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Sample records for confirm obstructive sleep

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  2. Adult obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S.; McSharry, David G.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is an increasingly common disorder of repeated upper airway collapse during sleep, which leads to oxygen desaturation and disrupted sleep. Symptoms include snoring, witnessed apnoeas, and sleepiness. Pathogenesis varies; predisposing factors include small upper airway lumen, unstable respiratory control, low arousal threshold, small lung volume, and dysfunctional upper airway dilator muscles. Risk factors include obesity, male sex, age, menopause, fluid retention, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and smoking. Obstructive sleep apnoea causes sleepiness, road traffic accidents, and probably systemic hypertension. It has also been linked to myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and diabetes mellitus though not definitively. Continuous positive airway pressure is the treatment of choice, with adherence of 60–70%. Bi-level positive airway pressure or adaptive servo-ventilation can be used for patients who are intolerant to continuous positive airway pressure. Other treatments include dental devices, surgery, and weight loss. PMID:23910433

  3. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    Snoring and excessive sleepiness are the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome but other clinical manifestations are present and a precise assessment of the disease involves clear definitions of the various kinds of apnea. Several pathogenetic factors (functional, anatomical, neurological, genetical) are still being discussed. However new insights of the pathophysiology of apneas allow more reliable treatments. Central nervous and cardiovascular complications as well as the traumatic morbidity, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, make it a major public health problem.

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Matthew L.; Brass, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances. PMID:22368774

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ho, Matthew L; Brass, Steven D

    2011-11-29

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  6. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sala Walther, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by an intermittent and repetitive obstruction of the upper respiratory tract during sleep, which leads to a complete (apnea) or partial (hypopnea) block of air flow. It is quite prevalent, being seen in 4-6% of males and 2% of females. Structural abnormalities present in the upper respiratory tract and obesity are the fundamental etiological factors. Clinical manifestations are due to sleep fragmentation and oxygen desaturation which cause the apnea. Day hypersomnia, snoring and episodes of apnea described by the spouse are the three basic symptoms. The diagnosis is based on polysomnography, which can be substituted for a night cardiorespiratory polygraphy. It has an important morbimortality rate, mainly due to traffic and labor accidents, ischemic heart disease and chronic respiratory failure. The treatment is multifactorial. First, eliminating alcohol and hypnotic drugs. Obesity, which is almost always present, must also be corrected. Structural abnormalities of the upper respiratory tract may require a surgical solution. The treatment preferred nowadays is the application of a nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) while the patient is asleep. It should be considered for those symptomatic patients with an apnea-hypopnea index over 30, or if the index is below 30, than when a respiratory insufficiency or cardiovascular risk factors are present. In some cases surgical procedures may be considered, such as uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnoea and anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Rudra, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, T.; Sengupta, S.; Maitra, G.; Kumar, P.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) correlates positively with obesity and age, both of which are becoming increasingly prevalent. Obstructive sleep apnoea occurs much more frequently in clinical practice than formerly diagnosed, and that this condition represents complex challenges for difficulty in mask ventilation, laryngoscopic intubation, accelerated arterial desaturation, postoperative monitoring and discharge status. In this review article pathophysiology, diagnosis, and perioperative management of this group of patients have been discussed in detail. PMID:19742249

  8. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: clinical history and physical examination].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Gleison Marinho

    2010-06-01

    Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common disease, it often goes undiagnosed. The signs and symptoms of the syndrome are mostly subjective. Therefore, snoring, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, dejection and mood changes should raise the suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Scales and tables that have good sensitivity and include the most relevant clinical symptoms and physical examination results can suggest a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The diagnosis is confirmed by polysomnography, which is considered the gold standard method.

  9. Managing snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea in childhood.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Nicholas M; Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2013-10-01

    Snoring assessment and its differentiation from obstructive sleep apnoea are difficult based upon a parent history and physical examination of the size of the tonsils. Not only is the presence of obstructive sleep apnoea important to diagnose, but confirming its severity is the key determinant in prioritising treatment in a resource-limited setting. This review provides current knowledge on the utility of common diagnostic tests, results of treatment options available and implications of treatment and unrecognised or untreated obstructive sleep apnoea.

  10. [Assessment of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea in Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Brill, Anne-Kathrin; Geiser, Thomas

    2016-01-06

    Obstructive sleep apnea is highly prevalent in the general population, but still the majority of patients remain undiagnosed and untreated. In primary care the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea should be considered in many clinical situations, especially if risk factors or typical comorbidities are present. Sleep history, daytime complaints and clinical examination in combination with screening questionnaires and screening sleep studies can help to confirm the diagnosis.

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zulkifli; Amin, Hilman Z; Amin, Lukman Z

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep respiratory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction, resulting in apneas or hypopneas. OSA could contribute to atherosclerosis through direct and indirect mechanisms. Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  13. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253

  14. Road traffic accidents in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Liam, C K; How, L G; Tan, C T

    1996-03-01

    Three patients involved in road traffic accidents were suspected to have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Two of them fell asleep while riding motorcycles and one patient fell asleep behind the wheel of a truck causing it to overturn. The diagnosis of OSA in each case was suspected based on a history of loud snoring, restless sleep, and excessive daytime somnolence and was confirmed by sleep studies.

  15. Cough in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin; Ing, Alvin; Birring, Surinder S

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) has recently been reported to be a cause of chronic cough. It should be considered when cough remains unexplained following investigations and treatments for common causes. The presence of nocturnal cough, snoring and gastro-oesophageal reflux may be helpful in identifying patients who require further investigation. Daytime somnolence is often absent. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy has been reported to be effective in alleviating cough. Therapy for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, if present, should be optimised. The mechanism of the association between OSA and cough is not clear, but airway inflammation, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, increased cough reflex sensitivity and tracheobronchomalacia are possible explanations. Further studies should identify clinical predictors of OSA-cough, establish mechanisms and the optimal therapy.

  16. The pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and represents an increasing burden on health care resources. Understanding underlying pathogenic mechanisms of OSA will ultimately allow for the development of rational therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review current concepts about the pathogenesis of OSA. Specifically, we consider the evidence that the upper airway plays a primary role in OSA pathogenesis and provide a framework for modelling its biomechanical properties and propensity to collapse during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular factors that modulate upper airway obstruction are also discussed. Finally, we consider models of periodic breathing, and elaborate generalizable mechanisms by which upper airway obstruction destabilizes respiratory patterns during sleep. In our model, upper airway obstruction triggers a mismatch between ventilatory supply and demand. In this model, trade-offs between maintaining sleep stability or ventilation can account for a full range of OSA disease severity and expression. Recurrent arousals and transient increases in airway patency may restore ventilation between periods of sleep, while alterations in neuromuscular and arousal responses to upper airway obstruction may improve sleep stability at still suboptimal levels of ventilation. PMID:26380762

  17. Reduced evoked motor and sensory potential amplitudes in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Mihalj, Mario; Lušić, Linda; Đogaš, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown to what extent chronic intermittent hypoxaemia in obstructive sleep apnea causes damage to the motor and sensory peripheral nerves. It was hypothesized that patients with obstructive sleep apnea would have bilaterally significantly impaired amplitudes of both motor and sensory peripheral nerve-evoked potentials of both lower and upper limbs. An observational study was conducted on 43 patients with obstructive sleep apnea confirmed by the whole-night polysomnography, and 40 controls to assess the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and peripheral neuropathy. All obstructive sleep apnea subjects underwent standardized electroneurographic testing, with full assessment of amplitudes of evoked compound muscle action potentials, sensory neural action potentials, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and distal motor and sensory latencies of the median, ulnar, peroneal and sural nerves, bilaterally. All nerve measurements were compared with reference values, as well as between the untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects. Averaged compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes were significantly reduced in the nerves of both upper and lower limbs in patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared with controls (P < 0.001). These results confirmed that patients with obstructive sleep apnea had significantly lower amplitudes of evoked action potentials of both motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Clinical/subclinical axonal damage exists in patients with obstructive sleep apnea to a greater extent than previously thought.

  18. 77 FR 25226 - Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea AGENCY... withdrawing its proposed regulatory guidance for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and request for comment...

  19. Treatments for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the efficacy of current treatment options for adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods Review of the literature. Results OSA, characterized by repetitive ≥ 10-second interruptions (apnea) or reductions (hypopnea) in airflow, is initiated by partial or complete collapse in the upper airway despite respiratory effort. When left untreated, OSA is associated with comorbid conditions, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The current “gold standard” treatment for OSA is continuous positive air pressure (CPAP), which pneumatically stabilizes the upper airways. CPAP has proven efficacy and potential cost savings via decreases in health comorbidities and/or motor-vehicle crashes. However, CPAP treatment is not well-tolerated due to various side effects, and adherence among OSA subjects can be as low as 50% in certain populations. Other treatment options for OSA include improving CPAP tolerability, increasing CPAP adherence through patient interventions, weight loss/exercise, positional therapy, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, oral pressure therapy, oral appliances, surgery, hypoglossal nerve stimulation, drug treatment, and combining 2 or more of the aforementioned treatments. Despite the many options available to treat OSA, none of them are as efficacious as CPAP. However, many of these treatments are tolerable, and adherence rates are higher than those of the CPAP, making them a more viable treatment option for long-term use. Conclusion Patients need to weigh the benefits and risks of available treatments for OSA. More large randomized controlled studies on treatments or combination of treatments for OSA are needed that measure parameters such as treatment adherence, apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation, subjective sleepiness, quality of life, and adverse events. PMID:27134515

  20. Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing, enuresis and combined disorders in children: chance or related association?

    PubMed

    Zaffanello, Marco; Piacentini, Giorgio; Lippi, Giuseppe; Fanos, Vassilios; Gasperi, Emma; Nosetti, Luana

    2017-02-06

    snoring, sleep apnoeas and restless sleep should be sought for all children with enuresis. Confirmed obstructive sleep-disordered breathing should be treated promptly; subsequently, the persistence of enuresis requires treatment following the standard protocol.

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atrial Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Mathias; Linz, Benedikt; Böhm, Michael; Linz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with relevant morbidity and mortality. Besides hypertension, valvular disease and cardiomyopathy, mainly ischemic and dilated, also other conditions like obesity, alcohol abusus, genetic factors and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are discussed to contribute to the progression from paroxysmal to persistent AF. The prevalence of OSA among patients with AF is 40-50%. OSA is characterized by periodic or complete cessation of effective breathing during sleep due to obstruction of the upper airways. Obstructive respiratory events result in acute intrathoracic pressure swings and profound changes in blood gases together leading to atrial stretch and acute sympatho-vagal dysbalance resulting in acute apnea related to electrophysiological and hemodynamic alterations. Additionally, repetitive obstructive events in patients with OSA may lead to sympathetic and neurohumoral activation and subsequent structural and functional changes in the atrium creating an arrhythmogenic substrate for AF in the long run. This review focuses on the acute and chronic effects of negative thoracic pressure swings, changes in blood pressure and sympatho-vagal dysbalance induced by obstructive respiratory events on atrial electrophysiology and atrial structure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:25004989

  2. Respiratory rate variability in sleeping adults without obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Guillermo; Williams, Jeffrey; Alrehaili, Ghadah A; McLean, Anna; Pirouz, Ramin; Amdur, Richard; Jain, Vivek; Ahari, Jalil; Bawa, Amandeep; Kimbro, Shawn

    2016-09-01

    Characterizing respiratory rate variability (RRV) in humans during sleep is challenging, since it requires the analysis of respiratory signals over a period of several hours. These signals are easily distorted by movement and volitional inputs. We applied the method of spectral analysis to the nasal pressure transducer signal in 38 adults with no obstructive sleep apnea, defined by an apnea-hypopnea index <5, who underwent all-night polysomnography (PSG). Our aim was to detect and quantitate RRV during the various sleep stages, including wakefulness. The nasal pressure transducer signal was acquired at 100 Hz and consecutive frequency spectra were generated for the length of the PSG with the Fast Fourier Transform. For each spectrum, we computed the amplitude ratio of the first harmonic peak to the zero frequency peak (H1/DC), and defined as RRV as (100 - H1/DC) %. RRV was greater during wakefulness compared to any sleep stage, including rapid-eye-movement. Furthermore, RRV correlated with the depth of sleep, being lowest during N3. Patients spent most their sleep time supine, but we found no correlation between RRV and body position. There was a correlation between respiratory rate and sleep stage, being greater in wakefulness than in any sleep stage. We conclude that RRV varies according to sleep stage. Moreover, spectral analysis of nasal pressure signal appears to provide a valid measure of RRV during sleep. It remains to be seen if the method can differentiate normal from pathological sleep patterns.

  3. [The sleep obstructive apnea and hypopnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Cambron, L; Roelants, F; Deflandre, E; Raskin, S; Poirrier, R

    2004-01-01

    Since two decades, sleep breathing disorders are more wisely recognized by the Belgian medical community. Among these, the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA) is the best known but its frontiers with others syndromes such as the Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), the Central Sleep Apnea Syndrome (CSAS) or the Overlap Syndrome are still matter of discussion. Its causes are plurifactorial, and many recent publications draw the attention to its long term effects in the cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric fields. This article summarizes the present definitions and features associated with OSA, from clinical and neurophysiological perspectives, and the different consequences to which untreated or underdiagnosed patients are exposed.

  4. Health Promotion in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: “Health Promotion,” “Sleep Disorders,” “Primary Prevention,” “Health Education,” and “Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes.” Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices. PMID:25992174

  5. Cognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, K; Baril, A-A; Gagnon, J-F; Fortin, M; Décary, A; Lafond, C; Desautels, A; Montplaisir, J; Gosselin, N

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterised by repetitive cessation or reduction of airflow due to upper airway obstructions. These respiratory events lead to chronic sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxemia. Several studies have shown that OSA is associated with daytime sleepiness and cognitive dysfunctions, characterized by impairments of attention, episodic memory, working memory, and executive functions. This paper reviews the cognitive profile of adults with OSA and discusses the relative role of altered sleep and hypoxemia in the aetiology of these cognitive deficits. Markers of cognitive dysfunctions such as those measured with waking electroencephalography and neuroimaging are also presented. The effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on cognitive functioning and the possibility of permanent brain damage associated with OSA are also discussed. Finally, this paper reviews the evidence suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for developing mild cognitive impairment and dementia in the aging population and stresses the importance of its early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Head posture in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Solow, B; Ovesen, J; Nielsen, P W; Wildschiødtz, G; Tallgren, A

    1993-04-01

    In growing subjects, obstruction of the upper airway may lead to excessive vertical facial development. According to the soft-tissue stretching hypothesis (Solow and Kreiborg, 1977) this could be due to an increased cranio-cervical angulation triggered by the airway obstruction. The present study aimed to examine the effect of airway obstruction on cranio-cervical posture in a sample of adult patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Lateral cephalometric radiographs taken in the natural head position (mirror position) were obtained from 50 male patients aged 28-70 with polysomnographic diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea. The Apnoea Index ranged from 21 to 98 episodes per hour with a mean of 54.6. Control samples were available from previous cephalometric studies of head posture in five samples of healthy subjects and one sample of congenitally blind subjects. The average cranio-cervical angle, NSL/OPT, was found to be extremely large (mean 104.1, SD 9.1) exceeding the average values in the control samples by 1-2 standard deviations (P < 0.001). It is suggested that the large cranio-cervical angle in OSA patients is a physiological adaptation aiming to maintain airway adequacy while the head, and thus the visual axis, is kept in its natural relationship to the true vertical. The findings thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that upper airway obstruction may trigger an increase in the cranio-cervical angulation.

  7. New frontiers in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    AYAS, Najib T.; HIRSCH, Allen A. J.; LAHER, Ismail; BRADLEY, T. Douglas; MALHOTRA, Atul; POLOTSKY, Vsevolod Y.; TASALI, Esra

    2015-01-01

    OSA (obstructive sleep apnoea), the most common respiratory disorder of sleep, is caused by the loss of upper airway dilating muscle activity during sleep superimposed on a narrow upper airway. This results in recurrent nocturnal asphyxia. Termination of these events usually requires arousal from sleep and results in sleep fragmentation and hypoxaemia, which leads to poor quality sleep, excessive daytime sleepiness, reduced quality of life and numerous other serious health consequences. Furthermore, patients with untreated sleep apnoea are at an increased risk of hypertension, stroke, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Although there are many predisposing risk factors for OSA, including male gender, endocrine disorders, use of muscle relaxants, smoking, fluid retention and increased age, the strongest risk factor is obesity. The aim of the present review is to focus on three cutting-edge topics with respect to OSA. The section on animal models covers various strategies used to simulate the physiology or the effects of OSA in animals, and how these have helped to understand some of the underlying mechanisms of OSA. The section on diabetes discusses current evidence in both humans and animal models demonstrating that intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation has a negative impact on glucose tolerance. Finally, the section on cardiovascular biomarkers reviews the evidence supporting the use of these biomarkers to both measure some of the negative consequences of OSA, as well as the potential benefits of OSA therapies. PMID:24780001

  8. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Aubertin, G

    2013-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in school-aged children. Tonsillar and/or adenoids hypertrophy is the most common etiology of OSA in children. OSA has been associated with sleep quality disturbance (frequent arousals) and nocturnal gas-exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia and sometimes hypercapnia), complicated with a large array of negative health outcomes. The clinical symptoms are not able to distinguish primary snoring from OSA. Polysomnography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing, but the demand is increasing for this highly technical sleep test. So, some other simpler diagnostic methods are available, as respiratory polygraphy, but need to be validated in children. Treatment of OSA in children must be based on a mutlidisciplinary approach with pediatricians, ENT surgeons and orthodontists.

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Hoffstein, V.

    1987-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a relatively common disorder which is being recognized and diagnosed with increasing frequency. Patients with this disorder are frequently overweight and usually present with longstanding history of heroic snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness. The diagnosis is established with an overnight sleep study, although the decision as to who should be sent to a sleep laboratory must be made on an individual basis, particularly for those whose main complaint is snoring. The major factor in the pathogenesis of this disorder is a narrow and floppy pharyngeal airway. Of the several treatment modalities available at the present time, the most successful is application of continuous positive airway pressure during sleep. PMID:21263879

  10. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: Metabolic complications].

    PubMed

    Frija-Orvoën, E

    2016-06-01

    Strongly linked to the presence of obesity, the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is an independent risk factor for abnormalities of glucose metabolism ranging from simple impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes. It is also a risk factor for dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The pathological mechanisms underlying these associations remain to be precisely discovered, but intermittent hypoxia is probably one of the major factors. The place of obstructive apnea treatment in the management of metabolic conditions remains unclear.

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Mimics Attention Deficit Disorder.

    PubMed

    Blesch, Lauri; Breese McCoy, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit and hyperactivity are known possible symptoms or correlates of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, these associations may be missed in children, because children often fail to report excessive daytime sleepiness, and attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are common primary diagnoses in themselves. We report on a 17-year-old, slender, non-snoring male who presented to his pediatrician with a prolonged history of four complaints: inattention, fidgeting, frequent sinusitis, and somnolence. He was diagnosed with ADHD, while the somnolence, which often abated somewhat upon use of antibiotics for sinusitis, was attributed to the sinus infections. A later sleep study revealed OSA, and thorough additional testing proved that the original ADHD diagnosis was in error. All four conditions were allayed with proper use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine.

  12. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tasali, Esra; Van Cauter, Eve; Ehrmann, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder of pre-menopausal women, is characterized by chronic hyperandrogenism, oligoanovulation, obesity and insulin resistance. Importantly, PCOS women are at increased risk for glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Recent reports indicate an unexpectedly high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in PCOS. Alterations in sex steroids (i.e. high androgen and low estrogen levels) and increased visceral adiposity in PCOS could potentially contribute to the increased prevalence of OSA in this disorder. There is some evidence to suggest that there may be strong associations between the presence and severity of OSA and the metabolic disturbances that characterize PCOS. Causal mechanisms in the link between PCOS and OSA remain to be elucidated. Clinicians who manage PCOS patients should be aware of the high prevalence of OSA in these patients and systematically evaluate these women for sleep disturbances. PMID:19255602

  13. Update on paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is one of the most common causes of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children. It is associated with significant morbidity, potentially impacting on long-term neurocognitive and behavioural development, as well as cardiovascular outcomes and metabolic homeostasis. The low grade systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress seen in this condition are believed to underpin the development of these OSA-related morbidities. The significant variance in degree of end organ morbidity in patients with the same severity of OSA highlights the importance of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors in determining the overall OSA phenotype. This review seeks to summarize the current understanding of the aetiology and mechanisms underlying OSA, its risk factors, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904263

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea presenting as pseudopheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Graja, Sameh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old female with a history of poorly controlled resistant hypertension was admitted to our hospital with severe hypertension. She had a history of fatigue and intermittent episodes of palpitations. Laboratory evaluation was significant for elevated 24-h urinary catecholamine levels (3,5 times the upper normal levels). This case was presenting with a clinical and biochemical picture indistinguishable from that of pheochromocytoma. However, neither computed tomography nor meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine scintigraphy detected any catecholamine-producing tumor in or outside the adrenal glands. Our patient was screened with full polysomnography because of heavy snoring, daytime somnolence and obesity. It revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. After three months of continuous positive airway pressure therapy, the patient experienced resolution of his presenting symptoms, improved blood pressure control and normalization of his urinary catecholamine levels. This case highlights sleep disordered breathing as a potentially reversible cause of pseudo-pheochromocytoma. PMID:27217898

  15. Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Bucca, Caterina; Cicolin, Alessandro; Brussino, Luisa; Arienti, Andrea; Graziano, Alessandra; Erovigni, Francesco; Pera, Paolo; Gai, Valerio; Mutani, Roberto; Preti, Giulio; Rolla, Giovanni; Carossa, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Background Complete tooth loss (edentulism) produces anatomical changes that may impair upper airway size and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether edentulism favours the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods Polysomnography was performed in 48 edentulous subjects on two consecutive nights, one slept with and the other without dentures. Upper airway size was assessed by cephalometry and by recording forced mid-inspiratory airflow rate (FIF50). Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and oral NO (oNO), were measured as markers of airway and oropharyngeal inflammation. Results The apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) without dentures was significantly higher than with dentures (17·4 ± 3·6 versus 11·0 ± 2·3. p = 0·002), and was inversely related to FIF50 (p = 0·017) and directly related to eNO (p = 0·042). Sleeping with dentures, 23 subjects (48%) had an AHI over 5, consistent with OSA, but sleeping without dentures the number of subjects with abnormal AHI rose to 34 (71%). At cephalometry, removing dentures produced a significant decrease in retropharyngeal space (from 1·522 ± 0·33 cm to 1·27 ± 0·42 cm, p = 0·006). Both morning eNO and oNO were higher after the night slept without dentures (eNO 46·1 ± 8·2 ppb versus 33·7 ± 6·3 ppb, p = 0·035, oNO 84·6 ± 13·7 ppb versus 59·2 ± 17·4 ppb, p = 0·001). Conclusion These findings suggest that complete tooth loss favours upper airway obstruction during sleep. This untoward effect seems to be due to decrease in retropharyngeal space and is associated with increased oral and exhaled NO concentration. PMID:16417639

  16. Adenoidectomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Domany, Keren Armoni; Dana, Elad; Tauman, Riva; Gut, Guy; Greenfeld, Michal; Yakir, Bat-El; Sivan, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Adenotonsillectomy is the recommended treatment for children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Since adenoidectomy alone may be associated with significantly lower morbidity, mortality, and cost, we aimed to investigate whether adenoidectomy alone is a reasonable and appropriate treatment for children with OSA. Methods: Five-hundred fifteen consecutive children diagnosed with moderate-to-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index > 5) based on polysomnography and who underwent adenoidectomy or adenotonsillectomy were reevaluated after 17–73 months (mean 41) for residual or recurrent OSA using a validated questionnaire (Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire, PSQ). Failure of OSA resolution was defined as a positive mean PSQ score ≥ 0.33. Contribution of age, obesity, tonsil size, and OSA severity at baseline to adenoidectomy or adenotonsillectomy failure was examined. Results: Positive PSQ score occurred in 15% of the entire sample and was not influenced by age or gender. No difference in failure rate was observed between adenoidectomy and adenotonsillectomy for children who were not obese with apnea-hypopnea index < 10 and had small tonsils (< 3). Children with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 10 and/or tonsil size ≥ 3 showed a higher failure rate after adenoidectomy compared to adenotonsillectomy (20% versus 9.8%, p = 0.028). Conclusions: We suggest that subjective, long term outcomes of adenoidectomy are comparable to those of adenotonsillectomy in non-obese children under 7 years old with moderately OSA and small tonsils. Hence, adenoidectomy alone is a reasonable option in some children. Future prospective randomized studies are warranted to define children who may benefit from adenoidectomy alone and those children in whom adenoidectomy alone is unlikely to succeed. Citation: Domany KA, Dana E, Tauman R, Gut G, Greenfeld M, Yakir BE, Sivan Y. Adenoidectomy for obstructive sleep apnea in children. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1285–1291. PMID:27448429

  17. On the cutting edge of obstructive sleep apnoea: where next?

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Atul; Orr, Jeremy E; Owens, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common disease that is now more widely recognised because of the rise in prevalence and the increasingly compelling data that shows major neurocognitive and cardiovascular sequelae. At the same time, the clinical practice of sleep medicine is changing rapidly, with novel diagnostics and treatments that have established a home-based (rather than laboratory-based) management approach. We review the most recent insights and discoveries in obstructive sleep apnoea, with a focus on diagnostics and therapeutics. As will be discussed, management of obstructive sleep apnoea could soon transition from a so-called one size fits all approach to an individualised approach. PMID:25887980

  18. Newer treatment modalities for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Ignacio E; Marcus, Carole L

    2013-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is common and its prevalence is expected to increase with the current obesity epidemic. If left untreated, it is associated with important morbidity such as growth failure, neurocognitive impairment, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, and endothelial dysfunction. Recent research has shown that many children, especially the obese or those with other underlying medical conditions, have residual obstructive sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy (the primary treatment for childhood obstructive sleep apnea). These children could be effectively treated with continuous positive airway pressure but poor adherence is a significant limitation of this therapy. Therefore, new treatment modalities for the pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are needed. Current research has focused on newer therapies for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, such as anti-inflammatories, dental treatments, high-flow nasal cannula, and weight loss. However, there are few randomized controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of these therapies. Further research is warranted.

  19. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Jor, Ondřej; Novák, Vilém; Matoušek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%). The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n = 17, 33.3%), followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n = 12, 23.5%). Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis) was observed in 16 patients (31.4%). The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3%) patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%). The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA. PMID:28070516

  20. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Hybášková, Jaroslava; Jor, Ondřej; Novák, Vilém; Zeleník, Karol; Matoušek, Petr; Komínek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%). The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n = 17, 33.3%), followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n = 12, 23.5%). Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis) was observed in 16 patients (31.4%). The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3%) patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%). The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA.

  1. Sleep complaints and sleep breathing disorders in upper and lower obstructive lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Matteo; Bagnasco, Diego; Roustan, Valeria; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Braido, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower obstructive lung diseases can induce sleep complaints and can be part of the pathogenesis of sleep breathing disorders. In fact, the physiological changes of the pattern of respiration during sleep, added to the airways disease can lead to symptomatic worsening of rhinitis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD); moreover, their functional and anatomical features can lead to sleep breathing disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This review highlights the above-mentioned relationships and the effect of disease management on its comorbidities and the patient’s quality of life. Rhinitis, asthma and COPD represent causes of sleep complaints that may be reduced with optimal management of these obstructive airways diseases. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of sleep apnea needs to be tailored after optimization of the therapy of concomitant diseases, but it can often ameliorate comorbid disease. PMID:27621908

  2. Epidemiological aspects of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Garvey, John F; Pengo, Martino F; Drakatos, Panagis; Kent, Brian D

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is probably the most common respiratory disorder, with recent data from the United States and Europe suggesting that between 14% and 49% of middle-aged men have clinically significant OSA. The intimate relationship between OSA and obesity means that its prevalence will only increase as the global obesity epidemic evolves. At an individual level, OSA leads to a significant decrease in quality of life (QOL) and functional capacity, alongside a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Emerging data also suggest that the presence and severity of OSA and associated nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cancer. At a societal level, OSA not only leads to reduced economic productivity, but also constitutes a major treatable risk factor for hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. This article addresses OSA from an epidemiological perspective, from prevalence studies to economic aspects to co-morbidity.

  3. [Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    The detection, correction or withdrawal of any cause or associated factor including obesity, drugs or alcohol is essential in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Treatment is mainly mechanical or surgical, but not medical. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) has now largely replaced tracheostomy and successful long-term domestic use of this method has been reported on many occasions. Oropharyngeal surgery can solve a large part of social snoring problems. However criteria for procedure selection and evaluation of results are still needed to clarify the indication of this operation in patients with full clinical expression of the syndrome. In this regard, a comprehensive preoperative evaluation and a logical approach to the reconstruction of the upper-airway has recently led to the association of palatopharyngoplasty and maxillo-mandibular surgery, with an excellent long-term success rate.

  4. Managing obstructive sleep apnoea in children: the role of craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, Maria Fernanda Rabelo; Di Francesco, Renata Cantisani

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is a type of sleep-disordered breathing that affects 1 to 5% of all children. Pharyngeal and palatine tonsil hypertrophy is the main predisposing factor. Various abnormalities are predisposing factors for obstructive sleep apnoea, such as decreased mandibular and maxillary lengths, skeletal retrusion, increased lower facial height and, consequently, increased total anterior facial height, a larger cranio-cervical angle, small posterior airway space and an inferiorly positioned hyoid bone. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, a physical examination and tests confirming the presence and severity of upper airway obstruction. The gold standard test for diagnosis is overnight polysomnography. Attention must be paid to identify the craniofacial characteristics. When necessary, children should be referred to orthodontists and/or sleep medicine specialists for adequate treatment in addition to undergoing an adenotonsillectomy.

  5. Managing obstructive sleep apnoea in children: the role of craniofacial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Bozzini, Maria Fernanda Rabelo; Di Francesco, Renata Cantisani

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is a type of sleep-disordered breathing that affects 1 to 5% of all children. Pharyngeal and palatine tonsil hypertrophy is the main predisposing factor. Various abnormalities are predisposing factors for obstructive sleep apnoea, such as decreased mandibular and maxillary lengths, skeletal retrusion, increased lower facial height and, consequently, increased total anterior facial height, a larger cranio-cervical angle, small posterior airway space and an inferiorly positioned hyoid bone. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, a physical examination and tests confirming the presence and severity of upper airway obstruction. The gold standard test for diagnosis is overnight polysomnography. Attention must be paid to identify the craniofacial characteristics. When necessary, children should be referred to orthodontists and/or sleep medicine specialists for adequate treatment in addition to undergoing an adenotonsillectomy. PMID:27982168

  6. Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Papandreou, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between gluteal adipose tissue fatty acids and sleep quality in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome after controlling for possible confounders. Sixty-three patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome based on overnight attended polysomnography were included. Gluteal adipose tissue fatty acids were analysed by gas chromatography. Anthropometric measurements were carried out. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale. Saturated fatty acids were positively related to total sleep time, sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement sleep. Significant positive associations were found between polyunsaturated fatty acids and sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement sleep. Moreover, n-3 fatty acids were positively associated with sleep efficiency, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. This study revealed independent associations between certain gluteal adipose tissue fatty acids and sleep quality after controlling for age, gender, obesity, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome indices and Zung Self-rating Depression Scale scores in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and its management

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Daniela; Di Maria, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of nocturnal breathing cessation due to upper airway collapse. OSA causes severe symptoms, such as excessive daytime somnolence, and is associated with a significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Different treatment options are now available for an effective management of this disease. After more than three decades from its first use, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is still recognized as the gold standard treatment. Nasal CPAP (nCPAP) is highly effective in controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and reducing the clinical sequelae of sleep apnoea. Other positive airway pressure modalities are available for patients intolerant to CPAP or requiring high levels of positive pressure. Mandibular advancement devices, particularly if custom made, are effective in mild to moderate OSA and provide a viable alternative for patients intolerant to CPAP therapy. The role of surgery remains controversial. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty is a well established procedure and can be considered when treatment with CPAP has failed, whereas maxillar-mandibular surgery can be suggested to patients with a craniofacial malformation. A number of minimally invasive procedures to treat snoring are currently under evaluation. Weight loss improves symptoms and morbidity in all patients with obesity and bariatric surgery is an option in severe obesity. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for an accurate management of the disease. PMID:26336596

  8. Prosthodontic Approach to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Annapurna, K; Suganya, S; Vasanth, R; Kumar, P Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing represents a continuum, ranging from simple snoring sans sleepiness, upper-airway resistance syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, to hypercapnic respiratory failure. Fifty seven articles formed the initial database and a final total of 50 articles were selected to form this review report. Four months were spent on the collection and retrieval of the articles. Articles were selected based on accuracy and evidence in the scientific literature. Oral appliances (OAs) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer them to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, or for those who do not respond to, are not appropriate candidates for, or for those who have failed treatment attempts with CPAP. OAs protrude the mandible and hold it in a forward and downward position. As a consequence, the upper airway enlarges antero-posteriorly and laterally, improving its stability. Although OA are effective in some patients with OSA, they are not universally suitable. Compliance with OAs depends mainly on the balance between the perception of benefit and the side effects. In conclusion, marked variability is illustrated in the individual response to OA therapy and hence the treatment outcome is subjective. PMID:25221691

  9. Facial morphology and obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Capistrano, Anderson; Cordeiro, Aldir; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Almeida, Veridiana Correia; Silva, Priscila Izabela de Castro e; Martinez, Sandra; de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at assessing the relationship between facial morphological patterns (I, II, III, Long Face and Short Face) as well as facial types (brachyfacial, mesofacial and dolichofacial) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients attending a center specialized in sleep disorders. Methods: Frontal, lateral and smile photographs of 252 patients (157 men and 95 women), randomly selected from a polysomnography clinic, with mean age of 40.62 years, were evaluated. In order to obtain diagnosis of facial morphology, the sample was sent to three professors of Orthodontics trained to classify patients' face according to five patterns, as follows: 1) Pattern I; 2) Pattern II; 3) Pattern III; 4) Long facial pattern; 5) Short facial pattern. Intraexaminer agreement was assessed by means of Kappa index. The professors ranked patients' facial type based on a facial index that considers the proportion between facial width and height. Results: The multiple linear regression model evinced that, when compared to Pattern I, Pattern II had the apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) worsened in 6.98 episodes. However, when Pattern II was compared to Pattern III patients, the index for the latter was 11.45 episodes lower. As for the facial type, brachyfacial patients had a mean AHI of 22.34, while dolichofacial patients had a significantly statistical lower index of 10.52. Conclusion: Patients' facial morphology influences OSA. Pattern II and brachyfacial patients had greater AHI, while Pattern III patients showed a lower index. PMID:26691971

  10. Impaired cerebral autoregulation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Fred; Roux, Francoise; Schindler, Joseph; Mohsenin, Vahid

    2008-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases the risk of stroke independent of known vascular and metabolic risk factors. Although patients with OSA have higher prevalence of hypertension and evidence of hypercoagulability, the mechanism of this increased risk is unknown. Obstructive apnea events are associated with surges in blood pressure, hypercapnia, and fluctuations in cerebral blood flow. These perturbations can adversely affect the cerebral circulation. We hypothesized that patients with OSA have impaired cerebral autoregulation, which may contribute to the increased risk of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We examined cerebral autoregulation in patients with and without OSA by measuring cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBFV) by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound and arterial blood pressure using finger pulse photoplethysmography during orthostatic hypotension and recovery as well as during 5% CO(2) inhalation. Cerebral vascular conductance and reactivity were determined. Forty-eight subjects, 26 controls (age 41.0+/-2.3 yr) and 22 OSA (age 46.8+/-2.3 yr) free of cerebrovascular and active coronary artery disease participated in this study. OSA patients had a mean apnea-hypopnea index of 78.4+/-7.1 vs. 1.8+/-0.3 events/h in controls. The oxygen saturation during sleep was significantly lower in the OSA group (78+/-2%) vs. 91+/-1% in controls. The dynamic vascular analysis showed mean CBFV was significantly lower in OSA patients compared with controls (48+/-3 vs. 55+/-2 cm/s; P <0.05, respectively). The OSA group had a lower rate of recovery of cerebrovascular conductance for a given drop in blood pressure compared with controls (0.06+/-0.02 vs. 0.20+/-0.06 cm.s(-2).mmHg(-1); P <0.05). There was no difference in cerebrovascular vasodilatation in response to CO(2). The findings showed that patients with OSA have decreased CBFV at baseline and delayed cerebrovascular compensatory response to changes in blood pressure but not to CO(2). These perturbations may

  11. Implications and interventions related to obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Amy; Untalan, Emylene

    2014-12-01

    Surgical patients with known or unknown obstructive sleep apnea are at increased risk for postoperative complications. By implementing evidence-based practices and a validated screening tool, the postoperative surgical patients at the authors' hospital have a decreased risk of postoperative complications, specifically oversedation. This article discusses the pathophysiology, prevalence, risk factors, care of the postsurgical patient, and use of the validated STOP-Bang questionnaire with obstructive sleep apnea as the focus.

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Cluster Analysis at Time of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Grillet, Yves; Richard, Philippe; Stach, Bruno; Vivodtzev, Isabelle; Timsit, Jean-Francois; Lévy, Patrick; Tamisier, Renaud; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background The classification of obstructive sleep apnea is on the basis of sleep study criteria that may not adequately capture disease heterogeneity. Improved phenotyping may improve prognosis prediction and help select therapeutic strategies. Objectives: This study used cluster analysis to investigate the clinical clusters of obstructive sleep apnea. Methods An ascending hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on baseline symptoms, physical examination, risk factor exposure and co-morbidities from 18,263 participants in the OSFP (French national registry of sleep apnea). The probability for criteria to be associated with a given cluster was assessed using odds ratios, determined by univariate logistic regression. Results: Six clusters were identified, in which patients varied considerably in age, sex, symptoms, obesity, co-morbidities and environmental risk factors. The main significant differences between clusters were minimally symptomatic versus sleepy obstructive sleep apnea patients, lean versus obese, and among obese patients different combinations of co-morbidities and environmental risk factors. Conclusions Our cluster analysis identified six distinct clusters of obstructive sleep apnea. Our findings underscore the high degree of heterogeneity that exists within obstructive sleep apnea patients regarding clinical presentation, risk factors and consequences. This may help in both research and clinical practice for validating new prevention programs, in diagnosis and in decisions regarding therapeutic strategies. PMID:27314230

  13. Increasing the functional residual capacity may reverse obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Cormier, Y; Lampron, N; La Forge, J

    1988-08-01

    We describe the reversal of obstructive sleep apnea with a 0.5 L increase in the functional residual capacity (FRC) in a patient with sleep apnea syndrome. The patient had been treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate for 8 months. The increase in FRC was obtained by applying a constant negative extrathoracic pressure (NEP) with a poncho-type respirator. With pulmonary inflation, there was a dramatic decrease in the apnea index and the percent apnea time, and an improvement in sleep architecture. At all sleep stages, the desaturation duration was shorter with NEP. The exact mechanisms by which pulmonary expansion improved sleep apnea in this patient remain unclear; lung volume dependence of upper airway patency and the improvements in apnea-induced desaturation may be contributing factors. Our observation illustrates that lung volumes may be an important factor in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea, especially in the apnea onset and in the apneic-induced desaturation.

  14. Identification of obstructive sites and patterns in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome by sleep endoscopy in 614 patients.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, F; Costantini, F; Bianchi, A; Amaina, T; Colombo, E; Zibordi, F

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and report sites and patterns of obstruction observed during sleep endoscopy in a large group of patients and suggest consequent therapeutic prescriptions. 614 consecutive patients who approached the Centre for Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Sleep Disorders underwent sleep endoscopy. We used propofol to induce sleep, monitoring the value of bispectral index to evaluate the depth of sedation. For each patient, we recorded obstruction sites,obstruction patterns and the effects of the mandibular pull-up manoeuvre on both obstruction and snoring. We ascertained that, in almost all patients, the noise of snoring was generated at the oropharyngeal level. The obstruction at the oropharyngeal level, either in isolation or in combination with other structures, is far more common. The mandibular pull-up manoeuvre was effective in reducing or resolving the obstruction in a large number of patients, even though their AHI values were high. For those patients having an AHI over 15, we point out the various therapeutic indications gained from the sleep endoscopy examinations. Drug-induced (propofol) sleep endoscopy can be considered be a safe procedure, easily practicable, valid and reliable; we therefore consider it a fundamental clinical investigation that can be essential when choosing treatment.

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Lipid Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Karkinski, Dimitar; Georgievski, Oliver; Dzekova-Vidimliski, Pavlina; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Dokic, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a great interest in the interaction between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic dysfunction, but there is no consistent data suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for dyslipidemia. AIM: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of lipid abnormalities in patients suspected of OSA, referred to our sleep laboratory for polysomnography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred patients referred to our hospital with suspected OSA, and all of them underwent for standard polysomnography. All patients with respiratory disturbance index (RDI) above 15 were diagnosed with OSA. In the morning after 12 hours fasting, the blood sample was collected from all patients. Blood levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), were determined in all study patients. In the study, both OSA positive and OSA negative patients were divided according to the body mass index (BMI) in two groups. The first group with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 and the second group with BMI > 30 kg/m^2. RESULTS: OSA positive patients with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 had statistically significant higher levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, and statistically significant lower level of HDL compared to OSA negative patients with BMI ≤ 30. There were no statistically significant differences in age and LDL levels between these groups. OSA positive patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2 had higher levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL and lower levels of HDL versus OSA negative patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2, but without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSION: OSA and obesity are potent risk factors for dyslipidemias. OSA could play a significant role in worsening of lipid metabolism in non-obese patients. But in obese patients, the extra weight makes the metabolic changes of lipid metabolism, and the role of OSA is not that very important like in non-obese patients. PMID

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea and the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Głebocka, A; Kossowska, A; Bednarek, M

    2006-09-01

    Patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are unaware of clinical symptoms, such as cessation of breathing during sleep, decrease in blood oxygen levels, severe sleep fragmentation, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Equally worrying is a low level of knowledge among physicians, psychiatrists, and psychologists of the intellectual and emotional impact of OSA. The illness may lead to anxiety, depression, psychosis, and other pathological symptoms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate relationships among OSA, quality of life, and psychological performance. STAI, UMACL, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Framingham Type A Scale, the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS), the Life Orientation Test - Revised (LOT-R), and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) were applied. The tests were used to describe the well-being and pathological symptoms, such as depression or anxiety, in a clinical group (newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients) in comparison with a control group (healthy volunteers). The results of the tests failed to substantiate the presence of significant differences between the clinical and control groups. We put forward a hypothesis that the rather unexpected lack of psychological differences might stem from a rapid mood improvement in OSA patients on anticipation of being diagnosed and taken care of in the hospital setting. Followed-up studies in the same patients are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  17. Update on obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Brian; Ezzie, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and preventable lung disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also common. It is not surprising that many people with COPD also suffer from OSA. This relationship, however, puts people at risk for more nocturnal desaturations and potential complications related to this, including pulmonary hypertension and heart rhythm disturbances. This update focuses on the physiology of sleep disturbances in COPD as well as the clinical implications of OSA in COPD. PMID:24748786

  18. Atrial fibrillation in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with rising incidence. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among patients with AF. This observation has prompted significant research in understanding the relationship between OSA and AF. Multiple studies support a role of OSA in the initiation and progression of AF. This association has been independent of obesity, body mass index and hypertension. Instability of autonomic tone and wide swings in intrathoracic pressure are seen in OSA. These have been mechanistically linked to initiation of AF in OSA patients by lowering atrial effective refractory period, promoting pulmonary vein discharges and atrial dilation. OSA not only promotes initiation of AF but also makes management of AF difficult. Drug therapy and electrical cardioversion for AF are less successful in presence of OSA. There has been higher rate of early and overall recurrence after catheter ablation of AF in patients with OSA. Treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure has been shown to improve control of AF. However, additional studies are needed to establish a stronger relationship between OSA treatment and success of AF therapies. There should be heightened suspicion of OSA in patients with AF. There is a need for guidelines to screen for OSA as a part of AF management. PMID:23802045

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by NIRS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Feraydune; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed at determining cerebral hemodynamic parameters in human subjects during breath holding using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath holding serves as a method of simulation OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea). Data was acquired non-invasively from 40 subjects, twenty OSA sufferers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-70 years), and twenty normal volunteers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-65 years). Measurements were conducted using a LED Imager (LEDI) during breath holding. In comparing OSA subjects with controls during breath holding, a consistent increase or even a decrease in oxy- ([O IIHb]), deoxy- ([HHb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentrations, and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO II) in the regional brain tissue were observed. The LEDI probe consists of 4 sources and 10 detectors serving as 4 sets of 1 source and 4 detectors each. A three wavelength (730, 805, and 850 nm) LED was used and the wavelengths were switched sequentially. The distance between sources and the source-detector separation were 2.5 cm. Data acquisition consisted of three segments, baseline for one minute, followed by a period of breath holding, and then 2 minutes of recovery time. The duration of the breath holding was subject-dependent. Our investigation proves that NIR spectroscopy could be used as a tool for detecting cerebral hemodynamics and also serves as a method of screening patients with OSA.

  20. Effect of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Dan M; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Kerfeld, Mitchell J; Hambsch, Zakary J; Reisbig, Mark D; Agrawal, Devendra K; Youngblood, Charles F

    2014-11-01

    The perioperative care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is currently receiving much attention due to an increased risk for complications. It is established that postoperative changes in sleep architecture occur and this may have pathophysiological implications for OSA patients. Upper airway muscle activity decreases during rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Severe OSA patients exhibit exaggerated chemoreceptor-driven ventilation during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), which leads to central and obstructive apnea. This article critically reviewed the literature relevant to preoperative screening for OSA, prevalence of OSA in surgical populations and changes in postoperative sleep architecture relevant to OSA patients. In particular, we addressed three questions in regard to the effects of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture, the underlying mechanisms and the relevance to OSA. Indeed, these classes of drugs alter sleep architecture, which likely significantly contributes to abnormal postoperative sleep architecture, exacerbation of OSA and postoperative complications.

  1. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation improves obstructive sleep apnea: 12-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kezirian, Eric J; Goding, George S; Malhotra, Atul; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Zammit, Gary; Wheatley, John R; Catcheside, Peter G; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Claman, David M; Huntley, Tod; Park, Steven Y; Campbell, Matthew C; Palme, Carsten E; Iber, Conrad; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Barnes, Maree

    2014-02-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is a key contributor to obstructive sleep apnea pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation activates upper airway dilator muscles, including the genioglossus, and has the potential to reduce obstructive sleep apnea severity. The objective of this study was to examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel hypoglossal nerve stimulation system (HGNS; Apnex Medical, St Paul, MN, USA) in treating obstructive sleep apnea at 12 months following implantation. Thirty-one subjects (35% female, age 52.4 ± 9.4 years) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and unable to tolerate positive airway pressure underwent surgical implantation and activation of the hypoglossal nerve stimulation system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. Primary outcomes were changes in obstructive sleep apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index, from in-laboratory polysomnogram) and sleep-related quality of life [Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)]. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation was used on 86 ± 16% of nights for 5.4 ± 1.4 h per night. There was a significant improvement (P < 0.001) from baseline to 12 months in apnea-hypopnea index (45.4 ± 17.5 to 25.3 ± 20.6 events h(-1) ) and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire score (14.2 ± 2.0 to 17.0 ± 2.4), as well as other polysomnogram and symptom measures. Outcomes were stable compared with 6 months following implantation. Three serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal; and two stimulation lead cuff dislodgements requiring replacement. There were no significant adverse events with onset later than 6 months following implantation. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation demonstrated favourable safety, feasibility and efficacy.

  2. Dynamic Drug-Induced Sleep Computed Tomography in Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lo, Yu-Lun; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Lee, Li-Ang

    2016-01-01

    Surgical success for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) depends on identifying sites of obstruction in the upper airway. In this study, we investigated sites of obstruction by evaluating dynamic changes in the upper airway using drug-induced sleep computed tomography (DI-SCT) in patients with OSA. Thirty-five adult patients with OSA were prospectively enrolled. Sleep was induced with propofol under light sedation (bispectral index 70–75), and low-dose 320-detector row CT was performed for 10 seconds over a span of 2–3 respiratory cycles with supporting a continuous positive airway pressure model. Most (89%) of the patients had multi-level obstructions. Total obstruction most commonly occurred in the velum (86%), followed by the tongue (57%), oropharyngeal lateral wall (49%), and epiglottis (26%). There were two types of anterior-posterior obstruction of the soft palate, uvular (94%) and velar (6%), and three types of tongue obstruction, upper (30%), lower (37%), and upper plus lower obstruction (33%). DI-SCT is a fast and safe tool to identify simulated sleep airway obstruction in patients with OSA. It provides data on dynamic airway movement in the sagittal view which can be used to differentiate palate and tongue obstructions, and this can be helpful when planning surgery for patients with OSA. PMID:27762308

  3. Genetic associations with obstructive sleep apnea traits in Hispanic/Latino Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and premature mortality. Although there is strong clinical and epidemiologic evidence supporting the importance of genetic factors in influencing obstructive sleep apnea, its genetic bas...

  4. Neurocognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; Strange, Charlie; Bachman, David

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder with far-reaching health implications. One of the major consequences of OSAS is an impact on neurocognitive functioning. Several studies have shown that OSAS has an adverse effect on inductive and deductive reasoning, attention, vigilance, learning, and memory. Neurocognitive impairment can be measured objectively with tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, the Steer Clear Performance Test, and tests of repetitive finger tapping. In children, OSAS may cause attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in addition to behavioral problems and learning disabilities. Risk factors for cognitive impairment include increasing age, male sex, apolipoprotein E ε4 allele positivity, current cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, Down syndrome, hypothyroidism, significant alcohol consumption, stroke, and the use of psychoactive medications. At a cellular level, OSAS likely causes cognitive impairment through intermittent hypoxia, hormonal imbalance, and/or systemic inflammation, either independently or via the resultant endothelial dysfunction that occurs. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be measured and minimized in all studies of neurocognitive impairment. Recent studies have used functional and structural neuroimaging to delineate the brain areas affected in patients with OSAS with neurocognitive dysfunction. A common finding in several of these studies is decreased hippocampal volume. Other affected brain areas include the frontal and parietal lobes of the brain, which show focal reductions in gray matter. These changes can be reversed at least partially with the use of CPAP, which highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of OSAS. The currently available data in this field are quite limited, and more research is needed.

  5. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    BRODIE, FRANK L.; CHARLSON, EMILY S.; ALEMAN, TOMAS S.; SALVO, REBECCA T.; GEWAILY, DINA Y.; LAU, MARISA K.; FARREN, NEIL D.; ENGELHARD, STEPHANIE B.; PISTILLI, MAXWELL; BRUCKER, ALEXANDER J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Methods Patients with CSCR without a history of steroid use or secondary retinal disease were matched based on age/gender/body mass index with control patients and administered the Berlin Questionnaire to assess for OSA risk. Patients were scored “OSA+” if they were at “high risk” on the Berlin Questionnaire or reported a previous OSA diagnosis. Rates of OSA+ were compared between the 2 groups, odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval was calculated using exact conditional logistic regression. Results Forty-eight qualifying patients with CSCR were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the CSCR and control groups by age (mean = 55 years), gender (79% male), body mass index (mean = 28.2), history of diabetes, or hypertension. Within the CSCR group, 22 patients (45.8%) were OSA+ versus 21 control patients (43.8%) (difference = 2.1%; 95% confidence interval, −18.2% to 22.2%; exact odds ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval, 0.47–2.49; P = 1.00). Conclusion When compared with matched controls, patients with CSCR did not have statistically significant higher rates of OSA risk or previous diagnosis. This finding contrasts with previous work showing a strong association between the diseases. The divergence is likely due to our matching controls for body mass index, a significant risk factor for OSA. PMID:25127049

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Women’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jehan, Shazia; Auguste, Evan; Zizi, Ferdinand; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Gupta, Ravi; Attarian, Hrayr; Jean-Louis, Giradin; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristics of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are airflow limitation, chronic intermittent hypoxia, or apnea; which may lead to tissue hypoperfusion and recurrent arousal from sleep. These episodes of hypoxia or apnea can lead to tissue inflammation, and are causal factors of disturbed sleep in both men and women. Several lines of evidence suggest that sleep patterns differ along the lifespan in both male and female subjects, and this may result from the influence of female gonadotropic hormones on sleep. Compared to men, women have more sleep complaints, as women’s sleep is not only influenced by gonadotropins, but also by conditions related to these hormones, such as pregnancy. It is therefore not surprising that sleep disturbances are seen during menopause, too. Factors that may play a role in this type of SDB in women include vasomotor symptoms, changing reproductive hormone levels, circadian rhythm abnormalities, mood disorders, coexistent medical conditions, and lifestyle factors. PMID:28239685

  7. The Predictors of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingöl, Züleyha; Kıyan, Esen

    2017-01-01

    Background: As obesity increases, the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increases also. However, obesity hypoventilation syndrome frequency is not known, as capnography and arterial blood gas analysis are not routinely performed in sleep laboratories. Aims: To investigate the frequency and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in obese subjects. Study Design: Retrospective clinical study. Methods: Obese subjects who had arterial blood gas analysis admitted to the sleep laboratory and polysomnography were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects with restrictive (except obesity) and obstructive pulmonary pathologies were excluded. Demographics, Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale scores, polysomnographic data, arterial blood gas analysis, and spirometric measurements were recorded. Results: Of the 419 subjects, 45.1% had obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Apnea hypopnea index (p<0.001), oxygen desaturation index (p<0.001) and sleep time with SpO2<90% (p<0.001) were statistically higher in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome compared to subjects with eucapnic obstructive sleep apnea. The nocturnal mean SpO2 (p<0.001) and lowest SpO2 (p<0.001) were also statistically lower in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Logistic regression analysis showed that the lowest SpO2, oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% were related factors for obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Conclusion: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome should be considered when oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% are high. PMID:28251022

  8. Gender Differences in Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Treatment Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Christine M.; Davidson, Terence M.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common cause of daytime sleepiness for millions of Americans. It is also a disease associated with an increased likelihood of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, daytime sleepiness, motor vehicle accidents, and diminished quality of life. A number of population based studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea is more common in men than in women and this discrepancy is often evident in the clinical setting. There are a number of pathophysiological differences to suggest why men are more prone to the disease than women. Although the exact mechanisms are unknown, differences in obesity, upper airway anatomy, breathing control, hormones, and aging are all thought to play a role. The purpose of this review was to examine the literature on gender differences in obstructive sleep apnea and to analyze whether or not these differences in pathogenic mechanisms affect diagnosis or treatment. PMID:18951050

  9. Does medically induced weight loss improve obstructive sleep apnoea in the obese: review of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Hemmingsson, E

    2011-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is characterized by repeated periods of breathing cessation during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnoea is both common and underdiagnosed in the obese. A recent study found that as many as 86% of older obese type 2 diabetics had obstructive sleep apnoea. Obesity is independently associated with developing obstructive sleep apnoea, and the reverse may also occur. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea is therefore expected to rise in the wake of the obesity epidemic. The number of partial (hypopnoea) or complete (apnoea) airway obstructions per hour (apnoea-hypopnoea index) is used to classify obstructive sleep apnoea as mild (5-14 events per hour), moderate (15-30) or severe (>30). Severe obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with a two to sixfold increase in all-cause mortality; the impact of mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnoea is less clear. Until recently, the evidence supporting a beneficial effect of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnoea has been limited by a lack of randomized trials. In 2009, at least three randomized controlled trials evaluated whether medically induced weight loss improves obstructive sleep apnoea. The treatment effect ranged from 42% to 62% improvement, although the highest estimate was seen in a very short duration study (9 weeks). Patients who either lost 10-15 kg or more, or had severe obstructive sleep apnoea at baseline, benefited most from treatment.

  10. CT demonstration of pharyngeal narrowing in adult obstructive sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlman, M.E.; Haponik, E.F.; Smith, P.L.; Allen, R.P.; Bleecker, E.R.; Goldman, S.M.

    1983-03-01

    Sleep apnea is a major cause of daytime hypersomnolence. Among the proposed etiologies, focal obstruction of the airways at the level of the pharynx has been suggested but not proven. Using computed tomography, the cross-sectional area of the airway can be readily assessed. Thirty-three adults with clinically proven sleep apnea and 12 normal adults underwent systematic computed tomography of the neck. Significant airway narrowing was demonstrated in all the patients with obstructive sleep apnea, whereas no such narrowing was seen in the controls. In 11, the narrowing was at a single level, whereas in 22 patients two or more levels were affected. This study has shown that a structurally abnormal airway may serve as an anatomic substrate for the development of sleep apnea. On the basis of this evidence, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty has been performed in two patients with relief of symptoms in one.

  11. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care.

  12. Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with peripheral vasoconstriction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imadojemu, Virginia A.; Gleeson, Kevin; Gray, Kristen S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Leuenberger, Urs A.

    2002-01-01

    Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with a substantial transient blood pressure elevation. The mechanism of this pressor response is unclear. In this study we measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (Psa), and mean limb blood velocity as an index of blood flow (MBV, Doppler) and calculated changes in limb vascular resistance during and after apneas during both wakefulness and sleep in patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Immediately postapnea during sleep Psa increased significantly compared with the earlier stages of apnea and this was preceded by a rise of MSNA (n = 5). In contrast to blood pressure, MBV remained unchanged. Because resistance = blood pressure/blood flow, limb vascular resistance increased by 29 +/- 8% from late apnea to postapnea (n = 7, p < 0.002). Voluntary breathhold maneuvers during room air exposure evoked similar responses (n = 10). Supplemental oxygen administered via nonrebreather face mask attenuated the MSNA and vasoconstrictor responses to obstructive (n = 2) and voluntary apneas (n = 10). Our data suggest that obstructive apneas in patients with the obstructive apnea syndrome are accompanied by transient limb vasoconstriction. This vasoconstrictor response appears to be, at least in part, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and may be linked to hypoxia.

  13. Inflammatory cytokines in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Guilleminault, Christian; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Cheng, Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lee, Li-Ang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with chronic systemic inflammation and with cognitive impairments. This study aimed to investigate the status of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interleukin 23 (IL-23) and cognition in pediatric OSA. Controls and OSA children participated in the study. Exclusion criteria were adenotonsillectomy, heart, neurological and severe psychiatric diseases, craniofacial syndromes, and obesity. Polysomnogram was followed by serum testing for inflammatory markers and neurocognitive tests such as continuous performance task (CPT) and Wisconsin card sorting test, questionnaires, analyses of plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-17, and IL-23. Seventy-nine, 4 to 12-year-old subjects in 2 groups ended the study: 47 nonobese OSA children (mean age = 7.84 ± 0.56 years, body mass index [BMI] = 16.95 ± 0.47 kg/m2, BMI z-score = 0.15 ± 0.21, and mean apnea–hypopnea index [AHI] = 9.13 ± 1.67 events/h) and 32 healthy control children (mean age = 7.02 ± 0.65 years, with BMI = 16.55 ± 0.58 kg/m2, BMI z-score = −0.12 ± 0.27, and mean AHI = 0.41 ± 0.07 event/h) were enrolled. Serum cytokine analyses showed significantly higher levels of HS-CRP, IL-17, and IL-23 in OSA children (P = 0.002, P = 0.024, and P = 0.047). Regression test showed significant influence of HS-CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, and specifically IL-23, with the continuous performance test and Wisconsin card sorting test. OSA children have abnormal levels of IL-17, an interleukin related to T helper 17 cells, a T helper cell involved in development of autoimmunity and inflammation. This high expression level may contribute to the complications of pediatric OSA; we also found a significant influence of inflammatory cytokines, particularly IL-23, on abnormal neurocognitive testing. PMID

  14. Ultrasonographic Detection of Airway Obstruction in a Model of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Isaiah, Amal; Mezrich, Reuben; Wolf, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common clinical disorder characterized by repetitive airway obstruction during sleep. The gold standard for diagnosis of OSA, polysomnogram (PSG), cannot anatomically localize obstruction. Precise identification of obstruction has potential to improve outcomes following surgery. Current diagnostic modalities that provide this information require anesthesia, involve ionizing radiation or disrupt sleep. To mitigate these problems, we conceived that ultrasound (US) technology may be adapted (i) to detect, quantify and localize airway obstruction and (ii) for translational application to home-based testing for OSA. Materials and Methods Segmental airway collapse was induced in 4 fresh cadavers by application of negative pressure. Following visualization of airway obstruction, a rotary US probe was used to acquire transcervical images of the airway before and after induction of obstruction. These images (n=800) were analyzed offline using image processing algorithms. Results Our results show that the non-obstructed airway consistently demonstrated the presence of a US air-tissue interface. Importantly, automated detection of the air-tissue interface strongly correlated with manual measurements. The algorithm correctly detected an air-tissue interface in 90% of the US images while incorrectly detecting it in 20% (area under the curve=0.91). Conclusion The non-invasive detection of airway obstruction using US represents a major step in expanding OSA diagnostics beyond PSG. The preliminary data obtained from our model could spur further research in non-invasive localization of obstruction. US offers the benefit of precise localization of the site of obstruction, with potential for improving outcomes in surgical management PMID:28345075

  15. Sleep-related sweating in obstructive sleep apnoea: association with sleep stages and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Thorleifsdottir, Bjorg; Svanborg, Eva; Olafsson, Isleifur; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sleep-related sweating as a symptom of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Fifteen otherwise healthy male non-smoking patients with untreated moderate-to-severe OSA underwent polysomnography, including measurements of skin and core body temperature and electrodermal activity (EDA) as an objective indicator of sweating. Evening and morning blood pressure was measured as well as catecholamines in nocturnal urine. All measurements were repeated after 3 months on successful continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. The untreated OSA subjects had a mean (+/-SD) apnoea-hypopnoea index of 45.3 +/- 3.9 and a mean EDA index during sleep of 131.9 +/- 22.4 events per hour. Patients with higher EDA indices had higher systolic blood pressure in the evening and morning (P = 0.001 and 0.006) and lower rapid eye movement (REM) sleep percentage (P = 0.003). The EDA index decreased significantly to 78.5 +/- 17.7 in the patients on CPAP treatment (P = 0.04). The decrease correlated with lower evening systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.05 and 0.006) and an increase in REM% (P = 0.02). No relationship was observed between EDA and skin or core body temperature, or to catecholamine levels in urine. OSA patients who experience sleep-related sweating may have increased blood pressure and decreased REM sleep compared with other OSA patients. CPAP treatment appears to lower blood pressure and increase REM sleep to a higher extent in these patients compared with other OSA patients.

  16. Updates on definition, consequences, and management of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Park, John G; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J

    2011-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep that has implications beyond disrupted sleep. It is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac, neurologic, and perioperative morbidities. Yet this disorder remains undiagnosed in a substantial portion of our population. It is imperative for all physicians to remain vigilant in identifying patients with signs and symptoms consistent with OSA. This review focuses on updates in the areas of terminology and testing, complications of untreated OSA, perioperative considerations, treatment options, and new developments in this field.

  17. Updates on Definition, Consequences, and Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Park, John G.; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep that has implications beyond disrupted sleep. It is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac, neurologic, and perioperative morbidities. Yet this disorder remains undiagnosed in a substantial portion of our population. It is imperative for all physicians to remain vigilant in identifying patients with signs and symptoms consistent with OSA. This review focuses on updates in the areas of terminology and testing, complications of untreated OSA, perioperative considerations, treatment options, and new developments in this field. PMID:21628617

  18. Sleep structure in patients with periodic limb movements and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Jorge; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Toledo, Estefania; Urrestarazu, Elena; Alegre, Manuel; Viteri, Cesar; Salvador, Javier; Baptista, Peter; Alcaide, Belen; Artieda, Julio

    2009-08-01

    Periodic limb movements (PLM) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are two frequent sleep disorders which often occur in the same patient. The goal of this study was to know the influence of the presence of PLM in the sleep architecture in patients with and without OSAS. Two hundred twenty consecutive patients (69 women and 151 men) participated in this transversal study. They were patients with clinical suspicion of dysomnia, including snoring, OSAS, and PLM. All of them underwent a full polysomnography and were interviewed using questionnaires about the sleep quality. The sleep parameters (percentage of sleep stages, rapid eye movement latency, sleep efficiency, awakenings, PLM presence, apnea-hypopnea index) were calculated and compared between groups. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric distribution techniques were used for the analysis. Patients with PLM when compared with patients with OSAS had lower sleep efficiency and less rapid eye movement percentage. The presence of PLM in patients with sleep apnea was less relevant being responsible only for an increase in the rapid eye movement latency and a decrease in the duration of the three to four sleep stages. However, the presence of OSAS was related to a better sleep efficiency (patients with PLM plus OSAS had a better sleep efficiency than patients with only PLM). PLM alters the structure of sleep. In patients with sleep apnea, the presence of PLM is less relevant.

  19. Automatic Video Analysis for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Jorge; Muñoz-Ferrer, Aida; Cervantes, Miguel Ángel; Esquinas, Cristina; Marin, Alicia; Martínez, Carlos; Morera, Josep; Ruiz, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: We investigated the diagnostic accuracy for the identification of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its severity of a noninvasive technology based on image processing (SleepWise). Methods: This is an observational, prospective study to evaluate the degree of agreement between polysomnography (PSG) and SleepWise. We recruited 56 consecutive subjects with suspected OSA who were referred as outpatients to the Sleep Unit of the Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol (HUGTiP) from January 2013 to January 2014. All patients underwent laboratory PSG and image processing with SleepWise simultaneously the same night. Both PSG and SleepWise analyses were carried independently and blindly. Results: We analyzed 50 of the 56 patients recruited. OSA was diagnosed through PSG in a total of 44 patients (88%) with a median apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 25.35 (24.9). According to SleepWise, 45 patients (90%) met the criteria for a diagnosis of OSA, with a median AHI of 22.8 (22.03). An analysis of the ability of PSG and SleepWise to classify patients by severity on the basis of their AHI shows that the two diagnostic systems distribute the different groups similarly. According to PSG, 23 patients (46%) had a diagnosis of severe OSA, 11 patients (22%) moderate OSA, and 10 patients (20%) mild OSA. According to SleepWise, 20, 13, and 12 patients (40%, 26%, and 24%, respectively) had a diagnosis of severe, moderate, and mild OSA respectively. For OSA diagnosis, SleepWise was found to have sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 83% in relation to PSG. The positive predictive value was 97% and the negative predictive value was 100%. The Bland-Altman plot comparing the mean AHI values obtained through PSG and SleepWise shows very good agreement between the two diagnostic techniques, with a bias of −3.85, a standard error of 12.18, and a confidence interval of −0.39 to −7.31. Conclusions: SleepWise was reasonably accurate for noninvasive and automatic diagnosis

  20. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hypertension. Evidence of their relationship].

    PubMed

    González-Pliego, José Angel; González-Marines, David; Guzmán-Sánchez, César Manuel; Odusola-Vázquez, Samuel O

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze the relation between obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension. We present epidemiological data of the respiratory disorder and its association with high blood pressure, as well as physiopathological interactions between both conditions, the diagnostic methods, and the impact of treatment on pathophysiology and prognosis.

  1. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy in the obstructive sleep apnea: comparison between NOHL and VOTE classifications.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Viana, Alonço; Mendes, Daniella Leitão; de Andrade Lemes, Lucas Neves; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Neves, Denise Duprat; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete collapse of the pharynx that result in a decrease in oxyhemoglobin saturation. Nasofibrolaryngoscopy under induced sleep is a promising alternative for identifying sites of upper airway obstruction in patients with OSA. This study aimed to compare the obstruction sites screened by drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) using the Nose oropharynx hypopharynx and larynx (NOHL) and Velum oropharynx tongue base epiglottis (VOTE) classifications. We also determined the relationship between OSA severity and the number of obstruction sites and compared the minimum SaO2 levels between DISE and polysomnography (PSG). This was a prospective study in 45 patients with moderate and severe OSA using DISE with target-controlled infusion of propofol bispectral index (BIS) monitoring. The retropalatal region was the most frequent obstruction site, followed by the retrolingual region. Forty-two percent of patients had obstruction in the epiglottis. Concentrically shaped obstructions were more prevalent in both ratings. The relationship between OSA severity and number of obstruction sites was significant for the VOTE classification. Similar minimum SaO2 values were observed in DISE and PSG. The VOTE classification was more comprehensive in the analysis of the epiglottis and pharynx by DISE and the relationship between OSA severity and number of affected sites was also established by VOTE. The use of BIS associated with DISE is a reliable tool for the assessment of OSA patients.

  2. [Obstructive laryngeal disease and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, a combination with serious peri-operative risk].

    PubMed

    Ayuso, M A; Sánchez-Etayo, G; Polanco, M; Risco, R

    2014-11-01

    We present the case of a patient who was diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, and large Reinke laryngeal oedemas that were removed by transoral laser microsurgery. In the immediate post-operative period acute respiratory insufficiency occurred due to pharyngeal collapse that required emergency re-intubation, after which the patient was transferred to the ICU where mechanical ventilation was given for 18h. Subsequent progress was normal. We describe the combination of various risk-factors related to anaesthetic management and the importance of considering each one of them, especially the preoperative detection of the severity of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

  3. Neurobehavioral functioning in obstructive sleep apnea: differential effects of sleep quality, hypoxemia and subjective sleepiness.

    PubMed

    Naismith, S; Winter, V; Gotsopoulos, H; Hickie, I; Cistulli, P

    2004-02-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between neuropsychological and affective functioning, subjective sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing in 100 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Using principal components analysis, three indices of sleep-disordered breathing were identified from polysomnography: sleep disturbance, extent of nocturnal hypoxemia, and sleep quality. Poorer sleep quality was related to slower processing speed, somatic symptomatology and tension-anxiety levels. Nocturnal hypoxemia was related to visuconstructional abilities, processing speed and mental flexibility. Patients who had high levels of subjective sleepiness had poorer performances on a complex task of executive functioning and higher levels of tension-anxiety. These results imply a differential effect of sleep-disordered breathing on domains of neuropsychological functioning. Additionally, they suggest that a patient's subjective level of sleepiness is a good predictor of certain aspects of neurobehavioral functioning.

  4. Association of naso-Oro-pharyngeal structures with the sleep architecture in suspected obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Pawan; Gupta, Ravi; Sharma, Rajanish; Mishra, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to find out the association of various naso-oro-pharyngeal structures with sleep macro-architecture in suspected obstructive sleep apnea subjects. Study included 51 subjects with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Subjects with possible central apnea and those consuming any substance that can affect sleep architecture were excluded. Level I polysomnography was performed after thorough physical examination. Overnight study was scored in 30 s epochs to find out the polysomnographic variables. Surgical treatment was offered wherever indicated. Subjects with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were manually titrated on CPAP with the polysomnogram. SPSS v 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. We did not find any difference in the sleep architecture between genders. Sleep Efficiency was better in subjects with dental overjet, dental attrition, high tongue base, macroglossia, lesser oral cavity volume, edematous uvula, increased submental fat, hypertrophied facial muscles and Mallampatti grade III-IV. Shorter Sleep Latency was seen in subjects with tender TMJ and Mallampatti Gr III-IV. REM latency was shorter in subjects with high tongue base, macroglossia and hypertrophied muscles of mastication. Increased REM was observed in subjects with high tongue base, edematous uvula and tender TMJ. Enlarged tonsils had reversed effect with poor sleep efficiency, increased REM latency and decreased REM. CPAP therapy (N = 20) lessened awake time, decreased N2 and increased REM. Oro-pharyngeal structures affect the sleep architecture in suspected OSA subjects. Nasal structures do not affect the sleep architecture in these subjects and enlarged tonsils have opposite effect. Sleep architecture changes on the titration night with CPAP.

  5. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on sleep-wake stage ratio.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrew Keong; Guan, Cuntai

    2012-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experience fragmented sleep and exhibit different sleep architectures. While polysomnographic metrics for quantifying sleep architecture are studied, there is little information about the impact of OSA on the ratio of different sleep-wake stages (wake, W; rapid eye movement, REM; non-REM stages 1 to 3, N1 to N3). This study, therefore, aims to investigate the relationship between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, a measure of OSA severity) and all possible ratios of sleep-wake stages. Sleep architectures of 24 adult subjects with suspected OSA were constructed according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine scoring manual, and subsequently analyzed through various correlation (Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall) and regression (linear, logarithmic, exponential, and power-law) approaches. Results show a statistically significant positive, linear and monotonic correlation between AHI and REM/N3, as well as between AHI and N1/W (p-values < 0.05). These findings imply that patients with increased severity of OSA may spend more time in REM than deep sleep, and in light sleep than wake (or less time in deep sleep than REM, and in wake than light sleep). A power-law regression model may possibly explain the relationships of AHI-REM/N3 and AHI-N1/W, and predict the value of AHI using REM/N3 or N1/W.

  6. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and <10 events/hour) in patients with OSAHS. This prospective cohort study recruited 36 OSAHS patients for 6-hour snoring sound recordings during in-lab full-night polysomnography, drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), and relocation pharyngoplasty. All patients received follow-up polysomnography after 6 months. Fifteen (42%) patients with at least two complete obstruction sites defined by DISE were significantly, positively associated with maximal snoring sound intensity (40–300 Hz; odds ratio [OR], 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.49) and body mass index (OR, 1.48, 95% CI 1.02–2.15) after logistic regression analysis. Tonsil obstruction was significantly, inversely correlated with mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz; OR, 0.84, 95% CI 0.74–0.96). Moreover, baseline tonsil obstruction detected by either DISE or mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz), and AHI could significantly predict the surgical response. Our findings suggest that snoring sound detection may be helpful in determining obstruction sites and predict surgical responses. PMID:27471038

  7. Is there a place for teaching obstructive sleep apnea and snoring in the predoctoral dental curriculum?

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Hottel, Timothy L; Pancratz, Frank

    2012-12-01

    The widespread prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and apneic snoring is both alarming and well documented. Sleep disorders affect one out of five Americans. Yet, during an attempt to study the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring among patients at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, a search through the entire school's database for the terms "sleep apnea" and "snoring" found only ninety-two patients who admitted to snoring. Currently, the condition "sleep apnea" is not even on the school's list of health/medical questions. These figures not only are inconsistent with national statistics, but confirm that more needs to be done to make dental students aware of these disorders, include them in patient medical histories, and ultimately educate patients about therapies that can help. Considering the health concerns related to this sleep disorder, the economic impact of insomnia and daytime sleepiness, as well as the fact that the dentist is well poised to reduce symptoms and increase the quality of life among sufferers, mandibular advancement devices should become an educational standard in the predoctoral clinical curriculum of dental schools. Predoctoral clinical curricula need to reflect this current health trend and train dentists to care for these patients comprehensively.

  8. Parasomnia Overlap Disorder with Sexual Behaviors during Sleep in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Soca, Rodolfo; Keenan, Joseph C.; Schenck, Carlos H.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep-related abnormal sexual behaviors (sexsomnia) are classified as a subtype of NREM sleep parasomnias. Sexsomnia has been reported as part of parasomnia overlap disorder (POD) in two other patients. We present the case of a 42-year-old male patient with video-polysomnography (vPSG) documented POD. The patient had sleepwalking, sleep-related eating, confusional arousals, sexsomnia, sleeptalking, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Confusional arousals and RBD were documented during the vPSG. This case had the added complexity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) playing a role in sleepwalking and sleep related eating, with good response to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). The sexsomnia did not respond to nCPAP but responded substantially to bedtime clonazepam therapy. Citation: Soca R, Keenan JC, Schenck CH. Parasomnia overlap disorder with sexual behaviors during sleep in a patient with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1189–1191. PMID:27166304

  9. Assessing severity of obstructive sleep apnea by fractal dimension sequence analysis of sleep EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, X. C.; Luo, L.; Shao, J.; Zhang, C.; Ma, J.; Wang, G. F.; Liu, Y.; Peng, C.-K.; Fang, J.

    2009-10-01

    Different sleep stages are associated with distinct dynamical patterns in EEG signals. In this article, we explored the relationship between the sleep architecture and fractal dimension (FD) of sleep EEG. In particular, we applied the FD analysis to the sleep EEG of patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), which is characterized by recurrent oxyhemoglobin desaturation and arousals from sleep, a disease which received increasing public attention due to its significant potential impact on health. We showed that the variation of FD reflects the macrostructure of sleep. Furthermore, the fast fluctuation of FD, as measured by the zero-crossing rate of detrended FD (zDFD), is a useful indicator of sleep disturbance, and therefore, correlates with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and hourly number of blood oxygen saturation (SpO 2) decreases greater than 4%, as obstructive apnea/hypopnea disturbs sleep architecture. For practical purpose, a modified index combining zDFD of EEG and body mass index (BMI) may be useful for evaluating the severity of OSAHS symptoms.

  10. Acoustic-integrated dynamic MR imaging for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunn-Jy; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Chang, Yi-Chung; Hsu, Ying-Chieh; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Lo, Men-Tzung; Pham, Van-Truong; Lin, Chen; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by multi-level upper airway obstruction. Anatomic changes at the sites of obstruction may modify the physical or acoustic properties of snores. The surgical success of OSA depends upon precise localization of obstructed levels. We present a case of OSAS who received simultaneous dynamic MRI and snore acoustic recordings. The synchronized image and acoustic information successfully characterize the sites of temporal obstruction during sleep-disordered breathing events.

  11. Airway evaluation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Boris A; Maurer, Joachim T

    2008-12-01

    As the interest in sleep-disordered breathing has increased, various attempts have been made to assess upper airway anatomy in patients with this relatively frequent disorder. The aim is not only to reveal potential differences in upper airway anatomy to better understand origin and pathophysiology of the disease but also to improve patient management and treatment success. The present review is based on a systematic literature search with regard to upper airway evaluation in sleep-disordered breathing; the articles were selected and discussed in light of our clinical experiences. Based on clinical assessment including endoscopy during wakefulness, the value of the Mueller Maneuver, static radiologic imaging techniques (X-ray cephalometry, computed tomography (CT) scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), dynamic scanning protocols (e.g. ultrafast CT or cine MRI), upper airway endoscopy during sleep and sedated sleep, pressure measurements and the assessment of the critical closing pressure are discussed. Each technique itself and its history in the field of sleep medicine are briefly reviewed and problems of standardization and interpretation are discussed when appropriate. Insights into the pathophysiology of the disease gained with the help of the investigational techniques are presented and the impact of the techniques on patient management is reported. Although all these additional techniques for upper airway assessment have substantially improved our understanding of sleep-disordered breathing, their significance in daily practice is limited. In contrast to the widespread use of the Mueller maneuver and sedated endoscopy, convincing data supporting their use in terms of treatment outcome are lacking. So far, there is only very limited evidence that selected techniques improve treatment outcome for selected indications. In general, there is not enough evidence that these techniques are superior to the routine clinical assessment.

  12. Recognizing and Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This review aims to impart information regarding recognition of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and associated excessive sleepiness (ES) in the primary care setting in order to provide optimal care to patients with this common but serious condition. This review will also discuss the prevalence and treatment of depression in patients with OSA. Data Sources: A MEDLINE search of articles published between 1990 and 2008 was conducted using the search terms obstructive sleep apnea AND excessive sleepiness, obstructive sleep apnea AND depression, and obstructive sleep apnea AND primary care. Searches were limited to articles in English concerned with adult patients. Study Selection: In total, 239 articles were identified. Articles concerning other sleep disorders and forms of apnea were excluded. The reference lists of identified articles were searched manually to find additional articles of interest. Data Synthesis: Primary care physicians can aid in the diagnosis of OSA and associated ES by being vigilant for lifestyle and physical risk factors associated with this condition. In addition, primary care physicians should maintain a high level of clinical suspicion when presented with illnesses that are commonly comorbid with OSA, such as psychiatric disorders and depression, in particular. Conversely, assessment of patients with OSA for common comorbidities may also improve a patient's prognosis and quality of life. Conclusions: Primary care physicians play a vital role in recognizing OSA and ES. These clinicians are crucial in supporting their patients during treatment by ensuring that they have clear, concise information regarding available therapies and the correct application and maintenance of prescribed devices. PMID:20098525

  13. Metabolomics Profiling for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Simple Snorers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qian, Yingjun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Zhao, Aihua; Yin, Shankai; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Few clinical studies have explored altered urinary metabolite levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thus, we applied a metabolomics approach to analyze urinary metabolites in three groups of participants: patients with polysomnography (PSG)-confirmed OSA, simple snorers (SS), and normal subjects. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used. A total of 21 and 31 metabolites were differentially expressed in the SS and OSA groups, respectively. Patients with OSA had 18 metabolites different from those with SS. Of the 56 metabolites detected among the 3 groups, 24 were consistently higher or lower. A receiver operator curve analysis revealed that the combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, arabinose, glycochenodeoxycholate-3-sulfate, isoleucine, serine, and xanthine produced a moderate diagnostic score with a sensitivity (specificity) of 75% (78%) for distinguishing OSA from those without OSA. The combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, 5-dihydrotestosterone sulfate, serine, spermine, and xanthine distinguished OSA from SS with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 80%. Multiple metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with SS and OSA were identified using the metabolomics approach, and the altered metabolite signatures could potentially serve as an alternative diagnostic method to PSG. PMID:27480913

  14. Studies on the mechanism of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kukwa, A; Gromysz, H; Jernajczyk, U; Karczewski, W A

    1989-01-01

    Several observations indicate that the mylohyoid nerve (NV) may play a crucial part in the mechanisms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The activity of this nerve normally counteracts the collapse of the upper airways during inspiration. Any reduction in this activity may thus facilitate the occurrence of apnoeic spells. We have studied the effects of ethanol and lung inflations on the activity of NV recorded along with the activities of phrenic and facial nerve in rabbits anaesthetised with chloralose-urethan, paralyzed with curare and artificially ventilated. Under the control conditions the NV exhibited phasic expiratory activity; after vagotomy and additional, inspiratory component was observed. Lung inflation strongly enhanced the expiratory activity of NV whereas both the phrenic and facial nerve activities (both phasic-inspiratory) were typically inhibited. An injection of 5 ml of 20% ethanol very strongly inhibited the NV activity. The results may confirm the importance of NV in the mechanism of OSA. The well-known fact that OSA patients are particularly sensitive to alcohol finds support in the response of NV activity to ethanol injection. The analysis of the patterns of discharges of the three outputs from the respiratory controller may additionally suggest that the Vth nerve nucleus is involved in the control of respiratory pattern.

  15. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosein; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Navvabi, Iman; Ahmadi Hoseini, Seyed Hosein; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar

    2015-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS) and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5) was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10) was 5% (2/40). There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively). In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively). There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = -0.48). We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80%) and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease.

  16. Using the Pathophysiology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea to Teach Cardiopulmonary Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The effects of intermittent upper airway obstruction include alveolar hypoventilation, altered arterial blood gases and acid-base status, and stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors, which leads to frequent arousals. These arousals disturb sleep…

  17. Brain circuitry mediating arousal from obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlin, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder of repetitive sleep disruption caused by reduced or blocked respiratory airflow. Although an anatomically compromised airway accounts for the major predisposition to OSA, a patient's arousal threshold and factors related to the central control of breathing (ventilatory control stability) are also important. Arousal from sleep (defined by EEG desynchronization) may be the only mechanism that allows airway re-opening following an obstructive event. However, in many cases arousal is unnecessary and even worsens the severity of OSA. Mechanisms for arousal are poorly understood. However, accumulating data are elucidating the relevant neural pathways and neurotransmitters. For example, serotonin is critically required, but its site of action is unknown. Important neural substrates for arousal have been recently identified in the parabrachial complex (PB), a visceral sensory nucleus in the rostral pons. Moreover, glutamatergic signaling from the PB contributes to arousal caused by hypercapnia, one of the arousal-promoting stimuli in OSA. A major current focus of OSA research is to find means to maintain airway patency during sleep, without sleep interruption. PMID:23810448

  18. [Obstructive sleep apnoea and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Plíhalová, Andrea; Westlake, Kateřina; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA) is a disease very frequently occurring in people with type 2 diabetes, that significantly increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In a number of studies, OSA has been identified as an independent risk factor for the development of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Disorders of glucose homeostasis in patients with OSA are probably mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and/or sleep fragmentation through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, pro-inflammatory paths or oxidative stress. Despite the high prevalence of OSA among patients with type 2 diabetes as well as the proven benefit of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on reduction of mortality, most patients with OSA remain undiagnosed. Active OSA screening should therefore be performed in all patients with type 2 diabetes, ideally through home monitoring of oxygen saturation and breathing during sleep. Although the effect of CPAP therapy on the improvement in diabetes control (decrease in glycated hemoglobin) has not been clearly proven in patients with type 2 diabetes so far, promising outcomes have been observed during the treatment of patients with prediabetes.Key words: CPAP - diabetes mellitus - glycemic control - intermittent hypoxia - obstructive sleep apnoea - screening - sleep fragmentation.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Lack, Leon; Sweetman, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Insomnia is often comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea. It reduces positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy acceptance and adherence. Comorbid patients show greater daytime impairments and poorer health outcomes. The insomnia often goes undiagnosed, undertreated, or untreated. Pharmacotherapy is not recommended for long-term treatment. Although care should be taken administering behavioral therapies to patients with elevated sleepiness, cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is an effective and durable nondrug therapy that reduces symptoms and may increase the effectiveness of PAP therapy. Sleep clinics should be alert to comorbid insomnia and provide adequate diagnostic tools and clinicians with CBTi expertise.

  20. Obstructive site localization using multisensor manometry versus the Friedman staging system in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul Hee; Won, Tae-Bin; Cha, Wonjae; Yoon, In Young; Chung, Seockhoon; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find the correlation between an anatomy-based staging system and pressure manometry performed during sleep. A retrospective study of 45 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was carried out. All patients were evaluated by polysomnography, and obstruction sites were localized using a multisensor manometer during the full night. Obstruction sites were classified into retropalatal and retroglossal. The patients were also staged by anatomic findings of tonsil size and palate position. The % retroglossal obstruction was 29.4, 33.5 and 48.6% in stages I, II and III, respectively. There was no significant difference between stages. In contrast, when compared according to the Friedman tongue position (FTP), the mean % retroglossal obstruction of FTP grade 3 was significantly higher than that of FTP grade 1 (P = 0.009) although apnea hypopnea index, body mass index and lowest SpO2 were not different among FTP grades. It seems that FTP correlates with retroglossal obstruction and may be used to select patients in need of retroglossal modification of the airway.

  1. Anti-inflammatory therapy for obstructive sleep apnea in children

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Question A 4-year-old child was diagnosed by polysomnography as experiencing mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Despite the child being inattentive and distracted during the day at school, his parents prefer to avoid surgical treatment (adenotonsillectomy). Are there any non-surgical treatments for mild OSA in young children? Answer Obstructive sleep apnea in children is caused mainly by adenotonsillar hypertrophy and can lead to considerable morbidities, including neurocognitive and behavioural disturbances. Surgical removal of the tonsils and adenoids is the treatment of choice. In recent years, however, a new understanding of the inflammatory components of OSA has led to the assumption that anti-inflammatory treatment can reduce adenotonsillar size and improve OSA symptoms. Evidence from a few studies suggests that intranasal steroids and oral leukotriene receptor antagonists have beneficial effects, but data from randomized controlled trials are still lacking. PMID:21841108

  2. Fatal Consequences: Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Train Engineer

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    This special report describes the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board’s investigation into the probable cause of the derailment of a Metro-North passenger train in the Bronx, New York on December 1, 2013, that resulted in 4 deaths and injuries to 59 additional persons. A key finding in the medical investigation was the engineer’s post-accident diagnosis of severe, obstructive sleep apnea, and the probable cause of the accident was determined to be the result of the engineer having fallen asleep while operating the train. This accident highlights the importance of screening, evaluating, and ensuring adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, particularly among patients working in positions where impairment of physical or cognitive function or sudden incapacitation may result in serious harm to the public. PMID:26553898

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Fatigue in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Braley, Tiffany J.; Segal, Benjamin M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unknown, and little information exists regarding the relative contributions of OSA to symptoms of MS-related fatigue in the presence of other clinical and sleep-related confounders. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence of diagnosed OSA and OSA risk among MS patients, and to assess relationships between fatigue severity, OSA, OSA risk, and sleep quality among persons with MS. Methods: N = 195 MS patients completed a questionnaire comprised of items regarding OSA diagnosis, sleep quality and quantity, daytime symptoms, and 4 validated scales: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and STOP-Bang questionnaire. Medical records were also accessed to examine clinical characteristics that may predict fatigue or OSA risk. Results: N = 41 patients (21%) carried a formal diagnosis of OSA. N = 110 (56%) of all patients, and 38 (93%) of those with diagnosed OSA had STOP-Bang scores ≥ 3, indicating an elevated OSA risk. In regression models, the most significant predictors of higher FSS scores were higher STOP-Bang scores (p = 0.01), higher number of nocturnal symptoms (p < 0.0001), and higher disability level (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances, and OSA in particular, may be highly prevalent yet underrecognized contributors to fatigue in persons with MS. Citation: Braley TJ; Segal BM; Chervin RD. Obstructive sleep apnea and fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):155-162. PMID:24532998

  4. The effects of aminophylline on sleep and sleep-disordered breathing in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, H; Antic, R; Thornton, A T; McEvoy, R D

    1987-07-01

    The methylxanthine derivatives are known to have respiratory stimulant properties. To determine whether these drugs would improve obstructive sleep apnea, 10 male patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (Apnea Index greater than 15/h) were given infusions of aminophylline and a saline placebo on 2 separate nights a week apart, using a randomized crossover design. There was a significant decrease during aminophylline infusion in the frequency of those apneas, which contained periods of complete respiratory inactivity (central and mixed apneas; placebo, 4.3 +/- 1.8/h; aminophylline, 0.7 +/- 0.5/h; p less than 0.05). There was no change in either the frequency (placebo, 31.8 +/- 5.9/h; aminophylline, 28.7 +/- 8.7/h; NS) or duration of obstructive apneas. Mean and minimal arterial oxygen saturation values were also unchanged. Sleep architecture was markedly disturbed by aminophylline. There was a reduction in sleep efficiency (placebo, 84.8 +/- 2.0%; aminophylline, 60.2 +/- 5.0%; p less than 0.005), an increase in sleep fragmentation (sleep stage shifts/h: placebo, 11.6 +/- 1.3: aminophylline, 21.0 +/- 2.9; p less than 0.05) and less Stage 2 and more Stage 1 non-REM sleep. We conclude that aminophylline reduces central apnea and the central component of mixed apneas but has no effect on obstructive apnea. Theophylline is therefore unlikely to be therapeutically useful in patients with OSA, and because it leads to marked sleep disruption, its long-term use could conceivably increase the propensity to upper airway occlusion during sleep.

  5. [Orthodontic treatment in children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Huet, A P; Paulus, C

    2015-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may affect children, especially those with dentofacial disharmonies. Dentofacial orthopedic (DFO) treatments carried out in those patients must take this condition into account and can, in selected cases, improve or even treat the OSAS. The goal of our work was to report our experience about DFO treatments of children affected by OSAS in the department of maxillofacial surgery of Femme-Mère-Enfant hospital of university hospitals of Lyon, France.

  6. Upper airway imaging in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slaats, Monique A; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Van Eyck, Annelies; Vos, Wim G; De Backer, Jan W; Boudewyns, An; De Backer, Wilfried; Verhulst, Stijn L

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children is a manifestation of sleep-disordered breathing and associated with a number of complications. Structural narrowing of the upper airway in combination with inadequate compensation for a decrease in neuromuscular tone is an important factor in the pathogenesis. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most important predisposing factor. However, many other causes of craniofacial defects may coexist. Additionally, the pathogenesis of narrowing is more complex in certain subgroups such as children with obesity, craniofacial malformations, Down syndrome or neuromuscular disorders. The diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea is based on an overnight polysomnography. This investigation is expensive, time consuming and not widely available. In view of the major role of structural narrowing, upper airway imaging could be a useful tool for investigating obstructive sleep apnea and in establishing the site(s) of obstruction. Several radiological techniques (lateral neck radiography, cephalometry, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and post-processing of these images using computational fluid dynamics) have been used to investigate the role of structural alterations in the pathogenesis. We reviewed the literature to examine if upper airway imaging could replace polysomnography in making the diagnosis and if imaging could predict the effect of treatment with a focus on adenotonsillectomy. There is a limited number of high quality studies of imaging predicting the effect of treatment. To avoid unnecessary risks and ineffective surgeries, it seems crucial to couple the exact individual anatomical risk factor with the most appropriate treatment. We conclude that imaging could be a non-invasive tool that could assist in selection of treatment.

  7. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  8. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  9. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  10. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  11. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep... obstructive sleep apnea are devices that are worn during sleep to reduce the incidence of snoring and to...

  12. α2-Adrenergic blockade rescues hypoglossal motor defense against obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Decreased noradrenergic excitation of hypoglossal motoneurons during sleep causing hypotonia of pharyngeal dilator muscles is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a widespread disease for which treatment options are limited. Previous OSA drug candidates targeting various excitatory/inhibitory receptors on hypoglossal motoneurons have proved unviable in reactivating these neurons, particularly during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. To identify a viable drug target, we show that the repurposed α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine potently reversed the depressant effect of REM sleep on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity (a first-line motor defense against OSA) in rats. Remarkably, yohimbine also restored the obstructive apnea–induced long-term facilitation of hypoglossal motoneuron activity (hLTF), a much-neglected form of noradrenergic-dependent neuroplasticity that could provide a second-line motor defense against OSA but was also depressed during REM sleep. Corroborating immunohistologic, optogenetic, and pharmacologic evidence confirmed that yohimbine’s beneficial effects on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity and hLTF were mediated mainly through activation of pontine A7 and A5 noradrenergic neurons. Our results suggest a 2-tier (impaired first- and second-line motor defense) mechanism of noradrenergic-dependent pathogenesis of OSA and a promising pharmacotherapy for rescuing both these intrinsic defenses against OSA through disinhibition of A7 and A5 neurons by α2-adrenergic blockade. PMID:28239660

  13. Obstructive sleep apnoea and schizophrenia--a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Kalucy, Megan J; Grunstein, Ron; Lambert, Timothy; Glozier, Nicholas

    2013-10-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with significantly increased physical morbidity and mortality particularly secondary to cardiometabolic disorders. In people with schizophrenia, rates of obesity and the metabolic syndrome are high compared to the general population. Whilst the weight gain secondary to antipsychotic medication is largely to blame, other factors include inactivity, poor diet and possibly the illness itself. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common and frequently under-recognized condition which may be associated with disabling symptoms including daytime sleepiness, cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety and long term increases in morbidity and mortality secondary to cardiometabolic disease. As the primary risk factor is obesity, elevated rates of sleep apnoea would therefore seem likely in association with schizophrenia. Thus, OSA might represent a treatable cause of psychiatric and physical co-morbidity in patients with schizophrenia. A review of the literature revealed a paucity of quality research in this area. Available data suggest increased rates of sleep apnoea in schizophrenia and that psychotic symptoms may improve when co-morbid sleep apnoea is treated. Health practitioners may be unaware of the need to screen for sleep apnoea in patients with schizophrenia and the disorder may be significantly under-recognised. Research is required to clarify the epidemiology, consequences and management of sleep apnoea in association with schizophrenia.

  14. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present.

  15. Rehabilitation of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chwieśko-Minarowska, Sylwia; Minarowski, Łukasz; Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Chwieśko, Jan; Chyczewska, Elżbieta

    2013-12-01

    The current treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) focuses on alleviation of symptoms by increasing airway patency during sleep through positive airway pressure, oral appliances, changes in sleep position, weight loss, or surgical treatment. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is currently the treatment of choice and prevents upper airway obstruction, resulting in improved sleep architecture and daytime symptoms. Despite proven efficacy, adherence to CPAP treatment is still not efficient. The new methods of rehabilitation (exercise training programs, hypoglossal nerve stimulation) for patients with OSAS are currently modified. The aim of the present study was to present recent developments in the field of selected aspects of rehabilitation in patients with OSAS. Database search was focused on exercise training programs and electrostimulation of genioglossus muscle. The search for articles on the rehabilitation interventions for OSAS was performed using the PubMed database from 1966 to 2013. Most of the findings have shown beneficial effects of rehabilitation. In detail, we describe the recent developments and potential adverse effects of electrostimulation and physical exercises. According to the results of studies presented, the above therapy might support conventional treatment or may be an alternative for patients with poor compliance to CPAP therapy, mandibular advancement devices, or ineffective results of surgical procedures as well.

  16. [Sleep disorders in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    PubMed

    Böing, Sebastian; Randerath, Winfried J

    2014-05-01

    Sleep disturbances (SD) are a frequent finding in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and have a negative impact on quality of life and the clinical course of the disease. The causes of SD are multiple and include for example respiratory symptoms and comorbidities. On the other hand sleep goes along with multiple physiological changes in respiration, so that sleep itself interacts with asthma and COPD. This interaction favors respiratory symptoms and may lead to hypoxemia and hypercapnia. A further complication of the respiratory situation and the clinical course can be found in asthma and COPD patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Due to the heterogeneity of SD in asthma and COPD, a detailed patient survey is the most important diagnostical tool. Based on the survey further technical examinations should be considered. Treatment strategies for the reduction of SD in asthma and COPD include an optimized medication and treatment of comorbidities. If indicated oxygen therapy, positive pressure breathing and pulmonary rehabilitation can contribute.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome accompanied by diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Imamura, Makoto; Iwasaki, Yasuki; Mori, Masatomo

    2003-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with diabetes mellitus was hospitalized with sleeping and dyspnea. Polysomnography determined an apnea hypopneas index (AHI) of 56/hr and that the events occurred in association with continued diaphragm electromyogram activity and thoraco-abdominal wall movement. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was then diagnosed and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) (11cmH2O) was set. AHI subsequently became 21/hr. Six months' later, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) for the narrowing middle pharynx was performed and the AHI became 7/hr. After starting nCPAP and UPPP, body weight and insulin resistance had decreased. Treatment for sleep apnea may improve insulin resistance in diabetes mellitus.

  18. Maxillomandibular Advancement in the Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Ranji; Adams, Nathan G.; Slocumb, Nancy L.; Viozzi, Christopher F.; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) is a surgical option for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). MMA involves forward-fixing the maxilla and mandible approximately 10  mm via Le Fort I maxillary and sagittal split mandibular osteotomies. We retrospectively reviewed outcomes from 24 consecutive OSA patients who underwent MMA at our institution. MMA resulted in an 83% reduction in the group mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) per polysomnography an average of 6.7 months after surgery. Forty-two percent of patients achieved a post-MMA AHI of less than 5 events/hour sleep and 71% achieved an AHI less than or equal to 10 events/hour sleep. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale score decreased by an average of 5 post-surgery. No parameters predictive of cure for OSA by MMA were identified. PMID:22518154

  19. The role of drug-induced sleep endoscopy in surgical planning for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Ozturk; Erdur, Omer; Cirik, Ahmet Adnan; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the role of drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) in the surgical treatment planning of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This study was conducted using patients diagnosed with OSAS between January 2007 and March 2009, who were scheduled for surgical treatment. DISE was performed using propofol in patients considered to have upper respiratory tract obstruction as indicated by Muller's maneuver. After completing the sleep endoscopy, the patient was intubated and surgery was performed (tonsillectomy and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty). A successful operation was defined as a decrease in the respiratory disturbance index to below 5 or a decrease of ≥50 % following the operation. The study included 20 patients (4 female and 16 male) aged 19-57 years. No statistically significant correlation between modified Mallampati class and operation success or between the polysomnographic stage of disease and operation success was identified. A significantly high operation success rate was found in the group with obstruction of the upper airway according to DISE (p < 0.05), whereas a significantly low operation success rate was found in the group with obstruction of the lower airway according to DISE (p < 0.01). DISE may be used to identify the localization of obstruction for diagnostic purposes, and it can be helpful in selecting the treatment method.

  20. Airway observations during upper endoscopy predicting obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Ali, Eslam; Raina, Amit; Leland, William; Abid, Sabeen; Vahora, Zahid; Movahed, Hossein; Kachru, Sumyra; Tee, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Background This pilot study examined airway characteristics during upper endoscopy to determine who is at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea. Methods Patients undergoing routine upper endoscopy were divided into 2 groups according to the Berlin Questionnaire (high and low risk for sleep disordered breathing). Patients underwent routine upper endoscopy using propofol sedation. The airway was then evaluated for no, partial, or complete collapse at the levels of the palate/uvula/tonsils, the tongue base, the hypopharynx, and the larynx. They were given a score of 0 for no collapse, 1 for partial collapse, and 2 for complete collapse. The score for each of these levels was added to give a total score or severity index. The larynx was also evaluated for lateral pharyngeal collapse (minimal, up to 50%, >50%, or 100%). Results We found that patients with a partial obstruction at the level of the palate/uvula/tonsils, tongue base, hypopharynx, or larynx, or complete obstruction at any level more often had a positive Berlin questionnaire. Patients with a positive Berlin questionnaire were more often of increased weight (mean 197 vs 175 lbs, P=0.19), increased body mass index (31.2 vs 27.42 kg/m2, P=0.11), increased neck circumference (36.7 vs 34.7 cm, P=0.23), and had a higher total airway score (2.61 vs 1.67, P=0.09). Conclusions The results of our pilot study represent preliminary data regarding the use of upper endoscopy as a potential tool to evaluate patients for obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:27708514

  1. Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Sleep and Mitigates Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Vranish, Jennifer R.; Bailey, E. Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: New and effective strategies are needed to manage the autonomic and cardiovascular sequelae of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We assessed the effect of daily inspiratory muscle strength training (IMT) on sleep and cardiovascular function in adults unable to use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Methods: This is a placebo-controlled, single-blind study conducted in twenty four adults with mild, moderate, and severe OSA. Subjects were randomly assigned to placebo or inspiratory muscle strength training. Subjects in each group performed 5 min of training each day for 6 w. All subjects underwent overnight polysomnography at intake and again at study close. Results: We evaluated the effects of placebo training or IMT on sleep, blood pressure, and plasma catecholamines. Relative to placebo-trained subjects with OSA, subjects with OSA who performed IMT manifested reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressures (−12.3 ± 1.6 SBP and −5.0 ± 1.3 DBP mmHg; P < 0.01); plasma norepinephrine levels (536.3 ± 56.6 versus 380.6 ± 41.2 pg/mL; P = 0.01); and registered fewer nighttime arousals and reported improved sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores: 9.1 ± 0.9 versus 5.1 ± 0.7; P = 0.001). These favorable outcomes were achieved without affecting apneahypopnea index. Conclusions: The results are consistent with our previously published findings in normotensive adults but further indicate that IMT can modulate blood pressure and plasma catecholamines in subjects with ongoing nighttime apnea and hypoxemia. Accordingly, we suggest IMT offers a low cost, nonpharmacologic means of improving sleep and blood pressure in patients who are intolerant of CPAP. Citation: Vranish JR, Bailey EF. Inspiratory muscle training improves sleep and mitigates cardiovascular dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1179–1185. PMID:27091540

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea, pain, and opioids: is the riddle solved?

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Karen K.; Kunder, Samuel; Wong, Jean; Doufas, Anthony G.; Chung, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Perioperative opioid-based pain management of patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may present challenges because of concerns over severe ventilatory compromise. The interaction between intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, pain, and opioid responses in OSA, is complex and warrants a special focus of perioperative outcomes research. Recent findings Life-threatening opioid-related respiratory events are rare. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that OSA together with other serious renal and heart disease, is among those conditions predisposing patients for opioid-induced ventilatory impairment (OIVI) in the postoperative period. Both intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, two distinct components of OSA, enhance pain. Intermittent hypoxia may also potentiate opioid analgesic effects. Activation of major inflammatory pathways may be responsible for the effects of sleep disruption and intermittent hypoxia on pain and opioid analgesia. Recent experimental evidence supports that these, seemingly contrasting, phenotypes of pain-increasing and opioid-enhancing effects of intermittent hypoxia, are not mutually exclusive. Although the effect of intermittent hypoxia on OIVI has not been elucidated, opioids worsen postoperative sleep-disordered breathing in OSA patients. A subset of these patients, characterized by decreased chemoreflex responsiveness and high arousal thresholds, might be at higher risk for OIVI. Summary OSA may complicate opioid-based perioperative management of pain by altering both pain processing and sensitivity to opioid effect. PMID:26545144

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea in patients with inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Sampol, Gabriel; Romero, Odile; Lloberes, Patricia; Trallero-Araguás, Ernesto; Vilardell-Tarrés, Miquel

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with inflammatory myopathy. An observational and prospective study was performed on a cohort of adult patients with inflammatory myopathy followed at a specialized outpatient clinic. Sixteen consecutive adult patients were evaluated by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and by complete polysomnography study. Disease activity and severity were assessed using the Myositis Disease Activity Assessment Tool (MDAAT) and Myositis Damage Index (MDI), respectively. Associations between sleep parameters and other factors were calculated using the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Wilcoxon's test. A serum autoantibody profile was determined for all patients. The mean apnea-hypopnea index was 28.7 (23.8), and 14 patients (87%) had an apnea-hypopnea index >5. The mean frequency of respiratory arousals was 20.1 (12.5). Eleven (68%) patients reported frequently-always snoring, and 3 (19%) had excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS >10). Seven patients were offered continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy; 4 tolerated the procedure well and reported a clear improvement in daytime sleepiness and/or sleep quality. No significant association was observed between the apnea-hypopnea index and clinical or immunological groups. Dysphagia, disease activity, and disease severity were not significantly associated with any sleep parameters. The frequency of obstructive sleep apnea in adult patients with inflammatory myopathy is high. The possibility that these alterations play a role in persistent fatigue in these patients cannot be ruled out.

  4. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a cause of cognitive disorders in the elderly?].

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, K; Nguyen-Michel, V H; Mariani, J

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a chronic disease characterized by repeated upper airway obstructions during sleep, resulting in fragmented sleep with arousals, nocturnal intermittent hypoxemia and diurnal dysfunctions. Despite its high prevalence in elderly, sleep apnea syndrome seems to be underestimated and difficult to be recognized because of the lack of clinical symptoms specificity in this population. Among the numerous consequences of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, cognitive impairment prevails on the attention, executive functions and memory. Neuroimaging studies in human and experimental models allowed to highlight neural correlates of these cognitive dysfunctions in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with cognitive impairment shares some features with Alzheimer's disease, involving genetic predisposition ApoE4, hippocampus and synaptic plasticity abnormalities. In this context, the question arises whether obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a possible etiological or aggravating factor of cognitive decline in elderly with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. Although there are conflicting results in studies evaluating therapeutic efficiency of continuous positive air pressure, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome seems nevertheless as a correctable factor, at least for its impact on some cognitive consequences. Looking for sleep apnea syndrome in elderly with cognitive decline should be considered in a global, diagnosis and therapeutic management.

  5. Clinical features and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed Central

    Kimoff, R J; Cosio, M G; McGregor, M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the clinical features and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). DATA SOURCE AND SELECTION: All articles on OSA published in French and English between 1970 and 1990 and indexed in Index Medicus were reviewed. Studies addressing the epidemiologic features and clinical aspects of OSA were selected, and special emphasis was given to articles reporting the effects of treatment on morbidity and mortality rates. MAIN RESULTS: OSA is characterized by episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep that result in repetitive hypoxemia and sleep disruption. OSA leads to various neuropsychologic and cardiovascular complications, including daytime hypersomnolence, cognitive impairment, systemic and pulmonary hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias. There is suggestive evidence that the death rate among affected people is increased. The true incidence of OSA is unknown, but estimates have varied from 1% upwards among men. The current treatment with the greatest overall effectiveness and acceptability is nasal continuous positive airway pressure. CONCLUSION: This common, readily treatable disorder is associated with serious complications and therefore must be widely recognized by health professionals. PMID:1998928

  6. Craniofacial skeletal architecture and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome severity.

    PubMed

    Costa E Sousa, Rui Augusto; dos Santos Gil, Nuno Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep related breathing disorder caused by pharynx obstruction that often terminates in abrupt arousals and is capable of disrupting physiological sleep profile. Its' severity has been associated, among others, with craniofacial skeletal morphology. To investigate this relationship and elucidate craniofacial skeleton patterns in individuals without obvious maxillofacial abnormalities, 171 OSAS patients were studied with nocturnal polysomnographic record and cephalometric X-ray (24 variables). Cephalometric variables were compared between three apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) groups (AHI ≤ 15; 15 < AHI < 30; AHI ≥ 30) and uni/multivariate analysis between cephalometric variables and AHI were performed. The patients were predominantly men (83%), with a mean age of 48.1 years. Mean BMI and AHI were 28.4 kg/m(2) and 26.2, respectively. Most cephalometric variables differed among the three AHI groups. Fifteen cephalometric variables showed a correlation with AHI. Five cephalometric variables and BMI were independent AHI predictors. Cephalometric variables were better AHI predictors in normal weight patients. Significant evidence of craniofacial skeleton influence was found on OSAS severity, caudalization of the hyoid and lower sagittal facial projection being the most important patterns. From the cephalometric variables analysed, the hypopharynx calibre demonstrated a higher predictive value for AHI, independently of BMI.

  7. Timing Matters: Circadian Rhythm in Sepsis, Obstructive Lung Disease, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Truong, Kimberly K; Lam, Michael T; Grandner, Michael A; Sassoon, Catherine S; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-07-01

    Physiological and cellular functions operate in a 24-hour cyclical pattern orchestrated by an endogenous process known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms represent intrinsic oscillations of biological functions that allow for adaptation to cyclic environmental changes. Key clock genes that affect the persistence and periodicity of circadian rhythms include BMAL1/CLOCK, Period 1, Period 2, and Cryptochrome. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of circadian rhythms and their role in common medical conditions. A critical review of the literature supports the association between circadian misalignment and adverse health consequences in sepsis, obstructive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and malignancy. Circadian misalignment plays an important role in these disease processes and can affect disease severity, treatment response, and survivorship. Normal inflammatory response to acute infections, airway resistance, upper airway collapsibility, and mitosis regulation follows a robust circadian pattern. Disruption of normal circadian rhythm at the molecular level affects severity of inflammation in sepsis, contributes to inflammatory responses in obstructive lung diseases, affects apnea length in obstructive sleep apnea, and increases risk for cancer. Chronotherapy is an underused practice of delivering therapy at optimal times to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. This approach has been shown to be advantageous in asthma and cancer management. In asthma, appropriate timing of medication administration improves treatment effectiveness. Properly timed chemotherapy may reduce treatment toxicities and maximize efficacy. Future research should focus on circadian rhythm disorders, role of circadian rhythm in other diseases, and modalities to restore and prevent circadian disruption.

  8. Cumulative Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Short Sleep Duration with the Risk for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Paris, Audrey; Pigeanne, Thierry; Nguyen, Xuan-Lan; Alizon, Claire; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurene; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration are individually associated with an increased risk for hypertension (HTN). The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis of a cumulative association of OSA severity and short sleep duration with the risk for prevalent HTN. Among 1,499 patients undergoing polysomnography for suspected OSA, 410 (27.3%) previously diagnosed as hypertensive and taking antihypertensive medication were considered as having HTN. Patients with total sleep time (TST) <6 h were considered to be short sleepers. Logistic regression procedures were performed to determine the independent association of HTN with OSA and sleep duration. Considering normal sleepers (TST ≥6 h) without OSA as the reference group, the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence intervals) for having HTN was 2.51 (1.35–4.68) in normal sleepers with OSA and 4.37 (2.18–8.78) in short sleepers with OSA after adjustment for age, gender, obesity, diabetes, depression, current smoking, use of thyroid hormones, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep complaint, time in bed, sleep architecture and fragmentation, and study site. The risk for HTN appeared to present a cumulative association with OSA severity and short sleep duration (p<0.0001 for linear trend). The higher risk for HTN was observed in short sleepers with severe OSA (AHI ≥30) (OR, 4.29 [2.03–9.07]). In patients investigated for suspected OSA, sleep-disordered breathing severity and short sleep duration have a cumulative association with the risk for prevalent HTN. Further studies are required to determine whether interventions to optimize sleep may contribute to lower BP in patients with OSA. PMID:25531468

  9. Validation of a novel sleep-monitoring system for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea: A comparison with polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lili; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Wu, Hongmin; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Overnight polysomnography (PSG) is currently the gold standard for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); however, it is time-consuming, expensive and uncomfortable for the patient. A micromovement sensitive mattress (MSM) sleep-monitoring system was developed as an alternative to PSG, however, there has yet to be a study verifying the accuracy of diagnosing OSA with this device. Therefore, the present study assessed the validity of the MSM sleep-monitoring system. Chinese Han participants who were suspected of having OSA were recruited between June 2013 and June 2014. The MSM sleep-monitoring system and PSG were utilized simultaneously overnight on each subject. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was measured by the MSM sleep-monitoring system (AHIMSM) and compared with that determined by PSG (AHIPSG), revealing a significant correlation between the two values (r=0.97, P<0.001). Bland-Altman plots also indicated good agreement (97%) between MSM and PSG. Using an AHIPSG cut-off of ≥5, ≥15 and ≥30 events/h, the sensitivity (specificity) of detecting an AHIMSM of ≥5, ≥15, and ≥30 events/h were 94.9 (100%), 89.9 (96.9%) and 90.3% (94.9%), respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve, which were used to differentiate an AHIPSG of ≥5, ≥15 and ≥30 events/h in clinically diagnosed OSA, were 0.984, 0.982 and 0.980, respectively. Thus, the MSM sleeping system may accurately diagnose OSA in the Chinese Han population. Further community-based studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm the validity of this MSM sleeping system. PMID:27882098

  10. Validation of a novel sleep-monitoring system for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea: A comparison with polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lili; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Wu, Hongmin; Yin, Shankai

    2016-11-01

    Overnight polysomnography (PSG) is currently the gold standard for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); however, it is time-consuming, expensive and uncomfortable for the patient. A micromovement sensitive mattress (MSM) sleep-monitoring system was developed as an alternative to PSG, however, there has yet to be a study verifying the accuracy of diagnosing OSA with this device. Therefore, the present study assessed the validity of the MSM sleep-monitoring system. Chinese Han participants who were suspected of having OSA were recruited between June 2013 and June 2014. The MSM sleep-monitoring system and PSG were utilized simultaneously overnight on each subject. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was measured by the MSM sleep-monitoring system (AHIMSM) and compared with that determined by PSG (AHIPSG), revealing a significant correlation between the two values (r=0.97, P<0.001). Bland-Altman plots also indicated good agreement (97%) between MSM and PSG. Using an AHIPSG cut-off of ≥5, ≥15 and ≥30 events/h, the sensitivity (specificity) of detecting an AHIMSM of ≥5, ≥15, and ≥30 events/h were 94.9 (100%), 89.9 (96.9%) and 90.3% (94.9%), respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve, which were used to differentiate an AHIPSG of ≥5, ≥15 and ≥30 events/h in clinically diagnosed OSA, were 0.984, 0.982 and 0.980, respectively. Thus, the MSM sleeping system may accurately diagnose OSA in the Chinese Han population. Further community-based studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm the validity of this MSM sleeping system.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic bone disease: Insights in to the relationship between bone and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine M.; Shea, Steven A.; Stone, Katie L.; Cauley, Jane A.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Redline, Susan; Karsenty, Gerard; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and low bone mass are two prevalent conditions, particularly among older adults, a section of the U.S. population that is expected to grow dramatically over the coming years. OSA, the most common form of sleep disordered breathing, has been linked to multiple cardiovascular, metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory derangements and may have adverse effects on bone. However, little is known about how OSA (including the associated hypoxia and sleep loss) affects bone metabolism. In order to gain insight into the relationship between sleep and bone, we review the growing information on OSA and metabolic bone disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms by which OSA may affect bone metabolism/architecture. PMID:25639209

  12. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  13. Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Claudio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Cesareo, Massimo; Romigi, Andrea; Izzi, Francesca; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Oliva, Corrado; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Placidi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the integrity of the visual system in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by means of electroretinogram (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Methods: We performed electrophysiological study of the visual system in a population of severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea events/time in bed ≥ 30/h) patients without medical comorbidities compared to a group of healthy controls similar for age, sex, and body mass index. Patients and controls did not have visual impairment or systemic disorders with known influence on the visual system. ERG and VEP were elicited by a reversal pattern generated on a television monitor at low (55') and high (15') spatial frequencies stimulation. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) in both patients and controls. Results: In comparison with healthy controls (n = 27), patients with OSA (n = 27) showed a significant latency delay coupled with a significant amplitude reduction of P100 wave of VEP at all spatial frequencies in both eyes. No significant differences between groups were detected as concerning ERG components. No correlations were found between polygraphic parameters, ESS scores, or VEP and ERG components in OSA patients. Conclusions: This study documented that patients with OSA, without medical comorbidities, present VEP alteration as documented by lower amplitude and longer latency of the P100 component than healthy controls. These altered electrophysiological findings may be the expression of optic nerve dysfunction provoked by hypoxia, acidosis, hypercarbia and airway obstruction, frequently observed in patients with OSA. Hence, we hypothesize that OSA per se may impair optic nerve function. Citation: Liguori C, Palmieri MG, Pierantozzi M, Cesareo M, Romigi A, Izzi F, Marciani MG, Oliva C, Mercuri NB, Placidi F. Optic nerve dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: an electrophysiological study. SLEEP 2016;39(1):19–23. PMID

  14. Tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess presenting with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpen B; Hinni, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic retropharyngeal abscess (RPA) caused by tuberculosis is an uncommon manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis within the head and neck. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults is a common condition with many etiologies that have been well described. Here, we present a case of retropharyngeal abscess caused by chronic tuberculosis with an unusual and interesting presenting symptom in an adult that has not been mentioned in literature, new-onset and worsening stertor or snoring, with signs and symptoms of OSA. The purpose of this manuscript is to present our experience with this case, as well as to emphasize the diagnosis, clinical course, and management of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess in adults, while also signifying the need to include retropharyngeal abscess in the differential diagnosis for symptoms presenting as new-onset stertor and airway obstruction.

  15. Correlation of Lateral Cephalogram and Flexible Laryngoscopy with Sleep Study in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Anila; Faizal, Bini

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the correlation between lateral cephalogram, flexible laryngoscopy, and sleep study in patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Background. Screening tools should be devised for predicting OSA which could be performed on an outpatient basis. With this aim we studied the skeletal and soft tissue characteristics of proven OSA patients. Methods. A prospective study was performed in patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea by sleep study. They were evaluated clinically and subjected to lateral cephalometry and nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. The findings were matched to see if they corresponded to AHI of sleep study in severity. An attempt was made to see whether the data predicted the patients who would benefit from oral appliance or surgery as the definitive treatment in indicated cases. Results. A retropalatal collapse seen on endoscopy could be equated to the distance from mandibular plane to hyoid (MP-H) of lateral cephalometry and both corresponded to severity of AHI. At the retroglossal region, there was a significant correlation with MP-H, length of the soft palate, and AHI. Conclusion. There is significant correlation of lateral cephalogram and awake flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscopy with AHI in OSA. In unison they form an excellent screening tool for snorers. PMID:26689652

  16. Severe onychophagia and finger mutilation associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nino, Gustavo; Singareddy, Ravi

    2013-04-15

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can lead to important neurobehavioral consequences including cognitive deficits, hyperactivity/inattention, daytime sleepiness, and mood disturbances. Interestingly, the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of impulse-control disorders such as nail biting (onychophagia) is currently unknown. We present a case of a man with severe onychophagia and biting-induced finger mutilation that was completely resolved after diagnosis and treatment of severe OSA. Accordingly, this report represents an important clinical observation that suggests a connection between sleep physiology and the neurobiological circuits implicated in the regulation of impulse-control behaviors. Further research in this area may improve our current understanding of the neurobehavioral consequences of untreated OSA.

  17. [Continuous positive airways pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea].

    PubMed

    Antone, E; Gilbert, M; Bironneau, V; Meurice, J C

    2015-04-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) still remains the most frequently used and the most efficient treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, its efficiency is conditioned by healthcare quality depending on many factors such as medical specificities of the patients as well as the severity of sleep-related breathing disorders. In order to optimize CPAP efficiency, it is necessary to be aware of the functional abilities of the different devices, and to perform a close monitoring of the patients, particularly during the first weeks of treatment, by maximally using the data provided by the CPAP apparatus. Some questions remain unsolved, such as the impact of nasal CPAP on glucose metabolism or cardiovascular prognosis. Furthermore, the strategy of CPAP use should be improved according to future results of studies dedicated to the interest of home telemonitoring and taking into account the validated mode of CPAP initiation.

  18. Home ventilation therapy in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    González Mangado, Nicolás; Troncoso Acevedo, María Fernanda; Gómez García, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea is a highly prevalent disease that is often underdiagnosed at present. It has a significant economic and social welfare impact, accounting for a large part of the resources assigned to home respiratory therapies. As part of the 2014 SEPAR Year of the Chronic Patient and Domiciliary Respiratory Care sponsored by the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, this article reviews the most recent publications on the indications and controversial issues in the treatment of sleep apnea, the latest evidence for indication of various positive pressure devices, and adjustment modes, ranging from the use of empirical formulae or mathematical estimations to modern auto-CPAP equipment, while not forgetting the gold standard of manual titration. Emphasis is placed on the need for monitoring required by patients to ensure treatment adherence and compliance. Finally, other therapies that are not the object of this article are briefly reviewed.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnoea in children with craniofacial syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is common in children. Craniofacial anomalies such as cleft palate are among the most common congenital conditions. Children with a variety of craniofacial conditions, including cleft palate, micrognathia, craniosynostosis, and midface hypoplasia are at increased risk for OSAS. Available evidence, which is largely limited to surgical case series and retrospective studies, suggests that OSAS can be successfully managed in these children through both surgical and non-surgical techniques. Prospective studies using larger cohorts of patients and including polysomnograms are needed to better understand the risk factors for this patient population and the efficacy of treatment options for OSAS and their underlying conditions. PMID:25555676

  20. Overview of proteomics studies in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Amélia; Torres, Vukosava Milic; Vaz, Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune; Pinto, Paula; Malhotra, Atul; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed common public health concern causing deleterious effects on metabolic and cardiovascular health. Although much has been learned regarding the pathophysiology and consequences of OSA in the past decades, the molecular mechanisms associated with such processes remain poorly defined. The advanced high-throughput proteomics-based technologies have become a fundamental approach for identifying novel disease mediators as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for many diseases, including OSA. Here, we briefly review OSA pathophysiology and the technological advances in proteomics and the first results of its application to address critical issues in the OSA field. PMID:25770042

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Common in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Lisa H.; Mason, Wendi R.; Parnell, James A.; Rice, Todd W.; Loyd, James E.; Milstone, Aaron P.; Collard, Harold R.; Malow, Beth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: From 1984 to 2006, studies of sleep in patients with interstitial lung disease revealed disturbed sleep, frequent nocturnal desaturations, nocturnal cough, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Our goal was to analyze OSA in an outpatient population of stable patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Methods: Patients with IPF who had been followed up in the Vanderbilt Pulmonary Clinic were asked to participate. All patients were given a diagnosis of IPF by the 2000 American Thoracic Society consensus statement criteria. Subjects completed an Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) questionnaire and a sleep apnea scale of sleep disorders questionnaire (SA-SDQ) before undergoing nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG). OSA was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > 5 events per hour. Results: Fifty subjects enrolled and completed a NPSG. The mean age was 64.9 years, and the mean BMI was 32.3. OSA was diagnosed in 88% of subjects. Ten subjects (20%) had mild OSA (AHI, 5 to 15 events per hour), and 34 subjects (68%) had moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI, > 15 events per hour). Only 6 subjects (12%) had a normal AHI. One patient was asymptomatic as determined by ESS and SA-SDQ, but had an AHI of 24 events per hour. The sensitivity of the ESS was 75% with a specificity of 15%, whereas the SA-SDQ had a sensitivity of 88% with a specificity of 50%. BMI did not correlate strongly with AHI (r = 0.30; p = 0.05). Conclusions: OSA is prevalent in patients with IPF and may be underrecognized by primary care providers and specialists. Neither ESS nor SA-SDQ alone or in combination was a strong screening tool. Given the high prevalence found in our sample, formal sleep evaluation and polysomnography should be considered in patients with IPF. PMID:19567497

  2. Reduced innervation in the human pharynx in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    de Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Macías, Emilio; Feito, Jorge; González, Mónica; Cobo, Teresa; Fernández-Mondragón, María P; García-Suárez, Olivia; Vega, José A

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a disease characterized by repetitive breathing during sleep that lead to reduced oxygen saturation and sleep disturbance among other symptoms. Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by blockade of the upper respiratory airway, although the pathogenic mechanism underlying this occlusion remains unknown. In these studies we explored the hypothesis that alterations in the innervation, especially mechanosensory innervation, of the pharynx may contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the innervation of the human pharynx in normal individuals and in subjects clinically diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. Using immunohistochemistry for axon and Schwann cells, as well as for two putative mechanoproteins (ASIC2 and TRPV4), we observed a significant reduction in the density of nerve fibers in the submucosa of patients with obstructive sleep apnea as well as morphological abnormalities in mechanosensory corpuscles. Importantly, while ASIC2 and TRPV4 expression was regularly found in the axons of mechanosensory corpuscles distributed throughout the muscular layer in the control subjects, it was absent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. These findings support that neurological alterations are important contributors to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea.

  3. Remote Ambulatory Management of Veterans with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Barry G.; Behari, Pratima Pathak; McCloskey, Susan; True, Gala; Richardson, Diane; Thomasson, Arwin; Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; Davies, Keith; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Despite significant medical sequelae of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the condition remains undiagnosed and untreated in many affected individuals. We explored the feasibility of a comprehensive, telemedicine-based OSA management pathway in a community-based Veteran cohort. Methods: This prospective, parallel-group randomized pilot study assessed feasibility of a telemedicine-based pathway for OSA evaluation and management in comparison to a more traditional, in-person care model. The study included 60 Veterans at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center and two affiliated community-based outpatient clinics. Telemedicine pathway feasibility, acceptability, and outcomes were assessed through a variety of quantitative (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, dropout rates, positive airway pressure [PAP] adherence rates, participant satisfaction ratings) and qualitative (verbal feedback) metrics. Results: There was no significant difference in functional outcome changes, patient satisfaction, dropout rates, or objectively measured PAP adherence between groups after 3 months of treatment. Telemedicine participants showed greater improvement in mental health scores, and their feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Conclusions: Our pilot study suggests that telemedicine-based management of OSA patients is feasible in terms of patient functional outcomes and overall satisfaction with care. Future studies should include larger populations to further elucidate these findings while assessing provider- and patient-related cost effectiveness. Citation: Fields BG, Behari PP, McCloskey S, True G, Richardson D, Thomasson A, Korom-Djakovic D, Davies K, Kuna ST. Remote ambulatory management of veterans with obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2016;39(3):501–509. PMID:26446115

  4. Trazodone increases arousal threshold in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Heinzer, R.C.; White, D.P.; Jordan, A.S.; Lo, Y.L.; Dover, L.; Stevenson, K.; Malhotra, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low arousal threshold is believed to predispose to breathing instability during sleep. The present authors hypothesised that trazodone, a nonmyorelaxant sleep-promoting agent, would increase the effort-related arousal threshold in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients. In total, nine OSA patients, mean±SD age 49±9 yrs, apnoea/hypopnoea index 52±32 events·h-1, were studied on 2 nights, one with trazodone at 100 mg and one with a placebo, in a double blind randomised fashion. While receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), repeated arousals were induced: 1) by increasing inspired CO2 and 2) by stepwise decreases in CPAP level. Respiratory effort was measured with an oesophageal balloon. End-tidal CO2 tension (PET,CO2) was monitored with a nasal catheter. During trazodone nights, compared with placebo nights, the arousals occurred at a higher PET,CO2 level (mean±SD 7.30±0.57 versus 6.62±0.64 kPa (54.9±4.3 versus 49.8±4.8 mmHg), respectively). When arousals were triggered by increasing inspired CO2 level, the maximal oesophageal pressure swing was greater (19.4±4.0 versus 13.1±4.9 cmH2O) and the oesophageal pressure nadir before the arousals was lower (-5.1±4.7 versus -0.38±4.2 cmH2O) with trazodone. When arousals were induced by stepwise CPAP drops, the maximal oesophageal pressure swings before the arousals did not differ. Trazodone at 100 mg increased the effort-related arousal threshold in response to hypercapnia in obstructive sleep apnoea patients and allowed them to tolerate higher CO2 levels. PMID:18256066

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun Jung

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is approximately 3% in children. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most common cause of OSAS in children, and obesity, hypotonic neuromuscular diseases, and craniofacial anomalies are other major risk factors. Snoring is the most common presenting complaint in children with OSAS, but the clinical presentation varies according to age. Agitated sleep with frequent postural changes, excessive sweating, or abnormal sleep positions such as hyperextension of neck or abnormal prone position may suggest a sleep-disordered breathing. Night terror, sleepwalking, and enuresis are frequently associated, during slow-wave sleep, with sleep-disordered breathing. Excessive daytime sleepiness becomes apparent in older children, whereas hyperactivity or inattention is usually predominant in younger children. Morning headache and poor appetite may also be present. As the cortical arousal threshold is higher in children, arousals are not easily developed and their sleep architectures are usually more conserved than those of adults. Untreated OSAS in children may result in various problems such as cognitive deficits, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, poor academic achievement, and emotional instability. Mild pulmonary hypertension is not uncommon. Rarely, cardiovascular complications such as cor pulmonale, heart failure, and systemic hypertension may develop in untreated cases. Failure to thrive and delayed development are serious problems in younger children with OSAS. Diagnosis of pediatric OSAS should be based on snoring, relevant history of sleep disruption, findings of any narrow or collapsible portions of upper airway, and confirmed by polysomnography. Early diagnosis of pediatric OSAS is critical to prevent complications with appropriate interventions. PMID:21189956

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and sequelae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Jung; Chae, Kyu Young

    2010-10-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is approximately 3% in children. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most common cause of OSAS in children, and obesity, hypotonic neuromuscular diseases, and craniofacial anomalies are other major risk factors. Snoring is the most common presenting complaint in children with OSAS, but the clinical presentation varies according to age. Agitated sleep with frequent postural changes, excessive sweating, or abnormal sleep positions such as hyperextension of neck or abnormal prone position may suggest a sleep-disordered breathing. Night terror, sleepwalking, and enuresis are frequently associated, during slow-wave sleep, with sleep-disordered breathing. Excessive daytime sleepiness becomes apparent in older children, whereas hyperactivity or inattention is usually predominant in younger children. Morning headache and poor appetite may also be present. As the cortical arousal threshold is higher in children, arousals are not easily developed and their sleep architectures are usually more conserved than those of adults. Untreated OSAS in children may result in various problems such as cognitive deficits, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, poor academic achievement, and emotional instability. Mild pulmonary hypertension is not uncommon. Rarely, cardiovascular complications such as cor pulmonale, heart failure, and systemic hypertension may develop in untreated cases. Failure to thrive and delayed development are serious problems in younger children with OSAS. Diagnosis of pediatric OSAS should be based on snoring, relevant history of sleep disruption, findings of any narrow or collapsible portions of upper airway, and confirmed by polysomnography. Early diagnosis of pediatric OSAS is critical to prevent complications with appropriate interventions.

  7. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ramar, Kannan; Dort, Leslie C.; Katz, Sheri G.; Lettieri, Christopher J.; Harrod, Christopher G.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    to improve or confirm treatment efficacy, rather than conduct follow-up without sleep testing, for patients fitted with oral appliances. (GUIDELINE) We suggest that sleep physicians and qualified dentists instruct adult patients treated with oral appliances for obstructive sleep apnea to return for periodic office visits— as opposed to no follow-up—with a qualified dentist and a sleep physician. (GUIDELINE) Conclusions: The AASM and AADSM expect these guidelines to have a positive impact on professional behavior, patient outcomes, and, possibly, health care costs. This guideline reflects the state of knowledge at the time of publication and will require updates if new evidence warrants significant changes to the current recommendations. Citation: Ramar K, Dort LC, Katz SG, Lettieri CJ, Harrod CG, Thomas SM, Chervin RD. Clinical practice guideline for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring with oral appliance therapy: an update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):773–827. PMID:26094920

  8. Analysis of Sleep Parameters in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Studied in a Hospital vs. a Hotel-Based Sleep Center

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Kimberly N.; Song, Yanna; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Polysomnography is associated with changes in sleep architecture called the first-night effect. This effect is believed to result from sleeping in an unusual environment and the technical equipment used to study sleep. Sleep experts hope to decrease this variable by providing a more familiar, comfortable atmosphere for sleep testing through hotel-based sleep centers. In this study, we compared the sleep parameters of patients studied in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed polysomnograms completed in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories from August 2003 to July 2005. All patients were undergoing evaluation for obstructive sleep apnea. Hospital-based patients were matched for age and apnea-hypopnea index with hotel-based patients. We compared the sleep architecture changes associated with the first-night effect in the two groups. The associated conditions and symptoms listed on the polysomnography referral forms are also compared. Results: No significant differences were detected between the two groups in sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, REM sleep latency, total amount of slow wave sleep (NREM stages 3 and 4), arousal index, and total stage 1 sleep. Conclusions: This pilot study failed to show a difference in sleep parameters associated with the first-night effect in patients undergoing sleep studies in our hotel and hospital-based sleep laboratories. Future studies need to compare the first-night effect in different sleep disorders, preferably in multi-night recordings. Citation: Hutchison KN; Song Y; Wang L; Malow BA. Analysis of sleep parameters in patients with obstructive sleep apnea studied in a hospital vs. A hotel-based sleep center. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(2):119–122. PMID:18468309

  9. Movement Distribution: A New Measure of Sleep Fragmentation in Children with Upper Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Scott; Baumert, Mathias; Kohler, Mark; Martin, James; Kennedy, Declan; Lushington, Kurt; Saint, David; Pamula, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To develop a measure of sleep fragmentation in children with upper airway obstruction based on survival curve analysis of sleep continuity. Design: Prospective repeated measures. Setting: Hospital sleep laboratory. Participants: 92 children aged 3.0 to 12.9 years undergoing 2 overnight polysomnographic (PSG) sleep studies, 6 months apart. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on their obstructive apnea and hypopnea index (OAHI) and other upper airway obstruction (UAO) symptoms: primary snorers (PS; n = 24, OAHI < 1), those with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS; n = 20, OAHI ≥ 1) and non-snoring controls (C; n = 48, OAHI < 1). Interventions: Subjects in the PS and OSAS groups underwent tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy between PSG assessments. Measurements and Results: Post hoc measures of movement and contiguous sleep epochs were exported and analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival to generate survival curves for the 3 groups. Statistically significant differences were found between these group curves for sleep continuity (P < 0.05) when using movement events as the sleep fragmenting event, but not if stage 1 NREM sleep or awakenings were used. Conclusion: Using conventional indices of sleep fragmentation in survival curve analysis of sleep continuity does not provide a useful measure of sleep fragmentation in children with upper airway obstruction. However, when sleep continuity is defined as the time between gross body movements, a potentially useful clinical measure is produced. Citation: Coussens S, Baumert M, Kohler M, Martin J, Kennedy D, Lushington K, Saint D, Pamula Y. Movement distribution: a new measure of sleep fragmentation in children with upper airway obstruction. SLEEP 2014;37(12):2025-2034. PMID:25325486

  10. Improving Activity in Adults with Diabetes and Coexisting Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chasens, Eileen R.; Korytkowski, Mary; Sereika, Susan M.; Burke, Lora E.; Drumheller, Oliver J.; Strollo, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    This study in participants with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea evaluated changes in activity, sleep quality and daytime sleepiness after 4 weeks of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). This pilot study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Sleep apnea was quantified with an overnight sleep study. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, daytime sleepiness by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, vigor and fatigue with the Profiles of Mood States, subjective activity with the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, and objective activity with the Bodymedia SenseWear Armband™. Subjects were randomized to either continuous positive airway pressure (n=12) or a sham-devices (n=11). The intervention group had reduced apneas and hypopneas, daytime sleepiness and fatigue; they also had improved sleep quality, increased objective activity, and vigor. The study suggested that treatment of obstructive sleep apnea results in a modest improvement of activity in persons with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23976778

  11. Impact of rail medical standard on obstructive sleep apnoea prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2004 edition of the National Standard for Health Assessment of Rail Safety Workers (the standard) used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to screen for excessive daytime sleepiness related to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The 2012 edition of the standard expanded the OSA screening matrix to include body mass index, comorbid hypertension and type 2 diabetes as triggers requiring a sleep study to be undertaken irrespective of the ESS. Aims To assess the impact of the new standard on the estimated prevalence of OSA in railway workers. Methods An analysis of data on safety critical employees referred for rail safety health assessment during the 2013 calendar year and meeting the criteria for sleep study referral. Sleep study outcomes were used to assess the predictive value of screening under the new standard. Results A total of 200/4311 workers were investigated with a sleep study. One hundred and ninety-three met the new risk factor criteria and 182 (91%) were newly diagnosed with OSA. The prevalence of OSA in the study population was 7%, compared with 2% in 2009. No worker reported an elevated ESS. The false positive to true positive ratio was 0.1 (95% CI 0.06–0.16). Conclusions The new medical standard has resulted in an increased estimate of the prevalence of OSA in rail workers. This study supports the use of objective clinical risk factors to select workers for further investigation, aiming to minimize the risk of accidents associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and other comorbid conditions of OSA. PMID:26276756

  12. SleepAp: an automated obstructive sleep apnoea screening application for smartphones.

    PubMed

    Behar, Joachim; Roebuck, Aoife; Shahid, Mohammed; Daly, Jonathan; Hallack, Andre; Palmius, Niclas; Stradling, John; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a sleep disorder with long-term consequences. Long-term effects include sleep-related issues and cardiovascular diseases. OSA is often diagnosed with an overnight sleep test called a polysomnogram. Monitoring can be costly with long wait times for diagnosis. In this paper, a novel OSA screening framework and prototype phone application are introduced. A database of 856 patients that underwent at-home polygraphy was collected. Features were derived from audio, actigraphy, photoplethysmography (PPG), and demographics, and used as the inputs of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The SVM was trained on 735 patients and tested on 121 patients. Classification on the test set had an accuracy of up to 92.2% when classifying subjects as having moderate or severe OSA versus being healthy or a snorer based on the clinicians' diagnoses. The signal processing and machine learning algorithms were ported to Java and integrated into the phone application-SleepAp. SleepAp records the body position, audio, actigraphy and PPG signals, and implements the clinically validated STOP-BANG questionnaire. It derives features from the signals and classifies the user as having OSA or not using the SVM trained on the clinical database. The resulting software could provide a new, easy-to-use, low-cost, and widely available modality for OSA screening.

  13. CPAP Treatment Partly Normalizes Sleep Spindle Features in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Saunamäki, Tiia; Huupponen, Eero; Loponen, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) decreases sleep spindle density and frequency. We evaluated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on different features of sleep spindles. Methods. Twenty OSA patients underwent two night polysomnographies in a diagnostic phase and one night polysomnography after 6 months of CPAP treatment. The control group comprised 20 healthy controls. Sleep spindles were analyzed by a previously developed automated method. Unilateral and bilateral spindles were identified in central and frontopolar brain locations. Spindle density and frequency were determined for the first and last half of the NREM time. Results. The density of bilateral central spindles, which did not change in the untreated OSA patients, increased towards the morning hours during CPAP treatment and in the controls. Central spindles did not become faster with sleep in OSA patients and the central spindles remained slow in the left hemisphere even with CPAP. Conclusion. CPAP treatment normalized spindle features only partially. The changes may be associated with deficits in thalamocortical spindle generating loops. Significance. This study shows that some sleep spindle changes persist after CPAP treatment in OSA patients. The association of these changes to daytime symptoms in OSA patients needs to be further evaluated. PMID:28261503

  14. An integrative review of screening for obstructive sleep apnea in commercial vehicle drivers.

    PubMed

    Burns, Nadine

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea has been a concern for commercial vehicle drivers for several decades. An increasing body of knowledge supports the idea that insufficient sleep can affect drivers' abilities to react efficiently and expediently, leading to motor vehicle accidents. Insufficient sleep can be described as short sleep periods, prolonged driving time, and dysfunctional sleep breathing. Commercial motor vehicle drivers are required to undergo physical examinations at least once every 2 years to maintain certification. Medical examiners are encouraged to screen for obstructive sleep apnea during these biannual examinations. Current literature identifies four frequently used screening tools for obstructive sleep apnea: STOP Questionnaire, STOP-Bang Questionnaire, Berlin Questionnaire, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Medical examiners must determine which screening method is valid, reliable, and has sufficient evidence to support its use.

  15. Sleep Position Trainer versus Tennis Ball Technique in Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Frans H.; van der Palen, Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods: 29 patients were treated with the sleep position trainer (SPT), 26 patients with the tennis ball technique (TBT). At baseline and 1 month polysomnography, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Quebec Sleep Questionnaire (QSQ) were taken. Daily compliance was objectively measured in both groups. Results: Both therapies prevent supine sleep position to a median of 0% (min-max: SPT 0.0% to 67%, TBT 0.0% to 38.9%), resulting in a treatment success (AHI < 5) in 68.0% of the SPT and 42.9% of the TBT patients. The ESS at baseline was < 10 in both groups. Sleep quality parameters, such as wake after sleep onset (WASO; p = 0.001) and awakenings (p = 0.006), improved more in the SPT group. Total QSQ scores (0.4 ± 0.2, p = 0.03), the QSQ domains nocturnal symptoms (0.7 ± 0.2, p = 0.01), and social interactions (0.8 ± 0.3, p = 0.02) changed in favor of the SPT group. Effective compliance (≥ 4 h/night + ≥ 5 days/week) was 75.9% for the SPT and 42.3% for the TBT users (p = 0.01). Conclusion: In mild POSAS with normal EES the new SPT device and the standard TBT are equally effective in reducing respiratory indices. However, compared to the TBT, sleep quality, quality of life, and compliance improved significantly more in the SPT group. Citation: Eijsvogel MM, Ubbink R, Dekker J, Oppersma E, de Jongh FH, van der Palen J, Brusse-Keizer MG. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):139–147. PMID:25515276

  16. A Case of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Assessments of Fitness for Work

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder that can cause excessive daytime sleepiness and impairment of cognition. These symptoms may lead to the occurrence of occupational accidents in workers with obstructive sleep apnea. Case presentation A 36-year-old man who worked as a dimensional control surveyor caused a vehicle accident while he was driving at the work site. Although he experienced loss of consciousness at the time of the accident, he had no other symptoms. His brain computed tomography and laboratory test did not show any specific findings. Medical tests were conducted to evaluate his fitness for work. Decreased sleep latency was observed on the electroencephalography image, which is suggestive of a sleep disorder. He frequently experienced daytime sleepiness and his Epworth sleepiness score was 13. The polysomnography showed a markedly increased apnea-hypopnea index of 84.3, which led to a diagnosis of severe obstructive sleep apnea. The patient was advised to return to work only when his obstructive sleep apnea improved through proper treatment. Conclusion Proper screening for obstructive sleep apnea among workers is important for preventing workplace accidents caused by this disorder, but screening guidelines have not yet been established in Korea. An effort toward preparing practical guidelines for obstructive sleep apnea is needed. PMID:24822091

  17. Atrial fibrillation among patients under investigation for suspected obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Martin; Sandström, Herbert; Sahlin, Carin; Rohani, Morteza; Al-Khalili, Faris; Hörnsten, Rolf; Blomberg, Anders; Wester, Per; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Franklin, Karl A.

    2017-01-01

    Study objectives Obstructive sleep apnea is common among patients with atrial fibrillation, but the prevalence and risk factors for atrial fibrillation among patients who are being investigated on suspicion of sleep apnea are not well known. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of atrial fibrillation among patients investigated for suspected obstructive sleep apnea and to identify risk factors for atrial fibrillation among them. Methods The prevalence of atrial fibrillation was investigated among 201 patients referred for suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Patients without known atrial fibrillation were investigated with a standard 12-lead ECG at hospital and short intermittent handheld ECG recordings at home, during 14 days. Results Atrial fibrillation occurred in 13 of 201 subjects (6.5%), and in 12 of 61 men aged 60 years and older (20%). The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increased with sleep apnea severity (p = 0.038). All patients with atrial fibrillation were men and all had sleep apnea. Age 60 or older, the occurrence of central sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors for atrial fibrillation after adjustments for body mass index, gender, sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Atrial fibrillation is common among subjects referred for sleep apnea investigation and the prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases with sleep apnea severity. Independent risk factors for atrial fibrillation among patients investigated for suspected obstructive sleep apnea include the occurrence of coexisting central sleep apnea, age 60 years or older and diabetes mellitus. PMID:28178304

  18. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Wang, Dawei; Qin, Wen; Li, Qiong; Chen, Baoyuan; Zhang, Yunting; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Structural and functional brain changes may contribute to neural dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the effect of OSA on resting-state brain activity has not been established. The objective of this study was to investigate alterations in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the common brain networks in patients with OSA and their relationships with changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the corresponding brain regions. Designs: Resting-state functional and structural MRI data were acquired from patients with OSA and healthy controls. Seven brain networks were identified by independent component analysis. The rsFC in each network was compared between groups and the GMV of brain regions with significant differences in rsFC was also compared. Setting: University hospital. Patients and Participants: Twenty-four male patients with untreated OSA and 21 matched healthy controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: OSA specifically affected the cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks but not the visual and auditory networks. The medial prefrontal cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed decreased rsFC and GMV in patients with OSA, suggesting structural and functional deficits. The right DLPFC and left precentral gyrus showed decreased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting a functional deficit. The right posterior cingulate cortex demonstrated increased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting functional compensation. In patients with OSA, the rsFC of the right DLPFC was negatively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: OSA specifically affects resting-state functional connectivity in cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks, which may be related to the impaired cognitive and motor functions in these patients. Citation: Zhang Q; Wang D; Qin W; Li Q; Chen B; Zhang Y; Yu C. Altered resting-state brain activity in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2013

  19. Mini Tracheostomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Evidence Based Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Macario; Zaghi, Soroush; Chang, Edward T.; Song, Sungjin A.; Szelestey, Blake; Certal, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To search for articles evaluating the use of tracheostomies (either permanent stomas or tracheostomy tubes) in adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to evaluate the potential for the use of mini tracheostomies as treatment for OSA. Study Design. Systematic review. Methods. Nine databases were searched from inception through July 21, 2015. Results. The overall tracheostomy search yielded 516 articles, of which eighteen studies provided polysomnographic data. No study was identified (empty review) for the use of mini tracheostomies for treating OSA. The mini tracheostomy search yielded ninety-five articles which describe findings for either mini tracheostomy kits (inner cannula diameter of 4 mm) or the performance of mini tracheotomies. Six articles described the use of mini tracheostomies as a temporary procedure to relieve acute upper airway obstruction and none described the use for OSA. For tracheostomy stomal sites, suturing the skin directly to the tracheal rings with defatting can minimize stomal site collapse. The smallest tracheostomy stomal size that can successfully treat OSA has not been described. Conclusion. Mini tracheostomies as small as 4 mm have been successfully used in the short term to relieve upper airway obstruction. Given that polysomnography data are lacking, additional research is needed. PMID:26925105

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes: interacting epidemics.

    PubMed

    Tasali, Esra; Mokhlesi, Babak; Van Cauter, Eve

    2008-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major public health concern with high morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. Recent reports have indicated that the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). There is compelling evidence that OSA is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Rapidly accumulating data from both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that OSA is also independently associated with alterations in glucose metabolism and places patients at an increased risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. Experimental studies in humans and animals have demonstrated that intermittent hypoxia and reduced sleep duration due to sleep fragmentation, as occur in OSA, exert adverse effects on glucose metabolism. Based on the current evidence, clinicians need to address the risk of OSA in patients with type 2 diabetes and, conversely, evaluate the presence of type 2 diabetes in patients with OSA. Clearly, there is a need for further research, using well-designed studies and long-term follow-up, to fully demonstrate a causal role for OSA in the development and severity of type 2 diabetes. In particular, future studies must carefully consider the confounding effects of central obesity in examining the link between OSA and alterations in glucose metabolism. The interactions among the rising epidemics of obesity, OSA, and type 2 diabetes are likely to be complex and involve multiple pathways. A better understanding of the relationship between OSA and type 2 diabetes may have important public health implications.

  1. CPAP Treatment Adherence in Women with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Baltzan, M.; Pavilanis, A.; Tran, D.-L.; Conrod, K.

    2017-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has numerous negative health-related consequences. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is generally considered the treatment of choice for OSA, but rates of nonadherence are high. It is believed that OSA is more prevalent among men; therefore understanding how OSA presents among women is limited and treatment adherence has received little research attention. For this study, 29 women were recruited from primary care offices. They completed a questionnaire battery and underwent a night of nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) followed by a visit with a sleep specialist. Women diagnosed with OSA were prescribed CPAP; 2 years later CPAP adherence was evaluated. Results show that approximately half the sample was adherent. There were no significant differences between adherent and nonadherent women on OSA severity; however CPAP adherent women had worse nocturnal and daytime functioning scores at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, when the seven nocturnal and daytime variables were used as predictors in a discriminant analysis, they could predict 87% of adherent and 93% of the nonadherent women. The single most important predictor was nonrefreshing sleep. We discuss the implications of the findings for identifying women in primary care with potential OSA and offer suggestions for enhancing treatment adherence. PMID:28352476

  2. CPAP Treatment Adherence in Women with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Libman, E; Bailes, S; Fichten, C S; Rizzo, D; Creti, L; Baltzan, M; Grad, R; Pavilanis, A; Tran, D-L; Conrod, K; Amsel, R

    2017-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has numerous negative health-related consequences. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is generally considered the treatment of choice for OSA, but rates of nonadherence are high. It is believed that OSA is more prevalent among men; therefore understanding how OSA presents among women is limited and treatment adherence has received little research attention. For this study, 29 women were recruited from primary care offices. They completed a questionnaire battery and underwent a night of nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) followed by a visit with a sleep specialist. Women diagnosed with OSA were prescribed CPAP; 2 years later CPAP adherence was evaluated. Results show that approximately half the sample was adherent. There were no significant differences between adherent and nonadherent women on OSA severity; however CPAP adherent women had worse nocturnal and daytime functioning scores at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, when the seven nocturnal and daytime variables were used as predictors in a discriminant analysis, they could predict 87% of adherent and 93% of the nonadherent women. The single most important predictor was nonrefreshing sleep. We discuss the implications of the findings for identifying women in primary care with potential OSA and offer suggestions for enhancing treatment adherence.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: blood viscosity, blood coagulation abnormalities, and early atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Peverini, Francesco; De Benedetto, Michele; De Nuccio, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and arterial thrombosis, which are associated with high cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. In studies performed in clinical populations with elevated CV event risk profiles, the occurrence of moderate to severe OSAS was very often accompanied by a worsened vascular function and increased prevalence of structural abnormalities. Recent investigations of atherosclerosis in OSAS have focused on thrombotic tendency and blood viscosity, providing new insight into mechanisms of the disease. Despite that knowledge about the mechanisms of development of CV disease in patients with OSAS is still incomplete, observations confirm a relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and the rheological properties (flow properties) of blood. While platelet dysfunction and hypercoagulability (PDMPs, PaI-1, and SF) play important roles in the pathogenesis of vascular disease, there are limited studies on the potential role of blood viscosity in the development of vascular disease in OSAS.

  4. The role of physical exercise in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Flávio Maciel Dias; Pedrosa, Rodrigo Pinto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common clinical condition, with a variable and underestimated prevalence. OSA is the main condition associated with secondary systemic arterial hypertension, as well as with atrial fibrillation, stroke, and coronary artery disease, greatly increasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is not tolerated by all OSA patients and is often not suitable in cases of mild OSA. Hence, alternative methods to treat OSA and its cardiovascular consequences are needed. In OSA patients, regular physical exercise has beneficial effects other than weight loss, although the mechanisms of those effects remain unclear. In this population, physiological adaptations due to physical exercise include increases in upper airway dilator muscle tone and in slow-wave sleep time; and decreases in fluid accumulation in the neck, systemic inflammatory response, and body weight. The major benefits of exercise programs for OSA patients include reducing the severity of the condition and daytime sleepiness, as well as increasing sleep efficiency and maximum oxygen consumption. There are few studies that evaluated the role of physical exercise alone for OSA treatment, and their protocols are quite diverse. However, aerobic exercise, alone or combined with resistance training, is a common point among the studies. In this review, the major studies and mechanisms involved in OSA treatment by means of physical exercise are presented. In addition to systemic clinical benefits provided by physical exercise, OSA patients involved in a regular, predominantly aerobic, exercise program have shown a reduction in disease severity and in daytime sleepiness, as well as an increase in sleep efficiency and in peak oxygen consumption, regardless of weight loss. PMID:28117479

  5. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and endogenous carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Masanori; Murase, Kimihiko; Tachikawa, Ryo; Hamada, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Minami, Takuma; Inouchi, Morito; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) levels are recognized as a surrogate marker for activity of heme oxygenase-1, which is induced by various factors, including hypoxia and oxidative stress. Few reports have evaluated endogenous CO in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Whether OSA more greatly affects exhaled or blood CO is not known. Sixty-nine patients with suspected OSA were prospectively included in this study. Exhaled and blood CO were evaluated at night and morning. Blood and exhaled CO levels were well correlated both at night and morning (r = 0.52, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.61, P < 0.0001, respectively). Although exhaled CO levels both at night and morning significantly correlated with total sleep time with arterial oxygen saturation < 90% (ρ = 0.41, P = 0.0005 and ρ = 0.27, P = 0.024, respectively), blood CO levels did not correlate with any sleep parameter. Seventeen patients with an apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 (control group) were compared with 52 patients with AHI ≥ 15 (OSA group). Exhaled CO levels at night in the OSA group were significantly higher than in the control group (3.64 ± 1.2 vs. 2.99 ± 0.70 ppm, P < 0.05). Exhaled CO levels at night decreased after 3 mo of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in OSA patients (n = 36; P = 0.016) to become nearly the same level as in the control group (P = 0.21). Blood CO levels did not significantly change after CPAP therapy. Exhaled CO was positively related to hypoxia during sleep in OSA patients, but blood CO was not. Exhaled CO might better correlate with oxidative stress associated with OSA than blood CO.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Overnight Body Fluid Shift before and after Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Forni Ogna, Valentina; Mihalache, Alexandra; Pruijm, Menno; Halabi, Georges; Phan, Olivier; Cornette, Françoise; Bassi, Isabelle; Haba Rubio, José; Burnier, Michel; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with significantly increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Fluid overload may promote obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ESRD through an overnight fluid shift from the legs to the neck soft tissues. Body fluid shift and severity of obstructive sleep apnea before and after hemodialysis were compared in patients with ESRD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Seventeen patients with hemodialysis and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were included. Polysomnographies were performed the night before and after hemodialysis to assess obstructive sleep apnea, and bioimpedance was used to measure fluid overload and leg fluid volume. Results The mean overnight rostral fluid shift was 1.27±0.41 L prehemodialysis; it correlated positively with fluid overload volume (r=0.39; P=0.02) and was significantly lower posthemodialysis (0.78±0.38 L; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the mean obstructive apnea-hypopnea index before and after hemodialysis (46.8±22.0 versus 42.1±18.6 per hour; P=0.21), but obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was significantly lower posthemodialysis (−10.1±10.8 per hour) in the group of 12 patients, with a concomitant reduction of fluid overload compared with participants without change in fluid overload (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index +8.2±16.1 per hour; P<0.01). A lower fluid overload after hemodialysis was significantly correlated (r=0.49; P=0.04) with a lower obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Fluid overload—assessed by bioimpedance—was the best predictor of the change in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index observed after hemodialysis (standardized r=−0.68; P=0.01) in multivariate regression analysis. Conclusions Fluid overload influences overnight rostral fluid shift and obstructive sleep apnea severity in patients with ESRD undergoing intermittent hemodialysis. Although no benefit of hemodialysis on obstructive sleep apnea severity

  7. Impact of nasal obstruction on sleep quality: a community-based study of women.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Caroline; Jonsson, Lars; Holmström, Mats; Svensson, Malin; Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny; Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the impact of self-reported nasal obstruction on sleep quality in women. A community-based sample of 400 women underwent a full night of polysomnography. Airway diseases, allergies and sleep-related symptoms were assessed by questionnaires. Women with subjective nasal obstruction were subdivided into three groups: persistent nasal obstruction (PNO, n = 46), hay fever (n = 88) and nasal obstruction at night (NON, n = 30). Sleep problems and related daytime symptoms were most prevalent among women with NON. After adjusting for age, BMI, smoking and asthma, NON was an independent predictor of 'Difficulties inducing sleep due to nasal obstruction' [adjusted odds ratio (95 % CI): 89.5 (27.0-296.7)], 'Snoring' [4.2 (1.7-10.2)], 'Sweating at night' [2.6 (1.1-6.1)], 'Difficulties maintaining sleep' [2.7 (1.2-6.2)], and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath' [32.2 (8.7-119.1)]. 'Dry mouth on awakening' [7.7 (3.2-18.4)], 'Waking up unrefreshed' [2.7 (1.2-6.0)], 'Excessive daytime sleepiness' [2.6 (1.1-6.0)], and 'Daytime nasal obstruction' [12.2 (4.8-31.2)] were also associated with NON. Persistent nasal obstruction and hay fever were both associated with some reported sleep problems due to an overlap with NON. When women with NON were excluded, only 'Daytime nasal obstruction' was still significantly associated with PNO, while hay fever was associated with 'Daytime nasal obstruction' and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath'. There were no significant differences in objectively measured sleep variables between any of the three subgroups and the study cohort. Self-reported nasal obstruction at night in women has a significant effect on several subjective day- and nighttime symptoms, but it does not appear to affect objectively measured sleep quality.

  8. Sleep bruxism associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - A pilot study using a new portable device.

    PubMed

    Winck, M; Drummond, M; Viana, P; Pinho, J C; Winck, J C

    Sleep bruxism (SB) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) share common pathophysiologic pathways. We aimed to study the presence and relationship of SB in a OSAS population. Patients referred with OSAS suspicion and concomitant SB complains were evaluated using a specific questionnaire, orofacial evaluation and cardio-respiratory polygraphy that could also monitor audio and EMG of the masseter muscles. From 11 patients studied 9 had OSAS. 55.6% were male, mean age was 46.3±11.3 years, and apnea hypopnea index of 11.1±5.7/h. Through specific questionnaire 55.6% had SB criteria. Orofacial examination (only feasible in 3) confirmed tooth wear in all. 77.8% had polygraphic SB criteria (SB index>2/h). Mean SB index was 5.12±3.6/h, phasic events predominated (72.7%). Concerning tooth grinding episodes, we found a mean of 10.7±9.2 per night. All OSAS patients except two (77.8%) had more than two audible tooth-grinding episodes. These two patients were the ones with the lowest SB index (1.0 and 1.4 per hour). Only in one patient could we not detect tooth grinding episodes. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between tooth grinding episodes and SB index and phasic event index (R=0.755, p=0.019 and R=0.737, p=0.023 respectively, Pearson correlation). Mean apnoea to bruxism index was 0.4/h, meaning that only a minority of SB events were not secondary to OSAS. We could not find any significant correlation between AHI and bruxism index or phasic bruxism index (R=-0.632 and R=-0.611, p>0.05, Pearson correlation). This pilot study shows that SB is a very common phenomenon in a group of mild OSAS patients, probably being secondary to it in the majority of cases. The new portable device used may add diagnostic accuracy and help to tailor therapy in this setting.

  9. The Utility of Three Screening Questionnaires for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Sleep Clinic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bomi; Lee, Eun Mi; Chung, Yoo-Sam; Kim, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of three screening questionnaires in identifying Korean patients at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a sleep clinic setting in Korea. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 592 adult patients with suspected OSA who visited a sleep center. All patients completed the Sleep Apnea of Sleep Disorder Questionnaire (SA-SDQ), the Berlin questionnaire, and the STOP-Bang questionnaire. Estimated OSA risk was compared to a diagnosis of OSA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for each questionnaire. Results The prevalence of OSA was 83.6% using an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5/h and 58.4% for an AHI ≥15/h. The STOP-Bang questionnaire had a high sensitivity (97% for AHI ≥5/h, 98% for AHI ≥15/h), but the specificity was low (19% and 11%, respectively). In contrast, the sensitivity of the SA-SDQ was not high enough (68% for AHI ≥5/h, 74% for AHI ≥15/h) to be useful in a clinical setting, whereas the specificity was relatively good (66% and 61%, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity values of the Berlin questionnaire fell between those of the STOP-Bang questionnaire and the SA-SDQ. Conclusion The STOP-Bang questionnaire may be useful for screening OSA in a sleep clinic setting, but its specificity is lower than the acceptable level for this purpose. A new screening questionnaire with a high sensitivity and acceptable specificity is therefore needed in a sleep clinic setting. PMID:25837173

  10. Cardiovascular regulation in different sleep stages in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gapelyuk, Andrej; Riedl, Maik; Suhrbier, Alexander; Kraemer, Jan F; Bretthauer, Georg; Malberg, Hagen; Kurths, Jürgen; Penzel, Thomas; Wessel, Niels

    2011-08-01

    Heart rate and blood pressure variability analysis as well as baroreflex sensitivity have been proven to be powerful tools for the assessment of autonomic control in clinical practice. Their ability to detect systematic changes caused by different states, diseases and treatments shall be shown for sleep disorders. Therefore, we consider 18 normotensive and 10 hypertensive patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) before and after a three-month continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Additionally, an age and sex matched control group of 10 healthy subjects is examined. Linear and nonlinear parameters of heart rate and blood pressure fluctuation as well as the baroreflex sensitivity are used to answer the question whether there are differences in cardiovascular regulation between the different sleep stages and groups. Moreover, the therapeutic effect of CPAP therapy in OSAS patients shall be investigated. Kruskal-Wallis tests between the sleep stages for each group show significant differences in the very low spectral component of heart rate (VLF/P: 0.0033-0.04 Hz, p<0.01) which indicates differences in metabolic activity during the night. Furthermore, the decrease of Shannon entropy of word distribution as a parameter of systolic blood pressure during non-REM sleep reflects the local dominance of the vagal system (p<0.05). The increased sympathetic activation of the patients leads to clear differences of cardiovascular regulation in different sleep stages between controls and patients. We found a significant reduction of baroreflex sensitivity in slow wave sleep in the OSAS patients (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.05) compared to controls, which disappeared after three months of CPAP therapy. Hence, our results demonstrate the ability of cardiovascular analyzes to separate between healthy and pathological regulation as well as between different severities of OSAS in this retrospective study.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea and driving: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Sleep Society position paper.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Najib; Skomro, Robert; Blackman, Adam; Curren, Kristen; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Fleetham, John; George, Charles; Hakemi, Tom; Hanly, Patrick; Li, Christopher; Morrison, Debra; Series, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for motor vehicle collisions; however, it is unclear how this should be translated into fitness-to-drive recommendations. Accordingly, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) Sleep Disordered Breathing Clinical Assembly and the Canadian Sleep Society (CSS) assembled a CTS-CSS working group to propose recommendations with regard to driving in patients with OSA. Recommendations for assessing fitness to drive in noncommercial drivers: 1. Severity of OSA alone is not a reliable predictor of collision risk and, therefore, should not be used in isolation to assess fitness to drive; 2. The severity of sleep apnea should be considered in the context of other factors to assess fitness to drive; 3. The decision to restrict driving is ultimately made by the motor vehicle licensing authority; however, they should take into account the information and recommendations provided by the sleep medicine physician and should follow provincial guidelines; 4. For patients prescribed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, objective CPAP compliance should be documented. Efficacy should also be documented in terms of reversing the symptoms and improvement in sleep apnea based on physiological monitoring; 5. For patients treated with surgery or an oral appliance, verification of adequate sleep apnea treatment should be obtained; and 6. A driver diagnosed with OSA may be recertified as fit to drive based on assessment of symptoms and demonstrating compliance with treatment. The assessment should be aligned with the provincial driver's license renewal period. Commercial vehicles: Assessment of fitness to drive should be more stringent for patients operating commercial vehicles. In general, the CTS-CSS working group was in agreement with the Medical Expert Panel recommendations to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration in the United States; these recommendations were adapted for Canadian practitioners.

  12. Risk factors for post coronary artery bypass graft atrial fibrillation: role of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Qaddoura, Amro; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-12-21

    In this chapter, we start by discussing coronary artery bypass grafting and the most common complication after surgery – post coronary artery bypass grafting atrial fibrillation (PCAF). We then discuss the major risk factors for PCAF, and subsequently conduct an in-depth discussion of obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor. In this endeavor, we outline how obstructive sleep apnea is diagnosed, its pathophysiological relationship to PCAF, and recent clinical studies investigating the association between obstructive sleep apnea and PCAF. We conclude with prevention and treatment strategies for PCAF, and a discussion of future research recommendations.

  13. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in North American Commercial Drivers

    PubMed Central

    KALES, Stefanos N.; STRAUBEL, Madeleine G.

    2013-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17–28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen. PMID:24317450

  14. Obstructive sleep apnoea, motor vehicle accidents, and work performance.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) shows a very high prevalence in the middle-age work force population and, between all diseases and medical conditions, is the major risk factor for motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). OSA can be diagnosed and treated, with resultant reduction in MVAs to those seen in the healthy population. It is increasing evidence that it is a major risk factor for occupational accidents also in fields different from the professional transport and for work disability. It is likely that the treatment of OSA results in the reduction of occupational accidents and work performance improvement with expected benefits in work processes and business in general. It is therefore advisable to develop strategies for screening and treatment of OSA in workers. The risk assessment of OSA in workers may also help to reduce the burden on national health care systems.

  15. [Dermatoglyphics and body composition in obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Mercanti, Luiz Bittencourt; Bezerra, Marcio L de S; Fernandes Filho, José; Struchiner, Claudio José

    2004-09-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and genetic patterns can modulate the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of this study is to describe the anthropometrics and dermatoglyphics features among OSAS carriers. We collected information on Body Mass Index (BMI), Conicity Index (CI), Body Fat Mass (BFM), somatotype and fingerprints. Thirty-one cases of OSAS were compared to an equal number of controls. Membership to the obese category is based on observed BMI and BFM. The CI distribution among cases shows a strong central obesity component. The endomorph-mesomorph somatotype category predominates among cases showing high adiposity and relative muscle-skeletic development, such as relative linearity of great mass per unit of height. Increased morbidity, as given by more serious indices of apnea, correlates positively with higher mesomorphic predominance in the body composition. Analysis of dermatoglyphic data does not show significant statistical differences between OSAS--patients and controls.

  16. Pediatric obesity, metabolic syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Mary A

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the pediatric population has dramatically increased in the last 30 years. While the adverse health effects of obesity have long been recognized in adults, many of these complications are now understood to begin in early childhood. Obese children and adolescents are significantly more likely than their peers of healthy weight to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome. In turn, affected individuals may experience myriad serious clinical sequelae; neuro-cognitive, psychiatric, cardiovascular, and endocrinologic complications have each been extensively documented. Thus, the spectrum of obesity-related disease represents a serious but preventable threat to personal and family wellness; additionally, it is a source of considerable health care expenditure and represents a national and international health crisis. The optimal care of these patients will be best achieved through the pediatric health care provider's timely recognition of these clinical problems and knowledge of appropriate intervention strategies.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea in North American commercial drivers.

    PubMed

    Kales, Stefanos N; Straubel, Madeleine G

    2014-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17-28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen.

  18. Craniocervical Posture in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Piccin, Chaiane Facco; Pozzebon, Daniela; Scapini, Fabricio; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. Objective  The objective of this study is to verify the craniofacial characteristics and craniocervical posture of OSA and healthy subjects, determining possible relationships with the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI). Methods  This case-control study evaluated 21 subjects with OSA, who comprised the OSA group (OSAG), and 21 healthy subjects, who constituted the control group (CG). Cephalometry analyzed head posture measurements, craniofacial measurements, and air space. Head posture was also assessed by means of photogrammetry. Results  The groups were homogeneous regarding gender (12 men and 9 women in each group), age (OSAG = 41.86 ± 11.26 years; GC = 41.19 ± 11.20 years), and body mass index (OSAG = 25.65 ± 2.46 kg/m2; CG = 24.72 ± 3.01 kg/m2). We found significant differences between the groups, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance between the hyoid bone and the mandibular plane in OSAG, when compared with CG. A positive correlation was found between higher head hyperextension and head anteriorization, with greater severity of OSA as assessed by AHI. Conclusion  OSAG subjects showed changes in craniofacial morphology, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance from the hyoid bone to the mandibular plane, as compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, in OSA subjects, the greater the severity of OSA, the greater the head hyperextension and anteriorization. PMID:27413397

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Metabolic Syndrome in Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Bienvenido; Garcia, Luis; Lozano, Lourdes; Almagro, Pere; Quintana, Salvador; Alsina, Monserrat; Heredia, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a clinical picture characterized by repeated episodes of obstruction of the upper airway. OSA is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, some of which are components of metabolic syndrome (MS). Objectives: First, determine the prevalence of MS in patients with OSA visited in sleep clinic. Second, evaluate whether there is an independent association between MS components and the severity of OSA. Methods: Patients with clinical suspicion of OSA were evaluated by polysomnography. Three groups were defined according to apnea hypoapnea index (AHI): no OSA (AHI <5), mild-moderate (AHI≥ 5 ≤30), and severe (AHI> 30). All patients were determined in fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin. MS was defined according to criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Results: A total of 141 patients (mean age 54 ± 11 years) were evaluated. According to AIH, 25 subjects had no OSA and 116 had OSA (41mild-moderate and 75 severe). MS prevalence ranged from 43-81% in OSA group. Also, a significant increase in waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, blood pressure levels, and a decrease in HDL cholesterol levels was observed in more severe OSA patients. All polysomnographic parameters correlated significantly with metabolic abnormalities. After a multiple regression analysis, abdominal obesity (p <0.02), glucose (p <0.01) and HDL cholesterol (p <0.001) were independently associated with OSA. Conclusions: Our findings show high prevalence of MS in OSA, especially in severe group. A significant association between OSA and some of the components of MS was found in Spanish population. PMID:24222804

  20. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, Luciana Balester Mello; Luz, Gabriela Pontes; Palombini, Luciana Oliveira; e Silva, Luciana Oliveira; Hoshino, Wilson; Guimarães, Thaís Moura; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia; Togeiro, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and normal individuals. Methods UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale—ESS—≥ 10) and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale—MFIS—≥ 38) associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10) and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38) associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. “Control group” criteria were AHI < 5 events/hour and RDI ≤ 5 events/hour and ESS ≤ 9, without any sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in “control group”), adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) was performed five times (each two hours) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Results UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire—FOSQ—and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index—PSQI: p < 0.05) and more fatigue than mild OSA patients (p = 0.003) and scored significantly higher in both Beck inventories than “control group” (p < 0.02). UARS patients had more lapses early in the morning (in time 1) compared to the results in the afternoon (time 5) than mild OSA (p = 0.02). Mild OSA patients had more lapses in times 2 than in time 5 compared to “control group” (p = 0.04). Conclusions UARS patients have a worse sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls. PMID:27228081

  1. Bimaxillary Advancement as the Initial Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Five Years Follow-Up of the Pori Experience

    PubMed Central

    Raunio, Antti; Rauhala, Esa; Kiviharju, Minna; Lehmijoki, Ossi; Sándor, George K. B.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Bimaxillary advancement surgery has proven to be effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. According to the Stanford protocol upper airway soft tissue surgery or advancement of tongue by chin plastic surgery is first carried out and if obstructive sleep apnea persists, then bimaxillary advancement is done. This study describes the 5 year outcome of 13 obstructive sleep apnea patients in whom the Stanford protocol was omitted and bimaxillary advancement was carried out as initial surgical treatment. Material and Methods Patients were divided in two groups. Group A comprised patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) confirmed by polysomnography in whom ODI-4 (oxygen desaturation index) was 5 or more. Group B consisted of patients with occlusal problems needing orthognathic surgery and with OSAS symptoms but no clear disease on polysomnography, where the ODI-4 index was less than 5. Both groups were treated with bimaxillary advancement surgery (BAS) as initial therapy. Results In the group A mean ODI-4 was 17.8 (SD 12) before treatment and 3.5 (SD 3.4) at 5-year follow-up (P = 0.018 in paired differences t-test). In group B the ODI-4 remained below 5. In group A mean saturation improved from 94.3% (SD 1.6) to 96.3% (SD 2), P = 0.115 and in group B from 96.3% (SD 1.2) to 97.8% (SD 1.7), P = 0.056 (in paired differences t-test). The static charge sensitive bed evaluation showed improvement in all patients except one. Conclusions Bimaxillary advancement surgery is safe and reliable as an initial surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:24422007

  2. Health Care Savings: The Economic Value of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Care for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Two new white papers commissioned by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) provide an in-depth, detailed analysis of the vast economic burden associated with undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea among adults in the United States. While the individual health benefits of treating OSA are well established, these papers emphasize the value of comprehensive OSA testing and treatment, which can provide dramatic health care savings for payors and large employers. Citation: Watson NF. Health care savings: the economic value of diagnostic and therapeutic care for obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1075–1077. PMID:27448424

  3. Obstructive sleep apnoea in the elderly: role of continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Chiner, Eusebi; Hernández, Luis; Cortes, Jose Pascual; Catalán, Pablo; Ponce, Silvia; Diaz, Jose Ramón; Pastor, Ester; Vigil, Laura; Carmona, Carmen; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Aizpuru, Felipe; Lloberes, Patricia; Mayos, Mercedes; Selma, Maria José; Cifuentes, Jose Fernando; Muñoz, Alvaro

    2015-07-01

    Almost all the information about the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) comes from clinical trials involving only middle-aged patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of CPAP treatment in elderly patients with severe OSA on clinical, quality-of-life and neurocognitive spheres. We performed an open-label, randomised, multicentre clinical trial in a consecutive clinical cohort of 224 elderly (≥70 years old) patients with confirmed severe OSA (apnoea-hypopnea index ≥30) randomised to receive CPAP (n=115) or no CPAP (n=109) for 3 months. A sleep study was performed by either full polysomnography or respiratory polygraphy. CPAP titration was performed by an autoCPAP device. The primary endpoint was quality of life (Quebec Sleep Questionnaire) and secondary endpoints included sleep-related symptoms, presence of anxiety/depression, office-based blood pressure and some neurocognitive tests. The mean±sd age was 75.5±3.9 years. The CPAP group achieved a greater improvement in all quality-of-life domains (p<0.001; effect size: 0.41-0.98), sleep-related symptoms (p<0.001; effect size 0.31-0.91) as well as anxiety (p=0.016; effect size 0.51) and depression (p<0.001; effect size: 0.28) indexes and some neurocognitive tests (digit symbol test (p=0.047; effect size: 0.20) and Trail Making Test A (p=0.029; effect size: 0.44)) in an intention-to-treat analysis. In conclusion, CPAP treatment resulted in an improvement in quality of life, sleep-related symptoms, anxiety and depression indexes and some neurocognitive aspects in elderly people with severe OSA.

  4. Immediate postarousal sleep dynamics: an important determinant of sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Younes, Magdy; Hanly, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    Arousability from sleep is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of the clinical spectrum of sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Patients with SDB display a wide range of arousability. The reason for these differences is not known. We hypothesized that differences in the speed with which sleep deepens following arousals/awakenings (postarousal sleep dynamics) is a major determinant of these differences in arousability in patients with SDB. We analyzed 40 preexisting clinical polysomnography records from patients with a range of SDB severity (apnea-hypopnea index 5-135/h). Sleep depth was determined every 3 s using the odds ratio product (ORP) method, a continuous index of sleep depth (0 = deep sleep, 2.5 = full wakefulness) that correlates strongly (r = 0.98) with arousability (Younes M, Ostrowski M, Soiferman M, Younes H, Younes M, Raneri J, and Hanly P. Sleep 38: 641-654, 2015). Time course of ORP was determined from end of arousal until the next arousal. All arousals were analyzed (142 ± 65/polysomnogram). ORP increased from 0.58 ± 0.32 during sleep to 1.67 ± 0.35 during arousals. ORP immediately (first 9 s) following arousals/awakenings (ORP-9) ranged from 0.21(very deep sleep) to 1.71 (highly arousable state) in different patients. In patients with high ORP-9, sleep deepened slowly (over minutes) beyond 9 s but only if no arousals/awakenings recurred. ORP-9 correlated strongly with average non-rapid eye movement sleep depth (r = 0.87, P < 2E-13), the arousal/awakening index (r = 0.68, P < 5E-6), and with the apnea-hypopnea index (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). ORP-9 was consistent within each patient and did not change on continuous positive airway pressure despite marked improvement in sleep architecture. We conclude that postarousal sleep dynamics are highly variable among patients with sleep-disordered breathing and largely determine average sleep depth and continuity.

  5. Drug induced sleep endoscopy in the decision-making process of children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Francesca; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Gaini, Renato Maria; Garavello, Werner

    2015-03-01

    Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) is currently recommended in children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). However, the condition persists after surgery in about one third of cases. It has been suggested that Drug Induced Sleep Endoscopy (DISE) may be of help for planning a more targeted and effective surgical treatment but evidence is yet weak. The aim of this review is to draw recommendation on the use of DISE in children with OSA. More specifically, we aimed at determine the proportion of cases whose treatment may be influenced by DISE findings. A comprehensive search of articles published from February 1983 to January 2014 listed in the PubMed/MEDLINE databases was performed. The search terms used were: "endoscopy" or "nasoendoscopy" or "DISE" and "obstructive sleep apnea" and "children" or "child" or "pediatric." The main outcome was the rate of naive children with hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids. The assumptions are that clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids is reliable and does not require DISE, and that exclusive T&A may solve OSA in the vast majority of cases even in the presence of other concomitant sites of obstruction. Five studies were ultimately selected and all were case series. The median (range) number of studied children was 39 (15-82). Mean age varied from 3.2 to 7.8 years. The combined estimate rate of OSA consequent to hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids was 71% (95%CI: 64-77%). In children with Down Syndrome, the combined estimated rate of hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids was 62% (95%CI: 44-79%). Our findings show that DISE may be of benefit in a minority of children with OSA since up to two thirds of naive cases presents with hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids. Its use should be limited to those whose clinical evaluation is unremarkable or when OSA persists after T&A.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Preoperative Screening and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert M; Pomerantz, Jonathan; Miller, Deborah E; Weiss-Coleman, Rebecca; Solomonides, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed. For adults, preoperative screening using the STOP or STOP-Bang questionnaires can help to identify adult patients at increased risk of OSA. In the pediatric setting, a question about snoring should be part of every preoperative examination. For patients with known OSA, continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively. Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring with an alarm system can help to prevent apneic catastrophes caused by OSA in the postoperative period.

  7. Cervical osteophytes: a rare cause of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eyigor, Hulya; Selcuk, Omer Tarik; Osma, Ustun; Koca, Rahime; Yilmaz, Mustafa Deniz

    2012-09-01

    Uncertain etiology of cervical osteophytes, in particular emerging in geriatric population, is a rare skeletal system disease. Often, the cases are asymptomatic and may lead to symptoms such as dysphagia, cough, dyspnea, and dysphonia. We present a patient who had anterior osteophytes causing symptoms of severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and literature on etiology of OSA has been reviewed. A 57-year-old male patient with complaints of snoring and cessation of breathing during sleep was referred to the ear nose throat clinic. Cervical radiograph and computed tomography showed the osteophytes in the anterior of the vertebral corpus at the level C1-2. In addition, bridging osteophyte was observed between C6 and C7 vertebrae. The patient's neck circumference was 41 cm, body mass index was 29 kg/m2, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 11, and apnea hypopnea index was 62. Surgery was recommended, but the patient refused. Continuous positive airway pressure titration was applied with 12.6 cm H2O pressure; apnea control was attained with an AHI of 2.7. One of the rare causes of OSA, a case of cervical vertebral osteophyte, was presented, and we would like to draw attention to the importance of ear nose throat examination in the diagnosis of OSA.

  8. Neuropathy and Dysautonomia in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    EVLİCE, Ahmet; UĞUREL, Burcu; BAKLAN, Barış; ÖZTURA, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study is to search for the existence of neuropathy, dysautonomia and to identify the correlations of sickness level of patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). Methods The research is based on the real cases at Dokuz Eylul University of Medicine Sleep and Epilepsy Center, observed during September 2008–May 2009. The patients were selected by polysomnography samples based on 20 persons at same ages with following criteria; high leveled OSAS (AHİ≥30), low OSAS (5≤AHİ<30) and healthy participants. Classical ENMG protocol, symphatic skin response and R-R interval variation test were performed on these samples. Results High and low leveled OSAS patients had a statistically significant (p<0.05) decrease in the average velocity of motor conduction in right tibialis posterior when compared to the control group. Besides we observed an statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in the average amplitud of symphatic skin responses in high leveled OSAS patients than control group. Conclusion OSAS indicates a risk of possible peripheral neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction risk increases in positive correlation with level of OSAS.

  9. Emerging technology: electrical stimulation in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Steier, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) of the upper airway (UAW) dilator muscles for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been used for several decades, but in recent years research in this field has experienced a renaissance; the results of several studies have triggered a steady rise in the interest in this topic. Prospective trials, although still lacking a sham-controlled and randomised approach, have revealed the potential of ES. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) leads to a significant reduction in the apnoea-hypopnoea index and the oxygen desaturation index (ODI). There are similar results published from feasibility studies for transcutaneous ES. A limitation of HNS remains the invasive procedure, the costs involved and severe adverse events, while for the non-invasive approach complications are rare and limited. The limiting step for transcutaneous ES is to deliver a sufficient current without causing arousal from sleep. Despite the progress up to date, numerous variables including optimal stimulation settings, different devices and procedures remain to be further defined for the invasive and the non-invasive method. Further studies are required to identify which patients respond to this treatment. ES of the UAW dilator muscles in OSA has the potential to develop into a clinical alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. It could benefit selected patients who fail standard therapy due to poor long-term compliance. It is likely that international societies will need to review and update their existing guidance on the use of ES in OSA. PMID:26380757

  10. Effect of Oral Appliance for Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Madhu; Srivastava, Govind Narayan; Pratap, Chandra Bhanu; Sharma, Vipul Kumar; Chaturvedi, Thakur Prasad

    2015-01-01

    To analyze therapeutic and clinical efficacy of mandibular advancement device (MAD) on snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thirty patients with OSA were recruited on the basis ofpolysomnography with an Apnea and Hypopnea Index (AHI) greater than 5 but less than 30. Repeat polysomnography was performed in follow up with the appliance in place. MAD used in the study is Medical Dental Sleep Appliance (MDSA). It is a titratable appliance. With the appliance in position, the mandible was advanced to an extent that did not exceed 70% of maximum protrusion capacity; Vertical opening did not exceed on an average 3-4 mm beyond freeway space. Comparison of pre AHI scores (diagnostic PSG) with post AHI scores (PSG with OA in-situ) showed a decrease from Mean +/- SD 26.2367 +/- 6.53 to 13.7111 +/- 627. A highly significant (p < 0.001) improvement in AHI was observed. Pre and post ESS score showed a mean decrease from 14.2333 +/- 5.00 to 6.1481 +/- 2.46 MDSA is effective in reducing apnea hypopnea index scores and improving oxygen saturation level.

  11. [Epworth drowsiness scale value in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Uribe Echevarría, E M; Alvarez, D; Giobellina, R; Uribe Echevarría, A M

    2000-01-01

    Hypersomnia is one of the most consulted symptoms among patients evaluated at sleep disorder centers and it is frequently related to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Our hypothesis is that Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) is the parameter with the greatest predictive value in the OSAS diagnosis. We compared patients with OSAS diagnosis to a control group. In both groups we compared ESS with body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist perimeter (WP). Anthropometric index (BMI, NC and WC), were similar in both groups (p < 0.10). When we analyzed ESS, a score greater than 10 was observed in the OSAS group, with a significant difference between groups (p < 0.001). Epworth sleepiness scale yielded 60% of sensibility, 82% of specificity and a positive predictive value of 85%. The negative predictive value was 52%. Confidence index was 70%. The relationship between OSAS and ESS scale was significant (Pearson Chi-Square value 7.5). Odds Ratio for apneas was 15 and its confidence interval was lower than 1.5 and upper than 141. We conclude that with ESS score exceeding 10 points OSAS should be suspected.

  12. Daytime sleepiness in obesity: mechanisms beyond obstructive sleep apnea--a review.

    PubMed

    Panossian, Lori A; Veasey, Sigrid C

    2012-05-01

    Increasing numbers of overweight children and adults are presenting to sleep medicine clinics for evaluation and treatment of sleepiness. Sleepiness negatively affects quality of life, mental health, productivity, and safety. Thus, it is essential to comprehensively address all potential causes of sleepiness. While many obese individuals presenting with hypersomnolence will be diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and their sleepiness will improve with effective therapy for sleep apnea, a significant proportion of patients will continue to have hypersomnolence. Clinical studies demonstrate that obesity without sleep apnea is also associated with a higher prevalence of hypersomnolence and that bariatric surgery can markedly improve hypersomnolence before resolution of obstructive sleep apnea. High fat diet in both humans and animals is associated with hypersomnolence. This review critically examines the relationships between sleepiness, feeding, obesity, and sleep apnea and then discusses the hormonal, metabolic, and inflammatory mechanisms potentially contributing to hypersomnolence in obesity, independent of sleep apnea and other established causes of excessive daytime sleepiness.

  13. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone.

  14. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cognition: A review].

    PubMed

    Daurat, Agnès; Sarhane, Majdouline; Tiberge, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of airflow cessation, resulting in brief arousals and intermittent hypoxemia. OSAS is associated with a number of adverse health consequences, and cognitive difficulties. The overall pattern of cognitive impairment in OSAS is complex, and research in this field is mixed. On balance, OSAS have negative effects on cognition, most likely in the domain of attention/vigilance, verbal and visual delayed long-term memory, and executive functions. A still unanswered question is whether these deficits are primarily a consequence of sleep fragmentation and/or hypoxemia, or whether they coexist independently from OSAS. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective and widely used treatment of OSAS. No consistent effect of CPAP use on cognitive performance was evident. This may be due, in part, to variability in study design and sampling methodology across studies. Structural changes have been reported in different brain regions, particularly in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the OSAS-related structural changes may improve with CPAP treatment. However, one of the challenges is to interpret the findings in light of comorbid conditions that also cause neural lesions. Animal models will be specifically useful to disentangle the different potential contributors to cognitive impairment in OSAS. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on cognition and neuroimaging in OSAS patients before and after CPAP treatment. We also discuss the mechanisms that have been proposed to explain cognitive deficits in OSAS patients.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics Forecasting of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Onsets.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung Q; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technologies and predictive analytics are fueling the growth in point-of-care (POC) therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other sleep disorders. The effectiveness of POC therapies can be enhanced by providing personalized and real-time prediction of OSA episode onsets. Previous attempts at OSA prediction are limited to capturing the nonlinear, nonstationary dynamics of the underlying physiological processes. This paper reports an investigation into heart rate dynamics aiming to predict in real time the onsets of OSA episode before the clinical symptoms appear. A prognosis method based on a nonparametric statistical Dirichlet-Process Mixture-Gaussian-Process (DPMG) model to estimate the transition from normal states to an anomalous (apnea) state is utilized to estimate the remaining time until the onset of an impending OSA episode. The approach was tested using three datasets including (1) 20 records from 14 OSA subjects in benchmark ECG apnea databases (Physionet.org), (2) records of 10 OSA patients from the University of Dublin OSA database and (3) records of eight subjects from previous work. Validation tests suggest that the model can be used to track the time until the onset of an OSA episode with the likelihood of correctly predicting apnea onset in 1 min to 5 mins ahead is 83.6 ± 9.3%, 80 ± 8.1%, 76.2 ± 13.3%, 66.9 ± 15.4%, and 61.1 ± 16.7%, respectively. The present prognosis approach can be integrated with wearable devices, enhancing proactive treatment of OSA and real-time wearable sensor-based of sleep disorders.

  16. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone. PMID:25429246

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics Forecasting of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technologies and predictive analytics are fueling the growth in point-of-care (POC) therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other sleep disorders. The effectiveness of POC therapies can be enhanced by providing personalized and real-time prediction of OSA episode onsets. Previous attempts at OSA prediction are limited to capturing the nonlinear, nonstationary dynamics of the underlying physiological processes. This paper reports an investigation into heart rate dynamics aiming to predict in real time the onsets of OSA episode before the clinical symptoms appear. A prognosis method based on a nonparametric statistical Dirichlet-Process Mixture-Gaussian-Process (DPMG) model to estimate the transition from normal states to an anomalous (apnea) state is utilized to estimate the remaining time until the onset of an impending OSA episode. The approach was tested using three datasets including (1) 20 records from 14 OSA subjects in benchmark ECG apnea databases (Physionet.org), (2) records of 10 OSA patients from the University of Dublin OSA database and (3) records of eight subjects from previous work. Validation tests suggest that the model can be used to track the time until the onset of an OSA episode with the likelihood of correctly predicting apnea onset in 1 min to 5 mins ahead is 83.6 ± 9.3%, 80 ± 8.1%, 76.2 ± 13.3%, 66.9 ± 15.4%, and 61.1 ± 16.7%, respectively. The present prognosis approach can be integrated with wearable devices, enhancing proactive treatment of OSA and real-time wearable sensor-based of sleep disorders. PMID:27835632

  18. Basal sympathetic predominance in periodic limb movements in sleep with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Ni; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Yen, Chen-Wen; Liou, Li-Min; Hsieh, Cheng-Fang; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chen, Sharon C-J; Hsu, Chung-Yao

    2015-12-01

    Because the impact of periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) is controversial, no consensus has been reached on the therapeutic strategy for PLMS in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). To verify the hypothesis that PLMS is related to a negative impact on the cardiovascular system in OSA patients, this study investigated the basal autonomic regulation by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Sixty patients with mild-to-moderate OSA who underwent polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires were analysed retrospectively and divided into the PLMS group (n = 30) and the non-PLMS group (n = 30). Epochs without any sleep events or continuous effects were evaluated using HRV analysis. No significant difference was observed in the demographic data, PSG parameters or sleep questionnaires between the PLMS and non-PLMS groups, except for age. Patients in the PLMS group had significantly lower normalized high frequency (n-HF), high frequency (HF), square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of difference between adjacent NN intervals (RMSSD) and standard deviation of all normal to normal intervals index (SDNN-I), but had a higher normalized low frequency (n-LF) and LF/HF ratio. There was no significant difference in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Short-Form 36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale between the two groups. After adjustment for confounding variables, PLMS remained an independent predictor of n-LF (β = 0.0901, P = 0.0081), LF/HF ratio (β = 0.5351, P = 0.0361), RMSSD (β = -20.1620, P = 0.0455) and n-HF (β = -0.0886, P = 0.0134). In conclusion, PLMS is related independently to basal sympathetic predominance and has a potentially negative impact on the cardiovascular system of OSA patients.

  19. Mandibular Movements Identify Respiratory Effort in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Martinot, Jean-Benoît; Senny, Fréderic; Denison, Stéphane; Cuthbert, Valérie; Gueulette, Emmanuelle; Guénard, Hervé; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OAH) diagnosis in children is based on the quantification of flow and respiratory effort (RE). Pulse transit time (PTT) is one validated tool to recognize RE. Pattern analysis of mandibular movements (MM) might be an alternative method to detect RE. We compared several patterns of MM to concomittant changes in PTT during OAH in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Methods: Participants: 33 consecutive children with snoring and symptoms/signs of OAH. Measurements: MMs were measured during polysomnography with a magnetometer device (Brizzy Nomics, Liege, Belgium) placed on the chin and forehead. Patterns of MM were evaluated representing peak to peak fluctuations > 0.3 mm in mandibular excursion (MML), mandibular opening (MMO), and sharp MM (MMS), which closed the mouth on cortical arousal (CAr). Results: The median (95% CI) hourly rate of at least 1 MM (MML, or MMO, or MMS) was 18.1 (13.2–36.3) and strongly correlated with OAHI (p = 0.003) but not with central apnea-hypopnea index (CAHI; p = 0.292). The durations when the MM amplitude was > 0.4 mm and PTT > 15 ms were strongly correlated (p < 0.001). The mean (SD) of MM peak to peak amplitude was larger during OAH than CAH (0.9 ± 0.7 mm and 0.2 ± 0.3 mm; p < 0.001, respectively). MMS at the termination of OAH had larger amplitude compared to MMS with CAH (1.5 ± 0.9 mm and 0.5 ± 0.7 mm, respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions: MM > 0.4 mm occurred frequently during periods of OAH and were frequently terminated by MMS corresponding to mouth closure on CAr. The MM findings strongly correlated with changes in PTT. MM analysis could be a simple and accurate promising tool for RE characterization and optimization of OAH diagnosis in children. Citation: Martinot JB, Senny F, Denison S, Cuthbert V, Gueulette E, Guénard H, Pépin JL. Mandibular movements identify respiratory effort in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):567–574. PMID

  20. [Night-to-night variability of the obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mjid, M; Ouahchi, Y; Toujani, S; Snen, H; Ben Salah, N; Ben Hmida, A; Louzir, B; Mhiri, N; Cherif, J; Beji, M

    2016-11-01

    The apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) is the primary measurement used to characterize the obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Despite its popularity, there are limiting factors to its application such as night-to-night variability.

  1. Positional abnormalities during sleep in children affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: the putative role of kinetic muscular chains.

    PubMed

    Carotenuto, Marco; Gimigliano, Francesca; Fiordelisi, Giovanni; Ruberto, Maria; Esposito, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD) are disorders of breathing during sleep characterized by prolonged partial upper airway obstruction, intermittent complete or partial obstruction (obstructive apnea or hypopnea), or both prolonged and intermittent obstruction that disrupts normal ventilation during sleep, normal sleep patterns, or both. Children with OSAS may sleep in unusual positions, such as seated or with neck hyperextended, even if the neck position is not the only unusual posture or the special sleeping positions that is possible to detect in children with SRBD. We have hypothesized that the assumption of unusual posture during sleep, in particular legs retracting or crossing during sleep, could be a way to enlarge the diaphragmatic excursion and promoting the alveolar gas exchanges avoiding the stress of the antero-lumbar and prevertebral muscular chains in SRBD subjects. We have hypothesized that the assumption of unusual posture during sleep, in particular legs retracting or crossing during sleep, could be a way to enlarge the diaphragmatic excursion and promoting the alveolar gas exchanges avoiding the stress of the antero-lumbar and prevertebral muscular chains in SRBD subjects. We can postulate that the prevertebral and antero-lumbar muscular chains could be oversolicited during the apnoic events, and the assumption of abnormal posture could be interpreted as a way to relax or diminish the strain or muscular stress caused by the apneas. The consequence of this hypothesis could be summarized in the concept that a specific rehabilitation or muscular program to improve the tone of this kinetic chain, could be useful to limit the effect nocturnal or diurnal of this so impacting syndrome.

  2. Efficacy and safety of maxillomandibular advancement in treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giarda, M; Brucoli, M; Arcuri, F; Benech, R; Braghiroli, A; Benech, A

    2013-02-01

    To assess the effectiveness of maxillomandibular adavancement for treatment of adults with obstructive sleep apnoea, we report the results obtained after maxillomandibular advancement. A group of 16 patients were studied before surgery, at 6 months after surgery and at followup. The analysis included: upper airway endoscopy during Mueller's manoeuvre, lateral cephalometry, polysomnography and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The results of surgical treatment were divided into "surgical success" and "surgical cure". The former was defined as an AHI < 20 events/hour and a > 50% reduction in AHI after surgical procedure, while the latter was defined as an AHI < 5 events/hour after surgical procedure. At follow-up, all patients had AHI < 20 events/hour with a surgical success rate of 100%. The surgical cure rate was 37.5%, with 6 patients having an AHI < 5 events/hour. Surgical success and long term stability of outcomes confirm the efficacy and safety of MMA for treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. However, a continuous follow-up of these patients is necessary to control their lifestyle and to detect possible relapse.

  3. High-flow transtracheal insufflation treats obstructive sleep apnea. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schneider, H; O'Hearn, D J; Leblanc, K; Smith, P L; O'Donnell, C P; Eisele, D W; Peter, J H; Schwartz, A R

    2000-06-01

    To determine the effect of transtracheal insufflation (TTI) on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), we examined breathing patterns in five tracheostomized patients with OSA at varying TTI flow rates when breathing with a closed tracheostomy. The breathing patterns and polysomnographic responses to air insufflation were studied as TTI was increased from 0 to 15 L/min for brief periods of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep (Experiment 1). The frequency of sleep-disordered breathing episodes remained high at 0 and 5 L/min (87.0 +/- 33.7 and 79.4 +/- 24.4 episodes per hour NREM) and decreased significantly to 41.3 +/- 31.5 and 43.4 +/- 31.4 episodes/h NREM sleep at rates of 10 and 15 L/min, respectively (p = 0.003). At high levels of TTI (10 and 15 L/min), obstructive apneas and hypopneas decreased but periodic laryngeal obstructions were induced during stage 1 NREM sleep. To prevent laryngeal obstructions, a servo-control system was used to briefly interrupt TTI during these events. When this system was implemented for more prolonged periods of sleep (Experiment 2, total sleep time 176.6 +/- 12.5 min), high-flow TTI (hf-TTI, 15 L/min) led to an overall reduction in the combined frequency of obstructive apneas and laryngeal obstructions from 63.8 +/- 21.8 to 10.7 +/- 9.1 (p < 0.03) and was associated with a marked reduction in arousal frequency from 60.0 +/- 26.0 to 8. 3 +/- 5.4/h in NREM sleep, and from 67.5 +/- 3.5 to 0 +/- 0/h in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Our findings demonstrate that hf-TTI stabilized breathing patterns in apneic patients, and was safe and efficacious for prolonged periods of sleep.

  4. Comparison of drug-induced sleep endoscopy and upper airway computed tomography in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Jingying; Pan, Chuxiong; Xian, Junfang; Sun, Nian; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuhuan; Kang, Dan

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the associations between the findings of drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) and upper airway computed tomography (UACT) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. This study was a non-randomized, prospective, clinical trial. We used DISE to identify the obstruction pattern according to VOTE classification. All 62 study subjects (all men) showed velum-related obstruction; 47 (75.8%) had lateral oropharyngeal obstruction, 45 (72.6%) had tongue-base-related obstruction, and 6 (9.7%) had epiglottal obstruction. The following UACT measurements significantly differed between subjects with and without lateral oropharyngeal obstruction (P < 0.05): airway length, laryngopharynx length, mandibular plane to hyoid distance, minimum lateral dimension of the retroglossal airway, retropalatal anteroposterior/lateral dimension, and retroglossal anteroposterior/lateral dimension. None of the UACT measurements significantly differed between subjects with and without tongue-base-related or epiglottal obstruction. These results indicate that in OSA patients, obstruction related to the lateral oropharyngeal walls can be identified using these UACT measurements. Thus, UACT, which is performed during wakefulness, can partially replace DISE, which is both time consuming and costly.

  5. Comparison of full-night and ambulatory polysomnography with ApneaGraph in the subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karaloğlu, Furkan; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf K; Yilmaz, Metin; Ulukavak Çiftçi, Tansu; Çiftçi, Bülent; Bakkal, Faruk K

    2017-01-01

    The localization of the obstruction is crucial in determining the appropriate surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS); ApneaGraph has been introduced for diagnosis of OSAS and localization of airway obstruction level. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic value of ApneaGraph for both clinical staging and site of obstruction. Thirty male OSAS patients were prospectively enrolled in this clinical trial. The following parameter were included to the study: Body mass indexes and neck circumferences of the subjects, Epworth sleepiness scale, site of obstruction detected by flexible endoscopy and ApneaGraph, apnea hypopnea index (AHI), apnea index, hypopnea index, maximal oxygen desaturation and average oxygen saturation which were detected by both polysomnography (PSG) and ApneaGraph devices. Our data presented that, although AHI measured by ApneaGraph and PSG were significantly correlated; severity stages of the subjects were different in 44 % of the subjects when based on AHI of ApneaGraph, compared to PSG. Majority of the changes were from severe OSAS to mild or moderate levels. Similar dominant collapse levels were detected in 64 % of the subjects by both devices. It was seen that transpalatal obstruction was better correlated between ApneaGraph and flexible endoscopy. As a conclusion, we might assume that ApneaGraph can be used as a screener for OSAS and it appears to be a more reliable device to confirm dominancy of palatal level obstruction.

  6. Severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in an adult patient with Laron syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Y; Abadi, J; Lifschitz, A; Laron, Z

    2001-08-01

    A 68 year old patient with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone (GH) resistance-insensitivity due to a molecular defect of the GH receptor) and severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is described. Treatment with continuous positive air pressure therapy resulted in improved nocturnal sleep, daytime alertness and cognitive functions.

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of Obstructive Airway Adult Test for Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Vicini, Claudio; De Benedetto, Michele; Salamanca, Fabrizio; Sorrenti, Giovanni; Romandini, Mario; Bosi, Marcello; Saponaro, Gianmarco; Foresta, Enrico; Laforì, Andreina; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Alessandro; Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Campanini, Aldo; Montevecchi, Filippo; Rizzotto, Grazia; Cervelli, Daniele; Moro, Alessandro; Arigliani, Michele; Gobbi, Riccardo; Pelo, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. The gold standard for the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is polysomnography, whose access is however reduced by costs and limited availability, so that additional diagnostic tests are needed. Objectives. To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of the Obstructive Airway Adult Test (OAAT) compared to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients. Methods. Ninety patients affected by OSA verified with polysomnography (AHI ≥ 5) and ten healthy patients, randomly selected, were included and all were interviewed by one blind examiner with OAAT questions. Measurements and Main Results. The Spearman rho, evaluated to measure the correlation between OAAT and polysomnography, was 0.72 (p < 0.01). The area under the ROC curve (95% CI) was the parameter to evaluate the accuracy of the OAAT: it was 0.91 (0.81–1.00) for the diagnosis of OSA (AHI ≥ 5), 0.90 (0.82–0.98) for moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15), and 0.84 (0.76–0.92) for severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). Conclusions. The OAAT has shown a high correlation with polysomnography and also a high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of OSA. It has also been shown to be able to discriminate among the different degrees of severity of OSA. Additional large studies aiming to validate this questionnaire as a screening or diagnostic test are needed. PMID:26636102

  8. Oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passali, D; Corallo, G; Yaremchuk, S; Longini, M; Proietti, F; Passali, G C; Bellussi, L

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder that leads to metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to identify early laboratory markers of cardiovascular disease through analysis of oxidative stress in normal subjects and patients with OSAS. A prospective study was designed to compare outcomes of oxidative stress laboratory tests in 20 adult patients with OSAS and a control group of 20 normal subjects. Laboratory techniques for detecting and quantifying free radical damage must be targeted to assess the pro-oxidant component and the antioxidant in order to obtain an overall picture of oxidative balance. No statistical differences in age, sex distribution, or BMI were found between the two groups (p>0.05). There were significant differences in the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) between OSAS patients and the control group (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences in isoprostane, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and non-protein bound iron (NPBI) levels were found between the study and control groups. No significant difference in the levels of thiol biomarkers was found between the two groups. The main finding of the present study was increased production of oxidative stress biomarkers in OSAS patients. The major difference between thiols and other oxidative stress biomarkers is that thiols are antioxidants, while the others are expressions of oxidative damage. The findings of the present study indicate that biomarkers of oxidative stress in OSAS may be used as a marker of upper airway obstructive episodes due to mechanical trauma, as well as a marker of hypoxaemia causing local oropharyngeal inflammation.

  9. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and sleep bruxism: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jokubauskas, L; Baltrušaitytė, A

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a clinical risk factor for sleep bruxism (SB). Both OSAS and SB are reported to be associated with sleep-related arousal reactions, although no clear causative link has been established. An electronic literature search was conducted of the MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Wiley Online Library, SAGE Journals and EBSCOhost databases covering the period January 2006 and September 2016. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract and full-text levels were performed. The review included observational studies in the English language with a clearly established aim to assess the relationship between OSAS and SB using full-night PSG. The seven-item quality-assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies was used to assess the methodology across the studies. After a comprehensive screening of titles, abstracts and full texts, only three studies that met the pre-defined criteria were finally included in this systematic review. Two studies gave evidence that OSAS is associated with the occurrence of SB events: (i) SB events frequently occur during micro-arousal events consequent on apnoea-hypopnoea (AH) events and (ii) most SB events occur in temporal conjunction with AH events termination. However, one study did not report a strong association between AH and SB events. It can be concluded that there are not enough scientific data to define a clear causative link between OSAS and SB. However, they appear to share common clinical features. Further studies should focus on the intermediate mechanisms between respiratory and SB events.

  10. Melatonin secretion and excretion in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wikner, J; Svanborg, E; Wetterberg, L; Röjdmark, S

    1997-11-01

    Melatonin (MT) secretion and excretion were investigated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Nine men, mean age 55.1 years, mean body mass index 31.2, with a previously confirmed diagnosis of moderate to severe OSAS, were tested on two occasions: immediately before initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and again after at least 4 weeks of continuous nocturnal use of CPAP. Serum MT concentrations were determined every second hour between 2000 and 0800 hours. Urine was collected between 2200 and 0700 hours for determination of urinary MT excretion. Sleep apnea recordings included ear oximetry, respiration and body movements, body position, and breathing sounds. Nine healthy male controls were tested on one occasion. We found that the MT secretion, as reflected by the area under the curve (AUC), among the OSAS patients did not differ from that found in healthy controls (MT AUC 1.68 vs. 1.92 nmol/l x h). Sleep apnea recordings were normalized during CPAP treatment. Moreover, the excessive daytime sleepiness disappeared in all patients. Neither MT secretion (MT AUC 1.68 vs. 1.56 nmol/l x h) nor urinary excretion of MT (0.122 vs. 0.108 nmol/9 h) changed significantly as a result of the CPAP treatment.

  11. Speckle tracking echocardiography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and overlapping obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Carmen; van Essen, Fabian; Linnhoff, Fabian; Schueler, Robert; Hammerstingl, Christoph; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk; Weber, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD and congestive heart failure represent two disease entities of growing global burden that share common etiological features. Therefore, we aimed to identify the degree of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in COPD as a function of COPD severity stages and concurrently placed particular emphasis on the presence of overlapping obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods A total of 85 COPD outpatients (64.1±10.4 years, 54.1% males) and 20 controls, matched for age, sex, and smoking habits, underwent speckle tracking echocardiography for LV longitudinal strain imaging. Complementary 12-lead electrocardiography, laboratory testing, and overnight screening for sleep-disordered breathing using the SOMNOcheck micro® device were performed. Results Contrary to conventional echocardiographic parameters, speckle tracking echocardiography revealed significant impairment in global LV strain among COPD patients compared to control smokers (−13.3%±5.4% vs −17.1%±1.8%, P=0.04). On a regional level, the apical septal LV strain was reduced in COPD (P=0.003) and associated with the degree of COPD severity (P=0.02). With regard to electrocardiographic findings, COPD patients exhibited a significantly higher mean heart rate than controls (71.4±13.0 beats per minute vs 60.3±7.7 beats per minute, P=0.001) that additionally increased over Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.01). Albeit not statistically significant, COPD led to elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels (453.2±909.0 pg/mL vs 96.8±70.0 pg/mL, P=0.08). As to somnological testing, the portion of COPD patients exhibiting overlapping OSA accounted for 5.9% and did not significantly vary either in comparison to controls (P=0.07) or throughout the COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.49). COPD-OSA overlap solely correlated with nocturnal hypoxemic events, whereas LV performance status was unrelated to coexisting OSA. Conclusion

  12. Sleep Apnea and Obstructive Airway Disease in Older Men: Outcomes of Sleep Disorders in Older Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying Y.; Blackwell, Terri; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Stone, Katie L.; Omachi, Theodore A.; Redline, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the association between obstructive airway disease (OAD) and sleep apnea in older men. Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study of 853 community-dwelling older men (mean age 80.7 ± 4.1 years [range 73 to 90]) across 6 centers in the United States from the Outcomes of Sleep Disorders in Older Men Study. Sleep was objectively measured using full in-home polysomnography and lung function was objectively measured using spirometry. The association of OAD (pre-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio < 0.7 and FEV1 < 80% predicted) and sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15 events/hour) was assessed using logistic regression. Results: OAD and sleep apnea were identified in 111 (13.0%) and 247 (29.0%) men, respectively. In univariate analysis, participants with OAD had a lower AHI (mean ± SD; 8.7 ± 11.7 vs. 12.7 ± 13.8, P = 0.0009) and a lower prevalence of sleep apnea (14.4 vs. 31.1%, P = 0.0003) compared to participants without OAD. OAD remained independently associated with a lower odds of sleep apnea (odds ratio 0.30, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.55, P = 0.0001) after adjustment for demographics, body composition, smoking, and potential mediators (arousal index, time spent in rapid eye movement sleep). Individuals with OAD and sleep apnea (n = 16) had an increased arousal index and lower oxygen saturation level as compared to individuals with OAD alone (P values < 0.05). Conclusions: Obstructive airway disease was associated with a lower prevalence of sleep apnea in a cohort of community-dwelling elderly men, and unexplained by differences in adiposity or sleep architecture. Although uncommon in this cohort, coexisting sleep apnea and OAD was associated with increased sleep fragmentation and nocturnal oxygen desaturation compared to OAD alone. Citation: Zhao YY, Blackwell T, Ensrud KE, Stone KL, Omachi TA, Redline S, Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Group. Sleep apnea and obstructive airway disease in older men: outcomes of sleep

  13. Prevalence and Characteristics of Central Compared to Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Analyses from the Sleep Heart Health Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Lucas M.; Kapur, Vishesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Determine the prevalence of central sleep apnea (CSA) in a large community-based cohort using current definitions and contrast the clinical characteristics of subjects with CSA to those with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and no sleep apnea. Methods: A cross sectional analysis of baseline data from 5,804 participants of the Sleep Heart Health study was performed. Subjects meeting contemporary diagnostic criteria for CSA and Cheyne Stokes respiration (CSR) were compared to those without sleep apnea and those with OSA. Demographic data, medical comorbidities, medication use, and sleep related symptoms were compared between the groups Results: The prevalences of CSA and Cheyne Stokes respiration (CSR) in this sample were 0.9 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.7–1.2)% and 0.4 (95% CI: 0.3–0.6)%, respectively. Individuals with CSA were older, had lower body mass indexes (BMI), lower Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores, and were more likely to be male than individuals with obstructive sleep apnea OSA. Among those with self-reported heart failure (HF), OSA was much more common at 55.1% (95% CI: 45.6–64.6) than CSA 4.1% (95% CI: 0.3–7.9). Conclusions: This is the largest community-based study of the prevalence and characteristics of CSA to date and demonstrates a prevalence of CSA that is intermediate to those previously noted. Contrary to prior data from clinic based samples, individuals with heart failure were much more likely to have OSA than CSA. Citation: Donovan LM, Kapur VK. Prevalence and characteristics of central compared to obstructive sleep apnea: analyses from the sleep heart health study cohort. SLEEP 2016;39(7):1353–1359. PMID:27166235

  14. Investigation of the Plasma Nitrite Levels and Oxidant–Antioxidant Status in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BOZKURT, Hakan; NEYAL, Abdurrahman; GEYİK, Sırma; TAYSI, Seyithan; ANARAT, Rüksan; BULUT, Mesut; NEYAL, Ayşe Münife

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of the most prevalent sleep disorders. In the present study, we assessed the nitrite level, which is an indirect indicator of nitric oxide (NO), total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS) and oxidative stress index (OSI), which may be associated with endotel dysfunction. We investigated the difference between the groups and the relationship among the severity of comorbid conditions. Methods This study was conducted in 39 OSA patients confirmed by polysomnography and 40 healthy subjects (controls). The OSA group consisted of 10 women and 29 men and the control group consisted of 20 women and 20 men. Polysomnographic revealed mild OSA in two, moderate in 7 and severe in 30 cases. We measured plasma TAS, TOS and nitrite levels from venous blood. The OSI value was obtained by dividing the TOS and TAS values. Values were compared with the control group and between patient groups. Results A high body mass index (BMI), cardiovasculer diseases (CVD) and the use of medication for co-morbid diseases were more prevalent in the OSA group (p=.001, p=.029 and p=.006, respectively). The median plasma TOS level and OSI in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OUA) group were significantly higher than those in the control group (p=.001 and p=.001, respectively). The plasma median nitrite level and TAS did not show any significant difference between the OSA and the control groups. None of the parameters revealed a significant difference between severe and moderate OSA cases. Conclusion Our findings in the present study revealed that the oxidant–antioxidant balance shifted toward the oxidant side in OSA cases; however, the NO level did not change. These findings together may point out that some molecules other than NO may have a role in the pathophysiology of endothelial dysfunction and also in the disturbed oxidant–antioxidant balance in OSA.

  15. Evidence Supports No Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Premolar Extraction: An Electronic Health Records Review

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ann J.; Rindal, D. Brad; Hatch, John P.; Kane, Sheryl; Asche, Stephen E.; Carvalho, Chris; Rugh, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A controversy exists concerning the relationship, if any, between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the anatomical position of the anterior teeth. Specifically, there has been speculation that extraction orthodontics and retraction of the anterior teeth contributes to OSA by crowding the tongue and decreasing airway space. This retrospective study utilized electronic medical and dental health records to examine the association between missing premolars and OSA. Methods: The sample (n = 5,584) was obtained from the electronic medical and dental health records of HealthPartners in Minnesota. Half of the subjects (n = 2,792) had one missing premolar in each quadrant. The other half had no missing premolars. Cases and controls were paired in a 1:1 match on age range, gender, and body mass index (BMI) range. The outcome was the presence or absence of a diagnosis of OSA confirmed by polysomnography. Results: Of the subjects without missing premolars, 267 (9.56%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. Of the subjects with four missing premolars, 299 (10.71%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. The prevalence of OSA was not significantly different between the groups (OR = 1.14, p = 0.144). Conclusion: The absence of four premolars (one from each quadrant), and therefore a presumed indicator of past “extraction orthodontic treatment,” is not supported as a significant factor in the cause of OSA. Citation: Larsen AJ, Rindal DB, Hatch JP, Kane S, Asche SE, Carvalho C, Rugh J. Evidence supports no relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and premolar extraction: an electronic health records review. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1443–1448. PMID:26235151

  16. Anthropometric and Dental Measurements in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David F.; Dalesio, Nicholas M.; Benke, James R.; Petrone, John A.; Vigilar, Veronica; Cohen, Aliza P.; Ishman, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    AP, Ishman SL. Anthropometric and dental measurements in children with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1279–1284. PMID:27448427

  17. Disparities and Genetic Risk Factors in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Katherine A.; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. Burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, though Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  18. Upper airway and systemic inflammation in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Eugenio; Marin, Jose M; Carrizo, Santiago J; Osuna, Carlos S; González, Ricardo; Marin-Oto, Marta; Forner, Marta; Vicente, Paul; Cubero, Pablo; Gil, Ana V; Soler, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with pharyngeal inflammation, but the coexistence of systemic inflammation is controversial. This study investigated whether local and systemic inflammatory biomarkers are related in patients with OSA. An uncontrolled extension to the study assessed the response to effective treatment.We recruited 89 patients with OSA (apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥5 events·h(-1)), 28 snorers and 26 healthy controls. Pharyngeal lavage (PHAL) and plasma samples were collected at baseline and after a 1-year follow-up. Inflammatory cells were evaluated by flow cytometry; interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-α were evaluated by immunoassay.In PHAL, CD4(+) T-cells, IL-6 and IL-8 were higher in OSA patients than in snorers or healthy controls (p<0.05). The AHI correlated with CD4(+), IL-6 and IL-8 in PHAL (all p-values <0.05). There were no differences in the inflammatory biomarkers in plasma between the study groups and no relationship between plasma and PHAL biomarkers. Biomarkers decreased significantly in PHAL but not in plasma after 1 year of therapy with continuous positive airway pressure or surgery.In patients with OSA, increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers were found in PHAL, which were reduced with effective treatment. No simultaneous increase in plasma inflammatory biomarkers was found.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Taryn; Zolezzi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms. PMID:26508864

  20. Circulating adhesion molecules in obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Pak, Victoria M; Grandner, Michael A; Pack, Allan I

    2014-02-01

    Over 20 years of evidence indicates a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular disease. Although inflammatory processes have been heavily implicated as an important link between the two, the mechanism for this has not been conclusively established. Atherosclerosis may be one of the mechanisms linking OSA to cardiovascular morbidity. This review addresses the role of circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA, and how these may be part of the link between cardiovascular disease and OSA. There is evidence for the role of adhesion molecules in cardiovascular disease risk. Some studies, albeit with small sample sizes, also show higher levels of adhesion molecules in patients with OSA compared to controls. There are also studies that show that levels of adhesion molecules diminish with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Limitations of these studies include small sample sizes, cross-sectional sampling, and inconsistent control for confounding variables known to influence adhesion molecule levels. There are potential novel therapies to reduce circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA to diminish cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of cell adhesion molecules generated in OSA will help elucidate one mechanistic link to cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA.

  1. Non-CPAP therapies in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Randerath, W J; Verbraecken, J; Andreas, S; Bettega, G; Boudewyns, A; Hamans, E; Jalbert, F; Paoli, J R; Sanner, B; Smith, I; Stuck, B A; Lacassagne, L; Marklund, M; Maurer, J T; Pepin, J L; Valipour, A; Verse, T; Fietze, I

    2011-05-01

    In view of the high prevalence and the relevant impairment of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) lots of methods are offered which promise definitive cures for or relevant improvement of OSAS. This report summarises the efficacy of alternative treatment options in OSAS. An interdisciplinary European Respiratory Society task force evaluated the scientific literature according to the standards of evidence-based medicine. Evidence supports the use of mandibular advancement devices in mild to moderate OSAS. Maxillomandibular osteotomy seems to be as efficient as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients who refuse conservative treatment. Distraction osteogenesis is usefully applied in congenital micrognathia or midface hypoplasia. There is a trend towards improvment after weight reduction. Positional therapy is clearly inferior to CPAP and long-term compliance is poor. Drugs, nasal dilators and apnoea triggered muscle stimulation cannot be recommended as effective treatments of OSAS at the moment. Nasal surgery, radiofrequency tonsil reduction, tongue base surgery, uvulopalatal flap, laser midline glossectomy, tongue suspension and genioglossus advancement cannot be recommended as single interventions. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, pillar implants and hyoid suspension should only be considered in selected patients and potential benefits should be weighed against the risk of long-term side-effects. Multilevel surgery is only a salvage procedure for OSA patients.

  2. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority.

  3. Cardiovascular implications in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vanderveken, Olivier M; Boudewyns, An; Ni, Quan; Kashyap, Bhavani; Verbraecken, Johan; De Backer, Wilfried; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular complications such as systemic hypertension, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Successful OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has resulted in coincident reductions in systemic hypertension, improvements in left ventricular systolic function, and reductions in sympathetic nervous activity. These data suggest that successful treatment of OSA may reduce cardiovascular morbidity in such patients. Although CPAP is the more successful treatment for OSA when used properly and consistently, its clinical success is often limited by poor patient and partner acceptance, which leads to suboptimal compliance. Oral appliances or upper airway surgeries are considered a second line of treatment for patients with mild to moderate OSA who do not comply with or refuse long-term CPAP treatment. Oral devices such as mandibular repositioning appliances were recently shown to improve arterial hypertension in OSA patients. Electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve is a new investigational therapy for patients with moderate to severe OSA. This new treatment option, if proven effective, may provide cardiovascular benefits secondary to treating OSA.

  4. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea on heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina A; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2013-06-01

    Symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been proven to be a risk factor for hypertension and vascular dysfunction, and has been proposed to be causally related with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Searches of bibliographical databases revealed that several mechanisms seem to underpin the association between OSA and cardiac arrhythmias: intermittent hypoxia associated with autonomic nervous system activation and increased oxidative stress, which may lead to cardiac cellular damage and alteration in myocardial excitability; recurrent arousals, resulting in sympathetic activation and coronary vasoconstriction; and increased negative intrathoracic pressure which may mechanically stretch the myocardial walls and, thus, promote acute changes in myocardial excitability as well as structural remodelling of the myocardium. Findings from cross-sectional studies suggest a high prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with OSA and a high prevalence of OSA in those with cardiac arrhythmias. Preliminary evidence from uncontrolled interventional studies suggests that treatment of OSA may prevent cardiac arrhythmias. In conclusion, there is preliminary evidence that OSA is associated with the development of cardiac arrhythmias. Data from randomised controlled studies are needed to definitively clarify the role of OSA in arrhythmogenesis.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Wing, Rena R.; Pi Sunyer, F. Xavier; Darcey, Valerie; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the risk factors for the presence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Unattended polysomnography was performed in 306 participants. RESULTS Over 86% of participants had OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. The mean AHI was 20.5 ± 16.8 events/h. A total of 30.5% of the participants had moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI <30), and 22.6% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30). Waist circumference (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.1; P = 0.03) was significantly related to the presence of OSA. Severe OSA was most likely in individuals with a higher BMI (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Physicians should be particularly cognizant of the likelihood of OSA in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, especially among individuals with higher waist circumference and BMI. PMID:19279303

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Surgery: Quality Improvement Imperatives and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in surgical candidates than in the general population and may increase susceptibility to perioperative complications that range from transient desaturation to catastrophic injuries. Understanding the potential impact of OSA on patients’ surgical risk profile is of particular interest to otolaryngologists, who routinely perform airway procedures—including surgical procedures for treatment of OSA. Whereas the effects of OSA on long-term health outcomes are well documented, the relationship between OSA and surgical risk is not collinear, and clear consensus on the nature of the association is lacking. Better guidelines for optimization of pain control, perioperative monitoring, and surgical decision making are potential areas for quality improvement efforts. Many interventions have been suggested to mitigate the risk of adverse events in surgical patients with OSA, but wide variations in clinical practice remain. We review the current literature, emphasizing recent progress in understanding the complex pathophysiologic interactions noted in OSA patients undergoing surgery and outlining potential strategies to decrease perioperative risks. PMID:25013745

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Women: Specific Issues and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Woehrle, Holger; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Ramanan, Dinesh; Armitstead, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has traditionally been seen as a male disease. However, the importance of OSA in women is increasingly being recognized, along with a number of significant gender-related differences in the symptoms, diagnosis, consequences, and treatment of OSA. Women tend to have less severe OSA than males, with a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and shorter apneas and hypopneas. Episodes of upper airway resistance that do not meet the criteria for apneas are more common in women. Prevalence rates are lower in women, and proportionally fewer women receive a correct diagnosis. Research has also documented sex differences in the upper airway, fat distribution, and respiratory stability in OSA. Hormones are implicated in some gender-related variations, with differences between men and women in the prevalence of OSA decreasing as age increases. The limited data available suggest that although the prevalence and severity of OSA may be lower in women than in men, the consequences of the disease are at least the same, if not worse for comparable degrees of severity. Few studies have investigated gender differences in the effects of OSA treatment. However, given the differences in physiology and presentation, it is possible that personalized therapy may provide more optimal care. PMID:27699167

  8. Self-Reported Sleep Bruxism and Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relationship to Gender and Ethnicity§

    PubMed Central

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives : Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. Results : In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Conclusion : Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups. PMID:25352924

  9. Effect of obstructive sleep apnoea on severity and short-term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Abad, Jorge; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquin; Mediano, Olga; Amilibia, Jose; Masdeu, Maria José; Florés, Marina; Barceló, Antonia; de la Peña, Mónica; Aldomá, Albina; Worner, Fernando; Valls, Joan; Castellà, Gerard; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of obstructive sleep apnoea on the severity and short-term prognosis of patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Obstructive sleep apnoea was defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) >15 h(-1). We evaluated the acute coronary syndrome severity (ejection fraction, Killip class, number of diseased vessels, and plasma peak troponin) and short-term prognosis (length of hospitalisation, complications and mortality). We included 213 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (mean±sd AHI 30±14 h(-1), 61±10 years, 80% males) and 218 controls (AHI 6±4 h(-1), 57±12 years, 82% males). Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea exhibited a higher prevalence of systemic hypertension (55% versus 37%, p<0.001), higher body mass index (29±4 kg·m(-2) versus 26±4 kg·m(-2), p<0.001), and lower percentage of smokers (61% versus 71%, p=0.04). After adjusting for smoking, age, body mass index and hypertension, the plasma peak troponin levels were significantly elevated in the obstructive sleep apnoea group (831±908 ng·L(-1) versus 987±884 ng·L(-1), p=0.03) and higher AHI severity was associated with an increased number of diseased vessels (p=0.04). The mean length of stay in the coronary care unit was higher in the obstructive sleep apnoea group (p=0.03). This study indicates that obstructive sleep apnoea is related to an increase in the peak plasma troponin levels, number of diseased vessels, and length of stay in the coronary care unit.

  10. Chronic kidney disease in European patients with obstructive sleep apnea: the ESADA cohort study.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Oreste; Battaglia, Salvatore; Steiropoulos, Paschalis; Basoglu, Ozen K; Kvamme, John A; Ryan, Silke; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Verbraecken, Johan; Grote, Ludger; Hedner, Jan; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-12-01

    The cross-sectional relationship of obstructive sleep apnea with moderate to severe chronic kidney disease, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL min(-1) ∙1.73 m(-2) , was investigated in a large cohort of patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea studied by nocturnal polysomnography or cardiorespiratory polygraphy. Data were obtained from the European Sleep Apnea Database, where information from unselected adult patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea afferent to 26 European sleep centres had been prospectively collected. Both the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equations were used for the assessment of estimated glomerular filtration rate. The analysed sample included 7700 subjects, 71% male, aged 51.9 ± 12.5 years. Severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥30) was found in 34% of subjects. The lowest nocturnal oxygen saturation was 81 ± 10.2%. Chronic kidney disease prevalence in the whole sample was 8.7% or 6.1%, according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease or the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equations, respectively. Subjects with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate were older, more obese, more often female, had worse obstructive sleep apnea and more co-morbidities (P < 0.001, each). With both equations, independent predictors of estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 were: chronic heart failure; female gender; systemic hypertension; older age; higher body mass index; and worse lowest nocturnal oxygen saturation. It was concluded that in obstructive sleep apnea, chronic kidney disease is largely predicted by co-morbidities and anthropometric characteristics. In addition, severe nocturnal hypoxaemia, even for only a small part of the night, may play an important role as a risk factor for kidney dysfunction.

  11. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity on Cardiac Remodeling: The Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Korcarz, Claudia E.; Peppard, Paul E.; Young, Terry B.; Chapman, Carrie B.; Hla, K. Mae; Barnet, Jodi H.; Hagen, Erika; Stein, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To characterize the prospective associations of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with future echocardiographic measures of adverse cardiac remodeling Methods: This was a prospective long-term observational study. Participants had overnight polysomnography followed by transthoracic echocardiography a mean (standard deviation) of 18.0 (3.7) y later. OSA was characterized by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, events/hour). Echocardiography was used to assess left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function and mass, left atrial volume and pressure, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, and right ventricular (RV) systolic function, size, and hemodynamics. Multivariate regression models estimated associations between log10(AHI+1) and future echocardiographic findings. A secondary analysis looked at oxygen desaturation indices and future echocardiographic findings. Results: At entry, the 601 participants were mean (standard deviation) 47 (8) y old (47% female). After adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index, baseline log10(AHI+1) was associated significantly with future reduced LV ejection fraction and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) ≤ 15 mm. After further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, participants with higher baseline log10(AHI+1) had lower future LV ejection fraction (β = −1.35 [standard error = 0.6]/log10(AHI+1), P = 0.03) and higher odds of TAPSE ≤ 15 mm (odds ratio = 6.3/log10(AHI+1), 95% confidence interval = 1.3–30.5, P = 0.02). SaO2 desaturation indices were associated independently with LV mass, LV wall thickness, and RV area (all P < 0.03) Conclusions: OSA is associated independently with decreasing LV systolic function and with reduced RV function. Echocardiographic measures of adverse cardiac remodeling are strongly associated with OSA but are confounded by obesity. Hypoxia may be a stimulus for hypertrophy in individuals with OSA. Citation: Korcarz CE, Peppard PE, Young TB, Chapman CB, Hla

  12. Oral Appliance Treatment Response and Polysomnographic Phenotypes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Kate; Takaya, Hisashi; Qian, Jin; Petocz, Peter; Ng, Andrew T.; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Mandibular advancement splints (MAS) are an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); however, therapeutic response is variable. Younger age, female gender, less obesity, and milder and supine-dependent OSA have variably been associated with treatment success in relatively small samples. Our objective was to utilize a large cohort of MAS treated patients (1) to compare efficacy across patients with different phenotypes of OSA and (2) to assess demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnography variables as treatment response predictors. Methods: Retrospective analysis of MAS-treated patients participating in clinical trials in sleep centers in Sydney, Australia between years 2000–2013. All studies used equivalent customized two-piece MAS devices and treatment protocols. Treatment response was defined as (1) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 5/h, (2) AHI < 10/h and ≥ 50% reduction, and (3) ≥ 50% AHI reduction. Results: A total of 425 patients (109 female) were included (age 51.2 ± 10.9 years, BMI 29.2 ± 5.0 kg/m2). MAS reduced AHI by 50.3% ± 50.7% across the group. Supine-predominant OSA patients had lower treatment response rates than non-positional OSA (e.g., 36% vs. 59% for AHI < 10/h). REM-predominant OSA showed a lower response rate than either NREM or non-stage dependent OSA. In prediction modelling, age, baseline AHI, and anthropometric variables were predictive of MAS treatment outcome but not OSA phenotype. Gender was not associated with treatment outcome. Conclusions: Lower MAS treatment response rates were observed in supine and REM sleep. In a large sample, we confirm that demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic data only weakly inform about MAS efficacy, supporting the need for alternative objective prediction methods to reliably select patients for MAS treatment. Citation: Sutherland K, Takaya H, Qian J, Petocz P, Ng AT, Cistulli PA. Oral appliance treatment response and polysomnographic phenotypes of

  13. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Breathlessness in Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Sichang; Bastianpillai, Johan; Ratneswaran, Culadeeban; Pengo, Martino F.; Luo, Yuanming; Jolley, Caroline J.; Moxham, John; Steier, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, long-term compliance with CPAP is limited. We tested the hypothesis that CPAP levels routinely used during sleep increase neural respiratory drive (NRD) and breathlessness, which may discourage compliance. Methods: This was an observational physiological cohort study in a respiratory physiology and sleep unit, University Hospital. Patients with a body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m2 and confirmed OSA were studied supine and awake on CPAP (4–20 cm H2O, increments of 2 cm H2O/3 min). We measured NRD during awake CPAP titration in obese subjects to quantify the response to the load of the respiratory system and compared it to the CPAP used for nocturnal treatment, with the modified Borg Scale (mBorg) for dyspnea recorded (from 0 to 10 points, with higher numbers indicating more breathlessness). Results: Fifteen patients (age 48 ± 10 years, 12 male, BMI 38.9 ± 5.8 kg/m2) with OSA (AHI 32.2 ± 21.1/h, 95th percentile of CPAP 14.1 ± 3.8 cm H2O) were studied and NRD (electromyogram of the parasternal intercostals, EMGpara; EMG of the external oblique, EMGabdomen) was recorded (awake, supine). Awake, EMGpara declined from baseline to 70.2% ± 17.1% when CPAP of 10.7 ± 3.4 cm H2O (P = 0.026) was applied. Further increase in CPAP led to a rise in EMGpara and increased breathlessness (P = 0.02). CPAP compliance (nights used) correlated negatively with mBorg scores (r = −0.738, P = 0.006). Conclusions: Awake, the respiratory system is maximally offloaded with lower than therapeutic CPAP levels in obese patients with OSA. Levels of NRD observed at effective CPAP levels while asleep are associated with breathlessness which may limit long-term CPAP compliance. Citation: Xiao S, Bastianpillai J, Ratneswaran C, Pengo MF, Luo Y, Jolley CJ, Moxham J, Steier J. Continuous positive airway pressure and breathlessness in obese patients with obstructive

  14. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy (DISE) with Target Controlled Infusion (TCI) and Bispectral Analysis in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Traxdorf, Maximilian; Tschaikowsky, Klaus; Scherl, Claudia; Bauer, Judith; Iro, Heinrich; Angerer, Florian

    2016-12-06

    The aim of this study was to establish a standardized protocol for drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) to differentiate obstruction patterns in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Target-controlled infusion (TCI) of the sedative propofol was combined with real-time monitoring of the depth of sedation using bispectral analysis. In an observational study 57 patients (mean age 44.8 years, ± SD 10.5; mean apnea hypopnea Index (AHI) 30.8/hr, ± SD 21.6, mean BMI 28.2 kg/m(2), ± SD 5.3) underwent cardiorespiratory polysomnography followed by DISE with TCI and bispectral analysis. Sleep was induced solely by the intravenous infusion of propofol with a TCI-pump, with an initial target plasma level of 2.0 µg/ml. Under continuous monitoring of the patient's respiration, state of consciousness and value of the bispectral analysis, the target plasma propofol level was raised in steps of 0.2 µg/ml/2 min until the desired depth of sedation was reached. The mean value of the bispectral analysis at the target depth of sedation was determined and the obstruction patterns during DISE-TCI-bispectral analysis then classified according to the VOTE-system. Subsequently the results were analyzed according to polysomnographic and anthropometric data. The occurrence of multilevel obstruction sites across all degrees of severity of OSA clarifies the need for sleep endoscopy prior to upper airway surgery. The advantage of this technique is the reproducibility of the protocol even for heterogeneous groups of patients. In addition, the gradual controlled and standardized increase of the plasma level of propofol with real-time control of the bispectral index leads to a precisely controllable depth of sedation. The DISE-TCI-bispectral analysis procedure is a step towards a required reproducible protocol of sleep endoscopy - capable of standardization. However it is not yet known whether these observed obstruction patterns also correspond to findings in natural sleep.

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and subtypes in autopsy-confirmed dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Dugger, Brittany N; Boeve, Bradley F; Murray, Melissa E; Parisi, Joseph E; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Dickson, Dennis W; Ferman, Tanis J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dementia with Lewy bodies with and without probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder differ clinically or pathologically. Patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) with probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior sleep disorder (n = 71) were compared with those without it (n = 19) on demographics, clinical variables (core features of dementia with Lewy bodies, dementia duration, rate of cognitive/motor changes), and pathologic indices (Lewy body distribution, neuritic plaque score, Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage). Individuals with probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder were predominantly male (82% vs 47%) and had a shorter duration of dementia (mean, 8 vs 10 years), earlier onset of parkinsonism (mean, 2 vs 5 years), and earlier onset of visual hallucinations (mean, 3 vs 6 years). These patients also had a lower Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage (stage IV vs stage VI) and lower neuritic plaque scores (18% vs 85% frequency), but no difference in Lewy body distribution. When probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder developed early (at or before dementia onset), the onset of parkinsonism and hallucinations was earlier and Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage was lower compared with those who developed the sleep disorder after dementia onset. Women with autopsy-confirmed DLB without a history of dream enactment behavior during sleep had a later onset of hallucinations and parkinsonism and a higher Braak NFT stage. Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is associated with distinct clinical and pathologic characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

  16. Effects of submental stimulation for several consecutive nights in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed Central

    Hida, W.; Okabe, S.; Miki, H.; Kikuchi, Y.; Taguchi, O.; Takishima, T.; Shirato, K.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--It has previously been reported that short term submental stimulation can reduce the frequency of apnoea and improve sleep architecture in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. The effects of submental stimulation during consecutive nights on apnoea or on daytime sleepiness have not, however, been studied. METHODS--Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were studied by polysomnography on a control night, for five consecutive nights of submental stimulation, and on three following nights (n = 8). A multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) (n = 8) and measurement of the upper airway resistance (n = 5) were performed during the day after the polysomnographic study, on the control night, and on the fifth stimulation night. In an additional five patients with obstructive sleep apnoea, matched for age, sex, and weight, the effects of two nights of stimulation were examined for comparison. Submental stimulation began when an apnoea lasted for five seconds and stopped with the resumption of breathing as detected by oronasal flow. RESULTS--The apnoea index, the number of times per hour that SaO2 dropped below 85% (SaO2 < 85%/hour), and the total apnoea duration expressed as a percentage of total sleep time during stimulation nights decreased to approximately 50% of the corresponding values on the control night. This improvement persisted for at least two nights after the five consecutive stimulation nights, but not after the two consecutive stimulation nights. Sleep architecture and MSLT following the stimulation nights improved but upper airway resistance did not change. CONCLUSIONS--Submental stimulation for five consecutive nights in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea improved the breathing disturbance, sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness. The effect lasted for the following two nights, but did not completely abolish the sleep disordered breathing. PMID:8016764

  17. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A. G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M. S.; Kharbanda, O. P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P. R.; Mallick, B. N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S. C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J. C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V. K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  18. Brief airway obstructions during sleep in infants with breath-holding spells.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Rebuffat, E; Sottiaux, M; Muller, M F; Bochner, A; Grosswasser, J

    1990-08-01

    We investigated the possibility that infants with breath-holding spells have breathing disorders during sleep. Seventy-one breath holders with a median age of 14 weeks were selected from a well babies clinic because of their histories: 34 infants without loss of consciousness, and 37 with loss of consciousness (21 of the latter had had cyanotic spells, 14 pallid spells, and 2 combined cyanotic and pallid spells). For each breath holder, one control infant without a history of breath holding was chosen from the same clinic. All infants were healthy and had no known cause of disrupted breathing during sleep. Their histories indicated that the breath holders were covered with sweat during sleep (p = 0.005) or wakefulness (p = 0.006) significantly more often than were the control infants. The infants were studied during a one-night monitoring session, and the 142 sleep recordings were analyzed without knowledge of the history. The breath holders had significantly less nonrapid eye movement (stage III) sleep, more indeterminate sleep, more arousals, and more sleep-stage changes than the control infants had. Central apneas were evenly distributed in the two groups. Airway obstructions were found in 41 breath holders and six control infants; the obstruction lasted longer in the breath holders. The infants with airway obstruction during sleep snored more often (p = 0.023) and sweated more (p = 0.035) during sleep. The water evaporation rate, measured on the forehead with an evaporation meter, was significantly greater in the breath holders (p = 0.001). Ocular compression induced longer asystoles in the infants with pallid syncopes than in either those with cyanotic syncopes (p = 0.036) or those without loss of consciousness (p = 0.031). We conclude that the obstructed breathing during both wakefulness and sleep could be related to a common immature breathing control.

  19. The role of polysomnography in diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Church, Gwynne D

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea in children is associated with serious neurocognitive and cardiovascular morbidity, systemic inflammation, and increased health care use, yet remains underdiagnosed. Although the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea is 1-3% in the pediatric population, the prevalence of primary snoring (PS) is estimated to be 3-12%. The challenge for pediatricians is to differentiate PS from obstructive sleep apnea in a cost-effective, reliable, and accurate manner before recommending invasive or intrusive therapies, such as surgery or continuous positive airway pressure. The validity of polysomnography as the gold standard for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea has been challenged, primarily related to concerns that abnormalities on polysomnography do not correlate well with adverse outcomes, that those abnormalities have statistical more than clinical significance, and that performing polysomnograms on all children who snore is a practical impossibility. The aim of this article is to review the clinical utility of diagnostic tests other than polysomnography to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea, to highlight the limitations and strengths of polysomnography, to underscore the threshold levels of abnormalities detected on polysomnography that correlate with morbidity, and to discuss what the practical implications are for treatment.

  20. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chiner, Eusebi; Llombart, Mónica; Valls, Joan; Pastor, Esther; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Andreu, Ada Luz; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can predispose individuals to lower airway infections and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to upper airway microaspiration. This study evaluated the association between OSA and CAP. Methods We performed a case-control study that included 82 patients with CAP and 41 patients with other infections (control group). The controls were matched according to age, sex and body mass index (BMI). A respiratory polygraph (RP) was performed upon admission for patients in both groups. The severity of pneumonia was assessed according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The associations between CAP and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), OSA, OSA severity and other sleep-related variables were evaluated using logistic regression models. The associations between OSA, OSA severity with CAP severity were evaluated with linear regression models and non-parametric tests. Findings No significant differences were found between CAP and control patients regarding anthropometric variables, toxic habits and risk factors for CAP. Patients with OSA, defined as individuals with an Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) ≥10, showed an increased risk of CAP (OR = 2·86, 95%CI 1·29–6·44, p = 0·01). Patients with severe OSA (AHI≥30) also had a higher risk of CAP (OR = 3·18, 95%CI 1·11–11·56, p = 0·047). In addition, OSA severity, defined according to the AHI quartile, was also significantly associated with CAP (p = 0·007). Furthermore, OSA was significantly associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0002), and OSA severity was also associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0006). Conclusions OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP when compared to patients admitted to the hospital for non-respiratory infections. In addition, OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP severity. These results support the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of CAP and could have clinical implications. This link between OSA and infection risk

  1. Sleep · 4: Sleepiness, cognitive function, and quality of life in obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engleman, H; Douglas, N

    2004-01-01

    Sleepiness, cognitive performance, and quality of life are overlapping aspects of daytime function that may be affected in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. The evidence is compatible with hypotheses that these deficits are reversible with treatment, particularly for patients with severe disease. PMID:15223874

  2. Resolution of obstructive sleep apnea with epilepsy surgery? Expanding the relationship between sleep and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Stephenson, Lisa; Bingaman, William

    2008-08-01

    Recent studies suggest a higher than expected prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with refractory epilepsy. In some cases, treatment of OSA improves seizure control. We report a case in which clinically significant OSA disappeared after left frontal lobe resection that produced a near seizure free state. This occurred in the absence of the usual factors, such as weight or medication change or variation in polysomnography (PSG) recording methodology, that often confound the comparison of sequential PSGs over time. Our patient underwent PSG with 18-channel EEG recording pre- and postoperatively using standardized scoring techniques. Baseline testing revealed an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 24 with severe oxygen desaturations reaching a nadir of 62%. Postoperative testing found both the AHI and oxygen saturation normalized as well as a marked reduction in spike rate. We hypothesize that the pathophysiology of OSA in patients with epilepsy may be impacted by frequent, extensive interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) and/or seizures altering upper airway control during sleep.

  3. Localization of glossopharyngeal obstruction using nasopharyngeal tube versus Friedman tongue position classification in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhua; Hei, Renyi; Wu, Dahai; Shi, Hongjin

    2014-08-01

    Assessing the severity of glossopharyngeal obstruction is important for the diagnosis and therapy of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The polysomnography (PSG) with nasopharyngeal tube insertion (NPT-PSG) has shown good results in assessing glossopharyngeal obstruction. The objective of this study was to compare NPT-PSG with Friedman tongue position (FTP) classification which was also used to evaluate the glossopharyngeal obstruction. One hundred and five patients with OSAHS diagnosed by PSG were included in the study. All the patients were successfully examined by NPT-PSG. Based on the grade of FTP classification, 105 patients were divided into four groups. The differences of the general clinical data, PSG and NPT-PSG results were analyzed among the four groups. And the coincidence of diagnosing glossopharyngeal obstruction of two methods was calculated. There was no significant difference among the four groups in general clinical data and PSG results. However, NPT-PSG results were significantly different among the four groups. Following with the increasing FTP, apnea hypopnea index increased and lowest saturation of blood oxygen decreased. There were 38 patients with and other 38 patients without glossopharyngeal obstruction diagnosed by both methods. The coincidence of two methods was 72.4 %. NPT-PSG is an easy and effective method in assessing the severity of glossopharyngeal obstruction. The coincidence between the NPT-PSG and FTP classification is good. But in some special OSAHS patients such as glossoptosis, unsuccessful uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or suspicious pachyglossia, NPT-PSG is better than FTP classification.

  4. Cephalometric comparison of obstructive sleep apnea patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Ahmet Yalcin; Turkkahraman, Hakan; Yilmaz, H. Huseyin; Yariktas, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the cephalometric characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with those of healthy subjects and to determine possible relationships between cephalometric measurements of OSA patients and control subjects. Methods: Standardized lateral cephalograms of 16 OSA patients and 16 healthy controls were obtained. Airway dimensions and dentofacial parameters were measured using a cephalometric analysis program (Dolphin Imaging Cephalometric and Tracing Software, Chatsworth, CA, USA). All statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS version 17.0.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Descriptive statistics were calculated for all measurements, and the Mann–Whitney U test was used to evaluate intergroup differences. Results: Midface length was significantly shorter and upper lip E-plane length was significantly longer in the OSA group than in the controls (P<.05). SNA, SNB, and mandibular plane angles (GoGn-SN), anterior and posterior facial heights, and posteroanterior face height ratio were similar in both groups. Maxillary length was slightly longer in the OSA group, whereas the mandibular length showed a slight increase in the control group (P<.05). The axial inclination of the lower incisor to its respective plane was normal, whereas the upper incisor was significantly protrusive (P<.05) in the OSA group. Distance between the hyoid and mandible was significantly greater in the OSA group than in the controls, indicating that the hyoid bone was positioned more downward in the OSA group (P<.05). Conclusions: In this study, the patients with OSA demonstrated significant differences in several craniofacial measurements. OSA patients showed reduced midface length and inferiorly placed hyoid bone and tended to have smaller airway dimensions. PMID:23408768

  5. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  6. Pupillometric findings in children with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Philby, Mona; Aydinoz, Secil; Gozal, David; Kilic, Selim; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Bandla, Hari P.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to intermittent hypoxia, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and eventually cardiovascular morbidity. Alterations in autonomic nervous system (ANS) tone and reflexes are likely to play major roles in OSA-associated morbidities, and have been identified in a subset of children with OSA. Objectives To evaluate whether pupillometry, a noninvasive and rapid bedside test for the assessment of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (ANS), would detect abnormal ANS function in children with OSA. Methods Children ages 2-12 years underwent polysomnography (PSG), and were divided based on PSG findings into two groups; Habitual Snorers (HS; AHI <1 h/TST, n=17) and OSA (AHI>1 h/TST, n=49), the latter then sub-divided into AHI severity categories (>1 but <5, >5 but <10, and >10 h/TST). Pupillometric measurements were performed during the clinic visit in a dark room using an automated pupillometer device. Results A total of 66 subjects with a mean age of 7.3 ±2.6 years were recruited. There were no statistically significant differences between any of the groups, even when comparing severe OSA (n=15) and HS in any of the measures related to pupillary reflexes. However, mild, yet significant increases in systolic blood pressure and morning plasma norepinephrine levels were detected in the severe OSA group. Conclusion Although ANS perturbation are clearly present in a proportion of children with OSA, particularly those with severe disease, pupillary responses do not appear to provide a sensitive method for the detection of ANS dysfunction in OSA children. PMID:26429743

  7. Potential inflammatory markers in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dongmei; Li, Nanfang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a complex chronic inflammatory respiratory disease with multiple pathogenic factors and high morbidity and mortality. Serum levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and surfactant protein D (SPD) were investigated in OSAHS patients, to determine their clinical significance and correlation with the pathogenesis. Patients were classified into a mild and moderate OSAHS group (n = 25) and severe OSAHS group (n = 33). Twenty healthy patients served as a control group. Peripheral blood levels of NF-κB, HIF-1α, and SPD were determined by Western blot, and a correlation analysis was performed. Severe OSAHS patients received nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) therapy and were followed up after 2 months. NF-κB p65, HIF-1α, and SPD expression levels were determined after valid nCPAP therapy. NF-κB p65 and HIF-1α expression was significantly higher in severe OSAHS group than in the other two groups (p < 0.01), and was positively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (r = 0.696, p < 0.001; r = 0.634, p < 0.001). SPD expression was significantly lower in severe OSAHS group than in the control group (p < 0.01) and mild and moderate OSAHS group (p < 0.01), and was negatively correlated with AHI (r = −0.569, p < 0.001). OSAHS pathogenesis was associated with changes in NF-κB, HIF-1α, and SPD protein expression levels. nCPAP therapy could improve the clinical characteristics of the patients, lower serum NF-κB and HIF-1α levels, and increase serum SPD levels. We conclude that OSAHS is related to the expression of NF-κB, HIF-1, and SPD. PMID:27754829

  8. Apnea–hypopnea index decreased significantly after nasal surgery for obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Zhao, Guoqiang; Li, Yunchuan; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Wang, Dongbo; Han, Demin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nasal surgeries have been applied to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with nasal obstruction for decades. However, the efficiency of nasal surgery in improving OSA remains controversial. The aim of this study was to identify whether isolated nasal surgery can improve apnea–hypopnea index (AHI). Methods: Computerized searches were performed in MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus from January 1, 2000 to April 30, 2016. A total of 18 articles and 587 participants were included. There were 1 randomized controlled trials, 2 nonrandomized trials, 11 prospective studies, and 4 retrospective studies. Data regarding study design (prospective/retrospective clinical trial, randomized, and controlled), population size, participant characteristics (age, gender, and body mass index), surgical intervention, and outcomes (AHI, Epworth sleep scale [ESS]) was collected. Results: Statistically significant improvement in AHI (subgroup 1: weighted mean difference [WMD] [95%confidence interval (CI)], −4.17 [−7.62, −0.73]; subgroup 2: WMD [95%CI], −4.19 [−7.51, −0.88]; overall: WMD [95%CI], −4.15 [−6.48, −1.82]) and ESS (subgroup 1: WMD [95%CI], −2.14 [−3.08, −1.19]; subgroup 2: WMD [95%CI], −4.70 [−5.95, −3.44]; overall: WMD [95%CI], −4.08 [−5.27, −2.88]) was revealed. Conclusion: Both AHI and ESS improved significantly after isolated nasal surgery, but the improvement of AHI is slightly significant. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the long-term benefits of nasal surgery on OSA. PMID:28151900

  9. A Prognosis Tool Based on Fuzzy Anthropometric and Questionnaire Data for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kung-Jeng; Chen, Kun-Huang; Huang, Shou-Hung; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are linked to the augmented risk of morbidity and mortality. Although polysomnography is considered a well-established method for diagnosing OSA, it suffers the weakness of time consuming and labor intensive, and requires doctors and attending personnel to conduct an overnight evaluation in sleep laboratories with dedicated systems. This study aims at proposing an efficient diagnosis approach for OSA on the basis of anthropometric and questionnaire data. The proposed approach integrates fuzzy set theory and decision tree to predict OSA patterns. A total of 3343 subjects who were referred for clinical suspicion of OSA (eventually 2869 confirmed with OSA and 474 otherwise) were collected, and then classified by the degree of severity. According to an assessment of experiment results on g-means, our proposed method outperforms other methods such as linear regression, decision tree, back propagation neural network, support vector machine, and learning vector quantization. The proposed method is highly viable and capable of detecting the severity of OSA. It can assist doctors in pre-diagnosis of OSA before running the formal PSG test, thereby enabling the more effective use of medical resources.

  10. Association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control in patients with untreated versus treated diabetes.

    PubMed

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Chollet, Sylvaine; Pigeanne, Thierry; Masson, Philippe; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Goupil, François; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control differs between patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, and patients with known and treated type 2 diabetes. This multicentre cross-sectional study included 762 patients investigated by sleep recording for suspected obstructive sleep apnea, 497 of whom were previously diagnosed and treated for type 2 diabetes (treated diabetic patients), while 265 had no medical history of diabetes but had fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg dL(-1) and/or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c ) ≥6.5% consistent with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (untreated diabetic patients). Multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the independent association between HbA1c and obstructive sleep apnea severity in treated and untreated patients with diabetes. In untreated diabetic patients, HbA1c was positively associated with apnea-hypopnea index (P = 0.0007) and 3% oxygen desaturation index (P = 0.0016) after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, alcohol habits, metabolic dyslipidaemia, hypertension, statin use and study site. The adjusted mean value of HbA1c increased from 6.68% in the lowest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (<17) to 7.20% in the highest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (>61; P = 0.033 for linear trend). In treated patients with diabetes, HbA1c was associated with non-sleep variables, including age, metabolic dyslipidaemia and insulin use, but not with obstructive sleep apnea severity. Obstructive sleep apnea may adversely affect glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, but may have a limited impact in patients with overt type 2 diabetes receiving anti-diabetic medications.

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and 15-Year Cognitive Decline: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lutsey, Pamela L.; Bengtson, Lindsay G.S.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Wruck, Lisa M.; MacLehose, Richard F.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Prospective data evaluating abnormal sleep quality and quantity with cognitive decline are limited because most studies used subjective data and/or had short follow-up. We hypothesized that, over 15 y of follow-up, participants with objectively measured obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other indices of poor sleep quantity and quality would experience greater decline in cognitive functioning than participants with normal sleep patterns. Methods: ARIC participants (n = 966; mean age 61 y, 55% women) with in-home polysomnography (1996–1998) and repeated cognitive testing were followed for 15 y. Three cognitive tests (Delayed Word Recall, Word Fluency, and Digit Symbol Substitution) were administered at two time points (1996–1998 and 2011–2013). Ten additional cognitive tests were administered at the 2011–2013 neurocognitive examination. OSA was modeled using established clinical OSA severity categories. Multivariable linear regression was used to explore associations of OSA and other sleep indices with change in cognitive tests between the two assessments. Results: A median of 14.9 y (max: 17.3) passed between the two cognitive assessments. OSA category and additional indices of sleep (other measures of hypoxemia and disordered breathing, sleep fragmentation, sleep duration) were not associated with change in any cognitive test. Analyses of OSA severity categories and 10 cognitive tests administered only in 2011–2013 also showed little evidence of an association. Conclusions: Overall, abnormal sleep quality and quantity at midlife was not related to cognitive decline and later-life cognition. The effect of adverse sleep quality and quantity on cognitive decline among the elderly remains to be determined. Citation: Lutsey PL, Bengtson LG, Punjabi NM, Shahar E, Mosley TH, Gottesman RF, Wruck LM, MacLehose RF, Alonso A. Obstructive sleep apnea and 15-year cognitive decline: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. SLEEP 2016

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Perioperative Complications: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Tajender S.; Grewal, Ritu; Doghramji, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep related breathing disorder. Its prevalence is estimated to be between 2% and 25% in the general population. However, the prevalence of sleep apnea is much higher in patients undergoing elective surgery. Sedation and anesthesia have been shown to increase the upper airway collapsibility and therefore increasing the risk of having postoperative complications in these patients. Furthermore, the majority of patients with sleep apnea are undiagnosed and therefore are at risk during the perioperative period. It is important to identify these patients so that appropriate actions can be taken in a timely fashion. In this review article, we will discuss the epidemiology of sleep apnea in the surgical population. We will also discuss why these patients are at a higher risk of having postoperative complications, with the special emphasis on the role of anesthesia, opioids, sedation, and the phenomenon of REM sleep rebound. We will also review how to identify these patients preoperatively and the steps that can be taken for their perioperative management. Citation: Vasu TS; Grewal R; Doghramji K. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and perioperative complications: a systematic review of the literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(2):199-207. PMID:22505868

  13. [The role of maxillofacial surgery in obstructive sleep hypopnea and apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gilon, Yves; Raskin, Sylviane; Heymans, Olivier; Poirrier, Robert

    2002-01-01

    One of the most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is daytime drowsiness. It is associated with a high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and an elevated incidence of car crashes. In general, young patients don't want conservative treatment because symptomatic and to prevent secondary effects. In this article, we briefly define sleep disorders and the interest of cephalometric examination. We describe the different treatment possibilities and stress the important role of orthognathic surgery in this syndrome.

  14. The prevalence and characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Puhong; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Heeley, Emma; Chai-Coetzer, Ching L; Liu, Jing; Jing, Bo; Han, Ping; Li, Qifu; Sun, Liao; Li, Yufeng; Dong, Shengying; Jiang, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Chunhua; Lu, Jinhui; Guo, Xingduan; Guo, Lixin; Mcevoy, R Doug; Ji, Linong

    2016-02-01

    Data on the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus in China is scarce. We conducted a multi-centre, cross-sectional study involving 12 hospitals from six regional cities to investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to explore the association between obstructive sleep apnea and related risk factors, diabetic complications and comorbidities in China. Each hospital recruited at least 70 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were admitted to the endocrinology ward. A total of 880 participants were enrolled and administered overnight sleep monitoring with a portable monitor (ApneaLink™, ResMed, San Diego, CA, USA); other information was collected from medical charts and a standardized questionnaire. In this study, 60.0% (95% confidence interval: 56.8%, 63.2%) of hospitalized patients in China with type 2 diabetes mellitus had comorbid obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 5). Only 1.5% (eight of 528) of the patients with both conditions had been diagnosed previously with obstructive sleep apnea. The prevalence of moderate-severe (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15) and severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 30) was estimated to be 25.6% (22.7, 28.5%) and 10.3% (8.3, 12.4%), respectively. Age, sex, body mass index, snoring, reported breath-holding in sleep or gasping or choking arousal, sleepiness, diabetes duration, hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases history were correlated significantly with the severity of obstructive sleep apnea. In China, the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is high. Routine screening for and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is an important, but often neglected, part of the management of diabetes.

  15. Comparison of a novel non-contact biomotion sensor with wrist actigraphy in estimating sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Pallin, Michael; O'Hare, Emer; Zaffaroni, Alberto; Boyle, Patricia; Fagan, Ciara; Kent, Brian; Heneghan, Conor; de Chazal, Philip; McNicholas, Walter T

    2014-08-01

    Ambulatory monitoring is of major clinical interest in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. We compared a novel non-contact biomotion sensor, which provides an estimate of both sleep time and sleep-disordered breathing, with wrist actigraphy in the assessment of total sleep time in adult humans suspected of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Both systems were simultaneously evaluated against polysomnography in 103 patients undergoing assessment for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in a hospital-based sleep laboratory (84 male, aged 55 ± 14 years and apnoea-hypopnoea index 21 ± 23). The biomotion sensor demonstrated similar accuracy to wrist actigraphy for sleep/wake determination (77.3%: biomotion; 76.5%: actigraphy), and the biomotion sensor demonstrated higher specificity (52%: biomotion; 34%: actigraphy) and lower sensitivity (86%: biomotion; 94%: actigraphy). Notably, total sleep time estimation by the biomotion sensor was superior to actigraphy (average overestimate of 10 versus 57 min), especially at a higher apnoea-hypopnoea index. In post hoc analyses, we assessed the improved apnoea-hypopnoea index accuracy gained by combining respiratory measurements from polysomnography for total recording time (equivalent to respiratory polygraphy) with total sleep time derived from actigraphy or the biomotion sensor. Here, the number of misclassifications of obstructive sleep apnoea severity compared with full polysomnography was reduced from 10/103 (for total respiratory recording time alone) to 7/103 and 4/103 (for actigraphy and biomotion sensor total sleep time estimate, respectively). We conclude that the biomotion sensor provides a viable alternative to actigraphy for sleep estimation in the assessment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. As a non-contact device, it is suited to longitudinal assessment of sleep, which could also be combined with polygraphy in ambulatory studies.

  16. Sleep stage and obstructive apneaic epoch classification using single-lead ECG

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polysomnography (PSG) is used to define physiological sleep and different physiological sleep stages, to assess sleep quality and diagnose many types of sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. However, PSG requires not only the connection of various sensors and electrodes to the subject but also spending the night in a bed that is different from the subject's own bed. This study is designed to investigate the feasibility of automatic classification of sleep stages and obstructive apneaic epochs using only the features derived from a single-lead electrocardiography (ECG) signal. Methods For this purpose, PSG recordings (ECG included) were obtained during the night's sleep (mean duration 7 hours) of 17 subjects (5 men) with ages between 26 and 67. Based on these recordings, sleep experts performed sleep scoring for each subject. This study consisted of the following steps: (1) Visual inspection of ECG data corresponding to each 30-second epoch, and selection of epochs with relatively clean signals, (2) beat-to-beat interval (RR interval) computation using an R-peak detection algorithm, (3) feature extraction from RR interval values, and (4) classification of sleep stages (or obstructive apneaic periods) using one-versus-rest approach. The features used in the study were the median value, the difference between the 75 and 25 percentile values, and mean absolute deviations of the RR intervals computed for each epoch. The k-nearest-neighbor (kNN), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), and support vector machines (SVM) methods were used as the classification tools. In the testing procedure 10-fold cross-validation was employed. Results QDA and SVM performed similarly well and significantly better than kNN for both sleep stage and apneaic epoch classification studies. The classification accuracy rates were between 80 and 90% for the stages other than non-rapid-eye-movement stage 2. The accuracies were 60 or 70% for that specific stage. In five

  17. A community-oriented framework to increase screening and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea among blacks

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Natasha J; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Ravenell, Joeseph; Seixas, Azizi; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); is a leading sleep disorder that is disproportionately more prevalent in minority populations and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. OSA is associated with many chronic conditions including hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, all of which disproportionately burden blacks (i.e., peoples of African American, Caribbean, or African descent). Methods This article will review studies conducted in the U.S. that examined sleep screenings and adherence to treatment for obstructive sleep apnea among blacks. In addition, we provide guidelines for implementing a practical framework to increase OSA screening and management among blacks. Results Several studies have documented racial/ethnic disparities in adherence to treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. However, despite its public health significance, there is a paucity of studies addressing these disparities. Further, there is a lack of health programs and policies to increase screening and treatment of OSA among blacks and other minority populations. A practical framework to increase the number of blacks who are screened for OSA and treated appropriately is warranted. Such a framework is timely and is of major importance, as early identification of OSA in this high-risk population could potentially lead to early treatment and prevention of CVD, thereby reducing racial and ethnic disparities in sleep-related CVD morbidity and mortality. PMID:26652238

  18. Distraction osteogenesis as a treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Wai Kin; Yang, Yanqi; Cheung, Lim Kwong; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To conduct a systematic review to answer the clinical question “What are the effectiveness of mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) and its complications to treat patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)?”. Methods: A systematic search including a computer search with specific keywords, reference list search, and manual search were done. Relevant articles on MDO were assessed and selected in 3 rounds for final review based on 5 predefined inclusion criteria and followed by a round of critical appraisal. Different types of distraction and their treatment outcomes of OSAS were recorded with standardized form and analyzed. Results: Twelve articles were included in the final review. A total of 256 patients aged 7 days to 60 years were treated with either external or internal MDO, with a mean follow-up period of 6 to 37 months. The average distraction distance of 12 to 29 mm was achieved with various distraction protocols. The success rate for adult patients was 100%, and cure rates were ranged from 82% to 100%. The definition of success or cure for OSAS in children or infants was not defined. Therefore, there were no clearly reported success or cure rates for children/infants in the included studies. However, all studies reported that these patients showed significant improvement in OSAS, with many of them who avoided tracheostomy or had the tracheostomy decannulated. The complication rates were ranged from 0% to 21.4%, with most being from local wound infections or neurosensory disturbances. Conclusion: This systematic review showed that MDO was effective in resolving OSAS in adults with retrognathic mandible. MDO also showed promising results in infants or children with OSAS. From the results of this systematic review, we recommend to define the criteria of success or cure for OSAS surgery in children and infants. We also recommend setting up randomized controlled trials to compare MDO with traditional maxillomandibular

  19. The role of physical exercise in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Flávio Maciel Dias de; Pedrosa, Rodrigo Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common clinical condition, with a variable and underestimated prevalence. OSA is the main condition associated with secondary systemic arterial hypertension, as well as with atrial fibrillation, stroke, and coronary artery disease, greatly increasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is not tolerated by all OSA patients and is often not suitable in cases of mild OSA. Hence, alternative methods to treat OSA and its cardiovascular consequences are needed. In OSA patients, regular physical exercise has beneficial effects other than weight loss, although the mechanisms of those effects remain unclear. In this population, physiological adaptations due to physical exercise include increases in upper airway dilator muscle tone and in slow-wave sleep time; and decreases in fluid accumulation in the neck, systemic inflammatory response, and body weight. The major benefits of exercise programs for OSA patients include reducing the severity of the condition and daytime sleepiness, as well as increasing sleep efficiency and maximum oxygen consumption. There are few studies that evaluated the role of physical exercise alone for OSA treatment, and their protocols are quite diverse. However, aerobic exercise, alone or combined with resistance training, is a common point among the studies. In this review, the major studies and mechanisms involved in OSA treatment by means of physical exercise are presented. In addition to systemic clinical benefits provided by physical exercise, OSA patients involved in a regular, predominantly aerobic, exercise program have shown a reduction in disease severity and in daytime sleepiness, as well as an increase in sleep efficiency and in peak oxygen consumption, regardless of weight loss. RESUMO A apneia obstrutiva do sono (AOS) é uma condição clínica comum, possuindo prevalência variável e subestimada. Principal condição associada à hipertens

  20. Utility of Symptoms to Predict Treatment Outcomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Taylor, H. Gerry; Marcus, Carole L.; Katz, Eliot S.; Paruthi, Shalini; Arens, Raanan; Muzumdar, Hiren; Garetz, Susan L.; Mitchell, Ron B.; Jones, Dwight; Weng, Jia; Ellenberg, Susan; Redline, Susan; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Polysomnography defines the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) but does not predict some important comorbidities or their response to adenotonsillectomy. We assessed whether OSAS symptoms, as reflected on the Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders Scale of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), may offer clinical predictive value. METHODS: Baseline and 7-month follow-up data were analyzed from 185 participants (aged 5–9 years with polysomnographically confirmed OSAS) in the surgical treatment arm of the multicenter Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial. Associations were assessed between baseline PSQ or polysomnographic data and baseline morbidity (executive dysfunction, behavior, quality of life, sleepiness) or postsurgical improvement. RESULTS: At baseline, each 1-SD increase in baseline PSQ score was associated with an adjusted odds ratio that was ∼3 to 4 times higher for behavioral morbidity, 2 times higher for reduced global quality of life, 6 times higher for reduced disease-specific quality of life, and 2 times higher for sleepiness. Higher baseline PSQ scores (greater symptom burden) also predicted postsurgical improvement in parent ratings of executive functioning, behavior, quality of life, and sleepiness. In contrast, baseline polysomnographic data did not independently predict these morbidities or their postsurgical improvement. Neither PSQ nor polysomnographic data were associated with objectively assessed executive dysfunction or improvement at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: PSQ symptom items, in contrast to polysomnographic results, reflect subjective measures of OSAS-related impairment of behavior, quality of life, and sleepiness and predict their improvement after adenotonsillectomy. Although objective polysomnography is needed to diagnose OSAS, the symptoms obtained during an office visit can offer adjunctive insight into important comorbidities and likely surgical responses. PMID:25667240

  1. Sexual behaviors during sleep associated with polysomnographically confirmed parasomnia overlap disorder.

    PubMed

    Cicolin, Alessandro; Tribolo, Antonella; Giordano, Alessandra; Chiarot, Elisabetta; Peila, Elena; Terreni, Anna; Bucca, Caterina; Mutani, Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Parasomnia overlap disorder (POD) refers to a sleep disorder characterized by the association of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) with NREM sleep parasomnia in the same patient. Sexual behaviors during sleep (SBS) can include most wakeful sexual activities and are classified in the ICSD-2 as a variant of confusional arousals and sleepwalking, both NREM parasomnias. A case of SBS associated with sleepwalking and possible RBD has been previously described, but it was not confirmed by polysomnography (PSG). We report two patients with SBS associated with POD documented by PSG. In one patient (60-year-old female) SBS was video-polysomnographically demonstrated: a few minute episode of masturbation occurring during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and preceded by hypersynchronous delta pattern. During the episode, the EEG pattern showed the persistence of delta rhythms with increasing alpha activity. When awoken by technicians, the patient was not aware of her sexual behavior and did not report any dream. The other patient, a 41-year-old male with a history of sleepwalking and RBD, was legally charged with repeatedly sexually fondling a young girl during the night. The POD was documented by PSG. The parasomnia defense, including sleepsex, was accepted by the Court and the patient was acquitted. This is an unprecedented report of SBS in patients with PSG-confirmed POD and of SBS documented during video-PSG.

  2. Managing Comorbid Illness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: What Can We Learn from Other Diseases?

    PubMed

    Conwell, Walter D; Tsai, Sheila C

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with numerous comorbid medical conditions. Symptoms of OSA may mimic those of comorbid conditions. The presence of OSA may worsen outcomes from the primary condition. Conversely, OSA treatment may benefit both sleep symptomatology and comorbid illness. Because of potential significant benefit, it is important to screen for sleep apnea symptoms, to have a low threshold to perform diagnostic testing, to treat OSA if present, and to closely monitor symptoms. OSA management does not necessarily replace, but rather, should be performed in conjunction with primary therapy for comorbid conditions.

  3. Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Comorbid Insomnia: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason C; Crawford, Megan R; Kong, Allison; Park, Margaret; Cvengros, Jamie A; Crisostomo, M Isabel; Alexander, Ewa I; Wyatt, James K

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the process of care in an interdisciplinary sleep clinic for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and comorbid insomnia. A mixed-methods approach was used to examine clinical and patient-centered measures for 34 patients who received positive-airway pressure for OSA or cognitive-behavior therapy for insomnia. The results revealed baseline-to-follow-up improvements on several self-reported sleep parameters and measures of daytime functioning. Qualitative analyses from patient interviews revealed three themes: conceptual distinctions about each sleep disorder, importance of treating both sleep disorders, and preferences with regard to the sequence of treatment. These findings indicate that patients with OSA and comorbid insomnia encounter unique challenges. A dimensional approach to assessment and treatment is proposed for future research.

  4. The sympathetic nervous system and catecholamines metabolism in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Bisogni, Valeria; Pengo, Martino F.; Maiolino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder of breathing in middle-aged and overweight subjects. It features recurrent episodes of upper airway total (apnoea) o partial (hypopnea) collapse during sleep, which are associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation and with arousal from sleep to re-establish airway patency. An association of OSA with dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system (ANS) and altered catecholamines (CAs) metabolism has been contended for years. However, the pathophysiology mechanisms underlying these alterations remain to be fully clarified. Nonetheless, these alterations are deemed to play a key pathogenic role in the established association of OSA with several conditions besides arterial hypertension (HT), including coronary artery disease, stroke, and, more in general, with increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. Hence, in this review we will analyse the relationship between the sleep disturbances associated with OSA and the altered function of the ANS, including CAs metabolism. PMID:26904265

  5. Recurrent acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery due to trachea malacia and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sankatsing, S.U.C.; Hanselaar, W.E.J.J.; van Steenwijk, R.P.; van der Sloot, J.A.P.; Broekhuis, E.; Kok, W.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe a patient with recurrent episodes of acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery. The first episode of pulmonary oedema was caused by mitral valve dysfunction. The second episode of pulmonary oedema was not clearly associated with a mitral valve problem, but reoperation was performed in the absence of another explanation. After the third episode of acute pulmonary oedema occurred, the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) was considered and confirmed. After starting treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during his sleep the patient had no further episodes of acute respiratory failure. Our case demonstrates that acute pulmonary oedema after cardiothoracic surgery can be caused or at least be precipitated by OSAS and should be suspected in patients with unexplained episodes of (recurrent) pulmonary oedema. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:310-2.) PMID:18827875

  6. Validity and reliability of a protocol of orofacial myofunctional evaluation for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Folha, Gislaine A; Valera, Fabiana C P; de Felício, Cláudia M

    2015-06-01

    There is no standardized protocol for the clinical evaluation of orofacial components and functions in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The aim of this study was to examine the validity, reliability, and psychometric properties of the Expanded Protocol of Orofacial Myofunctional Evaluation with Scores (OMES-expanded) in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects were evaluated, and the validity of OMES-expanded was tested by construct validity (i.e. the ability to discriminate orofacial status between apneic and control subjects) and criterion validity (i.e. correlation between OMES-expanded and a reference instrument). Construct validity was adequate; the apneic group showed significantly worse orofacial status than did control subjects. Criterion validity of OMES-expanded was good, as was its reliability. The OMES-expanded is valid and reliable for evaluating orofacial myofunctional disorders of patients with obstructive sleep apnea, with adequate psychometric properties. It may be useful to plan a therapeutic strategy and to determine whether the effects of therapy are related to improved muscle and orofacial functions.

  7. Design of a new controller to treat the obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Thomas

    2002-06-01

    The obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a sleep related breathing disorder caused by a relaxation of the upper airway structure during the sleep that leads to a complete closure of the upper airway. The most successful therapy is the nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment that keeps the airway opened. More recent devices use an automatic adaptation of the applied pressure. Either the forced oscillation technique (FOT) or the evaluation of the inspiration flow contour are used to evaluate the severity of obstructions. Both methods have disadvantages that may lead to wrong applied pressures. Based on the precise measurement of airflow and mask pressure during nCPAP with a Weinmann SOMNOsmart and additional polysomnography a new parameter set is presented that uses the advantage of both methods to detect the obstructive sleep apnoea. To evaluate the applicability of this parameter set to control Auto-nCPAP-devices a fuzzy-controller is designed under MATLAB/Simulink using an A/D-D/A-converter to control the blower of the SOMNOsmart during Auto-nCPAP-therapy. Obstructive events are detected and treated with a rise of nCPAP-pressure depending on the inspiratory flow requirement. The pressure is lowered after the end of flow limited phases. Although temporary low pressures no oxygen desaturation is recognized by the pulse oxymeter.

  8. Dynamics of snoring sounds and its connection with obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar, Adriano M.; da Silva, Diego Greatti Vaz; Oliveira, Carolina Beatriz; Vieira, André P.; Moriya, Henrique T.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    Snoring is extremely common in the general population and when irregular may indicate the presence of obstructive sleep apnea. We analyze the overnight sequence of wave packets - the snore sound - recorded during full polysomnography in patients referred to the Sleep Laboratory due to suspected obstructive sleep apnea. We hypothesize that irregular snore, with duration in the range between 10 and 100 s, correlates with respiratory obstructive events. We find that the number of irregular snores - easily accessible, and quantified by what we call the snore time interval index (STII) - is in good agreement with the well-known apnea-hypopnea index, which expresses the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and is extracted only from polysomnography. In addition, the Hurst analysis of the snore sound itself, which calculates the fluctuations in the signal as a function of time interval, is used to build a classifier that is able to distinguish between patients with no or mild apnea and patients with moderate or severe apnea.

  9. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and ischemic heart disease. Evidence of their relationship].

    PubMed

    González-Pliego, José Angel; Hernández-Gordillo, Daniel; Castañeda-Barragán, Edgar; García-Lamas, Leopoldo; Guzmán-Sánchez, César Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyse the relation between obstructive sleep apnea and coronary disease. We present epidemiological data on the respiratory disorder and its association with ischemic cardiopathy, as well as common cardiovascular risk factors, physiopathological interactions between both conditions, clinical evolution and impact of treatment on prognosis.

  10. Facial phenotype in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Agha, Bahn; Johal, Ama

    2017-04-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis explores the association between facial phenotype and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in adults. A comprehensive electronic (Medline via Ovid, Scopus, and Embase) database and reference search were undertaken in relation to imaging modalities for surface craniofacial assessments in subjects with sleep apnea. The outcome measures were surface facial dimensions, morphology and profile. The quality of studies was assessed and a meta-analysis conducted. The studies were weighted using the inverse variance method, and the random effects model was used to analyse data. This systematic review identified eight case-control studies. In five studies (906 participants), adults with sleep apnea showed increased weighted mean differences in neck circumference by 1.26 mm (P = 0.0001) with extensive heterogeneity between studies (I² = 93%). Only two studies (467 participants) shared the following outcomes: mandible length, lower facial height, mandible width and anterior mandible height parameters. The pooled results demonstrated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was associated with larger parameters than controls. In conclusion, the surface facial assessment was able to demonstrate some characteristic morphological features, facilitating a meta-analysis, in adults with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. The strength of these findings, however, was limited by the heterogeneity of the studies precluding the identification of a clear phenotype.

  11. Bone Loss in Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chakhtoura, Marlene; Nasrallah, Mona; Chami, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related respiratory disorder. It is associated with many endocrinopathies including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolism, and glucose intolerance that may lead to bone loss with secondary osteoporosis. Methods: We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with bilateral 9th rib fractures and was found to have obstructive sleep apnea and osteoporosis. We also present a literature review on this topic. Results: OSA can lead to bone loss through various mechanisms. Some are shared with obesity, including hypogonadism, altered adrenergic tone, inflammation, oxidative stress, vitamin D deficiency and diabetes mellitus; others are specific to OSA, such as hypoxia and altered glucocorticoids regulation. Conclusion: There are no guidelines on screening for osteoporosis in OSA. Further research is needed to assess the incidence of bone loss and fractures in OSA. Citation: Chakhtoura M, Nasrallah M, Chami H. Bone loss in obesity and obstructive sleep apnea: a review of literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):575–580. PMID:25580607

  12. Lifestyle modifications and the resolution of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Thaddeus R.; Seaman, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This purpose of this case study is to describe a natural method to help in management of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is known to be a common and debilitating condition. Clinical Features Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is typically managed with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device, which the patient wears during sleep to help maintain respiration. This report describes the chiropractic management and resolution of OSAS with dietary modifications in a 55-year-old man who wore a CPAP for 10 years. Intervention and Outcome After adhering to dietary modifications for 3 months, the patient no longer required the use of the CPAP device and continues to have a normal active lifestyle almost 7 years later. Conclusion Dietary modifications may be an effective tool to improve the management of OSAS. PMID:22014867

  13. [Could mouth breathing lead to obstructive sleep apnea syndromes. A preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Raskin, S; Limme, M; Poirrier, R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary work is to determine an easy method to diagnose "buccal breather" children and "nasal breather" children. Then, to establish a possible connection with the syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea. 22 children agreed to participate. Clinical, orthophonic, orthodontic, postural and polysomnographical exams have been carried out. The proposed clinical exam turns out to be a good means of diagnosing between buccal breathers and nasal breathers. The aerophonoscope reveals velar inadequacies in buccal breathers. The latter also present osseous discrepancies mainly in the mandible. The polysomnography reveals a higher apnea/hypopnea index and more agitated sleep in buccal breathers. Mandibular lowering movements are more frequent and similar to those of adults suffering from apnea. These elements similar to those encountered in adults suffering from apnea make us think that buccal breathing could be the origin of obstructive sleep apnea, several decades later.

  14. Ethical Issues in the Conduct of Clinical Trials in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Anderson, Craig S.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Kushida, Clete A.; Lewin, Daniel S.; Malow, Beth A.; Redline, Susan; Goldman, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    Scientifically rigorous clinical trials are needed to test continuous positive airway pressure's (CPAP) effect on important clinical endpoints known to be associated with obstructive sleep apnea, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmias, stroke, mortality, seizures, and cognitive function. In this “Special Article,” we review the regulatory and ethical issues that surround the design and conduct of CPAP trials, including selection of the appropriate control condition, exclusion criteria, and follow-up duration. Citation: Brown DL; Anderson CS; Chervin RD; Kushida CA; Lewin DS; Malow BA; Redline S; Goldman EB. Ethical issues in the conduct of clinical trials in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(1):103-108. PMID:21344041

  15. STOP-BANG questionnaire as a screening tool for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea by unattended portable monitoring sleep study.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Viral; Walia, Reuben; Jones, Kellie; Aston, Christopher E; Awab, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The Snoring, Tiredness, Observed apnea, high blood Pressure (STOP)-Body mass index (BMI), Age, Neck circumference, and Gender (BANG) questionnaire is a well validated screening tool for diagnosis of Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by an in- lab sleep study. However, performance of STOP-BANG as a screening tool for diagnosis of OSA in patients undergoing portable monitoring (PM) sleep study has not been well validated. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients older than 18 years who had unattended portable monitoring sleep study done at a VA medical center between June 2012 and October 2014. STOP-BANG questionnaire and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) were routinely done prior to study. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) various STOP-BANG score thresholds were calculated for diagnosis of OSA defined by Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) ≥5. Out of 502 unattended portable monitoring sleep studies, there were 465 males and 37 females. STOP-BANG thresholds of ≥2 and 3 have high sensitivity of 99.8 and 98.9 %, respectively, but very low specificity. Higher score thresholds of ≥7 and 8 have high specificity of 95 and 98.3 %, and PPV of 98.1 and 98.5 %, respectively, but very low sensitivity. A threshold of ≥7 in patients with BMI ≥30 was 100 % specific. The false negative rate for unattended portable monitoring sleep study compared to in-lab study was 80 %. STOP-BANG score thresholds of ≥7 and 8 are highly specific and have high PPV and therefore can potentially reduce need of diagnostic sleep studies in selected patients. Score thresholds of ≤2 or 3 are highly sensitive for AHI ≥5 by unattended portable monitoring sleep study but have high false negative rates. Therefore, in-lab sleep study should be performed to rule out OSA.

  16. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and propofol used for drug-induced sleep endoscopy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuyrukluyıldız, Ufuk; Binici, Orhan; Onk, Didem; Ayhan Celik, Serap; Torun, Mumtaz Taner; Unver, Edhem; Ozcicek, Adalet; Alagol, Aysin

    2015-01-01

    Backround: Surgical operations are alternative treatments in persons with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome who cannot tolerate continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy is a method with which somnolence is pharmacologically induced and collapse is evaluated through nasal endoscopy in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome. Aims: We aimed to evaluate efficiency of dexmedetomidine or propofol used for sedation in patients undergoing drug-induced sleep endoscopy. Methods: A total of 40 patients aged between 18 and 65 years old in the ASA STATUS I-II group were included in the study. After premedicatıon wıth midazolam 0.05 mg/kg intravenously, patients were randomly divided into two groups and administered intravenous (iv) propofol with the loading dose of 0.7 mg/kg for 10 minutes, followed 0.5 mg/kg/h infusion (Group P); or dexmedetomidine with the loading dose of 1 mcg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by 0.3 mcg/kg/h infusion (Group D). Haemodynamic and respiratuary parameters, Bispectral index score, Ramsey sedation score, time to achieve sufficient sedation, surgeon’s and patients’ satisfaction, postoperative Aldrete score and side effects were recorded. Results: Time to achieve sufficient sedation, Bispectral index scores at 5, 10 and 15th. minutes intraoperatively, first Aldrete score in the recovery room, SpO2 values and respiratory rates all over the surgical procedure and in the recovery room were found lower in Group P (P<0.05). Bispectral index scores, mean arterial pressure and heart rate in the recovery room were significantly lower in Group D (P<0.05). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine may be preferred as a safer agent with respecting to respiratory function compared with propofol in obstructive sleep apnea patients who known to be susceptible to hypoxia and hypercarbia. PMID:26131153

  17. Added value of a mandible movement automated analysis in the screening of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Maury, Gisele; Cambron, Laurent; Jamart, Jacques; Marchand, Eric; Senny, Frédéric; Poirrier, Robert

    2013-02-01

    In-laboratory polysomnography is the 'gold standard' for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but is time consuming and costly, with long waiting lists in many sleep laboratories. Therefore, the search for alternative methods to detect respiratory events is growing. In this prospective study, we compared attended polysomnography with two other methods, with or without mandible movement automated analysis provided by a distance-meter and added to airflow and oxygen saturation analysis for the detection of respiratory events. The mandible movement automated analysis allows for the detection of salient mandible movement, which is a surrogate for arousal. All parameters were recorded simultaneously in 570 consecutive patients (M/F: 381/189; age: 50±14 years; body mass index: 29±7 kg m(-2) ) visiting a sleep laboratory. The most frequent main diagnoses were: obstructive sleep apnea (344; 60%); insomnia/anxiety/depression (75; 13%); and upper airway resistance syndrome (25; 4%). The correlation between polysomnography and the method with mandible movement automated analysis was excellent (r: 0.95; P<0.001). Accuracy characteristics of the methods showed a statistical improvement in sensitivity and negative predictive value with the addition of mandible movement automated analysis. This was true for different diagnostic thresholds of obstructive sleep severity, with an excellent efficiency for moderate to severe index (apnea-hypopnea index ≥15h(-1) ). A Bland & Altman plot corroborated the analysis. The addition of mandible movement automated analysis significantly improves the respiratory index calculation accuracy compared with an airflow and oxygen saturation analysis. This is an attractive method for the screening of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, increasing the ability to detect hypopnea thanks to the salient mandible movement as a marker of arousals.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnoea in adults: body postures and weight changes interactions.

    PubMed

    Oksenberg, Arie; Dynia, Aida; Nasser, Khitam; Gadoth, Natan

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the relationship between changes of body posture dominance and changes of body weight overtime in adults with obstructive sleep apnoea. The participants were 112 non-treated adults with obstructive sleep apnoea who underwent two polysomnographic evaluations at our Sleep Disorders Unit during an average of 6.2years interval. Positional patients - having most of their breathing abnormalities in the supine posture and who became non-positional patients - had a significant gain in weight and a significant increase in apnoea-hypopnoea index, mainly in lateral apnoea-hypopnoea index. On the contrary, non-positional patients who became positional patients had a significant decrease in weight (but less than the increase in weight of positional patients who became non-positional patients) and showed a significant improvement in apnoea-hypopnoea index, again mainly in lateral apnoea-hypopnoea index. These non-positional patients who became positional patients initially had a less severe disease, as judged by apnoea-hypopnoea index, lateral apnoea-hypopnoea index and minimum SaO(2) during non-rapid eye movement sleep, and were less obese than non-positional patients who remained non-positional patients. The later were the patients who showed initially the worst disease and were more obese than the rest of the patients, and their condition did not change significantly over time. Non-positional patients who converted to positional patients showed a decrease in body weight and improvement of obstructive sleep apnoea, while positional patients who converted to non-positional patients showed an increase in body weight and worsening of obstructive sleep apnoea. It appears that weight changes have a modulatory effect on positional dominance, and lateral apnoea-hypopnoea index appears to be a sensitive parameter of these changes.

  19. Coexistence of obstructive sleep apnea worsens the overall outcome of intracranial aneurysm: a pioneer study.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Nanda, Anil; Cuellar, Hugo; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Liendo, Cesar; Minagar, Alireza; Chernyshev, Oleg Y

    2017-03-21

    OBJECTIVE Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with the progression of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms. However, the role of OSA in the overall outcome of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) has not yet been established. Authors of this report investigated the role of OSA in the overall outcome of IAs. METHODS Radiological and clinical data on patients (from 2010 through 2015) with confirmed IA were retrospectively reviewed. Significant differences between the OSA and non-OSA groups were determined using a chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of an unfavorable IA outcome. RESULTS Among the 283 patients with confirmed IAs, 45 patients (16%) were positively screened for OSA, a proportion that was significantly higher than the prevalence of OSA in nonaneurysmal neurosurgical patients (4%, p = 0.008). The percentage of patients with hypertension (p = 0.018), a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2) (p < 0.0001), hyperlipidemia (p = 0.034), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.005), chronic heart disease (CHD; p = 0.024), or prior stroke (p = 0.03) was significantly higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group. Similarly, the percentage of wide-necked aneurysms (p = 0.00001) and patients with a poor Hunt and Hess Grade IV-V (p = 0.01) was significantly higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group. In addition, the percentage of ruptured aneurysms (p = 0.03) and vasospasms (p = 0.03) was significantly higher in the OSA group. The percentage of patients with poor modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores (3-6) was significantly higher in the OSA group (p = 0.03). A separate cohort of patients with ruptured IAs showed similar results. In both univariate (p = 0.01) and multivariate (p = 0.04) regression analyses, OSA was identified as an individual predictor of an unfavorable outcome. In addition, hypertension and prior stroke were revealed as predictors of a poor IA outcome. CONCLUSIONS Complications of IA such as rupture and

  20. Evaluation of quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Alimohamad; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Kamrava, Seyed Kamran; Jalessi, Maryam; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder affecting quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of Quality of Life (QOL) in patients with OSA by means of World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) instrument. This study was conducted on adult patients with sleep problems referred to Noor Sleep Lab for an overnight sleep study. Subjects were assessed for QOL using WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. The Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) was also employed to assess excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Baseline characteristics, ESS, and measured QOL are reported and their correlations with QOL were examined. Out of 502 patients included in the study, 62.7 % had moderate to severe OSA. The mean score of QOL in physical domain was significantly lower compared with normative population data. While AHI did not show any correlation with quality of life, mean O(2) was weakly correlated with physical domain. Among the baseline characteristics, BMI and ESS were negatively correlated with physical and mental domains. Findings of this study show the impairment in quality of life related to physical functioning in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Our study further supports the lack of association between AHI and QOL.

  1. Orexin Plays a Role in Growth Impediment Induced by Obstructive Sleep Breathing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tarasiuk, Ariel; Levi, Avishag; Assadi, Mohammad H.; Troib, Ariel; Segev, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mechanisms linking sleep disordered breathing with impairment of sleep and bone metabolism/architecture are poorly understood. Here, we explored the role of the neuropeptide orexin, a respiratory homeostasis modulator, in growth retardation induced in an upper airway obstructed (AO) rat model. Methods: The tracheae of 22-day-old rats were narrowed; AO and sham-control animals were monitored for 5 to 7 w. Growth parameters, food intake, sleep/wake activity, and serum hormones were measured. After euthanasia, growth plate (GP) histology, morphometry, orexin receptors (OXR), and related mediators were analyzed. The effect of dual orexin receptor antagonist (almorexant 300 mg/kg) on sleep and GP histology were also investigated. Results: The AO group slept 32% less; the time spent in slow wave and paradoxical sleep during light period and slow wave activity was reduced. The AO group gained 46% less body weight compared to the control group, despite elevated food intake; plasma ghrelin increased by 275% and leptin level decreased by 44%. The impediment of bone elongation and bone mass was followed by a 200% increase in OX1R and 38% reduction of local GP ghrelin proteins and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a. Sry-related transcription factor nine (Sox9), a molecule mediating cartilage ossification, was downregulated and the level of transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was upregulated, explaining the bone architecture abnormalities. Administration of almorexant restored sleep and improved GP width in AO animals. Conclusions: In AO animals, enhanced expression of orexin and OX1R plays a role in respiratory induced sleep and growth abnormalities. Citation: Tarasiuk A, Levi A, Assadi MH, Troib A, Segev Y. Orexin plays a role in growth impediment induced by obstructive sleep breathing in rats. SLEEP 2016;39(4):887–897. PMID:26943473

  2. Decision Modeling in Sleep Apnea: The Critical Roles of Pretest Probability, Cost of Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Time Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Marilyn; Westover, M. Brandon; Kelly, Jessica; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) is cost-effective. However, the optimal diagnostic strategy remains a subject of debate. Prior modeling studies have not consistently supported the widely held assumption that home sleep testing (HST) is cost-effective. Methods: We modeled four strategies: (1) treat no one; (2) treat everyone empirically; (3) treat those testing positive during in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) via in-laboratory titration; and (4) treat those testing positive during HST with auto-PAP. The population was assumed to lack independent reasons for in-laboratory PSG (such as insomnia, periodic limb movements in sleep, complex apnea). We considered the third-party payer perspective, via both standard (quality-adjusted) and pure cost methods. Results: The preferred strategy depended on three key factors: pretest probability of OSA, cost of untreated OSA, and time horizon. At low prevalence and low cost of untreated OSA, the treat no one strategy was favored, whereas empiric treatment was favored for high prevalence and high cost of untreated OSA. In-laboratory backup for failures in the at-home strategy increased the preference for the at-home strategy. Without laboratory backup in the at-home arm, the in-laboratory strategy was increasingly preferred at longer time horizons. Conclusion: Using a model framework that captures a broad range of clinical possibilities, the optimal diagnostic approach to uncomplicated OSA depends on pretest probability, cost of untreated OSA, and time horizon. Estimating each of these critical factors remains a challenge warranting further investigation. Citation: Moro M, Westover MB, Kelly J, Bianchi MT. Decision modeling in sleep apnea: the critical roles of pretest probability, cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnea, and time horizon. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):409–418. PMID:26518699

  3. Nocturnal mouthpiece ventilation and medical hypnosis to treat severe obstructive sleep apnea in a child with cherubism.

    PubMed

    Khirani, Sonia; Kadlub, Natacha; Delord, Vincent; Picard, Arnaud; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2013-09-01

    A 4-year old boy presented severe obstructive sleep apnoea due to complete nasal obstruction secondary to cherubism. Because of anticipatory anxiety due to numerous surgical interventions, medical hypnosis was proposed to facilitate non-invasive continuous positive pressure ventilation (CPAP) acceptance. CPAP by means of an oral interface was completely accepted after three hypnosis sessions and resulted in the correction of his obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome. This report highlights the benefit of medical hypnosis in facilitating CPAP acceptance as well as the efficacy of mouthpiece ventilation in a severe form of cherubism with complete nasal obstruction.

  4. Impact of obstructive sleep apnoea on insulin resistance in nonobese and obese children.

    PubMed

    Koren, Dorit; Gozal, David; Philby, Mona F; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been inconsistently associated with insulin resistance and adverse metabolic states. We aimed to assess independent contributions of OSA to insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia in a large paediatric cohort.Habitually snoring children underwent overnight polysomnography, anthropometric measurements and fasting laboratory evaluations. Primary outcome measures included insulin, glucose, homeostasis model of insulin resistance, lipoproteins and sleep disturbance measures.Among 459 children aged 5-12 years, obesity was the primary driver of most associations between OSA and metabolic measures, but sleep duration was inversely associated with glucose levels, with N3 and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep being negatively associated and sleep fragmentation positively associated with insulin resistance measures. In children with mild OSA, the presence of obesity increased the odds for insulin resistance, while higher apnoea/hypopnoea index values emerged among obese children who were more insulin-resistant.The exclusive presence of interactions between OSA and obesity in the degree of insulin resistance is coupled with synergistic contributions by sleep fragmentation to insulin resistance in the context of obesity. Insufficient N3 or REM sleep may also contribute to higher glycaemia independently of obesity. Studies are needed to better delineate the roles of puberty and sleep fragmentation in insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Cardiac arrhythmias in obstructive sleep apnea (from the Akershus Sleep Apnea Project).

    PubMed

    Namtvedt, Silje K; Randby, Anna; Einvik, Gunnar; Hrubos-Strøm, Harald; Somers, Virend K; Røsjø, Helge; Omland, Torbjørn

    2011-10-15

    Increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias has been reported in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but this may not be generalizable to patients from the general population with a milder form of the condition. The aim of this study was to assess the association between cardiac arrhythmias and OSA of mainly mild and moderate severity. In total, 486 subjects (mean age 49 years, 55% men) recruited from a population-based study in Norway underwent polysomnography for OSA assessment and Holter recordings for arrhythmia assessment. Of these, 271 patients were diagnosed with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥5, median AHI 16.8, quartiles 1 to 3 8.9 to 32.6). Mean nadir oxygen saturations were 82% and 89% in patients with and without OSA, respectively. Ventricular premature complexes (≥5/hour) were more prevalent in subjects with OSA compared to subjects without OSA (median AHI 1.4, quartiles 1 to 3 0.5 to 3.0) during the night (12.2% vs 4.7%, p = 0.005) and day (14% vs 5.1%, p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis after adjusting for relevant confounders, AHI was independently associated with an increased prevalence of ventricular premature complexes at night (odds ratio per 1-U increase of log-transformed AHI 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p = 0.008) and during the day (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.8, p = 0.035). In conclusion, the prevalence of ventricular premature complexes is increased in middle-aged patients with mainly mild or moderate OSA, suggesting an association between OSA and ventricular arrhythmias even in mild OSA.

  6. Sleep-related breathing disorders. 5. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Grunstein, R R

    1995-10-01

    CPAP should be considered the first line of treatment in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea. In our centre in Sydney this generally means patients with more than 20 apnoea/hypopnoeas per hour with repeated dips in oxyhaemoglobin saturation and usually some symptomatology. Despite this first line role of nasal CPAP, recent objective studies question whether earlier enthusiastic reports on adherence to CPAP are correct. The role of technical innovations in new CPAP machines in improving usage remains to be tested. The "drop out" rate from physician selection for a CPAP trial to highly compliant user is certainly more than 50% of patients. What happens to these patients? Data from some studies suggest that surgical treatments are used, at least in the USA, but in all probability many of these patients remain untreated. The challenge in the next decade is either to improve CPAP devices to increase usage in this group or to develop other treatment options. The role of intensive inhospital "acclimatisation" to CPAP also has yet to be objectively tested. It is unclear whether "intelligent" CPAP will make huge inroads in increasing the number of patients who accept CPAP trials, prescriptions, or compliance. It will have minimal impact on patients with mask problems or claustrophobia or those who feel that CPAP is inconvenient. There is a high likelihood that it will reduce technologist workload during CPAP titration studies. "Intelligent" CPAP may help to reduce total overnight mouth leakage and therefore reduce nasal side effects. The current expense of developing such devices will mean that they are unlikely to supersede much cheaper standard "one pressure" CPAP machines in the next few years.

  7. The effect of increased lung volume in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on upper airway obstruction during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Biselli, Paolo; Grossman, Peter R.; Kirkness, Jason P.; Patil, Susheel P.; Smith, Philip L.; Schwartz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit increases in lung volume due to expiratory airflow limitation. Increases in lung volumes may affect upper airway patency and compensatory responses to inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) during sleep. We hypothesized that COPD patients have less collapsible airways inversely proportional to their lung volumes, and that the presence of expiratory airflow limitation limits duty cycle responses to defend ventilation in the presence of IFL. We enrolled 18 COPD patients and 18 controls, matched by age, body mass index, sex, and obstructive sleep apnea disease severity. Sleep studies, including quantitative assessment of airflow at various nasal pressure levels, were conducted to determine upper airway mechanical properties [passive critical closing pressure (Pcrit)] and for quantifying respiratory timing responses to experimentally induced IFL. COPD patients had lower passive Pcrit than their matched controls (COPD: −2.8 ± 0.9 cmH2O; controls: −0.5 ± 0.5 cmH2O, P = 0.03), and there was an inverse relationship of subject's functional residual capacity and passive Pcrit (−1.7 cmH2O/l increase in functional residual capacity, r2 = 0.27, P = 0.002). In response to IFL, inspiratory duty cycle increased more (P = 0.03) in COPD patients (0.40 to 0.54) than in controls (0.41 to 0.51) and led to a marked reduction in expiratory time from 2.5 to 1.5 s (P < 0.01). COPD patients have a less collapsible airway and a greater, not reduced, compensatory timing response during upper airway obstruction. While these timing responses may reduce hypoventilation, it may also increase the risk for developing dynamic hyperinflation due to a marked reduction in expiratory time. PMID:26048975

  8. Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and the relationship between sleep disorder and pain level, quality of life, and disability

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Ebru; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Komut, Ece Akyol; Okur, Sibel Caglar; Burnaz, Ozer; Caglar, Nil Sayiner; Demiryontar, Dilay Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and to assess the relationship between sleep disorder and pain, quality of life, and disability. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-four patients were included in the study and classified as having mild, moderate, or severe obstructive sleep apnea. Chronic widespread pain, quality of life, and disability were evaluated. [Results] Forty-one patients (55.4%) had chronic widespread pain. Female patients had a higher incidence of chronic pain, and female patients with chronic pain had higher body mass indexes, pain levels, and disability scores than did male patients. Physical component scores of female patients with chronic pain were lower than those of male patients. No correlation was observed between the degree of sleep disorder and severity of pain, pain duration, disability, or quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea patients with pain. [Conclusion] This study showed a 55.4% prevalence of chronic widespread pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and a greater risk of chronic pain in female than in male patients. Female patients with obstructive sleep apnea and chronic pain have higher pain and disability levels and a lower quality of life. PMID:26504332

  9. Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Differentially Elevated in Objective Versus Habitual Subjective Reduced Sleep Duration in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    DeMartino, Theresanne; Ghoul, Rawad El; Wang, Lu; Bena, James; Hazen, Stanley L.; Tracy, Russel; Patel, Sanjay R.; Auckley, Dennis; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Data have demonstrated adverse health effects of sleep deprivation. We postulate that oxidative stress and systemic inflammation biomarkers will be elevated in relation to short-term and long-term sleep duration reduction. Methods: We analyzed data from the baseline examination of a randomized controlled trial involving participants with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Baseline polysomnography provided the total sleep time (PSG-TST, primary predictor); self-reported habitual sleep duration (SR-HSD) data was collected. Morning measures of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation included: myeloperoxidase (MPO, pmol/L), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL, U/L), F2-isoprostane (ng/mg), paraoxonase 1 (PON1, nmol·min−1·mL−1), and aryl esterase (μmol·min−1·mL−1). Linear models adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular disease (CVD), smoking, statin/anti-inflammatory medications, and apnea-hypopnea index were utilized (beta estimates and 95% confidence intervals). Results: One hundred forty-seven participants comprised the final analytic sample; they were overall middle-aged (51.0 ± 11.7 y), obese (BMI = 37.3 ± 8.1 kg/m2), and 17% had CVD. Multivariable models demonstrated a significant inverse association of PSG-TST and MPO (β [95% CI] = −20.28 [−37.48, −3.08], P = 0.021), i.e., 20.3 pmol/L MPO reduction per hour increase PSG-TST. Alternatively, a significant inverse association with ox-LDL and SR-HSD was observed (β [95% CI] = 0.98 [0.96, 0.99], P = 0.027), i.e., 2% ox-LDL reduction per hour increase SR-HSD. Conclusions: Even after consideration of obesity and OSA severity, inverse significant findings were observed such that reduced PSG-TST was associated with elevated MPO levels and SR-HSD with ox-LDL, suggesting differential up-regulation of oxidative stress and pathways of inflammation in acute versus chronic sleep curtailment. Clinical Trial Registration: NIH clinical trials

  10. [Upper airway's 3D analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea using tomographic cone beam].

    PubMed

    Bruwier, A; Poirrier, A L; Limme, M; Poirrier, R

    2014-12-01

    The progress of medical imaging over the last decades has led to a better understanding of the upper airway structure in sleep-disordered patients. The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA) is attributed to a functional narrowing of the upper airway, particularly of the oropharynx, during sleep. This narrowing is multifactorial. We have shown that in 60% cases, the maxilla (nasal pyramid) seems too narrow. A mandible retroposition may also play a dominant role in 30% of the cases. Both scenarios can be combined. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a new medical imaging technique that permits to visualize the upper airway with less ionizing radiation than the conventional scanner. To date, only five authors have performed an upper airway's 3D analysis of sleep apnea patients with cone beam. A better understanding of the affected segment of the upper airway should help refine treatment options.

  11. Treatment of Insomnia, Insomnia Symptoms, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea During and After Menopause: Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Joshua Z.; Suh, Sooyeon A.; Dowdle, Claire L.; Nowakowski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Understanding sleep complaints among menopausal women is an emerging area of clinical and research interest. Several recent reviews have focused on mechanisms of menopausal insomnia and symptoms. In this review, we present a discussion on the most relevant and recent publications on the treatment of sleep disorders for menopausal women, with a focus on menopause-related insomnia, insomnia symptoms, and obstructive sleep apnea. We discuss both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments, including cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), complementary and alternative medicine, hormone replacement therapy, sedative hypnotics, antidepressants, and continuous positive airway pressure. In addition, we briefly discuss methods and considerations of assessment of sleep disorders in menopausal women. PMID:26478725

  12. Depression and sleep disturbance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Kim, InAh; Lim, Yeonjung; Jung, Hee Young; Park, Hye-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the unique contributions of sleep disturbance to depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after controlling for other contributing variables, including patient characteristics, self-efficacy, and physical activity. One hundred thirty-one outpatients diagnosed with COPD from 3 hospitals in South Korea participated in the study. Data were collected from March to June 2010 and analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression using the SPSS WIN program. The level of depression reported in this study was 13.84. Sleep disturbance, not living with a spouse, and self-efficacy were all predictors of depression and accounted for 45% of the variance. These findings show the need to screen routinely for sleep disturbance in patients with COPD and support potential benefits of interventions to enhance self-efficacy and quality of sleep in reducing depression in COPD patients.

  13. Using the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea to teach cardiopulmonary integration.

    PubMed

    Levitzky, Michael G

    2008-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The effects of intermittent upper airway obstruction include alveolar hypoventilation, altered arterial blood gases and acid-base status, and stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors, which leads to frequent arousals. These arousals disturb sleep architecture and cause hypersomnolence. Chronic intermittent alveolar and systemic arterial hypoxia-hypercapnia can cause pulmonary and systemic hypertension, with effects on the right and left ventricles, and even the renal system. The pathophysiology of OSA can therefore be used to review and integrate many topics in pulmonary and cardiovascular physiology in the context of problem-based learning, a guided discussion, or a formal lecture. The discussion begins with a case scenario, followed by a definition of the disorder, the common symptoms and signs of OSA, and a description of an apneic event. These are related to the physiology of the upper airway in OSA, normal alterations in the respiratory system during sleep, the effects of apnea on gas exchange and arterial blood gases, and the cardiovascular consequences of alterations in alveolar and systemic arterial PO(2) and PCO(2). The treatment of OSA, particularly how the use of continuous positive airway pressure relates to the pathophysiology of the disorder, is discussed briefly.

  14. Paediatric sleep-disordered breathing due to upper airway obstruction in the orthodontic setting: a review.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Vandana; Kennedy, Declan; Martin, James; Dreyer, Craig; Sampson, Wayne

    2013-11-01

    The essential feature of paediatric sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is increased upper airway resistance during sleep presenting clinically as snoring. Paediatric SDB is a continuum ranging from primary snoring (PS), which is not associated with gas exchange abnormalities or significant sleep fragmentation, to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) with complete upper airway obstruction, hypoxaemia, and obstructive hypoventilation. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obesity and craniofacial disharmonies are important predisposing factors in the development and progression of paediatric SDB. Clinical symptoms are significant and domains affected include behaviour, neurocognition, cardiovascular morbidity and quality of life. Overnight polysomnography is the current diagnostic gold standard method to assess SDB severity while adenotonsillectomy is the recommended first line of treatment. Other treatments for managing paediatric SDB include nasal continuous airway pressure, the administration of nasal steroids, dentofacial orthopaedic treatment and surgery. However, there are insufficient long-term efficacy data using dentofacial orthopaedics to treat paediatric SDB. Further studies are warranted to define the characteristics of patients who may benefit most from orthodontic treatment.

  15. Upper Airway Stimulation for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Dedhia, Raj C.; Strollo, Patrick J.; Soose, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent clinical problem with significant effects on both personal and public health. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has demonstrated excellent efficacy and low morbidity; long-term adherence rates approach 50%. Although traditional upper airway surgical procedures target the anatomic component of obstruction, upper airway stimulation tackles the twin goals of improving anatomic and neuromuscular pathology. After decades of trials demonstrating proof of concept of hypoglossal nerve stimulation in animal and human subjects, the results of a large multicenter, prospective trial were recently published. The trial demonstrated that hypoglossal nerve stimulation led to significant improvements in objective and subjective measurements of the severity of OSA. This novel approach is the first to combine sleep surgery techniques with a titratable medical device for the treatment of OSA. Further research is required to define optimal patient selection and device performance and to demonstrate long-term effectiveness. Citation: Dedhia RC, Strollo PJ, Soose RJ. Upper airway stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea: past, present, and future. SLEEP 2015;38(6):899– 906. PMID:25409109

  16. The predictive value of Muller maneuver in REM-dependent obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Kursat Murat; Ozcan, Muge; Ozdogan, Fatih; Hizli, Omer; Dere, Huseyin; Unal, Adnan

    2013-09-01

    To our knowledge, no studies up to date have investigated the correlation of rapid eye movement (REM) dependent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and Muller maneuver. The aim of this study is to investigate whether REM-dependent OSAS is predicted by the findings of the Muller maneuver. The study was conducted on 149 patients with witnessed apnea and daytime sleepiness. Muller maneuver was performed to all patients and the obstruction site was determined using a five-point scale. Then, polysomnography of the patient was obtained and the apnea-hypopnea indexes were determined in total sleep time, REM-dependent sleep and non-REM-dependent sleep. The correlations between the Muller maneuver findings and polysomnographic data were analyzed. The ages of the patients included in the study ranged between 25 and 73 years with a mean age of 49.3 ± 10.1 years. Their mean body mass index was 30.8 ± 5.1 kg/m(2) (range 21.9-55.4 kg/m(2)). The patients' mean apnea-hypopnea indexes in total sleep time was 28.1 and ranged between 5.4 and 124.3. REM-dependent OSAS was determined in 49 patients. When the data were analyzed, it was determined that there were no statistically significant correlations between tongue base or lateral pharyngeal band obstruction at the level of hypopharynx and the REM-dependent OSAS. At the level of the soft palate, the obstruction caused by the lateral pharyngeal bands or soft palate and REM dependency did not show any statistically significant correlation (p > 0.05). In conclusion, Muller maneuver does not provide useful data to predict REM dependency of OSAS.

  17. Molecular Signatures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: A Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Gislason, Thorarinn; Teff, Karen L.; Pack, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are largely mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. The primary molecular domains affected are sympathetic activity, oxidative stress and inflammation. Other affected domains include adipokines, adhesion molecules and molecules that respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Changes in molecular domains affected by OSA, assessed in blood and/or urine, can provide a molecular signature for OSA that could potentially be used diagnostically and to predict who is likely to develop different OSA-related comorbidities. High-throughput discovery strategies such as microarrays, assessing changes in gene expression in circulating blood cells, have the potential to find new candidates and pathways thereby expanding the molecular signatures for OSA. More research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiological significance of these molecular signatures and their relationship with OSA comorbidities. Many OSA subjects are obese, and obesity is an independent risk factor for many comorbidities associated with OSA. Moreover, obesity affects the same molecular pathways as OSA. Thus, a challenge to establishing a molecular signature for OSA is to separate the effects of OSA from obesity. We propose that the optimal strategy is to evaluate the temporal changes in relevant molecular pathways during sleep and, in particular, the alterations from before to after sleep when assessed in blood and/or urine. Such changes will be at least partly a consequence of chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation that occurs during sleep. Citation: Arnardottir ES; Mackiewicz M; Gislason T; Teff KL; Pack AI. Molecular signatures of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: A review and perspective. SLEEP 2009;32(4):447–470. PMID:19413140

  18. Facial features and hyoid bone position in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Bruno B; Itikawa, Carla E; de Almeida, Leila A; Sander, Heidi H; Aragon, Davi C; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T; Matsumoto, Mirian; Valera, Fabiana C P

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate facial features and hyoid bone position in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) by cephalometric radiography. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. Twenty-nine children in the 3-6 year age bracket were evaluated: 14 children with OSAS and 15 nasal-breathing children. All children underwent otorhinolaryngologic examination, and those with OSAS also underwent in-laboratory polysomnography for diagnostic confirmation. The children were then submitted to orthodontic evaluation and cephalometry. Lateral cephalometric radiographs from children with OSAS were compared to those of nasal-breathing children. We found no differences between the two groups regarding the linear and angular measurements of the face. However, the children with OSAS presented, already at the preschool age, with an inferiorly positioned hyoid bone, thus increasing the pharyngeal area. In children with OSAS, the hyoid bone appears to be in a significantly inferior position at an early age. Our findings provide evidence that there is a relationship between the position of the hyoid bone and OSAS in children, which could contribute to the persistence of OSAS into adulthood.

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Community-Dwelling Children: The NANOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Gonzalez-Martinez, Mónica; Jurado-Luque, María José; Corral-Peñafiel, Jaime; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity in children is assumed to serve as a major risk factor in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, the prevalence of OSAS in otherwise healthy obese children from the community is unknown. Aim: To determine the prevalence of OSAS in obese children identified and recruited from primary care centers. Methods: A cross-sectional, prospective, multicenter study. Spanish children ages 3–14 y with a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to the 95th percentile for age and sex were randomly selected, and underwent medical history, snoring, and Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) assessments, as well as physical examination, nasopharyngoscopy, and nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) recordings. Results: Two hundred forty-eight children (54.4% males) with mean age of 10.8 ± 2.6 y were studied with a BMI of 28.0 ± 4.7 kg/m2 corresponding to 96.8 ± 0.6 percentile when adjusted for age and sex. The mean respiratory disturbance index (RDI), obstructive RDI (ORDI), and obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) were 5.58 ± 9.90, 5.06 ± 9.57, and 3.39 ± 8.78/h total sleep time (TST), respectively. Using ≥ 3/h TST as the cutoff for the presence of OSAS, the prevalence of OSAS ranged from 21.5% to 39.5% depending on whether OAHI, ORDI, or RDI were used. Conclusions: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in obese children from the general population is high. Obese children should be screened for the presence of OSAS. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01322763. Citation: Alonso-Álvarez ML, Cordero-Guevara JA, Terán-Santos J, Gonzalez-Martinez M, Jurado-Luque MJ, Corral-Peñafiel J, Duran-Cantolla J, Kheirandish-Gozal L, Gozal D, for the Spanish Sleep Network. Obstructive sleep apnea in obese community-dwelling children: the NANOS study. SLEEP 2014;37(5):943-949. PMID:24790273

  20. Diagnostic Value of Screening Instruments for Identifying Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, David D. M.; Ahmed, Sofia B.; Loewen, Andrea H. S.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Sola, Darlene Y.; Beecroft, Jaime M.; Turin, Tanvir C.; Hanly, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that can have significant clinical implications. An accurate clinical screening tool for OSA that identifies patients for further diagnostic testing would assist in the identification of this comorbidity. The Berlin Questionnaire (BQ), Adjusted Neck Circumference (ANC), and STOP-BANG questionnaire are 3 such instruments that have been validated in patients with normal kidney function. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the validity of these screening instruments in patients with CKD and ESRD, using overnight cardiopulmonary monitoring to diagnose OSA. Methods: One hundred seventy-two patients were recruited from nephrology clinics and hemodialysis units (CKD: n = 109; ESRD: n = 63). All patients completed the BQ, ANC, STOP-BANG, and overnight cardiopulmonary monitoring to diagnose OSA (respiratory disturbance index [RDI] ≥ 15). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were calculated for the BQ, ANC, and STOP-BANG. Results: Obstructive sleep apnea was present in 41 CKD patients (38%) and 32 ESRD patients (51%). All screening instruments had satisfactory sensitivity (56% to 94%) but poor specificity (29% to 77%) and low accuracy (51% to 69%) in both CKD and ESRD patients with RDI ≥ 15. Using an RDI ≥ 30 yielded similar results. Conclusions: Current screening questionnaires do not accurately identify patients at high risk for OSA or rule out the presence of OSA in patients with CKD and ESRD. Consequently, objective monitoring during sleep is required to reliably identify sleep apnea in these patient populations. Citation: Nicholl DDM; Ahmed SB; Loewen AHS; Hemmelgarn BR; Sola DY; Beecroft JM; Turin TC; Hanly PJ. Diagnostic value of screening instruments for identifying obstructive sleep apnea in kidney failure. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(1):31-38. PMID:23319902

  1. Cortical Drive to Breathe during Wakefulness in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Launois, Claire; Attali, Valérie; Georges, Marjolaine; Raux, Mathieu; Morawiec, Elise; Rivals, Isabelle; Arnulf, Isabelle; Similowski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) involves recurrent sleep-related upper airways (UA) collapse. UA mechanical properties and neural control are altered, imposing a mechanical load on inspiration. UA collapse does not occur during wakefulness, hence arousal-dependent compensation. Experimental inspiratory loading in normal subjects elicits respiratory-related cortical activity. The objective of this study was to test whether awake OSAS patients would exhibit a similar cortical activity. Design: Descriptive physiology study. Setting: Sleep laboratory in a large university affiliated tertiary hospital. Patients: 26 patients with moderate OSAS according to polysomnography (5 < apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≤ 30, n = 14) or severe OSAS (AHI > 30, n = 12); 13 non-OSAS patients for comparison. Interventions: None. Measurements: Respiratory time-locked electroencephalographic segments ensemble averaged and analyzed for slow premotor potentials preceding inspiration (“pre-inspiratory potentials” [PIPs]). Results: PIPs were present in 1/13 controls and 11/26 patients (P = 0.0336; 4/14 “moderate” and 7/12 “severe” patients). Awake OSAS patients therefore exhibit respiratory-related cortical activity during quiet breathing significantly more frequently than non-OSAS individuals. The corresponding PIPs resemble those observed during prepared voluntary inspirations and in response to experimental inspiratory loads in normal subjects, which involve a cortical network comprising the supplementary motor area. Conclusions: A respiratory-related cortical activity could contribute to the increased neural drive to upper airway and to inspiratory muscles that has previously been described in obstructive sleep apnea, and could therefore contribute to the arousal-dependent compensation of upper airway abnormalities. Whether or not such cortical compensatory mechanisms have cognitive consequences remains to be determined. Citation: Launois C, Attali V

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Related to Impaired Cognitive and Functional Status after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, decreased functional outcome, and recurrent stroke. Research on the effect of OSA on cognitive functioning following stroke is scarce. The primary objective of this study was to compare stroke patients with and without OSA on cognitive and functional status upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation. Design: Case-control study. Setting and Patients: 147 stroke patients admitted to a neurorehabilitation unit. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: All patients underwent sleep examination for diagnosis of OSA. We assessed cognitive status by neuropsychological examination and functional status by two neurological scales and a measure of functional independence. Results: We included 80 stroke patients with OSA and 67 stroke patients without OSA. OSA patients were older and had a higher body mass index than patients without OSA. OSA patients performed worse on tests of attention, executive functioning, visuoperception, psychomotor ability, and intelligence than those without OSA. No differences were found for vigilance, memory, and language. OSA patients had a worse neurological status, lower functional independence scores, and a longer period of hospitalization in the neurorehabilitation unit than the patients without OSA. OSA status was not associated with stroke type or classification. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a lower cognitive and functional status in patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation. This underlines the importance of OSA as a probable prognostic factor, and calls for well-designed randomized controlled trials to study its treatability. Citation: Aaronson JA, van Bennekom CA, Hofman WF, van Bezeij T, van den Aardweg JG, Groet E, Kylstra WA, Schmand B. Obstructive sleep apnea is related to impaired cognitive and functional status after stroke. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1431–1437. PMID

  3. The Development of a Screening Questionnaire for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Emma; Hill, Catherine Mary; Evans, Hazel Jean; Tuffrey, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition which affects an estimated 50% of children with Down syndrome, particularly in their early years. It can cause serious sequelae in affected children but may not be recognized by parents or health professionals. Routine screening has been recommended in some countries, but is not standard practice. There are no validated questionnaire-based tools available to screen this population of children for this particular sleep-related disorder. Using existing validated sleep questionnaire items, we have developed a questionnaire to screen children with Down syndrome up to 6 years of age for obstructive sleep apnea, which corresponds with the recommendations made in UK national guidelines. This paper describes these first steps in demonstrating content validity for a new questionnaire, which will be subject to further in-depth psychometric analysis. Relevance, clarity, and age appropriateness were rated for 33 items using a content review questionnaire by a group of 18 health professionals with expertise in respiratory pediatrics, neurodevelopmental pediatrics, and sleep physiology. The content validity index was calculated for individual items and contributed to decisions about item inclusion. Scale level content validity index for the modified questionnaire of 14 items was at an accepted level of 0.78. Two parents of children with Down syndrome took part in cognitive interviews after completing the modified questionnaire. We describe the development of this 14 item questionnaire to screen for OSA in children with DS from infancy to 6 years. PMID:26539127

  4. Screening obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome by home videotape recording in children.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Y; Kornecki, A; Schonfeld, T

    1996-10-01

    Overnight polysomnography (PSG) has been used to diagnose and assess the severity of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in children. The aim of this study was to determine whether home video-recording of children during sleep may be used for screening OSAS. In 58 children suspected of having OSAS, PSG results were compared with the corresponding analyses of 30 min video-recordings of each child sleeping at home. The video-recordings were evaluated by: 1) overall investigator's clinical judgement; and 2) a scoring system based on noisy breathing, movements, walking episodes, apnoea, chest retractions and mouth breathing. PSG results were highly correlated with the video test results, with agreement in 49 out of 58 (84%). In 36 of the 58 children, the PSG was abnormal compared with 41 out of 58 abnormal video tests. The sensitivity of the overall investigator judgement of video test was 94% (34 out of 36) and the specificity 68% (15 out of 22). Video scores > 10 were highly predictive of OSAS, whilst scores < 5 were associated with normality. Using a stepwise logistic regression analysis, each of the scoring variables was tested against the PSG results and an equation was formulated for predicting PSG by the video test. The equation predicted PSG results in 49 out of 58 (84%) cases. Thirty minutes of home video-recordings during sleep is a reliable screening method for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children. This technique may, thus, improve patient selection for polysomnography.

  5. Management of obstructive sleep apnea in a Treacher Collins syndrome patient using distraction osteogenesis of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present the surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in a child with Treacher Collins syndrome. A 10-year-old girl with a past history of Treacher Collins syndrome presented to our clinic with her parents for respiratory distress and insomnia. The patient was referred to a sleep laboratory where she was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, which was a consequence of her Treacher Collins syndrome. The patient underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis under general anesthesia. The mandible was expanded by 15 mm using internal bilateral distractors. After distraction osteogenesis, the patient’s respiratory problems resolved, and she was able to sleep comfortably. Distraction osteogenesis was an effective method of advancing the mandible, increasing the upper airway space and ultimately preventing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. PMID:28053912

  6. The efficacy of Watch PAT in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Körkuyu, Emine; Düzlü, Mehmet; Karamert, Recep; Tutar, Hakan; Yılmaz, Metin; Çiftçi, Bülent; Güven, Selma Fırat

    2015-01-01

    Polysomnography is currently considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). But high expense and the backlog of the sleep centers have resulted in a search for an alternative method of diagnosis. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and reliability of Watch PAT as an alternate option in OSAS diagnosis. The patients have worn a Watch PAT(®) 200 device in the sleep laboratory during a standard polysomnography. The correlation in REM and Non-REM AHI scores, sleep periods and the mean O2 saturation percentage between Watch PAT and PSG sleep studies were assessed. There was a statistically significant very strong correlation between PSG and Watch PAT AHI scores (Spearman's rho = 0.802 p < 0.001). The mean recording time with PSG and Watch PAT was 463.06 ± 37.08 and 469.33 ± 72.81 min, respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.068). However, there was a statistically significant difference between two methods regarding the average sleep time and REM sleep period. No statistically significant difference was revealed in the mean O2 saturation percentage (p < 0.001). Watch PAT is an efficient device and is considered to be an adjunctive diagnostic method for PSG in diagnosis of OSAS.

  7. Effects of Suvorexant, an Orexin Receptor Antagonist, on Respiration during Sleep In Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Palcza, John; Card, Deborah; Gipson, Adrianna; Rosenberg, Russell; Kryger, Meir; Lines, Christopher; Wagner, John A.; Troyer, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the respiratory effects of suvorexant, an orexin receptor antagonist for treating insomnia, in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-period (4 days per period), crossover, sleep laboratory study. Twenty-six patients aged 18–65 years with mild (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 5 and < 15) to moderate (AHI ≥ 15 and < 30) OSA were randomized to receive suvorexant 40 mg or placebo in period-1 and then crossed over to the other treatment in period-2. Breathing during sleep was measured by AHI (primary endpoint) and oxygen saturation assessed by pulse oximetry (SpO2, secondary endpoint). The study was powered to rule out a mean increase in AHI between suvorexant and placebo of 5 or greater on Day 4. Results: There was a small increase in mean AHI (2.66) in OSA patients after multiple doses of suvorexant relative to placebo, with the upper 90% CI bound slightly exceeding 5.00 (0.22, 5.09). No increase in mean AHI was observed after a single dose of suvorexant versus placebo (mean difference = −0.47 [−3.20, 2.26]), and there was no treatment effect on mean SpO2 during total sleep time after single or multiple doses (Day 1: mean difference = −0.04 [−0.49, 0.42]; Day 4: mean difference = −0.06 [−0.45, 0.33]). There was inter- and intra-individual variability in suvorexant respiratory effects. Conclusions: Suvorexant 40 mg, twice the 20 mg maximum recommended dose for treating insomnia in the USA and Japan, does not appear to have clinically important respiratory effects during sleep in patients with mild to moderate OSA as assessed by mean AHI and SpO2. Due to inter- and intra-individual variability in respiratory effects, suvorexant should be used with caution in patients with compromised respiratory function, and at the lowest effective dose. Clinical Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01300455. Citation: Sun H, Palcza J, Card D, Gipson A

  8. Emerging co-morbidities of obstructive sleep apnea: cognition, kidney disease, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gildeh, Nadia; Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes daytime fatigue and sleepiness, and has an established relationship with cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of an evidence base linking OSA with an increased risk of degenerative neurological disease and associated cognitive impairment, an accelerated rate of decline in kidney function with an increased risk of clinically significant chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with a significantly higher rate of cancer incidence and death. This review evaluates the evidence base linking OSA with these seemingly unrelated co-morbidities, and explores potential mechanistic links underpinning their development in patients with OSA, including intermittent hypoxia (IH), sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation, and immune dysregulation. PMID:27747026

  9. [Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children: beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Esteller, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in the general childhood population is 1-2% and the most common cause is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy, there are other highly prevalent causes of this syndrome in children. The causes are often multifactorial and include muscular hypotonia, dentofacial abnormalities, soft tissue hypertrophy of the airway, and neurological disorders). Collaboration between different specialties involved in the care of these children is essential, given the wide variability of conditions and how frequently different factors are involved in their genesis, as well as the different treatments to be applied. We carried out a wide literature review of other causes of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy. We organised the prevalence of this syndrome in each pathology and the reasons that cause it, as well as their interactions and management, in a consistent manner.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hill, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterised by repeated cycles of upper airway obstruction during sleep, leading to diurnal symptoms. Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to OSAHS due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. Recent large studies using subjective and objective measures estimate that OSAHS affects around 40% of adults with Down syndrome, in contrast to 2-4% of the general adult population. The "double-hit" of comorbid Down syndrome and OSAHS may accelerate cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome. However, with the appropriate care and support, OSAHS can be treated effectively in this group using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, improving daytime function and behaviour. Symptoms of OSAHS should be routinely monitored in this population, with testing and treatment available to all adults with Down syndrome; however, this is not currently commonplace, and health inequalities are evident.

  11. Morbidity of obstructive sleep apnea in children: facts and theory.

    PubMed

    Gozal, D

    2001-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a frequent, albeit underdiagnosed, problem in children. If left untreated, SDB may lead to substantial morbidities affecting multiple target organs and systems. This review provides a detailed and current description of the current status of our understanding of SDB-associated morbidity in children, and provides recommendations of future research directions necessary for increasing our knowledge and awareness on the short- and long-term consequences of SDB during childhood.

  12. High risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction1

    PubMed Central

    Andrechuk, Carla Renata Silva; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to stratify the risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated at a public, tertiary, teaching hospital of the state of São Paulo, Brazil, and to identify related sociodemographic and clinical factors. Method: cross-sectional analytical study with 113 patients (mean age 59.57 years, 70.8% male). A specific questionnaire was used for the sociodemographic and clinical characterization and the Berlin Questionnaire for the stratification of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Results: the prevalence of high risk was 60.2% and the outcome of clinical worsening during hospitalization was more frequent among these patients. The factors related to high risk were body mass index over 30 kg/m2, arterial hypertension and waist circumference indicative of cardiovascular risk, while older age (60 years and over) constituted a protective factor. Conclusion: considering the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to clinical worsening, it is suggested that nurses should monitor, in their clinical practice, people at high risk for this syndrome, guiding control measures of modifiable factors and aiming to prevent the associated complications, including worsening of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26487128

  13. Sleep · 9: An approach to treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome including upper airway surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, C

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the management of the obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Where possible, recommendations are based on a review of the relevant literature. With the exception of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, which is considered in greater detail elsewhere in the series, and certain oral appliances, the efficacy of many proposed treatments for OSAHS is not supported by data from randomised controlled clinical trials. To a considerable extent, treatment recommendations are based on data from uncontrolled studies, case series, consensus guidelines, practice parameters, and other less rigorous forms of evidence. PMID:15994269

  14. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

    PubMed

    Macey, Paul M; Woo, Mary A; Kumar, Rajesh; Cross, Rebecca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2010-04-16

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight <125 kg). We evaluated relationships between the AHI and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; ESS), sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI), and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI), as well as sex and body mass index (BMI). AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  15. Use of electronic data and existing screening tools to identify clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Carl A; Pendharkar, Sachin R; Ronksley, Paul E; Tsai, Willis H

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the ability of electronic health data and existing screening tools to identify clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), as defined by symptomatic or severe OSA. METHODS: The present retrospective cohort study of 1041 patients referred for sleep diagnostic testing was undertaken at a tertiary sleep centre in Calgary, Alberta. A diagnosis of clinically significant OSA or an alternative sleep diagnosis was assigned to each patient through blinded independent chart review by two sleep physicians. Predictive variables were identified from online questionnaire data, and diagnostic algorithms were developed. The performance of electronically derived algorithms for identifying patients with clinically significant OSA was determined. Diagnostic performance of these algorithms was compared with versions of the STOP-Bang questionnaire and adjusted neck circumference score (ANC) derived from electronic data. RESULTS: Electronic questionnaire data were highly sensitive (>95%) at identifying clinically significant OSA, but not specific. Sleep diagnostic testing-determined respiratory disturbance index was very specific (specificity ≥95%) for clinically relevant disease, but not sensitive (<35%). Derived algorithms had similar accuracy to the STOP-Bang or ANC, but required fewer questions and calculations. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that a two-step process using a small number of clinical variables (maximizing sensitivity) and objective diagnostic testing (maximizing specificity) is required to identify clinically significant OSA. When used in an online setting, simple algorithms can identify clinically relevant OSA with similar performance to existing decision rules such as the STOP-Bang or ANC. PMID:26083542

  16. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process.

    PubMed

    Maranate, Thaya; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Ruttanaumpawan, Pimon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG) queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%).

  17. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process

    PubMed Central

    Maranate, Thaya; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Ruttanaumpawan, Pimon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG) queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%). PMID:26221183

  18. [Effect of positive pressure respiration on diurnal catecholamine excretion by patients with obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Cieślicki, J; Wocial, B; Koziej, M; Pałasiewicz, G; Zieliński, J

    1996-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate effects of CPAP treatment on diurnal catecholamine excretion in urine in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). 12 males with severe OSA (mean AHI = 63) were measured in 3 separate 8 hour samples by fluorimetric method. NA levels were higher in OSA patients in all urine samples than in obese, mildly hypertensive males (control group = C). In C group patients NA levels were significantly lower at night than during the day contrary to OSA patients in whom NA levels dropped insignificantly during sleep. In OSA patients NA levels during sleep correlated with severity of apneas (r = 0.42) and night hypoxaemia (r = -0.46). CPAP treatment resulted in significant fall in NA levels during sleep (p < 0.01). A levels did not change after CPAP treatment. We conclude that abnormally high NA level during sleep in OSA patients may be related to sleep fragmentation and hypoxia. CPAP treatment restores normal circadian rhythm of NA excretion.

  19. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  20. A New Animal Model of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Responding to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Gormand, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Parrot, Sandrine; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Buda, Colette; Guidon, Gérard; Sakai, Kazuya; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: An improved animal model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is needed for the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, flexion of the neck and a supine position, two main pathogenic factors during human sleep, are associated with substantially greater OSA severity. We postulated that these two factors might generate OSA in animals. Design: We developed a restraining device for conditioning to investigate the effect of the combination of 2 body positions—prone (P) or supine (S)—and 2 head positions—with the neck flexed at right angles to the body (90°) or in extension in line with the body (180°)—during sleep in 6 cats. Polysomnography was performed twice on each cat in each of the 4 sleeping positions—P180, S180, P90, or S90. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment was then investigated in 2 cats under the most pathogenic condition. Setting: NA. Patients or Participants: NA. Interventions: NA. Measurements and Results: Positions P180 and, S90 resulted, respectively, in the lowest and highest apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (3 ± 1 vs 25 ± 2, P < 0.001), while P90 (18 ± 3, P < 0.001) and S180 (13 ± 5, P < 0.01) gave intermediate values. In position S90, an increase in slow wave sleep stage 1 (28% ± 3% vs 22% ± 3%, P < 0.05) and a decrease in REM sleep (10% ± 2% vs 18% ± 2%, P < 0.001) were also observed. CPAP resulted in a reduction in the AHI (8 ± 1 vs 27 ± 3, P < 0.01), with the added benefit of sleep consolidation. Conclusion: By mimicking human pathogenic sleep conditions, we have developed a new reversible animal model of OSA. Citation: Neuzeret PC; Gormand F; Reix P; Parrot S; Sastre JP; Buda C; Guidon G; Sakai K; Lin JS. A new animal model of obstructive sleep apnea responding to continuous positive airway pressure. SLEEP 2011;34(4):541-548. PMID:21461333

  1. Toward numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Shao-Ching; White, Susan M.; Mallya, Sanjay M.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low-pressure loads incurred during breathing. This paper describes efforts toward the development of a numerical tool for simulation of air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with sleep apnea. A procedure by which patient-specific airway geometries are segmented and processed from dental cone-beam CT scans into signed distance fields is presented. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method based on the signed distance field is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the airflow in the airway geometries. For simulation of structure mechanics with large expected displacements, a cut-cell finite element method with nonlinear Green strains is used. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled with a partitioned iterative algorithm. Preliminary results are shown for flow simulation inside the three-dimensional rigid upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Two validation cases for the fluid-structure coupling problem are also presented.

  2. Outcomes of Upper Airway Stimulation for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Multicenter German Postmarket Study.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Clemens; Maurer, Joachim T; Hofauer, Benedikt; Sommer, J Ulrich; Seitz, Annemarie; Steffen, Armin

    2017-02-01

    Objective Selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve is a new surgical therapy for obstructive sleep apnea, with proven efficacy in well-designed clinical trials. The aim of the study is to obtain additional safety and efficacy data on the use of selective upper airway stimulation during daily clinical routine. Study Design Prospective single-arm study. Setting Three tertiary hospitals in Germany (Munich, Mannheim, Lübeck). Subjects and Methods A multicenter prospective single-arm study under a common implant and follow-up protocol took place in 3 German centers (Mannheim, Munich, Lübeck). Every patient who received an implant of selective upper airway stimulation was included in this trial (apnea-hypopnea index ≥15/h and ≤65/h and body mass index <35 kg/m(2)). Before and 6 months after surgery, a 2-night home sleep test was performed. Data regarding the safety and efficacy were collected. Results From July 2014 through October 2015, 60 patients were included. Every subject reported improvement in sleep and daytime symptoms. The average usage time of the system was 42.9 ± 11.9 h/wk. The median apnea-hypopnea index was significantly reduced at 6 months from 28.6/h to 8.3/h. No patient required surgical revision of the implanted system. Conclusion Selective upper airway stimulation is a safe and effective therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnea and represents a powerful option for its surgical treatment.

  3. Induction of periodic breathing during sleep causes upper airway obstruction in humans.

    PubMed

    Onal, E; Burrows, D L; Hart, R H; Lopata, M

    1986-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that occlusive apneas result from sleep-induced periodic breathing in association with some degree of upper airway compromise, periodic breathing was induced during non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep by administering hypoxic gas mixtures with and without applied external inspiratory resistance (9 cmH2O X l-1 X s) in five normal male volunteers. In addition to standard polysomnography for sleep staging and respiratory pattern monitoring, esophageal pressure, tidal volume (VT), and airflow were measured via an esophageal catheter and pneumotachograph, respectively, with the latter attached to a tight-fitting face mask, allowing calculation of total pulmonary system resistance (Rp). During stage I/II NREM sleep minimal period breathing was evident in two of the subjects; however, in four subjects during hypoxia and/or relief from hypoxia, with and without added resistance, pronounced periodic breathing developed with waxing and waning of VT, sometimes with apneic phases. Resistive loading without hypoxia did not cause periodicity. At the nadir of periodic changes in VT, Rp was usually at its highest and there was a significant linear relationship between Rp and 1/VT, indicating the development of obstructive hypopneas. In one subject without added resistance and in the same subject and in another during resistive loading, upper airway obstruction at the nadir of the periodic fluctuations in VT was observed. We conclude that periodic breathing resulting in periodic diminution of upper airway muscle activity is associated with increased upper airway resistance that predisposes upper airways to collapse.

  4. Biomarkers to improve diagnosis and monitoring of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Archontogeorgis, Konstantinos; Nena, Evangelia; Papanas, Nikolaos; Steiropoulos, Paschalis

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway collapse associated with oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. It is proposed that these periodic changes lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing serum biomarkers. Studies have identified inflammatory, oxidative, and metabolic perturbations attributable to sleep-disordered breathing. Given that OSAS is associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity, the ideal biomarker should enable timely recognition with the possibility of intervention. There is accumulating data on the utility of serum biomarkers for the evaluation of disease severity, prognosis, and response to treatment. However, current knowledge is limited by data collection techniques, disease complexity, and potential confounding factors. The current paper reviews the literature on the use of serum biomarkers in OSAS. It is concluded that the ideal serum biomarker still needs to be discovered, while caution is needed in the interpretation of hitherto available results.

  5. Chemoreceptors, Baroreceptors, and Autonomic Deregulation in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, David; Hakim, Fahed; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent sleep disorder of breathing in both adults and children that is fraught with substantial cardiovascular morbidities, the latter being attributable to a complex interplay between intermittent hypoxia (IH), episodic hypercapnia, recurrent large intra-thoracic pressure swings, and sleep disruption. Alterations in autonomic nervous system function could underlie the perturbations in cardiovascular, neurocognitive, immune, endocrine and metabolic functions that affect many of the patients suffering from OSA. Although these issues have received substantial attention in adults, the same has thus far failed to occur in children, creating a quasi misperception that children are protected. Here, we provide a critical overview of the evidence supporting the presence of autonomic nervous system (ANS) perturbations in children with OSA, draw some parallel assessments to known mechanisms in rodents and adult humans, particularly, peripheral and central chemoreceptor and baroreceptor pathways, and suggest future research directions. PMID:22954503

  6. Is treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with auto-CPAP useful?

    PubMed

    Sériès, F

    2000-06-15

    Automatic CPAP therapy has been developed to constantly adapt the positive pressure level to the required needs. The automatic devices have been used in two different ways, one being to determine the pressure level to be prescribed at home for fixed CPAP therapy, and the other one to replace fixed CPAP as an home treatment. This last application should alleviate the need for a titration study. The benefits reported up to now in the literature vary from one machine to another, but usually these machine are effective in abolishing obstructive breathing disturbances and the consecutive sleep fragmentation. The mean positive pressure level applied during automatic CPAP treatment is usually less than the effective pressure level measured during a conventional titration sleep study. Some results suggest that automatic CPAP therapy may improve compliance to CPAP therapy. There is a need to better define if automatic CPAP therapy may benefit to specific groups of sleep apnea patients.

  7. A review of the surgical treatment options for the obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Powers, David B; Allan, Patrick F; Hayes, Curtis J; Michaelson, Peter G

    2010-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a medical condition that has received significant attention within the medical community and mainstream media due to its potentially serious physiological consequences and relatively frequent occurrence within the general population. From the military perspective, the impact on individual readiness for deployment, and the potential degradation of performance in critically important military duties, often results in tremendous expenditures of training resources, time, and expertise to replace the military member with a suitable substitute or release of the individual from active duty. This article reviews common surgical techniques for clinical management of OSAHS patients in a presentation format for primary care and sleep medicine specialists, as well as surgeons interested in the philosophies of surgical management of sleep disordered breathing. Presentation of risks and benefits of surgical treatment are discussed in a manner to facilitate communication between patient and health care provider.

  8. Changes in breathing and the pharynx after weight loss in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Suratt, P M; McTier, R F; Findley, L J; Pohl, S L; Wilhoit, S C

    1987-10-01

    The effect of weight loss following dietary restriction on disordered breathing on the pharyngeal airway is controversial in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We therefore prospectively studied eight patients before and after dietary-induced weight loss. Mean weight loss was 20.6 kg +/- 12.8 SD. After weight loss there were significant improvements in PO2 and PCO2 measured during wakefulness, and in the number of desaturation episodes per hour of sleep, average desaturation per episode, and number of movement arousals. The number of apneas and hypopneas significantly decreased in six of eight patients. There was a significant correlation between body mass index and number of disordered breathing events. Nasopharyngeal collapsibility and pulse flow resistance decreased in awake patients after weight loss. We conclude that moderate weight loss in obese patients with OSA improves oxygenation during both sleep and wakefulness, decreases the number of disordered breathing events in many patients, decreases the collapsibility of the nasopharyngeal airway.

  9. [Experiences with therapy of pediatric sleep apnea syndrome and obstructive nasopharyngeal respiratory pattern with nasal BIPAP and CPAP therapy].

    PubMed

    Zwacka, G; Scholle, S

    1995-03-01

    Sleep-apnea in childhood shows a frequency similar to adults but it is caused by many other reasons. Therapeutic effects of nasal CPAP and BIPAP can replace surgical ENT-Therapy in large extent mainly in ages at 2-5 years. But also in older children is it possible to treat obstructive sleep apnea and hypoventilation neuromuscular diseases by BIPAP. Examples for treatment of children by BIPAP who are two years old were given. Other demonstrated cases cover children with stridor congenitus, obstructive sleep apnea, hypoventilation, adenoidal breathing disturbances with primary surgical treated tonsillar hyperplasia and one case of thoracal postobstructive malformation with therapeutic BIPAP options.

  10. High Priority Future Research Needs for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kamal; Moorthy, Denish; Chan, Jeffrey A.; Concannon, Thomas W.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Chung, Mei; Balk, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify and prioritize future research needs (FRN) topics for diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-one panel members represented six stake-holder categories: patients and the public, providers; purchasers of health care, payers, policymakers, and principal investigators. Building on a recently completed comparative effectiveness review, stakeholders nominated and discussed potential FRN topics. Stakeholders then nominated their top priority FRN topics based on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Health Care Program Selection Criteria. From these nominations, the highest priority FRN topics were determined and were elaborated upon to include possible study designs to address the topics. Results: Thirty-seven topics were discussed and prioritized. The nine highest priority FRN topics included: cost-effectiveness of management strategies, defining age- and sex-specific criteria for OSA, evaluating routine preoperative screening for OSA, evaluating involvement of a sleep medicine specialist in diagnosis of OSA, evaluating clinical prediction rules, assessing the effect of treating sleep disordered breathing and long-term clinical outcomes, comparing treatments for patients who do not tolerate positive airway pressure, evaluating strategies to improve treatment compliance, and evaluating the association between sleep apnea severity and long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions: While there are numerous specific research questions with low or insufficient strength of evidence for OSA management, OSA patients, their healthcare providers, and society at large would benefit from refocusing research efforts into the prioritized research questions and away from simple comparisons of short-term outcomes between specific interventions. Citation: Patel K; Moorthy D; Chan JA; Concannon TW. High priority future research needs for obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2013

  11. Frequency of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Dental Patients with Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Martínez-Null, Cristina; Aguirre, Jose Javier; Guinea, Elena Rubio; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in dental patients with tooth wear, and to assess the role of dentists in the identification of patients at risk of OSAS. Methods: Dental patients with tooth wear and treated with occlusal splint were prospectively recruited to perform sleep study. The severity of tooth wear was established by the treating dentist before patient referral to sleep disorders unit. Sleep questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and validated respiratory polygraphy were performed. Results: All patients with dental wear were offered a sleepiness analysis. Of 31 recruited patients, 30 (77% males) participated in this study. Patients' mean age was 58.5 ± 10.7 years (range: 35–90 years) and the body mass index was 27.9 ± 3.4 kg/m2. Tooth wear was mild in 13 patients, moderate in 8 and severe in 9. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 32.4 ± 24.9. AHI < 5 was reported in 2 patients, AHI of 5–29 in 17, and AHI ≥ 30 in 11. A statistically significant association was found between AHI severity and tooth wear severity (Spearman R = 0.505; p = 0.004). Conclusions: Tooth wear could be a tool to identify those patients at risk of having OSAS. This highlights the importance of dental professionals to identify and refer patients with OSAS. Citation: Durán-Cantolla J, Alkhraisat MH, Martínez-Null C, Aguirre JJ, Guinea ER, Anitua E. Frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in dental patients with tooth wear. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):445–450. PMID:25665693

  12. A Pro-Inflammatory Role for Nuclear Factor Kappa B in Childhood Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Lee P.; Benharoch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob; Goldbart, Aviv D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with an elevation of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) that correlates with specific morbidities and subsides following intervention. In adults, OSAS is associated with activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB). We explored the mechanisms underlying NF-kB activation, based on the hypothesis that specific NF-kB signaling is activated in children with OSAS. Design: Adenoid and tonsillar tissues from children with OSAS and matched controls were immunostained against NF-kB classical (p65 and p50) and alternative (RelB and p52) pathway subunits, and NF-kB-dependent cytokines: interleukin (IL)- 1α, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-8). Serum CRP levels were measured in all subjects. NF-kB induction was evaluated by a luciferase-NF-kB reporter assay in L428 cells constitutively expressing NF-kB and in Jurkat cells with inducible NF-kB expression. p65 translocation to the nucleus, reflecting NF-kB activation, was measured in cells expressing fluorescent NF-kB-p65-GFP (green fluorescent protein). Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Patients or Participants: Twenty-five children with OSAS and 24 without OSAS. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Higher expression of IL-1α and classical NF-kB subunits p65 and p50 was observed in adenoids and tonsils of children with OSAS. Patient serum induced NF-kB activity, as measured by a luciferase-NF-kB reporter assay and by induction of p65 nuclear translocation in cells permanently transfected with GFP-p65 plasmid. IL-1β showed increased epithelial expression in OSAS tissues. Conclusions: Nuclear factor kappa B is locally and systemically activated in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. This observation may motivate the search for new anti-inflammatory strategies for controlling nuclear factor kappa B activation in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Citation: Israel LP

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Insomnia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shahbaj; Gupta, Manan; Gupta, Ravi; Dhyani, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor sleep quality, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep apnea are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical correlates of these problems are poorly understood. Aims: This study was to find out the prevalence and correlates of insomnia and subjects with ‘high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)’ in adults with chronic kidney disease. Materials and Methods: One hundred and four adults with CKD were included. Their demographic data, details regarding kidney disease and hemodialysis (HD) were recorded. Presence of insomnia and its severity was assessed. They were screened for sleep apnea using a validated questionnaire. Results: Average age was 54.17 (± 12.96) years. 89.4% had stage 5 nephropathy and 78.8% subjects were on regular HD. Males outnumbered females. Insomnia was reported by 35.5%. Among these, 50% had chronic insomnia. Insomnia subjects had higher prevalence of diabetes (P = 0.01) and depression (P < 0.001). Fifty-one percent subjects were at “high risk for sleep apnea”. They had higher prevalence of diabetes (P < 0.001), coronary disease (P = 0.02), insomnia (P = 0.008), and experienced daytime symptoms of insomnia (P < 0.001). However, in the logistic regression, only male gender (odds ratio, OR = 13.59) and daytime symptoms of insomnia (OR = 7.34) were found to be associated with “higher risk for sleep apnea”. Conclusion: Insomnia was prevalent in CKD. Nearly half of these patients are at high risk for sleep apnea and a third of them suffer from insomnia. Hence, these patients should be screened for sleep disorders. PMID:24404542

  14. Overnight Motor Skill Learning Outcomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Shane; O'Driscoll, Denise M.; Hamilton, Garun S.; Conduit, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in alleviating known impairments in the overnight consolidation of motor skill learning in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-five patients with untreated moderate-severe OSA, 13 first-night CPAP users, 17 compliant CPAP users, and 14 healthy control patients were trained on a motor sequence learning task (Sequential Finger Tapping Task, SFTT) and were subsequently tested prior to and after polysomnographic recorded sleep. Measures of subjective sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) and sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were also completed before and after sleep. Results: Typical analyses of overnight improvement on the SFTT show significantly greater overnight gains in motor task speed in controls (+11.6 ± 4.7%, p = 0.007) and compliant CPAP users (+8.9 ± 4.3%, p = 0.008) compared to patients with OSA (−4.86 ± 4.5%). Additional analyses suggest that these improvements in motor performance occurred prior to the sleep episode, as all groups significantly improved (15% to 22%) over a 10-min presleep rest period. Thereafter, performance in all groups significantly deteriorated over sleep (6% to 16%) with trends toward patients with OSA showing greater losses in performance compared to control patients and compliant CPAP users. No between-group differences in subjective sleepiness and sustained attention were found presleep and postsleep. Conclusions: The current data suggest impairments in overnight motor learning in patients with OSA may be a combination of deficient stabilization of memory over a sleep episode as well as increased vulnerability to time on task fatigue effects. Compliant CPAP usage possibly offsets both of these impediments to learning outcomes by improving both sleep quality and subsequent daytime function. Citation: Landry S, O'Driscoll DM, Hamilton GS, Conduit R. Overnight motor skill learning

  15. Clinical Usefulness of Watch-PAT for Assessing the Surgical Results of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Yoon; Hong, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jae Heon; Lee, Kyu Eun; Cho, Hyun Sang; Lim, Su Jin; Kwak, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the accuracy and clinical efficacy of a wrist-worn device that is based on peripheral arterial tonometry (watch-PAT) to evaluate the surgical results of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome subjects. Study Design and Method: Thirty-five subjects who were diagnosed with OSA and underwent sleep surgeries such as septoplasty, tonsillectomy, or uvuloplasty to correct their airway collapse, participated in this study; the watch-PAT-derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation, and valid sleep time were measured after the sleep surgery. Results: The present study showed that RDI (32.8 ± 10.7 vs 14.8 ± 7.5), AHI (30.3 ± 8.6 vs 13.4 ± 8.2 events/h), lowest oxygen saturation (78.2% ± 8.4% vs 90.5% ± 7.1%), and valid sleep time (329.1 ± 47.2 min and a postoperative value of 389.1 ± 50.1 min) recovered to within a normal range after surgery in 28 subjects. In addition, good agreement was found between watch-PAT-derived factors and visual analogue scales for changes in subjective symptoms, such as snoring, apnea, and daytime somnolence. Seven of the 35 subjects showed no improvement for their subjective symptoms and complained of snoring and apnea after surgery. We found that the RDI and AHI of those 7 subjects were not reduced, and the changes between pre- and postoperative values which were measured with watch-PAT were minimal. Their postoperative lowest oxygen saturation and valid sleep time were not elevated per the watch-PAT. The results support a strong correlation between the findings from watch-PAT and improved symptoms after surgical correction of an airway collapse. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that the factors measured by the watch-PAT might be reliable indicators of symptomatic changes in OSA subjects after sleep surgery and also shows that the watch-PAT is a highly sensitive portable device for estimating treatment results in OSA. Citation: Park CY

  16. Quality of Life and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Symptoms After Pediatric Adenotonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ron B.; Parker, Portia D.; Moore, Reneé H.; Rosen, Carol L.; Giordani, Bruno; Muzumdar, Hiren; Paruthi, Shalini; Elden, Lisa; Willging, Paul; Beebe, Dean W.; Marcus, Carole L.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Redline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Data from a randomized, controlled study of adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were used to test the hypothesis that children undergoing surgery had greater quality of life (QoL) and symptom improvement than control subjects. The objectives were to compare changes in validated QoL and symptom measurements among children randomized to undergo adenotonsillectomy or watchful waiting; to determine whether race, weight, or baseline OSAS severity influenced changes in QoL and symptoms; and to evaluate associations between changes in QoL or symptoms and OSAS severity. METHODS: Children aged 5 to 9.9 years with OSAS (N = 453) were randomly assigned to undergo adenotonsillectomy or watchful waiting with supportive care. Polysomnography, the Pediatric Quality of Life inventory, the Sleep-Related Breathing Scale of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire, the 18-item Obstructive Sleep Apnea QoL instrument, and the modified Epworth Sleepiness Scale were completed at baseline and 7 months. Changes in the QoL and symptom surveys were compared between arms. Effect modification according to race and obesity and associations between changes in polysomnographic measures and QoL or symptoms were examined. RESULTS: Greater improvements in most QoL and symptom severity measurements were observed in children randomized to undergo adenotonsillectomy, including the parent-completed Pediatric Quality of Life inventory (effect size [ES]: 0.37), the 18-item Obstructive Sleep Apnea QoL instrument (ES: –0.93), the modified Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (ES: –0.42), and the Sleep-Related Breathing Scale of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (ES: –1.35). Effect modification was not observed by obesity or baseline severity but was noted for race in some symptom measures. Improvements in OSAS severity explained only a small portion of the observed changes. CONCLUSIONS: Adenotonsillectomy compared with watchful waiting resulted in significantly

  17. Sleep • 3: Clinical presentation and diagnosis of the obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schlosshan, D; Elliott, M

    2004-01-01

    Patients with OSAHS may present to a sleep clinic or to other specialists with symptoms that are not immediately attributable to the condition. The diagnostic methods available are reviewed. PMID:15047962

  18. Numerical analysis for the efficacy of nasal surgery in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shen; Liu, Ying-Xi; Sun, Xiu-Zhen; Su, Ying-Feng; Wang, Ying; Gai, Yin-Zhe

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we reconstructed upper airway and soft palate models of 3 obstructive sleep apnea—hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients with nasal obstruction. The airflow distribution and movement of the soft palate before and after surgery were described by a numerical simulation method. The curative effect of nasal surgery was evaluated for the three patients with OSAHS. The degree of nasal obstruction in the 3 patients was improved after surgery. For 2 patients with mild OSAHS, the upper airway resistance and soft palate displacement were reduced after surgery. These changes contributed to the mitigation of respiratory airflow limitation. For the patient with severe OSAHS, the upper airway resistance and soft palate displacement increased after surgery, which aggravated the airway obstruction. The efficacy of nasal surgery for patients with OSAHS is determined by the degree of improvement in nasal obstruction and whether the effects on the pharynx are beneficial. Numerical simulation results are consistent with the polysomnogram (PSG) test results, chief complaints, and clinical findings, and can indirectly reflect the degree of nasal patency and improvement of snoring symptoms, and further, provide a theoretical basis to solve relevant clinical problems. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Randomised sham-controlled trial of transcutaneous electrical stimulation in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Pengo, Martino F; Xiao, Sichang; Ratneswaran, Culadeeban; Reed, Kate; Shah, Nimish; Chen, Tao; Douiri, Abdel; Hart, Nicholas; Luo, Yuanming; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Williams, Adrian; Polkey, Michael I; Moxham, John; Steier, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is characterised by a loss of neuromuscular tone of the upper airway dilator muscles while asleep. This study investigated the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical stimulation in patients with OSA. Patients and methods This was a randomised, sham-controlled crossover trial using transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the upper airway dilator muscles in patients with confirmed OSA. Patients were randomly assigned to one night of sham stimulation and one night of active treatment. The primary outcome was the 4% oxygen desaturation index, responders were defined as patients with a reduction >25% in the oxygen desaturation index when compared with sham stimulation and/or with an index <5/hour in the active treatment night. Results In 36 patients (age mean 50.8 (SD 11.2) years, male/female 30/6, body mass index median 29.6 (IQR 26.9–34.9) kg/m2, Epworth Sleepiness Scale 10.5 (4.6) points, oxygen desaturation index median 25.7 (16.0–49.1)/hour, apnoea-hypopnoea index median 28.1 (19.0–57.0)/hour) the primary outcome measure improved when comparing sham stimulation (median 26.9 (17.5–39.5)/hour) with active treatment (median 19.5 (11.6–40.0)/hour; p=0.026), a modest reduction of the mean by 4.1 (95% CI −0.6 to 8.9)/hour. Secondary outcome parameters of patients' perception indicated that stimulation was well tolerated. Responders (47.2%) were predominantly from the mild-to-moderate OSA category. In this subgroup, the oxygen desaturation index was reduced by 10.0 (95% CI 3.9 to 16.0)/hour (p<0.001) and the apnoea-hypopnoea index was reduced by 9.1 (95% CI 2.0 to 16.2)/hour (p=0.004). Conclusion Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the pharyngeal dilators during a single night in patients with OSA improves upper airway obstruction and is well tolerated. Trial registration number NCT01661712. PMID:27435610

  20. Utility of portable monitoring in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, U; Aneja, A; Kumar, R Mohan; Kumar, T Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, which is associated with systemic consequences such as hypertension, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and ischemic heart disease. Nocturnal laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard test for diagnosis of OSA. PSG consists of a simultaneous recording of multiple physiologic parameters related to sleep and wakefulness including electroencephalography (EEG), electrooculography (EOG), surface electromyography (EMG), airflow measurement using thermistor and nasal pressure transducer, pulse oximetry and respiratory effort (thoracic and abdominal). Multiple alternative and simpler methods that record respiratory parameters alone for diagnosing OSA have been developed in the past two decades. These devices are called portable monitors (PMs) and enable performing sleep studies at a lower cost with shorter waiting times. It has been observed and reported that comprehensive sleep evaluation coupled with the use of PMs can fulfill the unmet need for diagnostic testing in various out-of-hospital settings in patients with suspected OSA. This article reviews the available medical literature on PMs in order to justify the utility of PMs in the diagnosis of OSA, especially in resource-poor, high-disease burden settings. The published practice parameters for the use of these devices have also been reviewed with respect to their relevance in the Indian setting. PMID:26440391

  1. The effect of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on telomere length.

    PubMed

    Tempaku, Priscila Farias; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Hirotsu, Camila; Andersen, Monica Levy; Xavier, Gabriela; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizzo, Lucas Bortolotto; Brietzke, Elisa; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-10-25

    Aging is associated with an increase in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as well as the shortening of telomeres. It is known that OSAS-related factors are stimuli that can contribute to the acceleration of cellular senescence. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the leukocyte telomere length (LTL) between OSAS patients and controls, as well as to verify the correlation between LTL and sleep parameters. We used DNA extracted of 928 individuals from EPISONO to measure the LTL by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All individuals were subjected to one full-night polysomnography. LTL was significantly shorter in OSAS patients compared to controls. The results showed negative correlations between LTL and the following variables: apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, desaturation index and wake after sleep onset. LTL was positively correlated with sleep efficiency, total sleep time, basal, minimum and maximum oxygen saturation. Lastly, it was observed that OSAS severity was associated with shorter LTL even after adjusting for sex, age, years of schooling, body mass index, diabetes, stroke and heart attack. In conclusion, our study indicates the presence of an association between LTL and OSAS and a significant impact of severity of OSAS in telomeres shortening.

  2. The effect of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Tempaku, Priscila Farias; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Hirotsu, Camila; Andersen, Monica Levy; Xavier, Gabriela; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizzo, Lucas Bortolotto; Brietzke, Elisa; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increase in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as well as the shortening of telomeres. It is known that OSAS-related factors are stimuli that can contribute to the acceleration of cellular senescence. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the leukocyte telomere length (LTL) between OSAS patients and controls, as well as to verify the correlation between LTL and sleep parameters. We used DNA extracted of 928 individuals from EPISONO to measure the LTL by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All individuals were subjected to one full-night polysomnography. LTL was significantly shorter in OSAS patients compared to controls. The results showed negative correlations between LTL and the following variables: apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, desaturation index and wake after sleep onset. LTL was positively correlated with sleep efficiency, total sleep time, basal, minimum and maximum oxygen saturation. Lastly, it was observed that OSAS severity was associated with shorter LTL even after adjusting for sex, age, years of schooling, body mass index, diabetes, stroke and heart attack. In conclusion, our study indicates the presence of an association between LTL and OSAS and a significant impact of severity of OSAS in telomeres shortening. PMID:27690344

  3. Microarray studies of genomic oxidative stress and cell cycle responses in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Michal S; Singh, Prachi; Wolk, Robert; Romero-Corral, Abel; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Somers, Virend K

    2007-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the commonest form of sleep-disordered breathing, is characterized by recurrent episodes of intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. This study evaluated microarray measures of gene transcript levels in OSA subjects compared to age and BMI matched healthy controls. Measurements were obtained before and after: (a) a night of normal sleep in controls; and (b) a night of untreated apnea in OSA patients. All subjects underwent full polysomnography. mRNA from the whole blood samples was analyzed by HG-U133A and B Affymetrix GeneChip arrays using Spotfire 7.2 data analysis platform. After sleep in OSA patients, changes were noted in several genes involved in modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including heme oxygenase 1, superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, and catalase. Changes were also observed in genes involved in cell growth, proliferation, and the cell cycle such as cell division cycle 25B, signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAM), calgizzarin S100A11, B-cell translocation gene, Src-like adapter protein (SLAP), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 2. These overnight changes in OSA patients are suggestive of activation of several mechanisms to modulate, and adapt to, increased ROS developing in response to the frequent episodes of intermittent hypoxia.

  4. MRI of the pharynx in ischemic stroke patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Concannon, Maryann; Helman, Joseph I.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common after stroke and associated with poor stroke outcomes. Whether OSA after acute stroke is caused by anatomic, physiologic, or both etiologies has not been studied. We therefore used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to assess oropharyngeal anatomy in stroke patients with and without OSA. Methods Patients within 7 days of ischemic stroke underwent nocturnal polysomnography. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI performed for clinical purposes was used to measure retropalatal distance, soft palatal length, soft palatal thickness, retroglossal space, and tongue length. Nasopharyngeal area and high retropharyngeal area were measured from axial T2-weighted images, and lateral pharyngeal wall thickness from coronal T1-weighted images. Results Among 27 subjects, 18 (67%) had OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5). Demographics, vascular risk factors, and stroke severity were similar in the two groups. Median retropalatal distance was shorter in subjects with OSA (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p= 0.03). Shorter retropalatal distance was associated with higher AHI (linear regression, p=0.04). None of the other morphological characteristics differed. Conclusions Anatomic difference between awake acute stroke patients with and without OSA shows that the sleep disorder cannot be attributed solely to sleep, sleeping position, or changes in neuromuscular control that are specific to the sleep state. PMID:20466584

  5. [Physiopathology of sleep obstructive respiratory disorders. Experimental methods and practical applications].

    PubMed

    Sériès, F

    1999-02-01

    Recent progress in the physiology of the upper airways has led to significant advances in evaluating the dynamics of upper airway occlusion during sleep. Measuring the collapsibility of the upper airways and localizing the site of obstruction should theoretically lead to efficacious non-mechanical treatment and enable selection of patients susceptible of benefiting from surgical procedures. From a diagnostic point of view, fluctuations in the nasal pressure curve appear to give more precise information on ventilatory changes and their association with disrupted sleep pattern than conventional parameters such as thermistance signals or induction plethysmography. Again, from a pathophysiological point of view, little is known about the role or tissue inflammation and repeated upper airway trauma in the transition from simple snoring to sleep apnea syndrome. Current studies lead to the conclusion that the dilatroy muscles of the upper airways in the apneic subject are the target for adaptive trophic, immunohistochemical and metabolic phenomena in response to stimulation comparable to training against resistance. Although there is no evidence that sleep affects neuromuscular activity in apneic subjects, the disappearance of compensatory hyperactivity on awakening and the reduction of muscle contraction efficacy (transmission of the dilatory force to soft tissues) observed in patients may explain the greater instability of the upper airways characteristic of sleep apnea syndrome.

  6. Impact of Acetazolamide and CPAP on Cortical Activity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Katrin; Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Nussbaumer-Ochsner, Yvonne; Tarokh, Leila; Ulrich, Silvia; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E.; Achermann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives 1) To investigate the impact of acetazolamide, a drug commonly prescribed for altitude sickness, on cortical oscillations in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). 2) To examine alterations in the sleep EEG after short-term discontinuation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Design Data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized cross-over design studies were analyzed. Setting Polysomnographic recordings in sleep laboratory at 490 m and at moderate altitudes in the Swiss Alps: 1630 or 1860 m and 2590 m. Patients Study 1: 39 OSAS patients. Study 2: 41 OSAS patients. Interventions Study 1: OSAS patients withdrawn from treatment with CPAP. Study 2: OSAS patients treated with autoCPAP. Treatment with acetazolamide (500–750 mg) or placebo at moderate altitudes. Measurements and Results An evening dose of 500 mg acetazolamide reduced slow-wave activity (SWA; approximately 10%) and increased spindle activity (approximately 10%) during non-REM sleep. In addition, alpha activity during wake after lights out was increased. An evening dose of 250 mg did not affect these cortical oscillations. Discontinuation of CPAP therapy revealed a reduction in SWA (5–10%) and increase in beta activity (approximately 25%). Conclusions The higher evening dose of 500 mg acetazolamide showed the “spectral fingerprint” of Benzodiazepines, while 250 mg acetazolamide had no impact on cortical oscillations. However, both doses had beneficial effects on oxygen saturation and sleep quality. PMID:24710341

  7. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea, driving simulator performance, and risk of road traffic accidents

    PubMed Central

    Turkington, P; Sircar, M; Allgar, V; Elliott, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of road traffic accidents (RTAs). Predicting the driving ability and risk of RTAs in an individual with OSA is difficult. On-road testing is the gold standard, but this is time consuming, expensive, and potentially dangerous. Simple computer based driving simulators have been developed to help determine driving ability. Although patients with OSA have been shown to perform poorly compared with matched controls, it is not known whether these simulators can predict those at most risk of accidents. In this study we evaluated whether data derived from a simple driving simulator provided information over and above that obtained from the history and a sleep study that might be useful for advising patients about driving.
METHODS—We examined 150 patients admitted for routine sleep studies for investigation of OSA and snoring. Each patient performed a 20 minute driving simulation and completed a questionnaire regarding their driving history and experience.
RESULTS—Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate factors associated with patients' performance on the simulator. It was found that patient characteristics, older age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.09, p<0.01), female sex (OR 9.32, 95% CI 1.09 to 79.4,p<0.04), and self-reported alcohol consumption (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07, p<0.01) had the greatest influence; however, the number of self-reported near miss accidents was independently associated with a poor performance (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.00 to 6.88,p<0.05). A further logistic regression was used to investigate whether clinical history, sleep study results, and data from the driving simulator were useful in classifying patients with OSA as having had an RTA. The number of off-road events per hour on the simulator was independently associated with a history of previous RTA (OR 1.004, 95% CI 1.0004 to 1.008, p<0.03). The Epworth score was independently

  8. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and 30-day mortality among patients with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Farzin; Ahmadpoor, Amin; Amra, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the most life-threatening form of venous thrombosis which causes the majority of mortalities in this category. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been indicated as one of the risk factors for thromboembolism because of hemostatic alterations. The present study was designed to seek for the relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality of patients with PE. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted among 137 consecutive patients referred to hospital with symptoms of PE and preliminary stable hemodynamic. Confirmation of PE was made by multislice computed tomography pulmonary angiography and in the case of contraindication; V/Q lung scan and Doppler sonography were done. A STOP-Bang Questionnaire was used to determine patients with high- and low-risk of OSA. Patients were followed up for 1-month, and their survivals were recorded. Results: This study showed that there was no relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality (P = 0.389). Chronic kidney disease (P = 0.004), hypertension (P = 0.003), main thrombus (P = 0.004), and segmental thrombus (P = 0.022) were associated with 30-day mortality. In the logistic regression analysis, history of chronic kidney disease was diagnosed as a risk factor for 30-day mortality among the PE patients (P = 0.029, odds ratio = 4.93). Conclusion: Results of this study showed 30-day mortality was not affected by OSA directly. In fact, it was affected by complications of OSA such as hypertension and thrombus. Also, positive history of chronic kidney disease increased the risk of 30-day mortality. PMID:26622255

  9. Membrane Level of Omega-3 Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Associated with Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ladesich, James B.; Pottala, James V.; Romaker, Ann; Harris, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a major component of neural tissues, and supplementation with fish oils improves autonomic tone and reduces risk for CVD. A link between low DHA status and less mature sleep patterns was observed in newborns. Methods: We investigated the relations between red blood cell (RBC) levels of DHA and OSA severity in 350 sequential patients undergoing sleep studies. Severity categories were defined as none/mild, moderate, and severe, based on apnea hypopnea index (AHI) scores of 0 to 14, 15 to 34, and > 34, respectively. Results: After controlling for age, sex, race, smoking, BMI, alcohol intake, fish intake, and omega-3 supplementation, RBC DHA was inversely related with OSA severity. For each 1-SD increase in DHA levels, a patient was about 50% less likely to be classified with severe OSA. The odds ratios (95% CI) were 0.47 (0.28 to 0.80) and 0.55 (0.31 to 0.99) for being in the severe group versus the none/mild or moderate groups, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that disordered membrane fatty acid patterns may play a causal role in OSA and that the assessment of RBC DHA levels might help in the diagnosis of OSA. The effects of DHA supplementation on OSA should be explored. Citation: Ladesich JB; Pottala JV; Romaker A; Harris WS. Membrane level of omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid is associated with severity of obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(4):391-396. PMID:21897776

  10. Neurobehavioral Functioning in Adolescents With and Without Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Bradford, Ruth; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children and adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) exhibit neurobehavioral abnormalities, but few studies have evaluated the transitional stage of adolescence. Obesity is also associated with neurobehavioral abnormalities, and many patients with OSAS are obese. However, the confounding effect of obesity on neurobehavioral abnormalities in adolescents with OSAS has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that obese adolescents with OSAS would exhibit more neurobehavioral abnormalities than obese and lean adolescents without OSAS. Design: Cross-sectional, case control. Setting: Sleep Center and community. Participants: Obese adolescents with OSAS compared to (1) nonsnoring, obese controls without OSAS, and (2) nonobese, nonsnoring controls. Interventions: Neurobehavioral evaluation. Measurements and Results: Obese adolescents with OSAS had significantly worse executive function and attention compared to both obese (P < 0.001) and lean (P < 0.001) controls, and more depression (P = 0.004) and externalizing symptoms than lean controls (P = 0.008). A higher percentage of participants in the OSAS group scored in the clinically abnormal range on executive functioning, attention, sleepiness, and behavioral functioning than lean controls. Mediation analyses indicated that level of sleep apnea significantly mediated the effect of body mass on executive functioning, attention, and behavior. Conclusions: Obese adolescents with OSAS show impaired executive and behavioral function compared to obese and lean controls, and are more likely to score in the clinically abnormal range on measures of neurobehavioral functioning. These results are especially concerning given that the frontal lobe is still developing during this critical age period. We speculate that untreated OSAS during adolescence may lead to significant neurobehavioral deficits in adulthood. Citation: Xanthopoulos MS, Gallagher PR, Berkowitz RI, Radcliffe J, Bradford R, Marcus CL

  11. Clinical Effect of Surgical Correction for Nasal Pathology on the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Yoon; Hong, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jae Heon; Lee, Kyu Eun; Cho, Hyun Sang; Lim, Su Jin; Kwak, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that relief of nasal obstruction in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) would lead to reduce OSA severity and to discuss the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of nasal surgery as a treatment modality for OSA. Study Design Twenty-five subjects who had reduced patency of nasal cavity and narrowing of retroglossal or retropalatal airways were diagnosed with OSA and underwent nasal surgery, such as septoplasty or turbinoplasty to correct nasal pathologies. The effect of the surgery on nasal patency was quantified by measuring minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) using acoustic rhinometry. The watch-PAT-derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation, and valid sleep time were measured before and after nasal surgery. Results The present study shows that the AHI and RDI decreased significantly and the lowest oxygen saturation and valid sleep time rose after nasal surgery in 25 OSA subjects. In addition, a reduction in subjective symptoms was observed in subjects and mean MCA increased after nasal surgery. Fourteen subjects were classified as responders and 11 subjects as non-responders. Responders showed considerable improvement of their subjective symptoms and the AHI and RDI were significantly lower after surgery. We found that the changes between pre- and post-operative AHI and RDI values were minimal in 11 non-responders. However, daytime somnolence and REM sleep time improved after nasal surgery in non-responders. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that the surgical treatment of nasal pathology improves nasal airway patency and reduces OSA severity in 56% subjects. Furthermore, correction of nasal pathology appears to result in improved sleep quality in both responder and non-responders OSA subjects. PMID:24896824

  12. Increased phosphatidylcholine concentration in saliva reduces surface tension and improves airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Kirkness, J P; Yamamura, S; Imaizumi, K; Yoshimine, H; Oi, K; Ayuse, T

    2013-10-01

    Surface tension may have important role for maintaining upper airway patency in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. It has been demonstrated that elevated surface tension increases the pharyngeal pressures required to reopen the upper airway following collapse. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between the concentrations of endogenous surfactants in saliva with indices of upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea. We studied 20 male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (age: 60·3 ± 10·3 years; BMI: 25·9 ± 4·6 kg m(-2); AHI: 41·5 ± 18·6 events h(-1)). We obtained 100-μL samples of saliva prior to overnight polysomnographic sleep study. The surface tension was determined using the pull-off force technique. The concentration of phosphatidylcholine (PC) was evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Regression analysis between apnoea, hypopnoea and apnoea/hypopnoea indices and the ratio of hypopnoea time/total disordered breathing time (HT/DBT) with surface tension and PC were performed. P < 0·05 was considered significant. The mean saliva surface tension was 48·8 ± 8·0 mN m(-1) and PC concentration was 15·7 ± 11·1 nM. The surface tension was negatively correlated with the PC concentration (r = -0·48, P = 0·03). There was a significant positive correlation between surface tension with hypopnoea index (r = 0·50, P = 0·03) and HT/DBT (r = 0·6, P = 0·006), but not apnoea or apnoea/hypopnoea index (P > 0·11). Similarly, PC concentration negatively correlated with hypopnoea index (r = -0·45, P = 0·04) and HT/DBT (r = -0·6, P = 0·004), but not with apnoea index or AHI (P > 0·08). An increase in salivary PC concentration may increase upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea through a reduction in surface tension.

  13. Zolpidem Induced Sleep-related Eating and Complex Behaviors in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Min; Shin, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Zolpidem-induced sleep-related complex behaviors (SRCB) with anterograde amnesia have been reported. We describe herein a case in which the development of zolpidem-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) and SRCB was strongly suspected. A 71-year-old Korean male was admitted to the Department of Psychiatry due to his repetitive SRED and SRCB with anterograde amnesia, which he reported as having occurred since taking zolpidem. The patient also had restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). His baseline serum iron level was low at admission. Zolpidem discontinuation resulted in the immediate disappearance of his SRED, but did not affect his RLS symptoms. These symptoms rapidly improved after adding a single i.v. iron injection once daily, and so he was discharged to day-clinic treatment. These findings indicate that zolpidem can induce SRCB. Although the pathophysiology of zolpidem-induced SRED and other SRCB remains unclear, clinicians should carefully monitor for the potential induction of complex behaviors associated with zolpidem in patients with comorbid RLS or OSA. PMID:27489385

  14. Effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure during sleep on 24-hour blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, I; Grunstein, R R; Hedner, J A; Doyle, J; Collins, F L; Fletcher, P J; Kelly, D T; Sullivan, C E

    1993-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was measured noninvasively (Oxford Medilog ABP) at 15-minute intervals for 24 hours before and after 8 weeks of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in 19 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We included both normotensive and hypertensive patients, but hypertensives were studied after withdrawal of antihypertensive drugs. Ambulatory BP before and after treatment was compared using patients as their own controls. Treatment with nCPAP was successfully established in 14 of the 19 patients (74%). Blood pressure fell significantly in patients who were successfully treated: 24-hour mean BP (systolic/diastolic) decreased from 141 +/- 18/89 +/- 11 mm Hg to 134 +/- 19/85 +/- 13 mm Hg (p < 0.05). The reduction in 24-hour mean systolic BP occurred during both day and night, but a significant fall in mean diastolic BP was only observed during the day. The mean blood pressure fell in both normotensive and hypertensive patients. Patients who were inadequately treated with nCPAP had no reduction in mean 24-hour BP. Effective treatment of sleep apnea with nCPAP was associated with a significant fall in both systolic and diastolic BP independent of changes in body weight or alcohol consumption, suggesting that sleep apnea was an independent factor contributing to elevated nighttime and daytime BP in these patients.

  15. Characterization of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSA) population by means of cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Lacedonia, Donato; Carpagnano, Giovanna Elisiana; Sabato, Roberto; Storto, Maria Maddalena Lo; Palmiotti, Giuseppe Antonio; Capozzi, Vito; Barbaro, Maria Pia Foschino; Gallo, Crescenzio

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSA) is being identified increasingly as an important health issue. It is typified by repeated episodes of upper airway collapse during sleep leading to occasional hypoxaemia, sleep fragmentation and poor sleep quality. OSA is also being considered as an independent risk factor for hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, leading to increased multi-morbidity and mortality. Cluster analysis, a powerful statistical set of techniques, may help in investigating and classifying homogeneous groups of patients with similar OSA characteristics. This study aims to investigate the (possible) different groups of patients in an OSA population, and to analyse the relationships among the main clinical variables in each group to better understand the impact of OSA on patients. Starting from a well-characterized OSA population of 198 subjects afferent to our sleep centre, we identified three different communities of OSA patients. The first has a very severe disease [apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) = 65.91 ± 22.47] and sleep disorder has a strong impact on daily life: a low level of diurnal partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 ) (77.39 ± 11.64 mmHg) and a high prevalence of hypertension (64%); the second, with less severe disease (AHI = 28.88 ± 17.13), in which sleep disorders seem to be less important for diurnal PaO2 and have a minimum impact on comorbidity; and the last with very severe OSA (AHI = 57.26 ± 15.09) but with a low risk of nocturnal hypoxaemia (T90 = 11.58 ± 8.54) and less sleepy (Epworth Sleepiness Scale 10.00 ± 4.77).

  16. Evaluation of a Single-Channel Nasal Pressure Device to Assess Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk in Laboratory and Home Environments

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Kate E.; Rajaratnam, Shantha M.W.; Shea, Steven A.; Epstein, Lawrence J.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a portable single-channel (intra-nasal pressure) sleep apnea device (ApneaLink) in both the laboratory and at home for assessment of sleep apnea risk in comparison with standard polysomnography (PSG). Methods: Fifty-five participants underwent simultaneous recordings of standard PSG and ApneaLink in the laboratory. Of these, 38 participants also used the ApneaLink device in their own homes for one night. PSG respiratory events were scored using standard criteria. Intra-nasal pressure signals were analyzed using the ApneaLink automated computerized algorithm provided to yield estimates of airflow for detection of apneas and hypopneas. Apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI) were compared. Results: There was high sensitivity and specificity for the ApneaLink AHI when compared to simultaneous PSG at comparable AHI levels (AHI ≥ 15 events/h; sensitivity 100%, specificity 92%; positive and negative predictive values 70% and 100%, respectively). Home-measured ApneaLink AHI sensitivity and specificity were also reliable when compared with PSG (AHI ≥ 5, 81% and 77%, respectively; AHI ≥ 15, 67% and 91%), and improved slightly when two nights' data were used (AHI ≥ 5, 88% and 85%; AHI ≥ 15, 67% and 93%). Conclusions: The ApneaLink demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity in quantifying AHI when compared to PSG in a population with and without confirmed OSA. This simple, easy-to-use device may be useful in de novo large-scale occupational or underserved community OSA diagnostic programs to identify those with unambiguous disease who need immediate treatment or indicate those who may be at increased risk of OSA. Citation: Crowley KE; Rajaratnam SMW; Shea SA; Epstein LJ; Czeisler CA; Lockley SW. Evaluation of a single-channel nasal pressure device to assess obstructive sleep apnea risk in laboratory and home environments. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):109–116. PMID:23372462

  17. Use of modified barium swallow study to measure posterior airway space in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Tyler; Phillips, Jeff; Carbo, Alberto; Babcock, Kelley; Nathan, Cherie-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion Measurement of the posterior airway space (PAS) using modified barium swallow (MBS) appears to correlate well with CT imaging. This data suggests MBS may be a low-cost alternative imaging modality to assess obstructive sleep apnea patients. Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea research has focused on imaging modalities that supplement polysomnography in evaluation of potential sites of airway obstruction. While several techniques have been used to assess the PAS, many incur significant costs and risks to the patient. This study proposes use of MBS as a simple modality to measure PAS. Advantages include its simplicity, lower radiation, and dynamic tongue base visualization, which may help predict surgical outcomes. It is hypothesized that cephalometric measurements obtained using MBS will correlate well with CT. Methods Thirty-six adult patients who underwent both CT imaging and MBS for head and neck cancer were included. Cephalometric measurements of the PAS were obtained using each imaging modality. Statistical analysis focused on correlating measurements taken using CT and MBS. Results The average PAS measurements were 12.53 ± 1.81 mm and 12.80 ± 1.75 mm by MBS and CT imaging, respectively. In comparing the two modalities, Pearson correlation between CT and MBS measurements revealed significant positive correlations between r = 0.769 and 0.937.

  18. Stem/progenitor cells and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - new insights for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Micheu, Miruna Mihaela; Rosca, Ana-Maria; Deleanu, Oana-Claudia

    2016-10-26

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a widespread disorder, characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep, mostly as a result of complete or partial pharyngeal obstruction. Due to the occurrence of frequent and regular hypoxic events, patients with OSAS are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic disorders, occupational errors, motor vehicle accidents and even death. Thus, OSAS has severe consequences and represents a significant economic burden. However, some of the consequences, as well as their costs can be reduced with appropriate detection and treatment. In this context, the recent advances that were made in stem cell biology knowledge and stem cell - based technologies hold a great promise for various medical conditions, including respiratory diseases. However, the investigation of the role of stem cells in OSAS is still recent and rather limited, requiring further studies, both in animal models and humans. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding both lung resident as well as circulating stem/progenitor cells and discuss existing controversies in the field in order to identify future research directions for clinical applications in OSAS. Also, the paper highlights the requisite for inter-institutional, multi-disciplinary research collaborations in order to achieve breakthrough results in the field.

  19. Stem/progenitor cells and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - new insights for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Micheu, Miruna Mihaela; Rosca, Ana-Maria; Deleanu, Oana-Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a widespread disorder, characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep, mostly as a result of complete or partial pharyngeal obstruction. Due to the occurrence of frequent and regular hypoxic events, patients with OSAS are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic disorders, occupational errors, motor vehicle accidents and even death. Thus, OSAS has severe consequences and represents a significant economic burden. However, some of the consequences, as well as their costs can be reduced with appropriate detection and treatment. In this context, the recent advances that were made in stem cell biology knowledge and stem cell - based technologies hold a great promise for various medical conditions, including respiratory diseases. However, the investigation of the role of stem cells in OSAS is still recent and rather limited, requiring further studies, both in animal models and humans. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding both lung resident as well as circulating stem/progenitor cells and discuss existing controversies in the field in order to identify future research directions for clinical applications in OSAS. Also, the paper highlights the requisite for inter-institutional, multi-disciplinary research collaborations in order to achieve breakthrough results in the field. PMID:27822340

  20. A comparative study on oxidative stress role in nasal breathing impairment and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passali, D; Corallo, G; Petti, A; Longini, M; Passali, F M; Buonocore, G; Bellussi, L M

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep disorder that leads to metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to define the expression and clinical significance of biomarkers involved in oxidative stress in patients with OSAS. A prospective study was designed to compare outcomes of oxidative stress laboratory tests in three groups of subjects. The study involved the recruitment of three groups of subjects, 10 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome with AHI > 30; 10 patients suffering from snoring at night with AHI < 15; 10 patients with nasal respiratory impairment with AHI < 5. Patients were subjected to skin prick tests for common aero-allergens, nasal endoscopy, active anterior rhinomanometry, fibrolaryngoscopy and polysomnography; and extra-routine diagnostic tests and procedures; analysis of oxidative and antioxidant (plasma thiol groups) biomarkers in blood and urine samples. No statistical differences in age, sex distribution or body mass index were present between the three groups (p > 0.05). There were significant differences in AHI among the three groups of patients (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found in the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test (p > 0.05) between the levels of biomarkers of oxidative stress in the three populations studied. The results of our study show that the nose can play a role in the pathogenesis of OSAS through the production of biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  1. Refractory Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Patient with Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis

    PubMed Central

    Darakjian, Ara; Darakjian, Ani B.; Chang, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) can cause ossification of ligaments and may affect the spine. We report a case of obstructive sleep apnea in a patient with significant upper airway narrowing secondary to cervical DISH. This patient had an initial apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 145 events/hour and was treated with uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, genial tubercle advancement, hyoid suspension, septoplasty, inferior turbinoplasties, and radiofrequency ablations to the tongue base which reduced his AHI to 40 events/hour. He redeveloped symptoms, was started on positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, and later underwent a maxillomandibular advancement which improved his AHI to 16.3 events/hour. A few years later his AHI was 100.4 events/hour. His disease has gradually progressed over time and he was restarted on PAP therapy. Despite PAP titration, years of using PAP therapy, and being 100 percent compliant for the past three months (average daily use of 7.6 hours/night), he has an AHI of 5.1 events/hour and has persistent hypersomnia with an Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire score of 18/24. At this time he is pending further hypersomnia work-up. DISH patients require prolonged follow-up to monitor the progression of disease, and they may require unconventional measures for adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:27957370

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy: Evidence for an Association

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Erica L.; Pepin, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is the most prevalent optic nerve disorder among patients over 50 years of age, characterized by sudden onset, painless visual loss, with an accompanying relative afferent pupillary defect and optic disc edema. Although the pathophysiology of NAION has not been fully elucidated, several risk factors have been considered, including advanced age, systemic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and certain optic disc morphologies. An association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and NAION has also been recognized. One prospective cohort study indicated that the relative risk of OSA among patients with NAION was 4.9; a later retrospective cohort study demonstrated that patients with OSA not treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) had a 16% increased hazard of developing NAION compared to patients without OSA.The following review will discuss the most recent understanding of the relationship between OSA and NAION, with implications for further research and prevention strategies. Citation: Archer EL; Pepin S. Obstructive sleep apnea and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: evidence for an association. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(6):613-618. PMID:23772197

  3. Supine position related obstructive sleep apnea in adults: pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Simon A; O'Driscoll, Denise M; Berger, Philip J; Hamilton, Garun S

    2014-02-01

    The most striking feature of obstructive respiratory events is that they are at their most severe and frequent in the supine sleeping position: indeed, more than half of all obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients can be classified as supine related OSA. Existing evidence points to supine related OSA being attributable to unfavorable airway geometry, reduced lung volume, and an inability of airway dilator muscles to adequately compensate as the airway collapses. The role of arousal threshold and ventilatory control instability in the supine position has however yet to be defined. Crucially, few physiological studies have examined patients in the lateral and supine positions, so there is little information to elucidate how breathing stability is affected by sleep posture. The mechanisms of supine related OSA can be overcome by the use of continuous positive airway pressure. There are conflicting data on the utility of oral appliances, while the effectiveness of weight loss and nasal expiratory resistance remains unclear. Avoidance of the supine posture is efficacious, but long term compliance data and well powered randomized controlled trials are lacking. The treatment of supine related OSA remains largely ignored in major clinical guidelines. Supine OSA is the dominant phenotype of the OSA syndrome. This review explains why the supine position so favors upper airway collapse and presents the available data on the management of patients with supine related OSA.

  4. High Altitude, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Subjective Observations and Objective Data

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Atul; Schwartz, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ginosar, Yehuda, Atul Malhotra, and Eli Schwartz. High altitude, continuous positive airway pressure, and obstructive sleep apnea: Subjective observations and objective data. High Alt Med Biol 14:186–189, 2013.—We report observations made by one of the authors who ascended to the Thorang La pass (5416 m) in the Nepal Himalaya in October 2010, despite moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. We report the first recorded use of nasal CPAP to treat high altitude pulmonary edema (progressively severe dyspnea at rest and severe orthopnea, with tachycardia and tachypnea) that occurred at 4400 meters, when snow and darkness made safe evacuation difficult. We also present objective longitudinal data of the effects of altitude on auto-adjusting CPAP delivered via a portable nasal CPAP device, and on the apnea hypopnea index measured during sleep while using the device. OSA may be a risk factor for the development of high altitude pulmonary edema and we suggest that a nasal CPAP device located in high altitude trekking stations may provide an additional or alternative treatment option for managing high altitude pulmonary edema until evacuation is possible. PMID:23795742

  5. Comparison of primary-care practitioners and sleep specialists in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Steven M; DeMore, Jennifer; Landau, Talia; Smale, Patricia

    2004-09-01

    We wished to determine if being treated for sleep apnea by a sleep specialist increased patient awareness or long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compliance. We performed a retrospective telephone survey and laboratory chart review in patients with a diagnosis of sleep apnea evaluated either at a laboratory in which only sleep specialists can order polysomnography (University Specialty Hospital, noted as USH) or at a laboratory serving the medical community at large (Kernan Hospital, noted as K). Both laboratories are under the same medical director, use the same policies and procedures, equipment, and technician pool. One hundred three patients participated in the survey (approximately 37% of those contacted), 59 from USH and 44 from K. The groups were comparable in terms of demographics, presenting complaints, and apnea severity. In patients treated by sleep specialists, awareness of the disease process was greater and the evaluation was timelier than in patients treated by generalists. However, there was no difference between the groups' long-term self-reported CPAP acceptance or compliance. The most robust predictor of continued CPAP use was the patient's self-report of feeling better.

  6. Cerebral Blood Flow Response to Hypercapnia in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Winters, Madeline E.; McCarthy, Ann L.; Newland, John J.; Ko, Tiffany; Cornaglia, Mary Anne; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; McDonough, Joseph M.; Samuel, John; Matthews, Edward; Xiao, Rui; Yodh, Arjun G.; Marcus, Carole L.; Licht, Daniel J.; Tapia, Ignacio E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) often experience periods of hypercapnia during sleep, a potent stimulator of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Considering this hypercapnia exposure during sleep, it is possible that children with OSAS have abnormal CBF responses to hypercapnia even during wakefulness. Therefore, we hypothesized that children with OSAS have blunted CBF response to hypercapnia during wakefulness, compared to snorers and controls. Methods: CBF changes during hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) were tested in children with OSAS, snorers, and healthy controls using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). Peak CBF changes with respect to pre-hypercapnic baseline were measured for each group. The study was conducted at an academic pediatric sleep center. Results: Twelve children with OSAS (aged 10.1 ± 2.5 [mean ± standard deviation] y, obstructive apnea hypopnea index [AHI] = 9.4 [5.1–15.4] [median, interquartile range] events/hour), eight snorers (11 ± 3 y, 0.5 [0–1.3] events/hour), and 10 controls (11.4 ± 2.6 y, 0.3 [0.2–0.4] events/hour) were studied. The fractional CBF change during hypercapnia, normalized to the change in end-tidal carbon dioxide, was significantly higher in controls (9 ± 1.8 %/mmHg) compared to OSAS (7.1 ± 1.5, P = 0.023) and snorers (6.7 ± 1.9, P = 0.025). Conclusions: Children with OSAS and snorers have blunted CBF response to hypercapnia during wakefulness compared to controls. Noninvasive DCS blood flow measurements of hypercapnic reactivity offer insights into physiopathology of OSAS in children, which could lead to further understanding about the central nervous system complications of OSAS. Citation: Busch DR, Lynch JM, Winters ME, McCarthy AL, Newland JJ, Ko T, Cornaglia MA, Radcliffe J, McDonough JM, Samuel J, Matthews E, Xiao R, Yodh AG, Marcus CL, Licht DJ, Tapia IE. Cerebral blood flow response to hypercapnia in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. SLEEP 2016

  7. Predictors and prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea and snoring in 1001 middle aged men.

    PubMed

    Stradling, J R; Crosby, J H

    1991-02-01

    One thousand and one men, aged 35-65 years, were identified from the age-sex register of one group general practice. Over four years 900 men were visited at home and asked questions about symptoms potentially related to sleep apnoea and snoring. Height, weight, neck circumference, resting arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), and spirometric values were also determined. All night oximetry was then performed at home and the tracing analysed for the number of dips in SaO2 of more than 4%. Subjects with more than five dips of 4% SaO2 or more per hour were invited for sleep laboratory polysomnography. Seventeen per cent of the men admitted to snoring "often." Multiple linear regression techniques identified and ranked neck circumference (r2 = 7.2%), cigarette consumption (r2 = 3.4%), and nasal stuffiness (r2 = 2%) as the only significant independent predictors of snoring. Together these account for at least a sixfold variation in the likelihood of being an "often" snorer. Forty six subjects (5%) had greater than 4% SaO2 dip rates of over five an hour and 31 of these had full sleep studies. Three subjects had clinically obvious and severe symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea, giving a prevalence of three per 1001 men (0.3%; 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.9%). Eighteen men had obstructive sleep apnoea only when supine and in 10 the cause of the SaO2 dipping on the original home tracing was not elucidated. The greater than 4% SaO2 dip rates correlated with the history of snoring. Multiple linear regression techniques identified and ranked neck circumference (r2 = 7.9%), alcohol consumption (r2 = 3.7%), age (r2 = 1%) and obesity (r2 = 1%) as the only significant independent predictors of the rate of overnight hypoxic dipping. This study shows that snoring in this randomly selected population correlates best with neck size, smoking, and nasal stuffiness. Obstructive sleep apnoea, defined by nocturnal hypoxaemia, correlates best with neck size and alcohol, and less so with age

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder in the population—a review on the epidemiology of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) defined at an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 was a mean of 22% (range, 9-37%) in men and 17% (range, 4-50%) in women in eleven published epidemiological studies published between 1993 and 2013. OSA with excessive daytime sleepiness occurred in 6% (range, 3-18%) of men and in 4% (range, 1-17%) of women. The prevalence increased with time and OSA was reported in 37% of men and in 50% of women in studies from 2008 and 2013 respectively. OSA is more prevalent in men than in women and increases with age and obesity. Smoking and alcohol consumption are also suggested as risk factors, but the results are conflicting. Excessive daytime sleepiness is suggested as the most important symptom of OSA, but only a fraction of subjects with AHI >5 report daytime sleepiness and one study did not find any relationship between daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea in women. Stroke and hypertension and coronary artery disease are associated with sleep apnea. Cross-sectional studies indicate an association between OSA and diabetes mellitus. Patients younger than 70 years run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. It is concluded that OSA is highly prevalent in the population. It is related to age and obesity. Only a part of subjects with OSA in the population have symptoms of daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of OSA has increased in epidemiological studies over time. Differences and the increase in prevalence of sleep apnea are probably due to different diagnostic equipment, definitions, study design and characteristics of included subjects including effects of the obesity epidemic. Cardiovascular disease, especially stroke is related to OSA, and subjects under the age of 70 run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. PMID:26380759

  9. The Effect of Body Position on Physiological Factors that Contribute to Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Simon A.; Edwards, Bradley A.; Wellman, Andrew; Turton, Anthony; Skuza, Elizabeth M.; Berger, Philip J.; Hamilton, Garun S.

    2015-01-01

    Study objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) resolves in lateral sleep in 20% of patients. However, the effect of lateral positioning on factors contributing to OSA has not been studied. We aimed to measure the effect of lateral positioning on the key pathophysiological contributors to OSA including lung volume, passive airway anatomy/collapsibility, the ability of the airway to stiffen and dilate, ventilatory control instability (loop gain), and arousal threshold. Design: Non-randomized single arm observational study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients/participants: 20 (15M, 5F) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated severe OSA patients. Interventions: Supine vs. lateral position. Measurements: CPAP dial-downs performed during sleep to measure: (i) Veupnea: asleep ventilatory requirement, (ii) passive V0: ventilation off CPAP when airway dilator muscles are quiescent, (iii) Varousal: ventilation at which respiratory arousals occur, (iv) active V0: ventilation off CPAP when airway dilator muscles are activated during sleep, (v) loop gain: the ratio of the ventilatory drive response to a disturbance in ventilation, (vi) arousal threshold: level of ventilatory drive which leads to arousal, (vii) upper airway gain (UAG): ability of airway muscles to restore ventilation in response to increases in ventilatory drive, and (viii) pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit). Awake functional residual capacity (FRC) was also recorded. Results: Lateral positioning significantly increased passive V0 (0.33 ± 0.76L/min vs. 3.56 ± 2.94L/min, P < 0.001), active V0 (1.10 ± 1.97L/min vs. 4.71 ± 3.08L/min, P < 0.001), and FRC (1.31 ± 0.56 L vs. 1.42 ± 0.62 L, P = 0.046), and significantly decreased Pcrit (2.02 ± 2.55 cm H2O vs. −1.92 ± 3.87 cm H2O, P < 0.001). Loop gain, arousal threshold, Varousal, and UAG were not significantly altered. Conclusions: Lateral positioning significantly improves passive airway anatomy/collapsibility (passive V0, pharyngeal

  10. The rotational genioplasty: a modified technique for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Heggie, A A; Portnof, J E; Kumar, R

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a serious condition that can be the cause of a number of systemic symptoms and conditions. The diagnosis of OSA is made by clinical and radiological examination, with polysomnography as the gold standard for recording the severity of the disorder. Among the many therapies offered for OSA, maxillomandibular advancement is recognized as a powerful technique for relieving upper airway obstruction. The upper airway may be further opened by an advancement genioplasty, but this may compromise facial aesthetics by over-projecting the chin prominence. To overcome this difficulty, a modified genioplasty is presented. This is designed to enable a rotational repositioning that allows for advancement of the genioglossus attachments but also avoids an excessive projection of pogonion, which would otherwise result in an unfavourable profile.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: An important piece in the puzzle of cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cátia; Santos, Beatriz; Severino, Davide; Cabanelas, Nuno; Peres, Marisa; Monteiro, Isabel; Leal, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a clinical entity characterized by recurring episodes of apnea and/or hypopnea during sleep, due to a total or partial collapse, respectively, of the upper airway. This collapse originates a set of pathophysiological changes that determine the appearance of several cardiovascular complications. OSA contributes for the development of hypertension, heart failure, arrhythmias and coronary heart disease. Nowadays it is recognized to be an important public health problem, taking into account not just its repercussions but also its prevalence, since the main risk factor for the disease is obesity, a growing problem worldwide, both in developed and developing countries. The present review summarizes the current knowledge about OSA, as regards its definition, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, cardiovascular effects and treatment.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Preethi; Greenberg, Harly

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with cardiovascular and cardiometabolic risk in several large epidemiologic studies. OSA leads to several physiologic disturbances such as intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, and increase in autonomic tone. These disturbances have been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in animal and human studies. Studies also suggest a bidirectional relationship between OSA and T2DM whereby T2DM itself might contribute to the features of OSA. Moreover, successful treatment of OSA may reduce these risks, although this is controversial. The purpose of this article is to review 1) the links and bidirectional associations between OSA and T2DM; 2) the pathogenic mechanisms that might link these two disease states; 3) the role of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in improving glucose tolerance, sensitivity, and resistance; and 4) the implications for clinical practice. PMID:26491377

  13. Consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome on left ventricular geometry and diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Bodez, Diane; Damy, Thibaud; Soulat-Dufour, Laurie; Meuleman, Catherine; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a frequent sleep disorder that is known to be an independent risk factor for arterial hypertension (AHT). Potential confounding factors associated with both OSAS and AHT, such as age, diabetes mellitus and obesity, have been explored extensively, and are considered as independent but additive factors. However, these factors are also contributors to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) and LV diastolic dysfunction, both of which are important causes of cardiovascular morbidity, and have been reported to be associated with OSAS for decades. In this review, we present an overview of how OSAS may promote changes in LV geometry and diastolic dysfunction through its best-known cardiovascular complication, arterial hypertension. We also summarize the epidemiological links between OSAS and LVH, outline diastolic dysfunction in OSAS patients, and try to highlight the mechanisms responsible, focusing on the effect of confounding factors.

  14. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Leon; Goldberg, Shmuel; Shitrit, Michal; Picard, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last decade, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy has become an increasingly important and popular mode of noninvasive respiratory support. HFNC facilitates delivery of humidified and heated oxygen at a high flow rate and generates positive airway pressure. Methods: We present five cases of children with OSA without adenotonsillar hypertrophy who were treated with HFNC. Results: We demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in apnea-hypopnea index and nadir oxygen saturation in this small cohort. Conclusion: We present our successful experience of treating severe OSA with HFNC in the home setting. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether HFNC could be considered as an established alternative for CPAP in OSA in children Citation: Joseph L, Goldberg S, Shitrit M, Picard E. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for obstructive sleep apnea in children. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(9):1007–1010. PMID:26094930

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea during pregnancy. Therapy and implications for fetal health.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, M; Falcone, T; Cosio, M G; Levy, R D

    1991-08-01

    A 32 yr-old woman in her last trimester of pregnancy was found to have severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The overnight polysomnogram demonstrated an apnea plus hypopnea index of 159 events per hour. Apneas were associated with severe oxygen desaturation to 40% during rapid eye movement sleep, maternal bradycardia, and second degree heart block. External cardiotocography showed normal fetal heart rate reactivity to fetal movements, even during the apneas and episodes of oxygen desaturation. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure at a level of 15 cm H2O effectively treated the apneas and desaturation and had no effect on the fetal heart rate. The patient was induced electively during the 39th wk of pregnancy and gave birth to a newborn with growth retardation. Early recognition and treatment of OSA in pregnancy might prevent problems with fetal development.

  16. Morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnoea for major spine surgery: An anaesthetic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Redhu, Shruti; Prakash, Prabhakar Suman; Jain, Virendra; Dash, Hari Hara

    2016-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients with clinical features of obstructive sleep apnoea can present a myriad of challenges to the anaesthesiologists which must be addressed to minimise the perioperative risks. Initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy early in the pre- and post-operative period along with appropriate anaesthetic planning is of paramount importance in such patients. This case report emphasises the usefulness of CPAP therapy, even for a short duration, to minimise morbidity, improve recovery and hasten early discharge from the hospital after major surgery. PMID:27330205

  17. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with mandibular advancement appliance over prostheses: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Thais Moura; Colen, Sâmia; Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Rossi, Rowdley; Dal-Fabbro, Cibele; Ferraz, Otávio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) is recommended for mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), primary snoring and as a secondary option for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, because it has better adherence and acceptance. However, edentulous patients do not have supports to hold the MAD. This study aimed to present a possible to OSA treatment with MAD in over complete upper and partial lower dentures. The patient, a 38-year-old female with mild OSA, was treated with a MAD. The respiratory parameter, such as apnea–hypopnea index, arousal index and oxyhemoglobin saturation was improved after treatment. PMID:26483952

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: controversies in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Carol L

    2004-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common, under-recognized condition in childhood with significant morbidities if undiagnosed and untreated. The American Academy of Pediatrics recently issued a clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of childhood OSAS. It was accompanied by a comprehensive evidence-based technical report that summarized the available literature supporting the guideline. The current review highlights areas of controversy and uncertainty that limit the development of more definitive standards of practice, updates the reader to several newer publications relevant to diagnosis and treatment of childhood OSAS, and identifies future directions for clinical research.

  19. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  20. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: From pathogenesis to treatment: Current controversies and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Peter R.; Malhotra, Atul; Palmer, Lyle J.; Kezirian, Eric J.; Horner, Richard L.; Ip, Mary S.; Thurnheer, Robert; Antic, Nick A.; Hillman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disease, recognized as an independent risk factor for a range of clinical conditions, such as hypertension, stroke, depression and diabetes. Despite extensive research over the past two decades, the mechanistic links between OSA and other associated clinical conditions, including metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease, remain unclear. Indeed, the pathogenesis of OSA itself remains incompletely understood. This review provides opinions from a number of leading experts on issues related to OSA and its pathogenesis, interaction with anaesthesia, metabolic consequences and comorbidities, cardiovascular disease, genetics, measurement and diagnosis, surgical treatment and pharmacotherapeutic targets. PMID:20136736

  1. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome in adults with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Key points Adults with Down syndrome are predisposed to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. The prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome is estimated at 35–42%. This is up to ten-times higher than in the general adult population. Symptoms of OSAHS, including behavioural and emotional disturbances as well as standard symptoms such as sleepiness, should be monitored as part of regular health surveillance in adults with Down syndrome. There is evidence that the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in adults with Down syndrome and comorbid OSAHS can lead to significant improvements in subjective sleepiness, behaviour and cognitive function, though further large-scale trials are required. Educational aims To discuss the relationship between the phenotypic features of Down syndrome and the risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). To examine the prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome. To review recent research into the effectiveness of treatment of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterised by repeated cycles of upper airway obstruction during sleep, leading to diurnal symptoms. Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to OSAHS due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. Recent large studies using subjective and objective measures estimate that OSAHS affects around 40% of adults with Down syndrome, in contrast to 2–4% of the general adult population. The “double-hit” of comorbid Down syndrome and OSAHS may accelerate cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome. However, with the appropriate care and support, OSAHS can be treated effectively in this group using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, improving daytime function and behaviour

  2. Upper airway surgery of obstructive sleep apnea in pycnodysostosis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Testani, Elisa; Scarano, Emanuele; Leoni, Chiara; Dittoni, Serena; Losurdo, Anna; Colicchio, Salvatore; Gnoni, Valentina; Vollono, Catello; Zampino, Giuseppe; Paludetti, Gaetano; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    Pycnodysostosis is an autosomal recessive disorder due to a mutation in the cathepsin K gene, which causes a decrease of the bone turnover; a review of the literature suggests that pycnodysostosis is frequently associated with severe respiratory obstruction, which needs surgical treatment. The aim of this paper is to describe the surgical treatment of a 3½-year-old girl affected by Pycnodysostosis complicated by a severe sleep-related respiratory disorder. The surgical treatment, consisting of adenotonsillectomy and palatoplasty, resulted in a striking amelioration of respiratory parameters and increased posterior airway space, and allowed the patient to avoid tracheotomy while awaiting for maxillo-mandibular surgery.

  3. Role of nocturnal rostral fluid shift in the pathogenesis of obstructive and central sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura H; Bradley, T Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general population and increases the risk of motor vehicle accidents due to hypersomnolence from sleep disruption, and risk of cardiovascular diseases owing to repetitive hypoxia, sympathetic nervous system activation, and systemic inflammation. In contrast, central sleep apnoea (CSA) is rare in the general population. Although their pathogenesis is multifactorial, the prevalence of both OSA and CSA is increased in patients with fluid retaining states, especially heart failure, where they are associated with increased mortality risk. This observation suggests that fluid retention may contribute to the pathogenesis of both OSA and CSA. According to this hypothesis, during the day fluid accumulates in the intravascular and interstitial spaces of the legs due to gravity, and upon lying down at night redistributes rostrally, again owing to gravity. Some of this fluid may accumulate in the neck, increasing tissue pressure and causing the upper airway to narrow, thereby increasing its collapsibility and predisposing to OSA. In heart failure patients, with increased rostral fluid shift, fluid may additionally accumulate in the lungs, provoking hyperventilation and hypocapnia, driving below the apnoea threshold, leading to CSA. This review article will explore mechanisms by which overnight rostral fluid shift, and its prevention, can contribute to the pathogenesis and therapy of sleep apnoea. PMID:23230237

  4. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced (“bigdata”) preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow). PMID:27170854

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and snoring in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    PubMed

    Misiolek, Maciej; Namyslowski, Grzegorz; Karpe, Jacek; Ziora, Dariusz; Misiolek, Hanna; Czecior, Eugeniusz; Scierski, Wojciech

    2003-04-01

    The analysis of the correlation between bilateral vocal cord paralysis and the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and snoring is presented. The aim of the study was to establish whether the decrease of the air flow in the upper airway in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis involves OSAS and/or snoring occurrence and whether arytenoidectomy affects an improvement of breathing parameters measured during sleep. Fourteen patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis underwent Poly-MESAM examination before and 3 months after arytenoidectomy. They had never complained of snoring before. The Epworth sleepiness scale was used to quantify excessive daytime somnolence. The RDI, DI, mean saturation and percentage of snoring, loud snoring and sleep without snoring were estimated and compared pre- and postoperatively. The results were compared by the Student's t-test for dependent values. No significant differences were shown between the Epworth scores before and after the treatment. The RDI, DI and mean saturation were normal before and after the operation. The percentage of loud snoring decreased and the percentage of sleep without snoring increased significantly after arytenoidectomy in both cases. The mechanism of snoring in patients with vocal cord paralysis seems to be similar to OSAS. The difference consists in the level of flow limitation. On the basis of the results there is no reason to diagnose OSAS and UARS in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. On the other hand, the intensive snoring that occurs after paralysis was significantly reduced as a result of arytenoidectomy.

  6. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung Q; Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced ("bigdata") preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow).

  7. Role of nocturnal rostral fluid shift in the pathogenesis of obstructive and central sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    White, Laura H; Bradley, T Douglas

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general population and increases the risk of motor vehicle accidents due to hypersomnolence from sleep disruption, and risk of cardiovascular diseases owing to repetitive hypoxia, sympathetic nervous system activation, and systemic inflammation. In contrast, central sleep apnoea (CSA) is rare in the general population. Although their pathogenesis is multifactorial, the prevalence of both OSA and CSA is increased in patients with fluid retaining states, especially heart failure, where they are associated with increased mortality risk. This observation suggests that fluid retention may contribute to the pathogenesis of both OSA and CSA. According to this hypothesis, during the day fluid accumulates in the intravascular and interstitial spaces of the legs due to gravity, and upon lying down at night redistributes rostrally, again owing to gravity. Some of this fluid may accumulate in the neck, increasing tissue pressure and causing the upper airway to narrow, thereby increasing its collapsibility and predisposing to OSA. In heart failure patients, with increased rostral fluid shift, fluid may additionally accumulate in the lungs, provoking hyperventilation and hypocapnia, driving below the apnoea threshold, leading to CSA. This review article will explore mechanisms by which overnight rostral fluid shift, and its prevention, can contribute to the pathogenesis and therapy of sleep apnoea.

  8. The promise of translational and personalised approaches for paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea: an 'Omics' perspective.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui-Leng; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2014-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) can result in significant morbidities including the cardiovascular, metabolic and neurocognitive systems. These effects are purportedly mediated via activation of inflammatory cascades and the induction of oxidative stress, ultimately resulting in cellular injury and dysfunction. While great advances have been made in sleep medicine research in the past decades, there are still wide gaps in our knowledge concerning the exact underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA and consequences. Without resolving these issues, the reasons why patients with a similar severity of OSA can have markedly different clinical presentation and end-organ morbidity, that is, phenotype, will continue to remain elusive. This review aims to highlight the recent exciting discoveries in genotype-phenotype interactions, epigenetics, genomics and proteomics related to OSA. Just as PCR revolutionised the field of genetics, the potential power of 'Omics' promises to transform the field of sleep medicine, and provide critical insights into the downstream pathological cascades inherent to OSA, thereby enabling personalised diagnosis and management for this highly prevalent sleep disorder.

  9. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Fernández-Pozo, Rubén; Toledano, Doroteo T.; Alcázar-Ramírez, José D.; López-Gonzalo, Eduardo; Hernández-Gómez, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA). OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients' facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition), over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets). Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). Support vector regression (SVR) is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI. PMID:26664493

  10. Serum Angiotensin Converting Enzyme and the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, John Amit; Moller, Maria; Ebden, Philip; Bartle, Ionah; Lewis, Keir E.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: We wanted to see if the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) causes hypertension and endothelial dysfunction through activation of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Methods: A cross-sectional followed by a prospective, interventional study in a sleep disordered breathing clinic in a UK Hospital. We measured baseline serum ACE activity and ACE allele frequencies in 26 consecutive (untreated) OSAHS patients, 26 consecutive Sleepy Snorers, and 26 healthy (non-sleepy) controls. The OSAHS and Sleepy Snorers had serum ACE repeated after 6 months, with the OSAHS group receiving CPAP in the interim. Results: There was no difference in baseline mean serum ACE among OSAHS (33 IU/L), sleepy snorers (36 IU/L), and healthy controls (32 IU/L), p = 0.63. There was no difference in serum ACE activity between OSAHS and sleepy snorers after 6 months (p = 0.9) and no change in serum ACE from baseline in either group. In particular, there was no change in ACE activity in the OSAHS group on an intention to treat basis or when limiting analysis was limited to only “good” CPAP users (n = 16, p = 0.68), despite significant improvements in their Epworth scores and blood pressure and normalization of the 4% dip-rate. Conclusions: Changes in serum ACE activity do not occur in OSAHS; therefore it is unlikely to be associated with the hypertension and other cardiovascular dysfunction often reported in OSAHS. Citation: Benjamin JA; Moller M; Ebden P; Bartle I; Lewis KE. Serum angiotensin converting enzyme and the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(4):325–331. PMID:18763423

  11. The Role of Tonsillectomy in Adults with Tonsillar Hypertrophy and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew M; Peterson, Ed; Yaremchuk, Kathleen L

    2017-03-01

    Objective To determine if tonsillectomy alone is an effective treatment in improving obstructive sleep apnea in adult subjects with tonsillar hypertrophy and to evaluate the effect of tonsillectomy on patient-reported quality-of-life indices. Study Design Case series with planned data collection. Setting Academic hospital. Subjects and Methods Thirty-four subjects completed enrollment and intervention from January 2011 to January 2016. Subjects completed pre- and postoperative quality-of-life questionnaires, including the Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-10. Surgical response to treatment was defined by a >50% decrease in the Apnea-Hypopnea Index and a decrease in the overall Apnea-Hypopnea Index to <20. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank tests were used to test each variable to assess for a change from pre- to postintervention. Subjects were then split into 3 BMI subgroups, with results also evaluated by Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank tests. Results There was a significant difference discovered between the mean preoperative Apnea-Hypopnea Index of 31.57 and the mean postoperative value of 8.12 ( P < .001). All patient-reported outcomes improved significantly following tonsillectomy. After stratifying all outcome variables (Apnea-Hypopnea Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-10) by sex, race, and tonsil size, no statistically significant difference was noted among any of these subgroups. There was a 78% surgical response to treatment. Conclusion Tonsillectomy appears to be an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea in a select population of adults with tonsillar hypertrophy.

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Older Adults is a Distinctly Different Physiological Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bradley A.; Wellman, Andrew; Sands, Scott A.; Owens, Robert L.; Eckert, Danny J.; White, David P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Current evidence suggests that the pathological mechanisms underlying obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are altered with age. However, previous studies examining individual physiological traits known to contribute to OSA pathogenesis have been assessed in isolation, primarily in healthy individuals. Design: We assessed the four physiological traits responsible for OSA in a group of young and old patients with OSA. Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Ten young (20-40 y) and old (60 y and older) patients with OSA matched by body mass index and sex. Measurements and Results: Pharyngeal anatomy/collapsibility, loop gain (LG), upper airway muscle responsiveness/gain (UAG) and the respiratory arousal threshold were determined using multiple 2- to 3-min decreases or drops in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Passive pharyngeal anatomy/collapsibility was quantified as the ventilation at CPAP = 0 cmH2O immediately after the CPAP drop. LG was defined as the ratio of the ventilatory overshoot to the preceding reduction in ventilation. UAG was taken as the ratio of the increase in ventilation to the increase in ventilatory drive across the pressure drop. Arousal threshold was estimated as the ventilatory drive that caused arousal. Veupnea was quantified as the mean ventilation prior to the pressure drop. In comparison with younger patients with OSA, older patients had a more collapsible airway (ventilation at 0 cmH2O = 3.4 ± 0.9 versus 1.5 ± 0.7 L/min; P = 0.05) but lower Veupnea (8.2 ± 0.5 versus 6.1 ± 0.4 L/min; P < 0.01) and a lower LG (5.0 ± 0.7 versus 2.9 ± 0.5; P < 0.05). The remaining traits were similar between groups. Conclusions: Our data suggest that airway anatomy/collapsibility plays a relatively greater pathogenic role in older adults, whereas a sensitive ventilatory control system is a more prominent trait in younger adults with obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Edwards BA, Wellman A, Sands SA, Owens RL, Eckert DJ

  13. Orthodontics treatments for managing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nelly T; Desplats, Eve; Almeida, Fernanda R

    2016-02-01

    A small maxilla and/or mandible may predispose children to sleep-disordered breathing, which is a continuum of severity from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea. Preliminary studies have suggested that orthodontic treatments, such as orthopedic mandibular advancement or rapid maxillary expansion, may be effective treatments. The aim is to investigate the efficacy of orthopedic mandibular advancement and/or rapid maxillary expansion in the treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and Internet were searched for eligible studies published until April 2014. Articles with adequate data were selected for the meta-analysis; other articles were reported in the qualitative assessment. Data extraction was conducted by two independent authors. A total of 58 studies were identified. Only eight studies were included in the review; of these, six were included in the meta-analysis. The research yielded only a small number of studies. Consequently, any conclusions from the pooled diagnostic parameters and their interpretation should be treated carefully. Although the included studies were limited, these orthodontic treatments may be effective in managing pediatric snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Other related health outcomes, such as neurocognitive and cardiovascular functions have not yet been systematically addressed. More studies are needed with larger sample size, specific inclusion and exclusion criteria and standardized data reporting to help establish guidelines for the orthodontic treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

  14. The use of an ambulatory, automatic sleep recording device (QUISI version 1.0) in the evaluation of primary snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Y; Junge-Hülsing, B; Rettinger, G; Panis, A

    2004-02-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) evaluation with polysomnography (PSG) according to the Rechtschaffen & Kales (R&K) rules is time and cost consumptive, but ambulatory polygraphy systems do not allow EEG recording routinely. As a consequence, the number of sleep disordered events cannot be calculated exactly. QUISI is a one-channel, self-applicable ambulatory EEG recording device. The present study was designed as a prospective, non-randomized clinical trial. This investigation evaluated the results of 40 patients with primary snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea measured with level 1 PSG and QUISI simultaneously. Fifteen patients (37.5%) were primary snorers with normal sleep profiles, whereas 25 patients (62.5%) suffered from obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) with a Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) of 38.6 +/- 23.8. The mean total sleeping time (TST) was underestimated by 4.5%, while Sleep Efficiency Index (SEI) was understimated by 4.6% by the QUISI device compared with PSG. The correlation between the QUISI and the PSG estimates for single sleep stages demonstrated only moderate correlation. The statistical significance for sleep stage 2 was r = 0.42, P = 0.002; for sleep stage 3/4, r = 0.31, P = 0.02; and for WAKE, r = 0.33, P = 0.01. Sleep stage 2 as well as sleep stage 3/4 were underestimated by QUISI substantially (difference: -5.6% and -10.3%), while WAKE was overestimated by QUISI to a larger amount (difference: +10.4%). Sensitivity and specificity of QUISI to recognize pathological sleep profiles compared with PSG/R&K were 0.92 and 0.96 respectively. QUISI is able to evaluate normal versus altered sleep profiles in patients with primary snoring and OSA. Comparing the quartile ranges, we found substantial differences between QUISI and PSG/R&K. QUISI gives an impression of sleep architecture and objective verification of a sleep disturbance in an ambulant setting but cannot replace the sleep laboratory-based PSG.

  15. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Increases the Risk of Motor Vehicle Crash in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kim L.; Hillman, David R.; James, Alan; Bremner, Alexandra P.; Simpson, Laila; Cooper, Matthew N.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Fedson, Annette C.; Mukherjee, Sutapa

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: (1) To describe the incidence rate of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); and (2) to investigate MVC risk factors in OSA patients. Methods: A retrospective case-series observational study was conducted using data from the West Australian Sleep Health Study at a tertiary hospital-based sleep clinic. Participants were patients (N = 2,673) referred for assessment of suspected sleep disordered breathing. Questionnaire data were collected including age, sex, years of driving, near-misses and MVCs, sleepiness, and consumption of alcohol and caffeinated drinks. Overnight laboratory-based polysomnography was performed using standard methodology.1 Poisson univariate and negative binomial multivariable regression models were used to investigate associations between risk factors and MVC and near-miss risk in patients with untreated OSA. Results: In patients with untreated OSA, the crash rate was 0.06 MVC/person-year compared with the general community crash rate of 0.02 MVC/person-year. The rate ratio comparing very sleepy men with normal men was 4.68 (95% CI 3.07, 7.14) for near-misses and 1.27 (95% CI 1.00, 1.61) for crashes, after adjusting for confounders. In women there was a significant association with sleepiness score (p = 0.02) but no dose effect across quartiles. Conclusions: Untreated OSA is associated with an increased risk of near-misses in men and women and an increased risk of MVCs in very sleepy men. There is a strong association between excessive daytime sleepiness and increased report of near-misses. Our data support the observation that it is those patients with increased sleepiness regardless of OSA severity who are most at risk. Citation: Ward KL; Hillman DR; James A; Bremner AP; Simpson L; Cooper MN; Palmer LJ; Fedson AC; Mukherjee S. Excessive daytime sleepiness increases the risk of motor vehicle crash in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):1013-1021. PMID:24127145

  16. The correlation of anxiety and depression with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeitalab, Fariborz; Moharrari, Fatemeh; Saberi, Soheila; Asadpour, Hadi; Rezaeetalab, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep. While respiratory pauses followed by loud snoring and daytime sleepiness are the main symptoms of OSAS, the patients may complain from sleep disruption, headache, mood disturbance, irritability, and memory impairment. However, the association of sleep apnea with anxiety and depression is not completely understood. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the treatment of choice for OSAS, may be influenced by psychological conditions, especially claustrophobia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of OSAS with anxiety and depression symptoms. This study also investigated the association of anxiety with body mass index (BMI) and the severity of OSAS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 178 adult individuals diagnosed with OSAS at the sleep laboratory between September 2008 and May 2012. The participants were interviewed according to a checklist regarding both their chief complaints and other associated symptoms. The psychological status was assessed according to Beck anxiety inventory (BAI) and Beck depression inventory (BDI) scoring. The severity of breathing disorder was classified as mild, moderate, and severe based on apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) which was ascertained by overnight polysomnography. Daytime sleepiness was assessed by Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Results: The mean (SD) age of participants was 50.33 years. In terms of sex, 85.5% of the study population were males and14.4% were females. We found no relation between sex and the symptoms of OSAS. Regarding the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms, 53.9% of the individuals had some degree of anxiety, while 46.1% demonstrated depressive symptoms. In terms of OSAS severity, this study showed that OSAS severity was associated with the frequency of anxiety, chocking, and sleepiness (P : 0

  17. Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G.; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Nagappa, Mahesh; Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Patrawala, Sara; Lam, David; Kumar, Anjana; Joshi, Girish P.; Fleetham, John; Ayas, Najib; Collop, Nancy; Doufas, Anthony G.; Eikermann, Matthias; Englesakis, Marina; Gali, Bhargavi; Gay, Peter; Hernandez, Adrian V.; Kaw, Roop; Kezirian, Eric J.; Malhotra, Atul; Mokhlesi, Babak; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Stierer, Tracey; Wappler, Frank; Hillman, David R.; Auckley, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients’ conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence. PMID:27442772

  18. Upper Airway Stimulation for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Durability of the Treatment Effect at 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Strollo, Patrick J.; Gillespie, M. Boyd; Soose, Ryan J.; Maurer, Joachim T.; de Vries, Nico; Cornelius, Jason; Hanson, Ronald D.; Padhya, Tapan A.; Steward, David L.; Woodson, B. Tucker; Verbraecken, Johan; Vanderveken, Olivier M.; Goetting, Mark G.; Feldman, Neil; Chabolle, Frédéric; Badr, M. Safwan; Randerath, Winfried; Strohl, Kingman P.

    2015-01-01

    , Strohl KP, Stimulation Therapy for Apnea Reduction Trial Group. Upper airway stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea: durability of the treatment effect at 18 months. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1593–1598. PMID:26158895

  19. [Chronic snoring and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    de Carlos Villafranca, F; Cobo Plana, J; Díaz-Esnal, B; Fernández-Mondragón, P; Macías Escalada, E; Puente Rodríguez, M

    2003-09-01

    The problems children have in sleeping are manifold; the gamut of disorders that have been described ranges from simple, occasional snoring with no accompanying complications, through the syndrome of increased blockage of the upper airways to the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) where respiratory difficulties accompanied by hypoxemia, hypercapnia and structural sleep difficulties. Mouth breathing and chronic snoring occur frequently in children, with the incidence of snoring, identical for both sexes, varying between 3.2 and 27%. Difficulties in sleeping begin between the ages of the 3 and 9, peaking between 3 and 6. These results demonstrate, in a general way, the disparity between growth of the adenoids and tonsils, and upper airway growth. A differential diagnosis between the various pathological possibilities is based on the observed clinical signs and symptoms, analysis of cephalometric radiographs, polysomnography, a nocturnal cardio-respiratory polygraph and a video film taken during sleep. Snoring is the most characteristic sign of OSAHS in children. We do not yet have available any synthetic study that would sum up results of studies of sleep disorders in children. Nevertheless, we can define obstructive sleep apnea in children as the partial or total cessation of nose and mouth breathing for a period double that of the normal respiratory cycle. Classical treatment of children who suffer from severe respiratory difficulties during sleep, after identification of the etiology of the problem, consists of surgical removal of the adenoids or tonsils and, in certain, continuous positive pressure to assist breathing. The authors of this article have worked with 137 patients between the ages of 6 and 9, 77 of whom were chronic snorers with an average age of 7 years 6 months. The average age of the control group of 60 children was 7 years 2 months. We collected clinical data, medical histories, and distributed a questionnaire to determine

  20. Position paper by Canadian dental sleep medicine professionals regarding the role of different health care professionals in managing obstructive sleep apnea and snoring with oral appliances

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Luc; Almeida, Fernanda; Arcache, Patrick; Ashton-McGregor, Catherine; Côté, David; Driver, Helen; Ferguson, Kathleen; Lavigne, Gilles; Martin, Philippe; Masse, Jean-François; Morisson, Florence; Pancer, Jeffrey; Samuels, Charles; Schachter, Maurice; Sériès, Frédéric; Sullivan, Glendon

    2012-01-01

    The present Canadian position paper contains recommendations for the management by dentists of sleep-disordered breathing in adults with the use of oral appliances (OAs) as a treatment option for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The recommendations are based on literature reviews and expert panel consensus. OAs offer an effective, first-line treatment option for patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer an OA to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, or for severe OSA patients who cannot tolerate CPAP, are inappropriate candidates for CPAP or who have failed CPAP treatment attempts. The purpose of the present position paper is to guide interdisciplinary teamwork (sleep physicians and sleep dentists) and to clarify the role of each professional in the management of OA therapy. The diagnosis of OSA should always be made by a physician, and OAs should be fitted by a qualified dentist who is trained and experienced in dental sleep medicine. Follow-up assessment by the referring physician and polysomnography or sleep studies are required to verify treatment efficacy. The present article emphasizes the need for a team approach to OA therapy and provides treatment guidelines for dentists trained in dental sleep medicine. Many of the dentists and sleep physicians who contributed to the preparation of the present article are members of the Canadian Sleep Society and the authors reached a consensus based on the current literature. PMID:23061075

  1. Hyoid myotomy without suspension: a surgical approach to obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scarano, E; Della Marca, G; De Corso, E; Dittoni, S; Di Nardo, W; Meucci, D; Bastanza, G; Gallus, R; Losurdo, A; Testani, E; Paludetti, G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if hyoid myotomy without hyoid suspension is effective in surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). We recruited six patients with OSAS, aged between 34 to 60 years, with retropalatal and retrolingual upper airway obstruction, non-obese (BMI < 27) and non-compliant to continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Pre-surgical clinical and instrumental evaluations included clinical examination, cephalometry, polysomnography (PSG) and sleep endoscopy. Surgical treatment included nasal surgery, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, tonsillectomy and hyoid myotomy without hyoid suspension. Follow-up evaluations were performed with serial PSGs, performed early (one week after surgery), and at 1, 6 and 18 months after surgery. We observed that surgery was followed by immediate normalisation of breathing parameters evaluated by PSG that persisted after 18 months. Thus, hyoid myotomy without suspension combined with nasal and palatal surgery may be considered a valid treatment of non-obese OSAS patients with retrolingual and retropalatal collapse. Furthermore, we suggest that hyoid bone suspension, binding it to mandibular or to thyroid cartilage, might be unnecessary in selected cases.

  2. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using radiofrequency-assisted uvulopalatoplasty with tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dae Jun; Kang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Bo-Hyeng; Hong, Seok-Chan; Yu, Myeong Sang; Kim, Young-Hyun; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Jin, Kwang Ho

    2013-02-01

    Radiofrequency surgery was introduced to minimize thermal damage to the tissue. A radiofrequency electrode can be used to make cuts in the free edge of the soft palate like those done in laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty [radiofrequency-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (RAUP)]. Tonsillectomy can enlarge the lateral diameter of the pharynx. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of RAUP with tonsillectomy in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Ninety-two patients with obstructive sleep apnea were included in this study. Patients were categorized according to disease severity and Friedman's staging system. Patients were assessed with the preoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for snoring, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) at baseline and repeated at 6 months postoperatively. The intensity of postoperative pain, speech deficits and dysphagia were also recorded. There was a significant improvement in the VAS score for snoring, ESS and AHI before and after surgery. Overall, the results of the present study indicated a surgery success rate (a 50 % decrease in AHI and AHI <20) of 66 % (61 of 92 patients). Postoperative pain, speech deficits and dysphagia were reduced at 2 weeks after surgery. The results of this study suggest that RAUP with tonsillectomy is an effective treatment for patients with OSAS.

  3. Percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianggang; Xu, Xiaomei; Gong, Yongsheng; Fan, Xiaofang; Wang, Liangxing; Zhang, Jianhua; Zeng, Yanjun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of stimulation of the genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic electrical pulses on patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The experiment was conducted in 22 patients clinically diagnosed with OSAS. The patients were monitored with polysomnography (PSG) in the trial. When the sleep apnea was detected, the genioglossus was stimulated with percutaneous biphasic electrical pulses that were automatically regulated by a microcontroller to achieve the optimal effect. The percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation caused contraction of the genioglossus, forward movement of the tongue, and relieving of the glossopharyngeal airway obstruction. The SaO2, apnea time, hypoxemia time, and change of respiratory disturbance index (RDI) were compared in patients with treatment and without treatment. With percutaneous biphasic electrical stimulation of the genioglossus, the OSAS patients showed apnea time decreased (P < 0.01), RDI decreased (P < 0.01), and SaO2 increased (P < 0.01). No tissue injury or major discomfort was noticed during the trial. The stimulation of genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic electrical current pulse is an effective method for treating OSAS.

  4. Computational fluid dynamic study on obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treated with maxillomandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Chih; Hsiao, Hung-Da; Lee, Lung-Cheng; Yao, Chih-Min; Chen, Ning-Hung; Wang, Chau-Jan; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2009-03-01

    Maxillomandibular advancement is one of the treatments available for obstructive sleep apnea. The influence of this surgery on the upper airway and its mechanism are not fully understood. The present research simulates the flow fields of narrowed upper airways of 2 patients with obstructive sleep apnea treated with maxillomandibular advancement. The geometry of the upper airway was reconstructed from computed tomographic images taken before and after surgery. The consequent three-dimensional surface model was rendered for measurement and computational fluid dynamics simulation. Patients showed clinical improvement 6 months after surgery. The cross-sectional area of the narrowest part of the upper airway was increased in all dimensions. The simulated results showed a less constricted upper airway, with less velocity change and a decreased pressure gradient across the whole conduit during passage of air. Less breathing effort is therefore expected to achieve equivalent ventilation with the postoperative airway. This study demonstrates the possibility of computational fluid dynamics in providing information for understanding the pathogenesis of OSA and the effects of its treatment.

  5. The Prevalence of Depression among Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Using a Standardized Psychiatric Interview

    PubMed Central

    Björnsdóttir, Erla; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Pack, Allan I.; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Kuna, Samuel T.; Gíslason, Thorarinn; Keenan, Brendan T.; Maislin, Greg; Sigurdsson, Jón Fridrik

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aims of this study were: (1) to use a standardized psychiatric interview, conducted by a trained psychologist to assess the prevalence of depression among patients with untreated OSA, and (2) to identify if OSA severity or other comorbid disorders (insomnia, hypertension, and diabetes) are related to depression among patients with untreated OSA. Methods: Participants were newly diagnosed patients with OSA (n = 284) waiting to start positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used to assess depression. Results: Overall, 15.5% of the sample met the diagnosis for dysthymia. Women had a significantly higher prevalence (29.5% versus 11.7% among men, p < 0.001). The prevalence of major depression was 6% in the overall sample and there was no difference in the prevalence among sexes (5.8% among men versus 6.6 % among women). Obesity, daytime sleepiness, low physical activity, initial and late insomnia, low quality of life, and sleep medication and antidepressant use were all related to depression, whereas OSA severity, as measured by apnea-hypopnea index or oxygen desaturation index, was not. Daytime sleepiness, initial insomnia, and sleep medication use were the strongest predictors of depression in multivariable analyses. Conclusions: Sleep medication use, daytime sleepiness, and symptoms of initial insomnia were independently related to depression but OSA severity was not. Increased awareness of the relationship between depression and OSA and the appropriate use of assessment tools might substantially improve diagnostic accuracy as well as treatment outcome for both disorders. Citation: Björnsdóttir E, Benediktsdóttir B, Pack AI, Arnardottir ES, Kuna ST, Gíslason T, Keenan BT, Maislin G, Sigurdsson JF. The prevalence of depression among untreated obstructive sleep apnea patients using a standardized psychiatric interview. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):105–112. PMID:26350608

  6. Evaluation of a Decision Support System for Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Nonlinear Analysis of Respiratory Signals

    PubMed Central

    Kaimakamis, Evangelos; Tsara, Venetia; Bratsas, Charalambos; Sichletidis, Lazaros; Karvounis, Charalambos; Maglaveras, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder requiring the time/money consuming polysomnography for diagnosis. Alternative methods for initial evaluation are sought. Our aim was the prediction of Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) in patients potentially suffering from OSA based on nonlinear analysis of respiratory biosignals during sleep, a method that is related to the pathophysiology of the disorder. Materials and Methods Patients referred to a Sleep Unit (135) underwent full polysomnography. Three nonlinear indices (Largest Lyapunov Exponent, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and Approximate Entropy) extracted from two biosignals (airflow from a nasal cannula, thoracic movement) and one linear derived from Oxygen saturation provided input to a data mining application with contemporary classification algorithms for the creation of predictive models for AHI. Results A linear regression model presented a correlation coefficient of 0.77 in predicting AHI. With a cutoff value of AHI = 8, the sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 71.4% in discrimination between patients and normal subjects. The decision tree for the discrimination between patients and normal had sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 60%, respectively. Certain obtained nonlinear values correlated significantly with commonly accepted physiological parameters of people suffering from OSA. Discussion We developed a predictive model for the presence/severity of OSA using a simple linear equation and additional decision trees with nonlinear features extracted from 3 respiratory recordings. The accuracy of the methodology is high and the findings provide insight to the underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome. Conclusions Reliable predictions of OSA are possible using linear and nonlinear indices from only 3 respiratory signals during sleep. The proposed models could lead to a better study of the pathophysiology of OSA and facilitate initial evaluation/follow up of suspected patients OSA

  7. Velopharyngeal mucosal surface topography in healthy subjects and subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Christopher; Amatoury, Jason; Wang, Ziyu; Foster, Sheryl; Amis, Terence; Kairaitis, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Macroscopic pharyngeal anatomical abnormalities are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of upper airway (UA) obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Microscopic changes in the UA mucosal lining of OSA subjects are reported; however, the impact of these changes on UA mucosal surface topography is unknown. This study aimed to 1) develop methodology to measure UA mucosal surface topography, and 2) compare findings from healthy and OSA subjects. Ten healthy and eleven OSA subjects were studied. Awake, gated (end expiration), head and neck position controlled magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the velopharynx (VP) were obtained. VP mucosal surfaces were segmented from axial images, and three-dimensional VP mucosal surface models were constructed. Curvature analysis of the models was used to study the VP mucosal surface topography. Principal, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were used to define surface shape composition and surface roughness of the VP mucosal surface models. Significant differences were found in the surface shape composition, with more saddle/spherical and less flat/cylindrical shapes in OSA than healthy VP mucosal surface models (P < 0.01). OSA VP mucosal surface models were also found to have more mucosal surface roughness (P < 0.0001) than healthy VP mucosal surface models. Our novel methodology was utilized to model the VP mucosal surface of OSA and healthy subjects. OSA subjects were found to have different VP mucosal surface topography, composed of increased irregular shapes and increased roughness. We speculate increased irregularity in VP mucosal surface may increase pharyngeal collapsibility as a consequence of friction-related pressure loss.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology was used to model the upper airway mucosal surface topography from magnetic resonance images of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy adults. Curvature analysis was used to analyze the topography of the models, and a new metric was derived to describe

  8. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth > For Parents > Obstructive Sleep Apnea Print ... kids and teens can develop it, too. About Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea happens when a person stops ...

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Impairs Postexercise Sympathovagal Balance in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Felipe X.; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Maki-Nunes, Cristiane; Rondon, Maria Urbana P.B.; Alves, Maria Janieire N.N.; Braga, Ana Maria F.W.; Martinez, Daniel G.; Drager, Luciano F.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrao, Carlos E.; Trombetta, Ivani C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise (ΔHRR) is independently impaired by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Therefore, we tested the hypotheses: (1) MetS + OSA restrains ΔHRR; and (2) Sympathetic hyperactivation is involved in this impairment. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: We studied 60 outpatients in whom MetS had been newly diagnosed (ATP III), divided according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15 events/h in MetS + OSA (n = 30, 49 ± 1.7 y) and AHI < 15 events/h in MetS - OSA (n = 30, 46 ± 1.4 y). Normal age-matched healthy control subjects (C) without MetS and OSA were also enrolled (n = 16, 46 ± 1.7 y). Interventions: Polysomnography, microneurography, cardiopulmonary exercise test. Measurements and Results: We evaluated OSA (AHI - polysomnography), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA - microneurography) and cardiac autonomic activity (LF = low frequency, HF = high frequency, LF/HF = sympathovagal balance) based on spectral analysis of heart rate (HR) variability. ΔHRR was calculated (peak HR minus HR at first, second, and fourth minute of recovery) after cardiopulmonary exercise test. MetS + OSA had higher MSNA and LF, and lower HF than MetS - OSA and C. Similar impairment occurred in MetS - OSA versus C (interaction, P < 0.01). MetS + OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at first, second, and at fourth minute than did C, and attenuated ΔHRR at fourth minute than did MetS - OSA (interaction, P < 0.001). Compared with C, MetS - OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at second and fourth min (interaction, P < 0.001). Further analysis showed association of the ΔHRR (first, second, and fourth minute) and AHI, MSNA, LF and HF components (P < 0.05 for all associations). Conclusions: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is impaired to a greater degree where metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) than by MetS with no or

  10. [Obstructive sleep-apnoea syndrome in adult and its perioperative management].

    PubMed

    Payen, J-F; Jaber, S; Levy, P; Pepin, J-L; Fischler, M

    2010-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome in adult is defined as an Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index (AHI) of 5 or more per hour of sleep in a context of excessive daytime sleepiness and snoring. OSA is considered as mild with an AHI of 5-15, moderate with an AHI of 15-30, and severe with an AHI greater than 30. OSA is a highly prevalent disease since it should affect 7-15% of the middle-aged population, but most patients are not yet diagnosed for OSA. Middle age, male gender, obesity and arterial hypertension are main risk factors for OSA in adults. OSA patients are exposed to higher neurological and cardiovascular morbidity, including stroke, depression, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, arrhythmias. Because OSA may lead to life-threatening problems if undiagnosed, anaesthesiologists should be aware of their screening role in the preoperative period. In that way, the STOP-BANG questionnaire is a well-adapted instrument to screen patients for OSA during the preoperative visit. OSA patients are exposed to higher preoperative morbidity in relation with OSA severity, particularly difficult manual ventilation with mask, difficult tracheal intubation and postoperative upper airway obstruction. The unknown diagnosis of OSA is one major contributor to facilitate the occurrence of those events. In the postoperative period, early resuming continuous positive airway pressure and installing the OSA patient in a nonsupine position could be effective in preventing pharyngeal obstruction. Considering the timing of postoperative complications, a careful monitoring in the post-anesthesia care unit for three hours is an appropriate strategy for a majority of OSA patients. Alternatives to opioids should be promoted for postoperative pain control.

  11. Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Adults: A Brief Review of Existing Data for Practice in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi, Moein; Razavi, Hossein; Malekmohammad, Majid; Jamaati, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with major comorbidities. It is estimated that 5–35% of the adult population in Iran are at high risk for OSA. This review article is designed to assist sleep medicine specialists as well as general practitioners in Iran to screen for OSA. It summarizes empirical data for diagnosing OSA including history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, and diagnostic criteria with regards to existing sleep medicine centers and availability of diagnostic tests in Iran. PMID:27904537

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Hospitalized Patients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Mather, Paul J.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Kahn, Daron; Shiue, Kristin Y.; Cheema, Mohammed; Malloy, Raymond; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This condition often is underrecognized in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical pathway evaluation (CPE) among obese patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital. We also assessed oxygen desaturation index (ODI, measured by overnight pulse oximetry) as a potential low-cost screening tool for identifying OSA. Methods: This was a prospective study of 754 patients admitted to an academic medical center between February 2013 and February 2014. Consecutive obese patients (body mass index ≥ 30) admitted to the hospital (medical services) were screened and evaluated for OSA with the snoring, tiredness during daytime, observed apnea, high blood pressure (STOP) questionnaire. The admitting team was advised to perform follow-up evaluation, including polysomnography, if the test was positive. Results: A total of 636 patients were classified as high risk and 118 as low risk for OSA. Within 4 w of discharge, 149 patients underwent polysomnography, and of these, 87% (129) were shown to have OSA. An optimal screening cutoff point for OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 10/h) was determined to be ODI ≥ 10/h [Matthews correlation coefficient = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.24–0.47]. Significantly more hospitalized patients were identified and underwent polysomnography compared with the year prior to introduction of the CPE. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the CPE increased the identification of OSA in this population. Furthermore, ODI derived from overnight pulse oximetry may be a cost-effective strategy to screen for OSA in hospitalized patients. Citation: Sharma S, Mather PJ, Efird JT, Kahn D, Shiue KY, Cheema M, Malloy R, Quan SF. Obstructive sleep apnea in obese hospitalized patients: a single center experience. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):717–723. PMID:25766715

  13. Home-based Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in an Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Natasha; Rolle, Andrew J.; Lee, Todd A.; Prasad, Bharati

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with portable monitoring (PM) is increasingly utilized, but remains understudied in underserved and minority populations. We tested the feasibility of home PM in an urban population at risk for OSA compared to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) and examined patient preference with respect to home PM versus PSG. Methods: Randomized crossover study of home PM (WatchPAT200) and in-laboratory simultaneous PSG and PM in 75 urban African Americans with high pre-test probability of OSA, identified with the Berlin questionnaire. Results: Fifty-seven of 75 participants were women, average age 45 ± 11 years (mean ± SD), 35% with ≤ high school education, and 76% with annual household income < $50,000. Technical failure rates were 5.3% for home vs. 3.1% for in-laboratory PM. There was good agreement between apnea hypopnea index on PSG; AHIPSG and AHI on home PM (mean ± 2 SD of the differences = 0.64 ± 46.5 and intraclass correlation coefficient; ICC = 0.73). The areas under the curve for the receiver-operator characteristic curves for home PM were 0.90 for AHIPSG ≥ 5, 0.95 for AHIPSG ≥ 10, and 0.92 for AHIPSG ≥ 15. 62/75 (82%) participants preferred home over in-laboratory testing. Conclusions: Home PM for diagnosis of OSA in a high risk urban population is feasible, accurate, and preferred by patients. As home PM may improve access to care, the cost-effectiveness of this diagnostic strategy for OSA should be examined in underserved urban and rural populations. Clinical Trials Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01997723 Citation: Garg N, Rolle AJ, Lee TA, Prasad B. Home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in an urban population. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(8):879-885. PMID:25126034

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Obesity, and the Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Lee, Augustine S.; Bender, S. Patrick; Talmor, Daniel; Festic, Emir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of respiratory complications and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) among surgical patients. OSA is more prevalent among obese individuals; obesity can predispose to ARDS. Hypothesis: It is unclear whether OSA independently contributes towards the risk of ARDS among hospitalized patients. Methods: This is a pre-planned retrospective subgroup analysis of the prospectively identified cohort of 5,584 patients across 22 hospitals with at least one risk factor for ARDS at the time of hospitalization from a trial by the US Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group designed to validate the Lung Injury Prediction Score. A total of 252 patients (4.5%) had a diagnosis of OSA at the time of hospitalization; of those, 66% were obese. Following multivariate adjustment in the logistic regression model, there was no significant relationship between OSA and development of ARDS (OR = 0.65, 95%CI = 0.32-1.22). However, body mass index (BMI) was associated with subsequent ARDS development (OR = 1.02, 95%CI = 1.00-1.04, p = 0.03). Neither OSA nor BMI affected mechanical ventilation requirement or mortality. Conclusions: Prior diagnosis of OSA did not independently affect development of ARDS among patients with at least one predisposing condition, nor the need for mechanical ventilation or hospital mortality. Obesity appeared to independently increase the risk of ARDS. Citation: Karnatovskaia LV, Lee AS, Bender SP, Talmor D, Festic E. Obstructive sleep apnea, obesity, and the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(6):657-662. PMID:24932146

  15. Evaluation of Bone Mineral Density by Computed Tomography in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Satoshi; Ikezoe, Kohei; Hirai, Toyohiro; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Clinical studies have investigated whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can modulate bone metabolism but data are conflicting. Bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the standard technique for quantifying bone strength but has limitations in overweight patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25 kg/m2). The aim of this study was to examine the association between OSA and BMD by examining CT images that allow true volumetric measurements of the bone regardless of BMI. Methods: Lumbar vertebrae BMD was evaluated in 234 persons (180 males and 54 females) by CT scan. The method was calibrated by a phantom containing a known concentration of hydroxyapatite. Results: BMD was lower in male patients with severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 30/h) than non OSA (AHI < 5; p < 0.05), while OSA and BMD had no association in females. Linear and multiple regression analyses revealed that age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.52), hypertension (p = 0.0068, β = −0.17), and the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference (A-aDO2) (p = 0.012, β = −0.15) in males were associated with BMD, while only age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.68) was associated with BMD in females. Conclusion: Males with severe OSA had a significantly lower BMD than non OSA participants. Age, hypertension, and elevation of A-aDO2 were significant factors for BMD by CT imaging. The usefulness of measuring BMD in OSA patients by CT scanning should be studied in future. Citation: Hamada S, Ikezoe K, Hirai T, Oguma T, Tanizawa K, Inouchi M, Handa T, Oga T, Mishima M, Chin K. Evaluation of bone mineral density by computed tomography in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):25–34. PMID:26235157

  16. Can Screening Tools for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Predict Postoperative Complications? A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lilia; Macavei, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common, underdiagnosed condition that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the perioperative setting. Increasing evidence suggests that the utility of preoperative screening tools may go beyond identification of OSA, to the prediction of perioperative complications. The primary objective of this study was to systematically review the literature on all studies assessing whether high risk scores on the STOP-Bang questionnaire, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) checklist, and the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) are associated with higher rates of postoperative complications. Methods: A systematic review of English language records was performed using Medline, EMBASE, and PsychInfo with additional studies identified by manual search through reference lists. Only studies that evaluated the ability of the STOP-Bang, the BQ, and ASA checklist to predict postoperative complications in adults were included. Results: Twelve studies were included in the final review. Eight studies looked at STOP-Bang, 3 at the Berlin Questionnaire, and 2 at the ASA Checklist. Significant differences across study characteristics prevented a meta-analysis and the studies were evaluated qualitatively. Conclusions: The ASA checklist, Berlin Questionnaire, and STOP-Bang questionnaire may be able to risk stratify patients for perioperative and postoperative complications. Further research is required, with a particular focus on specific surgery types and adjustment of potentially confounding factors in the analysis. Citation: Dimitrov L, Macavei V. Can screening tools for obstructive sleep apnea predict postoperative complications? A systematic review of the literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1293–1300. PMID:27448417

  17. Gel pillow designed specifically for obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Salvaggio, Adriana; Lo Bue, Anna; Isidoro, Serena Iacono; Romano, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Insalaco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts designed to accommodate a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask and reduce head temperature improves the efficacy of and adherence to auto-CPAP therapy. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive CPAP-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Patients were given an auto-CPAP machine with an appropriate CPAP mask and were instructed to use CPAP for 15 nights. They were instructed to sleep with their own pillow (the control pillow) from nights 1 to 5 and with either a foam pillow or a gel pillow, both of which had side cutouts, for 5 consecutive nights each, in random order. After night 15, auto-CPAP machine data were downloaded and patients rated their satisfaction with each pillow on a visual analog scale. Results: Twenty-two patients completed the protocol. The pressures administered, residual apnea-hypopnea index, air leaks, and mean duration of CPAP use did not differ among the periods during which each pillow was used. Patients were significantly more satisfied with the gel pillow than with the control pillow and the foam pillow (p = 0.022 and p = 0.004, respectively), their level of satisfaction with the gel pillow correlating significantly with excessive daytime sleepiness (r2 = 0.19; p = 0.0443). Conclusions: Among obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with nasal CPAP, the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts appears to have no impact on treatment effectiveness. Nevertheless, such patients seem to prefer a gel pillow over other types of pillows. PMID:27812636

  18. Impact of Treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) on Weight in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Clarke, Denise P.; Goodwin, James L.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Simon, Richard D.; Smith, Terry W.; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight change in persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blinded sham-controlled multicenter clinical trial conducted at 5 sites in the United States. Of 1,105 participants with an apnea hypopnea index ≥ 10 events/ hour initially randomized, 812 had body weight measured at baseline and after 6 months of study. Intervention: CPAP or Sham CPAP. Measurements: Body weight, height, hours of CPAP or Sham CPAP use, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score. Results: Participants randomized to CPAP gained 0.35 ± 5.01 kg, whereas those on Sham CPAP lost 0.70 ± 4.03 kg (mean ± SD, p = 0.001). Amount of weight gain with CPAP was related to hours of device adherence, with each hour per night of use predicting a 0.42 kg increase in weight. This association was not noted in the Sham CPAP group. CPAP participants who used their device ≥ 4 h per night on ≥ 70% of nights gained the most weight over 6 months in comparison to non-adherent CPAP participants (1.0 ± 5.3 vs. -0.3 ± 5.0 kg, p = 0.014). Conclusions: OSA patients using CPAP may gain a modest amount of weight with the greatest weight gain found in those most compliant with CPAP. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 995. Citation: Quan SF; Budhiraja R; Clarke DP; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Nichols DA; Simon RD; Smith TW; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. Impact of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):989-993. PMID:24127141

  19. Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Collop, Nancy A.; Jacobowitz, Ofer; Thomas, Sherene M.; Quan, Stuart F.; Aronsky, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes when left untreated. There is significant heterogeneity in the evaluation and management of OSA resulting in variation in cost and outcomes. Thus, the goal for developing these measures was to have a way to evaluate the outcomes and reliability of the processes involved with the standard care approaches used in the diagnosis and management of OSA. The OSA quality care measures presented here focus on both outcomes and processes. The AASM commissioned the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup to develop quality care measures aimed at optimizing care for adult patients with OSA. These quality care measures developed by the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup are an extension of the original Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) measures group for OSA. The measures are based on the available scientific evidence, focus on public safety, and strive to improve quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes for individual OSA patients. The three outcomes that were selected were as follows: (1) improve disease detection and categorization; (2) improve quality of life; and (3) reduce cardiovascular risk. After selecting these relevant outcomes, a total of ten process measures were chosen that could be applied and assessed for the purpose of accomplishing these outcomes. In the future, the measures described in this document may be reported through the PQRS in addition to, or as a replacement for, the current OSA measures group. The overall objective for the development of these measures is that implementation of these quality measures will result in improved patient outcomes, reduce the public health burden of OSA, and provide a measurable standard for evaluating and managing OSA. Citation: Aurora RN, Collop NA, Jacobowitz O, Thomas SM, Quan SF, Aronsky AJ. Quality measures for the care of adult patients with

  20. Evolution of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Infants with Cleft Palate and Micrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.; Taylor, Jesse A.; Vossough, Arastoo; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Thomas, Allison; Bradford, Ruth; Lioy, Janet; Tapia, Ignacio E.; Assadsangabi, Reza; Shults, Justine; Marcus, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with craniofacial anomalies are a heterogeneous group at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the prevalence and structural predictors of OSA in this population are unknown. We hypothesized that infants with micrognathia would have more significant OSA than those with isolated cleft palate ± cleft lip (ICP), and those with ICP would have more significant OSA than controls. We postulated that OSA severity would correlate with reduced mandibular size, neurodevelopmental scores, and growth. Methods: Prospective cohort study. 15 infants with ICP, 19 with micrognathia, and 9 controls were recruited for polysomnograms, neurodevelopmental testing, cephalometrics (ICP and micrognathia groups) at baseline and a follow-up at 6 mo. Results: Baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) [median (range)] of the micrognathia group [20.1 events/h (0.8, 54.7)] was greater than ICP [3.2 (0.3, 30.7)] or controls [3.1 (0.5, 23.3)] (p = 0.001). Polysomnographic findings were similar between ICP and controls. Controls had a greater AHI than previously reported in the literature. Cephalometric measures of both midface hypoplasia and micrognathia correlated with OSA severity. Neurodevelopment was similar among groups. OSA improved with growth in participants with ICP and postoperatively in infants with micrognathia. Conclusions: Micrognathia, but not ICP, was associated with more significant OSA compared to controls. Both midface and mandibular hypoplasia contribute to OSA in these populations. OSA improved after surgical correction in most infants with micrognathia, and improved without intervention before palate repair in infants with ICP. Citation: Cielo CM, Taylor JA, Vossough A, Radcliffe J, Thomas A, Bradford R, Lioy J, Tapia IE, Assadsangabi R, Shults J, Marcus CL. Evolution of obstructive sleep apnea in infants with cleft palate and micrognathia. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):979–987. PMID:27092700

  1. Risk of Occupational Accidents in Workers with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garbarino, Sergio; Guglielmi, Ottavia; Sanna, Antonio; Mancardi, Gian Luigi; Magnavita, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the single most important preventable medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and driving accidents. OSA may also adversely affect work performance through a decrease in productivity, and an increase in the injury rate. Nevertheless, no systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between OSA and work accidents has been performed thus far. Methods: PubMed, PsycInfo, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were searched. Out of an initial list of 1,099 papers, 10 studies (12,553 participants) were eligible for our review, and 7 of them were included in the meta-analysis. The overall effects were measured by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). An assessment was made of the methodological quality of the studies. Moderator analysis and funnel plot analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity. Results: Compared to controls, the odds of work accident was found to be nearly double in workers with OSA (OR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.53–3.10). Occupational driving was associated with a higher effect size. Conclusions: OSA is an underdiagnosed nonoccupational disease that has a strong adverse effect on work accidents. The nearly twofold increased odds of work accidents in subjects with OSA calls for workplace screening in selected safety-sensitive occupations. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1171. Citation: Garbarino S, Guglielmi O, Sanna A, Mancardi GL, Magnavita N. Risk of occupational accidents in workers with obstructive sleep apnea: systematic review and meta-analysis. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1211–1218. PMID:26951401

  2. Comparison of Sugammadex versus Neostigmine Costs and Respiratory Complications in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Dilek Yazıcıoğlu; Baran, İlkay; Mutlu, Murad; Ural, Gülçin; Akkaya, Taylan; Özlü, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare sugammadex and neostigmine regarding the efficacy in reversing rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block, the incidence of post-operative respiratory complications and costs in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods After obtaining ethical approval and patient consent, 74 patients in ASA physical status I or II were randomised into two groups to receive 2-mg kg−1 sugammadex (Group S) or 0.04-mg kg−1 neostigmine+0.5-mg atropine (Group N). Groups were compared regarding time to TOF (train-of-four) 0.9, operating room time, post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) stay, post-operative respiratory complications, costs related to neuromuscular block reversal, anaesthesia care and complication treatment. Results Patient demographics, anaesthesia, surgical data and total rocuronium doses were similar between groups. Time to TOF 0.9 was shorter for group S [Group N: 8 (5–18) min; Group S: 2 (1.5–6) min (p<0.001)]. Operating room time [Group S: 72.4±14.3 min; Group N: 96.6±22.8 min (p<0.001)] and PACU stay [Group S: 22.9±10.1 dk; Group N: 36.3±12.6 dk (p<0.001)] were also shorter in Group S. After extubation, desaturation was observed in 12 (32.4%) patients in group N and in 4 (8%) patients in group S (p=0.048). In group N, three patients were reintubated; there were eight (21.6%) unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admissions. There was one unplanned ICU admission in group S. Negative pressure pulmonary oedema was observed in one patient in group N. The results regarding costs were as follows. The reversal cost was higher in the sugammadex group (vial cost 98.14 TL) than that in the neostigmine group (ampoule cost 0.27 TL; total 6147.88 TL vs. 3569.5 TL); however, complication treatment cost and total cost were lower in group S than those in group N (199.5 TL vs. 3944.6 TL) (staff anaesthesia doctor cost was 0.392 TL per min and the cost of nurse anaesthetist was 0.244 TL per min). Conclusion This

  3. Cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fusetti, M; Fioretti, A B; Valenti, M; Masedu, F; Lauriello, M; Pagliarella, M

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between severity of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. We recruited 1185 patients with OSAS who underwent a complete ENT examination, including nasolaryngeal fibre optic endoscopy with Müller's manoeuvre, overnight cardio-respiratory monitoring, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to measure daytime sleepiness, body mass index (BMI), measurement of blood pressure and blood tests.SUBSEQUENTLY, SUBJECTS WERE DIVIDED INTO THREE SUBGROUPS ACCORDING TO THE APNOEA HYPOPNOEA INDEX (AHI): mild OSAS (AHI 5-15), moderate OSAS (AHI 15-30) and severe OSAS (AHI > 30). In the sample collected, 347 (262 males and 85 females) of 1185 patients suffered from mild OSAS, 363 (269 males and 94 females) from moderate OSAS and 475 (330 males and 145 females) from severe OSAS. In the group suffering from mild OSAS, we found: 127 patients affected by hypertension, 48 with diabetes, 11 with dyslipidaemia and 32 with metabolic syndrome. In the group with moderate OSAS there were 157 patients with hypertension, 63 with diabetes, 72 with dyslipidaemia and 47 with metabolic syndrome. In the group suffering from severe OSAS there were 244 patients with hypertension, 138 with diabetes, 47 with dyslipidaemia and 90 with metabolic syndrome. For data analysis, we used the Spearman correlation test adjusted according to Sidak between the dependent variable AHI and the independent variables BMI, ESS, average SO2 (SO(2med)), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. The results show different patterns of correlation in terms of statistical significance: BMI ρ(s) = 0.26, SO(2med) ρ(s) = -0:51, hypertension ρ(s) = -0.05, dyslipidaemia ρ(s) = 0.22 for women, and BMI ρ(s) = 0.53, ESS ρ(s) = 0.28, SO(2med) ρ(s) = -0.50, hypertension ρ(s) = 0.17, diabetes mellitus ρ(s) = 0.28 and metabolic syndrome ρ(s) = 0.26 for men. The results of the study confirm the

  4. Maxillary, mandibular, and chin advancement: treatment planning based on airway anatomy in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Stephen; Powell, Nelson; Jacobson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Surgical correction of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome involves understanding a number of parameters, of which the 3-dimensional airway anatomy is important. Visualization of the upper airway based on cone beam computed tomography scans and automated computer analysis is an aid in understanding normal and abnormal airway conditions and their response to surgery. The goal of surgical treatment of OSA syndrome is to enlarge the velo-oropharyngeal airway by anterior/lateral displacement of the soft tissues and musculature by maxillary, mandibular, and possibly, genioglossus advancement. Knowledge of the specific airway obstruction and characteristics based on 3-dimensional studies permits a directed surgical treatment plan that can successfully address the area or areas of airway obstruction. The end occlusal result can be improved when orthodontic treatment is combined with the surgical plan. The individual with OSA, though, is more complicated than the usual orthognathic patient, and both the medical condition and treatment length need to be judiciously managed when OSA and associated conditions are present. The perioperative management of the patient with OSA is more complex and the margin for error is reduced, and this needs to be taken into consideration and the care altered as indicated.

  5. The Influence of Intermittent Hypoxemia on Platelet Activation in Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Rahangdale, Shilpa; Yeh, Susie Yim; Novack, Victor; Stevenson, Karen; Barnard, Marc R.; Furman, Mark I.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Michelson, Alan D.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Literature regarding platelet function in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has considerable limitations. Given the central role of platelets in atherothrombosis and the known cardiovascular risk of OSA, we hypothesized that OSA severity is predictive of platelet function, independent of known comorbidities. Design: Obese subjects, without comorbidities, underwent overnight, in-lab polysomnography. The following morning, 5 biomarkers of platelet activation were measured by whole-blood flow cytometry at baseline and in response to agonists (no stimulation, stimulation with 5 μM ADP agonist, and stimulation with 20 μM ADP agonist): platelet surface P-selectin, activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, and GPIb receptor expression, platelet-monocyte aggregation (PMA) and platelet-neutrophil aggregation (PNA). Results: Of the 77 subjects, 47 were diagnosed with OSA (median apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] of 24.7 ± 28.1/h in subjects with OSA and 3.0 ± 3.9/h in subjects without OSA, p < 0.001). The groups were matched for body mass index, with a mean body mass index of 40.3 ± 9.6 kg/m2 in subjects with OSA and 38.9 ± 6.0 kg/m2 in subjects without OSA (p = 0.48). A comparison of time spent with an oxygen saturation of less than 90% showed that subjects who had 1 minute or more of desaturation time per hour of sleep had lower GPIb fluorescence in circulating platelets, as compared with those subjects who had less than 1 minute of desaturation time per hour of sleep; similar findings were observed following 5 μM and 20 μM of ADP stimulation, as compared with control vehicle, suggesting higher levels of circulating platelet activity. In multivariate analyses, only nocturnal hypoxemia and female sex predicted agonist response. Platelet surface P-selectin, platelet surface-activated GPIIb/IIIa, PMA, and PNA were not significantly correlated with markers of OSA. Conclusions: In obese patients with OSA, platelet activation is associated with greater levels of oxygen

  6. Robust spectral analysis of thoraco-abdominal motion and oxymetry in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nino, Cesar L; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Gutierrez, Maria J; Singareddi, Ravi; Nino, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) relies on polysomnography (PSG), a multidimensional biosignal recording that is conducted in sleep laboratories. Standard PSG montage involves the use of nasal-oral airflow sensors to visualize cyclic episodes of upper airflow interruption, which are considered diagnostic of sleep apnea. Given the high-cost and discomfort associated with in-laboratory PSG, there is an emergent need for novel technology that simplifies OSA screening and diagnosis with less expensive methods. The main goal of this project was to identify novel OSA signatures based on the spectral analysis of thoraco-abdominal motion channels. Our main hypothesis was that proper spectral analysis can detect OSA cycles in adults using simultaneous recording of oxygen saturation (SaO2) and either, chest or abdominal motion. A sample study on 35 individuals was conducted with statistically significant results that suggest a strong relationship between airflow-independent signals and oxygen saturation. The impact of this new approach is that it may allow the design of more comfortable and reliable portable devices for screening, diagnosis and monitoring of OSA, functioning only with oximetry and airflow-independent (abdominal or chest) breathing sensors.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L J; Strollo, P J; Donegan, R B; Delmar, J; Hendrix, C; Westbrook, P R

    1995-06-01

    Adenotonsillar hypertrophy has been identified as an early manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Three patients with HIV disease were identified with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy. In order to examine the relationship between HIV-induced adenotonsillar hypertrophy and OSA, 134 patients with asymptomatic HIV disease were screened with a self-administered sleep survey designed to detect OSA and excessive daytime somnolence. Patients meeting trigger score criteria were studied with overnight polysomnography and nine additional patients were identified with OSA. The only consistent risk factor for OSA in this young and primarily nonobese population was the presence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy, found in 11 of 12 patients with OSA. Three patients had tonsillar biopsy or tonsillectomy and all displayed benign follicular lymphoid hyperplasia. Scores on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were significantly higher for patients with OSA, indicating a greater degree of hypersomnolence (mean ESS scores: OSA+ = 11.4 +/- 3.6, OSA- = 7.8 +/- 4.6, p = 0.012). In our population, patients with HIV disease had a prevalence of OSA of 7%. HIV-induced adenotonsillar hypertrophy is a risk factor for the development of OSA. HIV patients with complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness and snoring who are found to have adenotonsillar hypertrophy on exam should undergo a sleep evaluation to rule out the presence of OSA.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnoea in the general population: highly prevalent but minimal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, Erna S; Bjornsdottir, Erla; Olafsdottir, Kristin A; Benediktsdottir, Bryndis; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to assess the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as defined by an apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 in the middle-aged general population, and the interrelationship between OSA, sleep-related symptoms, sleepiness and vigilance.A general population sample of 40-65-year-old Icelanders was invited to participate in a study protocol that included a type 3 sleep study, questionnaire and a psychomotor vigilance test (PVT).Among the 415 subjects included in the study, 56.9% had no OSA (AHI <5), 24.1% had mild OSA (AHI 5-14.9), 12.5% had moderate OSA (AHI 15-29.9), 2.9% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30) and 3.6% were already diagnosed and receiving OSA treatment. However, no significant relationship was found between AHI and subjective sleepiness or clinical symptoms. A relationship with objective vigilance assessed by PVT was only found for those with AHI ≥30. Subjects already on OSA treatment and those accepting OSA treatment after participating in the study were more symptomatic and sleepier than others with similar OSA severity, as assessed by the AHI.In a middle-aged general population, approximately one in five subjects had moderate-to-severe OSA, but the majority of them were neither symptomatic nor sleepy and did not have impaired vigilance.

  9. Positional modification techniques for supine obstructive sleep apnea: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hayley; Edwards, Bradley A; Joosten, Simon A; Naughton, Matthew T; Hamilton, Garun S; Dabscheck, Eli

    2016-11-18

    This review aimed to determine the effectiveness of positional modification techniques in preventing supine sleep, sleep-disordered breathing and other clinically important outcomes in patients with supine obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Randomized controlled trials comparing positional modification techniques with any other therapy or placebo were included. Electronic searches of databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and Web of Science up to April 2016 were performed. Meta-analysis was undertaken where possible. This comprehensive meta-analysis found benefit for positional modification techniques in those with supine OSA in terms of reduction in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and time spent supine. Whilst positional modification techniques were effective in terms of a reduction in AHI, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was more effective than these techniques. A reliable diagnosis of supine OSA should be considered, and further research is required on patient-centred outcomes including comfort, barriers to adherence, cost-analysis, and long term outcomes including the effect on cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance.

  10. The Interaction between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Parkinson's Disease: Possible Mechanisms and Implications for Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Marta; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Kimoff, R. John

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with hallmark motor and nonmotor symptoms (NMS) such as sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction. While dopaminergic treatments have improved the motor aspects of PD, progression remains inevitable. Research has recently increasingly focused on strategies to modify disease progression and on nonmotor manifestations of PD, given their impact on patients' quality of life. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable sleep disorder, common in the general population, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and neurocognitive deficits. Neuroimaging has demonstrated structural and functional changes in OSA patients; in animal models, OSA causes brain inflammation and oxidative injury, including in key areas involved in PD pathophysiology such as locus coeruleus. The prevalence of OSA in PD has been variable in studies to date, and potential consequences and interrelationship between the two disorders have not been well studied. There is however emerging evidence that OSA is associated with increased NMS in PD, particularly cognitive dysfunction. This review focuses on the possible interrelationship between OSA and PD. Mechanisms promoting OSA in PD will be reviewed, as well as mechanisms whereby OSA can affect the neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:26509097

  11. [Practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Facundo; Nigro, Carlos; Cambursano, Hugo; Borsini, Eduardo; Silio, Julio; Avila, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is one of the most relevant chronic respiratory pathologies due to its high prevalence and impact in morbidity and mortality. In 2001, the Asociación Argentina de Medicina Respiratoria (AAMR) published the first Argentinean Consensus on Sleep-Related breathing Disorders. Since then, wide new scientific evidence has emerged, increasing significantly the knowledge about this pathology. According to this, the Sleep-Related breathing Disorders and Oxygen Therapy Section of the AAMR, decided to update its Consensus, developing this Practical Guidelines on Management of patients with OSAS. A working group was created with members belonging to the section, experts in OSAS. They extensively reviewed the literature and wrote these guidelines, orientated to practical resolution of clinical problems and giving answers to questions emerged from dealing with patients who suffer from this syndrome. The document defines OSAS and describes the diagnosis and severity criteria, as well as the risk factors, ways of presentation and epidemiology. Clinical consequences, mainly on cognition, cardiovascular system and metabolism are pointed out. Different diagnostic methods, with their indications and technical aspects for validation and interpretation are detailed. Finally, we describe therapeutic alternatives, as well as practical aspects of their implementation. The authors' aim was to generate an accessible tool for teaching and spreading the knowledge on these disorders, which have a great impact in public health.

  12. The different clinical faces of obstructive sleep apnoea: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lichuan; Pien, Grace W; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Björnsdottir, Erla; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Pack, Allan I; Benediktsdottir, Bryndis; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2014-12-01

    Although commonly observed in clinical practice, the heterogeneity of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) clinical presentation has not been formally characterised. This study was the first to apply cluster analysis to identify subtypes of patients with OSA who experience distinct combinations of symptoms and comorbidities. An analysis of baseline data from the Icelandic Sleep Apnoea Cohort (822 patients with newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSA) was performed. Three distinct clusters were identified. They were classified as the "disturbed sleep group" (cluster 1), "minimally symptomatic group" (cluster 2) and "excessive daytime sleepiness group" (cluster 3), consisting of 32.7%, 24.7% and 42.6% of the entire cohort, respectively. The probabilities of having comorbid hypertension and cardiovascular disease were highest in cluster 2 but lowest in cluster 3. The clusters did not differ significantly in terms of sex, body mass index or apnoea-hypopnoea index. Patients with OSA have different patterns of clinical presentation, which need to be communicated to both the lay public and the professional community with the goal of facilitating care-seeking and early identification of OSA. Identifying distinct clinical profiles of OSA creates a foundation for offering more personalised therapies in the future.

  13. Liking for high fat foods in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, Simon S; Waight, Catherine; Doyle, Geoffrey; Rossa, Kalina R; Sullivan, Karen A

    2014-07-01

    Excess weight and obesity are factors that are strongly associated with risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). Weight loss has been associated with improvements in clinical indicators of OSA severity; however, patients' beliefs about diet change have not been investigated. This study utilized a validated behaviour change model to estimate the relationship between food liking, food intake and indices of OSA severity. Two-hundred and six OSA patients recruited from a Sleep Disorders Clinic completed standardized questionnaires of: a) fat and fibre food intake, food liking, and food knowledge and; b) attitudes and intentions towards fat reduction. OSA severity and body mass index (BMI) were objectively measured using standard clinical guidelines. The relationship between liking for high fat food and OSA severity was tested with hierarchical regression. Gender and BMI explained a significant 20% of the variance in OSA severity, Fibre Liking accounted for an additional 6% (a negative relationship), and Fat Liking accounted for a further 3.6% of variance. Although the majority of individuals (47%) were currently "active" in reducing fat intake, overall the patients' dietary beliefs and behaviours did not correspond. The independent relationship between OSA severity and liking for high fat foods (and disliking of high fibre foods) may be consistent with a two-way interaction between sleep disruption and food choice. Whilst the majority of OSA patients were intentionally active in changing to a healthy diet, further emphasis on improving healthy eating practices and beliefs in this population is necessary.

  14. Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... is REM sleep? What is the effect of sleep deprivation? What are sleep myths? What are sleep disorders? ... is REM sleep? What is the effect of sleep deprivation? What are sleep myths? What are sleep disorders? ...

  15. The Effect of Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Kai Hsun; Nixon, Gillian M.

    2008-01-01

    Benefits of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy could differ from those in otherwise healthy children. We examined the effects of OSA treatment by comparing a group of children with cerebral palsy treated with adenotonsillectomy or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by nasal mask with controls who…

  16. Short-Term Memory Performances during Sustained Wakefulness in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greneche, Jerome; Krieger, Jean; Bertrand, Frederic; Erhardt, Christine; Maumy, Myriam; Tassi, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Both working and immediate memories were assessed every 4 h by specific short-term memory tasks over sustained wakefulness in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and 10 healthy controls. Results indicated that OSAHS patients exhibited lower working memory performances than controls on both backward digit span and…

  17. The Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Neurocognitive Performance—The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES)

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Chan, Cynthia S.; Dement, William C.; Gevins, Alan; Goodwin, James L.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Green, Sylvan; Guilleminault, Christian; Hirshkowitz, Max; Hyde, Pamela R.; Kay, Gary G.; Leary, Eileen B.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Schweitzer, Paula K.; Simon, Richard D.; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurocognitive performance in a large cohort of adults. Study Design: Cross-sectional analyses of polysomnographic and neurocognitive data from 1204 adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), assessed at baseline before randomization to either continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or sham CPAP. Measurements: Sleep and respiratory indices obtained by laboratory polysomnography and several measures of neurocognitive performance. Results: Weak correlations were found for both the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and several indices of oxygen desaturation and neurocognitive performance in unadjusted analyses. After adjustment for level of education, ethnicity, and gender, there was no association between the AHI and neurocognitive performance. However, severity of oxygen desaturation was weakly associated with worse neurocognitive performance on some measures of intelligence, attention, and processing speed. Conclusions: The impact of OSA on neurocognitive performance is small for many individuals with this condition and is most related to the severity of hypoxemia. Citation: Quan SF; Chan CS; Dement WC; Gevins A; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Green S; Guilleminault C; Hirshkowitz M; Hype PR; Kay GG; Leary EB; Nichols DA; Schweitzer PK; Simon RD; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. The association between obstructive sleep apnea and neurocognitive performance—the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES). SLEEP 2011;34(3):303-314. PMID:21358847

  18. Validation of the STOP-BANG Questionnaire among Patients Referred for Suspected Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Boynton, Grace; Vahabzadeh, Arshia; Hammoud, Sami; Ruzicka, Deborah L.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The STOP-BANG is a simple obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) screening tool, part questionnaire (STOP) and part demographic or physical measures (BANG), developed for use in preoperative surgical clinics. This study assessed sensitivity and specificity of the instrument among patients referred to a sleep disorders laboratory, and also its performance characteristics when BANG physical measures are patient-reported rather than measured. Methods Adults referred for diagnostic polysomnography completed the STOP questions and answered four yes/no questions (BANG self-reported) about their body mass index (weight and height), age, neck circumference, and gender, which were also assessed by laboratory technologists (BANG-measured). Results Among N=219 subjects (mean age 46.3 ± 13.9 [s.d.] years; 98 [44.8%] males) the sensitivity of the STOP-BANG measured for an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI, events per hour of sleep) >5, >15, and >30 was 82, 93, and 97% respectively. Corresponding negative predictive values were 44, 87, and 96%. Specificities were comparatively low (48, 40, and 33%). The STOP-BANG measured and STOP-BANG self-reported scores showed essentially equivalent test characteristics against polysomnography. Conclusions The STOP-BANG appears to have limited utility in a referred, sleep laboratory setting. Negative results help to identify some individuals as unlikely to have moderate-to-severe apnea, and may thereby prove useful in identification of patients who would benefit more from laboratory studies than home studies. A STOP-BANG in which all information is self-reported may be as effective as the original version, and has potential to facilitate research or community screening where good negative predictive value is required for an effective screening tool. PMID:24800262

  19. Sleepiness and nocturnal hypoxemia in Peruvian men with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Jorge Rey; Mezones-Holguín, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the intensity of nocturnal hypoxemia associated with sleepiness in Peruvian men with a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods We carried out a secondary data analysis based on a study which includes patients with OSA who were seen in a private hospital in Lima, Peru from 2006 to 2012. We included male adults who had polysomnographic recordings and who answered the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESE). The intensity of nocturnal hypoxemia (oxygen saturation ≤90 %) was classified in four new categories: 0, <1, 1 to 10 and >10 % total sleep time with nocturnal hypoxemia (NH). When the ESE score was higher than 10, we used the definitions presence or absence of sleepiness. We used Poisson regression models with robust variance to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) for association between sleepiness and NH. Results 518 male patients with OSA were evaluated. Four hundred and fifty-two (87 %) patients had NH and 262 (51 %) had sleepiness. Of the 142 (27.4 %) patients who had >10 % total sleep time with NH, 98 (69.0 %) showed sleepiness and had a greater probability of sleepiness prevalence, with a crude PR of 1.82 (95 % CI 1.31–2.53). This association persisted in the multivariate models. Conclusions We found an association between NH and sleepiness. Only patients with the major intensity of NH (over 10 % of the total sleep time) had a greater probability of sleepiness. This suggests that sleepiness probably occurs after a chronic process and after overwhelming compensatory mechanisms. PMID:24249663

  20. Therapeutic outcomes of mandibular advancement devices as an initial treatment modality for obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Pona; Jeon, Hyoung Won; Han, Doo Hee; Won, Tae-Bin; Kim, Dong-Young; Rhee, Chae-Seo; Kim, Hyun Jik</