poorly understood. In this study, by using coarse-grained simulations, we propose that dynamics of DNA molecule and its degree of confinement due to cellular crowding concertedly regulate its groove geometry and modulate the inter-communication with DBPs. Under weak confinement, DNA dynamics promotes many short, rotation-decoupled sliding events interspersed by hopping dynamics. While this results in faster 1D diffusion, associated probability of missing targets by jumping over them increases. In contrast, strong confinement favours rotation-coupled sliding to locate targets but lacks structural flexibility to achieve desired specificity. By testing under physiological crowding, our study provides a plausible mechanism on how DNA molecule may help in maintaining an optimal balance between fast hopping and rotation-coupled sliding dynamics, to locate target sites rapidly and form specific complexes precisely. PMID:26400158

  14. Searching target sites on DNA by proteins: Role of DNA dynamics under confinement.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Anupam; Bhattacherjee, Arnab

    2015-10-30

    DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) rapidly search and specifically bind to their target sites on genomic DNA in order to trigger many cellular regulatory processes. It has been suggested that the facilitation of search dynamics is achieved by combining 3D diffusion with one-dimensional sliding and hopping dynamics of interacting proteins. Although, recent studies have advanced the knowledge of molecular determinants that affect one-dimensional search efficiency, the role of DNA molecule is poorly understood. In this study, by using coarse-grained simulations, we propose that dynamics of DNA molecule and its degree of confinement due to cellular crowding concertedly regulate its groove geometry and modulate the inter-communication with DBPs. Under weak confinement, DNA dynamics promotes many short, rotation-decoupled sliding events interspersed by hopping dynamics. While this results in faster 1D diffusion, associated probability of missing targets by jumping over them increases. In contrast, strong confinement favours rotation-coupled sliding to locate targets but lacks structural flexibility to achieve desired specificity. By testing under physiological crowding, our study provides a plausible mechanism on how DNA molecule may help in maintaining an optimal balance between fast hopping and rotation-coupled sliding dynamics, to locate target sites rapidly and form specific complexes precisely. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. A new approach to the formulation and validation of scaling expressions for plasma confinement in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Gelfusa, M.; Lupelli, I.; Gaudio, P.

    2015-07-01

    The extrapolation of the energy confinement time to the next generation of devices has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for several decades in the tokamak community. Various scaling expressions have been proposed using dimensional and dimensionless quantities. They are all based on the assumption that the scalings are in power law form. In this paper, an innovative methodology is proposed to extract the scaling expressions for the energy confinement time in tokamaks directly from experimental databases, without any previous assumption about the mathematical form of the scalings. The approach to obtain the scaling expressions is based on genetic programming and symbolic regression. These techniques have been applied to the ITPA database of H-mode discharges and the results have been validated with a series of established statistical tools. The soundest results, using dimensional variables, are not in the form of power laws but contain a multiplicative saturation term. Also the scalings, expressed in terms of the traditional dimensionless quantities, are not in power law form and contain additive saturation terms. The extrapolation to ITER of both dimensional and dimensionless quantities indicate that the saturation effects are quite significant and could imply a non-negligible reduction in the confinement time to be expected in the next generation of devices. The results obtained with the proposed techniques therefore motivate a systematic revisiting of the scaling expressions for plasma confinement in tokamaks.

  16. Observation of energetic electron confinement in a largely stochastic reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.; Chapman, B. E.; O'Connell, R.; Almagri, A. F.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Piovesan, P.

    2010-01-01

    Runaway electrons with energies >100 keV are observed with the appearance of an m =1 magnetic island in the core of otherwise stochastic Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field-pinch plasmas. The island is associated with the innermost resonant tearing mode, which is usually the largest in the m =1 spectrum. The island appears over a range of mode spectra, from those with a weakly dominant mode to those, referred to as quasi single helicity, with a strongly dominant mode. In a stochastic field, the rate of electron loss increases with electron parallel velocity. Hence, high-energy electrons imply a region of reduced stochasticity. The global energy confinement time is about the same as in plasmas without high-energy electrons or an island in the core. Hence, the region of reduced stochasticity must be localized. Within a numerical reconstruction of the magnetic field topology, high-energy electrons are substantially better confined inside the island, relative to the external region. Therefore, it is deduced that the island provides a region of reduced stochasticity and that the high-energy electrons are generated and well confined within this region.

  17. Observation of energetic electron confinement in a largely stochastic reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, D. J.; Chapman, B. E.; O'Connell, R.; Almagri, A. F.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Piovesan, P.

    2010-01-15

    Runaway electrons with energies >100 keV are observed with the appearance of an m=1 magnetic island in the core of otherwise stochastic Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field-pinch plasmas. The island is associated with the innermost resonant tearing mode, which is usually the largest in the m=1 spectrum. The island appears over a range of mode spectra, from those with a weakly dominant mode to those, referred to as quasi single helicity, with a strongly dominant mode. In a stochastic field, the rate of electron loss increases with electron parallel velocity. Hence, high-energy electrons imply a region of reduced stochasticity. The global energy confinement time is about the same as in plasmas without high-energy electrons or an island in the core. Hence, the region of reduced stochasticity must be localized. Within a numerical reconstruction of the magnetic field topology, high-energy electrons are substantially better confined inside the island, relative to the external region. Therefore, it is deduced that the island provides a region of reduced stochasticity and that the high-energy electrons are generated and well confined within this region.

  18. Investigations into the seeding of instabilities due to x-ray preheat in beryllium-based inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, E. N.; Greenfield, S. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Cobble, J. A.; Luo, S. N.; Montgomery, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.

    2010-05-15

    The geometry of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules makes them susceptible to various types of hydrodynamic instabilities at different stages during an ICF implosion. From the beginnings of ICF research, it has been known that grain-level anisotropy and defects could be a significant source of instability seeding in solid beryllium capsules. We report on experiments conducted at the Trident laser facility [S. H. Batha et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10F305 (2008)] to measure dynamic surface roughening from hard x-ray preheat due to anisotropic thermal expansion. M-band emission from laser-produced gold plasma was used to heat beryllium targets with different amounts of copper doping to temperatures comparable to ICF ignition preheat levels. Dynamic roughening measurements were made on the surface away from the plasma at discrete times up to 8 ns after the beginning of the drive pulse using a surface displacement interferometer with nanometer scale sensitivity. Undoped large-grained targets were measured to roughen between 15 and 50 nm rms. Fine-grained, copper-doped targets were observed to roughen near the sensitivity limit of the interferometer. The results of this work have shed light on the effects of high-Z doping and microstructural refinement on the dynamics of differential thermal expansion and have shown that current ICF capsule designs using beryllium are very effective in reducing preheat related roughening ahead of the first shock.

  19. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; ...

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metalmore » contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.« less

  20. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited).

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Maddox, J; Pablant, N; Hill, K; Bitter, M; Rice, J E; Granetz, R; Hubbard, A; Irby, J; Greenwald, M; Marmar, E; Tritz, K; Stutman, D; Stratton, B; Efthimion, P

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  1. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  2. Application of RF Power to Plasma Flow Drive in Fusion Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Berry, L.A.; Carter, M.D.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1999-09-13

    Wave induced flows can produce radially sheared velocity profiles that can in turn stabilize drift wave turbulence and improve plasma confinement. A second-order kinetic theory is developed in one-dimensional slab geometry to treat radio frequency (RF)-driven plasma flows. The Vlasov equation is solved to second order in the RF electric field. Moments of the second-order distribution function give time-averaged expressions for the heating rate, the wave kinetic flux, and the RF force exerted on the plasma. On the collisional or transport time scale, the RF force in the poloidal direction is balanced by neoclassical viscosity, and the force in the radial direction is balanced direction by ambipolar electric fields. Comparison is made with previous theories which have relied on incompressible fluid approximations. Very substantial differences are seen in situations involving the Ion Bernstein Wave, a compressional wave.

  3. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  4. Scaling of Confinement with Isotopic Content in Deuterium and Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Scott, S.D.; Bell, M.G.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Jassby, D.; Majeski, R.; Medley, S.S.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Bush, C.E.; Duong, H.H.; Petrov, M.P.

    1997-08-01

    Global energy confinement time in plasmas heated with waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor is 8{percent}{endash}11{percent} higher in deuterium-tritium (D-T) than in deuterium (D) only plasmas. Kinetic analysis based on local equilibrium profile measurements indicates that the increase in stored energy is almost entirely in the electron component and that the electron thermal diffusivity {chi}{sub e} is smaller in D-T than in D plasmas. The implied scaling of {chi}{sub e} with normalized ion gyro radius {rho}{sub {asterisk}} is opposite to that observed in Joint European Torus (JET) and DIII-D tokamaks when {rho}{sub {asterisk}} was varied by changing the magnetic field strength. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Anisotropy induced wave birefringence in bounded supercritical plasma confined in a multicusp magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2011-04-01

    Laboratory observation of rotation of the polarization axis (θc˜20°-40° with respect to vacuum) of a penetrating electromagnetic wave through a bounded supercritical plasma (plasma frequency ωp>wave frequency ω), confined in a multicusp magnetic field is reported. Birefringence of the radial and polar wave electric field components (Er and Eθ) has been identified as the cause for the rotation, similar to a magneto-optic medium, however, with distinct differences owing to the presence of wave induced resonances. Numerical simulation results obtained by solving the Maxwell's equations by incorporating the plasma and magnetostatic field inhomogeneities within a conducting boundary shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  6. SCR-1: Design and Construction of a Small Modular Stellarator for Magnetic Confinement of Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillas, L.; Vargas, V. I.; Alpizar, A.; Asenjo, J.; Carranza, J. M.; Cerdas, F.; Gutiérrez, R.; Monge, J. I.; Mora, J.; Morera, J.; Peraza, H.; Queral, V.; Rojas, C.; Rozen, D.; Saenz, F.; Sánchez, G.; Sandoval, M.; Trimiño, H.; Umaña, J.; Villegas, L. F.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes briefly the design and construction of a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma, called Stellarator of Costa Rica 1, or SCR-1; developed by the Plasma Physics Group of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, PlasmaTEC. The SCR-1 is based on the small Spanish stellarator UST_1, created by the engineer Vicente Queral. The SCR-1 will employ stainless steel torus-shaped vacuum vessel with a major radius of 460.33 mm and a cross section radius of 110.25mm. A typical SCR-1 plasma will have an average radius 42.2 mm and a volume of 8 liters (0.01 m3), and an aspect ratio of 5.7. The magnetic resonant field will be 0.0878 T, and a period of 2 (m=2) with a rotational transform of 0.3. The magnetic field will be provided by 12 modular coils, with 8 turns each, with an electrical current of 8704 A per coil (1088 A per turn of each coil). This current will be fed by a bank of cell batteries. The plasma will be heated by ECRH with magnetrons of a total power of 5kW, in the first harmonic at 2.45GHz. The expected electron temperature and density are 15 eV and 1017 m-3 respectively with an estimated confinement time of 7.30 x 10-4 ms. The initial diagnostics on the SCR-1 will consist of a Langmuir probe, a heterodyne microwave interferometer, and a field mapping system. The first plasma of the SCR-1 is expected at the end of 2011.

  7. Method for determining fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas using resonant nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.; Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The resonant nuclear reactions D(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 6/Li, /sup 6/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 10/B, and /sup 7/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 11/B are examined as diagnostics of fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas. Gamma rays from these resonant reactions with energies from 2.1 MeV to 9.2 MeV may be used to infer the alpha-particle population between energies of 0.4 MeV and 2.6 MeV. The ratio of these alpha-burnup reactions to the reactions T(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/He and /sup 3/He(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/Li provides a technique for the measurement of alpha confinement.

  8. Cholesterol modulates CFTR confinement in the plasma membrane of primary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Pandzic, Elvis; Goepp, Julie; Matthes, Elizabeth; Hanrahan, John W; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-07-07

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a plasma-membrane anion channel that, when mutated, causes the disease cystic fibrosis. Although CFTR has been detected in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction prepared from airway epithelial cells, suggesting that it may partition into cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts), its compartmentalization has not been demonstrated in intact cells and the influence of microdomains on CFTR lateral mobility is unknown. We used live-cell imaging, spatial image correlation spectroscopy, and k-space image correlation spectroscopy to examine the aggregation state of CFTR and its dynamics both within and outside microdomains in the plasma membrane of primary human bronchial epithelial cells. These studies were also performed during treatments that augment or deplete membrane cholesterol. We found two populations of CFTR molecules that were distinguishable based on their dynamics at the cell surface. One population showed confinement and had slow dynamics that were highly cholesterol dependent. The other, more abundant population was less confined and diffused more rapidly. Treatments that deplete the membrane of cholesterol caused the confined fraction and average number of CFTR molecules per cluster to decrease. Elevating cholesterol had the opposite effect, increasing channel aggregation and the fraction of channels displaying confinement, consistent with CFTR recruitment into cholesterol-rich microdomains with dimensions below the optical resolution limit. Viral infection caused the nanoscale microdomains to fuse into large platforms and reduced CFTR mobility. To our knowledge, these results provide the first biophysical evidence for multiple CFTR populations and have implications for regulation of their surface expression and channel function.

  9. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  10. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of cyclotron instability in an ECR heated mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, Dmitry; Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    Despite more than half a century history, the studies of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and particles in magnetoactive plasma under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions still remain topical. One of the most interesting ECR manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. Such phenomena are observed in a wide range of plasma parameters under various conditions: in the magnetospheres of the Earth and planets, in solar coronal loops, and in laboratory magnetic traps. We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under ECR conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Three stages of pulsed ECR discharge offer the opportunity to study wave-particles interactions for essentially different plasma parameters: the initial stage, when the density of hot (relativistic) electrons (Nh) exceeds the density of cold electrons (Nc), the developed discharge (Nh<plasma (Nh = Nc). On each stage we have detected quasi-periodic series of pulsed energetic electron precipitations accompanied by bursts of microwave radiation, which are caused by cyclotron instability of different electromagnetic modes. In cold dense plasma whistlers, propagating nearly parallel to the trap axis, are effectively excited, and in rarefied plasma - slow or fast extraordinary wave (Z- or X- mode), propagating across the external magnetic field. The detailed investigation of spectral and temporal characteristics of non-stationary bursts of electromagnetic emission is presented. The interrelationship between the observed time-frequency spectrograms of electromagnetic emission with similar effects

  11. The Inverse Z-Pinch as a Physics Test Bed, and a Possible Target Plasma for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, Irvin; Bauer, Bruno; Fuelling, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Ronald; Makhin, Volodymyr; Presura, Radu; Sheehey, Peter; Siemon, Richard

    2002-12-01

    From an overall fusion system perspective, there remains an untested and interesting possibility of compressing a magnetized target plasma with beta greater than unity by a magnetically driven imploding liner, or other target pusher driver. This approach, known as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), operates in an intermediate density regime and time scale between magnetic and inertial fusion, which are separated by twelve orders of magnitude. Even if magnetized plasma transport is Bohm-like, fusion gain in the MTF parameter space appears accessible with existing drivers, which means MTF does not require a major financial investment in driver technology. The physics of plasma confinement by material walls, and the thermal transport of magnetized high-beta plasma in the MTF regime, has received relatively little study theoretically, computationally, or experimentally. This paper describes a proposed experiment to test wall confinement in a regime of plasma parameters relevant to MTF. The geometry being considered is an inverse pinch designed to heat plasma to 100-eV temperatures. By using a current crowbar, the plasma formed in the pinch can be held against an outer wall (the return conductor) and the rate of cooling can be measured and compared with predictions from theory and numerical models. The well-benchmarked two-dimensional radiation-MHD code MHRDR is being used to guide the design activity. The existing 2-terawatt Zebra generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility is the power supply under consideration. Results from the code show adequate heating, formation of a quasi-static magnetic equilibrium, and a near-classical cooling rate to a room temperature boundary, even in the presence of substantial plasma convection.

  12. Excitation of the centrifugally driven interchange instability in a plasma confined by a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.; Waksman, J.

    2005-05-15

    The centrifugally driven electrostatic interchange instability is excited for the first time in a laboratory magnetoplasma. The plasma is confined by a dipole magnetic field, and the instability is excited when an equatorial mesh is biased to induce a radial current that creates rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities appear quasicoherent in the lab frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. The mode structure is measured using a multiprobe correlation technique as well as a novel 96-point polar imaging diagnostic which measures particle flux along field lines that map to the pole. Interchange instabilities caused by hot electron pressure are simultaneously observed at the hot electron drift frequency. Adjusting the hot electron fraction {alpha} modifies the stability as well as the structures of the centrifugally driven modes. In the presence of larger fractions of energetic electrons, m=1 is observed to be the dominant mode. For faster rotating plasmas containing fewer energetic electrons, m=2 dominates. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures in both regimes. The low azimuthal mode numbers seen in the experiment and simulation can also be interpreted with a local, linear dispersion relation of the electrostatic interchange instability. Drift resonant hot electrons give the instability a real frequency, inducing stabilizing ion polarization currents that preferentially suppress high-m modes.

  13. Confinement bifurcation initiated by plasma current profile and toroidal electric field perturbations in the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askinazi, L. G.; Bulanin, V. V.; Kornev, V. A.; Krikunov, S. V.; Lebedev, S. V.; Tukachinsky, A. S.; Vildjunas, M. I.; Zhubr, N. A.

    2011-03-01

    The results of the experimental study of confinement mode bifurcation performed on the TUMAN-3M tokamak are reported. As a trigger of confinement mode switching, plasma current ramp-up/-down or magnetic compression/decompression is used. It is found that the possibility and direction of confinement mode switching are correlated not with plasma current profile perturbation (peaking or broadening) but with the sign of toroidal electric field perturbation. A model connecting confinement bifurcation and toroidal electric field perturbation through the perturbation of the radial electric field is used to describe the phenomena observed in all eight scenarios investigated. This model ascribes the radial electric field generation to the non-compensated Ware drift of banana electrons at the TUMAN-3M peripheral plasma, where \

  14. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-13

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  15. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-13

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  16. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ b\\bot\\text{ext}≈ {{10}-4}\\to {{10}-3}~\\text{T} ). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes (ELMs). At the same time, theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design (Loarte et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 033007). This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  17. Flute instability in a plasma confined by perfectly reflecting end walls

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Pozzoli, R.; Ryutov, D. )

    1993-11-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic stability of a low-pressure plasma confined along the magnetic field by the end walls that are perfectly reflecting the impinging particles is considered. It is shown that, if the magnetic field lines do not intersect the walls along the normal, a fast instability can develop. An explicit expression for the growth rate has been derived, and an analogy with the usual flute instability has been traced. The instability can play some role in the scrape-off layers of tokamaks with poloidal limiter.

  18. Basic physics of Alfven instabilities driven by energetic particles in toroidally confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2008-05-15

    Superthermal energetic particles (EP) often drive shear Alfven waves unstable in magnetically confined plasmas. These instabilities constitute a fascinating nonlinear system where fluid and kinetic nonlinearities can appear on an equal footing. In addition to basic science, Alfven instabilities are of practical importance, as the expulsion of energetic particles can damage the walls of a confinement device. Because of rapid dispersion, shear Alfven waves that are part of the continuous spectrum are rarely destabilized. However, because the index of refraction is periodic in toroidally confined plasmas, gaps appear in the continuous spectrum. At spatial locations where the radial group velocity vanishes, weakly damped discrete modes appear in these gaps. These eigenmodes are of two types. One type is associated with frequency crossings of counterpropagating waves; the toroidal Alfven eigenmode is a prominent example. The second type is associated with an extremum of the continuous spectrum; the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode is an example of this type. In addition to these normal modes of the background plasma, when the energetic particle pressure is very large, energetic particle modes that adopt the frequency of the energetic particle population occur. Alfven instabilities of all three types occur in every toroidal magnetic confinement device with an intense energetic particle population. The energetic particles are most conveniently described by their constants of motion. Resonances occur between the orbital frequencies of the energetic particles and the wave phase velocity. If the wave resonance with the energetic particle population occurs where the gradient with respect to a constant of motion is inverted, the particles transfer energy to the wave, promoting instability. In a tokamak, the spatial gradient drive associated with inversion of the toroidal canonical angular momentum P{sub {zeta}} is most important. Once a mode is driven unstable, a wide variety

  19. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  20. Magnetic field generation in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Dimonte, Guy; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-04-20

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the field generation by 2D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma. Self-generated magnetic fields are predicted and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇n(e)×∇T(e) term in the generalized Ohm's law. Scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, Atwood number, and perturbation wavelength.

  1. Stability Theory of a Confined Toroidal Plasma. Part I. Existence and Uniqueness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Kruskal, M. D., and Kulsrud, R. M., An energy principle for hydromagnetic stability problems. Proc. Roy Soc. London Ser A 244, (1958), 17-40. Blank, A...AD-A11A 599 WISCONSIN UNIV-MADISON MATHEMATICS RESEARCH CENTER F/e 20/9 STABILITY THEORY OF A CONFINED TOROIDAL PLASMA. PART 1. EXISTEN--ETCWU) MAR...82 P LAURENCE, M C SHEN 0AA629-80-C-0011I UNCLASSIFIED MRCTSR-2348 ML 1111.08250 111111.25 flf1 .4 !. MRC Technical Sumary Report #2348 - STABILITY

  2. Indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion using highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, plasma slugs.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, J P; Dunne, M; Zepf, M; Lebedev, S V; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N

    2002-06-10

    We present a new approach to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion which makes use of highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, slugs of plasma to energize a hohlraum. 2D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of slug formation in shaped liner Z-pinch implosions are presented along with 2D-radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the slug impacting a converter foil and 3D-view-factor simulations of a double-ended hohlraum. Results for the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory indicate that two synchronous slugs of 250 kJ kinetic energy could be produced, resulting in a capsule surface temperature of approximately 225 eV.

  3. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R. Krokhin, O. N.; Osipov, I. E.

    2016-12-15

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  4. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Krokhin, O. N.; Osipov, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  5. A model for particle confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The approach adopted in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus experiment is to confine and heat a toroidal plasma by the simultaneous application of strong dc magnetic fields and electric fields. Strong radial electric fields (about 1 kV/cm) are imposed by biasing the plasma with up to 12 negative electrode rings which surround its minor circumference. The plasma containment is consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions in those sectors not containing electrode rings, resulting from the radially inward electric fields; and ion losses to the electrode rings, each of which acts as a sink and draws ions out the plasma in the manner of a Langmuir probe in the ion saturation regime. The highest density on axis which has been observed so far in this steady-state plasma is 6.2 trillion particles per cu cm, for which the particle containment time is 2.5 msec. The deuterium ion kinetic temperature for these conditions was in the range of 360 to 520 eV.

  6. Measurement of high-frequency, small scale density fluctuations in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, J. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Sarff, J. S.; Carmody, D.; Terry, P. W.; den Hartog, D. J.; Morton, L. A.; Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; MST Team

    2014-10-01

    In standard MST RFP plasmas, core transport is governed by magnetic fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. Using pulsed parallel current drive, tearing is significantly reduced and smaller-scale fluctuations are likely important to electron particle and heat transport for these improved confinement plasmas. On MST, an 11-chord FIR laser-based interferometry diagnostic, with ~ 8 cm chord spacing, is used to measure electron density fluctuations with wavenumbers k < 1-2 cm-1. An upgrade underway will allow resolution up to k ~ 15 cm-1. A fast magnetic coil array is employed for magnetic fluctuations. High-frequency (>50 kHz) small-scale (n > 15) density and magnetic fluctuations have been observed in the edge plasma, where density and temperature gradients are largest. These fluctuations are distinct from tearing and have amplitudes that correlate with the density gradient and electron beta. The MST is well suited to explore beta scaling given the large dynamic range (9-26%) found in the device. Correlation of the measured density fluctuations with plasma parameters in high beta plasmas will serve to identify the drive and contribute to validation of gyrokinetic codes. Work supported by DOE and NSF.

  7. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  8. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  9. Confinement of a potassium plasma in a spindle cusp magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, R.A.; Merlino, R.L.

    1986-11-01

    The confinement properties of a low-..beta.. (average) potassium plasma produced by contact ionization in a spindle cusp magnetic field were investigated. In this configuration, n/sub e/roughly-equal10/sup 8/-10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/, T/sub e/roughly-equalT/sub i/roughly-equal0.2 eV, and the ions are weakly magnetized. Electron and ion densities, space potentials, and plasma flow velocities were measured in the ring and point cusps. The leak width of the escaping plasma was measured over a wide range of magnetic field strengths and neutral pressures. The dependence of the leak width on neutral pressure and magnetic field strength is accounted for by a simple model in which the plasma streams out of the cusps along the magnetic field lines while diffusing across the magnetic field due to the combined effects of neutral-particle collisions and Bohm diffusion. Measurements of broadband plasma noise suggest the presence of ion acoustic wave turbulence.

  10. A model for particle confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A toroidal plasma is confined and heated by the simultaneous application of strong d.c. magnetic fields and electric fields. Strong radial electric fields (about 1 kilovolt per centimeter) are imposed by biasing the plasma with up to 12 negative electrode rings which surround its minor circumference. The plasma containment is consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions in those sectors not containing electrode rings, resulting from the radially inward electric fields; and ion losses to the electrode rings, each of which acts as a sink and draws ions out the plasma in the manner of a Langmuir probe in the ion saturation regime. The highest density on axis which has been observed so far in this steady-state plasma is 6.2 x 10 to the 12th power particles per cubic centimeter, for which the particle containment time is 2.5 milliseconds. The deuterium ion kinetic temperature for these conditions was in the range of 360 to 520 eV.

  11. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  12. Permeation fill-tube design for inertial confinement fusion target capsules

    DOE PAGES

    Rice, B. S.; Ulreich, J.; Fella, C.; ...

    2017-03-22

    A unique approach for permeation filling of nonpermeable inertial confinement fusion target capsules with deuterium–tritium (DT) is presented. This process uses a permeable capsule coupled into the final target capsule with a 0.03-mm-diameter fill tube. Leak free permeation filling of glow-discharge polymerization (GDP) targets using this method have been successfully demonstrated, as well as ice layering of the target, yielding an inner ice surface roughness of 1-more » $$\\unicode[STIX]{x03BC}$$m rms (root mean square). Finally, the measured DT ice-thickness profile for this experiment was used to validate a thermal model’s prediction of the same thickness profile.« less

  13. A technique for thick polymer coating of inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Feng, I.-A.; Wang, T. G.; Kim, H.-G.

    1983-01-01

    A technique to coat a stalk-mounted inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) target with a thick polymer layer has been successfully demonstrated. The polymer solution is first atomized, allowed to coalesce into a droplet, and positioned in a stable acoustic levitating field. The stalk-mounted ICF target is then moved into the acoustic field by manipulating a 3-D positioner to penetrate the surface membrane of the droplet, thus immersing the target in the levitated coating solution. The target inside the droplet is maintained at the center of the levitated liquid using the 3-D positional information provided by two orthogonally placed TV cameras until the drying process is completed. The basic components of the experimental apparatus, including an acoustic levitator, liquid sample deployment device, image acquisition instrumentation, and 3-D positioner, are briefly described.

  14. A technique for thick polymer coating of inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Feng, I.-A.; Wang, T. G.; Kim, H.-G.

    1983-01-01

    A technique to coat a stalk-mounted inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) target with a thick polymer layer has been successfully demonstrated. The polymer solution is first atomized, allowed to coalesce into a droplet, and positioned in a stable acoustic levitating field. The stalk-mounted ICF target is then moved into the acoustic field by manipulating a 3-D positioner to penetrate the surface membrane of the droplet, thus immersing the target in the levitated coating solution. The target inside the droplet is maintained at the center of the levitated liquid using the 3-D positional information provided by two orthogonally placed TV cameras until the drying process is completed. The basic components of the experimental apparatus, including an acoustic levitator, liquid sample deployment device, image acquisition instrumentation, and 3-D positioner, are briefly described.

  15. Time resolved interferometric study of the plasma plume induced shock wave in confined geometry: Two-dimensional mapping of the ambient and plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Kaushik; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai; Narayan, Surya; Srivastava, Atul

    2016-04-15

    An experimental investigation of the laser produced plasma induced shock wave in the presence of confining walls placed along the axial as well as the lateral direction has been performed. A time resolved Mach Zehnder interferometer is set up to track the primary as well as the reflected shock waves and its effect on the evolving plasma plume has been studied. An attempt has been made to discriminate the electronic and medium density contributions towards the changes in the refractive index of the medium. Two dimensional spatial distributions for both ambient medium density and plasma density (electron density) have been obtained by employing customised inversion technique and algorithm on the recorded interferograms. The observed density pattern of the surrounding medium in the presence of confining walls is correlated with the reflected shock wave propagation in the medium. Further, the shock wave plasma interaction and the subsequent changes in the shape and density of the plasma plume in confined geometry are briefly described.

  16. Optimization of confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary report on the identification and optimization of independent variables which affect the ion density and confinement time in a bumpy torus plasma is presented. The independent variables include the polarity, position, and number of the midplane electrode rings, the method of gas injection, and the polarity and strength of a weak vertical magnetic field. Some characteristic data taken under condition when most of the independent variables were optimized are presented. The highest value of the electron number density on the plasma axis is 3.2 x 10 to the 12th power/cc, the highest ion heating efficiency is 47 percent, and the longest particle containment time is 2.0 milliseconds.

  17. Plasma kinetic effects on interfacial mix in settings relevant to inertial confinement fusion and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Fernández, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hegelich, B. M.; Dyer, G.; Roycroft, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing of high-Z/low-Z interfaces in dense plasma media is a problem of importance for understanding mix in inertial confinement fusion experiments and recent experiments at the LANL Trident facility. In this presentation, we apply the VPIC particle-in-cell code with a binary collision model to explore kinetic effects of the atomic mixing. Comparisons are made to published analytic theory and hybrid modeling results and conditions are identified under which plasma kinetic behavior may lead to anomalously rapid atomic mixing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  18. Plasma confinement characteristics and runaway instability in the Proto-Cleo Torsatron

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    The role of the internal separatrix in plasma confinement and the properties of a runaway-modified discharge were studied in the Proto-Cleo torsatron. Two-dimensional profiles of plasma current and density revealed peaking of these quantities off the midplane and allowed for comparisons to analytical and numerical calculations. An investigation of the poloidal distribution of particles in the divertor region concluded that the flux peaks at the apices of the external separatrix, in agreement with numerical calculations. Experimental estimates of the magnitude of runaway current and the relaxation time of a runaway instability were found to be in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions. Electron temperature increases on the order of 50% were observed due to the instability.

  19. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, Dan

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  20. Ion distribution in the hot spot of an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua; Berk, Herb

    2012-10-01

    Maximizing the fusion gain of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications leads to the standard scenario of central hot spot ignition followed by propagating burn wave through the cold/dense assembled fuel. The fact that the hot spot is surrounded by cold but dense fuel layer introduces subtle plasma physics which requires a kinetic description. Here we perform Fokker-Planck calculations and kinetic PIC simulations for an ICF plasma initially in pressure balance but having large temperature gradient over a narrow transition layer. The loss of the fast ion tail from the hot spot, which is important for fusion reactivity, is quantified by Fokker-Planck models. The role of electron energy transport and the ambipolar electric field is investigated via kinetic simulations and the fluid moment models. The net effect on both hot spot ion temperature and the ion tail distribution, and hence the fusion reactivity, is elucidated.

  1. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton Radiography diagnostic of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R

    2010-04-23

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion is time-resolved imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. Here we report on the source and diagnostic development of hard x-ray radiography and on the first radiographs of direct drive implosions obtained at photon energies up to about 100keV, where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the shell opacity. The radiographs of direct drive, plastic shell implosions obtained at the OMEGA laser facility have a spatial resolution of {approx}10um and a temporal resolution of {approx}10ps. This novel Compton Radiography is an invaluable diagnostic tool for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets, and will be integrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  2. Confinement and ELM characteristics of H-mode plasmas in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.-W.; Kim, H.-S.; Park, Y. S.; Terzolo, L.; Ko, W. H.; Park, J.-K.; England, A. C.; Yoon, S. W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bae, Y. S.; Bak, J. G.; Hahn, S. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Kim, J.; Kim, W. C.; Kwak, J. G.; Lee, K. D.; Na, Y. S.; Nam, Y. U.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, S. I.

    2012-11-01

    The latest results of confinement and edge-localized mode (ELM) characteristics of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) H-mode plasmas are reported. The estimation of fast ion contribution to the total stored energy, calculated by both the NUBEAM and ASTRA simulations, and of the effective total heating power is used to derive the thermal energy confinement time (τE,thermal), which is compared with a multi-machine database. The measured power threshold for the L-H transition (Pthr) as a function of density shows a roll-over with minimum value at \\bar{n}_e \\sim 2\\times 10^{19}\\,m^{-3} . KSTAR H-mode plasmas exhibit three distinctive types of ELMs: large type-I ELMs, intermediate ELMs and a mixed (type-I and small ELM peaks) ELM regime. Power scans show that the frequency of the large ELMs increases with increasing heating power, a feature of type-I ELMs. The quality of confinement is higher for type-I and mixed ELMy H-mode (H98(y,2) ˜ 0.9-1) than for the intermediate ELM regime (H98(y,2) ˜ 0.7). Type-I ELMs have precursor-like signals from the magnetics measurement, while the other two ELM types do not. The low-field side (LFS) profile of electron temperature (Te), from the ECE measurement, and the pedestal profile of the toroidal velocity (Vt), from charge-exchange spectroscopy, show a continuous build up on the LFS during the inter-ELM period. However, the pedestal ion temperature (Ti) remains unchanged for most of the inter-ELM period until it rapidly rises in the last stage of the ELM cycle (⩾70-80%). The estimated electron pedestal collisionality for a type-I ELMy regime is v_e^\\ast \\sim 0.5{{--}}0.6 . The confinement and ELM characteristics for the ELM suppression discharges by the application of an n = 1 magnetic perturbation (MP) have also been investigated for each of the identified stages during the MP application. A second L-H transition during the L-mode phase after the end of first H-mode stage occurs for some discharges

  3. Distinct turbulence sources and confinement features in the spherical tokamak plasma regime

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; ...

    2015-10-30

    New turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in the spherical tokamak (ST) regime are identified through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) mode characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is shown to drive significant ion thermal transport in strongly rotating national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) L-modes. The long wavelength, quasi-coherent dissipative trapped electron mode (TEM) is destabilized in NSTX H-modes despite the presence of strong E x B shear, providing a robust turbulence source dominant over collisionless TEM. Dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM)-driven transport in the NSTX parametric regime is shown to increase with electron collision frequency, offeringmore » one possible source for the confinement scaling observed in experiments. There exists a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced collisionless trapped electron mode to DTEM transition for ST plasmas. In conclusion, this predicts a natural access to a minimum transport state in the low collisionality regime that future advanced STs may cover.« less

  4. Confining Domains Lead to Reaction Bursts: Reaction Kinetics in the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kalay, Ziya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Confinement of molecules in specific small volumes and areas within a cell is likely to be a general strategy that is developed during evolution for regulating the interactions and functions of biomolecules. The cellular plasma membrane, which is the outermost membrane that surrounds the entire cell, was considered to be a continuous two-dimensional liquid, but it is becoming clear that it consists of numerous nano-meso-scale domains with various lifetimes, such as raft domains and cytoskeleton-induced compartments, and membrane molecules are dynamically trapped in these domains. In this article, we give a theoretical account on the effects of molecular confinement on reversible bimolecular reactions in a partitioned surface such as the plasma membrane. By performing simulations based on a lattice-based model of diffusion and reaction, we found that in the presence of membrane partitioning, bimolecular reactions that occur in each compartment proceed in bursts during which the reaction rate is sharply and briefly increased even though the asymptotic reaction rate remains the same. We characterized the time between reaction bursts and the burst amplitude as a function of the model parameters, and discussed the biological significance of the reaction bursts in the presence of strong inhibitor activity. PMID:22479350

  5. Distinct turbulence sources and confinement features in the spherical tokamak plasma regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.

    2015-10-30

    New turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in the spherical tokamak (ST) regime are identified through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) mode characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is shown to drive significant ion thermal transport in strongly rotating national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) L-modes. The long wavelength, quasi-coherent dissipative trapped electron mode (TEM) is destabilized in NSTX H-modes despite the presence of strong E x B shear, providing a robust turbulence source dominant over collisionless TEM. Dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM)-driven transport in the NSTX parametric regime is shown to increase with electron collision frequency, offering one possible source for the confinement scaling observed in experiments. There exists a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced collisionless trapped electron mode to DTEM transition for ST plasmas. In conclusion, this predicts a natural access to a minimum transport state in the low collisionality regime that future advanced STs may cover.

  6. Generation and compression of a target plasma for magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is intermediate between the two very different approaches to fusion: inertial and magnetic confinement fusion (ICF and MCF). Results from collaboration with a Russian MTF team on their MAGO experiments suggest they have a target plasma suitable for compression to provide an MTF proof of principle. This LDRD project had tow main objectives: first, to provide a computational basis for experimental investigation of an alternative MTF plasma, and second to explore the physics and computational needs for a continuing program. Secondary objectives included analytic and computational support for MTF experiments. The first objective was fulfilled. The second main objective has several facets to be described in the body of this report. Finally, the authors have developed tools for analyzing data collected on the MAGO a nd LDRD experiments, and have tested them on limited MAGO data.

  7. Optimization of confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus facility may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kV by applying dc voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer midplane electrode rings. The radial electric fields, which are responsible for raising the ions to high energies by E x B/B-squared drift, then point out of or into the plasma. A preliminary report is given on the identification and optimization of independent variables which affect the ion density and confinement time in the Bumpy Torus plasma. The independent variables include the polarity, position, and number of the midplane electrode rings, the method of gas injection, and the polarity and strength of a weak vertical magnetic field. Some characteristic data taken under conditions where most of the independent variables were optimized are presented. The highest value of the electron number density on the plasma axis is 3.2 trillion per cu cm, the highest ion heating efficiency is 47%, and the longest particle containment time is 2.0 msec.

  8. Measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, J. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Anderson, J. K.; Sarff, J. S.; Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    In standard RFP plasmas, transport is dominated by global magnetic tearing modes. For improved-confinement plasmas using inductive current profile control (PPCD), smaller-scale fluctuations at higher frequencies (>50 kHz) may become more important as the global tearing modes are significantly reduced. In particular, drift-wave-like instabilities are theoretically unstable to the higher temperature and density gradients achieved during PPCD discharges. On the MST, an eleven chord Far-Infrared (FIR) laser-based diagnostic system with ~ 8 cm spacing is used to measure electron density fluctuations by interferometry and far-forward collective scattering. The existing diagnostic measures line-integrated density fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering a wavenumber range k-< 1.3 cm-1, corresponding to k-ρs < 1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius). Experimentally, in PPCD plasmas, global tearing modes are reduced while high frequency coherent modes (50 < f < 140 kHz) emerge among broadband fluctuations. Correlations of these modes with sources of free energy, such as temperature and density gradients, will be investigated. Additionally, effects of increased plasma flow from a 1MW tangential NBI on high frequency density fluctuations will also be explored. Work Supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  9. MAGNETICALLY CONFINED INTERSTELLAR HOT PLASMA IN THE NUCLEAR BULGE OF OUR GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Yasui, Kazuki; Nagata, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Uchiyama, Hideki; Schödel, Rainer; Hatano, Hirofumi; Sato, Shuji; Sugitani, Koji; Suenaga, Takuya

    2013-06-01

    The origin of the Galactic center diffuse X-ray emission (GCDX) is still under intense investigation. In particular, the interpretation of the hot (kT ≈ 7 keV) component of the GCDX, characterized by the strong Fe 6.7 keV line emission, has been contentious. If the hot component originates from a truly diffuse interstellar plasma, not a collection of unresolved point sources, such plasma cannot be gravitationally bound, and its regeneration would require a huge amount of energy. Here, we show that the spatial distribution of the GCDX does not correlate with the number density distribution of an old stellar population traced by near-infrared light, strongly suggesting a significant contribution of the diffuse interstellar plasma. Contributions of the old stellar population to the GCDX are implied to be ∼50% and ∼20% in the nuclear stellar disk (NSD) and nuclear star cluster, respectively. For the NSD, a scale height of 0.°32 ± 0.°02 is obtained for the first time from the stellar number density profiles. We also show the results of the extended near-infrared polarimetric observations in the central 3° × 2° region of our Galaxy, and confirm that the GCDX region is permeated by a large scale, toroidal magnetic field (MF) as previously claimed. Together with observed MF strengths close to energy equipartition, the hot plasma could be magnetically confined, reducing the amount of energy required to sustain it.

  10. The influence of electrode biasing on plasma confinement in the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yue; Chen, Z. P.; Zhu, T. Z.; Yu, Q.; Zhuang, G.; Nan, J. Y.; Ke, X.; Liu, H.; the J-TEXT Team

    2014-01-01

    The influence of both positive and negative bias on global and plasma-edge parameters has been comparatively studied with a newly designed electrode biasing system in the J-TEXT tokamak. Compared to the 0 V bias case, the global particle confinement of plasma is enhanced under bias with both polarities, with the increments of the central line-averaged density and the soft x-ray emission, as well as the reduction of the edge Hα radiation level. The suppression of plasma-edge fluctuations and turbulent particle transport are obviously observed under bias, in different degrees with different polarities. The potential fluctuation amplitude is observed to be increased at the vicinity of the limiter under positive bias, with the existence of a peaked low-frequency mode characterized as high coherence and near-zero cross-phase poloidally in the edge region, which is not found in the negative bias case. The poloidal correlation length of turbulence is greatly enhanced under bias with both polarities; it shows a positive correlation with the amplitude of the poloidal phase velocity, which is mainly driven by the local Jr × B torque at the plasma edge under bias. The characteristic parameters of intermittent events (i.e. blobs), including amplitude, radial velocity, related particle flux and radial size, decreased dramatically under bias in the edge region.

  11. Removal of volatile organic compounds in the confined space using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Toyoura, T.; Matsui, M.; Kishimoto, T.

    2013-10-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated as hazardous pollutants. Thus, the control of VOCs in the atmosphere is one of the most important environmental problems. Removal of VOCs has been generally carried out by conventional methods such as absorption, adsorption and incineration. There are some researches on development of removal system using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas. In this study, the plasma process is applied to removal of VOCs in the confined space such as an underwater vehicle because of low operating temperature and compact system. A copper wire is helically wound outside a glass tube, and a tungsten rod is inserted inside the glass tube. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced inside the glass tube by a high-voltage bipolar power supply for the removal of VOC. The DBD plasma decomposed hexane with the initial concentration of 30 ppm diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air. As the result, the removal efficiency of hexane diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air was 15%, 45% and 80%, respectively. Thus, it is considered that O and OH radicals are effective for removal of hexane. Optimization of the electrodes and the applied voltage waveforms for the enhancement of removal efficiency and the reduction of second products such as ozone will be investigated.

  12. Response of impurity particle confinement time to external actuators in QH-mode plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, Brian A.; Burrell, Keith H.; Garofalo, Andrea M.; Solomon, Wayne M.; Diallo, Ahmed; O'Mullane, M.

    2014-11-04

    A series of quiescent H-mode discharges have been executed with the specific aim of determining the particle confinement time of impurities in the presence of the edge harmonic oscillation. These discharges utilize non-intrinsic, non-recycling fully-stripped fluorine as the diagnostic species monitored by charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. It is found that the EHO is an efficient means of impurity expulsion from the core plasma, with impurity exhaust rates comparable to or exceeding those in companion ELMing discharges. Furthermore, as the external torque from neutral beam injection is lowered, the global energy confinement time increases while the impurity confinement time does not display an increase.

  13. Confinement time of electron plasma approaching magnetic pumping transport limit in small aspect ratio C-shaped torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhvani, Lavkesh; Pahari, Sambaran; Goswami, Rajiv; Bajpai, Manu; Yeole, Yogesh; Chattopadhyay, P. K.

    2016-06-01

    A long confinement time of electron plasma, approaching magnetic pumping transport limit, has been observed in SMARTEX-C (a small aspect ratio partial torus with R o / a ˜ 1.59 ). Investigations of the growth rate reveal that they are governed by instabilities like resistive wall destabilization, ion driven instabilities, and electron-neutral collisions. Successful confinement of electron plasmas exceeding > 1 × 10 5 poloidal E → × B → rotations lasting for nearly 2.1 ± 0.1 s is achieved by suppressing these instabilities. The confinement time has been estimated in two ways: (a) from the frequency scaling of the linear diocotron mode launched from sections of the wall that are also used as capacitive probes and (b) by dumping the plasma onto a charge collector at different hold times.

  14. GPUbased, Microsecond Latency, HectoChannel MIMO Feedback Control of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Nikolaus

    Feedback control has become a crucial tool in the research on magnetic confinement of plasmas for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. This thesis presents a novel plasma feedback control system that, for the first time, employs a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for microsecond-latency, real-time control computations. This novel application area for GPU computing is opened up by a new system architecture that is optimized for low-latency computations on less than kilobyte sized data samples as they occur in typical plasma control algorithms. In contrast to traditional GPU computing approaches that target complex, high-throughput computations with massive amounts of data, the architecture presented in this thesis uses the GPU as the primary processing unit rather than as an auxiliary of the CPU, and data is transferred from A-D/D-A converters directly into GPU memory using peer-to-peer PCI Express transfers. The described design has been implemented in a new, GPU-based control system for the High-Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The system is built from commodity hardware and uses an NVIDIA GeForce GPU and D-TACQ A-D/D-A converters providing a total of 96 input and 64 output channels. The system is able to run with sampling periods down to 4 μs and latencies down to 8 μs. The GPU provides a total processing power of 1.5 x 1012 floating point operations per second. To illustrate the performance and versatility of both the general architecture and concrete implementation, a new control algorithm has been developed. The algorithm is designed for the control of multiple rotating magnetic perturbations in situations where the plasma equilibrium is not known exactly and features an adaptive system model: instead of requiring the rotation frequencies and growth rates embedded in the system model to be set a priori, the adaptive algorithm derives these parameters from the evolution of the perturbation amplitudes themselves. This results in non-linear control

  15. Effects of acute temperature change, confinement and housing on plasma corticosterone in water snakes, Nerodia sipedon (Colubridae: Natricinae).

    PubMed

    Sykes, Kyle Lea; Klukowski, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    Body temperature affects many aspects of reptilian behavior and physiology, but its effect on hormonal secretion has been little studied, especially in snakes. Major objectives of this study were to determine if acute changes in body temperature during confinement influenced plasma corticosterone levels and if initial body temperatures upon capture in the field were related to baseline corticosterone levels in water snakes (Nerodia sipedon). Water snakes were bled upon capture in the field and after one hour of confinement in a cooled, control, or heated incubator. Since little is known about the potential metabolic changes in response to stress in reptiles, plasma triglyceride levels were also measured. Upon completion of the field study, snakes were housed for 5-8 days without food to determine the effect of chronic stress on both corticosterone and triglyceride levels. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and plasma triglycerides were determined enzymatically. In the field, experimental alterations of body temperature during confinement had no effect on corticosterone levels. Similarly, there was no correlation between initial body temperature and baseline plasma corticosterone concentrations. However, post-confinement corticosterone levels were approximately three-times greater in females than males. Plasma triglyceride levels were not affected by temperature treatment, confinement, or sex. Compared to field values, both baseline and post-confinement corticosterone levels were elevated after the chronic stress of short-term laboratory housing but triglyceride levels decreased. Overall, these results indicate that sex but not body temperature has a major influence on the adrenocortical stress response in Nerodia sipedon.

  16. Fusion reactivity, confinement, and stability of neutral-beam heated plasmas in TFTR and other tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyeon, K.; Sabbagh, S.A.

    1996-05-01

    The hypothesis that the heating beam fueling profile shape connects the edge condition and improved core confinement and fusion reactivity is extensively studied on TFTR and applied to other tokamaks. The derived absolute scalings based on beam fueling profile shape for the stored energy and neutron yield can be applied to the deuterium discharges at different major radii in TFTR. These include Supershot, High poloidal beta, L-mode, and discharges with a reversed shear (RS) magnetic configuration. These scalings are also applied to deuterium-tritium discharges. The role of plasma parameters, such as plasma current, Isdo2(p), edge safety factor, qsdo5(a), and toroidal field, Bsdo2(T), in the performance and stability of the discharges is explicitly studied. Based on practical and externally controllable plasma parameters, the limitation and optimization of fusion power production of the present TFTR is investigated and a path for a discharge condition with fusion power gain, Q > 1 is suggested based on this study. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks.

  17. Progress in theory and simulation of ion cyclotron emission from magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Chapman, Ben; Chapman, Sandra; Cook, James; Reman, Bernard; McClements, Ken; Carbajal, Leopoldo

    2016-10-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is detected from all large tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Its frequency spectrum has narrow peaks at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population (fusion-born or neutral beam-injected) at the outer edge of the plasma. ICE was the first collective radiative instability driven by confined fusion-born ions observed in deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR, and the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability is the most likely emission mechanism. Contemporary ICE measurements are taken at very high sampling rates from the LHD stellarator and from the conventional aspect ratio KSTAR tokamak. A correspondingly advanced modelling capability for the ICE emission mechanism has been developed using 1D3V PIC and hybrid-PIC codes, supplemented by analytical theory. These kinetic codes simulate the self-consistent full orbit dynamics of energetic and thermal ions, together with the electric and magnetic fields and the electrons. We report recent progress in theory and simulation that addresses: the scaling of ICE intensity with energetic particle density; the transition between super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes for the collectively radiating particles; and the rapid time evolution that is seen for some ICE measurements. This work was supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/I501045] and by Euratom.

  18. Fast Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria in Plasma Confinement Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, S. K.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Wingen, A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    High-fidelity reconstruction of plasma equilibria in confinement devices like stellarators and tokamaks with external three dimensional (3D) fields is computationally very expensive and routinely requires days, even weeks, to complete using serial approaches. Here, we present the performance results of coupling the 3D plasma reconstruction code, V3FIT, with PARVMEC, the recently developed parallel version of VMEC. We present the parallel design of this coupled software along with a scalability analysis to identify its performance bottlenecks. Dependence of its scalability limits on model parameters is derived. These analyses are supported by scaling studies on over 6,000 processor cores of a Cray XC30 supercomputer. PARVMEC, which dominates the total runtime of the reconstruction procedure, is shown to deliver speedup improvements of over one to two orders of magnitude, depending on whether the equilibrium computations are carried out in a free or fixed boundary mode. The overall speedup of the coupled reconstruction code is shown to deliver over 40X improvement enabling fusion scientists to carry out high-fidelity 3D plasma reconstruction analyses in only a few hours instead of in days/weeks for the first time. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Particle and momentum confinement in tokamak plasmas with unbalanced neutral beam injection and strong rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    There is a self-consistent theory of the effects of neutral beam injection on impurity transport in tokamak plasmas. The theory predicts that co-injection drives impurities outward and that counter-injection enhances the normally inward flow of impurities. The theory was applied to carry out a detailed analysis of the large experimental database from the PLT and the ISX-B tokamaks. The theory was found to generally model the experimental data quite well. It is, therefore, concluded that neutral beam co-injection can drive impurities outward to achieve clean central plasmas and a cool radiating edge. Theoretical predictions for future thermonuclear reactors such as INTOR, TIBER II, and ITER indicated that neutral beam driven flow reversal might be an effective impurity control method if the rate of beam momentum deposited per plasma ion is adequate. The external momentum drag, which is a pivotal concept in impurity flow reversal theory, is correctly predicted by the gyroviscous theory of momentum confinement. The theory was applied to analyze experimental data from the PLT and the PDX tokamaks with exact experimental conditions. The theory was found to be in excellent agreement with experiment over a wide range of parameters. It is, therefore, possible to formulate the impurity transport theory from first principles, without resort to empiricism.

  20. Customizing electron confinement in plasma-assembled Si/AlN nanodots for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S. Y.; Xu, S.; Arulsamy, A. Das; Xu, M.; Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2009-12-15

    Size-uniform Si nanodots (NDs) are synthesized on an AlN buffer layer at low Si(111) substrate temperatures using inductively coupled plasma-assisted magnetron sputtering deposition. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals that the sizes of the Si NDs range from 9 to 30 nm. Room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that the energy peak shifts from 738 to 778 nm with increasing the ND size. In this system, the quantum confinement effect is fairly strong even for relatively large (up to 25 nm in diameter) NDs, which is promising for the development of the next-generation all-Si tandem solar cells capable of effectively capturing sunlight photons with the energies between 1.7 (infrared: large NDs) and 3.4 eV (ultraviolet: small NDs). The strength of the resulting electron confinement in the Si/AlN ND system is evaluated and justified by analyzing the measured PL spectra using the ionization energy theory approximation.

  1. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  2. Insulin regulates Glut4 confinement in plasma membrane clusters in adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, Vladimir A; Stenkula, Karin; Troy, Aaron; Cushman, Samuel W; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM) is the hallmark of glucose metabolism. In this study we examined insulin's effects on GLUT4 organization in PM of adipose cells by direct microscopic observation of single monomers tagged with photoswitchable fluorescent protein. In the basal state, after exocytotic delivery only a fraction of GLUT4 is dispersed into the PM as monomers, while most of the GLUT4 stays at the site of fusion and forms elongated clusters (60-240 nm). GLUT4 monomers outside clusters diffuse freely and do not aggregate with other monomers. In contrast, GLUT4 molecule collision with an existing cluster can lead to immediate confinement and association with that cluster. Insulin has three effects: it shifts the fraction of dispersed GLUT4 upon delivery, it augments the dissociation of GLUT4 monomers from clusters ∼3-fold and it decreases the rate of endocytic uptake. All together these three effects of insulin shift most of the PM GLUT4 from clustered to dispersed states. GLUT4 confinement in clusters represents a novel kinetic mechanism for insulin regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  3. Insulin Regulates Glut4 Confinement in Plasma Membrane Clusters in Adipose Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lizunov, Vladimir A.; Stenkula, Karin; Troy, Aaron; Cushman, Samuel W.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM) is the hallmark of glucose metabolism. In this study we examined insulin’s effects on GLUT4 organization in PM of adipose cells by direct microscopic observation of single monomers tagged with photoswitchable fluorescent protein. In the basal state, after exocytotic delivery only a fraction of GLUT4 is dispersed into the PM as monomers, while most of the GLUT4 stays at the site of fusion and forms elongated clusters (60–240 nm). GLUT4 monomers outside clusters diffuse freely and do not aggregate with other monomers. In contrast, GLUT4 molecule collision with an existing cluster can lead to immediate confinement and association with that cluster. Insulin has three effects: it shifts the fraction of dispersed GLUT4 upon delivery, it augments the dissociation of GLUT4 monomers from clusters ∼3-fold and it decreases the rate of endocytic uptake. All together these three effects of insulin shift most of the PM GLUT4 from clustered to dispersed states. GLUT4 confinement in clusters represents a novel kinetic mechanism for insulin regulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:23520472

  4. Scaling of Microcavity Plasmas Toward 1 µm. Science and Engineering of Spatially-Confined, Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, J. G.

    2012-03-07

    The DOE has provided, by means of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), $146,400 in funding for the purchase of scientific equipment. Specifically, these funds have enabled the purchase of two scientific cameras that have already been applied to the research in microcavity plasmas at the University of Illinois (Urbana). The first camera system that was purchased with these funds is a gated ICCD system that allows events as short as 5 ns in time to be captured. It is difficult to express the impact that this equipment has already had on our research. Despite having arrived just 6 - 7 months ago, this camera system has already been used by five graduate students and several undergraduates to capture phenomena that we simply could not see in the past. As an example, the low temperature plasma confined to a spiral structure we fabricate in the Al/Al₂O₃ materials system appears, on long time scales such as those we see with our eyes, to be spatially uniform. However, when captured with the new camera system, the plasma actually is formed initially at the center of the spiral and then moves radially (literally, "jumping" over channels as it goes) at a velocity of a few km/sec. This is an exciting result and I should add that the camera shows that plasma standing waves are produced in some of the structures as well. We do not currently understand all of the phenomena we are witnessing but it is obvious that this new system has quite literally opened new areas of plasma research and application. The second system purchased under this ARRA grant is an infrared system that is far more sensitive than anything our laboratory (or the University of Illinois, for that matter) has had previously. Although fewer experiments have been completed to date with this second camera, it is already clear that it is, indeed, extremely sensitive and it is slated for several experiments in the near future in which we will be measuring the infrared spectra of several arrays of

  5. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  6. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters. PMID:26936382

  7. Compact Intense Neutron Generators Based on Inertial Electrostatic Confinement of D-D Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Inoue, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Nakamatsu, R.

    2015-10-01

    A neutron generator based on inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) of fusion plasmas is being developed for a non-destructive inspection system of special nuclear materials hidden in sea containers. The new IEC device is equipped with a multistage feedthrough which was designed aiming at both capability of a high bias voltage and enhancement of ion recirculation by modification of electric fields in the IEC device. Experimental comparison was made with a conventional single-stage IEC device developed in an earlier work. As the results, both the increase in the applied voltage and the modified field symmetry by the new multistage scheme showed significant enhancement in the neutron output. As a consequence, neutron output per input discharge current was enhanced drastically by a factor of ~30 in total. Also, the first pulsing experiments of the newly developed IEC neutron generator showed pulsed neutron output with a rapid pulse fall-off of ~ 1 μsec successfully.

  8. Mean and Oscillating Plasma Flows and Turbulence Interactions across the L-H Confinement Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, G. D.; Angioni, C.; Ryter, F.; Sauter, P.; Vicente, J.

    2011-02-11

    A complex interaction between turbulence driven ExB zonal flow oscillations, i.e., geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs), the turbulence, and mean equilibrium flows is observed during the low to high (L-H) plasma confinement mode transition in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Below the L-H threshold at low densities a limit-cycle oscillation forms with competition between the turbulence level and the GAM flow shearing. At higher densities the cycle is diminished, while in the H mode the cycle duration becomes too short to sustain the GAM, which is replaced by large amplitude broadband flow perturbations. Initially GAM amplitude increases as the H-mode transition is approached, but is then suppressed in the H mode by enhanced mean flow shear.

  9. Mean and oscillating plasma flows and turbulence interactions across the L-H confinement transition.

    PubMed

    Conway, G D; Angioni, C; Ryter, F; Sauter, P; Vicente, J

    2011-02-11

    A complex interaction between turbulence driven E × B zonal flow oscillations, i.e., geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs), the turbulence, and mean equilibrium flows is observed during the low to high (L-H) plasma confinement mode transition in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Below the L-H threshold at low densities a limit-cycle oscillation forms with competition between the turbulence level and the GAM flow shearing. At higher densities the cycle is diminished, while in the H mode the cycle duration becomes too short to sustain the GAM, which is replaced by large amplitude broadband flow perturbations. Initially GAM amplitude increases as the H-mode transition is approached, but is then suppressed in the H mode by enhanced mean flow shear.

  10. Stability properties and fast ion confinement of hybrid tokamak plasma configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferle, D.; Faustin, J. M. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Kleiner, A.; Lanthaler, S.; Patten, H. W.; Raghunathan, M.

    2015-11-01

    In hybrid scenarios with flat q just above unity, extremely fast growing tearing modes are born from toroidal sidebands of the near resonant ideal internal kink mode. New scalings of the growth rate with the magnetic Reynolds number arise from two fluid effects and sheared toroidal flow. Non-linear saturated 1/1 dominant modes obtained from initial value stability calculation agree with the amplitude of the 1/1 component of a 3D VMEC equilibrium calculation. Viable and realistic equilibrium representation of such internal kink modes allow fast ion studies to be accurately established. Calculations of MAST neutral beam ion distributions using the VENUS-LEVIS code show very good agreement of observed impaired core fast ion confinement when long lived modes occur. The 3D ICRH code SCENIC also enables the establishment of minority RF distributions in hybrid plasmas susceptible to saturated near resonant internal kink modes.

  11. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  12. Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion in a Z-Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert W.; Davis, Jack; Velikovich, Alexander; Rudakov, Leonid; Giuliani, John L.

    2002-12-01

    The recent successes with the Saturn and "Z" facilities at Sandia National Laboratory have renewed interest in Z-pinch fusion as a means of producing an abundance of high-energy photons. We have estimated that, in a nuclear fusion pulsed Z-pinch, peak currents in excess of 20-30 MA may produce magnetic fields sufficient to confine α-particles. We performed a series of numerical simulations with Au/CH/DT loads for devices with peak currents ranging from 20 to 60 MA. A detailed ionization model for Au was employed, and includes a forest of transported emission lines or line groups. For each case, we will give the calculated D-T yield and the yield of the α-particles deposited in the plasma.

  13. Structural phase transitions and out-of-plane dust lattice instabilities in vertically confined plasma crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, K.; Hyde, T. W.

    2005-02-01

    The formation of plasma crystals confined in an external one-dimensional parabolic potential well is simulated for a normal experimental environment employing a computer code called BOX&barbelow;TREE. Under appropriate conditions, crystals were found to form layered systems. The system’s structural phase transitions, including transitions between crystals with differing numbers of layers and the same number of layers but different intralayer structures, were investigated and found to agree with previous theoretical and experimental research results. One- to two-layer transitions were examined in detail and shown to start at the point where the out-of-plane lattice instability appears. The resulting three layer system caused by this instability was observed at the center of the system. Finally, growth rates for this out-of-plane lattice instability were obtained using the BOX&barbelow;TREE simulation with these results shown to agree with those obtained from analytical theory.

  14. Confinement and structure of electrostatically coupled dust clouds in a direct current plasma-sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, S.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    1998-10-01

    Mechanisms for the confinement and the internal structure of an electrostatically coupled dust cloud formed in a dc glow discharge have been investigated from a comparative viewpoint between experimental observations and a simple model. Two kinds of dust clouds with different internal structures are clearly observed, depending on the dispersion of the size distribution of dust particles. The dust cloud can be trapped only in the plasma-sheath boundary area, corresponding to the potential minimum region determined by gravitational and electrostatic forces in the cathode sheath. No dust particles were found deep inside of the sheath, which is consistent with the analysis because the dust particles may be charged positively due to an extreme reduction of the electron density. The internal structure of the electrostatically coupled dust cloud was found to be arranged so that the total potential energy, including the repulsive Coulomb interaction among negative dust particles, may become minimal.

  15. Laser material interaction in confined medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaux, David; Fabbro, Remy; Virmont, Jean; Ballard, Patrick; Fournier, Jean

    1990-04-01

    The technique of dielectric metallic target confinement is discussed. Improvements in experimental measurements by piezodielectric sensor are described. Laser material interaction by the hydrodynamic code FILM is described. The formed plasma is visualized using a streak camera.

  16. Numerical simulation on a new cylindrical target for Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y. Y.; Wang, Z.; Qi, J. M.; Wu, F. Y.; Li, Z. H.

    2017-06-01

    A new indirectly driven cylindrical target is proposed for Z-pinch inertial confinement fusion, and the target implosion dynamics is simulated with a combination of the mass-point model and the radiation hydrodynamic model. Driven by a current waveform with the peak value of 60 MA and 10-90% rising time of 180 ns, the shell kinetic energy of 5 MJ cm-1 can be obtained when the 60 mg cm-1 liner with initial radius 5 cm is imploded to radius of 5 mm. The simulated kinetic energy is loaded to compress the multi-layer cylindrical target, and 24.6 MJ fusion energy can be released according to the radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The power balance relationship is analyzed for the fusion fuel, and the fuel is ignited in the volume-ignition style. The target here can avoid the problem of coupling between the cylindrical Z-pinch and spherical fusion capsule, and can make use of dynamics hohlraum to weaken the influence of Z-pinch instability on the fuel compression. The implosion dynamics of the cylindrical fusion target is easy to diagnose from the axial direction, which makes it suitable to be investigated in future experiments.

  17. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  18. Improved confinement in ELM-suppressed high-density H-modes at the ITER field via modification of the plasma boundary with Lower Hybrid RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Injecting Lower Hybrid (LH) power into Alcator C-Mod's high-density H-mode plasmas has enhanced global confinement by increasing pedestal temperature gradients, modifying edge rotation, and decreasing edge and SOL turbulence. These new experiments indicate that edge LHRF can be used as a tool to increase confinement via direct modification of boundary quantities. Ray-tracing modeling and accessibility calculations for the LH waves indicate that the LH waves do not penetrate to regions inside the top of the pedestal and are not driving current in these plasmas; instead the LH power modifies the boundary conditions. When moderate amounts of LH power (PLH/Ptot = 20%) are applied to high-density EDA H-modes (neo = 3.5×1020 m-3) , we observe the following effects: edge/SOL fluctuation power decreases by roughly an order of magnitude; pedestal temperature gradients are increased; global energy confinement time and H-factor increase by 30-40% (H98 from 0.7 to 1.0); co-current core and pedestal rotation velocities increase; power to the (outer) divertor target increases promptly with an increment that is roughly 1/2 of the injected LH power, qualitatively consistent with the inaccessibility of the LH waves; and the central frequency of the edge-localized Quasi-Coherent Mode down-shifts and becomes much more coherent. These H-mode confinement improvements brought about by the edge LHRF are the result of changes in the pedestal (e.g. changes in rotation/shear and increased pedestal temperature gradients), with no substantial change in peaking of core density or temperature profiles. There is not perfect correlation with edge turbulence suppression, indicating that the turbulence decrease may be a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the pedestal and confinement improvements. Supported by US DoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, M. E.; Shalashov, A. G.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase-space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the “holes and clumps” mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for the acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  20. Immersed boundary methods for numerical simulation of confined fluid and plasma turbulence in complex geometries: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kai

    2015-12-01

    > Immersed boundary methods for computing confined fluid and plasma flows in complex geometries are reviewed. The mathematical principle of the volume penalization technique is described and simple examples for imposing Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in one dimension are given. Applications for fluid and plasma turbulence in two and three space dimensions illustrate the applicability and the efficiency of the method in computing flows in complex geometries, for example in toroidal geometries with asymmetric poloidal cross-sections.

  1. Transport and confinement in the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R. J.; Ahn, J. W.; Antar, G. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C. D.; Conway, N. J.; Counsell, G. F.; Dendy, R. O.; Dudson, B.; Field, A. R.; Kirk, A.; Lloyd, B.; Meyer, H. F.; Morris, A. W.; Patel, A.; Roach, C. M.; Rohzansky, V.; Sykes, A.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Valovi, M.; Wilson, H. R.; Axon, K. B.; Buttery, R. J.; Ciric, D.; Cunningham, G.; Dowling, J.; Dunstan, M. R.; Gee, S. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Keeling, D. L.; Knight, P. J.; Lott, F.; Loughlin, M. J.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; Price, M. N.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Walsh, M. J.; MAST, the; NBI Team

    2003-12-01

    A combination of recently installed state-of-the-art imaging and profile diagnostics, together with established plasma simulation codes, are providing for the first time on Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) the tools required for studying confinement and transport, from the core through to the plasma edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL). The H-mode edge transport barrier is now routinely turned on and off using a combination of poloidally localized fuelling and fine balancing of the X-points. Theory, supported by experiment, indicates that the edge radial electric field and toroidal flow velocity (thought to play an important role in H-mode access) are largest if gas fuelling is concentrated at the inboard side. H-mode plasmas show predominantly type III ELM characteristics, with confinement HH factor (w.r.t. scaling law IPB98[y, 2]) around ~1.0. Combining MAST H-mode data with the International Tokamak Physics Activities (ITPA) analyses, results in an L H power threshold scaling proportional to plasma surface area (rather than PLH ~ R2). In addition, MAST favours an inverse aspect ratio scaling PLH ~ egr0.5. Similarly, the introduction of type III ELMing H-mode data to the pedestal energy regression analysis introduces a scaling Wped ~ egr-2.13 and modifies the exponents on R, BT and kgr. Preliminary TRANSP simulations indicate that ion and electron thermal diffusivities in ELMing H-mode approach the ion-neoclassical level in the half-radius region of the plasma with momentum diffusivity a few times lower. Linear flux-tube ITG and ETG microstability calculations using GS2 offer explanations for the near-neoclassical ion diffusivity and significantly anomalous electron diffusivity seen on MAST. To complement the baseline quasi-steady-state H-mode, newly developed advanced regimes are being explored. In particular, 'broad' internal transport barriers (ITBs) have been formed using techniques developed at conventional aspect ratio. Electron and ion energy diffusivities

  2. Multi-Field/-Scale Interaction of Neoclassical Tearing Modes with Turbulence and Impact on Plasma Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardoczi, Laszlo

    Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs) are a major impediment in the development of operational scenarios of present toroidal fusion devices. The multi-scale and non-linear interaction of NTMs with turbulence has been an active field of theoretical plasma research in the past decade for its role in plasma confinement. However, little to no experimental effort has been devoted to explore this interaction. As part of this thesis, dedicated experiments were conducted utilizing the full complement of the DIII-D turbulence diagnostics to study the effect of NTM on turbulence as well as the effect of turbulence on NTM growth. The first localized measurements of long and intermediate wavelength turbulent density fluctuations and long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations modified by magnetic islands are presented. These long and intermediate wavelengths correspond to the expected Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) and Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) scales, respectively. Two regimes were observed when tracking density fluctuations during NTM evolution: (1) small islands are characterized by steep electron temperature radial profile and turbulence levels comparable to that of the background; (2) large islands have a flat electron temperature profile and reduced turbulence level at the O-point. Radially outside of the large island, the electron temperature profile is steeper and the turbulence level increased compared to the no or small island case. It was also found that turbulence is reduced in the O-point region compared to the X-point region. This helical structure of turbulence modification leads to a 15% modulation of the density fluctuation power as the island rotates in the lab frame and this modulation is nearly in phase with the electron temperature modulation. These measurements were also used to determine the turbulence penetration length scale at the island separatrix and was found that the turbulence penetration length scale is on the order of the

  3. Anomalous fluxes in the plateau regime for a weakly turbulent, magnetically confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R. )

    1990-09-01

    The anomalous particle and heat fluxes, together with the parallel electric current, are determined for a confined plasma in the plateau regime in the presence of weak electrostatic drift-wave turbulence. Proper account is taken of nonstationarity and of the finite ion Larmor radius (FLR). The quasineutrality of the drift-wave fluctuations imposes a consistency condition, by which the evaluation of the anomalous fluxes is closely related to the drift-wave dispersion equation. On the other hand, these fluxes are related to the thermodynamic forces via the poloidal fluxes. For the weak turbulence approximation considered here, a unified formulation of the anomalous transport problem has been obtained, including all aspects of neoclassical theory. The complete set of transport coefficients is calculated and various relations between them are exhibited. It clearly appears, for instance, that the anomalous ion heat flux is a pure FLR effect that vanishes as the Larmor radius goes to zero. The Onsager symmetry is broken for anomalous transport. The Appendix is devoted to a general discussion of the concept of heat flux in turbulent plasmas.

  4. Theoretical studies on plasma heating and confinement. Final report, May 4, 1984--May 13, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three principal topics are covered in this final report: Stabilization of low frequency modes of an axisymmetric compact torus plasma confinement system, such as, spheromaks and FRC`S, by a population of large orbit axis encircling energetic ions. Employing an extension of the `energy principle` which utilizes a Vlasov description for the energetic `ion component, it has been demonstrated that short wavelength MHD type modes are stabilized while the long wavelength tilt and precessional modes are marginally stable. The deformation of the equilibrium configuration by the energetic ions results in the stabilization of the tilt mode for spheromaks. Formation of Ion Rings and their coalescence with spheromaks. A two dimensional electromagnetic PIC codes has been developed for the study of ion ring formation and its propagation, deformation and slowing down in a cold plasma. It has been shown that a ring moving at a speed less than the Alfven velocity can merge with a stationary spheromak. Anomalous transport from drift waves in a Tokomak. The Direct Interaction Approximation in used to obtain incremental transport coefficients for particles and heat for drift waves in a Tokomak. It is shown that the transport matrix does not obey Onsager`s principle.

  5. Curling probe measurement of a large-volume pulsed plasma with surface magnetic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A.; Tashiro, H.; Sakakibara, W.; Nakamura, K.; Sugai, H.

    2016-12-01

    A curling probe (CP) based on microwave resonance is applied to the measurement of electron density in a pulsed DC glow discharge under surface magnetic confinement (SMC) provided by a number of permanent magnets on a chamber wall. Owing to the SMC effects, a 1 m scale large-volume plasma is generated by a relatively low voltage (~1 kV) at low pressure (~1 Pa) in various gases (Ar, CH4, and C2H2). Temporal variation of the electron density is measured for pulse frequency f  =  0.5-25 kHz for various discharge-on times (T ON) with a high resolution time (~0.2 µs), using the on-point mode. In general, the electron density starts to increase at time t  =  0 after turn-on of the discharge voltage, reaches peak density at t  =  T ON, and then decreases after turn-off. The peak electron density is observed to increase with the pulse frequency f for constant T ON owing to the residual plasma. This dependence is successfully formulated using a semi-empirical model. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cathode sheath in the pulsed discharge is revealed by a 1 m long movable CP. The measured thickness of the high-voltage cathode fall in a steady state coincides with the value of the so-called Child-Langmuir sheath.

  6. Introduction to Gyrokinetic Theory with Applications in Magnetic Confinement Research in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Tang

    2005-01-03

    The present lecture provides an introduction to the subject of gyrokinetic theory with applications in the area of magnetic confinement research in plasma physics--the research arena from which this formalism was originally developed. It was presented as a component of the ''Short Course in Kinetic Theory within the Thematic Program in Partial Differential Equations'' held at the Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Science (24 March 2004). This lecture also discusses the connection between the gyrokinetic formalism and powerful modern numerical simulations. Indeed, simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential modern tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was enabled by two key factors: (i) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (ii) access to powerful new computational resources.

  7. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Chrien, R. E.; Christian, J. M.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Goforth, J. H.; Haight, R. C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N. S.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Larson, R. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Olinger, B. W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P. T.; Shlachter, J. S.; Smith, R. C.; Veeser, L. R.; Warthen, B. J.; Younger, S. M.; Chernyshev, V. K.; Mokhov, V. N.; Demin, A. N.; Dolin, Y. N.; Garanin, S. F.; Ivanov, V. A.; Korchagin, V. P.; Mikhailov, O. D.; Morozov, I. V.; Pak, S. V.; Pavlovskii, E. S.; Seleznev, N. Y.; Skobelev, A. N.; Volkov, G. I.; Yakubov, V. A.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 μs magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 μs electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 1013 D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  8. Compact laser plasma EUV source based on a gas puff target for metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Bartnik, Andrzej; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Rakowski, Rafal; Szczurek, Miroslaw

    2003-06-01

    In the paper a newly developed compact laser plasma EUV source is presented. The source is based on the double-stream gas puff target approach. The targets are formed by pulsed injection of high-Z gas (xenon) into a hollow stream of low-Z gas (helium) using the valve system composed of two electromagnetic valves and equipped with the double-nozzle setup. The outer stream of gas confines the inner stream improving the gas puff target characteristics (higher density of high-Z gas at longer distance from the nozzle output). It causes efficient absorption of laser energy in a plasma and strong EUV production. The source has been developed in the frame of the EUV sources development project under the MEDEA+ program.

  9. Particle modelling of magnetically confined oxygen plasma in low pressure radio frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Benyoucef, Djilali; Yousfi, Mohammed

    2015-01-15

    The main objective of this paper is the modelling and simulation of a radio frequency (RF) discharge in oxygen at low pressure and at room temperature, including the effect of crossed electric and magnetic fields for generation and confinement of oxygen plasma. The particle model takes into account one axial dimension along the electric field axis and three velocity components during the Monte Carlo treatment of the collisions between charged particles and background gas. The simulation by this developed code allows us not only to determine the electrodynamics characteristics of the RF discharge, but also to obtain kinetics and energetic description of reactive oxygen plasma at low pressure. These information are very important for the control of the deep reactive-ion etching technology of the silicon to manufacture capacitors with high density and for the deposition thick insulating films or thick metal to manufacture micro-coils. The simulation conditions are as follows: RF peak voltage of 200 V, frequency of 13.56 MHz, crossed magnetic field varying from 0 to 50 Gauss, and oxygen pressure of 13.8 Pa. In the presence of magnetic field, the results show an increase of the plasma density, a decrease of the electron mean energy, and also a reduction of the ratio between electron density and positive ion density. Finally in order to validate, the results are successfully compared with measurements already carried out in the literature. The conditions of comparison are from 100 to 300 V of the peak voltage at 13.56 MHz under a pressure of 13.8 Pa and a gap distance of 2.5 cm.

  10. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; ...

    2015-10-15

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E x B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transportmore » that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs ~ 0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E x B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E x B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Furthermore, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in

  11. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-01

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E ×B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs˜0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E ×B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E ×B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Moreover, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in advanced ST

  12. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-15

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E x B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs ~ 0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E x B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E x B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Furthermore, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma

  13. Laboratory study of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Mansfeld, Dmitry; Izotov, Ivan; Gospodchikov, Egor; Shalashov, Alexander; Demekhov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the use of a mirror-confined plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge for modeling of burst processes in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth associated with the implementation of the plasma cyclotron maser. Heating under the electron cyclotron resonance conditions allows to create two component plasma which is typical for the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. One of the most interesting electron cyclotron resonance manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. We investigate several regimes of cyclotron maser which are realized in dense and rarefied plasma, in the presence and absence of a permanent powerful gyrotron microwave radiation as a source of nonequilibrium particles in the plasma. Using the new technique for detection of microwave radiation we studied the dynamical spectrum and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic radiation from the plasma in a wide frequency band covering all types of cyclotron instabilities. Also possible applications for astrophysical plasma are discussed.

  14. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Spragge, M.; Wallace, R.J.; Rivers, C.J. |

    1995-03-06

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of {approximately}3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of {approximately}1.0 E + 21 cm{sup {minus}3}. A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of {approximately}0.01 cm{sup 3} in volume at {approximately} 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL.

  15. The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX): Centrifugal Confinement and Velocity Shear Stabilization of Plasmas in Shaped Open Magnetic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil; Ellis, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) Project has investigated the concepts of centrifugal plasma confinement and stabilization of instabilities by velocity shear. The basic requirement is supersonic plasma rotation about a shaped, open magnetic field. Overall, the MCX Project attained three primary goals that were set out at the start of the project. First, supersonic rotation at Mach number up to 2.5 was obtained. Second, turbulence from flute interchange modes was found considerably reduced from conventional. Third, plasma pressure was contained along the field, as evidenced by density drops of x10 from the center to the mirror throats.

  16. Influence of the radial profile of the electric potential on the confinement of a high-{beta} two-component plasma in a gas-dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatkina, E. I.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Solomakhin, A. L.

    2008-04-15

    One of the most important problems to be studied in the gas-dynamic trap (GDT) facility is the investigation of MHD stability and cross-field transport in a plasma with a relatively high value of {beta} = {pi}p/B{sup 2}. Recent experiments demonstrated that the radial electric field produced in the plasma by using radial limiters and coaxial end plasma collectors improves plasma stability in axisymmetric magnetic mirror systems without applying special MHD stabilizers. The experimental data presented in this work show that stable plasma confinement can be achieved by producing a radial potential drop across a narrow region near the plasma boundary. Creating radial electric fields of strength 15-40 V/cm causes a shear plasma flow, thereby substantially increasing the plasma confinement time. When all the radial electrodes were grounded, the confinement was unstable and the plasma confinement time was much shorter than the characteristic time of plasma outflow through the magnetic mirrors. Measurements of cross-field plasma fluxes with the use of a specially designed combined probe show that, in confinement modes with differential plasma rotation, transverse particle losses are negligibly small as compared to longitudinal ones and thus can be ignored. It is also shown that, when the GDT plasma is in electric contact with the radial limiters and end collectors, the growth rate of interchange instability decreases considerably; such a contact, however, does not ensure complete MHD stability when the electrodes are at the same potential.

  17. Plasma-deposited beryllium carbide coatings for application to inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wu-Sheng

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an alternative energy source for the future energy needs in the next century. The materials of the microsphere which confines the D-T fuel inside require high energy transparency (low atomic number, Z), smooth surface, and permeability to Hsb2. Plasma-deposited Be polymer composite coatings with over 50 atomic % of Be and low O content (<5 atomic %) would meet these requirements. Several films with a Be to C atomic ratio of close to 2 to 1 which corresponds to Besb2C with a surface roughness < 100 A and acceptable permeability to Hsb2 were prepared. The coatings were prepared in a rf-induced cylindrical plasma reactor. Diethylberyllium (DEB) was introduced into the reactor as the precursor. Hsb2 was used as the co-reactant for the purpose of reducing internal/compressional stress of the coatings. These coatings were made at substrate temperatures in the range of ambient temperature to 325sp°C with various Hsb2 to DEB flow rate ratios. These coatings have been characterized by AES, XRD, XPS, SEM, AFM, FTIR, electrical resistivity, and TGA. Permeability to Hsb2 through ˜1 mum and ˜5 mum films was also measured. This is the first successful attempt to prepare Besb2C at 250sp°C by PECVD at low pressure as compare to prepare bulk Besb2C at over 1500sp°C by sintering process in a vacuum furnace (<10sp{-4} mmHg). It has been found that the Be content decreases along the distance from the DEB inlet. It has also been confirmed that Besb2C is the dominant phase in these coatings. The Besb2C in these films is resistant to hydrolysis and/or oxidation to dry and moist air in the temperature range of 30sp°C to 250sp°C. It was found that internal/compressional stress is somewhat reduced by introducing Hsb2 into the reactor as a co-reacting gas.

  18. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Izotov, I V; Razin, S V; Sidorov, A V; Skalyga, V A; Zorin, V G; Bagryansky, P A; Beklemishev, A D; Prikhodko, V V

    2012-02-01

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap ("vortex" confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of "vortex" confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  19. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C.

    2001-02-02

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  20. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium–tritium micro-implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R. J. Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J.

    2014-02-15

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ∼40 μm diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3} g/cm{sup 3} densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20 keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200 g/cm{sup 3}), while the elliptical shells evidence p = 2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  1. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium-tritium micro-implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J.

    2014-02-01

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ˜40 μm diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 102 or 103 g/cm3 densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20 keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200 g/cm3), while the elliptical shells evidence p = 2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  2. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton radiography diagnostic of inertial confinement fusion targets (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R.; MacPhee, A.; Hey, D.; Ma, T.; Chen, C.; Izumi, N.; Unites, W.; MacKinnon, A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Park, H. S.; Springer, P.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Seely, John; Holland, Glenn; Hudson, Larry

    2008-10-15

    We present scaled demonstrations of backlighter sources, emitting bremsstrahlung x rays with photon energies above 75 keV, that we will use to record x-ray Compton radiographic snapshots of cold dense DT fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In experiments performed at the Titan laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we measured the source size and the bremsstrahlung spectrum as a function of laser intensity and pulse length from solid targets irradiated at 2x10{sup 17}-5x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} using 2-40 ps pulses. Using Au planar foils we achieved source sizes down to 5.5 {mu}m and conversion efficiencies of about 1x10{sup -13} J/J into x-ray photons with energies in the 75-100 keV spectral range. We can now use these results to design NIF backlighter targets and shielding and to predict Compton radiography performance as a function of the NIF implosion yield and associated background.

  3. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton radiography diagnostic of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; MacPhee, A; Hey, D; Ma, T; Chen, C; Izumi, N; Unites, W; MacKinnon, A; Hatchett, S P; Remington, B A; Park, H S; Springer, P; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Seely, J; Holland, G; Hudson, L

    2008-05-07

    We present scaled demonstrations of backlighter sources, emitting Bremsstrahlung x-rays with photon energies above 75 keV, that we will use to record x-ray Compton radiographic snapshots of cold dense DT fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In experiments performed at the Titan laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we measured the source size and the Bremsstrahlung spectrum as a function of laser intensity and pulse length, from solid targets irradiated at 2e17-5e18 W/cm{sup 2} using 2-40 ps pulses. Using Au planar foils we achieved source sizes down to 5.5 {micro}m, and conversion efficiencies of about 1e-3 J/J into x-ray photons with energies in the 75-100 keV spectral range. We can now use these results to design NIF backlighter targets and shielding, and to predict Compton radiography performance as a function of the NIF implosion yield and associated background.

  4. The field line map approach for simulations of magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Andreas; Coster, David; Maj, Omar; Hallatschek, Klaus; Lackner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Predictions of plasma parameters in the edge and scrape-off layer of tokamaks is difficult since most modern tokamaks have a divertor and the associated separatrix causes the usually employed field/flux-aligned coordinates to become singular on the separatrix/X-point. The presented field line map approach avoids such problems as it is based on a cylindrical grid: standard finite-difference methods can be used for the discretisation of perpendicular (w.r.t. magnetic field) operators, and the characteristic flute mode property (k∥ ≪k⊥) of structures is exploited computationally via a field line following discretisation of parallel operators which leads to grid sparsification in the toroidal direction. This paper is devoted to the discretisation of the parallel diffusion operator (the approach taken is very similar to the flux-coordinate independent (FCI) approach which has already been adopted to a hyperbolic problem (Ottaviani, 2011; Hariri, 2013)). Based on the support operator method, schemes are derived which maintain the self-adjointness property of the parallel diffusion operator on the discrete level. These methods have very low numerical perpendicular diffusion compared to a naive discretisation which is a critical issue since magnetically confined plasmas exhibit a very strong anisotropy. Two different versions of the discrete parallel diffusion operator are derived: the first is based on interpolation where the order of interpolation and therefore the numerical diffusion is adjustable; the second is based on integration and is advantageous in cases where the field line map is strongly distorted. The schemes are implemented in the new code GRILLIX, and extensive benchmarks and numerous examples are presented which show the validity of the approach in general and GRILLIX in particular.

  5. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2−10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  6. Experimental and computational results for 1054-nm laser-induced shock effects in confined meteorite and metallic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, John L.; Hammerling, Peter X.

    2000-08-01

    When a single-pulse high-power laser irradiates a surface at atmospheric pressure, a laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can form above the target surface. The high-pressure gas behind the LSD wave transfers momentum to the target. The laser target coupling is substantially reduced in vacuum, the coupling coefficient typically being an order of magnitude less than that when an atmosphere is present. Another pressure enhancement technique is to confine the laser-target interface. Confinement or 'tamping' also can substantially increase the momentum coupling to the target. Experiments tend to differ from one another based on the target size (thickness) and confinement geometry. This work describes and compares some experimental results for metallic targets irradiated by 1054 nm radiation in the GW/cm2 range and interprets them in terms of simple models. As will be discussed in this paper, such models predict a weak sensitivity to target materials but results are likely to be different for inhomogeneous materials as has been seen in recent experiments on iron-nickel and stony meteorites.

  7. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; ...

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity andmore » to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.« less

  8. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang Xianzhu

    2012-08-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the {nabla}n{sub e} Multiplication-Sign {nabla}T{sub e} term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  9. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-08-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇ne×∇Te term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  10. APPARATUS FOR TRAPPING ENERGETIC CHARGED PARTICLES AND CONFINING THE RESULTING PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, G.; Jordan, W.C.; Lauer, E.J.

    1963-04-01

    The present invention relates to a plasma-confining device and a particle injector therefor, the device utilizing a generally toroidal configuration with magnetic fields specifically tailored to the associated injector. The device minimizes the effects of particle end losses and particle drift to the walls with a relatively simple configuration. More particularly, the magnetic field configuration is created by a continuous array of circular, mirror field coils, disposed side-by- side, in particularly spaced relation, to form an endless, toroidal loop. The resulting magnetic field created therein has the appearance of a bumpy'' torus, from which is derived the name Bumpy Torus.'' One of the aforementioned coils is split transverse to its axis, and injection of particles is accomplished along a plane between the halves of such modified coil. The guiding center of the particles follows a constant magnetic field in the plane for a particular distance within the torus, to move therefrom onto a precessional surface which does not intersect the point of injection. (AEC)

  11. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  12. Picosecond imaging of inertial confinement fusion plasmas using electron pulse-dilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Hares, J. D.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Piston, K.; Chung, T. M.

    2017-02-01

    Laser driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas typically have burn durations on the order of 100 ps. Time resolved imaging of the x-ray self emission during the hot spot formation is an important diagnostic tool which gives information on implosion symmetry, transient features and stagnation time. Traditional x-ray gated imagers for ICF use microchannel plate detectors to obtain gate widths of 40-100 ps. The development of electron pulse-dilation imaging has enabled a 10X improvement in temporal resolution over legacy instruments. In this technique, the incoming x-ray image is converted to electrons at a photocathode. The electrons are accelerated with a time-varying potential that leads to temporal expansion as the electron signal transits the tube. This expanded signal is recorded with a gated detector and the effective temporal resolution of the composite system can be as low as several picoseconds. An instrument based on this principle, known as the Dilation X-ray Imager (DIXI) has been constructed and fielded at the National Ignition Facility. Design features and experimental results from DIXI will be presented.

  13. The effect of target materials on colliding laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xingwen; Yang, Zefeng; Wu, Jian Han, Jiaxun; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici; Wei, Wenfu

    2016-04-07

    In laser ablation, nanosecond to femtosecond lasers with a wide range of laser power densities are used. During ablation, the result of collisions between two plasmas is of interest to many researchers in inertial confinement fusion and nuclear astrophysics. In this paper, the collisions of two seed plasmas ablated from planar target surfaces of different target materials (Al, Cu, and W) were studied with temporal-spatially resolved imaging and spectroscopy. The initial relative velocities and densities of the seed plasmas were measured, and then the collisional parameters were calculated to evaluate the degree of the collisions. In addition, spatially resolved spectra were analyzed to study the influences of materials on the temporal-spatial distribution of atom or ions. The results indicated that under the same laser intensity, the high atomic number (Z) material had a small value of collisionality parameter, mostly because of its heavy ion mass. Higher laser intensity would increase the initial relative velocity of seed plasmas, resulting in a lower collision frequency. In addition, the distribution of the ions from seed plasmas was influenced by the stagnation layer plasmas.

  14. Comparison of non-neutral electron plasma confinement in harmonic and rectangular potentials in a very dense regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, T.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2013-01-15

    Confinement of high density electron plasmas in a strong uniform magnetic field was experimentally studied in a multi-ring trap (MRT). The trap was housed inside a bore tube and surrounded by a superconducting solenoid. A 5 T magnetic field was used to provide radial confinement while an electrostatic harmonic or rectangular potential well was used for axial confinement. For trapped electrons of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} in a harmonic potential well (HPW) with the trap length of L{sub T} = 320 mm, the plasma lifetime was about 10{sup 4} s and it became much longer at lower N = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9}. Such long holding times were achieved without application of rotating electric fields. Contrastingly, in a rectangular potential well (RPW), the plasma of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} under the same trap length expanded to cover the whole Faraday Cup within 200 s, where its radial expansion rate was {eta} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mm/s, which was 20 times faster than HPW. The lifetime for RPW became shorter with increasing L{sub T} and scaled as 1/[L{sub T}]{sup 2}. This scaling found for high density plasmas is similar to the obtained one with different Penning-Malmberg traps at UC San Diego (USCD).

  15. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a the1monuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources-combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-te1m program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  16. Preparation of germanium doped plasma polymerized coatings as ICF target ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R M; Saculla, M D; Cook, R C

    1994-10-05

    Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) utilize an organic (CH) ablator coating prepared by plasma polymerization. Some of these experiments require a mid-Z dopant in the ablator coating to modify the opacity of the shell. Bromine had been used in the past, but the surface finish of brominated CH degrades rapidly with time upon exposure to air. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of plasma polymer layers containing germanium as a dopant at concentrations of between 1.25 and 2.25 atom percent. The coatings are stable in air and have an rms surface roughness of 7--9 nm (modes 10--1,000) which is similar to that obtained with undoped coatings. High levels of dopant result in cracking of the inner mandrel during target assembly. Possible explanations for the observed cracking behavior will be discussed.

  17. Response of impurity particle confinement time to external actuators in QH-mode plasmas on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Grierson, Brian A.; Burrell, Keith H.; Garofalo, Andrea M.; ...

    2014-11-04

    A series of quiescent H-mode discharges have been executed with the specific aim of determining the particle confinement time of impurities in the presence of the edge harmonic oscillation. These discharges utilize non-intrinsic, non-recycling fully-stripped fluorine as the diagnostic species monitored by charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. It is found that the EHO is an efficient means of impurity expulsion from the core plasma, with impurity exhaust rates comparable to or exceeding those in companion ELMing discharges. Furthermore, as the external torque from neutral beam injection is lowered, the global energy confinement time increases while the impurity confinement time does not displaymore » an increase.« less

  18. A spectral line survey from 17.5-250 nm of plasmas created in a magnetic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Hollmann, E. M.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; TJ-II Team1, the

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emission lines continue to be a powerful tool for studying astrophysical, process, laser-produced, and magnetically confined plasmas, among others. Hence, numerous spectroscopy-based plasma diagnostics, from the x-ray to the infrared, make use of the relative intensity, width, displacement in wavelength, or temporal evolution of such emission lines emitted by the atoms and ions present in such plasmas. In this work, a spectral line survey, from 17.5-250 nm, is presented for electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas created and maintained in the TJ-II stellarator, a medium-sized magnetically confined plasma device. In these plasmas, for which hydrogen, deuterium or helium have been used as the working gas, central electron temperatures and densities up to 1 keV and 5 × 1019 m-3, respectively, are achieved. This work is a compilation of the identified spectral emission lines emitted by the working gas as well by the intrinsic and injected impurity ions in the above wavelength range. For this, spectra were recorded, over the past fifteen years of TJ-II operation, using a 1 m focal length normal incidence spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled detector at its output focal plane. In total, almost 400 spectral emission lines from eighteen different elements have been identified using a number of atomic line emission databases.

  19. Radio Frequency (RF) Trap for Confinement of Antimatter Plasmas Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Pearson, J. Boise

    2004-01-01

    Perturbations associated with a rotating wall electric field enable the confinement of ions for periods approaching weeks. This steady state confinement is a result of a radio frequency manipulation of the ions. Using state-of-the-art techniques it is shown that radio frequency energy can produce useable manipulation of the ion cloud (matter or antimatter) for use in containment experiments. The current research focuses on the improvement of confinement systems capable of containing and transporting antimatter.

  20. Cisplatin cytotoxicity: DNA and plasma membrane targets.

    PubMed

    Rebillard, Amélie; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2008-01-01

    Most current anticancer therapies induce tumor cell death through apoptosis where its specific involved pathways are poorly understood. For example, for many DNA-damaging agents, the specific biochemical lesions (DNA adducts) are associated with the induction of apoptosis via the mitochondria death pathway. However, several of these DNA-damaging agents like cisplatin induce apoptosis through plasma membrane disruption, triggering the Fas death receptor pathway. In this review, we focus on the role of early plasma membrane events in cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Special attention is given to changes in plasma membrane fluidity, inhibition of NHE1 exchanger, activation of acid sphingomyelinase and their consequences on the Fas death pathway in response to cisplatin.

  1. Centrifugally confined plasmas for magnetic fusion energy. Final technical report for period March 15, 1998 - September 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Richard F.

    2001-07-16

    The purpose of the research funded under this study grant was to investigate the feasibility of a small scale experiment to test the concept of centrifugal confinement as a magnetic fusion energy scheme and to develop conceptual designs for important components of such an experiment. This work falls in the category of Innovative Confinement Concepts, as defined by the Office of Fusion Energy. The results of the funded work were very successful in that various studies were conducted which showed the concept to be viable and these studies led to design improvements. In addition, the major components of an experiment were identified and designed at least to the conceptual stage. In September, 2000 the Maryland Centrifugal Torus was funded for construction, in no small part because of the progress made during the time period reported here. The centrifugal confinement concept for fusion is based on three principles: (1) centrifugal forces from supersonic plasma rotation perpendicular to a strong magnetic field can provide effective confinement along the field; (2) the concomitant large velocity shear will suppress even macro-MHD instabilities; and (3) the sheared rotation will heat the plasma via viscous dissipation. Technical progress was made in clarifying and quantifying these concepts and designing a cost effective experiment. They briefly describe each area of progress and the implications for the MCT project.

  2. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  3. Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion: Plasma Injectors for MTF Guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2003-01-01

    To achieve increased payload size and decreased trip time for interplanetary travel, a low mass, high specific impulse, high thrust propulsion system is required. This suggests the need for research into fusion as a source of power and high temperature plasma. The plasma would be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) research consists of several related investigations into these topics. These include the orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the gun as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability are under investigation. One of the items under development is the plasma injector. This is a surface breakdown driven plasma generator designed to function at very low pressures. The performance, operating conditions and limitations of these injectors need to be determined.

  4. Characteristics and optimization of radar target with plasma cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying-ying; Zhao, Wei-fang; Wang, Wen-ting; Yi, Xiao-jing; Ji, Jun-wen; Lin, Xue-chun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we investigated the characteristic of radar target, the spherical and the pyramidal missile warheads, and compared the RCS and performance of the targets with and without the cover of the plasma metamaterials. Numerical simulation is obtained by the numerical calculation Finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD). The parameters of plasmonic structures as a metamaterial cloak was designed and optimized. The relationship between the parameters of the cloak and the corresponding electromagnetic characteristic of the target are analyzed by the simulation and discussion in broadband radar signals. After optimization, the plasma cover could attenuate 40 dBsm of the radar cross section (RCS) of the targets maximally. The result shows that the anomalous phenomenon of cloaking and stealth effects induced by plasma materials for the radar target, which might have potential application of military affairs.

  5. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-01

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  6. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezoe, R. Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  7. Dynamics of the electron thermal diffusivity at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kouprienko, D. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Lashkul, S. I.; Esipov, L. A.

    2010-05-15

    The dynamics of electron heat transport at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak was studied experimentally. Evolution of the profiles of the electron temperature and density was thoroughly investigated under conditions of fast variation in the plasma parameters. The energy balance in the electron channel is calculated with the help of the ASTRA code by using the measured plasma parameters. Correlation is revealed between the dynamics of electron heat transport and the behavior of small-scale drift turbulence measured using the enhanced scattering correlation diagnostics. The suppression of heat transfer and turbulence agrees well with the increase in the shear of poloidal plasma rotation calculated from experimental data in the neoclassical approximation.

  8. BX-U linear trap for one-way production and confinement of Li+ and e- plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himura, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    A modified version of the Penning-Malmberg trap was developed wherein both positive and negative harmonic potential wells were created by using multi-ring electrodes. The sequence of particle injection, particle trapping, and plasma extraction from the potential wells was controlled by a set of switching circuits. All the guns launching charged particles were collected together in one side of the linear trap. Nevertheless, pure electron (e-) and lithium-ion (Li+) plasmas were not only separately produced on the machine axis but also confined simultaneously. Preliminary data show that for B ≈ 0.13 T the e- plasma lasted for 15 s and the Li+ plasma lasted for ~ 4 s.

  9. Characterization of magnetically confined low-pressure plasmas produced by an electromagnetic field in argon-acetylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdessi, G. Al; Margot, J.; Clergereaux, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles formation was investigated in magnetically confined low-pressure plasma produced in argon-acetylene mixtures. The plasma characteristics were measured in order to identify the species involved in the dust particles formation. Their dependence on the operating conditions including magnetic field intensity, acetylene fraction in the gas mixture and operating pressure was examined. In contrast with noble gases, in the presence of acetylene, the electron temperature increases with the magnetic field intensity, indicating additional charged particles losses in the plasma. Indeed, in these conditions, larger hydrocarbon ions are produced leading to the formation of dust particles in the plasma volume. The observed dependence of positive ion mass distribution and density and relative negative ion density on the operating parameters suggests that the dust particles are formed through different pathways, where negative and positive ions are both involved in the nucleation.

  10. Feasibility of alpha particle measurement in a magnetically confined plasma by CO/sub 2/ laser Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.K.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.

    1987-08-01

    Fusion-product alpha particles will dominate the behavior of the next generation of ignited D-T fusion reactors. Advanced diagnostics will be required to characterize the energy deposition of these fast alpha particles in the magnetically confined plasma. For small-angle coherent Thomson scattering of a CO/sub 2/ laser beam from such a plasma, a resonance in the scattered power occurs near 90/sup 0/ with respect to the magnetic field direction. This spatial concentration permits a simplified detection of the scattered laser power from the plasma using a heterodyne system. The signal produced by the presence of fusion-product alpha particles in an ignited plasma is calculated to be well above the noise level, which results from statistical variations of the background signal produced by scattering from free electrons. 7 refs.

  11. Dynamics of the electron thermal diffusivity at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouprienko, D. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Lashkul, S. I.; Esipov, L. A.

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of electron heat transport at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak was studied experimentally. Evolution of the profiles of the electron temperature and density was thoroughly investigated under conditions of fast variation in the plasma parameters. The energy balance in the electron channel is calculated with the help of the ASTRA code by using the measured plasma parameters. Correlation is revealed between the dynamics of electron heat transport and the behavior of small-scale drift turbulence measured using the enhanced scattering correlation diagnostics. The suppression of heat transfer and turbulence agrees well with the increase in the shear of poloidal plasma rotation calculated from experimental data in the neoclassical approximation.

  12. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to {approximately}1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to {approximately}1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described.

  13. Automatic targeting of plasma spray gun

    DOEpatents

    Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Neal, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    A means for monitoring the material portion in the flame of a plasma spray gun during spraying operations is provided. A collimated detector, sensitive to certain wavelengths of light emission, is used to locate the centroid of the material with each pass of the gun. The response from the detector is then relayed to the gun controller to be used to automatically realign the gun.

  14. Equilibrium drives of the low and high field side n = 2 plasma response and impact on global confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Haskey, S. R.; ...

    2016-03-31

    The nature of the multi-modal n=2 plasma response and its impact on global confinement is studied as a function of the axisymmetric equilibrium pressure, edge safety factor, collisionality, and L-versus H-mode conditions. Varying the relative phase (ΔΦUL) between upper and lower in-vessel coils demonstrates that different n=2 poloidal spectra preferentially excite different plasma responses. These different plasma response modes are preferentially detected on the tokamak high-field side (HFS) or low-field side (LFS) midplanes, have different radial extents, couple differently to the resonant surfaces, and have variable impacts on edge stability and global confinement. In all equilibrium conditions studied, the observedmore » confinement degradation shares the same ΔΦUL dependence as the coupling to the resonant surfaces given by both ideal (IPEC) and resistive (MARS-F) MHD computation. Varying the edge safety factor shifts the equilibrium field-line pitch and thus the ΔΦUL dependence of both the global confinement and the n=2 magnetic response. As edge safety factor is varied, modeling finds that the HFS response (but not the LFS response), the resonant surface coupling, and the edge displacements near the X-point all share the same ΔΦUL dependence. The LFS response magnitude is strongly sensitive to the core pressure and is insensitive to the collisionality and edge safety factor. This indicates that the LFS measurements are primarily sensitive to a pressure-driven kink-ballooning mode that couples to the core plasma. MHD modeling accurately reproduces these (and indeed all) LFS experimental trends and supports this interpretation. In contrast to the LFS, the HFS magnetic response and correlated global confinement impact is unchanged with plasma pressure, but is strongly reduced in high collisionality conditions in both H- and L-mode. This experimentally suggests the bootstrap current drives the HFS response through the kink-peeling mode drive, though

  15. Two approaches to self-organization in plasma: Kinetic theory treatment for the dynamo problem and sandpile automaton model for pedestal formation in magnetically confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, Irina

    The dissertation consists of two parts, both of which relate to the topic of the self-organization in plasma. Self-organization in plasma is a process of spontaneous formation of ordered structures at scales much larger than the turbulent correlation scale. Examples of such structures could be a mean magnetic field in interstellar or in interplanetary space, accretion disks around dense objects, zonal fields and zonal flows in fusion plasmas, steep gradient profiles in tokamaks etc. Part I of the dissertation addresses the fundamental problem of magnetic field generation (dynamo action). The novelty of our work is that, applying a quasilinear theory to the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence, we demonstrate the possibility of the 'fast dynamo', i.e. a dynamo action which does not depend on plasma resistivity, which is extremely small in most of the relevant plasmas in space and in laboratories. Instead, the irreversibility of the dynamo action is provided by the Landau damping of the kinetic Alfven waves on plasma electrons. Whereas Part I explicitly exploite microscopic properties of the plasma instability, the opposite methodology is applied in Part II to the problem of L → H transition and pedestal formation in magnetically confined plasmas. There a generic dynamical model, known as a sandpile cellular automaton is applied. This model is independent of the particular kind of underlying turbulence and incorporates the key features of a confined plasma, namely, collisional diffusion, shear induced bistability of turbulent transport and a local MHD limit on the gradient. One chapter of Part II describes the general phenomenology of the pedestal formation. Another chapter is concerned with an effect of the diffusion. Diffusion changes the character of the edge discharge events and can lead to hysteresis in the L → H → L transition.

  16. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequence of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technical state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  17. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, David E.; Logan, B. Grant

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequency of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technological state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  18. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and

  19. Advanced targets, diagnostics and applications of laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity sub-nanosecond-pulsed lasers irradiating thin targets in vacuum permit generation of electrons and ion acceleration and high photon yield emission in non-equilibrium plasmas. At intensities higher than 1015 W/cm2 thin foils can be irradiated in the target-normal sheath acceleration regime driving ion acceleration in the forward direction above 1 MeV per charge state. The distributions of emitted ions in terms of energy, charge state and angular emission are controlled by laser parameters, irradiation conditions, target geometry and composition. Advanced targets can be employed to increase the laser absorption in thin foils and to enhance the energy and the yield of the ion acceleration process. Semiconductor detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer and streak camera can be employed as online plasma diagnostics to monitor the plasma parameters, shot by shot. Some applications in the field of the multiple ion implantation, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are reported.

  20. Local Regulation of Interchange Turbulence in a Dipole-Confined Plasma Torus using Current-Collection Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. Maximillian

    2014-10-01

    Turbulence in a dipole-confined plasma is dominated by interchange fluctuations with complex dynamics and short coherence. We report the first laboratory demonstration of the regulation of interchange turbulence in a plasma torus confined by an axisymmetric dipole magnet using active feedback. Feedback is performed by varying the bias to an electrode in proportion to the electric potential measured at other locations. The phase and amplitude of the bias to the electrode is adjusted with a linear circuit, forming a relatively broad-band current-collection feedback system. Changing the gain and phase of collection results in modification of turbulent fluctuations, observed as amplification or suppression of turbulent spectrum. Significantly, power can be either extracted from or injected into the turbulence. When the gain and phase are adjusted to suppress turbulence, the external circuit becomes a controlled load extracting power from the plasma. This is analogous to the regulation of magnetospheric convection by ionospheric currents. When the gain and phase of the external circuit is adjusted to amplify turbulence, the direction of power flow from the electrode reverses, enhancing the fluctuations. Although we observe significant changes to the intensity and spectrum of plasma fluctuations, these changes appear only on those magnetic field lines within a region near the current collector equal in size to the turbulent correlation length and shifted in the direction of the electron magnetic drift. We conclude that the effects of this feedback on turbulence in a dipole plasma torus is localized. The clear influence of current-collection feedback on interchange turbulence suggests the possibility of global regulation of turbulent motion using multiple sensor and electrode pairs as well as the ability to perform controlled tests of bounce-averaged gyrokinetic theory of turbulence in the geometry of a dipole plasma torus. Supported by NSF-DOE Partnership for Plasma

  1. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length plasmas for two-plasmon-decay planar-target experiments on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shaw, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Bates, J. W.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because it generates high-energy electrons that can preheat the target, thereby reducing target performance. Hydrodynamic simulations to design a new experimental platform to investigate TPD and other laser-plasma instabilities relevant to direct-drive-ignition implosions at the National Ignition Facility are presented. The proposed experiments utilize planar plastic targets with an embedded Mo layer to characterize generation of hot electrons through Mo Kα fluorescence and hard x-ray emission. Different laser-irradiation geometries approximate conditions near both the equator and the pole of a polar-direct-drive implosion.

  2. Simulation studies of plasma target compression by argon liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lina; Kim, Hyoungkeun; Samulyak, Roman; Roman Samulyak Team

    2013-10-01

    Simulation studies of plasma liners, formed by the merger of argon plasma jets, and the compression of plasma targets in the concept of the plasma jet driven magnetoinertial fusion have been performed using FronTier code. FromTier is a hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code that uses explicit tracking of material interfaces, thus enabling accurate resolution of hydro instabilities, and average ionization EOS models for high-Z materials. The jets merger process is accomplished through a cascade of oblique shock waves leading to the non-uniformity of imploding plasma liner and causing the Reyleigh-Taylor instability of target during compression. The stagnation pressure, deconfinement time, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of the target surface, and the production of fusion neutrons were analyzed for 2D simulations that included 8, 16, and 32 jets, 3D simulation with 90 jets, and compared with the corresponding cylindrically (2D) and spherically (3D) symmetric simulations. The liner non-uniformity induces instabilities in the plasma targets that result in the reduction of stagnation pressure and fusion energy. For example, 8 time reduction of the stagnation pressure and 31 time reduction of the fusion energy was observed when the 2D simulation involving 16 jets was compared to 1D simulation.

  3. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2000-11-15

    ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokalmak reactors of the size of ITER. Relatively high performace for long durations has been achieved and the scaling is favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Zeff and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one in which the degradation occurs with an intense gas puff, and the other with a spontaneous transition at the heating power threshold from Type I to III ELMs. Linear gryokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, glin of the fastest growing mode. Our results indicate that the flow-shearing rate wExB and glin are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high *wExB*/glin near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  4. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Suttrop, Wolfgang; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Here, the interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m = qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality,more » $$\

  5. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Suttrop, Wolfgang; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.

    2016-11-22

    Here, the interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m = qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, $\

  6. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  7. ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM Z-PINCH MTF TARGET PLASMA EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    F. WYSOCKI; J. TACCETTI; ET AL

    1999-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Colt facility has been used to create target plasma for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). The primary results regarding magnetic field, plasma density, plasma temperature, and hot plasma lifetime are summarized and the suitability of these plasma targets for MTF is assessed.

  8. Self-organized criticality and the dynamics of near-marginal turbulent transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The high plasma temperatures expected at reactor conditions in magnetic confinement fusion toroidal devices suggest that near-marginal operation could be a reality in future devices and reactors. By near-marginal it is meant that the plasma profiles might wander around the local critical thresholds for the onset of instabilities. Self-organized criticality (SOC) was suggested in the mid 1990s as a more proper paradigm to describe the dynamics of tokamak plasma transport in near-marginal conditions. It advocated that, near marginality, the evolution of mean profiles and fluctuations should be considered simultaneously, in contrast to the more common view of a large separation of scales existing between them. Otherwise, intrinsic features of near-marginal transport would be missed, that are of importance to understand the properties of energy confinement. In the intervening 20 years, the relevance of the idea of SOC for near-marginal transport in fusion plasmas has transitioned from an initial excessive hype to the much more realistic standing of today, which we will attempt to examine critically in this review paper. First, the main theoretical ideas behind SOC will be described. Secondly, how they might relate to the dynamics of near-marginal transport in real magnetically confined plasmas will be discussed. Next, we will review what has been learnt about SOC from various numerical studies and what it has meant for the way in which we do numerical simulation of fusion plasmas today. Then, we will discuss the experimental evidence available from the several experiments that have looked for SOC dynamics in fusion plasmas. Finally, we will conclude by identifying the various problems that still remain open to investigation in this area. Special attention will be given to the discussion of frequent misconceptions and ongoing controversies. The review also contains a description of ongoing efforts that seek effective transport models better suited than traditional

  9. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, M.

    1996-05-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``Onsite Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The authors are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Progress has been made on ways to both create viable layers and to characterize them. They continued engineering, assembly and testing of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  10. Characterization of a laser plasma produced from a graphite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Hevia, S.; Correa, N.; Bhuyan, H.; Wynham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the understanding of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films, we have initiated a detailed study of the plasma dynamics of laser produced carbon plasmas. The carbon plasma is produced by focusing a Nd:YAG laser pulse, 380 mJ, 4 ns at 1.06 μm, onto a graphite target, at a background pressure of 0.3 mTorr. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of the carbon plasma plume are obtained, with time and space resolution, using a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, with a 15 ns MCP gated OMA. Line emission from CII to CIV carbon ions is identified at different stages of the plasma evolution. Line intensity ratios of successive ionization stages, CIII/CIV, was used to estimate the electron temperature throughout the Saha-Boltzmann equation, under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and Stark broadening of CII lines was used to obtain measurements of the electron density. Characteristic plasma parameters, short after plasma formation, are 3.0 eV and 2-1017 cm-3which after 60 ns of plasma expansion decay to 2.7 eV and 5·10 cm-3, respectively.

  11. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-06-01

    Laser plasma created in gaseous target is studied as a source of radiation in the "water window" wavelength range. Plasma is created by focusing an 800 mJ/7 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse into the gas-puff target. Using nitrogen gas results in emission of an intense quasi-monochromatic radiation with the wavelength 2.88 nm, corresponding to the quantum transition 1s2p → 1s2 of helium -like nitrogen ion. The emission spectrum with argon target covers all the water window range. Laboratory and computer experiments have been performed for both target gases. The spatial distributions of emitted energy in the water window spectral range were compared. The total emitted energy with argon was one order higher than with nitrogen.

  12. Quasi-analytical method for solving nonlinear differential equations for turbulent self-confined magneto-plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurier, M.; Hayd, A.; Kaeppeler, H. J.

    1986-09-01

    The mathematical procedures employed in REDUCE/FORTRAN, a hybrid code developed by Hearn (1969 and 1973) and Hayd and Meinke (1980) to compute the dynamics of confined plasmas with simple magnetic-field configurations (Hayd et al., 1982; Kaeppeler, 1982; Kaeppeler et al., 1983) are explained. In REDUCE/FORTRAN, the dispersion relation is derived analytically, Fourier-transformed, and solved numerically, and the solution is then fitted to an analytical formula for further manipulation (including back-transformation). The procedure is demonstrated by solving the Burgers equation with a delta function for the initial conditions, and numerical results are presented in tables and graphs.

  13. Plasma equilibrium and confinement in a tokamak with nearly zero central current density in JT-60U.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Oikawa, T; Suzuki, T; Ide, S; Sakamoto, Y; Koide, Y; Hatae, T; Naito, O; Isayama, A; Hayashi, N; Shirai, H

    2001-12-10

    A high confinement equilibrium with nearly zero toroidal current in the central region (a "current hole") has been observed for the first time to persist stably for several seconds in the JT-60U tokamak. This observation indicates the possibility of stable tokamak operation without central toroidal current; the central current has previously been believed to be necessary in tokamaks. The radius of the current hole extended up to 40% of the plasma minor radius. It was observed that the current hole was formed by the increase of the off-axis noninductive current.

  14. Size control, quantum confinement, and oxidation kinetics of silicon nanocrystals synthesized at a high rate by expanding thermal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lihao E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H. M. E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl

    2015-05-25

    The growth mechanism of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) synthesized at a high rate by means of expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition technique are studied in this letter. A bimodal Gaussian size distribution is revealed from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images, and routes to reduce the unwanted large Si NCs are discussed. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies are employed to study the size-dependent quantum confinement effect, from which the average diameters of the small Si NCs are determined. The surface oxidation kinetics of Si NCs are studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the importance of post-deposition passivation treatments of hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces are demonstrated.

  15. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, M.

    1997-02-01

    On December 30, 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. In September 1995 this contract ended and a second contract was issued for us to continue this ICF target support work. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. During this period, GA and our partners WJ Schafer Associates (WJSA) and Soane Technologies, Inc. (STI) were assigned 14 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). We fabricated and delivered over 800 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. We produced nearly 1,200 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We also delivered over 100 flat foil targets for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and SNLA in FY96. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require capsules containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. We are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Substantial progress has been made on ways to both create and characterize viable layers. During FY96, significant progress was made in the design of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA.

  16. Protein Targeting to Exosomes/Microvesicles by Plasma Membrane Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Beiyi; Wu, Ning; Yang, Jr-Ming; Gould, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Animal cells secrete small vesicles, otherwise known as exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs). A short, N-terminal acylation tag can target a highly oligomeric cytoplasmic protein, TyA, into secreted vesicles (Fang, Y., Wu, N., Gan, X., Yan, W., Morell, J. C., and Gould, S. J. (2007) PLoS Biol. 5, 1267–1283). However, it is not clear whether this is true for other membrane anchors or other highly oligomeric, cytoplasmic proteins. We show here that a variety of plasma membrane anchors can target TyA-GFP to sites of vesicle budding and into EMVs, including: (i) a myristoylation tag; (ii) a phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2)-binding domain; (iii), a phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-trisphosphate-binding domain; (iv) a prenylation/palmitoylation tag, and (v) a type-1 plasma membrane protein, CD43. However, the relative budding efficiency induced by these plasma membrane anchors varied over a 10-fold range, from 100% of control (AcylTyA-GFP) for the myristoylation tag and PIP2-binding domain, to one-third or less for the others, respectively. Targeting TyA-GFP to endosome membranes by fusion to a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding domain induced only a slight budding of TyA-GFP, ∼2% of control, and no budding was observed when TyA-GFP was targeted to Golgi membranes via a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate-binding domain. We also found that a plasma membrane anchor can target two other highly oligomeric, cytoplasmic proteins to EMVs. These observations support the hypothesis that plasma membrane anchors can target highly oligomeric, cytoplasmic proteins to EMVs. Our data also provide additional parallels between EMV biogenesis and retrovirus budding, as the anchors that induced the greatest budding of TyA-GFP are the same as those that mediate retrovirus budding. PMID:21300796

  17. Penetration and screening of perpendicularly launched electromagnetic waves through bounded supercritical plasma confined in multicusp magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2011-02-01

    The question of electromagnetic wave penetration and screening by a bounded supercritical (ωp>ω with ωp and ω being the electron-plasma and wave frequencies, respectively) plasma confined in a minimum B multicusp field, for waves launched in the k ⊥Bo mode, is addressed through experiments and numerical simulations. The scale length of radial plasma nonuniformity (|ne/(∂ne/∂r)|) and magnetostatic field (Bo) inhomogeneity (|Bo/(∂Bo/∂r)|) are much smaller than the free space (λo) and guided wavelengths (λg). Contrary to predictions of plane wave dispersion theory and the Clemow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) diagram, for a bounded plasma a finite propagation occurs through the central plasma regions where αp2=ωp2/ω2≥1 and βc2=ωce2/ω2≪1(˜10-4), with ωce being the electron cyclotron frequency. Wave screening, as predicted by the plane wave model, does not remain valid due to phase mixing and superposition of reflected waves from the conducting boundary, leading to the formation of electromagnetic standing wave modes. The waves are found to satisfy a modified upper hybrid resonance (UHR) relation in the minimum B field and are damped at the local electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) location.

  18. Self-consistent dynamics of impurities in magnetically confined plasmas: turbulence intermittency and non-diffusive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Garbet, X; Benkadda, S.; Dubuit, N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-consistent turbulent transport of high concentration impurities in magnetically confined fusion plasmas is studied using a three-dimensional nonlinear fluid global turbulence model which includes ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron mode (TEM) instabilities. It is shown that the impurity concentration can have a dramatic feedback in the turbulence and, as a result, it can significantly change the transport properties of the plasma. High concentration impurities can trigger strong intermittency, that manifests in non-Gaussian heavy tails of the pdfs of E B and the ion-temperature flux fluctuations. At the heart of this self-consistent coupling is the existence of inward propagating ion temperature fronts with a sharp gradient at the leading edge that give rise to instabilities and avalanche-like bursty transport. Numerical evidence of time non-locality in the turbulent transport of high concentration impurities is also presented.

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support. Annual report, January 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  20. Reference distribution functions for magnetically confined plasmas from the minimum entropy production theorem and the MaxEnt principle, subject to the scale-invariant restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Cardinali, Alessandro; Steinbrecher, Gyorgy; Peeters, Philippe; Sonnino, Alberto; Nardone, Pasquale

    2013-12-01

    We derive the expression of the reference distribution function for magnetically confined plasmas far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. The local equilibrium state is fixed by imposing the minimum entropy production theorem and the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, subject to scale invariance restrictions. After a short time, the plasma reaches a state close to the local equilibrium. This state is referred to as the reference state. The aim of this Letter is to determine the reference distribution function (RDF) when the local equilibrium state is defined by the above mentioned principles. We prove that the RDF is the stationary solution of a generic family of stochastic processes corresponding to an universal Landau-type equation with white parametric noise. As an example of application, we consider a simple, fully ionized, magnetically confined plasmas, with auxiliary Ohmic heating. The free parameters are linked to the transport coefficients of the magnetically confined plasmas, by the kinetic theory.

  1. Transient Shock Formation of Pulsed Electrothermal Plasma Discharge Confined in an Extended Bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungjin; Kwak, Ho Sang; Park, Joong-Youn

    An electrothermal gun possesses a great potential to be an efficient source of pulsed plasma discharge for nanomaterials production or thermal plasma spray coatings. A plasma discharge by intense pulsed power is numerically studied utilizing time-dependent gas dynamics equations which are solved by FCT (flux-corrected transport) algorithm in two-dimensional domain of the interior capillary bore region and the external region of extended bore. Plasma conditions at the bore exit, mass ablation of polycarbonate bore wall, and degree of ionization are determined at different levels of transient arc current profile. As a way to controlling the plasma discharge, the extended bore at the capillary exit is considered and the flow pattern of pulsed plasma discharge in the extended bore exhibit complex shock structure from slightly to highly underexpanded jet depending on the level of arc current profiles. Flow instability of oscillating Mach disk is found at higher level of arc current profile cases.

  2. Magnetized plasma structures in laser-irradiated curved targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an extensive theoretical study of magnetic field generation effect in hollow targets with curved internal surface, known as “snail” or “escargot” targets [1]. They were recently proposed as a robust setup for generating intense spontaneous quasi-stationary magnetic fields frozen in laser-produced plasmas. The results of such studies are indispensable for planing experimental investigations and for possible applications of the curved targets, including, but not limited to, laboratory astrophysics, fast ignition, and particle acceleration.

  3. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Berger, R. L.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Winjum, B. J.; Brunner, S.; Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-01-15

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  4. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Brantov, A.; Winjum, B. J.; Berger, R. L.; Brunner, S.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-01-01

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  5. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  6. Three-dimensional simulations of the implosion of inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R.P.J.; Bell, A.R. )

    1991-09-30

    The viability of inertial confinement fusion depends crucially on implosion symmetry. A spherical three-dimensional hydrocode called PLATO has been developed to model the growth in asymmetries during an implosion. Results are presented in the deceleration phase which show indistinguishable linear growth rates, but greater nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability than is found in two-dimensional cylindrical simulations. The three-dimensional enhancement of the nonlinear growth is much smaller than that found by Sakagami and Nishihara.

  7. How mesoscopic staircases condense to macroscopic barriers in confined plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashourvan, Arash; Diamond, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    This Rapid Communication sets forth the mechanism by which mesoscale staircase structures condense to form macroscopic states of enhanced confinement. Density, vorticity, and turbulent potential enstrophy are the variables for this model. Formation of the staircase structures is due to inhomogeneous mixing of (generalized) potential vorticity (PV). Such mixing results in the local sharpening of density and vorticity gradients. When PV gradients steepen, the density staircase structure develops into a lattice of mesoscale "jumps" and "steps," which are, respectively, regions of local gradient steepening and flattening. The jumps then merge and migrate in radius, leading to the emergence of a new macroscale profile structure, so indicating that profile self-organization is a global process, which may be described by a local, but nonlinear model. This work predicts and demonstrates how mesoscale condensation of staircases leads to global states of enhanced confinement.

  8. Son of IXION: A Steady State Centrifugally Confined Plasma for Fusion*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassam, Adil

    1996-11-01

    A magnetic confinement scheme in which the inertial, u.grad(u), forces effect parallel confinement is proposed. The basic geometry is mirror-like as far as the poloidal field goes or, more simply, multipole (FM-1) type. The rotation is toroidal in this geometry. A supersonic rotation can effect complete parallel confinement, with the usual magnetic mirror force rendered irrelevant. The rotation shear, in addition, aids in the suppression of the flute mode. This suppression is not complete which indicates the addition of a toroidal field, at maximum of the order of the poloidal field. We show that at rotation in excess of Mach 3, the parallel particle and heat losses can be minimized to below the Lawson breakeven point. The crossfield transport can be expected to be better than tokamaks on account of the large velocity shear. Other advantages of the scheme are that it is steady state and disruption free. An exploratory experiment that tests equilibrium, parallel detachment, and MHD stability is proposed. The concept resembles earlier (Geneva, 1958) experiments on "homopolar generators" and a mirror configuration called IXION. Ixion, Greek mythological king, was forever strapped to a rotating, flaming wheel. *Work supported by DOE

  9. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The DIII-D Team; The Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m  =  qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, ν \\text{ped}\\ast≤slant 0.4 : (a) a reduction of the global plasma density by up to 61 % and (b) a reduction of the energy loss associated with edge localised modes (ELMs) by a factor of up to 9. A comprehensive database of ELM mitigation pulses at low {ν\\ast} in ASDEX Upgrade shows that the degree of ELM mitigation correlates with the reduction of pedestal pressure which in turn is limited and defined by the onset of ELMs, i. e. a modification of the ELM stability limit by the magnetic perturbation.

  10. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, M.

    1995-04-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments.

  11. Plasma generation in mass-limited water targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Jungmoo; Liberty, Kirk; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    One major problem associated with high repetition-rate experiment is obtaining a suitable new target for each shot, while maintaining shot-to-shot spatial stability. For high repetition-rate laser experiments with solid targets, rotating stage is usually used for moving a target point, which causes stability and size problems. To solve these problems, some researchers have tried to replace solid targets with liquid stream or droplet. Here, we use a syringe pump, a piezoelectric device and a tungsten needle to make continuous and stable water droplets with a diameter of ~ 2 μm. These mass-limited water droplets as a target have some advantages. First, heat dissipation is blocked, so the target is entirely heated. Second, effective spatial contrast is improved by reducing the interaction between lower intensity spatial wings of the beam and a single-micron target. Third, at the relativistic laser intensities, a smaller target allows for higher electron densities at the target's back surface, which enhances field's strength for ion acceleration. For these advantages, it is required that we understand plasma generation processes. Therefore, we investigate the processes by irradiating fs laser pulses to mass-limited droplets and these interactions are captured by CCD.

  12. Excitation of Ion Acoustic Waves in Confined Plasmas with Untrapped Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamis, Hanna; Dow, Ansel; Carlsson, Johan; Kaganovich, Igor; Khrabrov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Various plasma propulsion devices exhibit strong electron emission from the walls either as a result of secondary processes or due to thermionic emission. To understand the electron kinetics in plasmas with strong emission, we have performed simulations using a reduced model with the LSP particle-in-cell code. This model aims to show the instability generated by the electron emission, in the form of ion acoustic waves near the sheath. It also aims to show the instability produced by untrapped electrons that propagate across the plasma, similarly to a beam, and can drive ion acoustic waves in the plasma bulk. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Equilibrium, stability, and estimate of plasma confinement in the L-5 compact torsatron

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, M. I.; Shafranov, V. D.; Drevlyak, M.; Nuehrenberg, J.; Grebenshchikov, S. E.; Kuznetsov, A. B.; Shchepetov, S. V.

    2011-04-15

    Possible parameters of a plasma in a compact torsatron that is to be constructed at the Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (the L-5 project) are discussed. The properties of the original vacuum configuration created by the external coils are described. The equilibrium of a plasma with a free boundary and the stability of local MHD modes are investigated. The effective magnetic field ripples and the structural factor of the bootstrap current in the 1/{nu} regime are calculated, as well as collisionless losses of trapped {alpha}-particles. The dependence of these properties on the relative plasma pressure is examined. It is shown that the maximum possible <{beta}> (the ratio of the gas-kinetic plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure, averaged over the volume of the plasma column) consistent with equilibrium exceeds 2.0%. The power of the external sources for plasma heating in the anticipated operating modes is estimated using the present-day scalings. The efficiency of different methods for calculating the magnetic fields and, accordingly, the magnetic surfaces created by the external coils is analyzed in the Appendix.

  14. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development report. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Steinman, D.

    1994-03-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities which took place under this contract during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. During this period, GA was assigned 18 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included ``Capabilities Activation`` and ``Capabilities Demonstration`` to enable us to begin production of glass and composite polymer capsules. Capsule delivery tasks included ``Small Glass Shell Deliveries`` and ``Composite Polymer Capsules`` for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We also were asked to provide direct ``Onsite Support`` at LLNL and LANL. We continued planning for the transfer of ``Micromachining Equipment from Rocky Flats`` and established ``Target Component Micromachining and Electroplating Facilities`` at GA. We fabricated over 1100 films and filters of 11 types for Sandia National Laboratory and provided full-time onsite engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to make targets for the Naval Research Laboratory. We investigated spherical interferometry, built an automated capsule sorter, and developed an apparatus for calorimetric measurement of fuel fill for LLNL. We assisted LANL in the ``Characterization of Opaque b-Layered Targets.`` We developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process.

  15. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  16. A survey of laser plasma target emissions and contamination effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, James E.

    2013-11-01

    Since the late 1990s staff at national laboratories have been studying the effects of high energy focussed laser beams [>100J] on a variety of plasma physics targets to understand the disassembly of targets and their effects on target chamber surfaces. Target geometries have included metal foils, polymer foils, metal cylinders or cones, gas bags, metal wires and complex geometries of combinations of the above. The post shot target remnants have been studied by both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphology of exposed targets indicated phase changes and other physical phenomena [shock, spall, crater formation and material ejection]. Pre and post weighing of the targets has been used to determine mass lost from the target. Initially most of the material distribution analysis was performed by catching target by-products with glass or silica witness plates. Spatial and image analysis of micrographs has been used to measure angular distributions of material and its form. Spectrophotometry of the exposed witness plates in the UVVis- NIR region allowed transmission spectra to be determined and the reduction of transmittance at the laser wavelengths of interest. It also allowed estimation of average debris thickness. Shrapnel size and velocity has been studied by capturing fragments in silica aerogels. One unexpected aspect of studying the witness plates was the identification of secondary emissions from solid surfaces close to the irradiated target, this showed that the near environment of the target is also important in determining overall material distributions. We have been fortunate to find interested collaborators at other UK, European and US laboratories that have brought considerable insight into target disassembly processes and palliative measures.

  17. Fast piezoelectric valve offering controlled gas injection in magnetically confined fusion plasmas for diagnostic and fuelling purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griener, M.; Schmitz, O.; Bald, K.; Bösser, D.; Cavedon, M.; De Marné, P.; Eich, T.; Fuchert, G.; Herrmann, A.; Kappatou, A.; Lunt, T.; Rohde, V.; Schweer, B.; Sochor, M.; Stroth, U.; Terra, A.; Wolfrum, E.

    2017-03-01

    In magnetically confined fusion plasmas controlled gas injection is crucial for plasma fuelling as well as for various diagnostic applications such as active spectroscopy. We present a new, versatile system for the injection of collimated thermal gas beams into a vacuum chamber. This system consists of a gas pressure chamber, sealed by a custom made piezo valve towards a small capillary for gas injection. The setup can directly be placed inside of the vacuum chamber of fusion devices as it is small and immune against high magnetic fields. This enables gas injection close to the plasma periphery with high duty cycles and fast switch on/off times ≲ 0.5 ms. In this work, we present the design details of this new injection system and a systematic characterization of the beam properties as well as the gas flowrates which can be accomplished. The thin and relatively short capillary yields a small divergence of the injected beam with a half opening angle of 20°. The gas box is designed for pre-fill pressures of 10 mbar up to 100 bars and makes a flowrate accessible from 1018 part/s up to 1023 part/s. It hence is a versatile system for both diagnostic as well as fuelling applications. The implementation of this system in ASDEX Upgrade will be described and its application for line ratio spectroscopy on helium will be demonstrated on a selected example.

  18. Nonequilibrium-Plasma-Synthesized ZnO Nanocrystals with Plasmon Resonance Tunable via Al Doping and Quantum Confinement.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Benjamin L; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Held, Jacob T; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Aydil, Eray S; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2015-12-09

    Metal oxide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) tunable within the infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum by vacancy or impurity doping. Although a variety of these NCs have been produced using colloidal synthesis methods, incorporation and activation of dopants in the liquid phase has often been challenging. Herein, using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) NCs as an example, we demonstrate the potential of nonthermal plasma synthesis as an alternative strategy for the production of doped metal oxide NCs. Exploiting unique, thoroughly nonequilibrium synthesis conditions, we obtain NCs in which dopants are not segregated to the NC surfaces and local doping levels are high near the NC centers. Thus, we achieve overall doping levels as high as 2 × 10(20) cm(-3) in NCs with diameters ranging from 12.6 to 3.6 nm, and for the first time experimentally demonstrate a clear quantum confinement blue shift of the LSPR energy in vacancy- and impurity-doped semiconductor NCs. We propose that doping of central cores and heavy doping of small NCs are achievable via nonthermal plasma synthesis, because chemical potential differences between dopant and host atoms-which hinder dopant incorporation in colloidal synthesis-are irrelevant when NC nucleation and growth proceed via irreversible interactions among highly reactive gas-phase ions and radicals and ligand-free NC surfaces. We explore how the distinctive nucleation and growth kinetics occurring in the plasma influences dopant distribution and activation, defect structure, and impurity phase formation.

  19. Fast piezoelectric valve offering controlled gas injection in magnetically confined fusion plasmas for diagnostic and fuelling purposes.

    PubMed

    Griener, M; Schmitz, O; Bald, K; Bösser, D; Cavedon, M; De Marné, P; Eich, T; Fuchert, G; Herrmann, A; Kappatou, A; Lunt, T; Rohde, V; Schweer, B; Sochor, M; Stroth, U; Terra, A; Wolfrum, E

    2017-03-01

    In magnetically confined fusion plasmas controlled gas injection is crucial for plasma fuelling as well as for various diagnostic applications such as active spectroscopy. We present a new, versatile system for the injection of collimated thermal gas beams into a vacuum chamber. This system consists of a gas pressure chamber, sealed by a custom made piezo valve towards a small capillary for gas injection. The setup can directly be placed inside of the vacuum chamber of fusion devices as it is small and immune against high magnetic fields. This enables gas injection close to the plasma periphery with high duty cycles and fast switch on/off times ≲ 0.5 ms. In this work, we present the design details of this new injection system and a systematic characterization of the beam properties as well as the gas flowrates which can be accomplished. The thin and relatively short capillary yields a small divergence of the injected beam with a half opening angle of 20°. The gas box is designed for pre-fill pressures of 10 mbar up to 100 bars and makes a flowrate accessible from 10(18) part/s up to 10(23) part/s. It hence is a versatile system for both diagnostic as well as fuelling applications. The implementation of this system in ASDEX Upgrade will be described and its application for line ratio spectroscopy on helium will be demonstrated on a selected example.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in; Murtaza Hassan, Syed; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the role of a guiding magnetic field on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma for various laser pulse duration and intensity. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm, Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–15 ns) and intensity. A magnetic trap was fabricated with the use of two neodymium permanent magnets which provided a magnetic field strength ∼0.5 T along the plume expansion direction. Our results indicate that the EUV conversion efficiency do not depend significantly on applied axial magnetic field. Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma show that the ion flux reduces by a factor of ∼5 with the application of an axial magnetic field. It was found that the plasma plume expand in the lateral direction with peak velocity measured to be ∼1.2 cm/μs and reduced to ∼0.75 cm/μs with the application of an axial magnetic field. The plume expansion features recorded using fast photography in the presence and absence of 0.5 T axial magnetic field are simulated using particle-in-cell code. Our simulation results qualitatively predict the plasma behavior.

  1. Stability Analysis of Laser Plasma Interactions Relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focia, R. J.; Bers, A.; Ram, A. K.

    1998-11-01

    A complete three-dimensional (3-D) stability analysis of laser-plasma interactions relevant to ICF experiments is presented. This extends computations, initiated some years ago,(F. W. Chambers, Ph.D. Thesis, M.I.T., 1975.) to parameters of current interest. The laser-plasma interactions studied here all involve the resonant decay of an incident electromagnetic (EM) wave into two daughter waves in a homogeneous plasma. Second order, nonlinearly coupled mode dispersion relations for each interaction are used to carry out a linear instability analysis. Growth rate versus wavevector plots for parameters of recent experiments are presented. The time asymptotic impulse response, or space-time Green's function, of each interaction is also evaluated using the Bers-Briggs pinch point analysis.(A. Bers in Handbook of Plasma Physics) (gen. eds. M. N. Rosenbluth and R. Z. Sagdeev), Vol. 1, Basic Plasma Physics, 1983, pp. 451--517. Mode damping and relativistic corrections are incorporated into the expression for the time asymptotic growth rate. Visualizations of the space-time evolution of the instabilities will be presented.

  2. Plasma properties of RF magnetron sputtering system using Zn target

    SciTech Connect

    Nafarizal, N.; Andreas Albert, A. R.; Sharifah Amirah, A. S.; Salwa, O.; Riyaz Ahmad, M. A.

    2012-06-29

    In the present work, we investigate the fundamental properties of magnetron sputtering plasma using Zn target and its deposited Zn thin film. The magnetron sputtering plasma was produced using radio frequency (RF) power supply and Argon (Ar) as ambient gas. A Langmuir probe was used to collect the current from the plasma and from the current intensity, we calculate the electron density and electron temperature. The properties of Zn sputtering plasma at various discharge conditions were studied. At the RF power ranging from 20 to 100 W and gas pressure 5 mTorr, we found that the electron temperature was almost unchanged between 2-2.5 eV. On the other hand, the electron temperature increased drastically from 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} when the discharge gas pressure increased from 5 to 10 mTorr. The electron microscope images show that the grain size of Zn thin film increase when the discharge power is increased. This may be due to the enhancement of plasma density and sputtered Zn density.

  3. Experimental study on dipole motion of an ion plasma confined in a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Okano, T.; Moriya, K.; Fukushima, K.; Higaki, H.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-11-01

    The compact non-neutral plasma trap systems named "S-POD" have been developed at Hiroshima University as an experimental simulator of beam dynamics. S-POD is based either on a linear Paul trap or on a Penning trap and can approximately reproduce the collective motion of a relativistic charged-particle beam observed in the center-of-mass frame. We here employ the Paul trap system to investigate the behavior of an ion plasma near a dipole resonance. A simple method is proposed to calibrate the data of secular frequency measurements by using the dipole instability condition. We also show that the transverse density profile of an ion plasma in the trap can be estimated from the time evolution of ion losses caused by the resonance.

  4. Turbulent fluctuations during pellet injection into a dipole confined plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Roberts, T. M.; Kesner, J.; Woskov, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the turbulent evolution of the plasma density profile following the fast injection of lithium pellets into the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [Boxer et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 207 (2010)]. As the pellet passes through the plasma, it provides a significant internal particle source and allows investigation of density profile evolution, turbulent relaxation, and turbulent fluctuations. The total electron number within the dipole plasma torus increases by more than a factor of three, and the central density increases by more than a factor of five. During these large changes in density, the shape of the density profile is nearly "stationary" such that the gradient of the particle number within tubes of equal magnetic flux vanishes. In comparison to the usual case, when the particle source is neutral gas at the plasma edge, the internal source from the pellet causes the toroidal phase velocity of the fluctuations to reverse and changes the average particle flux at the plasma edge. An edge particle source creates an inward turbulent pinch, but an internal particle source increases the outward turbulent particle flux. Statistical properties of the turbulence are measured by multiple microwave interferometers and by an array of probes at the edge. The spatial structures of the largest amplitude modes have long radial and toroidal wavelengths. Estimates of the local and toroidally averaged turbulent particle flux show intermittency and a non-Gaussian probability distribution function. The measured fluctuations, both before and during pellet injection, have frequency and wavenumber dispersion consistent with theoretical expectations for interchange and entropy modes excited within a dipole plasma torus having warm electrons and cool ions.

  5. Steady-shear-enhanced microdiffusion with multiple time scales of confined, mesoscopic, two-dimensional dusty-plasma liquids.

    PubMed

    Io, Chong-Wai; I, Lin

    2009-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the multitime scale diffusion and the spatiotemporal behaviors of the degrees of enhancement for the longitudinal and the transverse diffusions in a confined mesoscopic quasi-two-dimensional dusty-plasma liquid sheared by two parallel counterpropagating laser beams. The steady external drive directly enhances the longitudinal cooperative hopping, associated with the shear bands that have high shear rate near boundaries. It drastically excites the slow hopping modes to high fluctuation level in the outer band region, accompanied by the enhanced superdiffusion. Through cascaded many-body interaction, the excitation flows from the outer region toward the center region, from the longitudinal modes to the transverse mode, and from the slow hopping modes to the fast caging modes, which are in better contact with the thermal bath. It causes the weaker enhancement of fluctuation level, and diffusion for the center region and the fast modes. The boundary confinement further breaks the system symmetry and enhances anisotropy. It has much stronger effect on the suppression of the transverse hopping modes than the longitudinal hopping mode. The degrees of enhancement of the fluctuations by the shear stress are highly anisotropic for the large amplitude slow modes, especially in the outer region but are more isotropic in the inner band.

  6. Effect of different tritium fractions on some plasma parameters in deuterium-tritium magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Mohsenpour, T.; Dashtban, N.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all reactor projects have considered deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion. The cross section of D-T reaction is larger than those of other fusion reactions, thus it is considered to be a more favorable reaction. The mix of fuel can vary. In this work, a comparison between the effects of different mixture of D-T fuel on the plasma parameters is made. A time dependence calculation of the fusion process is performed using the zero-dimensional model based on a coupled set of particle and energy balance equations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The time evolution of plasma parameters is also analyzed numerically.

  7. Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Tom

    2013-03-28

    This thesis explores the formation of ICF compatible foam layers inside of an ablator shell used for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In particular, the capability of p- DCPD polymer aerogels to serve as a scaffold for the deuterium-tritium mix was analyzed. Four different factors were evaluated: the dependency of different factors such as thickness or composition of a precursor solution on the uniformity of the aerogel layer, how to bring the optimal composition inside of the ablator shell, the mechanical stability of ultra-low density p-DCPD aerogel bulk pieces during wetting and freezing with hydrogen, and the wetting behavior of thin polymer foam layers in HDC carbon ablator shells with liquid deuterium. The research for thesis was done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in cooperation with the Technical University Munich.

  8. Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets

    DOE PAGES

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Hammel, B. A.; ...

    2013-07-22

    Mixing of plastic ablator material, doped with Cu and Ge dopants, deep into the hot spot of ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion implosions by hydrodynamic instabilities is diagnosed with x-ray spectroscopy on the National Ignition Facility. The amount of hot-spot mix mass is determined from the absolute brightness of the emergent Cu and Ge K-shell emission. The Cu and Ge dopants placed at different radial locations in the plastic ablator show the ablation-front hydrodynamic instability is primarily responsible for hot-spot mix. As a result, low neutron yields and hot-spot mix mass between 34(–13,+50) ng and 4000(–2970,+17 160) ng are observed.

  9. Small tritium filling and monitoring apparatus for particle beam inertial confinement fusion targets.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Leeper, R J; Martinez, C; McMurtry, W M

    1980-03-01

    A small gas filling apparatus has been developed to fill a particle beam ICF target with D-T gas mixture seconds before the target is irradiated. Included in the filling apparatus is a novel miniature pressure monitor which determines quantitatively the fill pressure by counting the rate of Beta particles emitted by the decaying tritium atoms.

  10. Study on the effect of target on plasma parameters of magnetron sputtering discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the effect of magnetron target on different plasma parameters of Argon/Hydrogen (Ar - H{sub 2}) direct current (DC) magnetron discharge is examined. Here, Copper (Cu) and Chromium (Cr) are used as magnetron targets. The value of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (kT{sub e}), electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for both the target are studied as a function of input power and hydrogen content in the discharge. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. The obtained results show that electron and ion density decline with gradual addition of Hydrogen in the discharge and increase with rising input power. It brings significant changes on the degree of ionization of Ar and dissociation of H{sub 2}. The enhanced value of electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of Ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for Cr compared to Cu target is explained on the basis of it's higher Ion Induced Secondary Electron Emission Coefficient (ISEE) value.

  11. Discovery of stationary operation of quiescent H-mode plasmas with net-zero neutral beam injection torque and high energy confinement on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, K. H.; Barada, K.; Chen, X.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Muscatello, C. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Yan, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    Recent experiments in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] have led to the discovery of a means of modifying edge turbulence to achieve stationary, high confinement operation without Edge Localized Mode (ELM) instabilities and with no net external torque input. Eliminating the ELM-induced heat bursts and controlling plasma stability at low rotation represent two of the great challenges for fusion energy. By exploiting edge turbulence in a novel manner, we achieved excellent tokamak performance, well above the H98y2 international tokamak energy confinement scaling (H98y2 = 1.25), thus meeting an additional confinement challenge that is usually difficult at low torque. The new regime is triggered in double null plasmas by ramping the injected torque to zero and then maintaining it there. This lowers E × B rotation shear in the plasma edge, allowing low-k, broadband, electromagnetic turbulence to increase. In the H-mode edge, a narrow transport barrier usually grows until MHD instability (a peeling ballooning mode) leads to the ELM heat burst. However, the increased turbulence reduces the pressure gradient, allowing the development of a broader and thus higher transport barrier. A 60% increase in pedestal pressure and 40% increase in energy confinement result. An increase in the E × B shearing rate inside of the edge pedestal is a key factor in the confinement increase. Strong double-null plasma shaping raises the threshold for the ELM instability, allowing the plasma to reach a transport-limited state near but below the explosive ELM stability boundary. The resulting plasmas have burning-plasma-relevant βN = 1.6-1.8 and run without the need for extra torque from 3D magnetic fields. To date, stationary conditions have been produced for 2 s or 12 energy confinement times, limited only by external hardware constraints. Stationary operation with

  12. Discovery of stationary operation of quiescent H-mode plasmas with net-zero neutral beam injection torque and high energy confinement on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K. H.; Chen, X.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Muscatello, C. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C. C.; Snyder, P. B.; Barada, K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Solomon, W. M.; Yan, Z.

    2016-05-15

    Recent experiments in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] have led to the discovery of a means of modifying edge turbulence to achieve stationary, high confinement operation without Edge Localized Mode (ELM) instabilities and with no net external torque input. Eliminating the ELM-induced heat bursts and controlling plasma stability at low rotation represent two of the great challenges for fusion energy. By exploiting edge turbulence in a novel manner, we achieved excellent tokamak performance, well above the H{sub 98y2} international tokamak energy confinement scaling (H{sub 98y2} = 1.25), thus meeting an additional confinement challenge that is usually difficult at low torque. The new regime is triggered in double null plasmas by ramping the injected torque to zero and then maintaining it there. This lowers E × B rotation shear in the plasma edge, allowing low-k, broadband, electromagnetic turbulence to increase. In the H-mode edge, a narrow transport barrier usually grows until MHD instability (a peeling ballooning mode) leads to the ELM heat burst. However, the increased turbulence reduces the pressure gradient, allowing the development of a broader and thus higher transport barrier. A 60% increase in pedestal pressure and 40% increase in energy confinement result. An increase in the E × B shearing rate inside of the edge pedestal is a key factor in the confinement increase. Strong double-null plasma shaping raises the threshold for the ELM instability, allowing the plasma to reach a transport-limited state near but below the explosive ELM stability boundary. The resulting plasmas have burning-plasma-relevant β{sub N} = 1.6–1.8 and run without the need for extra torque from 3D magnetic fields. To date, stationary conditions have been produced for 2 s or 12 energy confinement times, limited only by external hardware constraints

  13. Composition of the source region plasma in inertial electrostatic confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, D. R.; Emmert, G. A.

    2008-08-01

    The ion species composition in the source region of inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices plays an important role in the atomic and molecular physics processes in the device and in the resulting energy spectrum of the fast ions and the neutron production rate. A zero dimensional rate equation model for the ion species composition in the source region of IEC devices is presented and compared with experimental measurements on the Wisconsin IEC device [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley et al., Fusion Sci. Tech. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The ion species composition is measured using an ion acoustic wave diagnostic; the results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Both the theory and the experimental results show that D3+ ions are the majority species in the source region.

  14. Composition of the source region plasma in inertial electrostatic confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boris, D. R.; Emmert, G. A.

    2008-08-15

    The ion species composition in the source region of inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices plays an important role in the atomic and molecular physics processes in the device and in the resulting energy spectrum of the fast ions and the neutron production rate. A zero dimensional rate equation model for the ion species composition in the source region of IEC devices is presented and compared with experimental measurements on the Wisconsin IEC device [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley et al., Fusion Sci. Tech. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The ion species composition is measured using an ion acoustic wave diagnostic; the results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Both the theory and the experimental results show that D{sub 3}{sup +} ions are the majority species in the source region.

  15. Density-Modulation-Induced Absolute Laser-Plasma-Instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Yan, Rui; Ren, Chuang

    2016-10-01

    Fluid simulations show that when a static sinusoidal density modulation is superimposed on a linear density profile, convective instabilities can become absolutely unstable. This conversion can occur for two-plasmon-decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities under realistic direct-drive inertial confinement fusion conditions and can affect hot-electron generation and laser-energy deposition. Analysis of the three-wave model shows that a sufficiently large change of the density gradient in a linear density profile can turn convective instabilities into absolute ones. An analytical expression is given for the threshold of the gradient change, which depends only on the convective gain. This work was supported by DOE under Grant No. DE-SC0012316; by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734; and by Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

  16. Space-charge waves in magnetized and collisional quantum plasma columns confined in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Mehran; Abdikian, Alireza

    2014-04-15

    We study the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating in a column of quantum magnetized collisional plasma embraced completely by a metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The analysis is based on the quantum linearized hydrodynamic formalism of collective excitations within the quasi-static approximation. It is shown when the electronic de Broglie's wavelength of the plasma is comparable in the order of magnitude to the radius of the nanotube, the quantum effects are quite meaningful and our model anticipates one acoustical and two optical space-charge waves which are positioned into three propagating bands. With increasing the nanotube radius, the features of the acoustical branch remain unchanged, yet two distinct optical branches are degenerated and the classical behavior is recovered. This study might provide a platform to create new finite transverse cross section quantum magnetized plasmas and to devise nanometer dusty plasmas based on the metallic carbon nanotubes in the absence of either a drift or a thermal electronic velocity and their existence could be experimentally examined.

  17. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  18. Demonstration of Ion Kinetic Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions and Investigation of Magnetic Reconnection Using Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shock-driven laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions have demonstrated the presence of ion kinetic effects in ICF implosions and also have been used as a proton source to probe the strongly driven reconnection of MG magnetic fields in laser-generated plasmas. Ion kinetic effects arise during the shock-convergence phase of ICF implosions when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions (λii) approaches the size of the hot-fuel region (Rfuel) and may impact hot-spot formation and the possibility of ignition. To isolate and study ion kinetic effects, the ratio of N - K =λii /Rfuel was varied in D3He-filled, shock-driven implosions at the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility, from hydrodynamic-like conditions (NK 0.01) to strongly kinetic conditions (NK 10). A strong trend of decreasing fusion yields relative to the predictions of hydrodynamic models is observed as NK increases from 0.1 to 10. Hydrodynamics simulations that include basic models of the kinetic effects that are likely to be present in these experiments-namely, ion diffusion and Knudsen-layer reduction of the fusion reactivity-are better able to capture the experimental results. This type of implosion has also been used as a source of monoenergetic 15-MeV protons to image magnetic fields driven to reconnect in laser-produced plasmas at conditions similar to those encountered at the Earth's magnetopause. These experiments demonstrate that for both symmetric and asymmetric magnetic-reconnection configurations, when plasma flows are much stronger than the nominal Alfvén speed, the rate of magnetic-flux annihilation is determined by the flow velocity and is largely insensitive to initial plasma conditions. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Number DENA0001857.

  19. High Confinement and High Density with Stationary Plasma Energy and Strong Edge Radiation Cooling in Textor-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messiaen, A. M.

    1996-11-01

    A new discharge regime has been observed on the pumped limiter tokamak TEXTOR-94 in the presence of strong radiation cooling and for different scenarii of additional hearing. The radiated power fraction (up to 90%) is feedback controlled by the amount of Ne seeded in the edge. This regime meets many of the necessary conditions for a future fusion reactor. Energy confinement increases with increasing densities (reminiscent of the Z-mode obtained at ISX-B) and as good as ELM-free H-mode confinement (enhancement factor verus ITERH93-P up to 1.2) is obtained at high densities (up to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit) with peaked density profiles showing a peaking factor of about 2 and central density values around 10^14cm-3. In experiments where the energy content of the discharges is kept constant with an energy feedback loop acting on the amount of ICRH power, stable and stationary discharges are obtained for intervals of more than 5s, i.e. 100 times the energy confinement time or about equal to the skin resistive time, even with the cylindrical q_α as low as 2.8 β-values up to the β-limits of TEXTOR-94 are achieved (i.e. β n ≈ 2 of and β p ≈ 1.5) and the figure of merit for ignition margin f_Hqa in these discharges can be as high as 0.7. No detrimental effects of the seeded impurity on the reactivity of the plasma are observed. He removal in these discharges has also been investigated. [1] Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association "EURATOM-Belgian State", Ecole Royale Militaire-Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels, Belgium [2] Institut für Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, GmbH, Association "EURATOM-KFA", Jülich, Germany [3] Fusion Energy Research Program, Mechanical Engineering Division, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, USA [4] FOM Institüt voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Associatie "FOM-EURATOM", Nieuwegein, The Netherlands [*] Researcher at NFSR, Belgium itemize

  20. Steady-State Fully Noninductive Current Driven by Electron Cyclotron Waves in a Magnetically Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, O.; Henderson, M. A.; Hofmann, F.; Goodman, T.; Alberti, S.; Angioni, C.; Appert, K.; Behn, R.; Blanchard, P.; Bosshard, P.; Chavan, R.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Fasel, D.; Favre, A.; Furno, I.; Gorgerat, P.; Hogge, J.-P.; Isoz, P.-F.; Joye, B.; Lavanchy, P.; Lister, J. B.; Llobet, X.; Magnin, J.-C.; Mandrin, P.; Manini, A.; Marlétaz, B.; Marmillod, P.; Martin, Y.; Mayor, J.-M.; Martynov, A. A.; Mlynar, J.; Moret, J.-M.; Nieswand, C.; Nikkola, P.; Paris, P.; Perez, A.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.; Pitts, R. A.; Pochelon, A.; Pochon, G.; Refke, A.; Reimerdes, H.; Rommers, J.; Scavino, E.; Tonetti, G.; Tran, M. Q.; Troyon, F.; Weisen, H.

    2000-04-01

    A steady-state, fully noninductive plasma current has been sustained for the first time in a tokamak using electron cyclotron current drive only. In this discharge, 123 kA of current have been sustained for the entire gyrotron pulse duration of 2 s. Careful distribution across the plasma minor radius of the power deposited from three 0.5-MW gyrotrons was essential for reaching steady-state conditions. With central current drive, up to 153 kA of current have been fully replaced transiently for 100 ms. The noninductive scenario is confirmed by the ability to recharge the Ohmic transformer. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on the minor radius is also demonstrated.

  1. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelqvist, E. Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-07

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  2. On the plasma confinement by acoustic resonance. An innovation for electrodeless high-pressure discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courret, Gilles; Nikkola, Petri; Wasterlain, Sébastien; Gudozhnik, Olexandr; Girardin, Michel; Braun, Jonathan; Gavin, Serge; Croci, Mirko; Egolf, Peter W.

    2017-08-01

    In an applied research project on the development of a pulsed microwave sulfur lamp prototype of 1 kW, we have discovered an amazing phenomenon in which the plasma forms a ball staying at the center of the bulb despite gravity, thus protecting the glass from melting. In this paper, it is shown that this results from an acoustic resonance in a spherical mode. Measurements of the plasma response to short pulses are presented showing beats at the spherical resonance. It is demonstrated that the beats could result from the simultaneous excitation of two normal modes with a frequency difference of approximately 1%. One of the two frequencies matches precisely the microwave pulses repetition, a little below 30 kHz. Thus this one is due to a forced oscillation, whereas the other one is due to a free oscillation. The phase velocity of sound was calculated as a function of temperature in order to find the series of temperatures at which a resonance would occur if the bulb were an isothermal solid sphere. The mean temperature inside the actual bulb was determined from the only doublet of this series, that has characteristic frequencies close enough to cause the observed beats. In addition, one of these two modes has a spherical symmetry that can explain the plasma ball formation. The obtained mean temperature is consistent with the direct measurements on the bulb surface as well as with the temperature in the core of a similar plasma found in the literature. We have also proposed a model of the resonance onset based on the acoustic dispersion and the sound amplification due to electromagnetic coupling.

  3. Kinetic instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma sustained by high-power microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Viktorov, M. E.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the studies of plasma kinetic instabilities in the electron cyclotron frequency range carried out over the last decade at the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod. We investigate the nonequilibrium plasma created and sustained by high-power microwave radiation of a gyrotron under the electron cyclotron resonance condition. Resonant plasma heating results in the formation of at least two electron components, one of which, more dense and cold, determines the dispersion properties of the high-frequency waves, and the other, a small group of energetic electrons with a highly anisotropic velocity distribution, is responsible for the excitation of unstable waves. Dynamic spectra and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic emission are studied with high temporal resolution. Interpretation of observed data is based on the cyclotron maser paradigm; in this context, a laboratory modeling of non-stationary wave-particle interaction processes has much in common with similar processes occurring in the magnetosphere of Earth, planets, and solar coronal loops.

  4. Changes in Rat Myometrial Plasma Membrane Protein Kinase A are Confined to Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chun-Ying; Murtazina, Dilyara A.; Kim, Yoon-Sun; Garfield, Robert E.; Sanborn, Barbara M.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that pregnant rat myometrial plasma membrane-associated cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) decreases prior to delivery, coincident with a decline in the inhibitory effect of cAMP on contractant-stimulated parameters. We now find that rat myometrial membrane-associated PKA concentrations in early to mid-pregnancy are equivalent to those in cycling rats. Following the decline associated with parturition, membrane PKA recovers within 1–2 days postpartum. Treatment with the antiprogestin onapristone caused a decrease in myometrial membrane PKA-catalytic and regulatory subunits compared to untreated controls by 12 h. This coincided temporally with recently reported increases in electrical and contractile activity. In unilaterally pregnant rats, the decline in plasma membrane PKA was observed in both nonpregnant and pregnant horns but was more rapid in the pregnant horns. These data indicate that the myometrial plasma membrane PKA pattern before and during most of pregnancy is not consistent with progesterone exerting a primary influence on PKA membrane localization. Rather, the fall in membrane PKA associated with parturition may contribute to or be influenced by the increased contractile and electrical activity of labor that is a consequence of the loss of progesterone influence and is not absolutely dependent on the presence of fetuses. PMID:20457802

  5. Spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Marmar, E. S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Gu, M. F.; Eikenberry, E.; Broennimann, Ch.; Lee, S. G.

    2008-10-15

    The use of high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometers to diagnose fusion plasmas has been limited by the poor spatial localization associated with chord integrated measurements. Taking advantage of a new x-ray imaging spectrometer concept [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3660 (2004)], and improvements in x-ray detector technology [Ch. Broennimann et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 13, 120 (2006)], a spatially resolving high resolution x-ray spectrometer has been built and installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This instrument utilizes a spherically bent quartz crystal and a set of two dimensional x-ray detectors arranged in the Johann configuration [H. H. Johann, Z. Phys. 69, 185 (1931)] to image the entire plasma cross section with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm. The spectrometer was designed to measure line emission from H-like and He-like argon in the wavelength range 3.7 and 4.0 A with a resolving power of approximately 10 000 at frame rates up to 200 Hz. Using spectral tomographic techniques [I. Condrea, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2427 (2004)] the line integrated spectra can be inverted to infer profiles of impurity emissivity, velocity, and temperature. From these quantities it is then possible to calculate impurity density and electron temperature profiles. An overview of the instrument, analysis techniques, and example profiles are presented.

  6. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  7. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  8. The use of an intermediate wavelength laser for alignment to inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.E. Jr.; Seppala, L.G.; Vann, C.S.; Bliss, E.S.

    1995-09-21

    The conceptual design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) 192 beam laser incorporates a low-power alignment beam injected in the pinhole plane of the final spatial filter with a wave length intermediate between the 1053 mn laser output and the 351 mn frequency-converted beam that illuminates the target Choosing the specific wavelength for which the spatial filter plane is reimaged in the same target chamber plane as the frequency-converted main laser pulse, achieves optimum accuracy without the need for additional means to insure precise overlap between the two beams. Insertion of the alignment beam after the last laser amplifier also allows alignment to the target while the amplifiers are still cooling from a previous shot.

  9. Infrared laser induced plasma diagnostics of silver target

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmat, L. Nadeem, Ali; Ahmed, I.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, the optical emission spectra of silver (Ag) plasma have been recorded and analyzed using the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The emission line intensities and plasma parameters were investigated as a function of lens to sample distance, laser irradiance, and distance from the target surface. The electron number density (n{sub e}) and electron temperature (T{sub e}) were determined using the Stark broadened line profile and Boltzmann plot method, respectively. A gradual increase in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters, n{sub e} from 2.89 × 10{sup 17} to 3.92 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} and T{sub e} from 4662 to 8967 K, was observed as the laser irradiance was increased 2.29 × 10{sup 10}–1.06 × 10{sup 11} W cm{sup −2}. The spatial variations in n{sub e} and T{sub e} were investigated from 0 to 5.25 mm from the target surface, yielding the electron number density from 4.78 × 10{sup 17} to 1.72 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} and electron temperature as 9869–3789 K. In addition, the emission intensities and the plasma parameters of silver were investigated by varying the ambient pressure from 0.36 to 1000 mbars.

  10. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Li, Gang; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2017-05-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  11. Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product

    DOEpatents

    Masnari, Nino A.; Rensel, Walter B.; Robinson, Merrill G.; Solomon, David E.; Wise, Kensall D.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1982-01-01

    An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

  12. Isoelectronic x-ray spectroscopy to determine electron temperatures in long-scale-length inertial-confinement-fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, T. D.; Back, C. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Keane, C. J.; Klem, D. E.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Powers, L. V.; Suter, L. J.; Turner, R. E.; Failor, B. H.; Hsing, W. W.

    1996-05-01

    We have successfully employed isoelectronic line ratios to measure the electron temperature in gas-filled Hohlraum targets and gas bags shot with the Nova laser. These targets produce millimeter-scale-length plasmas with electron density Ne~1021 cm-3 and electron temperature Te~3 keV. The Hohlraum targets can also produce radiation temperature exceeding 200 eV. Isoelectronic line ratios are well suited to this measurement because they are relatively insensitive to radiation field effects in Hohlraum targets, opacity, transients, and variations in electron density compared to conventional line ratios. We survey the properties of isoelectronic line ratios formed from ratios of n-to-1 resonance transitions in heliumlike Cr to the same transitions in Ti and compare with conventional ratios of n-to-1 transitions in hydrogenlike Ti to the corresponding transitions in heliumlike Ti, concentrating on plasma parameter ranges of interest to the Nova experiments. We also consider the same ratios using K and Cl. Atomic kinetics are treated using collisional-radiative models and experimental data are analyzed with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamics calculations. When we apply isoelectronic techniques to the Nova experimental data, we find that the targets have electron temperatures of at least 3 keV.

  13. Development of a non-ideal plasma target for non-linear beam plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Nishinomiya, S.; Niinou, T.; Kaneko, J.; Hasegawa, J.; Ogawa, M.; Oguri, Y.

    2007-07-01

    A shock-driven plasma target was developed to examine non-linear interactions between low-energy heavy ions and cold-dense plasmas. MD calculations predicted that beam-plasma coupling constant γ˜0.1 must be achieved to observe the non-linearity, which corresponds to the plasma coupling constant Γ≈0.2 for projectiles of vproj≈10 keV/u and q≈2. One-dimensional numerical estimations using SESAME equation of state showed that a shock wave propagating in 5-Torr H2 gas with 47 km/s must be produced to satisfy Γ≈0.2. Utilizing an electromagnetic shock tube with a peak current of 50 kA and a current rise time of 800 ns, we achieved a shock speed of 45 km/s. The electron density distribution of the shock-produced plasma along the beam axis was measured by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. From this measurement we confirmed that the electron density was over 1017 cm-3 and the homogeneity was acceptable during several hundred nanoseconds. The electron temperature was also determined by optical spectroscopic measurements. The Coulomb coupling constant was evaluated using these experimental data to investigate feasibility of the beam-plasma interaction experiments.

  14. Encounter dynamics of a small target by a polymer diffusing in a confined domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, A.; Amoruso, C.; Ziskind, A.; Holcman, D.

    2012-12-01

    We study the first passage time for a polymer, that we call the narrow encounter time (NETP), to reach a small target located on the surface of a microdomain. The polymer is modeled as a freely joint chain (beads connected by springs with a resting non zero length) and we use Brownian simulations to study two cases: when (i) any of the monomer or (ii) only one can be absorbed at the target window. Interestingly, we find that in the first case, the NETP is an increasing function of the polymer length until a critical length, after which it decreases. Moreover, in the long polymer regime, we identified an exponential scaling law for the NETP as a function of the polymer length. In the second case, the position of the absorbed monomer along the polymer chain strongly influences the NETP. Our analysis can be applied to estimate the mean first time of a DNA fragment to a small target in the chromatin structure or for mRNA to find a small target.

  15. Fast Low-to-High Confinement Mode Bifurcation Dynamics in a Tokamak Edge Plasma Gyrokinetic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, C S; Ku, S; Tynan, G R; Hager, R; Churchill, R M; Cziegler, I; Greenwald, M; Hubbard, A E; Hughes, J W

    2017-04-28

    Transport barrier formation and its relation to sheared flows in fluids and plasmas are of fundamental interest in various natural and laboratory observations and of critical importance in achieving an economical energy production in a magnetic fusion device. Here we report the first observation of an edge transport barrier formation event in an electrostatic gyrokinetic simulation carried out in a realistic diverted tokamak edge geometry under strong forcing by a high rate of heat deposition. The results show that turbulent Reynolds-stress-driven sheared E×B flows act in concert with neoclassical orbit loss to quench turbulent transport and form a transport barrier just inside the last closed magnetic flux surface.

  16. Generality of Deterministic Chaos, Exponential Spectra, and Lorentzian Pulses in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, J. E.; Morales, G. J.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of transport at the edge of magnetized plasmas is deterministic chaos. The connection is made by a previous survey [M. A. Pedrosa , Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3621 (1999)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.82.3621] of measurements of fluctuations that is shown to exhibit power spectra with exponential frequency dependence over a broad range, which is the signature of deterministic chaos. The exponential character arises from Lorentzian pulses. The results suggest that the generalization to complex times used in studies of deterministic chaos is a representation of Lorentzian pulses emerging from the chaotic dynamics.

  17. Inertia driven radial breathing and nonlinear relaxation in cylindrically confined pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2014-02-15

    The dynamics of cylindrically trapped electron plasma has been investigated using a newly developed 2D Electrostatic PIC code that uses unapproximated, mass-included equations of motion for simulation. Exhaustive simulations, covering the entire range of Brillouin ratio, were performed for uniformly filled circular profiles in rigid rotor equilibrium. The same profiles were then loaded away from equilibrium with an initial value of rigid rotation frequency different from that required for radial force balance. Both these sets of simulations were performed for an initial zero-temperature or cold load of the plasma with no spread in either angular velocity or radial velocity. The evolution of the off-equilibrium initial conditions to a steady state involve radial breathing of the profile that scales in amplitude and algebraic growth with Brillouin fraction. For higher Brillouin fractions, the growth of the breathing mode is followed by complex dynamics of spontaneous hollow density structures, excitation of poloidal modes, leading to a monotonically falling density profile.

  18. Inertia driven radial breathing and nonlinear relaxation in cylindrically confined pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2015-06-29

    The dynamics of cylindrically trapped electron plasma has been investigated using a newly developed 2D Electrostatic PIC code that uses unapproximated, mass-included equations of motion for simulation. Exhaustive simulations, covering the entire range of Brillouin ratio, were performed for uniformly filled circular profiles in rigid rotor equilibrium. The same profiles were then loaded away from equilibrium with an initial value of rigid rotation frequency different from that required for radial force balance. Both these sets of simulations were performed for an initial zero-temperature or cold load of the plasma with no spread in either angular velocity or radial velocity. The evolution of the off-equilibrium initial conditions to a steady state involve radial breathing of the profile that scales in amplitude and algebraic growth with Brillouin fraction. For higher Brillouin fractions, the growth of the breathing mode is followed by complex dynamics of spontaneous hollow density structures, excitation of poloidal modes, leading to a monotonically falling density profile.

  19. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-08-26

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 ..mu..m thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 ..mu..m diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 ..mu..m) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets.

  20. Simulation of Ballistic Impact of a Tungsten Carbide Sphere on a Confined Silicon Carbide Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    AUTODYN – tensile crack softening and stochastic failure - were varied to study their influence on the simulated crack patterns. Comparisons with the...Johnson-Holmquist model parameters along with modifications incorporated to brittle damage models included in AUTODYN – tensile crack softening and...using the nonlinear analysis software AUTODYN . Using the geometry detailed above, the projectile and the SiC target were discretized using Smooth

  1. Synthesis of Functional Surfaces via Click Chemistry and Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker-Schwartz, Alexander Kevin

    inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density experiments. The current methods for synthesizing ICF shells are only able to produce low yields of shells with acceptable physical specification required for ICF experiments. These fabrication methods are also time consuming, tedious, and expensive. A new method that utilizes electric fields to controllably and perfectly center the inner droplet of double emulsion (DE) droplets was developed. Electric field-centered DE droplets were shown to meet the sphericity and shell uniformity requirements for ICF shells. The centered DE droplets were formed using a polymerizable outer liquid shell, which could be photopolymerized into a solid shell. Polymerized shells were found to meet the ICF sphericity requirements but fell just short of the shell wall thickness uniformity requirement. Nonetheless, electric field-driven DE droplet centering and polymerization has the potential to be an extremely useful approach for forming large numbers ICF shells.

  2. Numerical simulations of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in planar inertial-confinement-fusion targets using the FastRad3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Karasik, M.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a central issue in the performance of laser-accelerated inertial-confinement-fusion targets. Historically, the accurate numerical simulation of this instability has been a challenging task for many radiation hydrodynamics codes, particularly when it comes to capturing the ablatively stabilized region of the linear dispersion spectrum and modeling ab initio perturbations. Here, we present recent results from two-dimensional numerical simulations of the ablative RT instability in planar laser-ablated foils that were performed using the Eulerian code FastRad3D. Our study considers polystyrene, (cryogenic) deuterium-tritium, and beryllium target materials, quarter- and third-micron laser light, and low and high laser intensities. An initial single-mode surface perturbation is modeled in our simulations as a small modulation to the target mass density and the ablative RT growth-rate is calculated from the time history of areal-mass variations once the target reaches a steady-state acceleration. By performing a sequence of such simulations with different perturbation wavelengths, we generate a discrete dispersion spectrum for each of our examples and find that in all cases the linear RT growth-rate γ is well described by an expression of the form γ = α [ k g / ( 1 + ɛ k L m ) ] 1 / 2 - β k V a , where k is the perturbation wavenumber, g is the acceleration of the target, Lm is the minimum density scale-length, Va is the ablation velocity, and ɛ is either one or zero. The dimensionless coefficients α and β in the above formula depend on the particular target and laser parameters and are determined from two-dimensional simulation results through the use of a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure. While our findings are generally consistent with those of Betti et al. (Phys. Plasmas 5, 1446 (1998)), the ablative RT growth-rates predicted in this investigation are somewhat smaller than the values previously reported for the

  3. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-10-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time.

  4. Fast Low-to-High Confinement Mode Bifurcation Dynamics in a Tokamak Edge Plasma Gyrokinetic Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Tynan, G. R.; Hager, R.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.

    2017-04-01

    Transport barrier formation and its relation to sheared flows in fluids and plasmas are of fundamental interest in various natural and laboratory observations and of critical importance in achieving an economical energy production in a magnetic fusion device. Here we report the first observation of an edge transport barrier formation event in an electrostatic gyrokinetic simulation carried out in a realistic diverted tokamak edge geometry under strong forcing by a high rate of heat deposition. The results show that turbulent Reynolds-stress-driven sheared E ×B flows act in concert with neoclassical orbit loss to quench turbulent transport and form a transport barrier just inside the last closed magnetic flux surface.

  5. Fast low-to-high confinement mode bifurcation dynamics in a tokamak edge plasma gyrokinetic simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Tynan, G. R.; ...

    2017-04-25

    Transport barrier formation and its relation to sheared flows in fluids and plasmas are of fundamental interest in various natural and laboratory observations and of critical importance in achieving an economical energy production in a magnetic fusion device. Here we report the first observation of an edge transport barrier formation event in an electrostatic gyrokinetic simulation carried out in a realistic diverted tokamak edge geometry under strong forcing by a high rate of heat deposition. Here, the results show that turbulent Reynolds-stress-driven sheared E x B flows act in concert with neoclassical orbit loss to quench turbulent transport and formmore » a transport barrier just inside the last closed magnetic flux surface.« less

  6. Experimental verification of the Boltzmann relation in confined plasmas: Comparison of noble and molecule gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Hwang, Hye-Ju; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, June Young; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-03-15

    Experimental verification of the Boltzmann relation is performed in argon and oxygen gas inductively coupled plasmas from the measurements of both the spatial electron currents (as a fluid approach) and the electron energy probability functions (EEPFs, as a kinetic approach). At a low gas pressure of 10 mTorr, the measured electron currents are spatially uniform, and the EEPFs in the total electron energy scale are identical, which indicate that the Boltzmann relation is valid at both the argon and oxygen gases. As the gas pressure increases to 30-40 mTorr, however, the Boltzmann relation is broken in the oxygen gas discharge, while the Boltzmann relation is still valid in the argon gas discharge. This different variation in the oxygen gas discharge is mainly due to the presence of various inelastic collisions in the entire electron energy region, which causes the transition of the electron kinetics from a non-local to a local regime.

  7. Parametric decay instability near the upper hybrid resonance in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Stejner, M.; Stober, J.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we investigate parametric decay of an electromagnetic pump wave into two electrostatic daughter waves, particularly an X-mode pump wave decaying into a warm upper hybrid wave (a limit of an electron Bernstein wave) and a warm lower hybrid wave. We describe the general theory of the above parametric decay instability (PDI), unifying earlier treatments, and show that it may occur in underdense and weakly overdense plasmas. The PDI theory is used to explain anomalous sidebands observed in collective Thomson scattering (CTS) spectra at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The theory may also account for similar observations during CTS experiments in stellarators, as well as in some 1st harmonic electron cyclotron resonance and O-X-B heating experiments.

  8. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time. PMID:27796370

  9. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-11-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have signficant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D.J. Grove and D.M. Meade, Nuclear Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)], with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  10. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-12-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have significant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  11. Laser tracker orientation in confined space using on-board targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Kyle, Stephen; Lin, Jiarui; Yang, Linghui; Ren, Yu; Zhu, Jigui

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel orientation method for two laser trackers using on-board targets attached to the tracker head and rotating with it. The technique extends an existing method developed for theodolite intersection systems which are now rarely used. This method requires only a very narrow space along the baseline between the instrument heads, in order to establish the orientation relationship. This has potential application in environments where space is restricted. The orientation parameters can be calculated by means of two-face reciprocal measurements to the on-board targets, and measurements to a common point close to the baseline. An accurate model is then applied which can be solved through nonlinear optimization. Experimental comparison has been made with the conventional orientation method, which is based on measurements to common intersection points located off the baseline. This requires more space and the comparison has demonstrated the feasibility of the more compact technique presented here. Physical setup and testing suggest that the method is practical. Uncertainties estimated by simulation indicate good performance in terms of measurement quality.

  12. Pre-plasma effect on energy transfer from laser beam to shock wave generated in solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarczyk, T.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Kalinowska, Z.; Badziak, J.; Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.; Folpini, G.; Maheut, Y.; Baffigi, F.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Cristoforetti, G.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gizzi, L. A.; Kasperczuk, A.; Koester, P.; Krousky, E.; Labate, L.; Parys, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Renner, O.; Smid, M.; Rosinski, M.; Skala, J.; Dudzak, R.; Ullschmied, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency of the laser radiation energy transport into the shock wave generated in layered planar targets (consisting of massive Cu over coated by thin CH layer) was investigated. The targets were irradiated using two laser pulses. The 1ω pulse with the energy of ˜50 J produced a pre-plasma, imitating the corona of the pre-compressed inertial confinement fusion target. The second main pulse used the 1ω or 3ω laser harmonics with the energy of ˜200 J. The influence of the pre-plasma on parameters of the shock wave was determined from the crater volume measurements and from the electron density distribution measured by 3-frame interferometry. The experimental results show that the energy transport by fast electrons provides a definite contribution to the dynamics of the ablative process, to the shock wave generation, and to the ablation pressure in dependence on the target irradiation conditions. The strong influence of the pre-plasma on the investigated process was observed in the 1ω case. Theoretical analysis supports the explanation of experimental results.

  13. Pre-plasma effect on energy transfer from laser beam to shock wave generated in solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarczyk, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Kasperczuk, A.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.; Folpini, G.; Maheut, Y.; Baffigi, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Krousky, E.; and others

    2014-01-15

    Efficiency of the laser radiation energy transport into the shock wave generated in layered planar targets (consisting of massive Cu over coated by thin CH layer) was investigated. The targets were irradiated using two laser pulses. The 1ω pulse with the energy of ∼50 J produced a pre-plasma, imitating the corona of the pre-compressed inertial confinement fusion target. The second main pulse used the 1ω or 3ω laser harmonics with the energy of ∼200 J. The influence of the pre-plasma on parameters of the shock wave was determined from the crater volume measurements and from the electron density distribution measured by 3-frame interferometry. The experimental results show that the energy transport by fast electrons provides a definite contribution to the dynamics of the ablative process, to the shock wave generation, and to the ablation pressure in dependence on the target irradiation conditions. The strong influence of the pre-plasma on the investigated process was observed in the 1ω case. Theoretical analysis supports the explanation of experimental results.

  14. Gaussian beams for a linearized cold plasma confined in a torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Dobrokhotov, S. Yu.; Klevin, A.; Tirozzi, B.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a system of linear pde describing a cold plasma in a toroidal region in three-dimensional space. This system simulates the passage of a laser beam through the TOKAMAK, it consists of 9 equations for the electric field and the velocities of electrons and ions in a given magnetic field. Asymptotic solutions describing high-frequency Gaussian beams are constructed using the theory of Maslov complex germ in a fairly effective form. The solutions of the system are localized in the neighborhood of the beam passing through the toroidal domain (the camera). The equations for a ray take into account the density of particles in the camera and don't ``feel'' the presence of the magnetic field because of the high frequency of the Gaussian beam; the dependence on the magnetic field is contained in the amplitude of the electric field. Before the TOKAMAK camera the amplitude of the Gaussian beam is the same as in free space, but after the camera the amplitude vector rotates under the influence of the magnetic field. The formula for the angle of rotation is given explicitly. An analytical-numerical algorithm based on the asymptotic solutions is used to analyze the parameters of the magnetic field in the TOKAMAK.

  15. Plasma waves confined to the diamagnetic cavity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunell, H.; Goetz, C.; Eriksson, A.; Nilsson, H.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Henri, P.; Maggiolo, R.; Hamrin, M.; De Keyser, J.; Rubin, M.; Stenberg Wieser, G.; Cessateur, G.; Dhooghe, F.; Gibbons, A.

    2017-07-01

    Ion acoustic waves were observed in the diamagnetic cavity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the Rosetta spacecraft on 2015 August 3, when the comet was 1.25 au from the Sun. Wave spectra recorded by the Langmuir probe (RPC-LAP), peak near 200 Hz, decrease for higher frequencies and reach the noise floor at approximately 1.5 kHz. These waves were observed only when the spacecraft was in the diamagnetic cavity or at its boundary, which is identified as a sharp drop in magnetic field magnitude, measured by RPC-MAG. The plasma, on both sides of the boundary, is dominated by a cold (a few hundred K) water group ion population, one cold (kBTe ˜ 0.1 eV) and one warm (kBTe ˜ 10 eV) electron population. The observations are interpreted in terms of current-driven ion acoustic waves, generated by currents that flow through bulges on the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity.

  16. A self-organized criticality model for ion temperature gradient mode driven turbulence in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Isliker, H.; Pisokas, Th.; Vlahos, L.; Strintzi, D.

    2010-08-15

    A new self-organized criticality (SOC) model is introduced in the form of a cellular automaton (CA) for ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode driven turbulence in fusion plasmas. Main characteristics of the model are that it is constructed in terms of the actual physical variable, the ion temperature, and that the temporal evolution of the CA, which necessarily is in the form of rules, mimics actual physical processes as they are considered to be active in the system, i.e., a heating process and a local diffusive process that sets on if a threshold in the normalized ITG R/L{sub T} is exceeded. The model reaches the SOC state and yields ion temperature profiles of exponential shape, which exhibit very high stiffness, in that they basically are independent of the loading pattern applied. This implies that there is anomalous heat transport present in the system, despite the fact that diffusion at the local level is imposed to be of a normal kind. The distributions of the heat fluxes in the system and of the heat out-fluxes are of power-law shape. The basic properties of the model are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  17. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  18. NIM for Fokker-Planck equation applied to electrostatically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McArdle, K.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation is important in the kinetic theory of plasmas because it is used extensively to model the trapping of charged particles in magnetic mirrors and tokamaks. Standard finite difference numerical methods already exist that can compute the loss rates for multispecies linear and nonlinear models; however, these calculations are more difficult for smaller particle leakage (i.e., problems with larger magnetic mirror ratios R, defined as the ratio of the B-field at the end of the mirror to the B-field at the midplane). Approximate analytic estimates for the loss rates, accurate in the limit of large mirror ratios, exist via the Pastukov analytic method 4 but the accuracy is fixed and <20% (Ref. 5) for problems of interest to fusion. A nodal integral method (NIM) has been developed for the steady-state, space-independent Fokker-Planck equation and is now applied to electrostatic trapping of particles in a magnetic mirror. This paper shows that the NIM is superior to the finite difference method (FDM) for problems with less particle leakage and also in the calculation of the energy leakage. Electrostatic trapping, a difficult problem because the formulation becomes singular in the limit of complete trapping (zero leakage), is not as difficult for the NIM because the NIM gives exact one-dimensional solutions in such cases as zero leakage (a normalization constraint is required).

  19. Plasma confinement modification and convective transport suppression in the scrape-off layer using additional gas puffing in the STOR-M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreval, M.; Hubeny, M.; Ding, Y.; Onchi, T.; Liu, Y.; Hthu, K.; Elgriw, S.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of short gas puffing (GP) pulses on the scrape-off layer (SOL) transport is studied. Similar responses of ion saturation current and floating potential measured near the GP injection valve and in the 90° toroidally separated cross-section suggest that the GP influence on the SOL region should be global. A drop in plasma temperature and a decrease in the rotational velocity of the plasma are observed in the SOL region immediately after the GP pulse; however, an unexpected increase in electron and ion temperatures is observed in the second stage of the plasma response. The decrease in floating potential fluctuations indicates that the turbulent transport is dumped immediately after the GP pulse. The GP-induced modification of turbulence properties in the SOL points to a convective transport suppression in the STOR-M tokamak. A substantial decrease in the skewness and kurtosis of ion saturation current fluctuations is observed in the SOL region resulting in the probability distribution function (PDF) getting closer to the Gaussian distribution. The plasma potential reduction, the change in plasma rotation and the suppression of turbulent transport in the SOL region indicate that the plasma confinement is modified after the GP injection. Some features of the H-mode-like confinement in the plasma bulk also accompany the SOL observations after application of the additional sharp GP pulse.

  20. Thermo-statistical study of evaporation effects in a non neutral plasma under an imperfect magnetic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Huanca, C.; Velazquez, L.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies of non-neutral plasmas in magnetic traps undergo, in some degree of affectation, the incidence of evaporation. For example, the existence of a finite threshold energy {{\\varepsilon}c} for the escaping of plasma constituents can be favored by the external electrostatic forces near the grounded conducting walls of a cylindrical Penning trap. In contrast, the conventional statistical mechanics description of these situations is performed assuming the existence of a rigorous thermodynamic equilibrium (Dubin and O’Neil 1999 Rev. Mod. Phys. 71 87), dismissing thus the existence of evaporation effects. We propose in this work a two-dimensional toy model that describes the incidence of evaporation on thermo-statistics of a pure non-neutral plasma (a system composed of a single charge species like an infinitely long electron column). Considering the existing connections between the macroscopic descriptions of pure non-neutral plasmas and astrophysical systems, the treatment of evaporation along a quasi-stationary regime is developed here in analogy to some astrophysical models proposed in the literature. We start from a regularized microcanonical description that only considers those microscopic configurations where particles are trapped inside a confinement region of radius R c , which is implemented introducing a truncation of their velocity spectrum. These arguments lead us to a statistical procedure to predict the quasi-stationary particles distribution n≤ft(\\mathbf{r}\\right) similar to the maximum entropy approach. According to our analysis, the influence of evaporation for a non-zero temperature T crucially depends on the saturation parameter δ ={{r}\\text{B}}/{{R}c} , whose admissible values are located in the interval 0<δ <1 , with r B being the radius of Billouin steady state that appears in the limit T\\to 0 . The theoretical profiles predicted from this model are then compared to the metastable radial density distribution reported by