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Sample records for conflict management strategies

  1. Leadership Strategies for Managing Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kormanski, Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the impact of conflict in small group development theory. Views conflict as a positive, normally occurring behavior and presents leadership strategies involving withdrawal, suppression, integration, compromise, and power. Examines situational contingencies and presents a rationale for strategy selection and intervention. (Author)

  2. Managing Conflict: 50 Strategies for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Stacey; Combs, Julie; Harris, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    This book offers 50 easy-to-read strategies for managing conflicts in your school involving students, parents, and teachers. Individually, these strategies provide specific insights into conflict resolution, reduction, and management. As a whole, the 50 strategies provide a comprehensive method to lead constructive change in your school. With…

  3. Impact of Conflict Management Strategies on the Generation Mechanism of Miners' Unsafe Behavior Tendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ji-Zu; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Yao-Long; Wang, Tian-Ri

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between the generation mechanism of miners' unsafe behavior tendency and conflict management strategies, including cooperative conflict management strategy, competitive conflict management strategy and avoidant conflict management strategy. Miners from 3 collieries in Shanxi province completed a…

  4. Role of Emotional Intelligence in Conflict Management Strategies of Nurses.

    PubMed

    Başoğul, Ceyda; Özgür, Gönül

    2016-09-01

    This study analyzes the emotional intelligence levels and conflict management strategies of nurses and the association between them. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted with 277 nurses in a stratified random sample from a university hospital in Turkey. The data were collected from nurses who gave their informed consent to participate using a personal information form, the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II and Bar-On's Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-I). Data were assessed by descriptive statistics, t tests, and Pearson correlation analyses, using SPSS software. The levels of the nurses' strategies were as follows: avoiding (M = 2.98), dominating (M = 2.76), and obliging (M = 2.71) were medium; compromising (M = 1.99) and integration (M = 1.96) were low. The levels of the emotional intelligence of nurses (mean = 2.75) were medium on a 5-point scale. Integration (r = .168), obliging (r = .25), dominating (r = .18), and compromising (r = .33), which are conflict management strategies, were positively correlated with scores of emotional intelligence, and avoiding (r = -.25) was negatively correlated with scores of emotional intelligence (p < .05). The study determined that nurses' emotional intelligence affects conflict management strategies. To use effective strategies in conflict management, nurses must develop emotional intelligence. Training programs on conflict management and emotional intelligence are needed to improve effective conflict management in healthcare facilities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Leadership style and choice of strategy in conflict management among Israeli nurse managers in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Tova; Fish, Miri; Galon, Vered

    2005-03-01

    To identify conflict mode choices of head nurses in general hospitals and examine the relationship between leadership style, choice of strategy in handling conflicts and demographic characteristics. Nurse managers deal with conflicts daily. The choice of conflict management mode is associated with managerial effectiveness. The ability to creatively manage conflict situations, towards constructive outcomes is becoming a standard requirement. Head nurses (N = 60) in five general hospitals in central Israel were surveyed, using a 3-part questionnaire: The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument, the Multi-factor Leadership Questionnaire, Form 5X-Short (MLQ 5X) and demographic data. Head nurses perceive themselves significantly more as transformational leaders than as transactional leaders. Compromise was found to be the most commonly used conflict management strategy. Approximately half of the nurses surveyed used only one mode in conflict management. Transformational leadership significantly affected the conflict strategy chosen. Head nurses tend to choose a conflict-handling mode which is concerned a form of a Lose-Lose approach. Preparation in conflict management should start from undergraduate education.

  6. The Conflict Management Strategies of School Administrators While Conflicting with Their Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özyildirim, Gülnar; Kayikçi, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Conflict is everywhere as there are conflicts at educational organizations. One of the most affected groups from conflicts is administrators who are bridges between teachers and parents, supervisors. The aims of this study are to determine which strategies the school administrators use and how often they use these strategies and whether their…

  7. Principals' and Teachers' Use of Conflict Management Strategies on Secondary Students' Conflict Resolution in Rivers State-Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalagbor, Levi Doe; Nnokam, Nyege Chinda

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to identify the principals' and teachers' level of utilization of conflict management strategies: integrating, dominating, compromising and avoiding strategies on secondary students' conflict resolution and their related implications in the internal school administration. Four research questions and four hypotheses addressed…

  8. Conflict Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William; Koue, Glen

    1991-01-01

    Discusses general issues involved in conflict management and provides more specific examples of conflict management in libraries. Causes of conflict are considered, including organizational structure, departmentalization, performance appraisal, poor communication, and technological change; and methods of dealing with conflict are described,…

  9. The Effects of Pupil Control Ideology of Teachers on Their Conflict Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobanoglu, Necati; Kaya, Oguz; Angay, Abdurrahman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine teachers' perspectives on conflict management strategies and further to determine the effects of pupil control ideologies on their conflict management strategies. 120 primary and secondary school teachers were administered a Likert type questionnaire. The data collected were analyzed through multiple…

  10. Conflict Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawhon, Tommie; Jacobson, Arminta

    1983-01-01

    Teachers are expected to provide guidance in coping, adapting, and managing conflicts. Ways to resolve conflict include achieving a balance between work and family life goals to increase personal, family, and work satisfactions. (SK)

  11. Managing Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; Scott, James J.

    Chapter 15 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter defines and categorizes conflict and outlines techniques for its management in schools. Conflict, endemic to human existence, exists on many levels and assumes various forms. This chapter focuses on social conflict, or antagonistic interaction between individuals or groups common to…

  12. Do personality traits of nurses have an effect on conflict management strategies?

    PubMed

    Erdenk, Nigar; Altuntaş, Serap

    2017-07-01

    This research was conducted in a descriptive, correlational and cross-sectional design to determine whether personality traits of nurses have an effect on conflict management strategies. It is known that integration, avoidance and compromise conflict management strategies are the most frequent strategies used among nurses and obligation and domination are the least frequent. However, the reasons behind their strategy choice are not known. It is predicted that one of the reasons is the personality characteristics of the nurses. The study was conducted with the participation of 237 nurses working in three different hospitals. Research data were collected by using the 'Personal Information Form', 'Rahim Organisational Conflict Inventory-II' and 'Five Factor Personality Inventory' between December 2013 and February 2014. Ethical approval and the organisations' approvals were obtained before data collection. The collected data were analysed using frequency and percentage distributions, descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlation analysis, t-test, Cronbach's alpha coefficient and simple linear regression analysis tests. The majority of nurses had conflict especially with patients' relatives several times a month. It was found that the personality traits of nurses were mostly 'conscientiousness' and 'openness' and when they had a conflict, they tended to use 'integration' strategy. It was also found that the personality traits of nurses had an effect on some of the conflict management strategies adopted by them. It was found that the personality traits of nurses had an effect on some conflict management strategies adopted by them. Nurse managers should support nurses who adopt appropriate conflict management strategies and there should be conflict management programmes that can teach appropriate skills to other nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The critical role of conflict resolution in teams: a close look at the links between conflict type, conflict management strategies, and team outcomes.

    PubMed

    Behfar, Kristin J; Peterson, Randall S; Mannix, Elizabeth A; Trochim, William M K

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the linkages between strategies for managing different types of conflict and group performance and satisfaction. Results from a qualitative study of 57 autonomous teams suggest that groups that improve or maintain top performance over time share 3 conflict resolution tendencies: (a) focusing on the content of interpersonal interactions rather than delivery style, (b) explicitly discussing reasons behind any decisions reached in accepting and distributing work assignments, and (c) assigning work to members who have the relevant task expertise rather than assigning by other common means such as volunteering, default, or convenience. The authors' results also suggest that teams that are successful over time are likely to be both proactive in anticipating the need for conflict resolution and pluralistic in developing conflict resolution strategies that apply to all group members. 2008 APA

  14. The Influence of Individual and Situational Factors on Children's Choice of a Conflict Management Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamm, Anni; Tõugu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of individual and situational factors on nursery school children's conflict management strategies. This observational study of triadic interaction was carried out among 69 children whose mean age was 48 months. The video-recorded data were coded for the type of…

  15. The Correlation between Interpersonal Communication Skills of Inspection Groups and Their Conflict Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabanci, Ali; Sahin, Ahmet; Özdemir, Izzet

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the correlation between interpersonal communication skills and conflict management strategies in the case of inspection groups constituted by a number of inspectors based on the geographical and demographic dispersion of the school population in Turkey. This research was conducted as a survey. The…

  16. An Inquiry into Conflict Management Strategies: Study of Higher Education Institutions in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Din, Siraj ud; Khan, Bakhtiar; Bibi, Zainab

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to gain an insight into the conflict management strategies (CMS) of faculty in the higher education institutions (HEIs) of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. To achieve the above mentioned purpose, survey method was used with the help of questionnaire. In this research, impact of CMS was assessed on the negative…

  17. Interpersonal conflict: strategies and guidelines for resolution.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, D E; Bushardt, S C

    1985-02-01

    Historically, management theorists have recommended the avoidance or suppression of conflict. Modern management theorists recognize interpersonal conflict as an inevitable byproduct of growth and change. The issue is no longer avoidance of conflict but the strategy by which conflict is resolved. Various strategies of conflict resolution and the consequences of each are discussed in this article, along with guidelines for the effective use of confrontation strategy.

  18. Intergroup conflict management strategies as related to perceptions of dual identity and separate groups.

    PubMed

    Bizman, Aharon; Yinon, Yoel

    2004-04-01

    The authors examined the relations between (a) the perceptions of dual identity and separate groups and (b) intergroup conflict management strategies, in two contexts: the conflict between the secular and religious sectors in Israel and the allocation of resources among organizational subunits. In both contexts, contention (i.e., forcing one's will on the other party) was associated with the perception of separate groups. Only in the organizational context, avoidance (i.e., doing nothing or discontinuing participation in the conflict) was associated with the perception of dual identity. Problem solving (i.e., finding a solution that is acceptable to both parties) was related to the perception of dual identity in the secular-religious context. In the organizational context, this relation appeared only under a low perception of separate groups. Yielding (i.e., satisfying the other party's needs at the expense of one's own) was related to the perception of dual identity in the organizational context. In the secular-religious context, this relation appeared only under a high perception of separate groups. The authors discussed the varying pattern of the associations between (a) the perceptions of dual identity and separate groups and (b) the conflict management strategies in the two contexts in terms of the Dual Concern Model and the perceived feasibility of the strategies.

  19. Strategies for Resolving Conflicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragin, Nancy W.; And Others

    Conflict is a phenomenon of human relationships that occurs when an individual's needs are not being satisfied. This paper explains why it is crucial to recognize and deal with conflict on different levels of education. Chapter 1 discusses coping with conflict. It describes several management styles (competition; collaboration; avoidance;…

  20. Conflict management by hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas) during crowding: a tension-reduction strategy.

    PubMed

    Judge, P G; Griffaton, N S; Fincke, A M

    2006-10-01

    Primates change a variety of behavioral responses during short-term exposure to crowding. Under crowded conditions, rates of aggression, submissive behavior, and affiliative behavior may increase or decrease. Different patterns of change among these three categories of response have been interpreted as various coping "strategies" for managing the increased risk of conflict under crowded conditions. Grooming is of particular interest because this behavior is known to have a calming influence on the recipient and could be used to manage conflict under tense situations. A captive group of nine hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas) composed of two harems was observed under short-term crowding to determine whether this species adopts conflict-management strategies similar to those described in other primates. The aggression, submission, affiliation, and displacement activities of the six adults in the group (two males and four females) were recorded, and behaviors in their small indoor quarters was compared with baseline behaviors in the outdoor section of their enclosure, which had over 10 times more space. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare behavioral rates during crowding with baseline rates recorded immediately after crowding and during matched controls collected at the same time of day as the crowding sessions. Aggression and submission rates did not change significantly across conditions. Huddling together and proximity increased during crowding, and females increased grooming of their harem male during crowding. Displacement activities (e.g., pacing and self-grooming) increased during crowding, but scratching, an indicator of anxiety in primates, did not. The pattern of behavior exhibited by this group conforms to an active "tension-reduction" strategy in which animals successfully reduce the higher risk of aggression during crowding.

  1. Interpersonal Conflict Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roark, Albert E.

    1978-01-01

    The difference between constructive and destructive conflicts may be traced to the way in which they are managed. Third-party help is often utilized to achieve constructive conflict management. This article describes two models for conflict management consultation. Five guidelines are given for constructive conflict management. (Author/JEL)

  2. Relationship management strategies for daughters in conflicted relationships with their ageing mothers.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Carolyn E Z; Moon, Ailee; Pieters, Huibrie C; Mentes, Janet C; Phillips, Linda R

    2015-03-01

    To study relationship management strategies of daughters in conflicted relationships with their mothers and how they promoted or prevented elder abuse. Daughters have enduring, unique relationships with their mothers that often carry over into caregiving. Pre-caregiving relationship quality is related to many caregiving outcomes, although it is unclear how. Qualitative study. Grounded theory design, informed by feminism, with telephone interviews conducted between January 2013-July 2013. The sample (N = 13) was recruited through an online recruitment strategy, with advertisements posted on relevant websites asking 'Are you in an abusive relationship with your ageing mother?' Daughters used coping strategies and self-protective strategies aimed at decreasing their exposure to aggression and emotional distress when interacting with their ageing mothers. Daughters also used spiteful aggression out of the desire for revenge. Although the daughters' strategies served their personal needs, they jeopardized the mothers' needs by creating an environment where neglect could occur. Daughters also readily and intentionally used aggression against their mothers. These were strategies daughters have found useful. These strategies may be potential areas for designing interventions to promote healthy family relationships and decrease the occurrence of elder abuse and neglect. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The African Union and Conflict Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-02

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT THE AFRICAN UNION AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT by Lieutenant Colonel Flemming Mathiasen Royal Danish Army Colonel Patrick...AUTHOR: Lieutenant Colonel Flemming Mathiasen TITLE: The African Union and Conflict Management FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 2 March 2006...WORD COUNT: 5850 PAGES: 28 KEY TERMS: African Union, Africa, Conflict Management , Capabilities CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified Africa is a continent with a

  4. Conflict Management and Resolution Strategies between Teachers and School Leaders in Primary Schools of Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanka, Engdawork Birhanu; Thuo, Mary

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate various strategies used to manage and resolve conflict between teachers and school leaders in government primary schools of Wolaita zone. The study employed a descriptive survey design where both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to correct and analyze data, concurrently. From six…

  5. Constructive Management of Conflict in Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rex C.; Mitchell, Rie R.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a concise overview of important conflict management concepts and strategies for those working in group settings. Presents a brief conceptual basis for understanding conflict and group memebers' behavior when in conflict, followed by specific recommendations for managing and making use of conflict in groups. (JAC)

  6. Understanding and managing conservation conflicts.

    PubMed

    Redpath, Steve M; Young, Juliette; Evely, Anna; Adams, William M; Sutherland, William J; Whitehouse, Andrew; Amar, Arjun; Lambert, Robert A; Linnell, John D C; Watt, Allan; Gutiérrez, R J

    2013-02-01

    Conservation conflicts are increasing and need to be managed to minimise negative impacts on biodiversity, human livelihoods, and human well-being. Here, we explore strategies and case studies that highlight the long-term, dynamic nature of conflicts and the challenges to their management. Conflict management requires parties to recognise problems as shared ones, and engage with clear goals, a transparent evidence base, and an awareness of trade-offs. We hypothesise that conservation outcomes will be less durable when conservationists assert their interests to the detriment of others. Effective conflict management and long-term conservation benefit will be enhanced by better integration of the underpinning social context with the material impacts and evaluation of the efficacy of alternative conflict management approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Conflict Management Strategies in the ICU Differ Between Palliative Care Specialists and Intensivists.

    PubMed

    Chiarchiaro, Jared; White, Douglas B; Ernecoff, Natalie C; Buddadhumaruk, Praewpannarai; Schuster, Rachel A; Arnold, Robert M

    2016-05-01

    Conflict is common between physicians and surrogate decision makers around end-of-life care in ICU. Involving experts in conflict management improve outcomes, but little is known about what differences in conflict management styles may explain the benefit. We used simulation to examine potential differences in how palliative care specialists manage conflict with surrogates about end-of-life treatment decisions in ICUs compared with intensivists. Subjects participated in a high-fidelity simulation of conflict with a surrogate in an ICU. In this simulation, a medical actor portrayed a surrogate decision maker during an ICU family meeting who refuses to follow an advance directive that clearly declines advanced life-sustaining therapies. We audiorecorded the simulation encounters and applied a coding framework to quantify conflict management behaviors, which was organized into two categories: task-focused communication and relationship building. We used negative binomial modeling to determine whether there were differences between palliative care specialists' and intensivists' use of task-focused communication and relationship building. Single academic medical center ICU. Palliative care specialists and intensivists. None. We enrolled 11 palliative care specialists and 25 intensivists. The palliative care specialists were all attending physicians. The intensivist group consisted of 11 attending physicians, 9 pulmonary and critical care fellows, and 5 internal medicine residents rotating in the ICU. We excluded five residents from the primary analysis in order to reduce confounding due to training level. Physicians' mean age was 37 years with a mean of 8 years in practice. Palliative care specialists used 55% fewer task-focused communication statements (incidence rate ratio, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.36-0.83; p = 0.005) and 48% more relationship-building statements (incidence rate ratio, 1.48; 95% CI, 0.89-2.46; p = 0.13) compared with intensivists. We found that palliative care

  8. Conflict Management Strategies in the ICU Differ Between Palliative Care Specialists and Intensivists

    PubMed Central

    Chiarchiaro, Jared; White, Douglas B.; Ernecoff, Natalie C.; Buddadhumaruk, Praewpannarai; Schuster, Rachel A.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Conflict is common between physicians and surrogate decision makers around end-of-life care in intensive care units (ICU). Involving experts in conflict management improve outcomes, but little is known about what differences in conflict management styles may explain the benefit. We used simulation to examine potential differences in how palliative care specialists manage conflict with surrogates about end-of-life treatment decisions in ICUs compared with intensivists. DESIGN Subjects participated in a high-fidelity simulation of conflict with a surrogate in an ICU. In this simulation, a medical actor portrayed a surrogate decision maker during an ICU family meeting who refuses to follow an advance directive that clearly declines advanced life-sustaining therapies. We audio-recorded the simulation encounters and applied a coding framework to quantify conflict management behaviors, which was organized into two categories: task-focused communication and relationship-building. We used negative binomial modeling to determine whether there were differences between palliative care specialists’ and intensivists’ use of task-focused communication and relationship building. SETTING Single academic medical center ICU PARTICIPANTS Palliative care specialists and intensivists INTERVENTIONS none MEASUREMENTS and MAIN RESULTS We enrolled 11 palliative care specialists and 25 intensivists. The palliative care specialists were all attending physicians. The intensivist group consisted of 11 attending physicians, 9 pulmonary and critical care fellows, and 5 internal medicine residents rotating in the intensive care unit. We excluded the 5 residents from the primary analysis in order to reduce confounding due to training level. Physicians’ mean age was 37 years with a mean of 8 years in practice. Palliative care specialists used 55% fewer task-focused communication statements (Incidence Rate Ratio 0.55, 95% CI 0.36–0.83, p= 0.005) and 48% more relationship building

  9. Peer Teaching as a Strategy for Conflict Management and Student Re-Engagement in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a major action research program that experimented with the use of cross-age peer teaching in schools to assist teachers to manage conflict issues in their classrooms, and to re-engage disaffected students in learning. The research, which was conducted in a range of elementary and secondary schools in Australia, was part of…

  10. [Types of conflicts and conflict management among Hungarian healthcare workers].

    PubMed

    Csupor, Éva; Kuna, Ágnes; Pintér, Judit Nóra; Kaló, Zsuzsa; Csabai, Márta

    2017-04-01

    Efficient communication, conflict management and cooperation are the key factors of a successful patient care. This study is part of an international comparative research. The aim of this study is to unfold conflicts among healthcare workers. 73 healthcare workers were interviewed using a standardized interview protocol. The in-person interviews used the critical incident method. 30 interviews (15 doctors, 15 nurses) were analysed with the Atlas.ti 7 content analysis software. The sources, types, effects of conflicts and conflict management strategies were investigated. The content analysis unfolded the specificities of conflicts in healthcare based on personal experiences. Organizational hierarchy was a substantial source of conflict, especially among physicians, which originates from implicit rules. As a result of the avoiding conflict management the conflicts remain partly unresolved which has negative individual and group effect. Our conceptual framework helps to develop a proper intervention specific to healthcare. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(16), 625-632.

  11. Conflict Management: Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammerer, Ann

    This study examined the use of Conflict Managers, a program teaching students communication skills and the ways to apply these skills to resolve their own conflicts. Participating were 33 fourth and fifth graders from middle class families and with varying academic abilities. Of the participants, 23 were Caucasian, 4 Asian-American, 1…

  12. Derailing Intragroup Management Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John; Vaughn, Glen

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of management conflict highlights differing job perceptions held by middle managers. The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Assessment Program is described, and a management structure that requires members of each group to experience job perceptions and tasks of the other group is recommended for performance improvement. (Contains three…

  13. An Exploration of Conflict and Conflict Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusty, Francis M.

    The study reported on was conducted to study aspects of conflict and conflict management that might have implications for the fields of education and educational administration. The five phases of the study include a review of the literature, a series of interviews, a synthesis of ideas, the dissemination of findings, and a concluding research…

  14. Flexible conflict management: conflict avoidance and conflict adjustment in reactive cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Dignath, David; Kiesel, Andrea; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-07-01

    Conflict processing is assumed to serve two crucial, yet distinct functions: Regarding task performance, control is adjusted to overcome the conflict. Regarding task choice, control is harnessed to bias decision making away from the source of conflict. Despite recent theoretical progress, until now two lines of research addressed these conflict-management strategies independently of each other. In this research, we used a voluntary task-switching paradigm in combination with response interference tasks to study both strategies in concert. In Experiment 1, participants chose between two univalent tasks on each trial. Switch rates increased following conflict trials, indicating avoidance of conflict. Furthermore, congruency effects in reaction times and error rates were reduced following conflict trials, demonstrating conflict adjustment. In Experiment 2, we used bivalent instead of univalent stimuli. Conflict adjustment in task performance was unaffected by this manipulation, but conflict avoidance was not observed. Instead, task switches were reduced after conflict trials. In Experiment 3, we used tasks comprising univalent or bivalent stimuli. Only tasks with univalent revealed conflict avoidance, whereas conflict adjustment was found for all tasks. On the basis of established theories of cognitive control, an integrative process model is described that can account for flexible conflict management. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Cultural Difference in Conflict Management Strategies of Children and Its Development: Comparing 3- and 5-Year-Olds across China, Japan, and Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruyama, Hiroki; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Takai, Jiro; Takahama, Yuko; Sakagami, Hiroko; Shibayama, Makoto; Fukumoto, Mayumi; Ninomiya, Katsumi; Hyang Ah, Park; Feng, Xiaoxia; Takatsuji, Chie; Hirose, Miwa; Kudo, Rei; Shima, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Rumiko; Hamaie, Noriko; Zhang, Feng; Moriizumi, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the development of conflict management strategies, focusing on 3- and 5-year-olds, through a comparison of 3 neighboring Asian cultures, those of China (n = 114), Japan (n = 98), and Korea (n = 90). The dual concern model of conflict management was adopted to probe which…

  16. Conflict Resolution: Strategies for the Elementary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jesse

    2001-01-01

    Describes three types of conflict: (1) conflict over resources; (2) conflict of needs; and (3) conflict of values. Discusses strategies for conflict resolution appropriate for K-4 students. Addresses ways for combating conflict, such as developing active listening techniques, decision-making skills, self-assessments, and using children's…

  17. Managing Conflict: A Guide for the Pharmacy Manager.

    PubMed

    Haumschild, Ryan J; Hertig, John B; Weber, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Managing conflict among a variety of people and groups is a necessary part of creating a high performance pharmacy department. As new pharmacy managers enter the workforce, much of their success depends on how they manage conflict. The goal of this article is to provide a guide for the pharmacy director on conflict in the workplace. By evaluating each type of conflict, we can learn how to respond when it occurs. Resolving conflict requires a unique and individualized approach, and the strategy used may often be based on the situational context and the personality of the employee or manager. The more that pharmacy leaders can engage in conflict resolution with employees and external leaders, the more proactive they can be in achieving positive results. If pharmacy directors understand the source of conflicts and use management strategies to resolve them, they will ensure that conflicts result in a more effective patient-centered pharmacy service.

  18. Conflict resolution strategies in the pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Okolo, E N

    1985-04-01

    Conflict occurs in the pharmacy as employees seek limited resources, prestige, power, and position. An organization such as the pharmacy has a diversity of employees, including professional, semiprofessional, skilled, and technical, which makes the pharmacy susceptible to constant confrontation. Various strategies exist for the pharmacist to use in resolving conflict situations in the workplace. These include win-lose, lose-lose, and win-win strategies. To achieve a win-win situation, the pharmacy manager must have good communication skills that help employees clarify the meaning of words and avoid misunderstandings.

  19. Maritime Strategy for Regional Conflict,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-21

    Nationalism; Drugs ; Presence; Sea Contro 19 ABSTRACT (Confirm* on rsvsrs if necowary and idlentify by blok numfber) OUR NAVAL AND MILITARY LEADERSHIP...14 NATIONALISM ............................. 15 DRUGS .................................. 15 IV MARITIME STRATEGY AND REGIONAL CONFLICT ......... 17...global stability set by the national leadership as the nation’s goal. Theater commanders must be prepared for the most caallenging period in our

  20. Nursing and conflict communication: avoidance as preferred strategy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Margaret M; Nicotera, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted to examine nurses' (n = 57) selection of strategies to confront conflict in the workplace. Communication competence is the conceptual framework, defining competent conflict communication as joint problem-solving communication that is both effective and appropriate. Items were drawn from tools assessing nurses' conflict management strategies. Nurses reported a strong preference not to confront conflict directly; nurse managers were less likely to avoid direct communication. Nurses who do choose to confront conflict are more likely to use constructive than destructive strategies. The integration of the social science of health communication into nursing education and practice and other implications are discussed.

  1. Recognizing and Managing Interpersonal Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Nancy; Hovland, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Practical advice is offered, to managers and supervisors at any level, on recognizing and analyzing interpersonal conflicts, managing such conflicts and making them productive, and ensuring that performance reviews result in progress for both supervisor and employee. Conflict is seen as inevitable, an opportunity to take action, and manageable.…

  2. The Effects of Parental Involvement, Trust in Parents, Trust in Students and Pupil Control Ideology on Conflict Management Strategies of Early Childhood Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Mehmet; Savas, Ahmet Cezmi

    2012-01-01

    In this study it was aimed to determine the effects of parental involvement, teachers' trust in parents and students, and teachers' pupil control ideology on the conflict management strategies used by teachers in classroom management. Data were collected from a sample of 254 teachers through paper and pencil questionnaires. Data were analyzed with…

  3. Conflict Management: Cues and Implications for Managers from Conflict Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Joey A.

    A literature review, intended to help in the development and assessment of effective manager training programs, explored development of conflict management research with respect to managers and their subordinates and examined individual, interpersonal, and organizational factors that affect the management of conflict. Although limited in scope,…

  4. CONFLICT IN EASTERN UKRAINE: STRATEGY FOR TUBERCULOSIS.

    PubMed

    Kuchuloria, T; Akhvlediani, T; Akhvlediani, N

    2016-09-01

    This root cause analysis concerns the conflict in the Eastern Ukraine and its impact on healthcare delivery in the context of treating internally displaced persons (IDPs). Inadequate treatment of tuberculosis (TB) was selected as a major topic for intervention planning in conflict areas in Ukraine. With respect to treating TB among IDPs, rapid diagnosis and adequate nutrition and shelter are important components of care and disease control. The DOT, supported by trained primary healthcare providers equipped with rapid MDR TB diagnostic capacities, need to provide appropriate shelter and nutrition to IDPs. In addition to active disease management, this paper discusses the important role of ongoing project monitoring and communicating evaluation findings with all the major stakeholders shaping the national TB strategy in Ukraine. A comprehensive strategy is essential for successful transitioning and re-structuring of TB healthcare delivery both during after conflict resolution.

  5. Managing Conflict for Productive Results: A Critical Leadership Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simerly, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Describes sources of conflict in organizations and five effective management strategies: identify points of view, let parties articulate what they want, buy time, attempt negotiation, and ask parties to agree to arbitration. Provides a conflict management analysis sheet. (SK)

  6. Uncovered Coping Strategies Adopted by Children Living in Homes with Marital Conflicts for Their Own Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawuo, Ebenezer A.; Machumu, Haruni J.; Kimaro, Anathe R.

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that marital conflict pertains to three particular dimensions of communication including affect, conflict behaviours and conflict management and these affect conflict choice of management strategies. This paper explored the problems and coping strategies of children from homes with marital conflicts in Tanga City, Tanzania. An…

  7. Conflict Management Styles of Turkish Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkalp, Enver; Sungur, Zerrin; Ozdemir, Aytul Ayse

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine Turkish managers conflict styles in different sectors, namely durable consumer goods, aviation, automotive and banking. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 130 managers conflict management styles were assessed by applying the Rahim's 1983 Organizational Conflict Inventory-II. Findings: First,…

  8. Managing conflicts in systems development.

    PubMed

    Barnett, E

    1997-05-01

    Conflict in systems development is nothing new. It can vary in intensity, but there will always be two possible outcomes--one constructive and the other destructive. The common approach to conflict management is to draw the battle lines and apply brute force. However, there are other ways to deal with conflict that are more effective and more people oriented.

  9. Matrix Management: Is It Really Conflict Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    ru— A036 516 DEFENSE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT COLL FORT BELVOIR VA - FIG 5/1 MATRIX MANAGEMENT: IS IT REALLY CONFLICT MANAGEMENT . (U) NOV 76 R P... conflict management .” As a result , sensitivity training for managers and their subordinates was conducted in order to implement the matrix concept...Wilemon. “ Conflict Management in ProJect Life Cycles ,” Sloan ~anagement Review , Vol. 16,Spring , 1975, pp . 3 1—5 0. Thamhain , Hans J. and David L

  10. Conflict management: importance and implications.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Laurie

    2017-01-26

    Conflict is a consistent and unavoidable issue within healthcare teams. Despite training of nurse leaders and managers around areas of conflict resolution, the problem of staff relations, stress, sickness and retention remain. Conflict arises from issues with interpersonal relationships, change and poor leadership. New members of staff entering an already established healthcare team should be supported and integrated, to encourage mutual role respect between all team members and establish positive working relationships, in order to maximise patient care. This paper explores the concept of conflict, the importance of addressing causes of conflict, effective management, and the relevance of positive approaches to conflict resolution. Good leadership, nurturing positive team dynamics and communication, encourages shared problem solving and acceptance of change. Furthermore mutual respect fosters a more positive working environment for those in healthcare teams. As conflict has direct implications for patients, positive resolution is essential, to promote safe and effective delivery of care, whilst encouraging therapeutic relationships between colleagues and managers.

  11. The Management of Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, M. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    While educational institutions and industry share some common elements of the administrative decision-making process, a major point of divergence is the treatment of conflict. In higher education, conflict is seen as destructive and should be avoided, but it can be handled positively. Types, common elements, and styles of conflict are reviewed.…

  12. Conflict management and resolution.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay; Wood, Beverly P

    2006-03-01

    When people work collaboratively, conflict will always arise. Understanding the nature and source of conflict and its progression and stages, resolution, and outcome is a vital aspect of leadership. Causes of conflict include the miscomprehension of communication, emotional issues, personal history, and values. When the difference is understood and the resultant behavior properly addressed, most conflict can be settled in a way that provides needed change in an organization and interrelationships. There are serious consequences of avoiding or mismanaging disagreements. Informed leaders can effectively prevent destructive conflicts.

  13. A two stage analysis of recreation conflict as a basis for management strategies in the black forest: a methodological contribution

    Treesearch

    C. Mann; J.D. Absher

    2007-01-01

    The scientific inputs to management of recreation areas in Germany have been largely determined by ecologically oriented quantitative impact and conflict studies with an emphasis on nature protection. Today, however, Germany’s recreational situation has changed. New activities and increased participation by people seeking different recreational experiences challenge...

  14. Putting conflict management into practice: a nursing case study.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Cristina García

    2006-04-01

    This paper is intended to put knowledge in conflict management into practice through reflecting on a nursing case study. Nursing organizations are particularly vulnerable to conflict as the context of nurses' work may be difficult and stressful. Power conflict is argued to be an important source of tension within nursing units. Learning to manage conflict at an early stage is therefore crucial to the effective functioning of nursing organizations. A nursing case study that illustrates power conflict in an oncology nursing unit is displayed and reflection on conflict management from the case is provided. There is no appropriate or inappropriate strategy to deal with conflict. However, detecting initial symptoms of conflict and adopting the most effective behaviour to conflict resolution is essential in nursing units. Further nursing education in conflict management for staff nurses and nurse managers is greatly needed.

  15. Conflict management, Part 1. Conflict management checklist: a diagnostic tool for assessing conflict in organizations.

    PubMed

    Siders, C T; Aschenbrener, C A

    1999-01-01

    Complex interpersonal conflicts are inevitable in the high speed, high stakes, pressured work of health care. Poorly managed, conflict saps productivity, erodes trust, and spawns additional disputes. Well managed, conflict can enhance the self-confidence and self-esteem of the parties, build relationships, and engender creative solutions beyond expectations. Just as thoughtful differential diagnosis precedes optimum treatment in the doctor-patient relationship, management of conflict is greatly enhanced when preceded by careful assessment. In the first of two articles, the authors present a diagnostic approach, the Conflict Management Checklist, to increase self-awareness and decrease anxiety around conflict.

  16. Cultural Difference in Conflict Management Strategies of Children and Its Development: Comparing 3- and 5-Year-Olds Across China, Japan, and Korea.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hiroki; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Takai, Jiro; Takahama, Yuko; Sakagami, Hiroko; Shibayama, Makoto; Fukumoto, Mayumi; Ninomiya, Katsumi; Hyang Ah, Park; Feng, Xiaoxia; Takatsuji, Chie; Hirose, Miwa; Kudo, Rei; Shima, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Rumiko; Hamaie, Noriko; Zhang, Feng; Moriizumi, Satoshi

    2015-11-17

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the development of conflict management strategies, focusing on 3- and 5-year-olds, through a comparison of 3 neighboring Asian cultures, those of China ( n  = 114), Japan ( n  = 98), and Korea ( n  = 90). The dual concern model of conflict management was adopted to probe which strategy children would prefer to use in 2 hypothetical conflict situations. Results indicated that, first, for disagreement, 3-year-olds in the 3 countries equally preferred the dominating strategy. For competition for resources, 3-year-olds differed in their strategy preference across all cultures. Second, the observed strategy preference of 3- to 5-year-old children in this study was more or less different from that of older schoolchildren, regardless of culture. Practice or Policy: These findings suggest the significance of the context, the complexity of the phenomenon of the development of cultural differences, and the significance of cohort sampling.

  17. Cultural Difference in Conflict Management Strategies of Children and Its Development: Comparing 3- and 5-Year-Olds Across China, Japan, and Korea

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Hiroki; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Takai, Jiro; Takahama, Yuko; Sakagami, Hiroko; Shibayama, Makoto; Fukumoto, Mayumi; Ninomiya, Katsumi; Hyang Ah, Park; Feng, Xiaoxia; Takatsuji, Chie; Hirose, Miwa; Kudo, Rei; Shima, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Rumiko; Hamaie, Noriko; Zhang, Feng; Moriizumi, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the development of conflict management strategies, focusing on 3- and 5-year-olds, through a comparison of 3 neighboring Asian cultures, those of China (n = 114), Japan (n = 98), and Korea (n = 90). The dual concern model of conflict management was adopted to probe which strategy children would prefer to use in 2 hypothetical conflict situations. Results indicated that, first, for disagreement, 3-year-olds in the 3 countries equally preferred the dominating strategy. For competition for resources, 3-year-olds differed in their strategy preference across all cultures. Second, the observed strategy preference of 3- to 5-year-old children in this study was more or less different from that of older schoolchildren, regardless of culture. Practice or Policy: These findings suggest the significance of the context, the complexity of the phenomenon of the development of cultural differences, and the significance of cohort sampling. PMID:26430351

  18. Conflict management in online relationships.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kumi

    2010-08-01

    With the diffusion of networked technology, personal relationships can be easily formed and maintained online today. Similar to a face-to-face situation, conflict is also seen in these online relationships. Early theories suggested that computer-mediated communication (CMC) tends to increase conflicts because of the lack of social-context cues, and CMC is not rich enough to manage conflict. As CMC has become part of our daily life, we often face conflict online, and thus we need to understand how people manage conflict online. This study explored how online users manage interpersonal conflict. Self-report survey data from 159 university students were analyzed to examine their conflict-management styles in association with the perceived closeness of the online relationship and a future intention toward the relationship. The results indicated that online users select cooperative management styles to handle conflict in their close relationships. In addition, online users avoid less cooperative styles when they want to continue the relationship.

  19. Conflict Resolution, Can It Really Make a Difference in the Classroom: Conflict Resolution Strategies for Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollan, Savannah; Wilson-Younger, Dylinda

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses conflict and provides five resolutions for teachers on managing negative behaviors within the classroom. Acknowledging and implementing conflict resolution strategies in the classroom enables every student to fully participate in the learning process.

  20. Managing conflict in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Weygman, L

    1986-08-01

    Conflict is inevitable in the workplace. Mounting pressures to reduce staffing levels and improve productivity will almost certainly increase the level of conflict in the hospital setting in the coming months and years. The most effective managers will be those who can handle it constructively.

  1. Physicians in health care management: 10. Managing conflict through negotiation.

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux-Charles, L

    1994-01-01

    The recent focus on collaborative relationships in health care means that people and groups must cooperate to accomplish clinical and management tasks. This increasing interdependence may also cause increased organizational conflict. The management of conflicts is critical to the effectiveness of an organization. Negotiating strategies, based on Fisher and Ury's method of "principled negotiation," include establishing superordinate goals, separating the people from the problem, focussing on interests, inventing options, using objective criteria and defining success in terms of gains. PMID:7922944

  2. Conflict Management at School: An Unavoidable Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondesio, Mike J.

    Conflict management has become an integral part of a headmaster's tasks. Headmasters are not required to suppress or resolve conflict, but to manage it. Since 1976, conflict in black schools has increased, and headmasters have had to manage serious and dangerous situations. Unfortunately, there has been little research in conflict management in…

  3. Conflict management: a primer for doctors in training

    PubMed Central

    Saltman, D C; O'Dea, N A; Kidd, M R

    2006-01-01

    Conflict in the health arena is a growing concern and is well recognised for doctors in training. Its most extreme expression, workplace violence is on the increase. There is evidence that many conflicts remain unsatisfactorily resolved or unresolved, and result in ongoing issues for staff morale. This paper describes the nature of conflict in the health care system and identifies the difference between conflict and disagreement. Using a conflict resolution model, strategies for dealing with conflict as it arises are explored and tips are provided on how to effectively manage conflict to a satisfactory resolution for all parties. PMID:16397073

  4. Conflict management: a primer for doctors in training.

    PubMed

    Saltman, D C; O'Dea, N A; Kidd, M R

    2006-01-01

    Conflict in the health arena is a growing concern and is well recognised for doctors in training. Its most extreme expression, workplace violence is on the increase. There is evidence that many conflicts remain unsatisfactorily resolved or unresolved, and result in ongoing issues for staff morale. This paper describes the nature of conflict in the health care system and identifies the difference between conflict and disagreement. Using a conflict resolution model, strategies for dealing with conflict as it arises are explored and tips are provided on how to effectively manage conflict to a satisfactory resolution for all parties.

  5. Ethnic Conflicts and Governmental Conflict Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    the risk of violent conflict.12 Indisputably, many of the ethnically diverse nations of Europe in the 19th century emerged as nation- states in the...conflict involving Protestants, Catholics, and secularists in the first quarter of the 20th century .8 In Malaysia, Malays and Chinese have clashed...20th century . In the developing world, like Africa and the Middle East, however, attempts at nation building have often led to bitter conflict and

  6. Managing Diversity-Based Conflicts among Children. Fastback 414.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Charles C.; And Others

    This guide is designed to provide assistance in handling complex situational conflicts involving diversity through appropriate conflict management strategies for diverse classrooms at the elementary and middle school levels. Diversity-based conflict is not new in the United States. The classroom is, as it has been historically, one of the major…

  7. Managing Conflict in Temporary Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilemon, David L.

    1973-01-01

    As organizational tasks have grown more complex, several innovative temporary management systems such as matrix management have been developed. The Apollo space program has been an important contribution to the development of matrix management techniques. Discusses the role of conflict within the matrix, its determinants, and the process of…

  8. Conflict in schools: student nurses' conflict management styles.

    PubMed

    Kantek, Filiz; Gezer, Nurdan

    2009-01-01

    Unless conflicts between the students and the instructors can be successfully managed, they will certainly result in negative outcomes for the students. The conflict management styles of the students should be recognized in detail in order to attain positive outcomes in regard to the conflict management styles. The purpose of this study was to examine the conflict management styles used by nursing students in conflict with faculty members and the differences in use of style from the aspect of some variables. This study was conducted with 151 students in a public university nursing school. Data were collected using a personal information form and the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory II (ROCI II). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Tukey test, Kruskal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test and Cronbach alpha coefficient analyses. The students were found to use integrating (X=3.82) and obliging (X=3.81) styles the most, and dominating style (X=3.02) the least. In addition there were differences determined in management style between classes, frequency of experiencing conflict, and feeling of success in the conflict (p<0.05). It was determined that the integrating and obliging styles were used more by those who evaluated themselves as successful in conflict management, but the avoiding and compromising styles were used more by students who evaluated themselves as unsuccessful. It was determined that the students preferred to use styles that produced positive results in conflict resolution and that the frequency of experiencing conflict and the feeling of success in conflict had an effect on choice of style. It will be helpful to analyze the relationship between the causes of conflict between the student and the instructor in the practice field and the uses of conflict management styles.

  9. Conflict management and job satisfaction in paediatric hospitals in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kaitelidou, Daphne; Kontogianni, Alexandra; Galanis, Petros; Siskou, Olga; Mallidou, Anastasia; Pavlakis, Andreas; Kostagiolas, Petros; Theodorou, Mamas; Liaropoulos, Lycurgus

    2012-05-01

    To assess the major causes of conflict and to identify choices of strategy in handling conflicts. Conflict is inherent to hospitals as in all complex organizations, and health personnel deal with internal and external conflicts daily. The sample consisted of 286 participants. A five-part questionnaire, specific for conflicts in hospitals, was administered to health personnel. Of the participants 37% were physicians and 63% were nurses and nursing assistants. As far as choice of strategy in conflict management is concerned, avoidance was found to be the most frequent mode chosen while accommodation was the least frequent mode. Organizational problems were the main issue creating conflicts since 52% of nurses and 45% of physicians agreed that receiving direction from more than one manager may lead to conflicts (P=0.02). Educational differences and communication gaps were reported as another cause of conflicts, with nurses supporting this statement more than the other groups (P=0.006). To become effective in conflict management nurses and physicians must understand causes and strategies in handling conflicts. Major changes are needed regarding human resource management, work incentives and dynamics of teamwork in order to improve working conditions in Greek public hospitals. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Reaching out Merits of Information Technology: Conflict Management in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaiz, Mehmet Ekin; Altinay, Zehra

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of headmasters in conflict management process within the school culture. The study has qualitative nature through the interviews with 76 teachers on the leadership and conflict management strategies of the headmasters. Within the framework of action learning and learning organization of a school…

  11. Social scientist's viewpoint on conflict management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ertel, Madge O.

    1990-01-01

    Social scientists can bring to the conflict-management process objective, reliable information needed to resolve increasingly complex issues. Engineers need basic training in the principles of the social sciences and in strategies for public involvement. All scientists need to be sure that that the information they provide is unbiased by their own value judgments and that fair standards and open procedures govern its use.

  12. Links between Conflict Management Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roloff, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explicates the implications of my research on conflict management for self improvement and for practitioners who work to improve the conflict management of others. I also note how my experiences with practitioners have informed my research.

  13. Army Officers’ Attitudes of Conflict Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-11

    The purpose of this study was to measure the attitudes of the middle level career Army officers relative to the concepts of conflict management . The...the literature concerning conflict management and its related fields of study, an exploratory analysis employing Hierarchical Clustering Schemes, and... conflict management . (2) No difference exists in the attitudes of conflict management according to the sample’s three branch groups: combat arms

  14. How negotiators get to yes: predicting the constellation of strategies used across cultures to negotiate conflict.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, C H

    2001-08-01

    Individualism, hierarchy, polychronicity, and explicit-contracting values explain why managers from Germany, Japan, and the United States use a different mix of strategies to negotiate workplace conflict. Hypotheses extend prior research in showing that conflict behavior is multiply determined and that each culture uses a variety of interests, regulations, and power-based conflict management strategies. Results of actual (rather than survey-based) conflict resolution behavior suggest several fruitful avenues for future research, including examining the inferred meaning of negotiation arguments, analyzing interaction effects of cultural value dimensions, studying the effectiveness of different strategies across cultures, and examining whether strategic adjustments are made during intercultural conflict management.

  15. Team Conflict in ICT-Rich Environments: Roles of Technologies in Conflict Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Ana-Paula

    2008-01-01

    This study looks at how an information and communication technologies (ICT)-rich environment impacts team conflict and conflict management strategies. A case study research method was used. Three teams, part of a graduate class in instructional design, participated in the study. Data were collected through observations of team meetings, interviews…

  16. Conflict Management and Decision Making. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on conflict management and decision making is comprised of three papers. "Two Approaches to Conflict Management in Teams: A Case Study" (Mychal Coleman, Gary N. McLean) describes a study that provided conflict management training to two employee teams using the traditional lecture method and cooperative learning (CL).…

  17. Managing conflict between large carnivores and livestock.

    PubMed

    van Eeden, Lily M; Crowther, Mathew S; Dickman, Chris R; Macdonald, David W; Ripple, William J; Ritchie, Euan G; Newsome, Thomas M

    2018-02-01

    Large carnivores are persecuted globally because they threaten human industries and livelihoods. How this conflict is managed has consequences for the conservation of large carnivores and biodiversity more broadly. Mitigating human-predator conflict should be evidence-based and accommodate people's values while protecting carnivores. Despite much research into human and large-carnivore coexistence strategies, there have been few attempts to document the success of conflict-mitigation strategies on a global scale. We conducted a meta-analysis of global research on conflict mitigation related to large carnivores and humans. We focused on conflicts that arise from the threat large carnivores pose to livestock. We first used structured and unstructured searching to identify replicated studies that used before-after or control-impact design to measure change in livestock loss as a result of implementing a management intervention. We then extracted relevant data from these studies to calculate an overall effect size for each intervention type. Research effort and focus varied among continents and aligned with the histories and cultures that shaped livestock production and attitudes toward carnivores. Livestock guardian animals most effectively reduced livestock losses. Lethal control was the second most effective control, although its success varied the most, and guardian animals and lethal control did not differ significantly. Financial incentives have promoted tolerance of large carnivores in some settings and reduced retaliatory killings. We suggest coexistence strategies be location-specific, incorporate cultural values and environmental conditions, and be designed such that return on financial investment can be evaluated. Improved monitoring of mitigation measures is urgently required to promote effective evidence-based policy. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. The Impact of Perceptions on Conflict Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longaretti, Lynette; Wilson, Jeni

    2006-01-01

    This article describes research that explored student and teacher perceptions and management of conflict within the primary school context. It was found that both teachers and students shared similarities in their views of conflict and in their management of interpersonal problems at school. Conflict was generally perceived to be a negative…

  19. Teaching Conflict Management Using a Scenario-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callanan, Gerard A.; Perri, David F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a framework for the teaching of conflict management in college courses. The framework describes an experiential learning approach for helping individuals understand the influence of contextual factors in the selection of conflict handling strategy. It also includes a comparison of participants' choice of style,…

  20. Conflict management in public hospitals: the Cyprus case.

    PubMed

    Pavlakis, A; Kaitelidou, D; Theodorou, M; Galanis, P; Sourtzi, P; Siskou, O

    2011-06-01

    Conflict among health-care personnel has been identified as an issue within health-care settings around the world. To investigate the existence and management of conflict among health-care personnel in public hospitals in Cyprus; to assess the factors leading to conflict among staff members; to evaluate the consequences of conflict arising; and to consider the management strategies. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by a random sample of 1037 health-care professionals in all (seven) state-run hospitals in Cyprus in 2008. Mean age of respondents was 41 years, and 75% were female. Sixty-four per cent of respondents reported that they had never been informed about conflict management strategies, with physicians being the least informed as the relative percentage was 79.8% (χ(2) = 33, P < 0.001). Sixty per cent of health-care professionals reported conflict at work with other health-care personnel one to five times per week, and 37% of the respondents stated that they devote 90 min (mean value) from work during their shift in conflict resolution, meaning that managing conflicts may absorb 19% of working time daily. The majority of respondents agreed that organizational problems and communication gaps were the main issues creating conflict. Avoidance and collaboration were the preferable strategies for conflict resolution, used by 36.6% and 37.5% of the respondents, respectively.   Better communication, fair management practices and clear job descriptions and expectations may be needed in order to facilitate change and reverse the negative atmosphere that exists. Further education in conflict management for physicians, nurses and their managers may also be needed. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  1. Animosity, antagonism, and avatars: teaching conflict management in second life.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dena A; Curtis, Anthony R

    2011-11-01

    Conflict exists in all health care organizations and may take many forms, including lateral or horizontal violence. The Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education identified the development of conflict resolution strategies as core knowledge required of the bachelor's of science in nursing generalist. However, learning the art of conflict management takes both time and practice. With competition for clinical space increasing, class time in short supply, and traditional clinical opportunities for teaching conflict management lacking, a virtual approach to teaching conflict resolution was explored through the use of Second Life®. The project presented here explored students' perceptions of this unique approach to learning conflict management and sought to examine the effectiveness of this teaching method. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Conflict Management: Difficult Conversations with Difficult People

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Amy R.; Lowry, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict occurs frequently in any workplace; health care is not an exception. The negative consequences include dysfunctional team work, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased employee turnover. Research demonstrates that training in conflict resolution skills can result in improved teamwork, productivity, and patient and employee satisfaction. Strategies to address a disruptive physician, a particularly difficult conflict situation in healthcare, are addressed. PMID:24436688

  3. Conflict management: difficult conversations with difficult people.

    PubMed

    Overton, Amy R; Lowry, Ann C

    2013-12-01

    Conflict occurs frequently in any workplace; health care is not an exception. The negative consequences include dysfunctional team work, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased employee turnover. Research demonstrates that training in conflict resolution skills can result in improved teamwork, productivity, and patient and employee satisfaction. Strategies to address a disruptive physician, a particularly difficult conflict situation in healthcare, are addressed.

  4. Advanced communication skills: conflict management and persuasion.

    PubMed

    Ang, Marigene

    2002-11-01

    There is an increasing need in the medical school curriculum to adequately prepare students for professionalism in the workplace. This senior seminar is a four-week course designed to develop fluency in handling conflict and negotiation as well as understanding the elements of persuasive communication. Students used the Meyers-Brigg Personality Inventory as a paradigm for understanding different communication styles. The class was piloted in October and November 2001 and consisted of four modules. In module one, each student was given the Meyers-Brigg Personality Inventory to take. Discussions and exercises provided insight into the student's own communication style as well as styles the individual student might find more problematic. The second module consisted of four sessions focusing on conflict management and negotiating skills. Students were given strategies for dealing with conflict as well as specific approaches for communicating with "difficult" patients. In the subsequent sessions, students had a chance to further incorporate these strategies by (1) discussing in a small-group setting a conflict situation that they had either witnessed or experienced in order to systematically evaluate how to incorporate conflict-management approaches into their particular communication style. (2) Role-playing four conflict situations students' were likely to encounter in their professional lives. Role-plays were videotaped and individual feedback was given immediately after the role-play by the observing students, the patient-actor, and the evaluator, who had been trained to give specific feedback on the conflict strategies. (3) Watching specific videotaped role-plays as a class allowed students to see and give feedback on particularly effective strategies that their colleagues used. The third module was devoted to giving bad news and ways that different people prefer to receive bad news, using the MBTI personality types as examples. The final module outlined the

  5. [Conflict management in the workplace].

    PubMed

    Mola Sanna, Bruna; Igual Ayerbe, Blanca

    2010-02-01

    Our sanitary system and our health organizations have to confront the conflicts which have derived from the successive social and sanitary changes which have developed over the most recent decades. These new realities in the health fields oblige the professionals dedicated to them, the administrators of our organizations, the politicians, and society in general, as those who make use of the health services provided, to search for strategies and resources for the prevention, and transformation of those conflicts which can develop due to these situations, having as their final objective to preserve the basic principle of universal health care which is included in our Constitution. For this reason, the authors propose a profile for mediators in the health field, understanding that for mediation to really be useful, and to avoid or reduce improper litigation in our health system, values which belong to the culture of peace should be introduced into the culture of our health organizations. To that end, it is essential to count on not only professional mediators but also on an elenchus of natural mediators and informal mediators.

  6. “Catching Flies With Honey”: The Management of Conflict in Sexual Assault Response Teams

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Carrie A.; Lindhorst, Taryn

    2015-01-01

    Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) are models of service delivery characterized by coordination between rape crisis, health care, and criminal justice sectors. Expanding on research documenting the extent and nature of conflict in SARTs, this study qualitatively explores the strategies used to manage conflict and variations in the use of strategies between professions. Analysis of interviews with SART members (n = 24) revealed five types of strategies: (a) preventative strategies sought to prevent conflict and build capacity for resolving conflict, (b) problem-solving strategies identified and responded directly to conflicts, (c) forcing strategies involved one person attempting to force a perspective or solution on others, (d) unobtrusive strategies covertly worked toward change, and (e) resigned strategies limited direct responses to conflict to protect the coordination. Rape crisis advocates talked the most about conflict management strategies and were almost exclusively responsible for unobtrusive and resignation strategies. PMID:25246436

  7. "Conflict management" and "conflict resolution" are not synonymous terms.

    PubMed

    Robbins, S P

    1978-01-01

    Robbins sees functional conflict as an absolute necessity within organizations and explicitly encourages it. He explains: "Survival can result only when an organization is able to adapt to constant changes in the environment. Adaption is possible only through change, and change is stimulated by conflict." Robbins cites evidence indicating that conflict can be related to increased productivity and that critical thinking encourages well-developed decisions. He admits, however, that not all conflicts are good for the organization. Their functional or dysfunctional nature is determined by the impact of the conflict on the objectives of the organization. The author identifies several factors underlying the need for conflict stimulation: (1) managers who are surrounded by "yes men"; (2) subordinates who are afraid to admit ignorance or uncertainty; (3) decision-makers' excessive concern about hurting the feelings of others; or (4) an environment where new ideas are slow in coming forth. He suggests techniques for stimulating conflict; manipulating the communication channels (i.e., repression of information); changing the organizational structure (i.e., changes in size or position); and altering personal behavior factors (i.e., role incongruence). Robbins stresses that the actual method to be used in either resolving or stimulating conflict must be appropriate to the situation.

  8. Global nursing management. Avoiding conflicts of interest.

    PubMed

    Willers, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally, the healthcare industry has been no stranger to some conflicts of interest. However, as healthcare responds to demands to contain costs and adapts business models that resemble those of the corporate world, new conflicts of interest arise. Nurse executives operating in healthcare systems today must have an understanding of conflicts of interest in order to promptly identify actual as well as potential conflicts. It is imperative that strategies are set in place to prevent or handle conflicts of interest as they occur in order to build trusting relationships with patients, suppliers, and communities.

  9. Traditionalism and Feminism: A Typology of Strategies Used by University Women to Manage Career-Family Conflicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an Eriksonian analysis of the impact of traditionalism and feminism on the identity formation of university-attending women and postulates four "identity strategies": traditionalism, ambivalent semi-traditionalism, confident semi-traditionalism, and feminism. Describes a study assessing the reliability and validity of an…

  10. Health Education in Practice: Employee Conflict Resolution Knowledge and Conflict Handling Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackett, Alexis; Renschler, Lauren; Kramer, Alaina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine if a brief workplace conflict resolution workshop improved employee conflict resolution knowledge and to examine which conflict handling strategies (Yielding, Compromising, Forcing, Problem-Solving, Avoiding) were most used by employees when dealing with workplace conflict. A pre-test/post-test control…

  11. Managing Conflict: Policy and Research Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Sandra V.; Boardman, Susan K.

    1994-01-01

    Highlights the importance of constructive conflict management in resolving disagreements arising from diversity. The authors discuss policy recommendations for implementing conflict-management programs in schools, training individuals in nonschool settings, and designing cross-cultural programs for high-risk inner-city youth. Procedural…

  12. Conflict management styles of Asian and Asian American nurses: implications for the nurse manager.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Davidhizar, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Foreign nurses and American nurses who are culturally diverse make up an increasing number of the US nursing workforce. Of foreign nurses, Asians constitute the largest number. Conflict is an inevitable aspect of human relations in health care settings. Nurses and other health team members with diverse cultural background bring to the workplace different conflict behaviors that directly impact the outcomes of conflicts. It is essential for health care team members and managers to be cognizant of different conflict behaviors as well as different conflict management styles so that strategies can be designed to build a culturally diverse health care team that is able to effectively achieve group and organizational objectives.

  13. Conflict management style and marital satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Greeff, A P; de Bruyne, T

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is one conflict management style that correlated more significantly with marital satisfaction than any other. In addition, spousal satisfaction with how marital conflict is managed was also examined, as were gender differences. Fifty-seven couples who had been married for at least 10 years took part in the study. Results showed that the collaborative conflict management style has the highest correlation with both marital satisfaction and spousal satisfaction with conflict management in the marriage. In contrast, where one or both of the spouses used the competitive conflict management style, the lowest marital satisfaction was reported. The results were also interpreted in terms of cultural and gender differences.

  14. [Does clinical risk management require a structured conflict management?].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A key element of clinical risk management is the analysis of errors causing near misses or patient damage. After analyzing the causes and circumstances, measures for process improvement have to be taken. Process management, human resource development and other established methods are used. If an interpersonal conflict is a contributory factor to the error, there is usually no structured conflict management available which includes selection criteria for various methods of conflict processing. The European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder) has created a process model for introducing a structured conflict management system which is suitable for hospitals and could fill the gap in the methodological spectrum of clinical risk management. There is initial evidence that a structured conflict management reduces staff fluctuation and hidden conflict costs. This article should be understood as an impulse for discussion on to what extent the range of methods of clinical risk management should be complemented by conflict management.

  15. A Conflict Management Scale for Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Paul A.; Martin, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To develop and establish the validity and reliability of a conflict management scale specific to pharmacy practice and education. Methods A multistage inventory-item development process was undertaken involving 93 pharmacists and using a previously described explanatory model for conflict in pharmacy practice. A 19-item inventory was developed, field tested, and validated. Results The conflict management scale (CMS) demonstrated an acceptable degree of reliability and validity for use in educational or practice settings to promote self-reflection and self-awareness regarding individuals' conflict management styles. Conclusions The CMS provides a unique, pharmacy-specific method for individuals to determine and reflect upon their own conflict management styles. As part of an educational program to facilitate self-reflection and heighten self-awareness, the CMS may be a useful tool to promote discussions related to an important part of pharmacy practice. PMID:19960081

  16. A conflict management scale for pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Austin, Zubin; Gregory, Paul A; Martin, Craig

    2009-11-12

    To develop and establish the validity and reliability of a conflict management scale specific to pharmacy practice and education. A multistage inventory-item development process was undertaken involving 93 pharmacists and using a previously described explanatory model for conflict in pharmacy practice. A 19-item inventory was developed, field tested, and validated. The conflict management scale (CMS) demonstrated an acceptable degree of reliability and validity for use in educational or practice settings to promote self-reflection and self-awareness regarding individuals' conflict management styles. The CMS provides a unique, pharmacy-specific method for individuals to determine and reflect upon their own conflict management styles. As part of an educational program to facilitate self-reflection and heighten self-awareness, the CMS may be a useful tool to promote discussions related to an important part of pharmacy practice.

  17. Conflict coaching training for nurse managers: a case study of a two-hospital health system.

    PubMed

    Brinkert, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the application of the Comprehensive Conflict Coaching model in a hospital environment. Conflict coaching involves a coach working with a client to improve the client's conflict understanding, interaction strategies and/or interaction skills. The training of nurse managers as conflict coaches is an innovative continuing education programme that partially addresses conflict-related concerns in nursing. Twenty nurse managers trained as conflict coaches and each coached a supervisee. Qualitative data were gathered from nurse managers, supervisees and senior nursing leaders over an 8-month period and organized using standard programme evaluation themes. Benefits included supervisor conflict coaching competency and enhanced conflict communication competency for nurse managers and supervisees facing specific conflict situations. Challenges included the management of programme tensions. Additional benefits and challenges are discussed, along with study limitations. Conflict coaching was a practical and effective means of developing the conflict communication competencies of nurse managers and supervisees. Additional research is needed. Conflict is common in nursing. Conflict coaching is a new conflict communication and supervision intervention that demonstrates initial promise. Conflict coaching seems to work best when supported by a positive conflict culture and integrated with other conflict intervention processes. © 2010 The Author. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Constitutional Reform for Conflict Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    conflict. Empirical studies reveal that both accommodative and integrative constitutional design can produce political stability , if properly...reform, and the ability of various constitutional designs to promote democracy and political stability .

  19. The Situated Nature of Preschool Children's Conflict Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberg, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the peer conflict strategies of preschool children are situated and therefore vary across different conflict situations. Hypothetical conflict interviews were administered through a series of puppet shows. Participants were 178 preschool children. Results indicate that preschool children's conflict…

  20. The Value of Play for Conflict Management: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Lyn; Blunt, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This is a case study of a conflict management intervention in two secondary schools in post-apartheid South Africa. The feature of the intervention that we examine is the use of play as an educational strategy. The literature attests that play can facilitate change by allowing learners freedom to change their behaviour and opportunities to explore…

  1. Task conflict and relationship conflict in top management teams: the pivotal role of intragroup trust.

    PubMed

    Simons, T L; Peterson, R S

    2000-02-01

    Task conflict is usually associated with effective decisions, and relationship conflict is associated with poor decisions. The 2 conflict types are typically correlated in ongoing groups, however, which creates a prescriptive dilemma. Three explanations might account for this relationship--misattribution of task conflict as relationship conflict, harsh task conflict tactics triggering relationship conflict, and misattribution of relationship conflict as task conflict. The authors found that intragroup trust moderates the relationship between task conflict and relationship conflict in 70 top management teams. This result supports the "misattribution of task conflict" explanation. The authors also found a weak effect that is consistent with the argument that tactical choices drive the association between the 2 conflict types. We infer that trust is a key to gaining the benefits of task conflict without suffering the costs of relationship conflict.

  2. Teachers' Conflict Management Styles: The Role of Attachment Styles and Classroom Management Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris-Rothschild, Britta K.; Brassard, Marla R.

    2006-01-01

    Constructive conflict management strategies are important in maintaining a positive classroom environment yet little is known about interpersonal or school variables associated with teachers' use of such strategies with students. Teachers high in self-reported classroom management efficacy (CMEFF) and security of attachment (low on avoidance,…

  3. Teaching operating room conflict management to surgeons: clarifying the optimal approach.

    PubMed

    Rogers, David; Lingard, Lorelei; Boehler, Margaret L; Espin, Sherry; Klingensmith, Mary; Mellinger, John D; Schindler, Nancy

    2011-09-01

    Conflict management has been identified as an essential competence for surgeons as they work in operating room (OR) teams; however, the optimal approach is unclear. Social science research offers two alternatives, the first of which recommends that task-related conflict be managed using problem-solving techniques while avoiding relationship conflict. The other approach advocates for the active management of relationship conflict as it almost always accompanies task-related conflict. Clarity about the optimal management strategy can be gained through a better understanding of conflict transformation, or the inter-relationship between conflict types, in this specific setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate conflict transformation in OR teams in order to clarify the approach most appropriate for an educational conflict management programme for surgeons. A constructivist grounded theory approach was adopted to explore the phenomenon of OR team conflict. Narratives were collected from focus groups of OR nurses and surgeons at five participating centres. A subset of these narratives involved transformation between and within conflict types. This dataset was analysed. The results confirm that misattribution and the use of harsh language cause conflict transformation in OR teams just as they do in stable work teams. Negative emotionality was found to make a substantial contribution to responses to and consequences of conflict, notably in the swiftness with which individuals terminated their working relationships. These findings contribute to a theory of conflict transformation in the OR team. There are a number of behaviours that activate conflict transformation in the OR team and a conflict management education programme should include a description of and alternatives to these behaviours. The types of conflict are tightly interwoven in this setting and thus the most appropriate management strategy is one that assumes that both types of conflict will exist and

  4. Gender, Strategy Selection, and Discussion Satisfaction in Interpersonal Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Michael J.; Natalle, Elizabeth J.

    1989-01-01

    Examines gender-related similarities and differences regarding conflict strategies and satisfaction with conflict interaction in a corporate setting. Reports that gender significantly affected the selection of influence strategies: male-male dyads used assertiveness and reason consistently, while female-female dyads shifted from high levels of…

  5. Case-based Influence in Conflict Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0337 CASE-BASED INFLUENCE IN CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Robert Axelrod ARTIS RESEARCH & RISK MODELING Final Report 10/31/2014...FA9550-10-1-0373 Dr. Robert Axelrod - PI Dr. Richard Davis- PD ARTIS Research & Risk Modeling ARTIS 5741 Canyon Ridge North Cave Creek, AZ 85331-9318...analysis of the timing of cyber conflict that quickly received attention from over 30 countries. 3 1 Axelrod , Final Report and Publications Final

  6. Let's Resolve Conflicts Together: High School Classroom Activities. Conflict Management Week, May 1-7, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Commission on Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management, Columbus.

    The week of May 1-7, 2000 has been designated by the Governor of Ohio to be Conflict Management Week With heightened awareness to issues of school safety, it is important for high schools to take an active role in promoting constructive responses to conflict. Conflict is a natural and inevitable part of living, but managing conflict is difficult…

  7. Interpersonal Conflicts and Styles of Managing Conflicts among Students at Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazezew, Arega; Neka, Mulugeta

    2017-01-01

    Interpersonal conflict happens everywhere and at any time and is inherent in all societies. However, the methods of managing such conflict are quite different from one organisation to the other. The general objective of the study was to assess interpersonal conflicts and styles of managing conflicts among students at Bahir Dar University.…

  8. Let's Resolve Conflicts Together: Elementary School Classroom Activities. Conflict Management Week, May 1-7, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Commission on Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management, Columbus.

    With heightened awareness to issues of school safety, it is important for elementary schools to take an active role in promoting constructive responses to conflict. The week of May 1-7, 2000 has been designated as Conflict Management Week by the Governor of Ohio. Conflict is a natural and inevitable part of living; however, managing conflict is…

  9. The Relationship of Principal Conflict Management Style and School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Miriam Miley

    2013-01-01

    Using a mixed-methods design, this study examined conflict management styles of elementary school principals in South Carolina and the relationship of conflict management style and school climate. The Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II, Form B, which identifies five styles of managing conflict, was used to determine principal conflict…

  10. Effects of social identity salience on motivational orientation and conflict strategies in intergenerational conflict.

    PubMed

    Ho, Henry C Y; Yeung, Dannii Y

    2017-06-01

    With the upsurge of older adults still working, the labour force is becoming increasingly diverse in age. Age diversity in an organisation can increase the likelihood of intergenerational conflict. The present study aims to integrate the dual concern model and social identity theory to explain the underlying mechanisms of intergenerational conflict by examining the effects of social identity salience on motivational orientation and conflict strategies. A 2 (subgroup identity salience: low vs. high younger/older group membership) × 2 (superordinate identity salience: low vs. high organisational group membership) factorial design with a structured questionnaire on motivational orientation and conflict strategies in relation to a hypothetical work conflict scenario was implemented among 220 postgraduate university students in Hong Kong. Results revealed that subgroup and superordinate identities had a combined influence on conflict strategies but not in motivational orientation. Subgroup and superordinate identification promoted integrating and compromising strategies, superordinate identification promoted obliging strategy, subgroup identification promoted dominating strategy and no identification promoted avoiding strategy. Age did not moderate these relationships. This study contributes to the development of the integrated model of conflict. © 2017 International Union of Psychological Science.

  11. Conflict management, prevention, and resolution in medical settings.

    PubMed

    Andrew, L B

    1999-01-01

    Everything about conflict is difficult for physicians, who are by nature and conditioning quite confrontation adverse. But conflict is inevitable, and conflict management skills are essential life skills for effective people. The keys to conflict management are prevention, effective communication, and anger management, skills that can be learned and polished. Conflict management skills can enhance all aspects of life for physicians, as well as those who work or live with them.

  12. Conflict management styles in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, Susan; Hamilton, Patti

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine prevalent conflict management styles chosen by students in nursing and to contrast these styles with those chosen by students in allied health professions. The associations among the level of professional health care education and the style chosen were also determined. A convenience sample of 126 students in a comprehensive university completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which requires respondents to choose behaviors most characteristic of their response to conflict and classifies these behaviors as one of five styles. There was no significant difference between the prevalent conflict management styles chosen by graduate and undergraduate nursing students and those in allied health. Some of the students were already licensed in their discipline; others had not yet taken a licensing exam. Licensure and educational level were not associated with choice of styles. Women and men had similar preferences. The prevalent style for nursing students was compromise, followed by avoidance. In contrast, avoidance, followed by compromise and accommodation, was the prevalent style for allied health students. When compared to the TKI norms, slightly more than one half of all participants chose two or more conflict management styles, commonly avoidance and accommodation at the 75th percentile or above. Only 9.8% of the participants chose collaboration at that level. Implications for nurse educators, researchers, and administrators are discussed.

  13. Understanding Conflict Management Styles in Anesthesiology Residents.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Giordano, Christopher R; Hagan, Jack D; Fahy, Brenda G

    2018-05-17

    Successful conflict resolution is vital for effective teamwork and is critical for safe patient care in the operating room. Being able to appreciate the differences in training backgrounds, individual knowledge and opinions, and task interdependency necessitates skilled conflict management styles when addressing various clinical and professional scenarios. The goal of this study was to assess conflict styles in anesthesiology residents via self- and counterpart assessment during participation in simulated conflict scenarios. Twenty-two first-year anesthesiology residents (first postgraduate year) participated in this study, which aimed to assess and summarize conflict management styles by 3 separate metrics. One metric was self-assessment with the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), summarized as percentile scores (0%-99%) for 5 conflict styles: collaborating, competing, accommodating, avoiding, and compromising. Participants also completed self- and counterpart ratings after interactions in a simulated conflict scenario using the Dutch Test for Conflict Handling (DUTCH), with scores ranging from 5 to 25 points for each of 5 conflict styles: yielding, compromising, forcing, problem solving, and avoiding. Higher TKI and DUTCH scores would indicate a higher preference for a given conflict style. Sign tests were used to compare self- and counterpart ratings on the DUTCH scores, and Spearman correlations were used to assess associations between TKI and DUTCH scores. On the TKI, the anesthesiology residents had the highest median percentile scores (with first quartile [Q1] and third quartile [Q3]) in compromising (67th, Q1-Q3 = 27-87) and accommodating (69th, Q1-Q3 = 30-94) styles, and the lowest scores for competing (32nd, Q1-Q3 = 10-57). After each conflict scenario, residents and their counterparts on the DUTCH reported higher median scores for compromising (self: 16, Q1-Q3 = 14-16; counterpart: 16, Q1-Q3 = 15-16) and problem solving (self: 17, Q1-Q3 = 16

  14. Examining behavioural coping strategies as mediators between work-family conflict and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Aazami, Sanaz; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Akmal, Syaqirah

    2015-01-01

    We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual's needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict.

  15. Examining Behavioural Coping Strategies as Mediators between Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, Khadijah

    2015-01-01

    We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual's needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict. PMID:25695097

  16. Conflict Management in Declining School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, William Lowe; Wheaton, Dennis R.

    1983-01-01

    Professional literature about managing conflicts associated with declining enrollments indicates the existing tension in this area. A research study shows that, while upper-middle class districts may succeed using a rational approach to decision making, lower class districts, for various reasons, may not. Special problems of urban districts are…

  17. Reducing the Conflict Factors Strategies in Question Answering System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwarningsih, W.; Purwarianti, A.; Supriana, I.

    2017-03-01

    A rule-based system is prone to conflict as new knowledge every time will emerge and indirectly must sign in to the knowledge base that is used by the system. A conflict occurred between the rules in the knowledge base can lead to the errors of reasoning or reasoning circulation. Therefore, when added, the new rules will lead to conflict with other rules, and the only rules that really can be added to the knowledge base. From these conditions, this paper aims to propose a conflict resolution strategy for a medical debriefing system by analyzing scenarios based upon the runtime to improve the efficiency and reliability of systems.

  18. Managing Organizational Conflict: When To Use Collaboration, Bargaining and Power Approaches.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A contingency theory for managing conflicts in organizational settings is proposed. Using collaboration, bargaining and power approaches to conflict ... management are all appropriate given certain situations. These situations and the costs and benefits of using a given strategy under varying conditions are discussed.

  19. An integrative review on conflict management styles among nursing students: Implications for nurse education.

    PubMed

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M

    2017-12-01

    Nurse education plays a critical role in the achievement of conflict management skills in nursing students. However, a wider perspective on this concept has not been explored. This paper is a report of a review appraising and synthesizing existing empirical studies describing conflict management styles among nursing students. An integrative review method guided this review. Five (5) bibliographic databases (CINAHL, Medline, Psych Info, Embase and SCOPUS) were searched to locate relevant articles. An electronic database search was performed in December 2016 to locate studies published from 2007 onwards. The search words included: 'conflict', 'management resolution', 'management style', 'management strategy', 'nursing', 'student'. Thirteen (13) articles met the inclusion criteria. Nursing students preferred 'constructive/positive conflict management styles' when handling conflicts. However, more studies are needed to identify factors that may affect their choice of styles. Further, this review emphasizes the need for empirical studies to identify appropriate interventions that would effectively enhance nursing students' skills in managing conflicts using rigorous methods. Nursing faculty play a critical role in teaching, training, and modeling constructive conflict resolution styles in nursing students. Simulation scenarios, reflective exercises, and role playing may be useful to facilitate such learning in choosing constructive conflict management styles. Structured training programme on conflict management will assist nursing students develop positive conflict management styles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Debate as Encapsulated Conflict: Ruled Controversy as an Approach to Learning Conflict Management Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David G.; Hensley, Carl Wayne

    Debate can provide a format for the development of communication skills to aid students in managing conflicts, because an understanding of rule-governed communication in conflict situations is invaluable in constructive conflict management. Since in debate procedural rules restrict discussion primarily to substantive and procedural topics, debate…

  1. Handling Trajectory Uncertainties for Airborne Conflict Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Doble, Nathan A.; Karr, David; Palmer, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne conflict management is an enabling capability for NASA's Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) concept. DAGTM has the goal of significantly increasing capacity within the National Airspace System, while maintaining or improving safety. Under DAG-TM, autonomous aircraft maintain separation from each other and from managed aircraft unequipped for autonomous flight. NASA Langley Research Center has developed the Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP), an onboard decision support system that provides airborne conflict management (ACM) and strategic flight planning support for autonomous aircraft pilots. The AOP performs conflict detection, prevention, and resolution from nearby traffic aircraft and area hazards. Traffic trajectory information is assumed to be provided by Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B). Reliable trajectory prediction is a key capability for providing effective ACM functions. Trajectory uncertainties due to environmental effects, differences in aircraft systems and performance, and unknown intent information lead to prediction errors that can adversely affect AOP performance. To accommodate these uncertainties, the AOP has been enhanced to create cross-track, vertical, and along-track buffers along the predicted trajectories of both ownship and traffic aircraft. These buffers will be structured based on prediction errors noted from previous simulations such as a recent Joint Experiment between NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers and from other outside studies. Currently defined ADS-B parameters related to navigation capability, trajectory type, and path conformance will be used to support the algorithms that generate the buffers.

  2. Joint issues – conflicts of interest, the ASR hip and suggestions for managing surgical conflicts of interest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest in medicine and surgery are troubling because they have the capacity to skew decision making in ways that might be detrimental to patient care and well-being. The recent case of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip provides a vivid illustration of the harmful effects of conflicts of interest in surgery. Discussion We identify financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest experienced by surgeons, hospitals and regulators in the ASR case. These conflicts may have impacted surgical advice, decision-making and evidence gathering with respect to the ASR prosthesis, and contributed to the significant harms experienced by patients in whom the hip was implanted. Drawing on this case we explore shortcomings in the standard responses to conflicts of interest – disclosure and recusal. We argue disclosure is necessary but by no means sufficient to address conflicts of interest. Using the concept of recusal we develop remedies including second opinions and third party consent which may be effective in mitigating conflicts, but their implementation introduces new challenges. Summary Deployment of the ASR hip is a case of surgical innovation gone wrong. As we show, there were multiple conflicts of interest involved in the introduction of the ASR hip into practice and subsequent attempts to gloss over the mounting body of evidence about its lack of safety and effectiveness. Conflicts of interest in surgery are often not well managed. We suggest strategies in this paper which can minimise the conflicts of interest associated with surgical innovation. PMID:25128372

  3. Conflict management style of Jordanian nurse managers and its relationship to staff nurses' intent to stay.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Nussera, Hayat; Masa'deh, Rami

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between conflict management styles used by nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses. Nursing shortages require managers to focus on the retention of staff nurses. Understanding the relationship between conflict management styles of nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses is one strategy to retain nurses in the workforce. A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was carried out in Jordan. The Rahim organization conflict inventory II (ROCI II) was completed by 42 nurse managers and the intent to stay scale was completed by 320 staff nurses from four hospitals in Jordan. The anova analysis was carried out. An integrative style was the first choice for nurse managers and the last choice was a dominating style. The overall level of intent to stay for nurses was moderate. Nurses tend to keep their current job for 2-3 years. There was a negative relationship between the dominating style as a conflict management style and the intent to stay for nurses. The findings of the present study support the claim that leadership practices affect the staff nurses' intent to stay and the quality of care. Nurse managers can improve the intent to stay for staff nurses if they use the appropriate conflict management styles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 76 FR 22848 - Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and Conflict Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ...-AI63 Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and Conflict Management AGENCY: Defense Legal Services Agency... conflict management practices as an integral part of normal business practices within the Department of...) AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Sec. 83.1 Purpose. 83.2 Applicability. 83.3 Definitions. 83.4 Policy. 83.5...

  5. A conflict analysis of 4D descent strategies in a metered, multiple-arrival route environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Harris, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A conflict analysis was performed on multiple arrival traffic at a typical metered airport. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to simulate arrival operations using Denver Stapleton's arrival route structure. Sensitivities of conflict performance to three different 4-D descent strategies (clear-idle Mach/Constant AirSpeed (CAS), constant descent angle Mach/CAS and energy optimal) were examined for three traffic mixes represented by those found at Denver Stapleton, John F. Kennedy and typical en route metering (ERM) airports. The Monte Carlo technique was used to generate simulation entry point times. Analysis results indicate that the clean-idle descent strategy offers the best compromise in overall performance. Performance measures primarily include susceptibility to conflict and conflict severity. Fuel usage performance is extrapolated from previous descent strategy studies.

  6. Resolving future fire management conflicts using multicriteria decision making.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Don A; Bode, Michael; Bradstock, Ross A; Keith, David A; Penman, Trent D; Price, Owen F

    2016-02-01

    Management strategies to reduce the risks to human life and property from wildfire commonly involve burning native vegetation. However, planned burning can conflict with other societal objectives such as human health and biodiversity conservation. These conflicts are likely to intensify as fire regimes change under future climates and as growing human populations encroach farther into fire-prone ecosystems. Decisions about managing fire risks are therefore complex and warrant more sophisticated approaches than are typically used. We applied a multicriteria decision making approach (MCDA) with the potential to improve fire management outcomes to the case of a highly populated, biodiverse, and flammable wildland-urban interface. We considered the effects of 22 planned burning options on 8 objectives: house protection, maximizing water quality, minimizing carbon emissions and impacts on human health, and minimizing declines of 5 distinct species types. The MCDA identified a small number of management options (burning forest adjacent to houses) that performed well for most objectives, but not for one species type (arboreal mammal) or for water quality. Although MCDA made the conflict between objectives explicit, resolution of the problem depended on the weighting assigned to each objective. Additive weighting of criteria traded off the arboreal mammal and water quality objectives for other objectives. Multiplicative weighting identified scenarios that avoided poor outcomes for any objective, which is important for avoiding potentially irreversible biodiversity losses. To distinguish reliably among management options, future work should focus on reducing uncertainty in outcomes across a range of objectives. Considering management actions that have more predictable outcomes than landscape fuel management will be important. We found that, where data were adequate, an MCDA can support decision making in the complex and often conflicted area of fire management. © 2015

  7. Conflict Strategies: Parents with Children and Children with Peers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockenberg, Susan; Lourie, Andrea

    A study investigated whether parents' use of power-assertive or negotiating strategies to resolve conflicts with children predicted children's psychosocial adjustment and use of comparable strategies with peers. The study also determined whether children's behavior with mothers at 2 years of age predicted their behavior with peers at age 6. The…

  8. Conflict with China: Prospects, Consequences, and Strategies for Deterrence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Burma / Myanmar . Above and beyond the dangers posed by a clash between the world’s two most populous countries, the presence of nuclear weapons on...Reconnaissance CBRNE Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear , High-Yield Explosives DMZ Demilitarized Zone DPRK Democratic People’s Republic of Korea EEZ...most concern to the United States. 2 Conflict with China: Prospects, Consequences, and Strategies for Deterrence Occasions for Conflict North Korea

  9. Managing Conflict with Peers. An Ideas Into Action Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Talula

    This short publication provides a process for managing conflict among managerial peers. It focuses more on conflicts among managers that involve personal values, office politics, power struggles, and emotional reactions than on conflicts that arise from incompatible goals or from different views on how to accomplish a task. The process described…

  10. Constructive Conflict Management and Coping in Homeless Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Sandra V.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents findings concerning conflict management and coping behavior of homeless adolescents. Interviews with 176 families (mother-adolescent dyads) indicate peer conflict was the worst problem of the previous month. Homeless adolescents demonstrated conflict management and coping patterns differing in certain aspects from that described in the…

  11. Conflict management styles among Iranian critical care nursing staff: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ahanchian, Mohammad Reza; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Conflict among nurses has been recognized as an extremely important issue within health care settings throughout the world. Identifying the conflict management style would be a key strategy for conflict management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of conflict management styles and its related factors among Iranian critical care nursing staff. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, a total of 149 critical care nurses who worked in the critical care units of 4 teaching hospitals in Sari (Iran) were evaluated. A 2-part self-reported questionnaire including personal information and Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory II was used for data collection. Although Iranian critical care nurses used all 5 conflict management styles to manage conflict with their peers, the collaborating style was the most prevalent conflict management style used by them, followed by compromising, accommodating, avoiding, and competing. Male gender was a predictor for both compromising and competing styles, whereas position and shift time were significant predictors for compromising and competing styles, respectively. Based on the results of this study, nurse managers need to take these factors into account in designing programs to help nurses constructively manage unavoidable conflicts in health care setting.

  12. Let's Resolve Conflicts Together: Middle School Classroom Activities. Conflict Management Week, May 1-7, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Commission on Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management, Columbus.

    Conflict is a natural and inevitable part of living, but managing conflict is difficult for many people because they have not been taught how to resolve differences in cooperative, nonviolent ways. Communication problems can lead to misunderstanding and make conflicts more difficult to resolve. The Governor of Ohio has designated May 1-7, 2000 as…

  13. How social impact assessment can contribute to conflict management

    SciTech Connect

    Prenzel, Paula V., E-mail: p.v.prenzel@student.rug.nl; Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: frank.vanclay@rug.nl

    2014-02-15

    The potential for conflict is omnipresent in all projects, and even in all human interactions, and conflict itself leads to many second-order social impacts. This article examines the contribution of the methodological approach used in social impact assessment (SIA) to conflict management. We view conflict as a process that has its own dynamic, and is to be expected in all situations. By using game theory (prisoner's dilemma), we describe and conceptualize this process and highlight the importance of communication in managing conflict. We demonstrate the potential use of SIA in preventing, managing and resolving conflict. Emphasis is placed on themore » participatory character of SIA and the role of public media. In contrast to existing literature, our focus is not restricted to the typical fields of study of SIA (e.g. environmental conflicts), but understands conflict itself as a field of application. In this sense, conflict-sensitive SIA can be understood both as an extension to the SIA tool kit and a broadening of the scope of SIA application. -- Highlights: • Conflict is omnipresent and creates both positive and negative social impacts. • Conflict itself represents a possible field of application for SIA. • Conflict escalation is a process that can be modeled in a game-theoretic framework. • There needs to be concerted effort to prevent escalation to avoid harmful outcomes. • Conflict-sensitive SIA can support conflict management and sustainable resolution.« less

  14. Managing Conflict in School Teams: The Impact of Task and Goal Interdependence on Conflict Management and Team Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although conflict has traditionally been considered destructive, recent studies have indicated that conflict management can contribute to effective teamwork. The present study explores conflict management as a team phenomenon in schools. The author examined how the contextual variables (task interdependence, goal interdependence) are…

  15. Management strategies for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Le Marshall, Kim Francis; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question What are the effective, evidence-based strategies available for the management of fibromyalgia? Conclusion There are a number of management strategies available with robust evidence to support their use in clinical practice. Definition Fibromyalgia is a complex pain syndrome characterized by widespread, chronic muscular pain and tenderness, disordered sleep, emotional distress, cognitive disturbance, and fatigue. Its prevalence is estimated to be 3%–5% in the population and higher yet in patients with comorbid rheumatic diseases. Level of evidence Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Search sources PubMed, Cochrane Library, manual search Consumer summary Key messages for patients and clinicians are: There are many effective pharmacological management strategies available for fibromyalgia.A nonpharmacological, multicomponent approach utilizing education, aerobic exercise, psychological therapy, and other strategies is also effective for fibromyalgia.Despite the significant and, at times, disabling physical and psychological symptoms, fibromyalgia can be a manageable condition with a potentially good outcome. PMID:27790003

  16. Conflict Management: A Gap in Business Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Conflict management is a significant and unavoidable part of a manager's role in an organization. Employees need conflict management skills to manage themselves, make decisions, and work effectively in the ever-increasing team environment of today's organizations. In the present article, the author demonstrates the disconnect between the…

  17. Distributed and Centralized Conflict Management Under Traffic Flow Management Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feron, Eric; Bilimoria, Karl (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The past year's activity has concentrated on the following two activities: (1) Refining and completing our study on the stability of interacting flows of aircraft when they have to resolve conflicts in a decentralized and sequential manner. More specifically, it was felt that some of the modeling assumptions made during previous research (such offset maneuvering models) could be improved to include more realistic models such as heading changes when analyzing interacting flow stability problems. We extended our analysis to achieve this goal. The results of this study have been submitted for presentation at the 2002 American Control Conference; (2) Examining the issues associated with delay propagation across multiple enroute sectors. This study was initiated at NASA in cooperation with Dr. Karl Bilimoria. Considering a set of adjacent sectors, this ongoing study concentrates on the effect of various traffic flow management strategies on the propagation of delays and congestion across sectors. The problem description and findings so far are reported in the attached working paper "Enroute sector buffering capacity."

  18. Managing Conflict with Effective Communication Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Dick B.

    Conflict is a basic social process; there is no conceivable way of removing all conflict from an organization. Interpersonal conflict, often created by interdependency of people and tasks within an organization, lowers staff morale and employee productivity and drives people away. Difficult employees who foster conflicts fall into five distinct…

  19. Managing and mitigating conflict in healthcare teams: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Almost, Joan; Wolff, Angela C; Stewart-Pyne, Althea; McCormick, Loretta G; Strachan, Diane; D'Souza, Christine

    2016-07-01

    To review empirical studies examining antecedents (sources, causes, predictors) in the management and mitigation of interpersonal conflict. Providing quality care requires positive, collaborative working relationships among healthcare team members. In today's increasingly stress-laden work environments, such relationships can be threatened by interpersonal conflict. Identifying the underlying causes of conflict and choice of conflict management style will help practitioners, leaders and managers build an organizational culture that fosters collegiality and create the best possible environment to engage in effective conflict management. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Proquest ABI/Inform, Cochrane Library and Joanne Briggs Institute Library were searched for empirical studies published between 2002-May 2014. The review was informed by the approach of Whittemore and Knafl. Findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Forty-four papers met the inclusion criteria. Several antecedents influence conflict and choice of conflict management style including individual characteristics, contextual factors and interpersonal conditions. Sources most frequently identified include lack of emotional intelligence, certain personality traits, poor work environment, role ambiguity, lack of support and poor communication. Very few published interventions were found. By synthesizing the knowledge and identifying antecedents, this review offers evidence to support recommendations on managing and mitigating conflict. As inevitable as conflict is, it is the responsibility of everyone to increase their own awareness, accountability and active participation in understanding conflict and minimizing it. Future research should investigate the testing of interventions to minimize these antecedents and, subsequently, reduce conflict. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. 42 CFR 50.605 - Management of conflicting interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) must: Review all financial disclosures; and determine whether a conflict of interest exists and, if so, determine what actions should be taken by the institution to manage, reduce or eliminate such conflict of interest. A conflict of interest exists when the designated official(s) reasonably determines that a...

  1. Principals and Conflict Management: Do Preparation Programs Do Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Conflict management is among the skills necessary for the development of successful school leaders. Those in campus leadership positions are certain to face conflict situations on a regular basis. This study focused on four questions about conflict in the professional lives of campus administrators: (1) What is the frequency of conflict…

  2. Managing Conflict in Teams and Examining Hiring Assumptions. Research Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1996-01-01

    Research shows that well-managed conflicts can enrich a group, if good (cognitive) conflict is encouraged and bad (affective) conflict is discouraged. A model developed to understand how disabled people are treated at work suggests that there is a need to change beliefs about, as well as behavior towards, disabled people. Implications for camp are…

  3. [Influence of organizational commitment and professional nurses in conflict resolution strategies].

    PubMed

    Pinho, Paula; Albuquerque, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCE: The changes in the health area and the set of structural changes in the nursing profession and career interfere in the dynamics and stability of the future of the nurses. To study the influence of organizational and professional commitment of the nurses in the strategies of conflict resolution. This is a quantitative, transversal and non-experimental research, following a descriptive-correlational way. Non-probabilistic sample of 102 nurses to perform duties in Health Units, mostly female (82.4%) with a mean age of 39.33 years and standard deviation 9.226. The measuring instrument consists of three scales calibrated and validated for the portuguese population: Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, Professional Commitment Scale and Inventory Strategies for Conflict Resolution, which assesses how individuals deal with conflict situations before higher (Form A), subordinate (Form B) and colleagues (Form C). Nurses demonstrate a moderate organizational commitment and higher affective commitment and normative commitment to the instrumental. Nurses demonstrate a moderate professional commitment and the results show that nurses have higher values on the dimensions of that interest and challenge the relevance dimension of nursing as a profession. The organizational commitment influences the adoption of strategies of conflict resolution as a conflict situation arises with the boss, subordinates or colleagues. The higher the level of organizational commitment higher the level of professional commitment. Nurses more engaged professionally demonstrate strategies that use more integrative and compromise in conflict resolution whether against the boss, subordinates or colleagues. The results ensure the need to promote and stimulate the affective commitment by the positive consequences it entails the organization and the profession. The organizational performance benefits from the stimulation of the conflict under certain conditions and that the constructive

  4. Managing conflict of interest in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Cortese, Denis A

    2007-05-01

    Conflict of interest, even the appearance of potential conflict, has long been a concern for physicians and scientists. Conflict of interest arises when an activity is accompanied by a divergence between personal or institutional benefit when compared to the responsibilities to patients and to society; it arises in the context of research, purchasing, leadership, and investments. Conflict of interest is of concern because it compromises the trust of the patient and of society in the individual physician or the medical center.

  5. Flexible Conflict Management: Conflict Avoidance and Conflict Adjustment in Reactive Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dignath, David; Kiesel, Andrea; Eder, Andreas B.

    2015-01-01

    Conflict processing is assumed to serve two crucial, yet distinct functions: Regarding task performance, control is adjusted to overcome the conflict. Regarding task choice, control is harnessed to bias decision making away from the source of conflict. Despite recent theoretical progress, until now two lines of research addressed these…

  6. A Case Study in Conflict Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Lawrence J.; Smith, Val R.

    This paper presents a model for a message-centered theory of human conflict based on the assumption that conflict will result from the pairing of any two functional messages that share a common antecedent but contain different consequences with oppositely signed affect. The paper first shows how to represent conflict situations diagrammatically…

  7. Schools for Strategy: Teaching Strategy for 21st Century Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    To illustrate, if for now your army cannot win decisive success by fighting (tactically), you are obliged to adopt a long-haul strategy guided by a...sense,” but also who could fight their commands successfully in battle through the competent exercise of real- and near-real- time leadership.27 In...should always be recognition that ultimately it must be a practical, not a scholarly, pursuit. Education in strategy for potentially designated

  8. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  9. Learning About Conflict and Conflict Management Through Drama in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Arveklev, Susanna H; Berg, Linda; Wigert, Helena; Morrison-Helme, Morag; Lepp, Margret

    2018-04-01

    In the health care settings in which nurses work, involvement in some form of conflict is inevitable. The ability to manage conflicts is therefore necessary for nursing students to learn during their education. A qualitative analysis of 43 written group assignments was undertaken using a content analysis approach. Three main categories emerged in the analysis-to approach and integrate with the theoretical content, to step back and get an overview, and to concretize and practice-together with the overall theme, to learn by oscillating between closeness and distance. Learning about conflict and conflict management through drama enables nursing students to form new knowledge by oscillating between closeness and distance, to engage in both the fictional world and the real world at the same time. This helps students to form a personal understanding of theoretical concepts and a readiness about how to manage future conflicts. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(4):209-216.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Conflict Management Styles in an HBCU HSI Community College Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmittou, Natasha P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study is to investigate the conflict management styles in an HBCU and HSI community college and how gender, power position, age, educational level, and ethnicity influence conflict management. A convenience sample of 80 administrators and 220 subordinates completed an electronic demographic survey and the…

  11. Designing and Evaluating an Online Role Play in Conflict Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Watson, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify, through a literature review, key issues regarding how online role plays can be designed and to apply them when designing a role play on conflict management. Design/methodology/approach: By drawing on the key issues identified in the literature review, a role play on conflict management was designed and…

  12. Small, Task-Oriented Groups: Conflict, Conflict Management, Satisfaction, and Decision Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Victor D., Jr.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined relationship among amount of conflict experienced, the style of its management, individual satisfaction, and decision quality of small, task-oriented groups using 129 college student subjects in 24 groups. Data suggest a curvilinear relationship between the number of conflict episodes experienced by group members and the subsequent…

  13. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  14. Conflicts and conflict management in the collaboration between nurses and physicians - a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Leever, A M; Hulst, M V D; Berendsen, A J; Boendemaker, P M; Roodenburg, J L N; Pols, J

    2010-11-01

    In health care, optimal collaboration between nurses and physicians is crucial in the quality of the care process – but not self-generating. Little is known about how health-care professionals cope with conflicts within their collaboration. This qualitative study investigates the way nurses and physicians cope with conflict and clarifies the determinants of conflict management styles. All respondents formulate clear expectations which in their opinion are essential to collaboration. When collaboration leads to disagreement, physicians and nurses choose between ignoring the conflict or engaging in it. Choice is determined by five factors: the influence of oneself, the influence of the other, the nature of the conflict, the context of conflict, and personal motives.

  15. Conflicts Management Model in School: A Mixed Design Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Soner

    2016-01-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the reasons for conflicts occurring in school according to perceptions and views of teachers and resolution strategies used for conflicts and to build a model based on the results obtained. In the research, explanatory design including quantitative and qualitative methods has been used. The quantitative part…

  16. Hunting as a management tool? Cougar-human conflict is positively related to trophy hunting.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Kristine J; Cristescu, Bogdan; Darimont, Chris T

    2016-10-11

    Overexploitation and persecution of large carnivores resulting from conflict with humans comprise major causes of declines worldwide. Although little is known about the interplay between these mortality types, hunting of predators remains a common management strategy aimed at reducing predator-human conflict. Emerging theory and data, however, caution that such policy can alter the age structure of populations, triggering increased conflict in which conflict-prone juveniles are involved. Using a 30-year dataset on human-caused cougar (Puma concolor) kills in British Columbia (BC), Canada, we examined relationships between hunter-caused and conflict-associated mortality. Individuals that were killed via conflict with humans were younger than hunted cougars. Accounting for human density and habitat productivity, human hunting pressure during or before the year of conflict comprised the most important variables. Both were associated with increased male cougar-human conflict. Moreover, in each of five regions assessed, conflict was higher with increased human hunting pressure for at least one cougar sex. Although only providing correlative evidence, such patterns over large geographic and temporal scales suggest that alternative approaches to conflict mitigation might yield more effective outcomes for humans as well as cougar populations and the individuals within populations.

  17. Post-conflict affiliation as conflict management in captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Chisato; Morisaka, Tadamichi; Furuta, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Toshiaki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Taki, Michihiro; Mori, Yoshihisa; Amano, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Post-conflict affiliation between former opponents or between one of the former opponents and bystanders might have the function of conflict management, which reduces the costs associated with aggressions. One of the suggested functions of post-conflict affiliation is decreased renewed aggressions directed from aggressors to victims. However, the effect of post-conflict affiliation on renewed aggressions by victims has not been investigated. We examined whether post-conflict affiliations decreased the number of renewed aggressions initiated by winners or losers in captive bottlenose dolphins. Both winners and losers initiated renewed aggressions. However, these aggressions decreased after post-conflict affiliation between former opponents, initiated by bystanders to winners, initiated by losers to bystanders, and initiated by bystanders to losers. Post-conflict affiliation between former opponents is suggested to function as reconciliation. Post–conflict affiliation initiated by losers to bystanders is suggested to function as the protection of losers. Post-conflict affiliations initiated by bystanders to one of former opponents are suggested to function as both appeasement and protection of the opponent who affiliates with bystanders. PMID:26392064

  18. Post-conflict affiliation as conflict management in captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Chisato; Morisaka, Tadamichi; Furuta, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Toshiaki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Taki, Michihiro; Mori, Yoshihisa; Amano, Masao

    2015-09-22

    Post-conflict affiliation between former opponents or between one of the former opponents and bystanders might have the function of conflict management, which reduces the costs associated with aggressions. One of the suggested functions of post-conflict affiliation is decreased renewed aggressions directed from aggressors to victims. However, the effect of post-conflict affiliation on renewed aggressions by victims has not been investigated. We examined whether post-conflict affiliations decreased the number of renewed aggressions initiated by winners or losers in captive bottlenose dolphins. Both winners and losers initiated renewed aggressions. However, these aggressions decreased after post-conflict affiliation between former opponents, initiated by bystanders to winners, initiated by losers to bystanders, and initiated by bystanders to losers. Post-conflict affiliation between former opponents is suggested to function as reconciliation. Post-conflict affiliation initiated by losers to bystanders is suggested to function as the protection of losers. Post-conflict affiliations initiated by bystanders to one of former opponents are suggested to function as both appeasement and protection of the opponent who affiliates with bystanders.

  19. Demand management and case management: a conservation strategy.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C D R Anna K

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the history and development of managed competition, and explores the possibilities of a new demand management strategy in the context of nurse case management to offer less costly, higher quality care for a greater number of patients. The article examines the history and principles of healthcare demand management, its implementation in the hospital and clinical practices of nurse case managers, and its impacts in reducing costs while maintaining care levels. The article develops and analyzes the conflicts and common ground between demand management and case management. First, demand-side strategies can be effective in reducing costs while maintaining quality of nursing care; second, nurse case managers should employ patient education, self-care, and staffing solutions to manage demand. Nurse case managers must apply demand management principles carefully. Their goal is not to restrict care, but to maintain the highest levels of care possible within the limits of their practice's resources and staffing. Two critical themes emerge: (1) demand management is a potential alternative to market-driven managed competition and (2) nursing case management can affect an effective form of demand management. However, the long-term implications of these nursing case management strategies on healthcare staffing need further exploration.

  20. Family Members as Third Parties in Dyadic Family Conflict: Strategies, Alliances, and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuchinich, Samuel; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes conflicts of 52 families observed during dinner. Findings suggest that family members frequently joined dyadic conflicts, they were equally likely to attempt to end or continue conflicts, they formed alliances half of the time, and their intervention strategies were related to the patterning and outcome of the conflicts. (RJC)

  1. An Examination of the Conflict Resolution Strategies and Goals of Children with Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaldi, Christina M.; Heath, Nancy L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the reports of conflict strategies and goals in response to hypothetical conflict situations, (b) generation of solutions to hypothetical conflicts, and (c) conflict in observed dyadic exchanges in children with high and low depressive symptoms. Children from Grades 4, 5, and 6 were divided into high…

  2. Conflict Detection and Resolution for Future Air Transportation Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krozel, Jimmy; Peters, Mark E.; Hunter, George

    1997-01-01

    With a Free Flight policy, the emphasis for air traffic control is shifting from active control to passive air traffic management with a policy of intervention by exception. Aircraft will be allowed to fly user preferred routes, as long as safety Alert Zones are not violated. If there is a potential conflict, two (or more) aircraft must be able to arrive at a solution for conflict resolution without controller intervention. Thus, decision aid tools are needed in Free Flight to detect and resolve conflicts, and several problems must be solved to develop such tools. In this report, we analyze and solve problems of proximity management, conflict detection, and conflict resolution under a Free Flight policy. For proximity management, we establish a system based on Delaunay Triangulations of aircraft at constant flight levels. Such a system provides a means for analyzing the neighbor relationships between aircraft and the nearby free space around air traffic which can be utilized later in conflict resolution. For conflict detection, we perform both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional analyses based on the penetration of the Protected Airspace Zone. Both deterministic and non-deterministic analyses are performed. We investigate several types of conflict warnings including tactical warnings prior to penetrating the Protected Airspace Zone, methods based on the reachability overlap of both aircraft, and conflict probability maps to establish strategic Alert Zones around aircraft.

  3. The Role of the Principal as a Manager of Conflict Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Antoinette A.

    An overview of conflict management as it relates to the role of the principal is presented. The traditional approach to conflict, which minimizes conflict and emphasizes social control, is contrasted with the perspective that views conflict as inevitable, functional, and manageable. Intrapersonal and interpersonal conflicts, functions of conflict,…

  4. Managing Conflict with Direct Reports. For the Practicing Manager. An Ideas into Action Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popejoy, Barbara; McManigle, Brenda J.

    Conflict is inevitable when people work together because they have different points of view, values, and ways of working. Resolving conflicts can be extremely difficult because of these differences. This short guidebook addresses ways successful leaders can work to manage conflict in the workplace, in particular conflict with people who report to…

  5. [Conflict matrix : Risk management tool in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Andel, D; Markstaller, K; Andel, H

    2017-05-01

    In business conflicts have long been known to have a negative effect on costs and team performance. In medicine this aspect has been widely neglected, especially when optimizing processes for operating room (OR) management. In the multidisciplinary setting of OR management, shortcomings in rules for decision making and lack of communication result in members perceiving themselves as competitors in the patient's environment rather than acting as art of a multiprofessional team. This inevitably leads to the emergence and escalation of conflicts. We developed a conflict matrix to provide an inexpensive and objective way for evaluating the level of escalation of conflicts in a multiprofessional working environment, such as an OR. The senior members of all involved disciplines were asked to estimate the level of conflict escalation between the individual professional groups on a scale of 0-9. By aggregating the response data, an overview of the conflict matrix within this OR section was created. No feedback was received from 1 of the 11 contacted occupational groups. By color coding the median, minimum and maximum values of the retrieved data, an intuitive overview of the escalation levels of conflict could be provided. The value range of all feedbacks was between 0 and 6. Estimation of the escalation levels differed widely within one category, showing a range of up to 6 (out of 6) levels. The presented assessment using a conflict matrix is a simple and cost-effective method to assess the conflict landscape, especially in multidisciplinary environments, such as OR management. The chance of conflict prevention or the early recognition of existing conflicts represents an enormous potential for cost and risk saving and might have positive long-term effects by building a culture of conflict prevention at the workplace and a positive influence on interdisciplinary cooperation in this working environment.

  6. Analysis of the effect of conflict-management and resolution training on employee stress at a healthcare organization.

    PubMed

    Haraway, Dana L; Haraway, William M

    2005-01-01

    Conflict is inevitable and can be both positive and negative. Although it is impossible, and probably not wise, to eliminate conflict, it is prudent for healthcare organizations to provide direct instruction in conflict-management training. In this study, 23 supervisors and managers in a local healthcare organization participated in two 3-hour sessions designed to teach practical conflict-management strategies immediately applicable to their workplace duties and responsibilities. A comparison of pretest and posttest measures indicates statistically significant differences in four areas and suggests a positive influence of the brief intervention.

  7. Conflicts of Interest: State and Local Pension Fund Asset Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlmeier, Louis M.

    This booklet is part of a series of monographs focusing on conflicts of interest in different sectors of the financial industry. This particular study examines a number of conflict-of-interest problems related to the management of public pension funds. In his discussion, the author analyzes a variety of related problems, such as the selection of…

  8. Teaching and Managing: Conflicting Roles of the Department Chair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Susan; And Others

    Community college department chairs are called upon to be colleagues and peers, managers, and teachers, with duties and responsibilities that are usually far more complex and demanding than any college document can convey. As a result of the demands of the position, department chairs may experience role conflict or strain. Role conflicts are…

  9. Avoiding School Management Conflicts and Crisis through Formal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwogbaga, David M. E.; Nwankwo, Oliver U.; Onwa, Doris O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examined how conflicts and crisis can be avoided through formal communication. It was necessitated by the observation that most of the conflicts and crisis which tend to mar school management today are functions of the inconsistencies arising from "grapevines, rumours, and gossips" generated through informal communication…

  10. Conflicts in Schools, Conflict Management Styles and the Role of the School Leader: A Study of Greek Primary School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Conflict may occur in any organization (and hence school) and, for schools, conflict management style is a joint activity and the degree of its effectiveness determines the type of impact of conflict on school performance. This empirical study investigates the potential sources of conflict in Greek primary schools, determine appropriate approaches…

  11. The Effectiveness of Cyberprogram 2.0 on Conflict Resolution Strategies and Self-Esteem.

    PubMed

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Martínez-Valderrey, Vanesa

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the problem of youth violence has been a cause of increasing concern for educational and mental health professionals worldwide. The main objective of the study was to evaluate experimentally the effects of an anti-bullying/cyberbullying program (Cyberprogram 2.0; Pirámide Publishing, Madrid, Spain) on conflict resolution strategies and self-esteem. A randomly selected sample of 176 Spanish adolescents aged 13-15 years (93 experimental, 83 control) was employed. The study used a repeated measures pretest-posttest design with a control group. Before and after the program (19 one-hour sessions), two assessment instruments were administered: the questionnaire for measuring conflict management message styles and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale. The analyses of covariance of the posttest scores confirmed that the program stimulated an increase of cooperative conflict resolution strategies, a decrease in aggressive and avoidant strategies, and an increase of self-esteem. The change was similar in both sexes. The study provides evidence of the effectiveness of Cyberprogram 2.0 to improve the capacity for conflict resolution and self-esteem. The discussion focuses on the importance of implementing programs to promote socioemotional development and to prevent violence. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Behavioural patterns of conflict resolution strategies in preschool boys with language impairment in comparison with boys with typical language development.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Laura; Jansson, Liselotte; Ljungberg, Tomas; Hedenbro, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Children with language impairment (LI) experience social difficulties, including conflict management. This paper is therefore motivated to examine behavioural processes guiding preschool peer conflict progression, which ultimately contributes to overall development. To describe behavioural sequences in conflicts between children with typically developing language (TL) and between children with LI. Attention is particularly focused on the conflict resolution strategy reconciliation, i.e. friendly contact between former opponents shortly following conflict termination. It is hypothesized that children with LI, with weaker language skills, experience difficulties attaining effective reconciliation. Unstructured play of 11 boys with LI (4-7-years-old), at a specialized language preschool, and 20 TL boys (4-6-years-old), at mainstream preschools, were video filmed. Conflicts were identified and recorded according to a validated coding system. Recorded conflict details included behavioural sequences constituting conflict cause (conflict period) and in the post-conflict period, reconciliatory behaviours that were classified into six 'categories' (Invitation to play, Body contact, Object offer, Verbal apology, Self-ridicule, Cognition, i.e. offering privileges/negotiating) and the verbal character of accepted behaviours were determined. The mean proportion of individual target children's conflicts in which specific behavioural sequences had occurred were calculated and thereafter compared between and within the groups. Boys with LI reconcile fewer conflicts than TL boys (LI: 47.3 +/- 4.5%; TL: 63.6 +/- 2.0%). Contributory factors include the occurrence of conflicts caused by aberrance, i.e. conflicts initiated by inappropriate behavioural play intensities (i.e. 'a pillow fight' where one partner swings so intensively the other partner cannot participate as a player in the game) and protests that are no longer directed to the opponent within reciprocal exchanges, but

  13. To assert or not to assert: conflict management and occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Landa-Gonzalez, Belkis

    2008-01-01

    As occupational therapists prepare to fulfill the vision of the profession and face the challenges of this century, asserting themselves professionally and effectively collaborating with others is of critical importance. The conflict resolution behaviors used to manage current and future practice environments have significant implications for job retention, work climate, patient care and the development of professional relationships. The literature suggests that occupational therapy students tend to use unassertive forms of conflict management. In an effort to identify potential inconsistencies between students' tendencies and professional demands, this study examined the conflict resolution behaviors that graduate, traditional, and nontraditional occupational therapy students, are likely to use (n = 145). The design of the study was descriptive and correlational. The Thomas Kilmann's MODE instrument and a Conflict Case questionnaire were used as measures of the conflict resolution styles. Results indicated that traditional students favored collaborating while nontraditional students preferred competing and avoiding. The management strategies used by the two groups differed based on the outcome focus and the power relationship between disputants. Findings are relevant for occupational therapy education and continuing professional development. Training in conflict management strategies that would strengthen students' assertiveness and interpersonal skills would be helpful in fostering the leadership needed for fulfilling the profession's vision.

  14. Managing Workplace Conflict in the United States and Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Catherine H.; Brett, Jeanne M.

    2001-07-01

    We propose that managers have norms (standards of appropriate behavior) for resolving conflict, that these norms are culturally based, and that they explain cultural differences in conflict management outcomes. We confirm that the traditionally American norms of discussing parties' interests and synthesizing multiple issues were exhibited more strongly by American managers than by their Hong Kong Chinese counterparts. In addition, we confirm that the traditionally Chinese norms of concern for collective interests and concern for authority appeared more strongly among Hong Kong Chinese managers than among their American counterparts. American managers were more likely than Hong Kong Chinese managers, to resolve a greater number of issues and reach more integrative outcomes, while Hong Kong Chinese managers were more likely to involve higher management in conflict resolution. Culture had a significant effect on whether parties selected an integrative outcome rather than an outcome that involved distribution, compromise, higher management, or no resolution at all. Conflict norms explained the cultural differences that existed between reaching an integrative outcome and reaching an outcome involving distribution, compromise, or higher management; however, conflict norms did not fully explain the cultural differences that existed between reaching an integrative outcome and reaching no resolution. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Communication Satisfaction and Interpersonal Solidarity as Outcomes of Conflict Message Strategy Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cupach, William R.

    A study investigated the relationships between conflict message strategy utilization and the criterion variables of communication satisfaction and interpersonal solidarity in situations of interpersonal conflict. Subjects were 114 college students and their "willing" conversational partners. Each subject completed a questionnaire…

  16. Functionalizing Conflict: Jesse Jackson's Rhetorical Strategy at the 1984 Democratic National Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Mare, Lesley A.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Jesse Jackson's rhetorical strategy of functionalizing conflict among divisive Democrats during the 1984 national convention. Applies conflict theory to Jackson's convention address, which serves as the basis for this rhetorical analysis. (JD)

  17. [ARDS and severe brain injury. Therapeutic strategies in conflict].

    PubMed

    Bein, T; Kuhr, L P; Metz, C; Woertgen, C; Philipp, A; Taeger, K

    2002-07-01

    The development of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) complicates the treatment of patients with severe head injury, since special therapeutic strategies for both conditions might lead to a "conflict of interest". We report on the intensive care treatment of a young man who suffered severe brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale = 3) due to a traffic accident and simultaneously developed ARDS from the aspiration of gastric content. We performed extensive monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism (intracranial pressure measurement, jugular bulb oxymetry, estimation of arterial-jugular bulb lactate concentration difference) to prevent cerebral hypoxia and to control cerebral hyperemia. The application of a "lung protective strategy" with "permissive hypercapnia" led to a conflict, since the development of cranial hyperemia combined with cranial hypertension a few days after trauma, warranted the concept of controlled, temporary hyperventilation. Therefore, we applied a pumpless extracorporeal lung assist to improve carbon dioxide elimination. Furthermore, we started the ventilation in the prone position, since arterial oxygenation continued to deteriorate, although there is a lack of data describing the effect of a prone position on acute cerebral injury. Positioning the patient prone, we observed a prompt increase in intracranial pressure, which resulted in pharmacological intervention (mannitol). Treating the patient by intermittent prone position, by continuous extracorporeal lung assist and aerosolized prostacyclin administration in the following period, lung function improved and ARDS was treated successfully. After withdrawing the analgo-sedation the patient's vigilance rose continuously. The patient was transferred to a rehabilitation ward 33 days after admission to the intensive care unit. The combination of ARDS and severe brain injury needs special treatment, which includes extensive monitoring techniques to find a solution for therapeutic

  18. Interpersonal conflict strategies and their impact on positive symptom remission in persons aged 55 and older with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Carl I; Solanki, Dishal; Sodhi, Dimple

    2013-01-01

    Although interpersonal interactions are thought to affect psychopathology in schizophrenia, there is a paucity of data about how older adults with schizophrenia manage interpersonal conflicts. This paper examines interpersonal conflict strategies and their impact on positive symptom remission in older adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The schizophrenia group consisted of 198 persons aged 55 years and over living in the community who developed schizophrenia before age 45. A community comparison group (n = 113) was recruited using randomly selected block-groups. Straus' Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) was used to assess the ways that respondents handled interpersonal conflicts. Seven conflict management subscales were created based on a principal component analysis with equamax rotation of items from the CTS. The order of the frequency of the tactics that was used was similar for both the schizophrenia and community groups. Calm and Pray tactics were the most commonly used, and the Violent and Aggressive tactics were rarely utilized. In two separate logistic regression analysis, after controlling for confounding variables, positive symptom remission was found to be associated significantly with both the Calm and Pray subscales. The findings suggest that older persons with schizophrenia approximate normal distribution patterns of conflict management strategies and the most commonly used strategies are associated with positive symptom remission.

  19. Stress resiliency, psychological empowerment and conflict management styles among baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Pines, Eula W; Rauschhuber, Maureen L; Norgan, Gary H; Cook, Jennifer D; Canchola, Leticia; Richardson, Cynthia; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2012-07-01

    This article is a report of a Neuman Systems Model-guided correlational study of the relations of stress resiliency, psychological empowerment, selected demographic characteristics (age, ethnicity, semester in school) and conflict management styles. Emerging evidence suggests that stress resiliency and psychological empowerment can strengthen student nurses in academic achievement and coping with stress. Little is known about conflict management styles of students and the relationship to empowerment, resiliency and the implications for managing workplace conflict. A correlational study was conducted in Spring 2010 with 166 baccalaureate students. Most participants were female, single, Hispanic and 25 years old. The data collection instruments included the Stress Resiliency Profile, the Psychological Empowerment Instrument, the Conflict Mode Instrument and a demographic inventory. Descriptive and inferential correlational statistics were used to analyse the data. Students scored in the high range for focusing on their deficiencies in conflict situations; they scored above the 60th percentile for avoiding and accommodating behaviours and were less likely to use competing or collaborating strategies to manage conflict. Empowerment scores were significantly correlated with stress resiliency scores. Students with high scores on empowerment had high scores on the skill recognition subscale of the Stress Resiliency Profile suggesting more resilience; high scores on empowerment were related to high necessitating subscale scores of the Stress Resiliency Profile suggesting a predisposition to stress. Neuman Systems Model may provide guidance for educators to strengthen student nurses' management of stressors in the workplace. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. The Effects of Conflict Resolution and Peer Mediation Training on Turkish Elementary School Students' Conflict Resolution Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnuklu, Abbas; Kacmaz, Tarkan; Gurler, Selma; Turk, Fulya; Kalender, Alper; Zengin, Feza; Sevkin, Burcak

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of conflict resolution and peer mediation (CRPM) training among 10- and 11-year-old elementary school students was examined. The CRPM training program consisted of skills, such as understanding the nature of interpersonal conflicts, communication, anger management, negotiation and peer mediation. The research was carried out…

  1. Conflict Management: Trends and Issues Alerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    The dynamics of a diverse work force characterized by organizational change, competition, and complex communication are increasing attention toward finding new ways of avoiding the costly and destructive outcomes of relationship dysfunctions. Litigation and legal negotiation are two of the most expensive ways of conflict resolution; and…

  2. Citizen Participation -- A Tool for Conflict Management on the Public Lands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irland, Lloyd C.

    1975-01-01

    The search for harmony in public land-use planning is a hopeless pursuit. A more realistic approach is a conflict management strategy that emphasizes concern for the planning process, rather than for the plan itself. The search for legitimate planning processes calls for the conscious building of citizen participation. (JG)

  3. Predicting Conflict Management Based on Organizational Commitment and Selected Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balay, Refik

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between different levels of organizational commitment (compliance, identification, internalization) of teachers and their different conflict management strategies (compromising, problem solving, forcing, yielding, avoiding). Based on a questionnaire survey of 418 teachers, this study…

  4. Strategies for resolving conflict: their functional and dysfunctional sides.

    PubMed

    Stimac, M

    1982-01-01

    Conflict in the workplace can have a beneficial effect. That is if appropriately resolved, it plays an important part in effective problem solving, according to author Michele Stimac, associate dean, curriculum and instruction, and professor at Pepperdine University Graduate School of Education and Psychology. She advocates confrontation--by way of negotiation rather than brute force--as the best way to resolve conflict, heal wounds, reconcile the parties involved, and give the resolution long life. But she adds that if a person who has though through when, where, and how to confront someone foresees only disaster, avoidance is the best path to take. The emphasis here is on strategy. Avoiding confrontation, for example, is not a strategic move unless it is backed by considered judgment. Stimac lays out these basic tenets for engaging in sound negotiation: (1) The confrontation should take place in neutral territory. (2) The parties should actively listen to each other. (3) Each should assert his or her right to fair treatment. (4) Each must allow the other to retain his or her dignity. (5) The parties should seek a consensus on the issues inconflict, their resolution, and the means of reducing any tension that results from the resolution. (6) The parties should exhibit a spirit of give and take--that is, of compromise. (7) They should seek satisfaction for all involved.

  5. International System and Foreign Policy Approaches: Implications for Conflict Modelling and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    tool for conflict management , preliminary version of which is the Computer Aided Conflict Information System. Using expert judgments to describe...1961. The combined model is more relevant during the crisis phase. The results have implications for conflict modelling. With respect to conflict ... management , there is an important implication. Since the organizational processes model may be more valid than an event interaction model, then conflict

  6. Socialization of Children's Recall and Use of Strategies for Coping with Interparental Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Paul A.; Kliewer, Wendy; Partch, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Using experimental, observational and interview-assessment methods, we examined relations among mother-child discussion skills and suggested strategies for coping with postdivorce interparental conflict in a conflict task, children's memory for those strategies in a later recall interview, and children's self-reported use of coping strategies in…

  7. Disentangling the roles of parental monitoring and family conflict in adolescents' management of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Holmes, Clarissa S; Chen, Rusan; Maher, Kathryn; Robinson, Elizabeth; Streisand, Randi

    2013-04-01

    Less parental monitoring of adolescents' diabetes self-care and more family conflict are each associated with poorer diabetes outcomes. However, little is known about how these two family factors relate with one another in the context of self-care and glycemic control. Diabetes self-care was evaluated as a mediator of the associations among parental monitoring, family conflict, and glycemic control in early adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Adolescent-parent dyads (n = 257) reported on the frequency of parental monitoring, family conflict, and diabetes self-care. Hemoglobin A1c was abstracted from medical charts. Structural equation modeling was used for mediation analysis. A mediation model linking parental involvement and family conflict with A1c through diabetes self-care fit the data well. Monitoring and conflict were inversely correlated (β = -0.23, p < .05) and each demonstrated indirect associations with A1c (standardized indirect effects -0.13 and 0.07, respectively) through their direct associations with self-care (β = 0.39, p < .001 and β = -0.19, p < .05, respectively). Conflict also was positively associated with higher A1c (β = 0.31, p < .01). Elevated family conflict and less parental monitoring are risk factors for poorer glycemic control, and diabetes self-care is one mediator linking these variables. Interventions to promote parental monitoring of diabetes management during early adolescence may benefit from emphasizing strategies to prevent or reduce family conflict. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  8. Addressing the burden of post-conflict surgical disease - strategies from the North Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Lunze, Karsten; Lunze, Fatima I

    2011-01-01

    The 2004 terror attack on a school in Beslan, North Caucasus, with more than 1300 children and their families taken hostage and 334 people killed, ended after extreme violence. Following the disaster, many survivors with blast ear injuries developed complications because no microsurgery services were available in the region. Here, we present our strategies in North Ossetia to strengthen subspecialty surgical care in a region of instable security conditions. Disaster modifies disease burden in an environment of conflict-related health-care limitations. We built on available secondary care and partnered international with local stakeholders to reach and treat victims of a humanitarian disaster. A strategy of mutual commitment resulted in treatment of all consenting Beslan victims with blast trauma sequelae and of non disaster-related patients. Credible, sustained partnerships and needs assessments beyond the immediate phases after a disaster are essential to facilitate a meaningful transition from humanitarian aid to capacity building exceeding existing insufficient standards. Psychosocial impacts of disaster might constitute a barrier to care and need to be assessed when responding to the burden of surgical disease in conflict or post-conflict settings. Involving local citizen groups in the planning process can be useful to identify and access vulnerable populations. Integration of our strategy into broader efforts might strengthen the local health system through management and leadership.

  9. Aggression and conflict management at fusion in spider monkeys.

    PubMed

    Aureli, Filippo; Schaffner, Colleen M

    2007-04-22

    In social systems characterized by a high degree of fission-fusion dynamics, members of a large community are rarely all together, spending most of their time in smaller subgroups with flexible membership. Although fissioning into smaller subgroups is believed to reduce conflict among community members, fusions may create conflict among individuals from joining subgroups. Here, we present evidence for aggressive escalation at fusion and its mitigation by the use of embraces in wild spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi). Our findings provide the first systematic evidence for conflict management at fusion and may have implications for the function of human greetings.

  10. Human capital strategy: talent management.

    PubMed

    Nagra, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Large organizations, including the US Army Medical Department and the Army Nurse Corps, are people-based organizations. Consequently, effective and efficient management of the human capital within these organizations is a strategic goal for the leadership. Over time, the Department of Defense has used many different systems and strategies to manage people throughout their service life-cycle. The current system in use is called Human Capital Management. In the near future, the Army's human capital will be managed based on skills, knowledge, and behaviors through various measurement tools. This article elaborates the human capital management strategy within the Army Nurse Corps, which identifies, develops, and implements key talent management strategies under the umbrella of the Corps' human capital goals. The talent management strategy solutions are aligned under the Nurse Corps business strategy captured by the 2008 Army Nurse Corps Campaign Plan, and are implemented within the context of the culture and core values of the organization.

  11. [Styles of conflict management among nurses. Instrument validation].

    PubMed

    Francisco, M T; Clos, A C; dos Santos, I; Larrubia, E de O

    1997-01-01

    The present study has as an object the modalities of conflict administration adopted by nurses in professional praxis. Considering the Management Grid Theory (BLAKE & MOUNTON, 1978), the conflict can be solved in different levels of quality or even, not solved, influenced by the manager behavior model. It is intended to identify nurses managing styles in conflict administration, analyzing their interactions. A questionnaire composed with 25 items, in its majority of popular adagios which express the five basic models of the Management Grid, has been tested. The research was run at the Rio de Janeiro State University Pedro Ernesto University Hospital from June, 1996 to August, 1997, and descriptive method and check-list schedule type functional analysis technique have been used. The factorial analysis of items has showed an occurrence of eight interdependent factors which designing the following styles that have been adopted by nurses: confrontation, negotiation, facing, conciliation, manipulation, acceptance, submission and withdrawing. The authors recommend data collect instrument revalidation.

  12. Effective coping strategies in stressful outdoor recreation situations: conflict on the Ocoee River

    Treesearch

    Rudy Schuster; William Hammitt

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to identify conflict situations that cause stress, and predict appraisals of stress, coping strategies and outcomes of the coping process among private boaters on the Ocoee River in Tennessee. Results show that 72 percent of the respondents experienced conflict. Conflict was of moderate intensity and concern, boaters generally psychologically...

  13. Similarly Torn, Differentially Shorn? The Experience and Management of Conflict between Multiple Roles, Relationships, and Social Categories

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Janelle M.; Hynie, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    In three studies we examined the experience and management of conflict between different types of multiple identities. Participants described a conflict between pairs of role, relational, or social identities before rating the experience (i.e., magnitude, stress, and growth) and management of conflict on a newly developed scale assessing four strategies: reconciliation, where identities are integrated, realignment, where one identity is chosen over another, retreat, where both identities are avoided, and reflection, where fit (with others, situation) determines identity selection. In general, the types of identities mattered for conflict management but not its experience: Magnitude and growth did not differ, however, stress was greater for role identity conflicts (Study 3 only) and participants endorsed the use of more realignment for role conflicts (Study 2) and more retreat for relational conflicts (Study 3) relative to other types of identity conflicts. Furthermore, findings suggested that the perceived flexibility of identities, not their importance or valence, were associated with realignment and retreat for roles and with retreat for relationships. Experiencing conflicts between multiple identities leaves people similarly torn, but multiple roles and relationships may be differentially shorn to manage conflict. PMID:29051744

  14. Similarly Torn, Differentially Shorn? The Experience and Management of Conflict between Multiple Roles, Relationships, and Social Categories.

    PubMed

    Jones, Janelle M; Hynie, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    In three studies we examined the experience and management of conflict between different types of multiple identities. Participants described a conflict between pairs of role, relational, or social identities before rating the experience (i.e., magnitude, stress, and growth) and management of conflict on a newly developed scale assessing four strategies: reconciliation , where identities are integrated, realignment , where one identity is chosen over another, retreat , where both identities are avoided, and reflection , where fit (with others, situation) determines identity selection. In general, the types of identities mattered for conflict management but not its experience: Magnitude and growth did not differ, however, stress was greater for role identity conflicts ( Study 3 only ) and participants endorsed the use of more realignment for role conflicts ( Study 2 ) and more retreat for relational conflicts ( Study 3 ) relative to other types of identity conflicts. Furthermore, findings suggested that the perceived flexibility of identities, not their importance or valence, were associated with realignment and retreat for roles and with retreat for relationships. Experiencing conflicts between multiple identities leaves people similarly torn, but multiple roles and relationships may be differentially shorn to manage conflict.

  15. Co-operation and conflict in a hospital: interprofessional differences in perception and management of conflicts.

    PubMed

    Skjørshammer, M

    2001-02-01

    This article presents a case study of a Norwegian hospital, analysing how health professionals manage conflicts related to work co-operation. Altogether, 29 health professionals working in the hospital were interviewed, and data was analysed according to a grounded theory approach. When in conflict, health professionals seem to use three major approaches to handling the situation: avoidance, forcing and negotiation, and usually in that order. Avoidance behaviour or suppression is the most common reaction to an emerging conflict. If the use of power does not re-establish a balance between the participants, one negotiates. These conflict styles seem to be determined by two major factors: the perceived interdependence between parties and the perceived urgency of doing something about the situation. Nurses and physicians in particular seem to differ considerably in their perception of what is a conflict and when to do something about it. Such differences in perceptions and the extensive use of avoidance represent important challenges to managers and clinical leaders when it comes to advancing interprofessional co-operation.

  16. Relations of husbands and wives dysphoria to marital conflict resolution strategies.

    PubMed

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D; Papp, Lauren M; Cummings, E Mark

    2004-03-01

    This study investigated relations between spouses' dysphoria and constructive and destructive emotions and tactics displayed by husbands and wives throughout marital conflicts. Behavioral observations were made of 267 couples' interactions during marital conflict resolution tasks. Husbands' and wives' dysphoria levels were related to particular negative marital conflict expressions and the absence of positive strategies, even after taking into account couples' marital satisfaction and their partners' levels of dysphoria. Moreover, in comparison with wives' dysphoria, husbands' dysphoria was associated with more pervasive impairments in couples" conflict strategies evident in multiple contexts of conflict resolution, including discussion of relatively minor sources of disagreement. Implications for the treatment of depressed or maritally discordant couples are discussed.

  17. [Child protection--cooperation and conflict management].

    PubMed

    Averbeck, Birgit; Hermans, Björn Enno

    2010-01-01

    When people have to deal with conflicts or opposing views they often refer to the term cooperation. But after lengthy discussions the question may be raised if it is more useful not to cooperate. The authors of this article analyse why cooperation is often called for but frequently fails. In this article key prerequisites for successful cooperation are described before the authors present their practical method of 'sYpport'. 'SYpport' mostly refers to trans-institutional cooperation and focuses on the required attitude of those involved. The authors' simple but crucial conclusion is that cooperation requires faith in others.

  18. Conflict Management in Schools: Sowing Seeds for a Safer Society. Final Report of the School Conflict Management Demonstration Project 1990-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Terrence; And Others

    In August 1990, the Ohio Commission on Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management initiated a three-year School Conflict Management Demonstration Project. This publication is the final report on the Project. Twenty schools, which reflected the state's diversity, were selected to help assess the impact of the conflict management programs. The…

  19. Conflict management styles used by nurse managers in the Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Shukri, Raghda; Anthony, Denis

    2011-02-01

    The study aimed at investigating the conflict management styles used by nurse managers in the Sultanate of Oman. Conflict is inevitable in daily nursing work. Several styles are used to manage conflict situations. In previous studies conducted in Western countries, avoiding and compromising conflict management styles appear to be the first choices for the nurses. In Arab countries, no study to date has examined the conflict management styles used by nurse managers to compare with the results from studies conducted in Western countries. Survey. A questionnaire was distributed to all nurse managers working in the three-management levels from nine referral hospitals in Sultanate of Oman, 271 were returned, a response rate of 86%. The results were analysed using spss version 16. Nurse managers in Oman used all five conflict management styles, with integrating style as the first choice followed in order by compromising, obliging, dominating and avoiding. These results differ from the results of the studies conducted on nurses in other countries. The results of this study have implications for people who work in the hospitals, whether practitioners or policy makers. Recommendations are offered to improve nurse managers' work environment. Conflict can affect patient care if handled badly. Poorly handled conflict results in lower staff morale and poorer retention, both adversely affect patient care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Parkinson's disease management strategies.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Alex; Rajput, Ali H

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment strategies should consider each patient individually. Drug therapy is the mainstay of treatment. An average 62-year-old male first diagnosed with PD will likely live for 20 years and treatment should be geared for long-term control of symptoms and quality of life. Of the currently available drugs, none are neurotoxic to the human substantia nigra and none are neuroprotective. As PD is a progressive disorder, all drugs have adverse effects and reduced efficacy with time. PD patients need regular follow-ups to make necessary medication adjustments. There is no perfect treatment. The authors have discussed their treatment methods and the reasoning behind it. Depending on the patient's age, the predominant symptoms and quality of life, treatment is individualized. In an average patient the least potent drugs, such as anticholinergics or amantadine, are administered first adding a dopamine agonist later on. Levodopa (LD) remains the most useful drug for PD and is reserved for later stages of disease. The objective is to keep the patient at Hoehn and Yahr Stage 2.0 or lower level of disability (bilateral findings with preserved postural reflexes) during off-stage and to avoid adverse effects. There is no long-term difference between standard preparations and control release formulations of LD/carbidopa or LD/benserazide. In older subjects, the first choice is LD. In patients who cannot be managed medically, surgical treatment is an option in selected patients (nondemented, <70 years old, previous good LD response). The surgical treatment of choice is currently subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation. Physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy are valuable in advanced PD cases.

  1. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Ronald

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to explore the multigenerational strategies used by 3 managers from a Franklin County, Ohio manufacturing facility with a population size of 6 participants. The conceptual framework for this study was built upon generational theory and cohort group theory. The data were collected through face-to-face semistructured interviews, company documents, and a reflexive journal. Member checking was completed to strengthen the credibility and trustworthiness of the interpretation of participants' responses. A modified van Kaam method enabled separation of themes following the coding of data. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) required multigenerational managerial skills, (b) generational cohort differences, (c) most effective multigenerational management strategies, and (d) least effective multigenerational management strategies. Findings from this study may contribute to social change through better understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of the primary generations in the workforce, and, in turn, improve community relationships.

  2. Conflict in Protected Areas: Who Says Co-Management Does Not Work?

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Bas; Vranckx, An; Léon-Sicard, Tomas; Van Damme, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Natural resource-related conflicts can be extremely destructive and undermine environmental protection. Since the 1990s co-management schemes, whereby the management of resources is shared by public and/or private sector stakeholders, have been a main strategy for reducing these conflicts worldwide. Despite initial high hopes, in recent years co-management has been perceived as falling short of expectations. However, systematic assessments of its role in conflict prevention or mitigation are non-existent. Interviews with 584 residents from ten protected areas in Colombia revealed that co-management can be successful in reducing conflict at grassroots level, as long as some critical enabling conditions, such as effective participation in the co-management process, are fulfilled not only on paper but also by praxis. We hope these findings will re-incentivize global efforts to make co-management work in protected areas and other common pool resource contexts, such as fisheries, agriculture, forestry and water management. PMID:26714036

  3. Adolescents’, Mothers’, and Fathers’ Gendered Coping Strategies during Conflict: Youth and Parent Influences on Conflict Resolution and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Kristine; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Schreiber, Jane E; Hastings, Paul; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We observed gendered coping strategies and conflict resolution outcomes used by adolescents and parents during a conflict discussion task to evaluate associations with current and later adolescent psychopathology. We studied 137 middle-to-upper-middle class predominantly Caucasian families of adolescents (aged 11–16 years, 65 males) who represented a range of psychological functioning including normative (~1/3) sub-clinical (~1/3) and clinical (~1/3) levels of problems. Adolescent coping strategies played key roles both in the extent to which parent-adolescent dyads resolved conflict and in the trajectory of psychopathology symptom severity over a two-year period. Gender-prototypic adaptive coping strategies were observed in parents but not youth, i.e. more problem-solving by fathers than mothers and more regulated emotion-focused coping by mothers than fathers. Youth-mother dyads more often achieved full resolution of conflict than youth-father dyads. There were generally not bidirectional effects among youth and parents’ coping across the discussion except boys’ initial use of angry/hostile coping predicted fathers’ angry/hostile coping. The child was more influential than the parent on conflict resolution. This extended to exacerbation/alleviation of psychopathology over two years: higher conflict resolution mediated the association of adolescents’ use of problem-focused coping with decreases in symptom severity over time. Lower conflict resolution mediated the association of adolescents’ use of angry/hostile emotion coping with increases in symptom severity over time. Implications of findings are considered within a broadened context of the nature of coping and conflict resolution in youth-parent interactions, as well as how these processes impact on youth well-being and dysfunction over time. PMID:26439060

  4. Adolescents', mothers', and fathers' gendered coping strategies during conflict: Youth and parent influences on conflict resolution and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Kristine; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Schreiber, Jane E; Hastings, Paul; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2015-11-01

    We observed gendered coping strategies and conflict resolution outcomes used by adolescents and parents during a conflict discussion task to evaluate associations with current and later adolescent psychopathology. We studied 137 middle- to upper-middle-class, predominantly Caucasian families of adolescents (aged 11-16 years, 65 males) who represented a range of psychological functioning, including normative, subclinical, and clinical levels of problems. Adolescent coping strategies played key roles both in the extent to which parent-adolescent dyads resolved conflict and in the trajectory of psychopathology symptom severity over a 2-year period. Gender-prototypic adaptive coping strategies were observed in parents but not youth, (i.e., more problem solving by fathers than mothers and more regulated emotion-focused coping by mothers than fathers). Youth-mother dyads more often achieved full resolution of conflict than youth-father dyads. There were generally not bidirectional effects among youth and parents' coping across the discussion except boys' initial use of angry/hostile coping predicted fathers' angry/hostile coping. The child was more influential than the parent on conflict resolution. This extended to exacerbation/alleviation of psychopathology over 2 years: higher conflict resolution mediated the association of adolescents' use of problem-focused coping with decreases in symptom severity over time. Lower conflict resolution mediated the association of adolescents' use of angry/hostile emotion coping with increases in symptom severity over time. Implications of findings are considered within a broadened context of the nature of coping and conflict resolution in youth-parent interactions, as well as on how these processes impact youth well-being and dysfunction over time.

  5. Managed care strategy.

    PubMed

    Maguire, E F

    1996-01-01

    Managed care is, in reality, managed payment delivered through exclusive price-competitive contracts that require healthcare providers to reorganize to participate as equals in the division of premium dollars.

  6. Conflict Resolution in Marriage: Toward a Theory of Spousal Strategies and Marital Dissolution Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chafetz, Janet Saltzman

    1980-01-01

    There are four strategies spouses may attempt to employ in cases of conflict: authority, control, influence, and manipulation. Rates of marital dissolution are a function of the relative equality between spouses in terms of the types of conflict-resolution strategies they are able to employ. (Author)

  7. Associations between social understanding, sibling relationship quality, and siblings' conflict strategies and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Holly E; Howe, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Sibling relationship quality and social understanding (second-order false belief, conflict interpretation, and narrative conflict perspective references) were examined as unique and interactive correlates of sibling conflict behavior in 62 dyads (older M age = 8.39 years and younger M age = 6.06 years). High-quality relationships were associated with positive conflict processes. Younger siblings' second-order false belief scores were negatively associated with constructive conflict strategies, and older siblings' narrative self-referential focus was negatively associated with compromise. Associations between younger children's social understanding (conflict interpretation and narrative perspective references) and siblings' dyadic conflict behavior were moderated by relationship quality. Results suggest that links between social understanding and conflict behavior should be considered in conjunction with the quality of children's relationships.

  8. Development of a utility conflict management system.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    A critical process for the timely development and delivery of highway construction projects is the early : identification and depiction of utility interests that may interfere with proposed highway facilities. The : effective management of such utili...

  9. An asymmetric parental investment conflict with continuous strategy sets.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Osnat

    2005-12-07

    In the parental investment conflict each of the sexes decides how much to invest in its brood, where its decision influences both sexes' fitness. In nature, each species is usually characterized by a common parental care pattern, male-only care, female-only care or biparental care. A possible way for understanding the factors that have led each species to adopt its unique parental care pattern is to analyse a male's and a female's decision process using a game-theoretical model. This paper suggests a two-stage game-theoretical model with two types of players, male and female. During the game each parent makes three decisions. The interval between the beginning of the game, i.e. after mating and having offspring, and the moment a parent starts to care for them is a random variable. Thus, in the first stage a parent chooses the cumulative probability distribution of this interval, and its amount of parental care. In the second stage the other parent chooses its probability for cooperation. It is assumed that as long as parental care is not provided the offspring are at risk, and that parental caring accrues a different cost for each sex. We compute the Evolutionary Stable Strategies (ESS) under payoff-relevant asymmetry, and show that uniparental and biparental care are possible ESS. We also characterize cases where the sex having the lower cost "forces" the sex having the higher cost to care and vice versa.

  10. Managing Workplace Incivility: The Role of Conflict Management Styles--Antecedent or Antidote?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Jeannie; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The workforce of the 21st century is dealing with rapid changes and increased competition across industries. Such changes place stress on management and workers alike, increasing the potential for workplace conflict and deviant workplace behaviors, including incivility. The importance of effective conflict management in the workplace has been…

  11. Conflict Management Styles Predicted by Managerial Frames of Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Epps, Pamela D.; Thompson, Bruce

    The measurement integrity of M. A. Rahim's Organizational Conflict Inventory (ROCI-II) and D. M. Roussel's Managerial Frames of Mind Survey (MFMS) was investigated, as was the relationship between scores on the two measures. Subjects were 369 managers from three types of organizations: (1) higher education; (2) not-for-profit public sector…

  12. Airborne Management of Traffic Conflicts in Descent With Arrival Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    NASA is studying far-term air traffic management concepts that may increase operational efficiency through a redistribution of decisionmaking authority among airborne and ground-based elements of the air transportation system. One component of this research, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows trained pilots of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for traffic separation. Ground-based air traffic controllers would continue to separate traffic unequipped for autonomous operations and would issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To evaluate En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a human-in-the-loop experiment was jointly conducted by the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. In this experiment, test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve conflicts in cruise and descent, and to adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by test subject controllers. Simulators at NASA Langley were equipped with a prototype Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) flight deck toolset to assist pilots with conflict management and constraint compliance tasks. Results from the experiment are presented, focusing specifically on operations during the initial descent into the terminal area. Airborne conflict resolution performance in descent, conformance to traffic flow management constraints, and the effects of conflicting traffic on constraint conformance are all presented. Subjective data from subject pilots are also presented, showing perceived levels of workload, safety, and acceptability of autonomous arrival operations. Finally, potential AOP functionality enhancements are discussed along with suggestions to improve arrival procedures.

  13. 45 CFR 94.5 - Management of conflicting interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Management of conflicting interests. 94.5 Section 94.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RESPONSIBLE... interest include, but are not limited to: (1) Public disclosure of significant financial interests; (2...

  14. Modeling potential river management conflicts between frogs and salmonids

    Treesearch

    Steven F. Railsback; Bret C. Harvey; Sarah J. Kupferberg; Margaret M. Lang; Scott McBain; Hart H. Welsh

    2016-01-01

    Management of regulated rivers for yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) and salmonids exemplifies potential conflicts among species adapted to different parts of the natural flow and temperature regimes. Yellow-legged frogs oviposit in rivers in spring and depend on declining flows and warming temperatures for egg and tadpole survival and growth,...

  15. Strategies of Conflict in China during 1975-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberthal, Kenneth

    The pamphlet reviews political conflict in Peking from spring 1975 through spring 1976. During this period three political groups existed in The People's Republic of China: radicals (populists), moderates (Western-style modernizers), and the military (Chinese equivalent of the Pentagon). Most conflict traditionally occurred between radicals and…

  16. The Determination of the Conflict Resolution Strategies of University Students that They Use when They Have Conflicts with People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincyurek, Sibel; Civelek, Ali H.

    2008-01-01

    This study is performed aiming to find out the resolution strategies our youth develop for the conflicts they live through along the way to being a mature individual, "grown teenager-young-teen-adolescent", who can keep abreast of the rapid progress and improvement in technical and social areas today. (Contains 11 tables.)

  17. Integrating School-Based and Therapeutic Conflict Management Models at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Explores the possibility of integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models, comparing two management models: a school-based conflict management program, "Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers"; and a therapeutic conflict management program, "Life Space Crisis Intervention." The paper concludes that integration might be possible…

  18. Role Management Strategies of Beginning Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Pik Lin; Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan

    2005-01-01

    Beginning teachers encounter new challenges as the role system in contemporary society has become more and more demanding. By means of the life history method, role management strategies of four Hong Kong beginning teachers employed to cope with role demands and intra-role conflicts were located in their biographical, workplace and wider…

  19. An Analysis of Student Affairs Professionals' Management of Role Conflict and Multiple Roles in Relation to Work/Life Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Nicole Lepone

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this inquiry is to study how student affairs professionals manage role conflict in relation to work/life balance based on the challenging culture of the field. The underlying goals are to identify the barriers or challenges of managing multiple roles as a student affairs administrator and identify strategies to assist employees in…

  20. Crisis management strategies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Maria C; Politis-Norton, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the different facets of crisis as experienced within the pharmaceutical industry but which are also prevalent throughout other industries. It highlights the importance of early identification and management of crises and issues, which in return are strongly intertwined with a fundamental positive internal corporate climate. A corporate philosophy should always embrace crisis management with the attitude of 'when' and not 'if'; therefore, a company should act today and not tomorrow once a crisis is on its doorstep. Preparation is of utmost importance and there are several items that can be addressed even before a crisis has arisen. Further, this paper also provides guidance on how to deal with the media, what to do and what not to do, and how to appoint the appropriate spokesperson. In this era of fast exchange of information, crisis, which previously may have stayed behind corporate doors, may not do so any longer. Image is very important and should therefore not be risked. Crisis and issue management should therefore be integrated in every company's philosophy and standard operating procedures.

  1. Conflict termination and military strategy: Coercion, persuasion, and war

    SciTech Connect

    Cimbala, S.J.; Dunn, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contributors examine a wide variety of topics ranging from superpower views on conflict termination to past, present, and future U.S. military service contributions. They aim to highlight the importance of thinking about conflict termination goals and objectives in peacetime to insure that plans that may be used in war have been carefully evaluated outside the heat of battle, when the emotions created by war might cloud decision making.

  2. The office of strategy management.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2005-10-01

    There is a disconnect in most companies between strategy formulation and strategy execution. On average, 95% of a company's employees are unaware of, or do not understand, its strategy. If employees are unaware of the strategy, they surely cannot help the organization implement it effectively. It doesn't have to be like this. For the past 15 years, the authors have studied companies that achieved performance breakthroughs by adopting the Balanced Scorecard and its associated tools to help them better communicate strategy to their employees and to guide and monitor the execution of that strategy. Some companies, of course, have achieved better, longer-lasting improvements than others. The organizations that have managed to sustain their strategic focus have typically established a new corporate-level unit to oversee all activities related to strategy: an office of strategy management (OS M). The OSM, in effect, acts as the CEO's chief of staff. It coordinates an array of tasks: communicating corporate strategy; ensuring that enterprise-level plans are translated into the plans of the various units and departments; executing strategic initiatives to deliver on the grand design; aligning employees' plans for competency development with strategic objectives; and testing and adapting the strategy to stay abreast of the competition. The OSM does not do all the work, but it facilitates the processes so that strategy is executed in an integrated fashion across the enterprise. Although the companies that Kaplan and Norton studied use the Balanced Scorecard as the framework for their strategy management systems, the authors say the lessons of the OSM are applicable even to companies that do not use it.

  3. Understanding Children’s Emotional Processes and Behavioral Strategies in the Context of Marital Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Koss, Kalsea J.; George, Melissa R. W.; Bergman, Kathleen N.; Cummings, E. Mark; Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Marital conflict is a distressing context in which children must regulate their emotion and behavior, however, the associations between the multidimensionality of conflict and children’s regulatory processes needs to be examined. The current study examined differences in children’s (n = 207; M = 8.02 years) emotions (mad, sad, scared, and happy) and behavioral strategies to regulate conflict exposure during resolved, unresolved, escalating, and child-rearing marital conflict vignettes. Children’s cortisol levels were assessed in relation to child-rearing and resolved conflict vignettes. Anger and sadness were associated with escalating and child-rearing conflicts; fearfulness was related to escalating and unresolved conflicts. Children’s happiness was associated with resolution. Anger was associated with children’s strategies to stop conflict; whereas, sadness was associated with monitoring and avoidant strategies. Cortisol recovery moderated the link between fearfulness and behavioral regulation. These results highlight the importance of children’s emotions and regulatory processes in understanding the impact of marital conflict. PMID:21397249

  4. Bibliography on peace, security, and international conflict management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    This bibliography presents an annotated list of approximately one hundred titles for public libraries seeking to serve the college-educated nonspecialist in the fields of peace, security, and international conflict management. representative titles have been selected in eight subject areas: (1) arms control, disarmament, and proliferation; (2) causes and nature of international conflict; (3) conflict management, diplomacy, and negotiation; (4) human rights and ethnic and religious conflicts; (5) international law and international order; (6) international organizations and transnationalism; (7) other approaches to, and overviews of, security and peace; and (8) religion and ethics. Three criteria determined selection of titles: the bookmore » is in print and is expected to remain in print for the foreseeable future; the book is of interest to the college-educated lay reader with a serious interest in the subject; and the list, as a whole, illustrates the full spectrum of debate, both in selection of topics and selection of titles. As an aid to the identification and acquisition of any of these materials, the editors have provided a bibliographic citation with an annotation that includes the following: author, title, statement of responsibility, publisher, publication information, pagination, and ISBN or ISSN.« less

  5. Autonomous Aircraft Operations using RTCA Guidelines for Airborne Conflict Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Wing, David J.; Barmore, Bryan E.; Barhydt, Richard; Palmer, Michael T.; Johnson, Edward J.; Ballin, Mark G.; Eischeid, Todd M.

    2003-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop experiment was performed at the NASA Langley Research Center to study the feasibility of DAG-TM autonomous aircraft operations in highly constrained airspace. The airspace was constrained by a pair of special-use airspace (SUA) regions on either side of the pilot's planned route. Traffic flow management (TFM) constraints were imposed as a required time of arrival and crossing altitude at an en route fix. Key guidelines from the RTCA Airborne Conflict Management (ACM) concept were applied to autonomous aircraft operations for this experiment. These concepts included the RTCA ACM definitions of distinct conflict detection and collision avoidance zones, and the use of a graded system of conflict alerts for the flight crew. Three studies were conducted in the course of the experiment. The first study investigated the effect of hazard proximity upon pilot ability to meet constraints and solve conflict situations. The second study investigated pilot use of the airborne tools when faced with an unexpected loss of separation (LOS). The third study explored pilot interactions in an over-constrained conflict situation, with and without priority rules dictating who should move first. Detailed results from these studies were presented at the 5th USA/Europe Air Traffic Management R&D Seminar (ATM2003). This overview paper focuses on the integration of the RTCA ACM concept into autonomous aircraft operations in highly constrained situations, and provides an overview of the results presented at the ATM2003 seminar. These results, together with previously reported studies, continue to support the feasibility of autonomous aircraft operations.

  6. Turkish Adolescents' Conflict Resolution Strategies toward Peers and Parents as a Function of Loneliness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciftci, Ayse; Demir, Ayhan; Bikos, Lynette Heim

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of loneliness on the conflict resolution strategies of adolescents toward their friends, mothers, and fathers. High school students (N = 180) from 8 different schools in Ankara, Turkey, completed the UCLA Loneliness Scale and Conflict Resolution Questionnaire with respect to their friends, mothers, and fathers.…

  7. Interpersonal Conflict Resolution Strategies in Children: A Father-Child Co-Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricaud-Droisy, Helene; Zaouche-Gaudron, Chantal

    2003-01-01

    The interpersonal conflict gives an opportunity to learn living together and to accept differences. We consider the interpersonal conflict resolution strategies as an indicator of the socialization and as such of the autonomisation and social integration. If, at the earliest age, the child has the advantage of a differentiated and early paternal…

  8. Mediation as a Leadership Strategy to Deal with Conflict in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntho-Ntho, Maitumeleng Albertina; Nieuwenhuis, Frederik Jan

    2016-01-01

    The concept of mediation is a process that is frequently used in the labour field and is under-developed in a field such as education. Mediation as a strategy to resolve conflict in an amicable way has gained support in various other fields but seems not to be seen as a mainstream solution to resolving conflict in education. This article reports…

  9. Voices from the Field: Teachers Talk about Strategies for Peace and Conflict Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Edyth; Stomfay-Stitz, Aline

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the strategies used by teachers in early childhood programs and elementary schools when they teach about peace and conflict resolution. In a focus group, the teachers relate that they primarily need consistency as they work toward peace and conflict resolution. The teachers also identify communication with…

  10. Early Adolescent Health Risk Behaviors, Conflict Resolution Strategies, and School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRusso, Maria; Selman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon an ethnically and socio-economically diverse sample of 323 7th grade students from twelve urban schools within one school district, this mixed method study examined early adolescents' self-reported health risk behaviors as related to their conflict resolution strategies and their school's conflict resolution climate. Survey data…

  11. Conflict Resolution Strategies in Non-Government Secondary Schools in Benue State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oboegbulem, Angie; Alfa, Idoko Alphonusu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated perceived CRSs (conflict resolution strategies) for the resolution of conflicts in non-government secondary schools in Benue State, Nigeria. Three research questions and three hypotheses guided this study. Proportionate stratified random sampling technique was used in drawing 15% of the population which gave a total of 500…

  12. Blood management issues using blood management strategies.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Bernard N; Zadzilka, Jayson D

    2007-06-01

    Blood management strategies is a term used to address a coordinated approach to the management of blood loss in the perioperative period for total joint arthroplasty. The premise of any blood management strategy is that each patient, surgeon, and operative intervention experiences different risks of requiring transfusion, that those risks can be identified, and that a plan can be implemented to address them. A surgeon's decision to transfuse should be based on physiologic assessment of the patient's response to anemia and not on an arbitrary number ("transfusion trigger"). Intervention strategies can be applied preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively. Patient-specific planning allows for the appropriate use of patient, hospital, and system resources, ensuring that the consequences of anemia are minimized and that the patient's recovery process is optimized.

  13. Relationship between Communication Competence and Conflict Management Styles of School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzun, Tevfik; Ayik, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Determining the relationship between communication competence and conflict management styles of school principals, according to teacher perceptions, is important for school principals to effectively manage and foster a positive school environment. Conflicts are inevitable in all types of schools. Managing conflicts and maintaining…

  14. Strategies for managing margins.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    Potential Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement cuts have made it critical for home health agencies to manage their gross and net operating profit margins. Agencies need to develop tools to analyze their margins and make sure they are following best practices. Try as you may, your agency might still face the question, "Why am I not meeting my budget?" Get some answers in this session from David Berman and Andrea L. Devoti. Berman is a principal at Simione Healthcare Consultants in Hamden, CT, where he is responsible for merchant acquisitions, business valuation due diligence, and oversight of the financial monitor benchmarking tool besides serving as interim chief financial officer. Devoti is chairman of the NAHC board and President & CEO of Neighborhood Health Visiting Nurse Association in West Chester PA.

  15. Conflict management training and nurse-physician collaborative behaviors.

    PubMed

    Boone, Brenda N; King, Major L; Gresham, Louise S; Wahl, Patricia; Suh, Eunice

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration between nurses and physicians continues to be elusive although it is a desirable goal for most in health care. This study used a quasi-experimental design to evaluate the outcomes of a conflict resolution (management) training program on nurses' perception of their collaboration with the physicians with whom they work. Results showed no differences between the experimental and control groups following the intervention. Individual readiness and evaluation of the antecedents of collaboration should be determined before implementing such an intervention.

  16. Applying smart growth principles and strategies to resolving land use conflicts around airports.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-09-01

    This report presents the findings and conclusions from a research project to explore how the principles and : strategies of smart growth can be applied to resolving land use conflicts around airports. The study entailed a : literature review, intervi...

  17. Sex-Related Strategies for Coping With Interpersonal Conflict in Children Aged Five and Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Patrice M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Explores the differences between boys and girls (5- and 7-year-olds) in their use of two kinds of strategies with interpersonal conflict: (1) active persuasion and negotiation, and (2) mitigation without disrupting social harmony between the interactors. (HOD)

  18. Investigating School Counselors' Perceived Role and Self-Efficacy in Managing Multiparty Student Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacco, Summer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine school counselors' perceived role and self-efficacy in managing multiparty student conflict. Literature on conflict resolution in the field of education has not addressed conflicts that take place among three or more students, or multiparty student conflict. Therefore, investigated in this study were middle…

  19. The Relationship between High Labor-Management Conflict and Turnover of Key School District Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, William E.; Sites, Woodrow H.

    Beginning with a review of recent literature on social conflict, this study adopts Coser's distinction between realistic conflict, which seeks to balance both sides of a disagreement, and nonrealistic conflict, which seeks domination by only one party. Where nonrealistic conflict develops in intense labor-management disputes in public school…

  20. Acceptability of an e-learning program to help nursing assistants manage relationship conflict in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Marziali, Elsa; Mackenzie, Corey Scott; Tchernikov, Illia

    2015-02-01

    Management of nursing assistants' (NAs) emotional stress from relationship conflicts with residents, families, and coworkers is rarely the focus of educational programs. Our objective was to gather feedback from NAs and their nursing supervisors (NSs) about the utility of our e-learning program for managing relationship stress. A total of 147 NAs and their NSs from 17 long-term care homes viewed the educational modules (DVD slides with voice-over), either individually or in small groups, and provided feedback using conference call focus groups. Qualitative analysis of NA feedback showed that workplace relationship conflict stress was associated with workload and the absence of a forum for discussing relationship conflicts that was not acknowledged by NSs. This accessible e-learning program provides NAs with strategies for managing stressful emotions arising from workplace relationship conflict situations and underscores the importance of supervisory support and team collaboration in coping with emotionally evoked workplace stress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Children's Goals and Strategies in Response to Conflicts within a Friendship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Amanda J.; Asher, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Examined whether fourth- and fifth-grade children's social goals and strategies in friendship conflict situations are predictive of their friendship adjustment, after accounting for level of peer acceptance. Found that children's goals were highly related to their strategies and that children's goals and strategies were predictive of their…

  2. Conflict Resolution Strategies Adopted from Parenting Coordination: Assisting High-Conflict Coparenting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Wilma J.; Mitcham, Michelle A.; Henry, Lynette M.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the challenges faced by nontraditional college students who are coparents as a result of divorce. The need for college counseling centers to have counseling options designed to assist this special population in successfully completing their academic pursuits is presented. Conflict resolution techniques based on the Parenting…

  3. The Relationships between Organizational Justice, Confidence, Commitment, and Evaluating the Manager and the Perceptions of Conflict Management at the Context of Organizational Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgan, Habib

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the perceptions related to strategies of conflict management, organizational confidence, organizational justice, organizational commitment and evaluating the manager which are effective on the organizational behavior of teachers are studied. The research is a discretional study in the model of survey. The high-schools in the center…

  4. Medical device development: managing conflicts of interest encountered by physicians.

    PubMed

    Baim, Donald S; Donovan, Aine; Smith, John J; Briefs, Nancy; Geoffrion, Richard; Feigal, David; Kaplan, Aaron V

    2007-04-01

    New technologies introduced over the past three decades have transformed medical diagnosis and treatment, and significantly improved patient outcomes. These changes have been mediated by the introduction of new medical devices, particularly for the treatment of cardiovascular, orthopedic, and ophthalmic disorders. These devices, in turn, have created large markets and spawned a burgeoning medical device industry, including six Fortune 500 companies whose combined market capitalization now exceeds 400 billion dollars. This success story, which has unquestionably benefited patients and society alike, has been dependent upon an intense collaboration among industry, clinicians, and regulatory authorities. However, when physicians actively involved in patient care participate in such collaborations, they are increasingly vulnerable to creating potential conflicts between these two (clinical and device development) roles. Such conflicts, which may ultimately erode public trust, have important consequences not only for the individual physicians, but also for their parent institutions, their patients, sponsoring companies, and the entire clinical research enterprise that makes the development and introduction of new devices possible. The third Dartmouth Device Development Symposium held in October 2005 brought together thought leaders within the medical device community, including academicians, clinical investigators, regulators from the Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), large and small device manufacturers and the financial (venture capital and investment banks) community. The Symposium examined the conflicts of interest encountered during the early development and commercialization of a medical device. The goal of these discussions was to (1) identify and characterize the conflicts that arise and (2) provide strategies to address these conflicts. This manuscript was prepared by a writing committee to provide a summary

  5. [Management of war orthopaedic injuries in recent armed conflicts].

    PubMed

    Frank, M; Mathieu, L

    2013-01-01

    The extremities continue to be the most frequent sites of wounding during armed conflicts despite the change of combat tactics, soldier armour and battlefield medical support. Due to the advances in prehospital care and timely transport to the hospital, orthopaedic surgeons deal with severe and challenging injuries of the limbs. In contrast to civilian extremity trauma, the most combat-related injuries are open wounds that often have infection-related complications. Data from two recent large armed conflicts (Iraq, Afghanistan) show that extremity injuries are associated with a high complication rate, morbidity and healthcare utilization. A systematic approach that consists of sequential surgical care and good transport capabilities can reduce the complication rate of these injuries. New medical technologies have been implemented in the treatment strategy during the last decade. This article reviews the published scientific data and current opinions on combat-related extremity injuries. Key words: extremity, combat, trauma, medical support system.

  6. The Usage of Domination Strategies in Conflicts between the Teachers and Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özgan, Habib

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the sources of conflict between students and teachers, how they are managed, and their effect on students and thus gain insight about student-teacher conflicts. The study is a qualitative one and has been carried out with the method of case study. The method of criterion sampling which is one of the methods…

  7. Funding strategies for wilderness management

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Alkire

    2000-01-01

    Funding wilderness protection will continue to be a challenge for public land managers. With continuing competition for federal funds and balanced budget goals, other sources of funds may be necessary to supplement annual federal appropriations. This paper identifies and evaluates five potential funding strategies and provides examples of each that are currently in use...

  8. Spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, Y.-F.; Marion, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource and social impacts caused by recreationists and tourists have become a management concern in national parks and equivalent protected areas. The need to contain visitor impacts within acceptable limits has prompted park and protected area managers to implement a wide variety of strategies and actions, many of which are spatial in nature. This paper classifies and illustrates the basic spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in parks and protected areas. A typology of four spatial strategies was proposed based on the recreation and park management literature. Spatial segregation is a common strategy for shielding sensitive resources from visitor impacts or for separating potentially conflicting types of use. Two forms of spatial segregation are zoning and closure. A spatial containment strategy is intended to minimize the aggregate extent of visitor impacts by confining use to limited designated or established Iocations. In contrast, a spatial dispersal strategy seeks to spread visitor use, reducing the frequency of use to levels that avoid or minimize permanent resource impacts or visitor crowding and conflict. Finally, a spatial configuration strategy minimizes impacting visitor behavior though the judicious spatial arrangement of facilities. These four spatial strategics can be implemented separately or in combination at varying spatial scales within a single park. A survey of national park managers provides an empirical example of the diversity of implemented spatial strategies in managing visitor impacts. Spatial segregation is frequently applied in the form of camping restrictions or closures to protect sensitive natural or cultural resources and to separate incompatible visitor activities. Spatial containment is the most widely applied strategy for minimizing the areal extent of resource impacts. Spatial dispersal is commonly applied to reduce visitor crowding or conflicts in popular destination areas but is less frequently applied or

  9. Asian cultural values gap, cognitive flexibility, coping strategies, and parent-child conflicts among Korean Americans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Annie J; Kim, Bryan S K; Park, Yong S

    2008-10-01

    The study examined Korean American college students' perceived Asian cultural values gap between themselves and their parents, cognitive flexibility, and coping strategies. The relationships between these factors were studied with the intensities and types of parent-child conflicts. The results indicated that the participants adhered less strongly to Asian values than their parents. When faced with conflicts, the participants reported using problem solving coping strategy to the greatest extent, followed by social support coping strategy, and then avoidance coping strategy. Simultaneous regression analyses revealed a positive relationship between the participant-perceived parent-child values gap and the intensity of conflicts, particularly in the area of dating and marriage. There were inverse relationships between cognitive flexibility and the intensity of conflicts, specifically in the area of dating and marriage. A positive relationship was observed between the use of social support coping strategy and intensity of conflicts. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect in which participant-perceived parent-child values gap and cognitive flexibility were related to increased frequency of dating and marriage conflicts.

  10. Interdepartmental conflict management and negotiation in cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Otero, Hansel J; Nallamshetty, Leelakrishna; Rybicki, Frank J

    2008-07-01

    Although the relationship between cardiologists and radiologists has a thorny history, advanced cardiac imaging technology and the promise of cardiac computed tomography are forcing both specialties back to the negotiation table. These discussions represent an opportunity for better communication, collaboration, and resource allocation. The authors address the aspects of interdepartmental conflict management and negotiation through their radiology department's ongoing efforts to provide high-quality advanced noninvasive cardiovascular imaging services at a large academic institution. The definition and causes of conflict are defined, with a specific focus on noninvasive cardiovascular imaging, followed by a description of steps used in the negotiation process. The authors encourage radiologists to entertain an open dialogue with cardiology, because in many cases, both sides can benefit. The benefits of a negotiated outcome include minimizing internal competitors, incorporating cardiologists' expertise to cardiac imaging algorithms, and more effective training opportunities.

  11. Greek-Turkish Crises since 1955. Implications for Greek-Turkish Conflict Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS GREEK-TURKISH CRISES SINCE 1955. IMPLICATIONS FOR GREEK-TURKISH CONFLICT MANAGEMENT by...EU, WEU) have only to gain from a Greek-Turkish rapprochement. 14. SUBJECT TERMS GrEek-Turkish RElATiONS, CRiSiS MANAgEMENT, CONfLICT management 15...crises, because the intended outcome of mediation attempts has been regional stability instead of Greek-Turkish conflict management . Power mediation

  12. An Exploratory Study of the Conflict Management Styles of Department Heads in a Research University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Christine A.; Algert, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    Conflict in the university setting is an inherent component of academic life. Leaders spend more than 40% of their time managing conflict. Department heads are in a unique position--they encounter conflict from individuals they manage and from others to whom they report such as a senior administrator in the position of dean. There are very few…

  13. Handling Conflict in the Work Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Ernest W.

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of workplace conflict management examines erroneous assumptions inherent in traditional reaction patterns, considers key elements of planning for conflict prevention, and some workplace strategies to help minimize conflicts. Several approaches to conflict management, and their outcomes, are highlighted, and stages of the…

  14. Adolescents' Conflict Management Styles with Mothers: Longitudinal Associations with Parenting and Reactance.

    PubMed

    Missotten, Lies Christine; Luyckx, Koen; Branje, Susan; Van Petegem, Stijn

    2018-02-01

    Adolescents' conflict management styles with parents are assumed to have an important impact on the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship and on adolescents' psychosocial development. Longitudinal research investigating possible determinants of these conflict management skills is scarce. The parenting context and adolescents' tendency to reject maternal authority are expected to shape adolescents' conflict management styles. Therefore, the present three-wave longitudinal study focuses on how parenting and adolescents' reactance relates to adolescents' conflict management styles and conflict frequency with mothers over time, and whether reactance may also explain the associations between parenting and certain conflict variables. We addressed these research questions by using a hybrid cross-lagged panel model with parenting as a latent variable (i.e., supportive parenting) and the other variables as manifest variables. Supportive parenting was measured by four well-known parenting dimensions: autonomy support, responsiveness, psychological control, and harsh control. Four conflict styles were investigated: positive problem solving, withdrawal, conflict engagement, and compliance. Questionnaires were completed by 812 adolescents at three annual waves (52% girls at Time 1). Supportive parenting was associated with fewer conflicts, more positive problem solving, and less compliance and reactance over time. Reactance was associated with more conflicts, conflict engagement and withdrawal, and less compliance. We did not find evidence for the mediating role of reactance in the over-time associations between parenting and adolescents' conflict management and frequency. Both parenting and reactance appeared important and unique determinants for adolescents' conflict management styles and frequency.

  15. Where Does Conflict Management Fit in the System's Leadership Puzzle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Vickie S.; Johnston, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Superintendents are faced with conflicts every day. The conflicts arise around issues of personnel, community roles, funding, politics, and work/life balance. Good leadership involves an understanding of how to deal with conflict, whom to involve in the conflict resolution, how to set up structures and processes that ensure conflict doesn't…

  16. Conflict with China Revisted: Prospects, Consequences, and Strategies for Deterrence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    Gompert, Derek Grossman, Eric Heginbotham, Howard J. Shatz Summary Six years ago, the RAND Corporation reviewed the prospects for war...descending order of probabil- ity. These remain the same as those we identified six years ago, although we now rate conflict originating in the South...our margin of confidence is somewhat lower than it was six years ago. This judgment was and is still based on the view that the United States will

  17. Addressing multigenerational conflict: mutual respect and carefronting as strategy.

    PubMed

    Kupperschmidt, Betty R

    2006-05-31

    This article addresses the challenges faced by nurses as they work side-by-side with nurses from a variety of generational cohorts. First a brief overview of the generational characteristics of the four generational cohorts in today's workplace is presented. Next the importance of each nurse using respect and carefronting as antidotes to generational conflict is discussed. Finally the role of nursing leadership in facilitating respect and carefronting is noted.

  18. Managing Conflict: Examining Recent PLA Writings on Escalation Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    addition, that PLA authors for the most part assume that in an era of modern, informatized warfare, crisis and conflict can be controlled—so long as...Art of War Situation Control in Informatized Warfare” (Lun xinxihua zhanzheng de zhanju kongzhi yishu; 论信息化战争的战局控制艺术), China Military Science... Informatized Warfare,” p. 25. 17 Shou Xiaosong, ed., The Science of Military Strategy, 2013, p. 142. See also Peng Guangqian, “The Development and

  19. Opinions from the Front Lines of Cat Colony Management Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, M. Nils; Hartis, Brett; Rodriguez, Shari; Green, Matthew; Lepczyk, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs) and bird conservation professionals (BCPs) across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia) and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators). Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals. PMID:22970269

  20. The role of women in water management and conflict resolution in Marsabit, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Yerian, Sarah; Hennink, Monique; Greene, Leslie E; Kiptugen, Daniel; Buri, Jared; Freeman, Matthew C

    2014-12-01

    We employed qualitative methods to explore how conflict over water collection and use impacts women, and the role that women play in water management and conflict resolution in Marsabit, Kenya. Conflicts between domestic and livestock water led to insufficient water for domestic use and intra-household conflict. Women's contributions to water management were valued, especially through informal initiatives, though involvement in statutory water management committees was not culturally appropriate. Promoting culturally appropriate ways to involve women in water management, rather than merely increasing the percentage of women on water committee, may reduce conflicts and increase women's access to domestic water supplies.

  1. The Role of Women in Water Management and Conflict Resolution in Marsabit, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerian, Sarah; Hennink, Monique; Greene, Leslie E.; Kiptugen, Daniel; Buri, Jared; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2014-12-01

    We employed qualitative methods to explore how conflict over water collection and use impacts women, and the role that women play in water management and conflict resolution in Marsabit, Kenya. Conflicts between domestic and livestock water led to insufficient water for domestic use and intra-household conflict. Women's contributions to water management were valued, especially through informal initiatives, though involvement in statutory water management committees was not culturally appropriate. Promoting culturally appropriate ways to involve women in water management, rather than merely increasing the percentage of women on water committee, may reduce conflicts and increase women's access to domestic water supplies.

  2. Organizational Conflict Management as Disputing Process: The Problem of Social Escalation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrill, Calvin; Thomas, Cheryl King

    1992-01-01

    Develops an instrument to study organizational conflict management as a disputing process involving the social escalation from grievance to conflict and dispute stages. Finds differences in dispute process according to different strengths of informal relations. (SR)

  3. Sibling relationship quality moderates the associations between parental interventions and siblings' independent conflict strategies and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Holly E; Howe, Nina

    2009-08-01

    This study extends research on sibling conflict strategies and outcomes by examining unique and interactive associations with age, relative birth order, sibling relationship quality, and caregivers' interventions into conflict. Each of 62 sibling dyads (older sibling mean age = 8.39 years; younger sibling mean age = 6.06 years) discussed 1 recurring conflict alone (dyadic negotiation) and a 2nd conflict with their primary parental caregiver (triadic negotiation). Negotiations were coded for children's conflict strategies, outcomes, and caregiver interventions; each family member provided ratings of sibling relationship quality. Results revealed that age was associated with siblings' constructive strategies, particularly in the dyadic negotiation. With age controlled, younger siblings referred more frequently to their own perspective. Caregivers' future orientation in the triadic negotiation was associated with children's future orientation in the dyadic negotiation; however, this association was most evident when sibling relationship quality was high. Similarly, caregivers' past orientation was positively associated with dyadic compromise, especially when relationship quality was high. Results reveal the value of simultaneously considering associations among parental, affective, and developmental correlates of sibling conflict strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  5. Automated Conflict Resolution, Arrival Management and Weather Avoidance for ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, H.; Lauderdale, Todd A.; Chu, Yung-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a unified solution to three types of separation assurance problems that occur in en-route airspace: separation conflicts, arrival sequencing, and weather-cell avoidance. Algorithms for solving these problems play a key role in the design of future air traffic management systems such as NextGen. Because these problems can arise simultaneously in any combination, it is necessary to develop integrated algorithms for solving them. A unified and comprehensive solution to these problems provides the foundation for a future air traffic management system that requires a high level of automation in separation assurance. The paper describes the three algorithms developed for solving each problem and then shows how they are used sequentially to solve any combination of these problems. The first algorithm resolves loss-of-separation conflicts and is an evolution of an algorithm described in an earlier paper. The new version generates multiple resolutions for each conflict and then selects the one giving the least delay. Two new algorithms, one for sequencing and merging of arrival traffic, referred to as the Arrival Manager, and the other for weather-cell avoidance are the major focus of the paper. Because these three problems constitute a substantial fraction of the workload of en-route controllers, integrated algorithms to solve them is a basic requirement for automated separation assurance. The paper also reviews the Advanced Airspace Concept, a proposed design for a ground-based system that postulates redundant systems for separation assurance in order to achieve both high levels of safety and airspace capacity. It is proposed that automated separation assurance be introduced operationally in several steps, each step reducing controller workload further while increasing airspace capacity. A fast time simulation was used to determine performance statistics of the algorithm at up to 3 times current traffic levels.

  6. The effect of hospital control strategies on physician satisfaction and physician-hospital conflict.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, L R; Andersen, R M; Shortell, S M

    1990-01-01

    This article examines several strategies that hospitals use to control their medical staffs. Such strategies include placing physicians on salary, developing exclusive hospital affiliations with physicians, and involving physicians in decision-making bodies. Using regression techniques, we investigate which hospitals are more likely to utilize these strategies and whether such strategies are effective in promoting physician-hospital integration. Contrary to our expectations, corporate hospital structures (e.g., for-profit hospitals, membership in multihospital systems) generally do not employ these strategies more often and oftentimes employ them less. There is also little evidence that control strategies are effective levers for increasing physician satisfaction or decreasing physician-hospital conflict. We suggest that control strategies are useful for purposes other than promoting physician-hospital integration. Finally, hospital ownership appears to exert the biggest effect on physician satisfaction and conflict. PMID:2380074

  7. Trends and management of wolf-livestock conflicts in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, S.H.; Paul, W.J.; Mech, L.D.; Scott, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    ). Improvements in farm management practices may reduce the present number of conflicts.

  8. Asthma in pregnancy: management strategies.

    PubMed

    McCallister, Jennifer W

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic medical conditions to complicate pregnancy. With approximately one-third of women experiencing a worsening of control during the course of their pregnancy, identifying those at greatest risk has the potential to improve maternal and fetal outcomes for a large number of pregnancies. Similarly, active management strategies that prioritize asthma control in this vulnerable population can have a far-reaching impact. Demographic characteristics and patient noncompliance place certain populations of pregnant women at increased risk of poor asthma control during pregnancy. In addition, undertreatment and disparities in care of acute exacerbations during pregnancy likely contribute. Targeted educational interventions and treatment algorithms using objective markers of disease activity have shown improved outcomes in asthma control. Active management strategies which focus on identifying patient-specific risk factors, patient and provider education, and targeted treatment interventions can improve asthma care for women during pregnancy.

  9. Complexity Science Applications to Dynamic Trajectory Management: Research Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawhill, Bruce; Herriot, James; Holmes, Bruce J.; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The promise of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is strongly tied to the concept of trajectory-based operations in the national airspace system. Existing efforts to develop trajectory management concepts are largely focused on individual trajectories, optimized independently, then de-conflicted among each other, and individually re-optimized, as possible. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time are valuable, though perhaps could be greater through alternative strategies. The concept of agent-based trajectories offers a strategy for automation of simultaneous multiple trajectory management. The anticipated result of the strategy would be dynamic management of multiple trajectories with interacting and interdependent outcomes that satisfy multiple, conflicting constraints. These constraints would include the business case for operators, the capacity case for the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), and the environmental case for noise and emissions. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time might be improved over those possible under individual trajectory management approaches. The proposed approach relies on computational agent-based modeling (ABM), combinatorial mathematics, as well as application of "traffic physics" concepts to the challenge, and modeling and simulation capabilities. The proposed strategy could support transforming air traffic control from managing individual aircraft behaviors to managing systemic behavior of air traffic in the NAS. A system built on the approach could provide the ability to know when regions of airspace approach being "full," that is, having non-viable local solution space for optimizing trajectories in advance.

  10. Choice of conflict resolution strategy is linked to sociability in dog puppies.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2013-12-01

    Measures that are likely to increase sociability in dog puppies, such as appropriate socialisation, are considered important in preventing future fear or aggression related problems. However, the interplay between sociability and conflict behaviour has rarely been investigated. Moreover, while many studies have addressed aggression in domestic dogs, alternative, non-aggressive conflict resolution strategies have received less scientific attention. Here we tested 134 Border collie puppies, aged 40-50 days, in a personality test which included friendly interactions with an unfamiliar person, exposure to a novel object, and three brief restraint tests. Considering the latter to be mild 'conflict' situations, we analysed whether the puppies' behaviour in the restraint tests was related to their sociability or to their boldness towards the novel object. Strategies employed by the puppies during restraint tests included trying to interact socially with the experimenter, remaining passive, and attempting to move away. In line with findings from humans and goats, puppies scoring high on sociability were more likely to adopt an interactive conflict resolution strategy, while those with low sociability scores tended to react passively. In contrast, avoidance behaviours were unrelated to sociability, possibly reflecting inconsistency in the flight strategy in dogs. Boldness towards a novel object was not related to sociability or to puppies' reactions in restraint tests. This is one of the first studies to demonstrate a link between sociability and conflict resolution strategies in non-human animals.

  11. Mother-Father Dyad Conflict Strategy Clusters: Implications for Emerging Adults.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Cliff; Walker, Courtney S; Kwan, Janet W

    2016-12-01

    Research has examined the different parenting styles that are present during emerging adulthood; however, less is known about potential parental conflict strategies that emerging adults may be experiencing during this developmental time period. Conflict strategies are conceptualized in the current study as parents' efforts to regulate, correct, or enforce a consequence in response to their emerging adult child's behavior. Previous research on discipline during childhood and adolescence has suggested the use of harsh discipline (e.g., use of physical force) leads to negative outcomes for children. Despite evidence linking harsh discipline methods to harmful outcomes in various developmental periods and suggested influence of parents in emerging adulthood, very little is known about how parents handle conflict with their emerging adult children. Thus, the present study investigated parental conflict strategies and mental health outcomes of emerging adults. Results revealed a significant parent-child gender interaction for non-violent strategies and psychological aggression. Moreover, results indicated that emerging adult children of parents who utilize similar levels of aggressive methods reported greater psychological problems. The findings from the current study underscore parents' use of conflict strategies when interacting with their emerging adult children, and further emphasize the importance of future research in this area.

  12. Longitudinal Transmission of Conflict Management Styles Across Inter-Parental and Adolescent Relationships.

    PubMed

    Staats, Soundry; van der Valk, Inge E; Meeus, Wim H J; Branje, Susan J T

    2018-03-01

    This study longitudinally investigated transmission of conflict management styles across inter-parental, adolescent-parent, adolescent-friend, and adolescent-partner relationships. During four waves, 799 middle-to-late adolescents (M age-t1  = 15.80; 54% boys) and their parents completed the Conflict Resolution Style Inventory. Cross-lagged path analyses indicated transmission of adolescent conflict management styles in relationships with parents to relationships with friends and romantic partners: Positive problem solving and conflict engagement utilized by adolescents in conflicts with parents were significantly, positively related to, respectively, adolescent positive problem solving and conflict engagement in relationships with friends 1 year later and relationships with partners 2 years later. Thus, the study showed that the way adolescents manage conflicts with parents predicts how they handle conflicts later in relationships outside the family. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2017 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  13. Small Group Conflict: A Look at Equity, Satisfaction, and Styles of Conflict Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Victor D., Jr.; Nolan, Linda L.

    1987-01-01

    Study of 71 task-oriented groups revealed that perceived inequity was negatively related to amount of expressed satisfaction with the group and positively related to amount of perceived conflict within the group. Inequity was associated more strongly with conflict centered around people than with conflict centered around task; least associated…

  14. Human resource management in post-conflict health systems: review of research and knowledge gaps

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In post-conflict settings, severe disruption to health systems invariably leaves populations at high risk of disease and in greater need of health provision than more stable resource-poor countries. The health workforce is often a direct victim of conflict. Effective human resource management (HRM) strategies and policies are critical to addressing the systemic effects of conflict on the health workforce such as flight of human capital, mismatches between skills and service needs, breakdown of pre-service training, and lack of human resource data. This paper reviews published literatures across three functional areas of HRM in post-conflict settings: workforce supply, workforce distribution, and workforce performance. We searched published literatures for articles published in English between 2003 and 2013. The search used context-specific keywords (e.g. post-conflict, reconstruction) in combination with topic-related keywords based on an analytical framework containing the three functional areas of HRM (supply, distribution, and performance) and several corresponding HRM topic areas under these. In addition, the framework includes a number of cross-cutting topics such as leadership and governance, finance, and gender. The literature is growing but still limited. Many publications have focused on health workforce supply issues, including pre-service education and training, pay, and recruitment. Less is known about workforce distribution, especially governance and administrative systems for deployment and incentive policies to redress geographical workforce imbalances. Apart from in-service training, workforce performance is particularly under-researched in the areas of performance-based incentives, management and supervision, work organisation and job design, and performance appraisal. Research is largely on HRM in the early post-conflict period and has relied on secondary data. More primary research is needed across the areas of workforce supply, workforce

  15. Human resource management in post-conflict health systems: review of research and knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Roome, Edward; Raven, Joanna; Martineau, Tim

    2014-01-01

    In post-conflict settings, severe disruption to health systems invariably leaves populations at high risk of disease and in greater need of health provision than more stable resource-poor countries. The health workforce is often a direct victim of conflict. Effective human resource management (HRM) strategies and policies are critical to addressing the systemic effects of conflict on the health workforce such as flight of human capital, mismatches between skills and service needs, breakdown of pre-service training, and lack of human resource data. This paper reviews published literatures across three functional areas of HRM in post-conflict settings: workforce supply, workforce distribution, and workforce performance. We searched published literatures for articles published in English between 2003 and 2013. The search used context-specific keywords (e.g. post-conflict, reconstruction) in combination with topic-related keywords based on an analytical framework containing the three functional areas of HRM (supply, distribution, and performance) and several corresponding HRM topic areas under these. In addition, the framework includes a number of cross-cutting topics such as leadership and governance, finance, and gender. The literature is growing but still limited. Many publications have focused on health workforce supply issues, including pre-service education and training, pay, and recruitment. Less is known about workforce distribution, especially governance and administrative systems for deployment and incentive policies to redress geographical workforce imbalances. Apart from in-service training, workforce performance is particularly under-researched in the areas of performance-based incentives, management and supervision, work organisation and job design, and performance appraisal. Research is largely on HRM in the early post-conflict period and has relied on secondary data. More primary research is needed across the areas of workforce supply, workforce

  16. Preschool children's social understanding: a pilot study of goals and strategies during conflict situations.

    PubMed

    Kazura, Kerry; Flanders, Rachel

    2007-10-01

    This pilot study tested a new enactive measure of social information-processing skills and investigated whether preschool children's goals were related to their strategies during hypothetical conflict situations. Children (13 boys, 12 girls) ages 3 to 6 years (three 3-yr.-olds, three 4-yr.-olds, 11 5-yr.-olds, and eight 6-yr.-olds) engaged in a puppet interview of six hypothetical situations. Significant correlations were found between goals and strategies of the adapted version of Chung and Asher's Children's Conflict Resolution Measure, suggesting that preschool children who endorsed friendship goals tended to select more prosocial strategies (.41). Children who endorsed more retaliation goals tended to select more hostile strategies (.67) but fewer prosocial strategies (-.41), and children who endorsed more avoidance goals tended to select more adult-seeking strategies (.45).

  17. A Case Study of Conflict in an Educational Workplace: Managing Personal and Cultural Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Michael John

    2006-01-01

    This article is about conflict in an educational workplace setting. It reports on a case study investigating the emergence, development, and management of conflict among diverse native English speakers working as language instructors within a Japanese university. The example of conflict presented, which deals with divergent assumptions about the…

  18. Management strategies in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Campen, Christopher J; Dragovich, Tomislav; Baker, Amanda F

    2011-04-01

    Current first-line and adjuvant chemotherapeutic strategies for management of patients with pancreatic cancer are reviewed. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the 10th most prevalent cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. More than 80% of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease and are not candidates for surgery; these patients often require multimodal treatment. The most widely used chemotherapy for such patients, as well as patients requiring adjuvant therapy after surgery, is gemcitabine or gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. All current chemotherapies for pancreatic cancer are associated with dose-limiting hematologic toxicity and other adverse effects that require ongoing monitoring and dosage adjustment to balance the benefits and risks of treatment. Pharmacists can play an important role in monitoring and providing drug information and guidance to patients and oncologists. Current investigational strategies include efforts to improve chemotherapy response rates and outcomes through modulation of cell signaling pathways and use of nanotechnology to improve drug delivery. Current management of pancreatic cancer is multifaceted, involving anticancer therapy, supportive care, and toxicity management. Standard systemic therapy with gemcitabine as a single agent or in combination with other cytotoxic agents provides modest benefits in terms of response and symptom control.

  19. Organizational Conflict and Management: A Study at Schools of Physical Education and Sport in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirzeoglu, Nevzat

    2007-01-01

    Effective management relates to creativity, good leadership, and a strong educational basis. Managing conflict is one of the main responsibilities to be an effective administrator. The purpose of this study was to investigate conflict management methods that administrators are using and what the perceptions of subordinates. Thirty-eight…

  20. Skin color as post-colonial hierarchy: a global strategy for conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ronald E

    2003-01-01

    The post-colonial hierarchy is a critical dynamic of global coexistence. Power is associated with those sovereignties characterized by light-skinned populations. Those characterized by dark skin are denigrated and assumed less qualified to negotiate global issues as equals. Although political objectives are expected to stimulate conflict, skin color is directly correlated with the present world order. Moreover, most post-colonial sovereignties are heterogeneous in one way or another and yet do not engage in destructive conflict. From a global perspective, conflict resolution will require post-colonial sovereignties--particularly those of relative light skin--to forfeit their self-serving denigration of others. Strategies for conflict resolution should ignore skin color and incorporate measures designed to improve problem solving, moral reasoning, and the general etiquette skills of those engaged in any negotiation process.

  1. Managing human resources for successful strategy execution.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Managers face difficult challenges when they implement organizational strategies to achieve important goals. Execution of strategy has become more dependent upon the effective management of human resources. This article suggests how people can be managed more effectively to facilitate the execution of strategies and improve organizational performance.

  2. Choice of conflict resolution strategy is linked to sociability in dog puppies

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Measures that are likely to increase sociability in dog puppies, such as appropriate socialisation, are considered important in preventing future fear or aggression related problems. However, the interplay between sociability and conflict behaviour has rarely been investigated. Moreover, while many studies have addressed aggression in domestic dogs, alternative, non-aggressive conflict resolution strategies have received less scientific attention. Here we tested 134 Border collie puppies, aged 40-50 days, in a personality test which included friendly interactions with an unfamiliar person, exposure to a novel object, and three brief restraint tests. Considering the latter to be mild ‘conflict’ situations, we analysed whether the puppies’ behaviour in the restraint tests was related to their sociability or to their boldness towards the novel object. Strategies employed by the puppies during restraint tests included trying to interact socially with the experimenter, remaining passive, and attempting to move away. In line with findings from humans and goats, puppies scoring high on sociability were more likely to adopt an interactive conflict resolution strategy, while those with low sociability scores tended to react passively. In contrast, avoidance behaviours were unrelated to sociability, possibly reflecting inconsistency in the flight strategy in dogs. Boldness towards a novel object was not related to sociability or to puppies’ reactions in restraint tests. This is one of the first studies to demonstrate a link between sociability and conflict resolution strategies in non-human animals. PMID:24910487

  3. Management strategies of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D

    2012-11-21

    Barrett's esophagus is a condition resulting from chronic gastro-esophageal reflux disease with a documented risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Current strategies for improved survival in patients with Barrett's adenocarcinoma focus on detection of dysplasia. This can be obtained by screening programs in high-risk cohorts of patients and/or endoscopic biopsy surveillance of patients with known Barrett's esophagus (BE). Several therapies have been developed in attempts to reverse BE and reduce cancer risk. Aggressive medical management of acid reflux, lifestyle modifications, antireflux surgery, and endoscopic treatments have been recommended for many patients with BE. Whether these interventions are cost-effective or reduce mortality from esophageal cancer remains controversial. Current treatment requires combinations of endoscopic mucosal resection techniques to eliminate visible lesions followed by ablation of residual metaplastic tissue. Esophagectomy is currently indicated in multifocal high-grade neoplasia or mucosal Barrett's carcinoma which cannot be managed by endoscopic approach.

  4. Distributed and Centralized Conflict Management Under Traffic Flow Management Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feron, Eric; Bilimoria, Karl (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Current air transportation in the United States relies on a system born half a century ago. While demand for air travel has kept increasing over the years, technologies at the heart of the National Airspace System (NAS) have not been able to follow an adequate evolution. For instance, computers used to centralize flight data in airspace sectors run a software developed in 1972. Safety, as well as certification and portability issues arise as major obstacles for the improvement of the system. The NAS is a structure that has never been designed, but has rather evolved over time. This has many drawbacks, mainly due to a lack of integration and engineering leading to many inefficiencies and losses of performance. To improve the operations, understanding of this complex needs to be built up to a certain level. This work presents research done on Air Traffic Management (ATM) at the level of the en-route sector.

  5. A strategic approach for managing conflict in hospitals: responding to the Joint Commission leadership standard, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Scott, Charity; Gerardi, Debra

    2011-02-01

    The Joint Commission's leadership standard for conflict management in hospitals, LD.02.04.01, states, "The hospital manages conflict between leadership groups to protect the quality and safety of care." This standard is one of numerous standards and alerts issued by The Joint Commission that address conflict and communication. They underscore the significant impact of relational dynamics on patient safety and quality of care and the critical need for a strategic approach to conflict in health care organizations. Whether leadership conflicts openly threaten a major disruption of hospital operations or whether unresolved conflicts lurk beneath the surface of daily interactions, unaddressed conflict can undermine a hospital's efforts to ensure safe, high-quality patient care. How leaders manage organizational conflict has a significant impact on achieving strategic objectives. Aligning conflict management approaches with quality and safety goals is the first step in adopting a strategic approach to conflict management. A strategic approach goes beyond reducing costs of litigation or improving grievance processes--it integrates a collaborative mind-set and individual conflict competency with nonadversarial processes. Conflict assessment should determine how conflicts are handled among the leaders at the hospital, the degree of conflict competence already present among the leaders, where the most significant conflicts occur, and how leaders think a conflict management system might work for them. Strategically aligning a conflict management approach that addresses conflict among leadership groups as a means of protecting the quality and safety of patient care is at the heart of LD.02.04.01.

  6. Integrating impact assessment and conflict management in urban planning: Experiences from Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Peltonen, Lasse, E-mail: lasse.peltonen@tkk.f; Sairinen, Rauno, E-mail: rauno.sairinen@joensuu.f

    2010-09-15

    The article examines the interlinkages between recent developments in conflict management and impact assessment procedures in the context of urban planning in Finland. It sets out by introducing the fields of impact assessment and conflict mediation. It then proceeds to discuss the development of impact assessment practices and the status of conflict mediation in Finnish land use planning. The case of Korteniitty infill development plan in Jyvaeskylae is used to demonstrate how the Finnish planning system operates in conflict situations - and how social impact assessment can contribute to managing planning conflicts. The authors ask how the processes of impactmore » assessment contribute to conflict management. Based on the Finnish experience, it is argued that social impact assessment of land use plans can contribute to conflict management, especially in the absence of institutionalised conflict mediation processes. In addition, SIA may acquire features of conflict mediation, depending on extent and intensity of stakeholder participation in the process, and the quality of linkages it between knowledge production and decision-making. Simultaneously, conflict mediation practices and theoretical insights can inform the application of SIA to help it address land use conflicts more consciously.« less

  7. Interpersonal issues between pain physician and patient: strategies to reduce conflict.

    PubMed

    Diesfeld, Kate

    2008-11-01

    This article analyzes scholarship on the interpersonal challenges that pain physicians face, with an emphasis on strategies to reduce conflicts within therapeutic relationships. Scholarship on the dilemmas pain physicians face suggests that 1) there are unique and perhaps unrecognized features of pain medicine that generate stress; 2) interpersonal conflict may contribute to stress; and 3) clinicians' biases may interfere with the doctor-patient relationship and with the best practice of pain medicine. Application of a framework based on clinicians' beliefs and Papadimos' reflections on justice and temperance may reduce such conflicts. The challenges of pain medicine may be complicated by the clinician's undisclosed attitudes regarding their roles and their perceptions of pain sufferers. A strategy for physicians to examine their beliefs within a supportive environment may aid physicians caring for people with chronic pain. Papadimos' reflections upon the virtues of justice and tolerance guide this analysis.

  8. Deployment strategies of managed lanes on arterials.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-02-01

    This report investigates issues related to planning, financing, deployment, and operation of managed : lanes on arterials. In this report, a strategy for managed lanes refers to a combination of the managed : lane type, the design and implementation,...

  9. Day Care Experiences and the Development of Conflict Strategies in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elly; Van Hoogdalem, Anne-Greth; De Haan, Dorian; Bekkema, Nienke

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study of learning experiences in peer conflicts among two- and three-year-olds in Dutch daycare centres. Data were collected from individual sampling of 96 children during their free play. As in earlier studies, the results we obtained showed that three-year-olds used fewer unilateral strategies and more bilateral strategies…

  10. Teaching the Concept of Limit by Using Conceptual Conflict Strategy and Desmos Graphing Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Senfeng

    2016-01-01

    Although the mathematics community has long accepted the concept of limit as the foundation of modern Calculus, the concept of limit itself has been marginalized in undergraduate Calculus education. In this paper, I analyze the strategy of conceptual conflict to teach the concept of limit with the aid of an online tool--Desmos graphing calculator.…

  11. The Married Professional Woman: An Examination of Her Role Conflicts and Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Janet Dreyfus

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed married professional women (N=232) about their attitudes toward their roles and how they cope with role conflicts. A majority of women stated that they often experienced strains between these roles. Coping strategies such as having family members help with chores, and reducing standards, were significantly related to satisfaction.…

  12. Marital Conflict and Children's Adjustment: The Mediating and Moderating Role of Children's Coping Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Katherine H.; Harold, Gordon T.

    2007-01-01

    This prospective, longitudinal study examined the role of children's coping strategies in the link between interparental conflict and children's psychological adjustment. Using a sample of 100 parents and children aged 11-14 years, this study investigated children's venting of negative emotion, social support seeking, and problem solving…

  13. The Link between Social Interaction with Adults and Adolescent Conflict Coping Strategy in School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Zhuojun; Enright, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Based on social learning theory, this study aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of social interaction on adolescents' conflict coping strategy. This study used the data from the Taiwan Educational Panel Survey (N = 8717) to test the unique contribution of religious involvement, parent-child interaction, teacher-student…

  14. Enhancing resilience, empowerment, and conflict management among baccalaureate students: outcomes of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pines, Eula W; Rauschhuber, Maureen L; Cook, Jennifer D; Norgan, Gary H; Canchola, Leticia; Richardson, Cynthia; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2014-01-01

    To manage interpersonal conflict, nursing students need evidence-based interventions to strengthen stress resiliency, psychological empowerment, and conflict management skills. A pilot 1-group, pre-post-design, 2-semester intervention used simulated experiences to enhance these skills with 60 undergraduate nursing students. Findings suggest that integration of conflict resolution skills throughout the curriculum, with repeated opportunities to practice using a variety of styles of conflict management in relation to situational factors, may be beneficial to prepare students for the challenges of today's healthcare environment.

  15. Behavioural Patterns of Conflict Resolution Strategies in Preschool Boys with Language Impairment in Comparison with Boys with Typical Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Laura; Jansson, Liselotte; Ljungberg, Tomas; Hedenbro, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Background: Children with language impairment (LI) experience social difficulties, including conflict management. This paper is therefore motivated to examine behavioural processes guiding preschool peer conflict progression, which ultimately contributes to overall development. Aims: To describe behavioural sequences in conflicts between children…

  16. Configuration Management Process Assessment Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a strategy for assessing the development and effectiveness of configuration management systems within Programs, Projects, and Design Activities performed by technical organizations and their supporting development contractors. Scope: Various entities CM Systems will be assessed dependent on Project Scope (DDT&E), Support Services and Acquisition Agreements. Approach: Model based structured against assessing organizations CM requirements including best practices maturity criteria. The model is tailored to the entity being assessed dependent on their CM system. The assessment approach provides objective feedback to Engineering and Project Management of the observed CM system maturity state versus the ideal state of the configuration management processes and outcomes(system). center dot Identifies strengths and risks versus audit gotcha's (findings/observations). center dot Used "recursively and iteratively" throughout program lifecycle at select points of need. (Typical assessments timing is Post PDR/Post CDR) center dot Ideal state criteria and maturity targets are reviewed with the assessed entity prior to an assessment (Tailoring) and is dependent on the assessed phase of the CM system. center dot Supports exit success criteria for Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews. center dot Gives a comprehensive CM system assessment which ultimately supports configuration verification activities.*

  17. Training paediatric healthcare staff in recognising, understanding and managing conflict with patients and families: findings from a survey on immediate and 6-month impact.

    PubMed

    Forbat, Liz; Simons, Jean; Sayer, Charlotte; Davies, Megan; Barclay, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Conflict is a recognised component of healthcare. Disagreements about treatment protocols, treatment aims and poor communication are recognised warning signs. Conflict management strategies can be used to prevent escalation, but are not a routine component of clinical training. To report the findings from a novel training intervention, aimed at enabling paediatric staff to identify and understand the warning signs of conflict, and to implement conflict resolution strategies. Self-report measures were taken at baseline, immediately after the training and at 6 months. Questionnaires recorded quantitative and qualitative feedback on the experience of training, and the ability to recognise and de-escalate conflict. The training was provided in a tertiary teaching paediatric hospital in England over 18 months, commencing in June 2013. A 4-h training course on identifying, understanding and managing conflict was provided to staff. Baseline data were collected from all 711 staff trained, and 6-month follow-up data were collected for 313 of those staff (44%). The training was successful in equipping staff to recognise and de-escalate conflict. Six months after the training, 57% of respondents had experienced conflict, of whom 91% reported that the training had enabled them to de-escalate the conflict. Learning was retained at 6 months with staff more able than at baseline recognising conflict triggers (Fischer's exact test, p=0.001) and managing conflict situations (Pearson's χ 2 test, p=0.001). This training has the potential to reduce substantially the human and economic costs of conflicts for healthcare providers, healthcare staff, patients and relatives. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. The strategy of women in facing agrarian land conflict: Case of female farmers of Makassar Ethnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulubuhu, D. A. T.; Eryani, A. N.; Fachry, M. E.; Arsyad, M.

    2018-05-01

    One of the crucial issues in developing country is land conflict. It occured since 1978 and still unsolved. This research aimed to investigate and analyze (1) the social and cultural values of Makassarese Women (2) the impact of the land conflict on Makassarese Women, (3) the strategy of female farmers in facing land conflict. The research was conducted in the villages of Timbuseng and Kampung Beru, North Polongbangkeng Sub-District, Takalar Regency, Indonesia. The research employed qualitative method combined with ethnography case study with in-depth interviews, observation, document study, and focus group discussion (FGD). The results indicate that the land conflict happened in North Polongbangkeng Sub-District had an impact on the socio-economic and cultural life of the community. The women had to play a role and the same position as the man in productive, social and domestic matters. For 25 years, the community had to avoid and wait. Since 2007, the community had thought that the contact with PTPN XIV land had ended and the community could take over the land they owned. The strategy done by women was to join the man in their fight to get back their land. They started with confronting actions to forming an organization called Polongbangkeng Farmers Unity. In 2014 the partnership program was established as an effort to settle the land conflict, though until now this program had not answered the primary needs of the community in the region.

  19. Cognitive conflict as a teaching strategy in solving chemistry problems: A dialectic-constructivist perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, Mansoor

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of teaching experiments within a dialectic-constructivist framework based on the following considerations: (a) Cognitive conflicts used in the teaching experiments must be based on problem-solving strategies that students find relatively convincing: (b) after having generated a cognitive conflict, it is essential that the students be provided with an experience that could facilitate the resolution of the conflict; and (c) the teaching strategy developed is used by an interactive constructivist approach within an intact classroom. The study was based on two sections of freshman students who had registered for Chemistry I at the Universidad de Oriente, Venezuela. One of the sections was randomly designated as the control group and the other as the experimental group. To introduce cognitive conflict, the experimental group was exposed to two teaching experiments dealing with stoichiometry problems based on the concept of limiting reagent. Students in the control group were exposed to the same problems - however, without the cognitive conflict teaching experiments format. To evaluate the effect of the teaching experiments, both groups were evaluated on five different problems at different intervals during the semester, referred to as posttests. All posttests formed part of the regular evaluation of the students. Results obtained show the advantage of the experimental group on four of the posttests. It is concluded that the experimental treatment was effective in improving performance on the immediate posttests. It was observed that some students protect their core belief [see Lakatos, I. (1970). Falsification and the methodology of scientific research programmes. In I. Lakatos & A. Musgrave (Eds.), Criticism and the growth of knowledge (pp. 91-196). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] in stoichiometry (establishing equivalent relations between different elements or compounds) by ignoring the conflicting

  20. Family Correlates of Children's Social and Physical Aggression with Peers: Negative Interparental Conflict Strategies and Parenting Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.; Beron, Kurt J.; Gentsch, Joanna K.; Galperin, Mikal B.; Risser, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examines whether negative interparental conflict strategies (stonewalling, triangulation, verbal aggression, and physical aggression) and parenting styles are related to social and physical aggression with peers for children followed longitudinally from age 9 to 10 (N = 256). Parents reported on negative conflict strategies and…

  1. Psychological Strategies for Resolving Interpersonal Conflicts among Administrators in Tertiary Institutions: A Case of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obi, Joy Sylvia C.; Obineli, Amaka S.

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at studying the psychological strategies for resolving interpersonal conflict among administrators in Tertiary Institutions with Nnamdi Azikiwe University as the case study. Gaining an understanding of these strategies may assist administrators of educational programs in handling interpersonal conflicts in more constructive and…

  2. Workplace Incivility and Conflict Management Styles: Predicting Job Performance, Organizational Commitment and Turnover Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Trudel, Jeannie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relations among conflict management styles and target and instigator incivility and job performance, organizational commitment, and turnover intent. Data from 270 employees suggested that experiencing and instigating uncivil behavior occurred frequently. Using an integrative conflict management style…

  3. The Role of Gender and How It Relates to Conflict Management Style and School Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Chris Harriet; Martin, Barbara N.; Hutchinson, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    This investigation focused on principals, by gender, and the impact that the principals' conflict management style had on cultural aspects in schools. Findings were: principals with a conflict management style that is high in dominating show lower school culture scores in professional development, and, conversely, principals with a conflict…

  4. The Evolution of a Japanese Theory of Conflict Management and Implications for Japanese Foreign Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    This thesis explores whether there is a uniquely Japanese method of conflict management Given the delicate balance of stability in Northeast Asia...Japanese leadership needs to use conflict management tools to resolve territorial claims with the governments of China, Russia, and South Korea, Given

  5. Recreation conflict potential and management in the northern/central Black Forest Nature Park

    Treesearch

    C. Mann; J. D. Absher

    2008-01-01

    This study explores conflict in recreational use of the Black Forest Nature Park (BFNP) by six different nature sports groups as a function of infrastructure, forest management and other users. A multi-step, methodological triangulation conflict model from US recreation management was applied and tested in the Park. Results from two groups, hikers and mountain bikers,...

  6. Conflict Management Training for Peacekeepers: Assessment and Recommendations. Special Report 411

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milofsky, Alison; Sany, Joseph; Lancaster, Illana; Krentel, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This report examines the role of conflict management training in preparing peacekeepers for United Nations/African Union missions through an assessment of the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Conflict Management Training for Peacekeepers program. The assessment relies on data collected through 137 semistructured interviews with returned…

  7. New Directions in Conflict Research and Theory: Conflict-Management through the Rhetoric of Compliance-Gaining Apologia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Christa L.; Fadely, Dean

    The study of conflict and its management is diverse in that it involves many academic disciplines, sub-disciplines, and specific situations. One aspect of this diversity can be found in the revelations regarding television evangelists such as Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker, Oral Roberts, and Jimmy Swaggart. The effects arising out of the publication of…

  8. Conflict management style, supportive work environments and the experience of work stress in emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Mary L; Cadmus, Edna

    2016-03-01

    To examine the conflict management style that emergency department (ED) nurses use to resolve conflict and to determine whether their style of managing conflict and a supportive work environment affects their experience of work stress. Conflict is a common stressor that is encountered as nurses strive to achieve patient satisfaction goals while delivering quality care. How a nurse perceives support may impact work stress levels and how they deal with conflict. A correlational design examined the relationship between supportive work environment, and conflict management style and work stress in a sample of 222 ED nurses using the expanded nurse work stress scale; the survey of perceived organisational support; and the Rahim organisational conflict inventory-II. Twenty seven percent of nurses reported elevated levels of work stress. A supportive work environment and avoidant conflict management style were significant predictors of work stress. Findings suggest that ED nurses' perception of a supportive work environment and their approach to resolving conflict may be related to their experience of work stress. Providing opportunities for ED nurses in skills training in constructive conflict resolution may help to reduce work stress and to improve the quality of patient care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Prevention and management of the conflict patient-doctor].

    PubMed

    Sassoon, D

    2007-04-01

    A surgeon's daily practice evolves according to techniques, but also according to a legal and associative environment. The patient is becoming a health consumer, demanding and informed, legitimately exacting security and transparency, but also compensation in the event of accidental injury. The constraints that weigh upon this profession are growing heavier: knowledge and respect of laws, ordinances and regulations are becoming essential and law suits more and more frequent. Ever present in surgery, risk evaluation and assessing the risk-benefit ratio for the patient must be clearly stated by the practitioner and his team, despite the inherent difficulties in sharing information. A classification of surgical risk facilitates an approach to the definitions of a fault, medical accident, iatrogenic condition or undesirable event. This is a fundamental concept, since precise criteria apply to a fault in the legal sense, whereas no normative definition exists for a medical fault. Prevention of conflict requires the implementation of collective steps aimed at ensuring security in a complex system, confidence between the surgeon and his patient based on appropriate information and strict adherence to current regulations. In the event of complications, difficult after-effects, objectively unsatisfactory results or those perceived as such by the patient, post-operative follow-up must face these difficulties squarely with transparency and responsibility. Following a legal summons involving the responsibility of the practitioner, management of the conflict between the physician and the patient requires solid preparation of the medical file and his active participation in the judicial expertise so as to best inform the judge.

  10. Judo principles and practices: applications to conflict-solving strategies in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gleser, J; Brown, P

    1988-07-01

    Jigoro Kano created judo from ju-jitsu techniques. He realized that the Ju principle of both judo and ju-jitsu as the art of yielding, was that of living and changing. The principle of yielding has been applied in dynamic and directive psychotherapies for many years and was recently linked to the Ju principle in martial arts. After several years of using a modified judo practice as a therapeutic tool, and applying the principle of yielding as a dynamic conflict-solving strategy, the authors discovered judo principles applicable to conflict solving, particularly for regressed and violent psychotic patients.

  11. Resource conflict detection and removal strategy for nondeterministic emergency response processes using Petri nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qingtian; Liu, Cong; Duan, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Correctness of an emergency response process specification is critical to emergency mission success. Therefore, errors in the specification should be detected and corrected at build-time. In this paper, we propose a resource conflict detection approach and removal strategy for emergency response processes constrained by resources and time. In this kind of emergency response process, there are two timing functions representing the minimum and maximum execution time for each activity, respectively, and many activities require resources to be executed. Based on the RT_ERP_Net, the earliest time to start each activity and the ideal execution time of the process can be obtained. To detect and remove the resource conflicts in the process, the conflict detection algorithms and a priority-activity-first resolution strategy are given. In this way, real execution time for each activity is obtained and a conflict-free RT_ERP_Net is constructed by adding virtual activities. By experiments, it is proved that the resolution strategy proposed can shorten the execution time of the whole process to a great degree.

  12. Integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models at schools.

    PubMed

    D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2003-08-01

    Including children with emotional and behavioral needs in mainstream school systems leads to growing concern about the increasing number of violent and nonviolent conflicts. Schools must adapt to this evolution and adopt a more therapeutic dimension. This paper explores the possibility of integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models and compares two management models: a school-based conflict management program. Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers; and a therapeutic conflict management program, Life Space Crisis Intervention. The authors conclude that integration might be possible, but depends on establishing a positive school atmosphere, the central position of the teacher, and collaborative and social learning for pupils. Further implementation of integrated conflict management models can be considered but must be underpinned by appropriate scientific research.

  13. Enhancing conflict negotiation strategies of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder using video modeling.

    PubMed

    Hochhauser, M; Weiss, P L; Gal, E

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have particular difficulty in negotiating conflict. A randomized control trial (RCT) was carried out to determine whether the negotiation strategies of adolescents with ASD would be enhanced via a 6-week intervention based on a video modeling application. Adolescents with ASD, aged 12-18 years, were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 36) and a non-treatment control group (n = 25). Participants' negotiating strategies prior to and following the intervention were measured using the Five Factor Negotiation Scale (FFNS; Nakkula & Nikitopoulos, 1999) and the ConflicTalk questionnaire (Kimsey & Fuller, 2003). The results suggest that video modeling is an effective intervention for improving and maintaining conflict negotiation strategies of adolescents with ASD.

  14. Homosexuality in Turkey: strategies for managing heterosexism.

    PubMed

    Bakacak, Ayça Gelgeç; Oktem, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the strategies used by young homosexuals to manage their sexual minority status in Turkey. In-depth interviews were conducted with 15 self-identified homosexual university students. The data on the strategies employed by homosexuals suggested a categorization of these strategies into four interrelated areas: strategies employed in the process of self-acceptance; strategies to manage sexual stigma and prejudice; strategies specific to the coming-out process; and the strategies used while openly expressing their sexual identities.

  15. Management of postural sensory conflict and dynamic balance control in late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Colnat-Coulbois, S; Gauchard, G C; Maillard, L; Barroche, G; Vespignani, H; Auque, J; Perrin, P P

    2011-10-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is known to affect postural control, especially in situations needing a change in balance strategy or when a concurrent task is simultaneously performed. However, few studies assessing postural control in patients with PD included homogeneous population in late stage of the disease. Thus, this study aimed to analyse postural control and strategies in a homogeneous population of patients with idiopathic advanced (late-stage) PD, and to determine the contribution of peripheral inputs in simple and more complex postural tasks, such as sensory conflicting and dynamic tasks. Twenty-four subjects with advanced PD (duration: median (M)=11.0 years, interquartile range (IQR)=4.3 years; Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS): M "on-dopa"=13.5, IQR=7.8; UPDRS: M "off-dopa"=48.5, IQR=16.8; Hoehn and Yahr stage IV in all patients) and 48 age-matched healthy controls underwent static (SPT) and dynamic posturographic (DPT) tests and a sensory organization test (SOT). In SPT, patients with PD showed reduced postural control precision with increased oscillations in both anterior-posterior and medial-lateral planes. In SOT, patients with PD displayed reduced postural performances especially in situations in which visual and vestibular cues became predominant to organize balance control, as was the ability to manage balance in situations for which visual or proprioceptive inputs are disrupted. In DPT, postural restabilization strategies were often inefficient to maintain equilibrium resulting in falls. Postural strategies were often precarious, postural regulation involving more hip joint than ankle joint in patients with advanced PD than in controls. Difficulties in managing complex postural situations, such as sensory conflicting and dynamic situations might reflect an inadequate sensory organization suggesting impairment in central information processing. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Building on common ground to address biodiversity conflicts and foster collaboration in environmental management.

    PubMed

    Lecuyer, Lou; White, Rehema M; Schmook, Birgit; Calmé, Sophie

    2018-08-15

    Conservation biology faces critical challenges that require collaborative approaches, including novel strategies to support interactions among actors in biodiversity conflicts. The goals of this study were to investigate the concept of common ground across multiple issues and to explore its practical application for the support of environmental management. We conceptually defined common ground as the areas of relevance underlying the suite of issues expressed by people regarding environmental management in a particular context. We then empirically tested this in the Calakmul region of Mexico, where the complex socio-historical context and high biodiversity have created environmental management challenges that are now being addressed by a local, multi-stakeholder management board. We conducted 26 open interviews with members of the board and a further round of quantitative prioritisation of issues raised. Using a coding process designed to reveal common ground, we categorized the issues at four levels ranging from coarse to fine (themes, topics, sub-topics and perspectives). We then analysed two levels, topics (n = 14 issues) and sub-topics (n = 51 issues). To do so, we built common ground matrices to identify and analyze common ground among actors and across issues. First, cluster and non-metrical data analyses revealed the diversity of actor positions and the lack of consistent grouping among actors by occupational activity. This demonstrated that focusing on actors' differences might be misleading, and that actors' views were not closely aligned with their roles. Second, we located issues according to their levels of common ground and importance among actors. We showed that by not focusing on single issue conflicts, the identification of common ground across multiple issues can pinpoint synergies. We then proposed a framework for collaboration that prioritizes issues of high importance with greater common ground (e.g. sustainable resource use activities

  17. Differences between Brazilian Men and Women Managers in Their Managing of Conflicts with Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Ana Maria; Todd-Mancillas, William R.

    A study was conducted to compare Brazilian men and women managers' preferences for using communication versus power-centered strategies when resolving employer/employee disputes. Subjects were 40 men and 40 women in middle and top-management positions. Each manager read a packet of four scripts describing various problems that a manager might have…

  18. Parenting Coordination: Applying Clinical Thinking to the Management and Resolution of Post-Divorce Conflict.

    PubMed

    Demby, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    There is a small but significant number of parents who remain stuck in a high level of conflict with each other after the legal conclusion of their divorce. Exposure to chronically high levels of parental conflict is a strong risk factor negatively affecting both children's short- and long-term adjustment. Parenting coordination is a nonadversarial, child-focused dispute-resolution process designed to help divorced parents contain their conflict to protect children from its negative effect. Parenting coordination is a hybrid role combining different skills and conflict-resolution approaches. In high-conflict divorce, each parent's internalization of relationship patterns constructed from past experiences contributes to the intractable nature of the interparent conflict. A case presentation illustrates how this clinical perspective enhances the parenting coordinator's ability to work with parents to manage and contain their parenting conflicts with each other. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Teaching Conflict Management Skills to the Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, James R.; And Others

    The health care organization, as a specialized organizational setting, has some characteristics that make it of special concern to the conflict theorist. In a health care setting, conflict may arise as a result of (1) the complexity of medicine and the bureaucracy of health care delivery, (2) the problems of acquiring relevant information from…

  20. Managing complex workplace stress in health care organizations: leaders' perceived legitimacy conflicts.

    PubMed

    Dellve, Lotta; Wikström, Ewa

    2009-12-01

    To conceptualize how health care leaders' strategies to increase their influence in their psychosocial work environment are experienced and handled, and may be supported. The complex nature of the psychosocial work environment with increased stress creates significant challenges for leaders in today's health care organizations. Interviews with health care leaders (n = 39) were analysed in accordance with constructivist grounded theory. Compound identities, loyalty commitments and professional interests shape conditions for leaders' influence. Strategies to achieve legitimacy were either to retain clinical skills and a strong occupational identity or to take a full leadership role. Ethical stress was experienced when organizational procedural or consequential legitimacy norms were in conflict with the leaders' own values. Leadership support through socializing processes and strategic support structures may be complementary or counteractive. Support programmes need to have a clear message related to decision-making processes and should facilitate communication between top management, human resource departments and subordinate leaders. Ethical stress from conflicting legitimacy principles may be moderated by clear policies for decision-making processes, strengthened sound networks and improved communication. Supportive programmes should include: (1) sequential and strategic systems for introducing new leaders and mentoring; (2) reflective dialogue and feedback; (3) team development; and (4) decision-making policies and processes.

  1. Pediatric electrical burns: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Zubair, M; Besner, G E

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse the course of patients hospitalised with electrical burn wounds in the past 25 years at a major children's hospital in the United States in order to devise safe and cost effective management strategies for these patients. The study was a retrospective chart review of patients with electrical injuries admitted to the hospital between 1971 and 1995. We identified 127 children who were included in the study. Injuries resulted from biting an electrical cord (oral injury) (n = 48), placing an object into an electrical socket (outlet injury) (n = 33), contacting a low voltage wire or appliance indoors (low voltage household injury) (n = 25), contacting a high voltage wire outdoors (high voltage wire injury) (n = 18), or being struck by lightning (n = 3). A retrospective review revealed that the great majority of patients with low voltage electrical injuries did not need admission to the hospital and could have been cared for on an outpatient basis. Almost every patient with high voltage injury had a justified admission due to the severity of the injury. On the basis of these results we conclude that we can safely reduce the number of admissions to the hospital for children with low voltage minor electrical injuries.

  2. UAS Conflict-Avoidance Using Multiagent RL with Abstract Strategy Type Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebhuhn, Carrie; Knudson, Matt; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in the national airspace is of growing interest to the research community. Safety and scalability of control algorithms are key to the successful integration of autonomous system into a human-populated airspace. In order to ensure safety while still maintaining efficient paths of travel, these algorithms must also accommodate heterogeneity of path strategies of its neighbors. We show that, using multiagent RL, we can improve the speed with which conflicts are resolved in cases with up to 80 aircraft within a section of the airspace. In addition, we show that the introduction of abstract agent strategy types to partition the state space is helpful in resolving conflicts, particularly in high congestion.

  3. Announced Strategy Types in Multiagent RL for Conflict-Avoidance in the National Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebhuhn, Carrie; Knudson, Matthew D.; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in the national airspace is of growing interest to the research community. Safety and scalability of control algorithms are key to the successful integration of autonomous system into a human-populated airspace. In order to ensure safety while still maintaining efficient paths of travel, these algorithms must also accommodate heterogeneity of path strategies of its neighbors. We show that, using multiagent RL, we can improve the speed with which conflicts are resolved in cases with up to 80 aircraft within a section of the airspace. In addition, we show that the introduction of abstract agent strategy types to partition the state space is helpful in resolving conflicts, particularly in high congestion.

  4. Targeting International Terrorism with the Law of Armed Conflict: An Alternative Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-11

    AD-A236 582 D TIC III IBII IH IH JUNI 1. 1991. (Unclassified Paper) NAVAL WAR COLLEGE Newport, R.I. TARGETING INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM WITH THE LAW OF...11. TITLE OWN11110 Secrty Ceu4ifction) TARGETING INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM WITH THE LAW OF ARMED CONFLICT: AN ALTERNATIVE STRATEGY (1.) 12, PERSONAL...lawegieforcoperatiosb re forcdaigwt nes.nItiofurther rorimmendgfral rbetos msesnt ofte thkede easuc-tresa en ocnrotadrsodttate-sponsored terrorism . Ti a

  5. An Exploratory Study of Conflict and Its Management in Systems of Care for Children with Mental, Emotional, or Behavioral Problems and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, Roger A; Evans, Mary E; Chen, Huey-Jen; Boustead, Robyn; Blanch, Andrea K

    2015-07-01

    Since 1993, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has invested more than $1 billion establishing systems of care (SOC) in over 173 local communities to provide services to children with mental, emotional, and behavioral problems and their families. The SOC model requires that effective partnerships be developed between parents and professionals and also among different service sectors and agencies. To date, there has been no systematic examination of these interagency partnerships associated with the presence of conflict and its management. This paper reports the findings from a survey of the members of the governing boards of currently funded and graduated SOC sites related to interorganizational conflict. The results indicated that conflict was common in SOC regardless of the stage of the system's development. The most common types of conflict included incompatible goals, interpersonal relationships, and overlapping authority. When conflict occurred, a number of management efforts were used including analyzing the conflict and developing a strategy to deal with it and dealing with the conflict behind the scenes. Suggestions are provided for identifying and managing conflict.

  6. Influence of Learning Strategy of Cognitive Conflict on Student Misconception in Computational Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmam, A.; Anshari, R.; Amir, H.; Jalinus, N.; Amran, A.

    2018-04-01

    Misconception is one of the factors causing students are not suitable in to choose a method for problem solving. Computational Physics course is a major subject in the Department of Physics FMIPA UNP Padang. The problem in Computational Physics learning lately is that students have difficulties in constructing knowledge. The indication of this problem was the student learning outcomes do not achieve mastery learning. The root of the problem is the ability of students to think critically weak. Student critical thinking can be improved using cognitive by conflict learning strategies. The research aims to determine the effect of cognitive conflict learning strategy to student misconception on the subject of Computational Physics Course at the Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Science, Universitas Negeri Padang. The experimental research design conducted after-before design cycles with a sample of 60 students by cluster random sampling. Data were analyzed using repeated Anova measurements. The cognitive conflict learning strategy has a significant effect on student misconception in the subject of Computational Physics Course.

  7. Bench-to-bedside review: leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Strack van Schijndel, Rob J M; Burchardi, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the result of personal experience and a study of literature on leadership as well on conflicts and negotiations in non-medical areas. From this, information was selected that was recognisable to the authors and, thus, also seems to be useful knowledge for medical doctors in the ICU environment.

  8. Bench-to-bedside review: Leadership and conflict management in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Strack van Schijndel, Rob JM; Burchardi, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    In the management of critical care units, leadership and conflict management are vital areas for the successful performance of the unit. In this article a practical approach to define competencies for leadership and principles and practices of conflict management are offered. This article is, by lack of relevant intensive care unit (ICU) literature, not evidence based, but it is the result of personal experience and a study of literature on leadership as well on conflicts and negotiations in non-medical areas. From this, information was selected that was recognisable to the authors and, thus, also seems to be useful knowledge for medical doctors in the ICU environment. PMID:18086322

  9. Adolescents' and Best Friend's Depressive Symptoms and Conflict Management: Intraindividual and Interpersonal Processes Over Time.

    PubMed

    Boersma-van Dam, Elise; Hale, Bill; Koot, Hans; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan

    2016-12-12

    This 6-year longitudinal study examined the relation between 3 conflict management styles (i.e., problem solving, conflict engagement, and compliance) and depressive symptoms in adolescent-best friend relationships. Participants were 479 Dutch adolescents and their best friend who reported annually on depressive symptoms and conflict management styles toward each other. Bidirectional effects between conflict management styles and depressive symptoms were studied both within adolescents (intraindividual) and between adolescent best friends (interpersonal). A positive interpersonal effect of depressive symptoms of one dyad member on depressive symptoms of the other member was found. Similarly, higher positive problem solving and conflict engagement of one dyad member predicted respectively higher problem solving and conflict engagement of the other dyad member. Adolescents who reported more depressive symptoms reported more conflict engagement and compliance over time. In addition, for boys, higher levels of depressive symptoms of one dyad member were related to more problem solving by the other member over time. The current study contributed to the literature by showing that depressive symptoms and conflict management are related constructs in adolescents and that both intrapersonal and interpersonal processes contribute to this relation.

  10. Examination of the Relationship between Coaching Efficacy and Conflict Management Style in Soccer Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balyan, Melih

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between coaching efficacy and conflict management style of the soccer coaches. The sample included 224 male soccer coaches ranging in coaching experience from 2 to 15 years. The Coaching Efficacy Scale and The Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory were used to measure coaching…

  11. Nursing Students' Perception of Conflict Management Styles of Their Nursing Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashish, Ebtsam Aly Abou; Hamouda, Ghada Mohamed; Taha, Eman El-Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The interactive nature of the teaching process is built on a social relationship between teachers and students. Conflicts in the relationship between students and teachers may occur for a several reasons. Effective and constructive management of conflict can decrease its negative effects on the learning environment, students, and…

  12. Conflict Management Styles and Job Satisfaction by Organizational Level and Status in a Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Irene Ana

    2011-01-01

    Effective handling of conflict can result in effective teamwork and leadership, higher morale, increased productivity, satisfied customers, and satisfied employees. Ineffective conflict management styles in the workplace can lead to low levels of job satisfaction, resulting in high levels of turnover. Research indicates that the economic cost to…

  13. Cooperative Conflict Management as a Basis for Training Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjosvold, Dean; Fang, Sofia Su

    2004-01-01

    Chinese educators recognize that for their students to take advantage of new opportunities, as well as handle emerging threats in their rapidly changing society, they must learn to manage many conflicts. But Chinese collectivism and valuing harmony may seem to make Western approaches to conflict resolution culturally inappropriate. This article…

  14. Managing conflict over biological control: the case of strawberry guava in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Tracy Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Biological control researchers commonly avoid targets with potential for high conflict, but for certain highly damaging invaders with no viable management alternatives, it may be necessary to consider biological control even when it is likely to generate conflict. Discussed here is a case study, strawberry guava (Psidium cattleianum Sabine...

  15. Creative Approaches to Managing Conflict in Africa: Findings from USIP-Funded Projects. Peaceworks No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smock, David R., Ed.

    This report shares some lessons of projects, programs, and interventions that have identified or implemented innovative approaches to managing Africa's conflicts, and examines their potential applicability to other conflicts there or elsewhere. All of the projects described in the report have been supported by grants from the United States…

  16. Voices of Experience: Understanding and Enhancing Successful Conflict Management by Community College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanjani, Mellissia M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to enhance understanding of successful conflict management by community college Presidents through highlighting and describing conflict experiences with the faculty union or the board of trustees in a community college context. The following questions guided the research: (a) How do community college…

  17. Aggression and Withdrawal Related Behavior within Conflict Management Progression in Preschool Boys with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Laura; Westlund, Karolina; Ljungberg, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examined conflict behavior in naturalistic preschool settings to better understand the role of non-affiliative behavior and language in conflict management. Method: Free-play at preschool was filmed among 20 boys with typically developing language (TL) and among 11 boys with Language Impairment (LI); the boys 4-7 years old.…

  18. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert D.; Scyphers, Steven B.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders’ perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state’s management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders’ support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that

  19. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert D; Scyphers, Steven B; Grabowski, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may

  20. Challenges and leadership strategies for managers of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Reay, Trish; Golden-Biddle, Karen; Germann, Kathy

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to report on the findings from our research into the recent introduction of nurse practitioners in Alberta, Canada. Through an organizational research perspective, we identify the critical role of health care managers in developing a sustainable nurse practitioner role. Previous literature has focused on nurse practitioners themselves as the key factor in their integration into the health care system. Although they are qualified and organizationally well placed, managers of nurse practitioners have been overlooked as a critical part of implementation strategies. We interviewed 25 nurse practitioners and seven of their managers. Through our data analysis we identified three major challenges for managers: (1) clarifying the reallocation of tasks; (2) managing altered working relationships within the team; (3) continuing to manage the team in an evolving situation. Associated with these challenges, we propose leadership strategies that managers may find useful as they work through the consequences of introducing the nurse practitioner role. These strategies are: * encourage all team members to sort out 'who does what'; * ensure that task reallocation preserves job motivating properties; * give consideration to how tasks have been allocated when issues identified as 'personal conflict' arise; * pay attention to all perspectives of the working relationships within the team; * facilitate positive relationships between team members; * lead from a 'balcony' perspective; * work with the team to develop goals that are not over focused on the nurse practitioner; * regularly share with other managers the experiences and lessons learned in introducing nurse practitioners. For managers to be most effective, they need to address three challenges that are of a managerial, not clinical, nature. By implementing specific leadership strategies, managers of nurse practitioners can facilitate the introduction of the new role and improve its sustainability in

  1. Pre-Conflict Management Tools: Winning the Peace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    violence . Conflict prevention requires that sufficient warning be given to policy-makers, and that they devote the necessary time and resources to...and Political Violence (Portland, OR: Frank Cass, 2001); Audrey Kurth Cronin, “Behind the Curve: Globalization and International Terrorism...and perspectives exist on the sources of conflict, and disagreements over the conditions and structures that give rise to violence are likely to

  2. Work-School Conflict and Coping Strategies: Perceptions of Taiwanese Non-Traditional Students in Technological and Vocational Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ching-Yi; Fischer, Jerome; Biller, Ernie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to measure non-traditional students' perceptions of role conflicts between work and school and subsequent coping strategies, and to determine factors relevant to both role conflicts and coping. A survey was developed and implemented to investigate the continuing education issues. Results were based on 485…

  3. Strategies for coping with work-family conflict: the distinctive relationships of gender role ideology.

    PubMed

    Somech, Anit; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2007-01-01

    Study 1, with 266 employed parents, identified 8 coping strategies: super at home, good enough at home, delegation at home, priorities at home, super at work, good enough at work, delegation at work, and priorities at work. Study 2, with 679 employed parents, demonstrated a moderating effect of sex and gender role ideology in the relationship between coping strategy and work-family conflict. Specifically, the relationships between coping strategies (i.e., good enough at home, good enough at work, and delegation at work) and work interference with family were moderated by sex and gender role ideology. Regarding family interference with work, the relationships between coping strategies (i.e., good enough at home and good enough at work, delegation at home and delegation at work, and priorities at home) and family interference with work were moderated by sex and gender role ideology. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Challenges Facing Managers in Managing Conflict in Schools in the South and South Central Regions of Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morake, Nnior Machomi; Monobe, Ratau John; Dingwe, Stephonia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the challenges facing managers in managing conflict in schools of South and South Central Regions of Botswana. In this study, the schedule of interview was used to collect empirical data. A random sample of 50 school managers and deputy school managers was selected for interviews. Major findings of the…

  5. Effects of empathy and conflict resolution strategies on psychophysiological arousal and satisfaction in romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Perrone-McGovern, Kristin M; Oliveira-Silva, Patrícia; Simon-Dack, Stephanie; Lefdahl-Davis, Erin; Adams, David; McConnell, John; Howell, Desiree; Hess, Ryan; Davis, Andrew; Gonçalves, Oscar F

    2014-03-01

    The present research builds upon the extant literature as it assesses psychophysiological factors in relation to empathy, conflict resolution, and romantic relationship satisfaction. In this study, we examined physiological reactivity of individuals in the context of emotionally laden interactions with their romantic partners. Participants (N = 31) completed self-report measures and attended in-person data collection sessions with their romantic partners. Participants were guided through discussions of problems and strengths of their relationships in vivo with their partners while we measured participants' skin conductance level (SCL) and interbeat interval (IBI) of the heart. We hypothesized that participants' level of empathy towards their partners would be reflected by physiological arousal (as measured by SCL and IBI) and relationship satisfaction, such that higher levels of empathy would be linked to changes in physiological arousal and higher relationship satisfaction. Further, we hypothesized that differences would be found in physiological arousal (as measured by SCL and IBI) based on the type of conflict resolution strategy used by participants. Finally, we hypothesized that differences would be found in empathy towards partner and relationship satisfaction based on the type of conflict resolution strategies used by participants. Results partially supported hypotheses and were discussed in light of existing knowledge based on empirical and theoretical sources.

  6. Conflict resolution in air traffic management : a study in multi-agent hybrid systems

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-04-01

    Air Traffic Management (ATM) of the future allows for the possibility of free flight, in which aircraft choose their own optimal routes, altitudes, and velocities. The safe resolution of trajectory conflicts between aircraft is necessary to the succe...

  7. Using mediation techniques to manage conflict and create healthy work environments.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Debra

    2004-01-01

    Healthcare organizations must find ways for managing conflict and developing effective working relationships to create healthy work environments. The effects of unresolved conflict on clinical outcomes, staff retention, and the financial health of the organization lead to many unnecessary costs that divert resources from clinical care. The complexity of delivering critical care services makes conflict resolution difficult. Developing collaborative working relationships helps to manage conflict in complex environments. Working relationships are based on the ability to deal with differences. Dealing with differences requires skill development and techniques for balancing interests and communicating effectively. Techniques used by mediators are effective for resolving disputes and developing working relationships. With practice, these techniques are easily transferable to the clinical setting. Listening for understanding, reframing, elevating the definition of the problem, and forming clear agreements can foster working relationships, decrease the level of conflict, and create healthy work environments that benefit patients and professionals.

  8. Erase the battle lines: how to cut out conflicts with MCO case managers.

    PubMed

    1999-02-01

    With managed care penetration increasing, it's more important than ever for hospital case managers to find ways to resolve the inevitable conflicts that arise with their managed care-based counterparts. Typical conflicts include struggles over authorization, vendor selection, lack of contact, and access to the patient. Some conflicts can be resolved simply by increasing the level of communication--usually by having managed care case managers stationed in the hospital itself. But even when contact is only by telephone, there are steps you can take to ease the tension. One way is simply to keep managed care case managers informed regarding such things as return admissions by problem patients. Effective discharge planning practices also can strengthen bonds, especially when it comes to patients with complex care needs.

  9. Conflict over natural resource management a social indicator based on analysis of online news media text

    Treesearch

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    1999-01-01

    An indicator of the level of conflict over natural resource management was developed and applied to the case of U.S. national forest policy and management. Computer-coded content analysis was used to identify expressions of conflict in a national database of almost 10,000 news media stories about the U.S. Forest Service. Changes in the amount of news media discussion...

  10. The Impact of Resources on Women's Strategies for Coping with Work-Home Conflict: Does Sociocultural Context Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat

    2012-01-01

    The study examined differences in the impact of resources on strategies for coping with work-home conflict (WHC) among Jewish (n = 59) and Muslim Arab (n = 87) women from dual-earner families in Israel. A distinction was made between three main types of coping strategies: taking initiative, help seeking (active strategies), and redefinition (a…

  11. Developing Organizational Competences for Conflict Management: The Use of the Prisoner's Dilemma in Higher Education

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Andreina; Dell'Aversana, Giuseppina; Guidetti, Gloria

    2018-01-01

    Interpersonal relationship require sophisticated competences of cohabitation. However, the availability of training tools to develop conflict management skills is limited and problematic. The prisoner's dilemma game (PDG), the most widely known example of game theory, a nonzero-sum game, has been used, in higher education, to provide students with an opportunity of active learning and for understanding counterintuitive concepts. It creates a condition of emotive, moral and decisional conflict in and between agents. This paper presents a case-study in higher education in which PDG was proposed to enhance organizational competences for conflict management, according to the psychoanalytic approach to organizational studies. The study aims to explore: (1) the significant characteristics of PDG used in an affective-emotional key in higher education; (2) the learning outcomes that PDG enables to activate in the participants in relation to the development of organizational skills for conflict management. Twenty students' reflective journals were analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings indicated that PDG is perceived as a useful device in students' learning experience, which is appreciated in relation to its concreteness, intensity and debriefing phase. Learning outcomes allow new meanings about conflict, by emphasizing its defensive, automatic and interpersonal dimension. This paper contributes to the understanding of PDG as a tool to develop competences in dealing with the challenges of conflict management, since it seems to favor the overcoming of the individualistic stereotype in conflict representation by highlighting the interdependence of social interaction. PMID:29619000

  12. Developing Organizational Competences for Conflict Management: The Use of the Prisoner's Dilemma in Higher Education.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Andreina; Dell'Aversana, Giuseppina; Guidetti, Gloria

    2018-01-01

    Interpersonal relationship require sophisticated competences of cohabitation. However, the availability of training tools to develop conflict management skills is limited and problematic. The prisoner's dilemma game (PDG), the most widely known example of game theory, a nonzero-sum game, has been used, in higher education, to provide students with an opportunity of active learning and for understanding counterintuitive concepts. It creates a condition of emotive, moral and decisional conflict in and between agents. This paper presents a case-study in higher education in which PDG was proposed to enhance organizational competences for conflict management, according to the psychoanalytic approach to organizational studies. The study aims to explore: (1) the significant characteristics of PDG used in an affective-emotional key in higher education; (2) the learning outcomes that PDG enables to activate in the participants in relation to the development of organizational skills for conflict management. Twenty students' reflective journals were analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings indicated that PDG is perceived as a useful device in students' learning experience, which is appreciated in relation to its concreteness, intensity and debriefing phase. Learning outcomes allow new meanings about conflict, by emphasizing its defensive, automatic and interpersonal dimension. This paper contributes to the understanding of PDG as a tool to develop competences in dealing with the challenges of conflict management, since it seems to favor the overcoming of the individualistic stereotype in conflict representation by highlighting the interdependence of social interaction.

  13. Conflict management based on belief function entropy in sensor fusion.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kaijuan; Xiao, Fuyuan; Fei, Liguo; Kang, Bingyi; Deng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor network plays an important role in intelligent navigation. It incorporates a group of sensors to overcome the limitation of single detection system. Dempster-Shafer evidence theory can combine the sensor data of the wireless sensor network by data fusion, which contributes to the improvement of accuracy and reliability of the detection system. However, due to different sources of sensors, there may be conflict among the sensor data under uncertain environment. Thus, this paper proposes a new method combining Deng entropy and evidence distance to address the issue. First, Deng entropy is adopted to measure the uncertain information. Then, evidence distance is applied to measure the conflict degree. The new method can cope with conflict effectually and improve the accuracy and reliability of the detection system. An example is illustrated to show the efficiency of the new method and the result is compared with that of the existing methods.

  14. THE EFFECT OF INTIMACY AND STATUS DISCREPANCY ON SALIENT AND NON-SALIENT CONFLICT STRATEGIES OF JAPANESE.

    PubMed

    Nakatsugawa, Satomi; Takai, Jiro

    2015-10-01

    It has been claimed that Japanese people prefer passive forms of conflict strategies to preserve interpersonal harmony. This study aimed to identify some conditions in which such passive strategies are used. The effects of target intimacy and status discrepancy on the intent and use of salient and non-salient conflict strategies were examined, along with respondent sex differences. Questionnaires were collected from 205 Japanese university students. Results indicated that women were more likely to have non-salient intents than men and that intimacy affected considerateness intent but not avoidance intent. Active non-salient strategy was affected by status while passive non-salient strategy was affected by intimacy. Overall, target characteristics proved to be a strong factor in the intents and strategies employed in conflict situations of Japanese.

  15. 75 FR 7522 - Peer Review, Conflict of Interest and Disclosure Form; Request for the Office of Management and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Review, Conflict of Interest and Disclosure Form; Request for the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB... proposal to extend the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) approval of the Conflict of Interest (COI) and Disclosure Form which is used to determine whether or not a conflict of interest exists for a...

  16. Disease management as a performance improvement strategy.

    PubMed

    McClatchey, S

    2001-11-01

    Disease management is a strategy of organizing care and services for a patient population across the continuum. It is characterized by a population database, interdisciplinary and interagency collaboration, and evidence-based clinical information. The effectiveness of a disease management program has been measured by a combination of clinical, financial, and quality of life outcomes. In early 1997, driven by a strategic planning process that established three Centers of Excellence (COE), we implemented disease management as the foundation for a new approach to performance improvement utilizing five key strategies. The five implementation strategies are outlined, in addition to a review of the key elements in outcome achievement.

  17. Comprehensive Self-Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, J; Lavoie, K L; Sedeno, M

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we provide a review of the literature on self-management interventions and we are giving some thought to how, when, and by whom they should be offered to patients. The present literature based on randomized clinical trials has demonstrated benefits (reduced hospital admissions and improved health status) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients undergoing self-management interventions, although there are still problems with the heterogeneity among interventions, study populations, follow-up time, and outcome measures that make generalization difficult in real life. Key to the success, self-management intervention has to target behavior change. Proper self-management support is a basic prerequisite, for example, techniques and skills used by health care providers "case manager" to instrument patients with the knowledge, confidence, and skills required to effectively self-manage their disease. To improve health behaviors and engagement in self-management, self-management interventions need to target enhancing intrinsic motivation to change. This will best be done using client-centered communication (motivational communication) that encourages patients to express what intrinsically motivates them (e.g., consistent with their values or life goals) to adopt certain health behavior, with the goal of helping them overcome their ambivalence about change. Finally, if we want to be able to design and implement self-management interventions that are integrated, coherent, and have a strong likelihood of success, we need to take a more careful look and give more attention at the case manager, the patient (patient evaluation), and the quality assurance. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Aggression and withdrawal related behavior within conflict management progression in preschool boys with language impairment.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Laura; Westlund, Karolina; Ljungberg, Tomas

    2007-10-01

    This study examined conflict behavior in naturalistic preschool settings to better understand the role of non-affiliative behavior and language in conflict management. Free-play at preschool was filmed among 20 boys with typically developing language (TL) and among 11 boys with Language Impairment (LI); the boys 4-7 years old. Conflict behavior was coded and analyzed with a validated system. Post-conflict non-affiliative behavior (aggression and withdrawal) displays, and the links between the displays and reconciliation (i.e., former opponents exchange friendly behavioral shortly after conflict termination) was examined. Group comparisons revealed boys with LI displayed aggression in a smaller share of conflicts, but exhibited [Symbol: see text]active' withdrawal (left the room), in a larger conflict share. Boys with TL overcame aggression (more common TL behavior) and after reconciled, to a greater extent than the boys with LI after active withdrawal (more common LI behavior). Also, after reciprocal or only verbal aggression, boys with LI reconciled to a lesser extent than boys with TL. The boys with LI demonstrated difficulties confronting conflict management, as well as concluding emotionally heightened and aggressive behavioral turns.

  19. Time management strategies for research productivity.

    PubMed

    Chase, Jo-Ana D; Topp, Robert; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy; Zerwic, Julie J; Benefield, Lazelle E; Anderson, Cindy M; Conn, Vicki S

    2013-02-01

    Researchers function in a complex environment and carry multiple role responsibilities. This environment is prone to various distractions that can derail productivity and decrease efficiency. Effective time management allows researchers to maintain focus on their work, contributing to research productivity. Thus, improving time management skills is essential to developing and sustaining a successful program of research. This article presents time management strategies addressing behaviors surrounding time assessment, planning, and monitoring. Herein, the Western Journal of Nursing Research editorial board recommends strategies to enhance time management, including setting realistic goals, prioritizing, and optimizing planning. Involving a team, problem-solving barriers, and early management of potential distractions can facilitate maintaining focus on a research program. Continually evaluating the effectiveness of time management strategies allows researchers to identify areas of improvement and recognize progress.

  20. What's your strategy for managing knowledge?

    PubMed

    Hansen, M T; Nohria, N; Tierney, T

    1999-01-01

    The rise of the computer and the increasing importance of intellectual assets have compelled executives to examine the knowledge underlying their businesses and how it is used. Because knowledge management as a conscious practice is so young, however, executives have lacked models to use as guides. To help fill that gap, the authors recently studied knowledge management practices at management consulting firms, health care providers, and computer manufacturers. They found two very different knowledge management strategies in place. In companies that sell relatively standardized products that fill common needs, knowledge is carefully codified and stored in databases, where it can be accessed and used--over and over again--by anyone in the organization. The authors call this the codification strategy. In companies that provide highly customized solutions to unique problems, knowledge is shared mainly through person-to-person contacts; the chief purpose of computers is to help people communicate. They call this the personalization strategy. A company's choice of knowledge management strategy is not arbitrary--it must be driven by the company's competitive strategy. Emphasizing the wrong approach or trying to pursue both can quickly undermine a business. The authors warn that knowledge management should not be isolated in a functional department like HR or IT. They emphasize that the benefits are greatest--to both the company and its customers--when a CEO and other general managers actively choose one of the approaches as a primary strategy.

  1. Control Strategies for Corridor Management

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-28

    Integrated management of travel corridors comprising of freeways and adjacent arterial streets can potentially improve the performance of the highway facilities. However, several research gaps exist in data collection and performance measurement, ana...

  2. Exploring the Relationship of Emotional Intelligence and Conflict Management Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Andrea Claire

    2010-01-01

    A growing emphasis exists in higher education and corporate America on the importance of interpersonal skills, emotional intelligence, and ability to resolve conflict in the workforce. As MBA schools across the country seek to prepare students for prominent business careers, the concern is that the general graduate level curriculum does not…

  3. Material Specters: International Conflicts, Disaster Management, and Educational Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Marianna Papastephanou discusses three books--Michalinos Zembylas's "The Politics of Trauma in Education"; Sigal Ben-Porath's "Citizenship Under Fire: Democratic Education in Times of Conflict"; and Kenneth Saltman's "Capitalizing on Disaster: Taking and Breaking Public Schools"--from the perspective of the material causality of…

  4. Effects of Resource Availability on Children's Behavior and Conflict Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Enora R.

    1996-01-01

    Examined the effect of resource availability on dyadic interaction of African American three- to five-year olds in a painting activity conducted under two resource conditions. Limited resources promoted more resource and task conflict, while plentiful resources promoted more nonconflictive social and task interactions. Results underscored the role…

  5. Lowell Revitalization: One Student Conflict Manager at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane-Garon, Pamela S.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the initial, collaborative implementation efforts of a school-based conflict resolution program. Lowell elementary School is predominately Hispanic and located in one of the poorest areas of Fresno. The University's Kremen School of Education and Human Development partners with local educators to train children in grades…

  6. Strategies for data management engagement.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Deborah H

    2013-01-01

    The research landscape is growing dramatically, and librarians are examining new roles, services, and types of collaborations to support data-intensive research. This column describes curricular enhancements at one School of Library and Information Science in the United States. Several key areas of data management in which health sciences librarians may wish to build or enhance their skills are outlined. Possible roles and opportunities for health sciences librarians to strategically engage in data management initiatives are also presented.

  7. Developments in weather responsive traffic management strategies.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-06-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of weather-responsive traffic management practices. It focuses on what WRTM strategies exist, where they have been used, the benefits realized, what improvements are needed, and how to implement and evalu...

  8. Social knowledge in children with language impairments: examination of strategies, predicted consequences, and goals in peer conflict situations.

    PubMed

    Timler, Geralyn R

    2008-09-01

    This study investigated social knowledge in school-age children, aged 8-12 years, with and without language impairment (LI and TD groups). A hypothetical peer conflict task was administered to examine the relationship among prosocial responses and parent/teacher ratings of children's social behaviours. Stimuli included 12 hypothetical peer conflict vignettes presented in an open-ended and forced choice condition. The LI group generated (open-ended) and selected (forced choice) fewer prosocial strategies. When asked to predict a friend's reaction to a selected conflict resolution strategy, the LI group predicted fewer positive consequences; however, the proportion of prosocial strategies followed by prediction of a positive peer consequence was similar across groups. Both groups identified more self-interest than relationship goals as the rationale for selected strategies. In the LI group, teacher ratings of children's social skills and problems in peer provocation situations were associated with selection of prosocial strategies. Implications for clinical service providers are discussed.

  9. Optimizing diabetes management: managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, E Albert

    2013-06-01

    Both the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated costs have been rising over time and are projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, type 2 DM (T2DM) management costs represent a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system unless substantial, systemic changes are made. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are uniquely positioned to attempt to make the changes necessary to reduce the burdens associated with T2DM by developing policies that align with evidence-based DM management guidelines and other resources. For example, MCOs can encourage members to implement healthy lifestyle choices, which have been shown to reduce DM-associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, MCOs are exploring the strengths and weaknesses of several different benefit plan designs. Value-based insurance designs, sometimes referred to as value-based benefit designs, use both direct and indirect data to invest in incentives that change behaviors through health information technologies, communications, and services to improve health, productivity, quality, and financial trends. Provider incentive programs, sometimes referred to as "pay for performance," represent a payment/delivery paradigm that places emphasis on rewarding value instead of volume to align financial incentives and quality of care. Accountable care organizations emphasize an alignment between reimbursement and implementation of best practices through the use of disease management and/ or clinical pathways and health information technologies. Consumer-directed health plans, or high-deductible health plans, combine lower premiums with high annual deductibles to encourage members to seek better value for health expenditures. Studies conducted to date on these different designs have produced mixed results.

  10. Management strategy 3: fixed rate fertilizer applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous chapters outlined management strategies for pond fertilization that take into account specific individual pond nutrient needs. Those methods would most likely be more ecologically efficient than a pre-determined fixed-rate nutrient addition strategy. However, the vast majority of available ...

  11. Managing work, family, and school roles: disengagement strategies can help and hinder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bonnie Hayden; McCarthy, Julie M

    2013-07-01

    The extent to which individuals manage multiple role domains has yet to be fully understood. We advance past research by examining the effect of interrole conflict among three very common and critically important life roles-work, family, and school-on three corresponding types of satisfaction. Further, we examine individual-based techniques that can empower people to manage multiple roles. In doing so, we integrate the disengagement strategies from the work recovery and coping literatures. These strategies focus on taking your mind off the problems at hand and include cognitive disengagement (psychological detachment, cognitive avoidance coping), as well as cognitive distortion (escape avoidance coping). We examine these strategies in a two-wave study of 178 individuals faced with the challenge of managing work, family, and school responsibilities. Findings demonstrated a joint offsetting effect of psychological detachment and cognitive avoidance coping on the relationship between work conflict and work satisfaction. Findings also indicated an exacerbating effect of escape avoidance coping on the relationship between work conflict and work satisfaction, school conflict and school satisfaction, and between family conflict and family satisfaction. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. [Conflict management: challenges experienced by nurse-leaders in the hospital environment].

    PubMed

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert; Thofehrn, Maira Buss; Martini, Jussara Gue; Meirelles, Betina Hörner Schlindwein; Trindade, Letícia de Lima

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to understand the main conflicts experienced by nurses-leaders in the hospital environment, as well as the strategies adopted to face them.The study reflects a qualitative descriptive type approach, which was used in the case study as research strategy. The study included 25 nurses who worked in three hospitals in the city of Florianopolis, Santa Catarina. Information where obtained in the months of May to December of 2010 through semi-structured interviews, non-participant observation and dialogical workshops. Data were analyzed using the Thematic Analysis. The results demonstrated the predominant of interpersonal conflicts involving the multidisciplinary team, nurses and the nursing staff Adopting a participatory leadership, based on dialogue emerges as a strategy for coping with conflicts in the hospital environment.

  13. The Changing Career Strategies of Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Tony; Davies, Goronwy

    1999-01-01

    Faced with reduced employment security, managers are redefining careers to include work/personal life balance. Changes in any area can cause revision of career strategies. Depending on how they define careers, managers recognize career development as an individual, not an organizational, responsibility. (SK)

  14. Gender and Conflict Resolution Strategies in Spanish Teen Couples: Their Relationship With Jealousy and Emotional Dependency.

    PubMed

    Perles, Fabiola; San Martín, Jesús; Canto, Jesús M

    2016-06-08

    Previous research has pointed to the need to address the study of violence in teen couples. However, research has not delved into the study of the variables related to the different types of violence employed by boys and girls. The purpose of this study was to test whether gender, jealousy, and dependency predict specific strategies for conflict resolution (psychological aggression and mild physical aggression). Another objective of the study was to test gender differences in the conflict resolution strategies used by Spanish teen couples and to test the association between these variables and jealousy and emotional dependency. A sample of 296 adolescent high school students between 14 and 19 years of age of both genders from the south of Spain participated in this study. Hierarchical regression models were used to estimate the relationship between psychological aggression and mild physical aggression, and jealousy, and dependency. Results showed that jealousy correlated with psychological aggression and mild physical aggression in girls but not in boys. Psychological aggression and mild physical aggression were associated with dependency in boys. Girls scored higher in psychological aggression and jealousy than did boys. Finally, the interaction between jealousy and dependency predicted psychological aggression only in girls. These results highlight the need to address the role of the interaction between dependence and jealousy in the types of violence employed in teen dating. However, it is necessary to delve into the gender differences and similarities to develop appropriate prevention programs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Post conflict water management: learning from the past for recovery planning in the Orontes River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadé-Sbeih, Myriam; Zwahlen, François; Haj Asaad, Ahmed; Gonzalez, Raoul; Jaubert, Ronald

    2016-10-01

    Water management is a fundamental issue in post-conflict planning in Syria. Based on historical water balance assessment, this study identifies the drivers of the profound changes that took place in the Lebanese and Syrian parts of the Orontes River basin since the 1930s. Both drastic effects of the conflict on the hydro-system and the strong uncontrolled anthropization of the river basin prior to the crisis have to be considered in the design of recovery interventions.

  16. Selecting habitat management strategies on refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Richard L.; King, Wayne J.; Cornely, John E.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a joint effort of the Biological Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to provide National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) managers guidance on the selection and evaluation of habitat management strategies to meet stated objectives. The FWS recently completed a handbook on writing refuge management goals and objectives (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996a). the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires that National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) lands be managed according to approved Comprehensive Conservation Plans to guide management decisions and devise strategies for achieving refuge unit purposes and meeting the NWRS mission. It is expected that over the next several years most refuges will develop new or revised refuge goals and objectives for directing their habitat management strategies. This paper outlines the steps we recommend in selecting and evaluating habitat management strategies to meet specific refuge habitat objectives. We selected two examples to illustrate the process. Although each refuge is unique and will require specific information and solutions, these two examples can be used as guidance when selecting and evaluating habitat management strategies for other refuge resources: Example 1. Management of floodplain woods habitat for forest interior birds. The biological recourse of concern is the quality and quantity of floodplain woods habitat for eastern forest interior birds in the Cypress Creek NWR (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996b). Example 2. Management of habitat for biodiversity: Historical landscape proportions. The biological resource of concern is the change in diversity associated with man-induced changes in the distribution and abundance of habitat types at the Minnesota Valley NWR (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996c).

  17. Teaching Students with Behavioral Disorders to Use a Negotiation Procedure: Impact on Classroom Behavior and Conflict Resolution Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the instruction of a six-step problem solving negotiation procedure on the conflict resolution strategies and classroom behavior of six elementary students with challenging behaviors was examined. Moderately positive effects were found for the following negotiation strategies used by students: independent problem solving, problem…

  18. Disclosure, Evaluation and Management of Financial Conflict of Interest in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Winona; Strong, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The most difficult aspect of financial conflict of interest (FCOI) and compliance with federal regulations involves the assessment and management of identified FCOIs. While some federal agencies provide examples of the structure and content of management plans, it is up to institutions to evaluate FCOI to determine whether and how research may be…

  19. Management strategies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Kristen M; Ditre, Chérie M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What are the most effective treatment(s) for mild, moderate, severe, and hormonally driven acne? Results: Mild acne responds favorably to topical treatments such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and a low-dose retinoid. Moderate acne responds well to combination therapy comprising-topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, and/or retinoids, as well as oral antibiotics in refractory cases and oral contraceptive pills for female acne patients. Severe nodulocystic acne vulgaris responds best to oral isotretinoin therapy. In female patients with moderate to severe acne, facial hair, loss of scalp hair and irregular periods, polycystic ovarian syndrome should be considered and appropriate treatment with hormonal modulation given. Adjunctive procedures can also be considered for all acne patients. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating acne: treatment of acne in women of child-bearing age; familiarization of all acne treatments in order to individualize management for patients; indications for specialist referral. PMID:21691566

  20. Conflict management styles, emotional intelligence and implicit theories of personality of nursing students: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joanne C Y; Sit, Emily N M; Lau, W M

    2014-06-01

    Conflict management is an essential skill that nursing students need to master as conflict is unavoidable in clinical settings. Examining nursing students' conflict management styles and the associating factors can inform nurse educators on how to equip nursing students for effective conflict management. This study aimed at examining undergraduate nursing students conflict management styles in managing conflict with their supervisors in clinical placement. The associations of emotional intelligence and implicit theories of personality with conflict management styles were also investigated. This is a cross-sectional quantitative survey. This study took place at a nursing school at a university in Hong Kong. 568 undergraduate nursing students participated in the study. Students completed a questionnaire which consisted of demographics, Measure of Implicit Theories of Personality, The Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale (SEIS) and The Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II (ROCI-II) and received a HKD 20 book coupon as compensation. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, reliability analyses, t-tests, correlational and linear regression analyses. For managing conflict with clinical supervisors, students used obliging and integrating most frequently whereas used dominating least. Emotional intelligence was a significant predictor of all five conflict management styles. The higher the emotional intelligence, the more students used integrating, obliging, compromising and dominating. The lower the emotional intelligence, the more students used avoiding. There was a significant association between implicit theories of personality and compromising. The less malleable students perceived personality to be, the more they used compromising. Emotional intelligence was significantly associated with all five conflict management styles while implicit theories of personality were significantly associated with compromising style only. Efforts of nurse educators to

  1. 78 FR 42549 - Conflict of Interest and Disclosure Form; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...] Conflict of Interest and Disclosure Form; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's Approval of... requirements contained in the proposed Conflict of Interest (COI) and Disclosure Form which will be used to determine whether or not a conflict of interest exists for a potential peer review panel member. DATES...

  2. Medication management strategies used by older adults with heart failure: A systems-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Robin S; Holden, Richard J

    2017-09-01

    Older adults with heart failure use strategies to cope with the constraining barriers impeding medication management. Strategies are behavioral adaptations that allow goal achievement despite these constraining conditions. When strategies do not exist, are ineffective or maladaptive, medication performance and health outcomes are at risk. While constraints to medication adherence are described in literature, strategies used by patients to manage medications are less well-described or understood. Guided by cognitive engineering concepts, the aim of this study was to describe and analyze the strategies used by older adults with heart failure to achieve their medication management goals. This mixed methods study employed an empirical strategies analysis method to elicit medication management strategies used by older adults with heart failure. Observation and interview data collected from 61 older adults with heart failure and 31 caregivers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis to derive categories, patterns and themes within and across cases. Data derived thematic sub-categories described planned and ad hoc methods of strategic adaptations. Stable strategies proactively adjusted the medication management process, environment, or the patients themselves. Patients applied situational strategies (planned or ad hoc) to irregular or unexpected situations. Medication non-adherence was a strategy employed when life goals conflicted with medication adherence. The health system was a source of constraints without providing commensurate strategies. Patients strived to control their medication system and achieve goals using adaptive strategies. Future patient self-mangement research can benefit from methods and theories used to study professional work, such as strategies analysis.

  3. Correlates of conflict, power and authority management, aggression and impulse control in the Jamaican population.

    PubMed

    Walcott, G; Hickling, F W

    2013-01-01

    The object of this study is to establish the correlates of the phenomenology of conflict and power management in the Jamaican population. A total of 1506 adult individuals were sampled from 2150 households using a stratified sampling method and assessed using the 12 questions of the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI) on the phenomenology of conflict and power management that are grouped into the psychological features of aggressive social behaviour, unlawful behaviour, socially unacceptable behaviour and financial transgressive behaviour. The database of responses to the demographic and JPDI questionnaires was created and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17. Of the national population sampled, 69.1% denied having any phenomenological symptoms of abnormal power management relations while 30.9% of the population admitted to having some degree of conflict and power management, ranging from mild (10.3%), to moderate (17.1), or severe (3.5%). There were 46.55% of the population which had problems with aggressive social behaviour, 9.33% had problems with unlawful behaviour, 9.58% had problems with unacceptable social behaviour and 37.74% had problems with financial transgressive behaviour. Significant gender and socio-economic class patterns for conflict and power management were revealed. This pattern of conflict and power management behaviour is critical in understanding the distinction between normal and abnormal expression of these emotions and actions. Nearly one-third of the sample population ` studied reported problems with conflict, abnormal power and authority management, impulse control and serious aggressive and transgressive behaviour.

  4. Information Technology Management Strategies to Implement Knowledge Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Mary Jane Christy

    2017-01-01

    More than 38% of the U.S. public workforce will likely retire by 2030, which may result in a labor shortage. Business leaders may adopt strategies to mitigate knowledge loss within their organizations by capturing knowledge in a knowledge management system (KMS). The purpose of this single case study was to explore strategies that information…

  5. Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management (UTM): Conflict Mitigation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    This is a presentation that describes the UAS Traffic Management Approach to an alternate means of compliance with 91.113 right of way regulations. UTM is an "air traffic management" ecosystem for uncontrolled operations.

  6. Generation of Conflict Resolution Maneuvers for Air Traffic Management

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-01-01

    We explore the use of distributed on-line motion planning algorithms for multiple mobile agents, in Air Traffic Management Systems (ATMS). The work is motivated by current trends in ATMS to move towards decentralized air traffic management, in which ...

  7. Using Conflict-Management Surveys to Extricate Research out of the "Ivory Tower": An Experiential Learning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anakwe, Uzoamaka P.; Purohit, Yasmin S.

    2006-01-01

    Management scholars have encouraged newer approaches to management education combining cognitive lessons with active experiential activities. This article describes how surveys, originally intended for collecting conflict-management data, can be introduced in the classroom to catalyze a deeper understanding of conflict. This article exemplifies…

  8. Nurse/physician conflict management mode choices: implications for improved collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Tova; Fish, Miri; Berger, Ornit

    2007-01-01

    In today's complex healthcare organizations, conflicts between physicians and nurses occur daily. Consequently, organizational conflict has grown into a major subfield of organizational behavior. Researchers have claimed that conflict has a beneficial effect on work group function and identified collaboration as one of the intervening variables that may explain the relationship between magnet hospitals and positive patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare conflict mode choices of physicians and head nurses in acute care hospitals and examine the relationship of conflict mode choices with their background characteristics. In a cross-sectional correlational study, 75 physicians and 54 head nurses in 5 hospitals were surveyed, using the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument. No difference was found between physicians and nurses in choice of the most frequently used mode in conflict management. The compromising mode was found to be the significantly most commonly chosen mode (P = .00) by both. Collaborating was chosen significantly more frequently among head nurses (P = .001) and least frequently among physicians (P = .00). Most of the respondents' characteristics were not found to be correlated with mode choices. The findings indicate a need to enhance partnerships in the clinical environment to ensure quality patient care and staff satisfaction.

  9. Sources of motivation, interpersonal conflict management styles, and leadership effectiveness: a structural model.

    PubMed

    Barbuto, John E; Xu, Ye

    2006-02-01

    126 leaders and 624 employees were sampled to test the relationship between sources of motivation and conflict management styles of leaders and how these variables influence effectiveness of leadership. Five sources of motivation measured by the Motivation Sources Inventory were tested-intrinsic process, instrumental, self-concept external, self-concept internal, and goal internalization. These sources of work motivation were associated with Rahim's modes of interpersonal conflict management-dominating, avoiding, obliging, complying, and integrating-and to perceived leadership effectiveness. A structural equation model tested leaders' conflict management styles and leadership effectiveness based upon different sources of work motivation. The model explained variance for obliging (65%), dominating (79%), avoiding (76%), and compromising (68%), but explained little variance for integrating (7%). The model explained only 28% of the variance in leader effectiveness.

  10. Momentum management strategy during Space Station buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Lynda; Malchow, Harvey; Hattis, Philip

    1988-01-01

    The use of momentum storage devices to control effectors for Space Station attitude control throughout the buildup sequence is discussed. Particular attention is given to the problem of providing satisfactory management of momentum storage effectors throughout buildup while experiencing variable torque loading. Continuous and discrete control strategies are compared and the effects of alternative control moment gyro strategies on peak momentum storage requirements and on commanded maneuver characteristics are described.

  11. Pilot Preference, Compliance, and Performance With an Airborne Conflict Management Toolset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted at the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers, investigating the En Route Free Maneuvering component of a future air traffic management concept termed Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). NASA Langley test subject pilots used the Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) airborne toolset to detect and resolve traffic conflicts, interacting with subject pilots and air traffic controllers at NASA Ames. Experimental results are presented, focusing on conflict resolution maneuver choices, AOP resolution guidance acceptability, and performance metrics. Based on these results, suggestions are made to further improve the AOP interface and functionality.

  12. U.S.-Japan Relations: The View from Both Sides of the Pacific. Part I, Episodes in the History of U.S.-Japan Relations: Case Studies of Conflict, Conflict Management & Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukai, Gary

    This curriculum unit is the first part of a three-part series; it focuses on the theme of conflict. It introduces students to conflict on personal, group, international, and global levels and to basic conflict resolution/management alternatives. Students learn about six categories of conflict through the analysis of episodes in the history of…

  13. Human-elephant conflict in western Thailand: Socio-economic drivers and potential mitigation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Matteson, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Understanding human-wildlife conflict is an important first step in the conservation of highly endangered species that can have adverse effects on human communities, such as elephants. To gain insights into variables that shape attitudes toward elephant conservation in Asia, we surveyed 410 households and 46 plantation owners in seven villages around the Salakpra Wildlife Sanctuary in western Thailand, an area of high human-elephant conflict. We sought to evaluate how past experiences with elephants (positive or negative), as well as socio-economic variables (age, income level, gender, and employment type) affect attitudes toward elephant conservation and coexistence in this area. In addition, we quantified deterrence methods currently used and identify potential mitigation strategies supported by community members. In general, less supportive attitudes toward elephant conservation and coexistence were held by individuals older than 35 years of age, those who had previously had experienced negative interactions with elephants, those with lower incomes, and those working in the agricultural sector. Conversely, those who had received benefits from living near elephants (e.g., supplemental income or feelings of pride from hosting volunteers or participating in conservation work) had more supportive views of elephant coexistence. Plantation owners reported using a variety of deterrence methods with varying success, with firecrackers being the most commonly utilized method. Community members identified several potentially beneficial mitigation strategies including forest restorations and patrol teams, adding water sources to wild elephant habitat, and education of local school and community groups. Overall, our results highlight the value of community members receiving benefits from living near elephants and suggest that special incentives may be needed for demographic groups disproportionately affected by elephants (e.g. those at lower income levels, those working in

  14. Nurses as image emissaries: are role conflicts impinging on a potential asset for an internal marketing strategy?

    PubMed

    Hafer, J C; Joiner, C

    1984-01-01

    This article addresses role conflict and image problems nurses have with role partners. If these problems were corrected, nurses could be valuable assets in a "team selling" effort to help hospitals build their images. This research integrates sales management concepts and cites literature alluding to sales management research on identical problems.

  15. Management Strategies for Promoting Teacher Collective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Eric C. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to validate a theoretical model for developing teacher collective learning by using a quasi-experimental design, and explores the management strategies that would provide a school administrator practical steps to effectively promote collective learning in the school organization. Twenty aided secondary schools in Hong Kong were…

  16. Effects of work-family conflict on employees' well-being: the moderating role of recovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita; Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Geurts, Sabine; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Garrosa, Eva

    2009-10-01

    Based on the effort-recovery model, this study links work-family conflict (WFC) and family-work conflict (FWC) with the concept of recovery. The authors hypothesize that 2 recovery strategies-psychological detachment from work and verbal expression of emotions-moderate the relationship of these 2 types of conflict with 2 indicators of well-being, namely psychological strain and life satisfaction. For our sample of 128 emergency professionals from Spain, psychological detachment from work moderated the relationship between WFC and psychological strain, and between FWC and life satisfaction. Verbal expression of emotions moderated the relationship between both types of conflict and psychological strain. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Social-ecological resilience and social conflict: institutions and strategic adaptation in Swedish water management.

    PubMed

    Galaz, Victor

    2005-11-01

    Dealing with uncertainty and complexity in social-ecological systems is profoundly dependent on the ability of natural resource users to learn and adapt from ecological surprises and crises. This paper analyzes why and how learning processes are affected by strategic behavior among natural resource users and how social conflict is affected by social and ecological uncertainty. The claim is that social conflict among natural resource users seriously inhibits the possibilities of learning and adaptation in social-ecological systems. This is done combining insights from political science, experimental economics, and social-psychology and an analytical case study elaborating social conflict and institutional change in Swedish water management institutions. This paper also discusses the crucial role the institutional context plays in defining the outcome of learning processes in Swedish water management institutions and hence highlights previously poorly elaborated political aspects of learning processes and institutional change in social-ecological systems.

  18. Time management strategies in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Susan

    2003-09-01

    With the increasing emphasis on efficiency and effectiveness in health care, how a nurse manages her time is an important consideration. Whilst time management is recognized as an important component of work performance and professional nursing practice, the reality of this process in nursing practice has been subject to scant empirical investigation. To explore how nurses organize and manage their time. A qualitative study was carried out, incorporating narratives (22 nurses), focus groups (24 nurses) and semi-structured interviews (22 nurses). In my role as practitioner researcher I undertook observation and had informal conversations, which provided further data. Study sites were five health care organizations in the United Kingdom during 1995-1999. Time management is complex, with nurses using a range of time management strategies and a repertoire of actions. Two of these strategies, namely routinization and prioritizing, are discussed, including their implications for understanding time management by nurses in clinical practice. Ignoring the influence of 'others', the team and the organization perpetuates a rather individualistic and self-critical perspective of time management. This may lead to a failure to address problems in the organizing of work, and the co-ordinating of care involving other health care workers.

  19. Some Effects of Teaching Adolescents: Some Creative, Peaceful Conflict Resolution Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Twenty-seven approaches to conflict resolution, representing the creativity of behavioral scientists, are included to indicate the inexhaustible number of means for dealing with conflict without using violence. (JH)

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome: contemporary nutrition management strategies.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Gerard E; Shepherd, Sue J; Chander Roland, Bani; Ireton-Jones, Carol; Matarese, Laura E

    2014-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex disorder whose pathophysiology involves alterations in the enteric microbiota, visceral hypersensitivity, gut immune/barrier function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, neurotransmitters, stress response, psychological factors, and more. The importance of diet in the management of irritable bowel syndrome has taken center stage in recent times as the literature validates the relationship of certain foods with the provocation of symptoms. Likewise, a number of elimination dietary programs have been successful in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Knowledge of the dietary management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome will help guide nutritionists and healthcare practitioners to deliver optimal outcomes. This tutorial reviews the nutrition management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Ethical conflict in nurse practitioners and physician assistants in managed care.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M; Danis, Marion; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Koziol, Deloris; Soeken, Karen L; Grady, Christine

    2006-01-01

    More patients are receiving healthcare services from nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). These providers are likely to be confronted with a variety of ethical issues as they balance quality care with their patients' rising cost concerns. However, very little is known about the ethical conflicts and causes of these conflicts experienced by these clinicians in their daily practice. To identify ethical concerns and conflicts NPs and PAs encounter related to managed care in the delivery of primary care to patients and the factors that influence ethical conflict. A cross-sectional self-administered mailed questionnaire was sent to 3,900 NPs and PAs randomly selected from primary care and primary care subspecialties in the United States (adjusted response rate, 50.6%). Respondents were surveyed on ethical issues and concerns, ethics preparedness, and ethical conflict. Bivariate and multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate predictors of ethical conflict. Insurance constraints were reported to have interfered with the ability to provide quality patient care by 72% of respondents, with 55.3% reporting daily to weekly interferences. Nearly half of respondents (47%) have been asked by a patient to mislead insurers to assist them in receiving care. A perceived obligation to advocate for patients, even if it means exaggerating the severity of a patient's condition, was the single most significant predictor of ethical conflict, explaining 25% of the variance. NPs and PAs are experiencing ethical conflict often associated with their perceived professional obligations to advocate for patients. Being well-prepared in ethics and having sufficient professional independence help clinicians balance the ethical complexities and demands of meeting patients' needs within a constrained healthcare system.

  2. Beyond PARR - PMEL's Integrated Data Management Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, E. F.; O'Brien, K.; Manke, A. B.; Schweitzer, R.; Smith, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) hosts a wide range of scientific projects that span a number of scientific and environmental research disciplines. Each of these 14 research projects have their own data streams that are as diverse as the research. With its requirements for public access to federally funded research results and data, the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology memo on Public Access to Research Results (PARR) changed the data management landscape for Federal agencies. In 2015, with support from the PMEL Director, Dr. Christopher Sabine, PMEL's Science Data Integration Group (SDIG) initiated a multi-year effort to formulate and implement an integrated data-management strategy for PMEL research efforts. Instead of using external requirements, such as PARR, to define our approach, we focussed on strategies to provide PMEL science projects with a unified framework for data submission, interoperable data access, data storage, and easier data archival to National Data Centers. This improves data access to PMEL scientists, their collaborators, and the public, and also provides a unified lab framework that allows our projects to meet their data management objectives, as well as those required by the PARR. We are implementing this solution in stages that allows us to test technology and architecture choices before comitting to a large scale implementation. SDIG developers have completed the first year of development where our approach is to reuse and leverage existing frameworks and standards. This presentation will describe our data management strategy, explain our phased implementation approach, the software and framework choices, and how these elements help us meet the objectives of this strategy. We will share the lessons learned in dealing with diverse and complex datasets in this first year of implementation and how these outcomes will shape our decisions for this ongoing effort. The data management capabilities now

  3. Associations between Social Understanding, Sibling Relationship Quality, and Siblings' Conflict Strategies and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recchia, Holly E.; Howe, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Sibling relationship quality and social understanding (second-order false belief, conflict interpretation, and narrative conflict perspective references) were examined as unique and interactive correlates of sibling conflict behavior in 62 dyads (older M age = 8.39 years and younger M age = 6.06 years). High-quality relationships were associated…

  4. Leadership Orientations and Conflict Management Styles of Academic Deans in Masters Degree Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimencu, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that academic deans follow the human relations and structural perspectives in conflict management (Feltner & Goodsell, 1972). However, the position of an academic dean has been described to have undertones that are more political and social than hierarchical and technical. Hence, the current study evaluated the role of…

  5. An Investigation of Conflict Management in Public and Private Sector Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Din, Siraj ud; Khan, Bakhtiar; Rehman, Rashid; Bibi, Zainab

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to gain an insight into the conflict management in public and private sector universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. To achieve the earlier mentioned purpose, survey method was used with the help of questionnaire. In this research, impact of university type (public and private sector) was examined on the conflict…

  6. The moderating role of personality traits on emotional intelligence and conflict management styles.

    PubMed

    Ann, Bao-Yi; Yang, Chun-Chi

    2012-06-01

    In a sample of 442 part-time MBA and undergraduate students, the relationships between emotional intelligence and the integrating style and between emotional intelligence and the dominating style of conflict management were moderated by extraversion. In addition, agreeableness moderated the relationships between emotional intelligence and compromising style and between emotional intelligence and dominating style.

  7. The Effects of Secure Attachments on Preschool Children's Conflict Management Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesner, John

    This study examined the relationship between the security of children's attachment relationships to parents and teachers and how children negotiate and manage conflicts. Sixty-six preschool-aged children participated in story completion tasks regarding their attachment relationship with parents and teachers, and in hypothetical situations…

  8. Conflict Management in Children's Play: The Role of Parent-Child Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesner, John E.

    This study examined the relationship between the security of preschool children's attachment relationship to their parents and how they negotiated and managed hypothetical conflict with peers. Participating were 66 preschool-age children recruited from child care facilities and residing in a large urban area in the southeastern United States. The…

  9. The Best Friendships of Aggressive Boys: Relationship Quality, Conflict Management, and Rule-Breaking Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagwell, Catherine L.; Coie, John D.

    2004-01-01

    The current study examined the best friendships of aggressive and nonaggressive boys (N=96 boys, 48 dyads, mean age=10.6 years). Friends completed self-report measures of friendship quality, and their interactions were observed in situations that required conflict management and provided opportunities for rule-breaking behavior. Although there…

  10. The Effects of Cognitive Conflict Management on Cognitive Development and Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiman, Zainol Badli; Halim, Lilia; Mohd Meerah, Subahan; Osman, Kamisah

    2014-01-01

    Three teaching methods were compared in this study, namely a Cognitive Conflict Management Module (CCM) that is infused into Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education (CASE), (Module A) CASE without CCM (Module B) and a conventional teaching method. This study employed a pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design using non-equivalent…

  11. Psychosocial Maturity and Conflict Resolution Management of Higher Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaseena M.P.M., Fathima; P., Divya

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find out the extent and difference in the mean scores of Psychosocial Maturity and Conflict Resolution Management of Higher secondary school students of Kerala. A survey technique was used for the study. Sample consists of 685 higher secondary students by giving due representation other criteria. Findings revealed that…

  12. Principals' Management of Conflicts in Public Secondary Schools in Ondo State, Nigeria: A Critical Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyemi, T. O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examined principals' management of conflicts in public secondary schools in Ondo State, Nigeria. As a descriptive survey, the study population comprised all the 281 public secondary schools in the State. Out of this population, a sample of 80 schools was drawn while 340 respondents (80 principals and 260 teachers) were selected through…

  13. Associations between Working Models of Attachment and Conflict Management Behavior in Romantic Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, Gary

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to specify relations between internal working models of attachment (IWM) and conflict management behaviors in a sample of young adults involved in romantic relationships. One hundred forty-five romantic couples were recruited to address this goal. All participants were administered the Adult Attachment Interview (C.…

  14. Transforming Technocratic Practitioners' Thinking toward Responsible Management of Land-Related Conflicts: Experience from Eastern Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Jeylan Wolyie; Bedasa, Nigusie Angessa

    2017-01-01

    The article presents analysis of the epistemological, pedagogical and methodological processes and dilemmas that unfolded during our efforts to transform the conceptions and understandings of our participants' thinking about ways of managing land-related conflicts. The paper reports our evaluation of the thinking and perspectives that guided our…

  15. Managing outdoor recreation conflict on the Squamish, British Columbia Trail Network

    Treesearch

    Ana Elia Ramón Hidalgo; Howard Harshaw

    2012-01-01

    Recreationists with high expectations of satisfaction from outdoor recreation activities are increasingly using trails networks near urban areas. But differences in expectations, behaviors and values of trail users may create conflicts resulting in unsatisfactory experiences. The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of management practices that may reduce...

  16. Measuring conflicts in the management of anthropized ecosystems: Evidence from a choice experiment in a human-created Mediterranean wetland.

    PubMed

    Perni, Ángel; Martínez-Paz, José Miguel

    2017-12-01

    Economic valuation of ecosystem services provides valuable information for the management of anthropized environments, where individual preferences can be heterogeneous and even opposed. Here, we discuss how these ecosystem services were approached in the literature and we address the main issues in relation to their economic valuation. We consider that avoiding misspecifications in economic valuation surveys requires considering the linkages between anthropized ecosystems and human intervention. To illustrate, we analyse the case study of a human-created Mediterranean wetland (El Hondo, SE Spain) using a Choice Experiment. Our findings suggest that management strategies in El Hondo should be oriented to improve the water ecological status, to enhance biodiversity and to develop ecotourism, whereas hunting should be strictly limited and controlled. Our measures of conflict (trade-off between ecosystem services and willingness to pay values) can help to find the optimal allocation of public and private goods and services and for the implementation of compensation schemes in the area. According to public preferences, a conservationist management strategy would generate 331,100 €/year in terms of environmental benefits, whereas a tourism-based management strategy would benefit society with 805,200 €/year. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An exploration of Bureau of Reclamation approaches for managing conflict over diverging science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkardt, Nina; Ruell, Emily; Clark, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    As a major institutional agent supplying Western water resources, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) provides important leadership, technical, and financial resources in water management, serving as the West's "water broker" (Bowersox 2000; Pisani 2003). In recent years, growing numbers of constituencies using water and the over-allocation of water resources have contributed to conflict over the resource in the American West (National Research Council 2004). Although the conflicts arise from many sources, one common theme is that Reclamation managers often must make decisions about water use and allocation when scientific studies provide uncertain or competing recommendations. We conducted a preliminary study of Reclamation water managers and water scientists to try to understand the approaches or techniques they use or consider useful for dealing with scientific conflicts over water allocation and how these compare to techniques found in the relevant literature. We report the results of (1) an electronic survey of Reclamation senior managers and (2) a panel discussion amongst Reclamation senior managers as to the current institutional capabilities for managing diverging scientific findings in water dispute resolution processes. We conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the different tools and techniques managers reported in the survey and in the panel discussion.

  18. Effects of Bullying Experience on Psychological Well-Being Mediated by Conflict Management Styles and Psychological Empowerment among Nursing Students in Clinical Placement: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liping; Kim, Hyunli

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to test a proposed structural equation model in which bullying experience, conflict management styles and psychological empowerment predict psychological well-being among Chinese nursing students in clinical placement. Three hundred and sixty-six nursing students recruited from five hospitals in J city and Y city were assessed with self-report questionnaires on bullying experience, conflict management styles, psychological empowerment and psychological well-being including depression, self-esteem, and academic major satisfaction. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 and AMOS version 22.0. The evaluation parameters included the comparative fit index at .90, the goodness of fit index at .93, the root mean square error of approximation at .07, and χ²/df ratio at 2.66, indicating that the proposed structural equation model provided a good fit to the data. Experience of being bullied during clinical placement, conflict management styles and psychological empowerment explained 93.0% of the variance and had significant effects on psychological well-being, with conflict management styles and psychological empowerment mediating the association between bullying and psychological well-being. The findings indicated that mediation by conflict management styles and psychological empowerment alleviated the negative influence of bullying on psychological well-being. To limit bullying and its negative effects, development of effective guidelines to deal with bullying will be a critical tool for both Chinese nursing students and their instructors. Further research should incorporate conflict management styles and psychological empowerment into the specific intervention strategies for handling bullying behaviors among nursing students and staff nurses and promoting nursing students' psychological well-being. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  19. Self-Efficacy for Managing Work-Family Conflict: Validating the English Language Version of a Hebrew Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Kelly D.; Lent, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy for Work-Family Conflict Management Scale (SE-WFC), developed in Israel, was designed to assess beliefs regarding one's ability to manage conflict between work and family roles. This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an English language version of the SE-WFC in a sample of 159 working mothers in…

  20. A Reinforcement Model of the Relationships of Supervisors' General Communication Styles and Conflict Management Styles to Task Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeless, Lawrence R.; Reichel, Lisa S.

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between general styles of communicating and more situation-specific conflict management styles. Finds substantial relationships between general communication styles and conflict management styles, as well as very substantial relationships between the style constructs and task attraction of supervisors. (SR)

  1. Virtual Simulation in Leadership Development Training: The Impact of Learning Styles and Conflict Management Tactics on Adult Learner Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putman, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    Adult learners can develop leadership skills and competencies such as conflict management and negotiation skills. Virtual simulations are among the emerging new technologies available to adult educators and trainers to help adults develop various leadership competencies. This study explored the impact of conflict management tactics as well as…

  2. Care management program evaluation: constituents, conflicts, and moves toward standardization.

    PubMed

    Long, D Adam; Perry, Theodore L; Pelletier, Kenneth R; Lehman, Gregg O

    2006-06-01

    Care management program evaluations bring together constituents from finance, medicine, and social sciences. The differing assumptions and scientific philosophies that these constituents bring to the task often lead to frustrations and even contentions. Given the forms and variations of care management programs, the difficulty associated with program outcomes measurement should not be surprising. It is no wonder then that methods for clinical and economic evaluations of program efficacy continue to be debated and have yet to be standardized. We describe these somewhat hidden processes, examine where the industry stands, and provide recommendations for steps to standardize evaluation methodology.

  3. Infanticide as Sexual Conflict: Coevolution of Male Strategies and Female Counterstrategies

    PubMed Central

    Palombit, Ryne A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest recognized forms of sexual conflict was infanticide by males, which imposes serious costs on female reproductive success. Here I review two bodies of evidence addressing coevolved strategies of males and females. The original sexual selection hypothesis arguing that infanticide improves male mating success by accelerating the return of females to fertilizable condition has been generally supported in some taxa—notably, some primates, carnivores, rodents, and cetaceans—but not in other taxa. One result of recent research has been to implicate other selective benefits of infanticide by males in various taxa from insects to birds to mammals, such as acquisition of breeding status or improvement of the female breeding condition. In some cases, however, the adaptive significance of male infanticide remains obscure. The second body of data I review is arguably the most important result of recent research: clarifying the possible female counterstrategies to infanticide. These potential counterstrategies span diverse biological systems, ranging from sexual behavior (e.g., polyandrous mating), to physiology (e.g., the Bruce effect), to individual behavior (e.g., maternal aggression), to social strategies (e.g., association with coalitionary defenders of either sex). Although much remains to be studied, these current data provide compelling evidence of sexually antagonistic coevolution surrounding the phenomenon of infanticide. PMID:25986557

  4. [Conflict as a reality and a cultural challenge in the practice of nurses' management].

    PubMed

    Prochnow, Adelina Giacomelli; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora

    2007-12-01

    The practice of nurses' management is permeated by conflicts that can be interpreted through culture references. The objective of this study is to denote cultural specificities, analyzed according to Geertz's Cultural Interpretative Theory, that are expressed as conflicts in the scope of nurses' management at a University Hospital. The results denoted the incorporation of ideological elements and mechanisms of control and power, whose origin can be seen in the way in which the work is organized. The application of policies based on the profession's very values was observed. Practices highlight a cultural construction that elucidates some understandings regarding cognitive, social and behavioral processes, because they organize the interpretations and the answers to the events of nurses' practices in management. The results of this study point out the importance of organizational culture in the practice of Nursing management in the face of labor uncertainties in the complexity of a hospital environment.

  5. Riparian ecosystems and their management: Reconciling conflicting uses

    Treesearch

    R. Roy Johnson; Charles D. Ziebell; David R. Patton; Peter F. Ffolliott; R. H. Hamre

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings include 105 papers and 12 poster presentations. Primary topics include: physical characteristics, hydrology, and ecology of riparian ecosystems; riparian resources; recreation, agriculture, wildlife, livestock use, fisheries, and amphibians and reptiles; multiple-use planning and management; legal and institutional needs; and riparian ecosystems in...

  6. Mathematical Critical Thinking and Curiosity Attitude in Problem Based Learning and Cognitive Conflict Strategy: A Study in Number Theory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zetriuslita; Wahyudin; Jarnawi

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to describe and analyze result of applying Problem-Based Learning and Cognitive Conflict Strategy (PBLCCS) in increasing students' Mathematical Critical Thinking (MCT) ability and Mathematical Curiosity Attitude (MCA). Adopting a quasi-experimental method with pretest-posttest control group design and using mixed method with…

  7. Organizational Conflict among Teachers and the Principal's Strategies of Dealing with It from the Teachers' Perspective in Schools of Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubran, Ali Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to evaluate the degree of organizational conflict among teachers in Jordanian schools, along with the principal strategies to deal with them effectively. The research population was based on a sample of 123 teachers from Irbid, Jordan for the academic year 2013/2014. A descriptive research approach was adopted with the help of…

  8. Conflict in medical teams: opportunity or danger?

    PubMed

    Greer, Lindred L; Saygi, Ozum; Aaldering, Hillie; de Dreu, Carsten K W

    2012-10-01

      Intragroup conflicts often occur when people are called upon to collaborate in the accomplishment of a task. For example, when surgeons and nurses work together during an operation, conflicts may emerge because of differences in functional understanding. Whether these conflicts are beneficial or detrimental to team outcomes has been the source of much debate. From one perspective, a conflict that stems from differences in members' functional understanding may enhance team members' understanding and performance of the task at hand. By contrast, such a conflict may cause hostility, emotionality and distraction from actual task accomplishment.   This study reviews findings on the relationships between intragroup conflict and team outcomes, discusses potential conflict resolution strategies for intragroup conflicts and explores how these link to the field of medical education.   Three primary types of conflict have been distinguished, involving, respectively, task-, process- and relationship-associated conflict. Both process conflict, or conflict about the logistics of task accomplishment, and relationship conflict, or conflict about interpersonal incompatibilities, have been shown to detract from effective team functioning. Task conflict, or conflict about the content of the task itself, is also generally negative for team functioning, but under certain conditions its negative effects may be minimised. For example, when teams can clearly separate task issues from relationship issues, task conflicts are less destructive for team outcomes. However, achieving such a separation in practice, and thereby realising the benefits of task conflict, is quite difficult to achieve.   Intragroup conflicts pose a challenge to effective team functioning. In the education of medical professionals, effective training in conflict management skills and their application to specific team conflict dynamics, such as with reference to how to resolve task as opposed to relationship

  9. An overview of conflict.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jacinta

    2006-01-01

    Conflict is found in all aspects of society and nursing is not immune. Conflict is also found in critical care units. However, conflict within the nursing profession has traditionally generated negative feelings and many nurses use avoidance as a coping mechanism. This article will provide an overview of conflict, conflict management, and conflict resolution.

  10. Trajectories of Mothers' Discipline Strategies and Interparental Conflict: Interrelated Change during Middle Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lansford, Jennifer E.; Staples, Angela D.; Bates, John E.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Using data collected annually when children were in kindergarten through 3rd grade (N = 478), this study investigated changes in mothers' use of nonharsh, harsh verbal, and physical discipline; changes in interparental conflict; and associations between changes in discipline and interparental conflict. Controlling for potential confounds, physical discipline decreased over the course of middle childhood, whereas harsh verbal and nonharsh discipline remained stable. Increases in interparental conflict were associated with increases in physical discipline; decreases in interparental conflict were associated with decreases in physical discipline. Change in interparental conflict was unrelated to change in harsh verbal or nonharsh discipline, although more frequent interparental conflict was associated with more frequen10t use of all three types of discipline in 1st grade. Findings extend previous research on how two major forms of communication within families—conflict between parents and parents' attempts to influence their children through discipline—change across middle childhood. PMID:24089598

  11. Managing work and family: Do control strategies help?

    PubMed

    Versey, H Shellae

    2015-11-01

    How can we effectively manage competing obligations from work and family without becoming overwhelmed? This question inspires the current study by examining control strategies that may facilitate better work-life balance, with a specific focus on the role of lowered aspirations and positive reappraisals, attitudes that underlie adaptive coping behaviors. Data from the Midlife in the United States Survey (MIDUS II) were used to explore the relationship between negative spillover, control strategies, and well-being among full-time working men and women (N = 2,091). In this nationally representative sample, findings indicate that while positive reappraisals function as a protective buffer, lowering aspirations exacerbate the relationship between work-family spillover and well-being, with moderating effects stronger among women. This study extends prior research tying work-life conflict to health and mental health, and suggests further investigation is needed to consider types of resources that may be effective coping strategies in balancing work and family. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Flexible management: strategies for the changing workforce.

    PubMed

    Michaels, B

    1994-01-01

    In the year 2000, managers will supervise employees whose career aspirations differ drastically from their own. Success not only will be measured by salary and status, but will be tied to a person's family relationships. Twenty years ago, most managers were not concerned with the family problems of their subordinates. This notion is now out of date. The family responsibilities of staff have a direct effect on the company's productivity. An employee who is worried about the care of an elderly parent, or concerned with the safety of a preteen home alone after school, is unlikely to give full attention to the task at hand. Flexible management is a cost-effective way of dealing with these issues. Managers who have the skills to be flexible and the strategies to work with employees for a win-win situation will reduce distractions and tardiness and gain productivity and loyalty.

  13. Investment under Uncertainty with Manager-Shareholder Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takashi; Nishihara, Michi

    2009-09-01

    This paper examines investment timing by the manager in a decentralized firm in the presence of asymmetric information. In particular, we extend the agency problem in a real options model to incorporate an audit technology which allows the owner, at a cost, to verify private information. The implied investment triggers include those in three related papers: standard full information model (e.g., McDonald and Siegel, 1986); Grenadier and Wang (2005); Shibata (2009). An increase in the penalty for the manager's false report always reduces inefficiency in the investment triggers, while it does not necessarily reduce inefficiency in the total social welfare. Most importantly, however, the full information investment triggers and total social welfare can be approximated arbitrarily closely by making the penalty sufficiently large.

  14. Redirected aggression as a conflict management tactic in the social cichlid fish Julidochromis regani.

    PubMed

    Ito, Munehiko H; Yamaguchi, Motoomi; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2018-01-31

    Conflict management consists of social behaviours that reduce the costs of conflict among group members. Redirected aggression-that is, when a recently attacked individual attacks a third party immediately after the original aggression-is considered a conflict management tactic, as it may reduce the victim's probability of being the object of further aggression. Redirected aggression has been reported in many vertebrates, but few quantitative studies have been conducted on this behaviour in fishes. We examined the function of redirected aggression in Julidochromis regani , a social cichlid fish. Behavioural experiments showed that redirected aggression functioned to divert the original aggressor's attention towards a third party and to pre-empt an attack towards the victim by the third-party individual, specifically among females. We found, however, that redirected aggression did not delay the recurrence of aggression by the original aggressor. These results suggest that a primary function of redirected aggression is to maintain the dominance of its actor against a subordinate occupying an adjacent rank. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence that redirected aggression functions to manage conflict in social fish. © 2018 The Author(s).

  15. Environmental management strategy: four forces analysis.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Martin W; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  16. Environmental Management Strategy: Four Forces Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Martin W.; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  17. Conflict management in public university hospitals in Turkey: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Kisa, Adnan

    2005-01-01

    By nature, hospitals are extremely complex organizations, combining many different professional groups within an intricate administrative structure. Conflicts therefore expectedly arise between individuals, groups, and departments. It is in the interest of health care administrators to periodically assess the major factors giving rise to these conflicts. In this study, a questionnaire designed to measure sources of conflict in the workplace was completed by 204 staff members at Gazi University Hospital. Of the participants, 30.9% were physicians, and 12.5% were administrators at various levels; 61.5% were female, and 38.5% were male. In terms of work experience, 52.6% of participants had worked less than 5 years at the hospital. The results of the study show that educational differences among the hospital staff were a major barrier to good communication and information flow between groups. Professionals in the same specialties experienced fewer conflicts. Another source of conflict was that resource allocation was considered unfair across departments. Although the hospital management provided an ombudsman for staff concerns, staff rarely resorted to the ombudsman because of the stigma associated with complaining. A lack of opportunity for career advancement was mentioned by 52% of the participants as a source of conflict. At present, job performance and rewards are not closely related in public university hospitals in Turkey because promotions and pay raises are strictly limited by law. Bureaucracy was also perceived to be a source of conflict, with 48.4% of participants saying that their performance was less than optimal because of the presence of multiple supervisors. This pilot study suggests that in Turkey, legislative reform is needed to give public university hospitals more flexibility regarding work incentives, open-door policies at the administrative level, and social interactions to improve teamwork among hospital staff.

  18. Management strategies for promoting successful breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bear, K; Tigges, B B

    1993-06-01

    Clinicians can promote a successful breastfeeding experience by providing support, anticipatory guidance and practical information. This article presents the components of early follow-up and guidelines for assessment. Management strategies for common problems are discussed, such as nipple soreness, cracked nipples, plugged ducts and mastitis, insufficient infant weight gain, perceived inadequacy of milk supply, breast-milk jaundice, sexual adjustment and failure at breastfeeding. Breastfeeding guidelines for employed mothers and adoptive mothers are indicated.

  19. Daylighting as a design and energy strategy: Overview of opportunities and conflicts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkowitz, S.

    1981-06-01

    The potentials and problems associated with using daylight both to improve visual performance and interior aesthetics and to reduce electrical lighting energy consumption and peak electric loads are reviewed. Use of daylighting as a design strategy is not always synonymous with effective use of daylighting as an energy-saving strategy unless both approaches are jointly pursued by the design team. Criteria for visual performance, disability and discomfort glare, historical perspectives on daylight utilization, building form as a limit to daylight penetration, beam sunlighting strategies, luminous efficacy of daylight versus efficient electric light sources, comparative thermal impacts, peak load and load management potential, and nonenergy benefits are reviewed. Although the energy benefits of daylighting can be oversold, it is concluded that in most cases a solid understanding of the energy and design issues should produce energy efficiency and pleasing working environments.

  20. Impact of Conflict Avoidance Responsibility Allocation on Pilot Workload in a Distributed Air Traffic Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligda, Sarah V.; Dao, Arik-Quang V.; Vu, Kim-Phuong; Strybel, Thomas Z.; Battiste, Vernol; Johnson, Walter W.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot workload was examined during simulated flights requiring flight deck-based merging and spacing while avoiding weather. Pilots used flight deck tools to avoid convective weather and space behind a lead aircraft during an arrival into Louisville International airport. Three conflict avoidance management concepts were studied: pilot, controller or automation primarily responsible. A modified Air Traffic Workload Input Technique (ATWIT) metric showed highest workload during the approach phase of flight and lowest during the en-route phase of flight (before deviating for weather). In general, the modified ATWIT was shown to be a valid and reliable workload measure, providing more detailed information than post-run subjective workload metrics. The trend across multiple workload metrics revealed lowest workload when pilots had both conflict alerting and responsibility of the three concepts, while all objective and subjective measures showed highest workload when pilots had no conflict alerting or responsibility. This suggests that pilot workload was not tied primarily to responsibility for resolving conflicts, but to gaining and/or maintaining situation awareness when conflict alerting is unavailable.

  1. Uncertainty management by relaxation of conflicting constraints in production process scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Juergen; Slany, Wolfgang; Stary, Christian

    1992-01-01

    Mathematical-analytical methods as used in Operations Research approaches are often insufficient for scheduling problems. This is due to three reasons: the combinatorial complexity of the search space, conflicting objectives for production optimization, and the uncertainty in the production process. Knowledge-based techniques, especially approximate reasoning and constraint relaxation, are promising ways to overcome these problems. A case study from an industrial CIM environment, namely high-grade steel production, is presented to demonstrate how knowledge-based scheduling with the desired capabilities could work. By using fuzzy set theory, the applied knowledge representation technique covers the uncertainty inherent in the problem domain. Based on this knowledge representation, a classification of jobs according to their importance is defined which is then used for the straightforward generation of a schedule. A control strategy which comprises organizational, spatial, temporal, and chemical constraints is introduced. The strategy supports the dynamic relaxation of conflicting constraints in order to improve tentative schedules.

  2. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Adriano Maia; Giovanella, Ligia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. RESULTS The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee’s permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that “facilitators” under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and

  3. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriano Maia dos; Giovanella, Ligia

    2014-08-01

    To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee's permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that "facilitators" under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and intermediate institutionalism. The regional interagency committee

  4. Defining ecological and economical hydropoweroperations: a framework for managing dam releasesto meet multiple conflicting objectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, Elise R.

    2014-01-01

    Hydroelectric dams are a flexible source of power, provide flood control, and contribute to the economic growth of local communities through real-estate and recreation. Yet the impoundment of rivers can alter and fragment miles of critical riverine habitat needed for other competing needs such as downstream consumptive water use, fish and wildlife population viability, or other forms of recreation. Multiple conflicting interests can compromise progressive management especially with recognized uncertainties related to whether management actions will fulfill the objectives of policy makers, resource managers and/or facility owners. Decision analytic tools were used in a stakeholder-driven process to develop and implement a template for evaluation and prediction of the effects of water resource management of multiple-use systems under the context provided by R.L. Harris Dam on the Tallapoosa River, Alabama, USA. The approach provided a transparent and structured framework for decision-making and incorporated both existing and new data to meet multiple management objectives. Success of the template has been evaluated by the stakeholder governing body in an adaptive resource management framework since 2005 and is ongoing. Consequences of management of discharge at the dam were evaluated annually relative to stakeholder satisfaction to allow for adjustment of both management scenarios and objectives. This template can be applied to attempt to resolve conflict inherent in many dam-regulated systems where management decisions impact diverse values of stakeholders.

  5. Interparental Conflict Relative to Suicidal Ideation in Chinese Adolescents: The Roles of Coping Strategies and Meaning in Life

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongwei; Li, Dan; Chen, Fei; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice M.; Liu, Shihong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the paths between interparental conflict and Chinese adolescents’ suicidal ideation. Altogether 931 adolescents (Mage = 17.84, SD = 0.77, females = 531) completed the Dyadic Consensus Scale, Self-Report Coping Scale, Meaning in Life Questionnaire, and Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation questionnaires. Mediation analyses were conducted, focusing on the relations between interparental conflict and suicidal ideation along with coping styles and a sense of meaning in life. The results showed that interparental conflict indirectly predicted adolescents’ suicidal ideation via three mediators: coping-approach strategies, presence of meaning, and the joint serial effects of coping-approach strategies and presence of meaning in Chinese adolescents. In addition, boys were more likely to be at risk for suicidal ideation than girls, so were 10th graders compared to 11th graders. These findings supported a combined distress-to-meaninglessness line of thinking along with the use of coping-approach strategies to depress self-harm ideation. Generally, interparental conflict should be kept out of youngsters’ immediate vicinity as a preventive measure of suicidal ideation. PMID:28690561

  6. Guided Inquiry with Cognitive Conflict Strategy: Drilling Indonesian High School Students’ Creative Thinking Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syadzili, A. F.; Soetjipto; Tukiran

    2018-01-01

    This research aims to produce physics learning materials in Indonesian high school using guided inquiry with cognitive conflict strategy to drill students’ creative thinking skills in a static fluid learning. This development research used 4D model with one group pre-test and post-test design implemented in the eleventh grade students in the second semester of 2016/2017 academic year. The data were collected by validation sheets, questionnaires, tests and observations, while data analysis techniques is descriptive quantitative analysis. This research obtained several findings, they are : the learning material developed had an average validity score with very valid category. The lesson plan can be implemented very well. The students’ responses toward the learning process were very possitive with the students’ interest to follow the learning. Creative thinking skills of student before the implementation of product was inadequate, then it is very creative after product was implemented. The impacts of the research suggest that guided inquiry may stimulate the students to think creatifly.

  7. The Political Divide Over Same-Sex Marriage: Mating Strategies in Conflict?

    PubMed

    Pinsof, David; Haselton, Martie

    2016-04-01

    Although support for same-sex marriage has grown dramatically over the past decade, public opinion remains markedly divided. Here, we propose that the political divide over same-sex marriage represents a deeper divide between conflicting mating strategies. Specifically, we propose that opposition to same-sex marriage can be explained in terms of (a) individual differences in short-term mating orientation and (b) mental associations between homosexuality and sexual promiscuity. We created a novel Implicit Association Test to measure mental associations between homosexuality and promiscuity. We found that mental associations between homosexuality and promiscuity, at both the implicit and the explicit levels, interacted with short-term mating orientation to predict opposition to same-sex marriage. Our model accounted for 42.3% of the variation in attitudes toward same-sex marriage, and all predictors remained robust when we controlled for potential confounds. Our results reveal the centrality of mating psychology in attitudes toward same-sex marriage. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Human-carnivore conflict in China: a review of current approaches with recommendations for improved management.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melissa; Xie, Yan; Kang, Aili; Rao, Madhu; Goodrich, John; Liu, Tong; Berger, Joshua

    2012-06-01

    Human-wildlife conflict (HWC) is a conservation concern that increasingly threatens the continued existence of some of the world's most endangered species. With an increase in human population, urban sprawl and subsequent encroachment on wild land, human and wildlife interaction has become inevitable. In the majority of cases, this interaction results in a negative outcome for humans, wildlife or both. In China, these key elements, along with a decrease in wild prey species, have resulted in the expansion of HWC encounters, and the need for alleviating this conflict has become a conservation priority. Loss of human life, livestock and/or crops is most often the catalysts that fuel HWC. Techniques to alleviate conflict around the world have included preventative measures and mitigation techniques, such as financial compensation and other incentive programs. Both types of measures have had variable success. We review the current status of human-carnivore conflict management in China, and, drawing lessons from around the globe, we make recommendations for improving conservation management in China. For example, an increase in law enforcement in nature reserves is vital to reducing human disturbance in prime carnivore habitat, thereby reducing conflict encounters. Also, modifications to current wildlife compensation programs, so that they are linked with preventative measures, will ensure that moral hazards are avoided. Furthermore, investigating the potential for a community self-financed insurance scheme to fund compensation and increasing efforts to restore wild prey populations will improve the outcome for wildlife conservation. Ultimately, HWC management in China will greatly benefit from an integrative approach. © 2012 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  9. A strategic approach for managing conflict in hospitals: responding to the Joint Commission leadership standard, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Scott, Charity; Gerardi, Debra

    2011-02-01

    A well-designed conflict management process for hospital leaders should both retain the positive benefits of constructive conflict engagement and minimize the adverse consequences that unmanaged conflict can have on patient care. Dispute system design (DSD) experts recommend processes that emphasize the identification of the disputing parties' interests and that avoid reliance on exertions of power or resort to rights. In an emerging trend in designing conflict management systems, focus is placed on the relational dynamics among those involved in the conflict, in recognition of the reciprocal impact that each participant in a conflict has on the other. The aim is then to restore trust and heal damaged relationships as a component of resolution. The intent of Standard LD.02.04.01 is to prevent escalation to formal legal disputes and encourage leaders to overcome their conflict-avoidance tendencies through the use of well-designed approaches that support engagement with conflict. The sequence of collaborative options consists of individual coaching and counseling; informal face-to-face meetings; informal, internally facilitated meetings; informal, externally facilitated meetings; formal mediation; and postdispute analysis and feedback. Every hospital has unique needs, and every conflict management process must be tailored to individual circumstances. The recommendations in this two-part article can be adapted and incorporated in other, more comprehensive conflict management processes throughout the hospital. Expanding the conflict competence of leaders to enable them to effectively engage in and model constructive conflict-handling behaviors will further support the strategic goal of providing safe and effective patient care.

  10. Antecedents and consequences of intra-group conflict among nurses.

    PubMed

    Almost, Joan; Doran, Diane M; McGillis Hall, Linda; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2010-11-01

    To test a theoretical model linking selected antecedent variables to intra-group conflict among nurses, and subsequently conflict management style, job stress and job satisfaction. A contributing factor to the nursing shortage is job dissatisfaction as a result of conflict among nurses. To develop strategies to reduce conflict, research is needed to understand the causes and outcomes of conflict in nursing work environments. A predictive, non-experimental design was used in a random sample of 277 acute care nurses. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the hypothesised model. Nurses' core self-evaluations, complexity of care and relationships with managers and nursing colleagues influenced their perceived level of conflict. Conflict management style partially mediated the relationship between conflict and job satisfaction. Job stress had a direct effect on job satisfaction and core self-evaluation had a direct effect on job stress. Conflict and its associated outcomes is a complex process, affected by dispositional, contextual and interpersonal factors. How nurses manage conflict may not prevent the negative effects of conflict, however, learning to manage conflict using collaboration and accommodation may help nurses experience greater job satisfaction. Strategies to manage and reduce conflict include building interactional justice practices and positive interpersonal relationships. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Diabetes benefit management: evolving strategies for payers.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert L

    2011-11-01

    Over the next quarter century, the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is expected to at least double. Currently, 1 in every 10 healthcare dollars is spent on diabetes management; by 2050, it has been projected that the annual costs of managing T2DM will rise to $336 billion. Without substantial, systemic changes, T2DM management costs will lead to a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system. However, the appropriate management of diabetes can reduce associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, adequate glycemic control can improve patient outcomes and significantly reduce diabetes-related complications. This article provides an overview of key concepts associated with a value-based insurance design (VBID) approach to T2DM coverage. By promoting the use of services or treatments that provide high benefits relative to cost, and by alternatively discouraging patients from utilizing services whose benefits do not justify their cost, VBID improves the quality of healthcare while simultaneously reining in spending. VBID initiatives tend to focus on chronic disease management and generally target prescription drug use. However, some programs have expanded their scope by incorporating services traditionally offered by wellness and disease management programs. The concept of VBID is growing, and it is increasingly being implemented by a diverse and growing number of public and private entities, including pharmacy benefit managers, health plans, and employers. This article provides key background on VBID strategies, with a focus on T2DM management. It also provides a road map for health plans seeking to implement VBID as part of their programs.

  12. Using WAS/MYWAS For Water Management And Conflict Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, F. M.; Huber, A. T.

    2008-12-01

    Water is a special economic commodity that cannot be efficiently allocated in a free private market because of social values that are not private ones. The WAS (Water Allocation System) model and its multiyear extension (MYWAS) use demand curves as well as supply conditions to allocate water so as to optimize the total net benefits it brings. However, they permit the user to prescribe policies and constraints on the allocation process so as to take social values into account. These models can be used to perform cost- benefit analyses of projected infrastructure projects taking into account the system-wide effects such projects will bring about. MYWAS, in particular will choose from a menu of possible projects and provide guidance on which ones should be built, when, in what order, and to what capacity. It is a very powerful tool that can be used under varying assumed conditions of climatic conditions. WAS models have been built for Israel, Jordan, and Palestine, and MYWAS models are underway for all three. Aside from their value as domestic management tools, WAS and MYWAS also offer assistance in resolving water disputes, turning what appear to be zero-sum games into win-win situations. They do so by concentrating on water value rather than water quantity and monetizing the disputes in question. In so doing, they provide a method of guiding cooperation in water and separating the analysis of optimal water usage from the often unresolvable question of water ownership and water rights. We have shown in the case of the Middle East, that the gains from such cooperation are typically worth more than the value of fairly large changes in water ownership the size of which is greatly reduced by cooperation. Moreover, disputing parties need not wait for the resolution of the water ownership issue to begin a cooperation that benefits all and permits flexible readjustment of water usage as situations (climatic conditions, populations, etc.) change. They can agree to pay for

  13. Understanding Children's Emotional Processes and Behavioral Strategies in the Context of Marital Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Kalsea J.; George, Melissa R. W.; Bergman, Kathleen N.; Cummings, E. M.; Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Marital conflict is a distressing context in which children must regulate their emotion and behavior; however, the associations between the multidimensionality of conflict and children's regulatory processes need to be examined. The current study examined differences in children's (N=207, mean age=8.02 years) emotions (mad, sad, scared, and happy)…

  14. Fighting Fair: Adaptive Marital Conflict Strategies as Predictors of Future Adolescent Peer and Romantic Relationship Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miga, Erin M.; Gdula, Julie Ann; Allen, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the associations between reasoning during inter-parental conflict and autonomous adolescent conflict negotiation with peers over time. Participants included 133 adolescents and their parents, peers, and romantic partners in a multimethod, multiple reporter, longitudinal study. Inter-parental reasoning at adolescent age of 13…

  15. Combating Conflicting Messages of Values: A Closer Look at Parental Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Thompson, Ross A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined how parents respond when their children encounter values outside the home that conflict with family values. Forty-eight middle-class European American parents completed questionnaires consisting of 11 vignettes asking how they would respond to hypothetical situations where outside sources posed potential conflicts with parental…

  16. Fighting fair: Adaptive Marital Conflict Strategies as Predictors of Future Adolescent Peer and Romantic Relationship Quality.

    PubMed

    Miga, Erin M; Gdula, Julie Ann; Allen, Joseph P

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the associations between reasoning during interparental conflict and autonomous adolescent conflict negotiation with peers over time. Participants included 133 adolescents and their parents, peers, and romantic partners in a multi-method, multiple reporter, longitudinal study. Interparental reasoning at adolescent age 13 predicted greater autonomy and relatedness in observed adolescent-peer conflict one year later and lower levels of autonomy undermining during observed romantic partner conflict five years later. Interparental reasoning also predicted greater satisfaction and affection in adolescent romantic relationships seven years later. Findings suggest that autonomy promoting behaviors exhibited in the interparental context may influence adolescents' own more autonomous approaches to subsequent peer and romantic conflict. Possible explanatory models are discussed, including social learning theory and attachment theory.

  17. TASKILLAN II - Pilot strategies for workload management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Leon D.; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1990-01-01

    This study focused on the strategies used by pilots in managing their workload level, and their subsequent task performance. Sixteen licensed pilots flew 42 missions on a helicopter simulation, and were evaluated on their performance of the overall mission, as well as individual tasks. Pilots were divided in four groups, defined by the presence or absence of scheduling control over tasks and the availability of intelligence concerning the type and stage of difficulties imposed during the flight. Results suggest that intelligence supported strategies that yielded significant higher performance levels, while scheduling control seemed to have no impact on performance. Both difficulty type and the stage of difficulty impacted performance significantly, with strongest effects for time stresss and difficulties imposed late in the flight.

  18. Modeling and management of water in the Klamath River Basin: overcoming politics and conflicts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flug, Marshall; Scott, John F.; Abt, Steven R.; Young-Pezeshk, Jayne; Watson, Chester C.

    1998-01-01

    The network flow model MODSIM, which was designed as a water quantity mass balance model for evaluating and selecting water management alternatives, has been applied to the Klamath River basin. A background of conflicting issues in the basin is presented. The complexity of water quantity model development, while satisfying the many stakeholders and involved special interest groups is discussed, as well as the efforts taken to have the technical model accepted and used, and overcome stakeholder criticism, skepticism, and mistrust of the government.

  19. A Strategy for Addressing Population Health Management.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Julie M; Oliver, Debra Parker; Simoes, Eduardo J

    2016-01-01

    Population health management in the era of the Affordable Care Act focuses on identifying needs of health care service areas for targeted strategies. The United States has a "health disadvantage" compared with peer countries, particularly regarding obesity and women's life expectancy, while having high rates of mammography screening. Emphasizing lifestyle factors is a strategy to reduce one's risk of obesity and heart disease, as well as some breast cancers. We explored perceptions of the risk of female population-based breast cancer mortality compared with heart disease mortality; perceived likelihood of developing breast cancer; and recognition of the association between modifiable lifestyle factors and breast cancer risk. Cross-sectional online survey. Service area of one mid-Missouri health care system. Female US residents ages 35 to 49 years who did not have a personal history of any cancer. Minority women and women with a college education or less had greater odds of reporting that breast cancer, rather than heart disease, would cause more deaths in women this year. Women who had ever had a mammogram had greater odds of reporting a moderate/high compared with low likelihood of developing breast cancer. Women with less than a college education had greater odds of not knowing of any lifestyle behaviors or reporting only clinical behaviors related to reducing one's risk of breast cancer. The present study illuminates areas of lagging information dissemination that may be used for targeted strategies for population health management in the era of the Affordable Care Act, that of bridging healthy lifestyle strategies for heart health with messages for breast health.

  20. Committees and Conflict: Developing a Conflict Resolution Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Describes development of conflict-resolution framework to address committee conflict. Describes several conflict-resolution strategies. Matches appropriate strategies with different types of committee conflict. For example, compromise is listed at the appropriate strategy to resolve interpersonal conflict. (Contains 24 references.) (PKP)

  1. Studies of transformational leadership in consumer service: leadership trust and the mediating-moderating role of cooperative conflict management.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2012-02-01

    This is the third in a series of studies evaluating how transformational leadership is associated with related variables such as job satisfaction, change commitment, leadership trust, cooperative conflict management, and market orientation. The present paper evaluates the effects of transformational leadership and cooperative conflict management along with their mediating and moderating of leadership trust in the life insurance industry for two sample groups, sales managers and sales employees. The main effect of leadership trust was mediated and moderated by cooperative conflict management. Cooperative conflict management made a more important contribution than transformational leadership or the moderating effect (interaction), but these three together were the most important variables predicting highest leadership trust. Transformational leadership has an indirect influence on leadership trust. This work summarizes the specific contribution and importance of building successful leadership trust associations with employees in relation to leadership and satisfaction with change commitment.

  2. Marital conflict management skills, parenting style, and early-onset conduct problems: processes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Webster-Stratton, C; Hammond, M

    1999-09-01

    This study examined whether the link between marital conflict management style and child conduct problems with peers and parents is direct or mediated by mothers' and fathers' parenting style (critical parenting and low emotional responsivity). One hundred and twenty children, aged 4 to 7 years, were observed interacting in our laboratory playroom solving a problem with their best friend as well as at home with their parents. In addition, all the children's parents were observed in our laboratory trying to solve two family problems as well as at home interacting under more natural conditions with each other and with their children. Mothers and fathers completed questionnaires assessing marital problem solving as well as reports of their children's behavior problems. Results indicated that a negative marital conflict management style had direct links with children's conduct problems. In addition, the linkage between negative marital conflict management and children's interactions with parents and peers was found to be mediated by both mothers' and fathers' critical parenting and low emotional responsivity, thereby supporting the indirect as well as the direct model of negative family interactions. The findings are discussed in relation to the implications for treatment.

  3. Dazed and confused: sports medicine, conflicts of interest, and concussion management.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Brad

    2014-03-01

    Professional sports with high rates of concussion have become increasingly concerned about the long-term effects of multiple head injuries. In this context, return-to-play decisions about concussion generate considerable ethical tensions for sports physicians. Team doctors clearly have an obligation to the welfare of their patient (the injured athlete) but they also have an obligation to their employer (the team), whose primary interest is typically success through winning. At times, a team's interest in winning may not accord with the welfare of an injured player, particularly when it comes to decisions about returning to play after injury. Australia's two most popular professional football codes-rugby league and Australian Rules football-have adopted guidelines that prohibit concussed players from continuing to play on the same day. I suggest that conflicts of interest between doctors, patients, and teams may present a substantial obstacle to the proper adherence of concussion guidelines. Concussion management guidelines implemented by a sport's governing body do not necessarily remove or resolve conflicts of interest in the doctor-patient-team triad. The instigation of a concussion exclusion rule appears to add a fourth party to this triad (the National Rugby League or the Australian Football League). In some instances, when conflicts of interest among stakeholders are ignored or insufficiently managed, they may facilitate attempts at circumventing concussion management guidelines to the detriment of player welfare.

  4. Factors driving collaboration in natural resource conflict management: Evidence from Romania.

    PubMed

    Hossu, Constantina Alina; Ioja, Ioan Cristian; Susskind, Lawrence E; Badiu, Denisa L; Hersperger, Anna M

    2018-02-03

    A critical challenge in natural resource management is to bring all stakeholders together to negotiate solutions to critical problems. However, various collaborative approaches to heading off conflicts and resolving natural resource management disputes have been used. What drives these efforts, however, still needs further research. Our study provides a systematic look at the drivers likely to initiate collaborative problem-solving efforts in four cases in Romania. We use Emerson's et al. (2012) framework for collaborative governance and multi-value qualitative comparative analysis (mvQCA) to analyze cases involving endangered species, restrictions on forest harvest, conflicts associated with infrastructure development projects, and disputes over the management of environmentally sensitive areas. Our findings contribute to the already existing collaborative governance literature indicating which of the four factors: uncertainty, interdependence, consequential incentives, and leadership, in which combination, are necessary and sufficient to spur collaborative resource management efforts. Our results showed that in Romania the initiation of collaboration is best explained by positive consequential incentives (i.e., financial opportunities) which has determined leaders to take initiative. This study provides additional information for the complicated process of natural resource management which is often overriding collaboration by investigating what enables and constrains collaborative efforts in a country where natural resources were managed and used according to the principles of central planning.

  5. Management Strategies for CLN2 Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth E; Adams, Heather R; Blohm, Martin; Cohen-Pfeffer, Jessica L; de Los Reyes, Emily; Denecke, Jonas; Drago, Kristen; Fairhurst, Charlie; Frazier, Margie; Guelbert, Norberto; Kiss, Szilárd; Kofler, Annamaria; Lawson, John A; Lehwald, Lenora; Leung, Mary-Anne; Mikhaylova, Svetlana; Mink, Jonathan W; Nickel, Miriam; Shediac, Renée; Sims, Katherine; Specchio, Nicola; Topcu, Meral; von Löbbecke, Ina; West, Andrea; Zernikow, Boris; Schulz, Angela

    2017-04-01

    CLN2 disease (neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2) is a rare, autosomal recessive, pediatric-onset, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) enzyme deficiency, and is characterized by language delay, seizures, rapid cognitive and motor decline, blindness, and early death. No management guidelines exist and there is a paucity of published disease-specific evidence to inform clinical practice, which currently draws upon experience from the field of childhood neurodisability. Twenty-four disease experts were surveyed on CLN2 disease management and a subset met to discuss current practice. Management goals and strategies are consistent among experts globally and are guided by the principles of pediatric palliative care. Goals and interventions evolve as the disease progresses, with a shift in focus from maintenance of function early in the disease to maintenance of quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach is critical for optimal patient care. This work represents an initial step toward the development of consensus-based management guidelines for CLN2 disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Goose management schemes to resolve conflicts with agriculture: Theory, practice and effects.

    PubMed

    Eythórsson, Einar; Tombre, Ingunn M; Madsen, Jesper

    2017-03-01

    In 2012, the four countries hosting the Svalbard population of pink-footed goose Anser brachyrhynchus along its flyway launched an International Species Management Plan for the population. One of the aims was to reduce conflicts between geese and agriculture to an acceptable level. Since 2006, Norway has offered subsidies to farmers that provide refuge areas for geese on their land. We evaluate the mid-Norwegian goose management subsidy scheme, with a view to its adjustment to prevailing ecological and socio-economic parameters. The analysis indicates that the legitimacy of the scheme is highly dependent on transparency of knowledge management and accountability of management scheme to the farming community. Among farmers, as well as front-line officials, outcomes of prioritisation processes within the scheme are judged unfair when there is an evident mismatch between payments and genuine damage. We suggest how the scheme can be made more fair and responsive to ecological changes, within a framework of adaptive management.

  7. WITHDRAWN: Initial management strategies for dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Brendan; Ford, Alex C; Forman, David; Moayyedi, Paul; Qume, Michelle

    2009-10-07

    This review considers management strategies (combinations of initial investigation and empirical treatments) for dyspeptic patients. Dyspepsia was defined to include both epigastric pain and heartburn. To determine the effectiveness, acceptability, and cost effectiveness of the following initial management strategies for patients presenting with dyspepsia (a) Initial pharmacological therapy (including endoscopy for treatment failures). (b) Early endoscopy. (c) Testing for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori )and endoscope only those positive. (d) H. pylori eradication therapy with or without prior testing. Trials were located through electronic searches and extensive contact with trialists. All randomised controlled trials of dyspeptic patients presenting in primary care. Data were collected on dyspeptic symptoms, quality of life and use of resources. An individual patient data meta-analysis of health economic data was conducted Twenty-five papers reporting 27 comparisons were found. Trials comparing proton pump inhibitors (PPI) with antacids (three trials) and histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) (three trials), early endoscopy with initial acid suppression (five trials), H. pylori test and endoscope versus usual management (three trials), H. pylori test and treat versus endoscopy (six trials), and test and treat versus acid suppression alone in H. pylori positive patients (four trials), were pooled. PPIs were significantly more effective than both H2RAs and antacids. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were; for PPI compared with antacid 0.72 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.80), PPI compared with H2RA 0.63 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.85). Results for other drug comparisons were either absent or inconclusive. Initial endoscopy was associated with a small reduction in the risk of recurrent dyspeptic symptoms compared with H. pylori test and treat (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96), but was not cost effective (mean additional cost of endoscopy US$401 (95% CI $328 to 474

  8. Dehumanization, retributive and restorative justice, and aggressive versus diplomatic intergroup conflict resolution strategies.

    PubMed

    Leidner, Bernhard; Castano, Emanuele; Ginges, Jeremy

    2013-02-01

    The desire for justice can escalate or facilitate resolution of intergroup conflicts. Two studies investigated retributive and restorative notions of justice as the mediating factor of the effect of perceived outgroup sentience-an aspect of (mechanistic) dehumanization referring to the emotional depth attributed to others-on intergroup conflict resolution. Study 1 showed that for Palestinians, who see themselves as victims, perceived sentience of Israelis decreased retributive but increased restorative notions of justice, which, ultimately, increased support for conflict resolution by negotiation rather than political violence. Study 2 partially replicated Study 1's findings with Jewish Israelis. The role of perceived sentience and its relationship to retributive and restorative notions of justice in protracted and nonprotracted conflicts and their resolution is discussed.

  9. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a "Stakeholder Feedback". Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: the development of workload for the medical staff the profit oriented performance of the medical staff. According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and "blind spots". This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management.

  10. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Methodology: Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a “Stakeholder Feedback”. Results: Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: the development of workload for the medical staff the profit oriented performance of the medical staff. According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Conclusion: Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and “blind spots”. This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management. PMID:26504735

  11. Counterpoint: physician-industry relationships can be ethically established, and conflicts of interest can be ethically managed.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew P; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Zdeblick, Thomas

    2007-05-15

    Review of the nature of conflicts of interest in physician-industry relationships, with a focus on the efforts to ethically manage physician-industry relationships. To illustrate the perspective that physician-industry relationships can be ethically established, and conflicts of interest can be ethically managed. The interest in considering the appropriateness of physician-industry relationships has recently become focused on spine surgery. Many of the conflicts of interest inherent to these relationships have been interpreted as problematic, and have been scrutinized by the media, industry, medical and legal professions, and Federal government. The basis for conflicts of interest, manner in which bias may be introduced, and methods to reduce bias are presented. The potential risks and benefits to patients that are inherent to physician-industry relationships are considered. A framework, developed by medical ethicists, is provided to guide analysis of conflicts of interest in physician-industry relationships. Collaboration between spine surgeons and industry is necessary to improve patient care. The conflicts of interest that often arise in physician-industry relationships must be recognized, and keenly managed in order to eliminate the risk and maximize the benefit to the patient. Ethical management of conflicts must include disclosure. To preserve patient autonomy, management should also include a discussion of the quality of the medical evidence on which treatment recommendations are made. Guidelines from industry and medical professional organizations, including the "Standards of Professionalism" currently under development by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery, are also expected to aid in the ethical establishment and management of conflicts of interest. Careful consideration of conflicts of interest in physician-industry relationships has provided an opportunity to review our goals as physicians in society, and to continue collaborative advancement of

  12. Managing Sustainable Development Conflicts: The Impact of Stakeholders in Small-Scale Hydropower Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkin, Laura Jane; Kemp, Paul S.; Williams, Ian D.; Harwood, Ian A.

    2012-06-01

    The growing importance of the environment and its management has simultaneously emphasized the benefits of hydroelectric power and its environmental costs. In a changing policy climate, giving importance to renewable energy development and environmental protection, conflict potential between stakeholders is considerable. Navigation of conflict determines the scheme constructed, making sustainable hydropower a function of human choice. To meet the needs of practitioners, greater understanding of stakeholder conflict is needed. This paper presents an approach to illustrate the challenges that face small-scale hydropower development as perceived by the stakeholders involved, and how they influence decision-making. Using Gordleton Mill, Hampshire (UK), as an illustrative case, soft systems methodology, a systems modeling approach, was adopted. Through individual interviews, a range of problems were identified and conceptually modeled. Stakeholder bias towards favoring economic appraisal over intangible social and environmental aspects was identified; costs appeared more influential than profit. Conceptual evaluation of the requirements to meet a stakeholder-approved solution suggested a complex linear systems approach, considerably different from the real-life situation. The stakeholders introduced bias to problem definition by transferring self-perceived issues onto the project owner. Application of soft systems methodology caused a shift in project goals away from further investigation towards consideration of project suitability. The challenge of sustainable hydropower is global, with a need to balance environmental, economic, and social concerns. It is clear that in this type of conflict, an individual can significantly influence outcomes; highlighting the need for more structured approaches to deal with stakeholder conflicts in sustainable hydropower development.

  13. Managing sustainable development conflicts: the impact of stakeholders in small-scale hydropower schemes.

    PubMed

    Watkin, Laura Jane; Kemp, Paul S; Williams, Ian D; Harwood, Ian A

    2012-06-01

    The growing importance of the environment and its management has simultaneously emphasized the benefits of hydroelectric power and its environmental costs. In a changing policy climate, giving importance to renewable energy development and environmental protection, conflict potential between stakeholders is considerable. Navigation of conflict determines the scheme constructed, making sustainable hydropower a function of human choice. To meet the needs of practitioners, greater understanding of stakeholder conflict is needed. This paper presents an approach to illustrate the challenges that face small-scale hydropower development as perceived by the stakeholders involved, and how they influence decision-making. Using Gordleton Mill, Hampshire (UK), as an illustrative case, soft systems methodology, a systems modeling approach, was adopted. Through individual interviews, a range of problems were identified and conceptually modeled. Stakeholder bias towards favoring economic appraisal over intangible social and environmental aspects was identified; costs appeared more influential than profit. Conceptual evaluation of the requirements to meet a stakeholder-approved solution suggested a complex linear systems approach, considerably different from the real-life situation. The stakeholders introduced bias to problem definition by transferring self-perceived issues onto the project owner. Application of soft systems methodology caused a shift in project goals away from further investigation towards consideration of project suitability. The challenge of sustainable hydropower is global, with a need to balance environmental, economic, and social concerns. It is clear that in this type of conflict, an individual can significantly influence outcomes; highlighting the need for more structured approaches to deal with stakeholder conflicts in sustainable hydropower development.

  14. Evaluating adaptive co-management as conservation conflict resolution: Learning from seals and salmon.

    PubMed

    Butler, J R A; Young, J C; McMyn, I A G; Leyshon, B; Graham, I M; Walker, I; Baxter, J M; Dodd, J; Warburton, C

    2015-09-01

    By linking iterative learning and knowledge generation with power-sharing, adaptive co-management (ACM) provides a potential solution to resolving complex social-ecological problems. In this paper we evaluate ACM as a mechanism for resolving conservation conflict using a case study in Scotland, where seal and salmon fishery stakeholders have opposing and entrenched objectives. ACM emerged in 2002, successfully resolving this long-standing conflict. Applying evaluation approaches from the literature, in 2011 we interviewed stakeholders to characterise the evolution of ACM, and factors associated with its success over 10 years. In common with other ACM cases, triggers for the process were shifts in slow variables controlling the system (seal and salmon abundance, public perceptions of seal shooting), and exogenous shocks (changes in legal mandates, a seal disease outbreak). Also typical of ACM, three phases of evolution were evident: emerging local leadership preparing the system for change, a policy window of opportunity, and stakeholder partnerships building the resilience of the system. Parameters maintaining ACM were legal mechanisms and structures, legal power held by government, and the willingness of all stakeholders to reach a compromise and experiment with an alternative governance approach. Results highlighted the critical role of government power and support in resolving conservation conflict, which may constrain the extent of local stakeholder-driven ACM. The evaluation also demonstrated how, following perceived success, the trajectory of ACM has shifted to a 'stakeholder apathy' phase, with declining leadership, knowledge exchange, stakeholder engagement, and system resilience. We discuss remedial actions required to revive the process, and the importance of long term government resourcing and alternative financing schemes for successful conflict resolution. Based on the results we present a generic indicator framework and participatory method for the

  15. Curbside consultation re-imagined: Borrowing from the conflict management toolkit.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Lauren M; Lynch, John J; Mokwunye, Nneka O; DeRenzo, Evan G

    2010-03-01

    Curbside ethics consultations occur when an ethics consultant provides guidance to a party who seeks assistance over ethical concerns in a case, without the consultant involving other stakeholders, conducting his or her own comprehensive review of the case, or writing a chart note. Some have argued that curbside consultation is problematic because the consultant, in focusing on a single narrative offered by the party seeking advice, necessarily fails to account for the full range of moral perspectives. Their concern is that any guidance offered by the ethics consultant will privilege and empower one party's viewpoint over-and to the exclusion of-other stakeholders. This could lead to serious harms, such as the ethicist being reduced to a means to an end for a clinician seeking to achieve his or her own preferred outcome, the ethicist denying the broader array of stakeholders input in the process, or the ethicist providing wrongheaded or biased advice, posing dangers to the ethical quality of decision-making. Although these concerns are important and must be addressed, we suggest that they are manageable. This paper proposes using conflict coaching, a practice developed within the discipline of conflict management, to mitigate the risks posed by curbside consultation, and thereby create new "spaces" for moral discourse in the care of patients. Thinking of curbside consultations as an opportunity for "clinical ethics conflict coaching" can more fully integrate ethics committee members into the daily ethics of patient care and reduce the frequency of ethically harmful outcomes.

  16. Conflict and Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice and the Army in the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-21

    terms of the field are: conflict settlement, conflict management , and conflict resolution. Miall, Ramsbotham, and Woodhouse describe conflict...settlement and conflict management . These are useful terms because they describe situations where the endstate may be more in line with what the...doctrine concerning the concepts of theory and conflict and the addition ofa manual for conflict resolution. 16. SUBJECT TERMS Conflict, Conflict

  17. Design of a Multi-mode Flight Deck Decision Support System for Airborne Conflict Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley has developed a multi-mode decision support system for pilots operating in a Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) environment. An Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) assists pilots in performing separation assurance functions, including conflict detection, prevention, and resolution. Ongoing AOP design has been based on a comprehensive human factors analysis and evaluation results from previous human-in-the-loop experiments with airline pilot test subjects. AOP considers complex flight mode interactions and provides flight guidance to pilots consistent with the current aircraft control state. Pilots communicate goals to AOP by setting system preferences and actively probing potential trajectories for conflicts. To minimize training requirements and improve operational use, AOP design leverages existing alerting philosophies, displays, and crew interfaces common on commercial aircraft. Future work will consider trajectory prediction uncertainties, integration with the TCAS collision avoidance system, and will incorporate enhancements based on an upcoming air-ground coordination experiment.

  18. The best friendships of aggressive boys: relationship quality, conflict management, and rule-breaking behavior.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, Catherine L; Coie, John D

    2004-05-01

    The current study examined the best friendships of aggressive and nonaggressive boys (N = 96 boys, 48 dyads, mean age = 10.6 years). Friends completed self-report measures of friendship quality, and their interactions were observed in situations that required conflict management and provided opportunities for rule-breaking behavior. Although there were no differences in boys' self-reports of friendship quality, observers rated nonaggressive boys and their friends as showing greater positive engagement, on-task behavior, and reciprocity in their interactions compared with aggressive boys and their friends. Aggressive boys and their friends provided more enticement for rule violations and engaged in more rule-breaking behavior than did nonaggressive boys and their friends. Also, the intensity of negative affect in observed conflicts between aggressive boys and their friends was greater than that between nonaggressive boys and their friends. The findings suggest that friendships may provide different developmental contexts for aggressive and nonaggressive boys. Copyright 2003 Elsevier, Inc.

  19. Professional Disclosure Statements and Formal Plans for Supervision: Two Strategies for Minimizing the Risk of Ethical Conflicts in Post-Master's Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobia, Debra C.; Boes, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses ethical conflicts related to issues of informed consent, due process, competence, confidentiality, and dual relationships in supervision. Proposes two strategies as ways to minimize the potential for ethical conflict in post-master's supervision: the use of professional disclosure statements by supervisors and the development of formal…

  20. A Comparative Study of the Relationships between Conflict Management Styles and Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, and Propensity to Leave the Job among Saudi and American Universities' Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzahrani, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    This study used Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II, Form C to examine the preference for conflict management styles among Saudi and American faculty members. Additionally, the study examined the relationships between conflict management styles and job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and propensity to leave the job. A random sample…

  1. Exploring Conflict Management: A Qualitative Study on the Lack of Compromise and Collaboration in Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alvin L., II.

    2017-01-01

    Conflict management is a very important part of higher education, and is the process of limiting negative aspects of conflict while increasing the positive aspects of collaboration. The success of conflict management in HBCUs has become ineffective due to the lack of collaboration and compromise in HBCU leader practice. Prior research concerning…

  2. Predicting Hotspots of Human-Elephant Conflict to Inform Mitigation Strategies in Xishuangbanna, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Marino, Jorgelina; Chen, Yong; Tao, Qing; Sullivan, Casey D; Shi, Kun; Macdonald, David W

    2016-01-01

    Research on the spatial patterns of human-wildlife conflict is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms underlying it and to identifying opportunities for mitigation. In the state of Xishuangbanna, containing China's largest tropical forest, an imbalance between nature conservation and economic development has led to increasing conflicts between humans and Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), as both elephant numbers and conversion of habitable land to rubber plantations have increased over the last several decades. We analyzed government data on the compensation costs of elephant-caused damage in Xishuangbanna between 2008 and 2012 to understand the spatial and temporal patterns of conflict, in terms of their occurrence, frequency and distribution. More than 18,261 incidents were reported, including episodes involving damage to rubber trees (n = 10,999), damage to crops such as paddy, upland rice, corn, bananas and sugarcane (n = 11,020), property loss (n = 689) and attacks on humans (n = 19). The conflict data reconfirmed the presence of elephants in areas which have lacked records since the late 1990s. Zero Altered Negative Binomial models revealed that the risk of damage to crops and plantations increased with proximity to protected areas, increasing distance from roads, and lower settlement density. The patterns were constant across seasons and types of crop damaged. Damage to rubber trees was essentially incidental as elephants searched for crops to eat. A predictive map of risks revealed hotspots of conflict within and around protected areas, the last refuges for elephants in the region, and along habitat corridors connecting them. Additionally, we analyzed how mitigation efforts can best diminish the risk of conflict while minimizing financial costs and adverse biological impacts. Our analytical approach can be adopted, adjusted and expanded to other areas with historical records of human-wildlife conflict.

  3. Perceived conflict in the couple and chronic illness management: preliminary analyses from the Quebec Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Soubhi, Hassan; Fortin, Martin; Hudon, Catherine

    2006-10-19

    The quality of the relationship with the spouse/partner appears crucial among patients with multiple chronic conditions where illness management is complex and multifaceted. This study draws on data from the Quebec Health Survey (QHS) to examine, among patients with one or more chronic conditions, the relation between marital status, the perceived conflict with the spouse/partner, and what the patients do to manage their illness as well as how they perceive their health. Data from the QHS 1998 were used. The sample included 7547 coupled adults who had one or more chronic health problems lasting more than 6 months. Independent variables included marital status, perceived conflict with the spouse/partner, and the number of chronic conditions. Illness management was defined broadly as a measure of the patient's efforts at self-care and an illness status indicator, including visits to the generalist and the specialist, the use of telephone health line in the last 12 months, self-rated general health, mental health, and a measure of psychological distress. Linkages between the independent variables and illness management were assessed for males and females separately with logistic regressions, while accounting for the survey sampling design and household clustering. Female patients who did not live with their partner and had never been married were more likely to report a negative perception of their general health and a higher psychological distress than those who were married. Perceived conflict with the partner was linked to a negative perception of mental health and a higher psychological distress among both men and women. Compared to patients with only one chronic condition, males who reported more than one chronic condition were more likely to have consulted a generalist prior to the survey and used the telephone health line, whereas females were more likely to have consulted a specialist. Both males and females with more than one chronic condition were more

  4. Influence of the management strategy model on estimating water system performance under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Baptiste; Hingray, Benoit; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Hendrickx, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    The performance of water systems used worldwide for the management of water resources is expected to be influenced by future changes in regional climates and water uses. Anticipating possible performance changes of a given system requires a modeling chain simulating its management. Operational management is usually not trivial especially when several conflicting objectives have to be accounted for. Management models are therefore often a crude representation of the real system and they only approximate its performance. Estimated performance changes are expected to depend on the management model used, but this is often not assessed. This communication analyzes the influence of the management strategy representation on the performance of an Alpine reservoir (Serre-Ponçon, South-East of France) for which irrigation supply, hydropower generation and recreational activities are the main objectives. We consider three ways to construct the strategy named as clear-, short- and far-sighted management. They are based on different forecastability degrees of seasonal inflows into the reservoir. The strategies are optimized using a Dynamic Programming algorithm (deterministic for clear-sighted and implicit stochastic for short- and far-sighted). System performance is estimated for an ensemble of future hydro-meteorological projections obtained in the RIWER2030 research project (http://www.lthe.fr/RIWER2030/) from a suite of climate experiments from the EU - ENSEMBLES research project. Our results show that changes in system performance is much more influenced by changes in hydro-meteorological variables than by the choice of strategy modeling. They also show that a simple strategy representation (i.e. clear-sighted management) leads to similar estimates of performance modifications than those obtained with a representation supposedly closer to real world (i.e. the far-sighted management). The Short-Sighted management approach lead to significantly different results, especially

  5. Clarifying values, risk perceptions, and attitudes to resolve or avoid social conflicts in invasive species management.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Rodrigo A; Anderson, Christopher B; Pizarro, J Cristobal; Burgman, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    Decision makers and researchers recognize the need to effectively confront the social dimensions and conflicts inherent to invasive species research and management. Yet, despite numerous contentious situations that have arisen, no systematic evaluation of the literature has examined the commonalities in the patterns and types of these emergent social issues. Using social and ecological keywords, we reviewed trends in the social dimensions of invasive species research and management and the sources and potential solutions to problems and conflicts that arise around invasive species. We integrated components of cognitive hierarchy theory and risk perceptions theory to provide a conceptual framework to identify, distinguish, and provide understanding of the driving factors underlying disputes associated with invasive species. In the ISI Web of Science database, we found 15,915 peer-reviewed publications on biological invasions, 124 of which included social dimensions of this phenomenon. Of these 124, 28 studies described specific contentious situations. Social approaches to biological invasions have emerged largely in the last decade and have focused on both environmental social sciences and resource management. Despite being distributed in a range of journals, these 124 articles were concentrated mostly in ecology and conservation-oriented outlets. We found that conflicts surrounding invasive species arose based largely on differences in value systems and to a lesser extent stakeholder and decision maker's risk perceptions. To confront or avoid such situations, we suggest integrating the plurality of environmental values into invasive species research and management via structured decision making techniques, which enhance effective risk communication that promotes trust and confidence between stakeholders and decision makers. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. National launch strategy vehicle data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, David

    1990-01-01

    The national launch strategy vehicle data management system (NLS/VDMS) was developed as part of the 1990 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. The system was developed under the guidance of the Engineering Systems Branch of the Information Systems Office, and is intended for use within the Program Development Branch PD34. The NLS/VDMS is an on-line database system that permits the tracking of various launch vehicle configurations within the program development office. The system is designed to permit the definition of new launch vehicles, as well as the ability to display and edit existing launch vehicles. Vehicles can be grouped in logical architectures within the system. Reports generated from this package include vehicle data sheets, architecture data sheets, and vehicle flight rate reports. The topics covered include: (1) system overview; (2) initial system development; (3) supercard hypermedia authoring system; (4) the ORACLE database; and (5) system evaluation.

  7. Insulin Management Strategies for Exercise in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Dessi P; Riddell, Michael C

    2017-10-01

    There is no question that regular exercise can be beneficial and lead to improvements in overall cardiovascular health. However, for patients with diabetes, exercise can also lead to challenges in maintaining blood glucose balance, particularly if patients are prescribed insulin or certain oral hypoglycemic agents. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse event associated with exercise and insulin therapy, and the fear of hypoglycemia is also the greatest barrier to exercise for many patients. With the appropriate insulin dose adjustments and, in some cases, carbohydrate supplementation, blood glucose levels can be better managed during exercise and in recovery. In general, insulin strategies that help facilitate weight loss with regular exercise and recommendations around exercise adjustments to prevent hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are often not discussed with patients because the recommendations can be complex and may differ from one individual to the next. This is a review of the current published literature on insulin dose adjustments and starting-point strategies for patients with diabetes in preparation for safe exercise. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of alternative management strategies in meeting conservation objectives

    Treesearch

    Richards S. Holthausen; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2007-01-01

    This chapter evaluates how well various management strategies meet a variety of conservation objectives, summarizes their effectiveness in meeting objectives for rare or little-known (RLK) species, and proposes ways to combine strategies to meet overall conservation objectives. We address two broad categories of management strategies. Species approaches result in...

  9. Relationship-Driven Classroom Management: Strategies That Promote Student Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitto, John M.

    This book combines information about resiliency, classroom management, and discipline into a user-friendly discussion suitable for all teachers. The material covers both preventive strategies and reactive strategies. The chapters of part 1, "Reinventive Strategies," are: (1) "Relationship-Driven Classroom Management and Resilience"; (2)…

  10. Strategies for increasing student knowledge and understanding about conflict minerals in a mineralogy class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Conflict minerals, including their uses and methods of extraction, are associated with significant societal and environmental issues in today's world. Minerals such as columbite-tantalite (also referred to as COLTAN), wolframite, cassiterite and gold are important in electronics manufacturing and have a wide variety of other usages. Mining practices are frequently unsustainable and have significant impacts on the environment; moreover, in many locations, such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo—the epicenter of the conflict mineral trade—major human rights violations are associated with the extraction and production of these minerals. Because conflict minerals represent a relatively new issue, students in geology classes are frequently unfamiliar with the topic and commonly have little understanding of the concerns. In some cases they are completely unaware of the issues. In an introductory mineralogy class at the University of California, San Diego I have introduced a content module into my otherwise traditional curriculum that introduces students to conflict minerals, explains the issues, and delineates the problems our society will face with the continued uses of these natural resources. Most significantly, an assignment has been created and implemented in class that is paired with the content module and is designed to enhance and reinforce student learning. Its goal is to increase awareness of the societal and environmental issues surrounding conflict minerals. Initial results suggest (based on pre and post-tests) that our students have learned significantly from the combination of content, exercise, and assessment and that they are much better informed on the issues of conflict minerals. This model, including the exercise, can be modified and adapted for other introductory classes and learning settings.

  11. Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Perceptions of Effective Behavior Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nields, Allison N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student teachers' perceptions and knowledge of behavior management strategies. A questionnaire that included questions about broad behavior management techniques, behavioral learning theory, and behavior management strategies related to behavioral learning theory was given to sixty-one student teacher candidates at a large…

  12. Conflict Misleads Large Carnivore Management and Conservation: Brown Bears and Wolves in Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gil, Alberto; Naves, Javier; Ordiz, Andrés; Quevedo, Mario; Revilla, Eloy; Delibes, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Large carnivores inhabiting human-dominated landscapes often interact with people and their properties, leading to conflict scenarios that can mislead carnivore management and, ultimately, jeopardize conservation. In northwest Spain, brown bears Ursus arctos are strictly protected, whereas sympatric wolves Canis lupus are subject to lethal control. We explored ecological, economic and societal components of conflict scenarios involving large carnivores and damages to human properties. We analyzed the relation between complaints of depredations by bears and wolves on beehives and livestock, respectively, and bear and wolf abundance, livestock heads, number of culled wolves, amount of paid compensations, and media coverage. We also evaluated the efficiency of wolf culling to reduce depredations on livestock. Bear damages to beehives correlated positively to the number of female bears with cubs of the year. Complaints of wolf predation on livestock were unrelated to livestock numbers; instead, they correlated positively to the number of wild ungulates harvested during the previous season, the number of wolf packs, and to wolves culled during the previous season. Compensations for wolf complaints were fivefold higher than for bears, but media coverage of wolf damages was thirtyfold higher. Media coverage of wolf damages was unrelated to the actual costs of wolf damages, but the amount of news correlated positively to wolf culling. However, wolf culling was followed by an increase in compensated damages. Our results show that culling of the wolf population failed in its goal of reducing damages, and suggest that management decisions are at least partly mediated by press coverage. We suggest that our results provide insight to similar scenarios, where several species of large carnivores share the landscape with humans, and management may be reactive to perceived conflicts.

  13. Conflict Misleads Large Carnivore Management and Conservation: Brown Bears and Wolves in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Gil, Alberto; Naves, Javier; Ordiz, Andrés; Quevedo, Mario; Revilla, Eloy; Delibes, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Large carnivores inhabiting human-dominated landscapes often interact with people and their properties, leading to conflict scenarios that can mislead carnivore management and, ultimately, jeopardize conservation. In northwest Spain, brown bears Ursus arctos are strictly protected, whereas sympatric wolves Canis lupus are subject to lethal control. We explored ecological, economic and societal components of conflict scenarios involving large carnivores and damages to human properties. We analyzed the relation between complaints of depredations by bears and wolves on beehives and livestock, respectively, and bear and wolf abundance, livestock heads, number of culled wolves, amount of paid compensations, and media coverage. We also evaluated the efficiency of wolf culling to reduce depredations on livestock. Bear damages to beehives correlated positively to the number of female bears with cubs of the year. Complaints of wolf predation on livestock were unrelated to livestock numbers; instead, they correlated positively to the number of wild ungulates harvested during the previous season, the number of wolf packs, and to wolves culled during the previous season. Compensations for wolf complaints were fivefold higher than for bears, but media coverage of wolf damages was thirtyfold higher. Media coverage of wolf damages was unrelated to the actual costs of wolf damages, but the amount of news correlated positively to wolf culling. However, wolf culling was followed by an increase in compensated damages. Our results show that culling of the wolf population failed in its goal of reducing damages, and suggest that management decisions are at least partly mediated by press coverage. We suggest that our results provide insight to similar scenarios, where several species of large carnivores share the landscape with humans, and management may be reactive to perceived conflicts. PMID:26974962

  14. Environment management conflict in Mount Tangkuban Perahu Nature Reserve and Nature Park, North Bandung, West Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanik, Demak Ely Riana; Sjarmidi, Achmad

    2014-03-01

    Nature Park Mount Tangkuban Perahu is part of the Nature Reserve that defined as utilization zone. Until now the nature park continues to experience disruption and threat caused by human activities such as tourists, local peoples, and administrators so that giving rise to the area conflict. The number of rules did not guarantee high protection of the area and even can lead conflict. The evaluation performance of stakeholder and analysis environmental sustainablity, seems that there are not sustainable. The performance score of stakeholders in conservation efforts in the field of preservation and protection are 1.5 and 2 respectively (low category), while the area of utilization is 2 (low category). Total score condition of management area are 1.75 (low category). Visitors assume that Tangkuban Perahu was categorized as cheap attraction (< Rp. 100,000 pervisit), but the benefits, comfort and safety are considerable (> 50%). Most visitors have a good perception of the facilities (66.2%), ticket price (64.6%), and ecosystems (78.5%). However this is not followed by magnitude of willingness to pay from the visitor to keep the preserved area (61.5% of visitors want to pay < 100,000). Most argue that the management of the area classified as good (78.5%), but approximately 38.5% of visitors said that need additional facilities such as children's play facilities in the area. This shows the lack of understanding of visitor of the meaning of natural recreation. Some visitors (47.69%) mentioned the need of management system implementation to ensure the region sustainability. The causes and alternative conflict resolution also discussed in this study.

  15. Public acceptance of management methods under different human-wildlife conflict scenarios.

    PubMed

    Liordos, Vasilios; Kontsiotis, Vasileios J; Georgari, Marina; Baltzi, Kerasia; Baltzi, Ioanna

    2017-02-01

    Wildlife management seeks to minimise public controversy for successful application of wildlife control methods. Human dimensions research in wildlife seeks a better understanding of public preferences for effective human-wildlife conflict resolution. In face to face interviews, 630 adults in Greece were asked to rate on a 5-point Likert-like scale their acceptance of 3 management methods, i.e., do nothing, non-lethal control, and lethal control, in the context of 5 human-wildlife conflict scenarios: 1) corvids damage crops; 2) starlings damage crops; 3) starlings foul urban structures; 4) coypus damage crops; and 5) coypus transfer disease. Univariate GLMs determined occupation, hunting membership and their interaction as the stronger predictors of public acceptance, generating 4 stakeholder groups: the general public, farmers, hunters, and farmers-hunters. Differences in acceptance and consensus among stakeholder groups were assessed using the Potential for Conflict Index 2 (PCI 2 ). All 4 stakeholder groups agreed that doing nothing was unacceptable and non-lethal control acceptable in all 5 scenarios, with generally high consensus within and between groups. The lethal control method was more controversial and became increasingly more acceptable as the severity of scenarios was increased and between non-native and native species. Lethal control was unacceptable for the general public in all scenarios. Farmers accepted lethal methods in the corvids and starlings scenarios, were neutral in the coypus damage crops scenario, whereas they accepted lethal control when coypus transfer disease. Hunters' opinion was neutral in the corvids, starlings and coypus damage crops and starlings foul urban structures scenarios, but they accepted lethal methods in the coypus transfer disease scenario. Farmers-hunters considered lethal control acceptable in all 5 scenarios. Implications from this study could be used for designing a socio-ecological approach which incorporates

  16. Environment management conflict in Mount Tangkuban Perahu Nature Reserve and Nature Park, North Bandung, West Java

    SciTech Connect

    Damanik, Demak Ely Riana, E-mail: damanikdemak@gmail.com, E-mail: sjarmidi@sith.itb.ac.id; Sjarmidi, Achmad, E-mail: damanikdemak@gmail.com, E-mail: sjarmidi@sith.itb.ac.id

    Nature Park Mount Tangkuban Perahu is part of the Nature Reserve that defined as utilization zone. Until now the nature park continues to experience disruption and threat caused by human activities such as tourists, local peoples, and administrators so that giving rise to the area conflict. The number of rules did not guarantee high protection of the area and even can lead conflict. The evaluation performance of stakeholder and analysis environmental sustainablity, seems that there are not sustainable. The performance score of stakeholders in conservation efforts in the field of preservation and protection are 1.5 and 2 respectively (low category),more » while the area of utilization is 2 (low category). Total score condition of management area are 1.75 (low category). Visitors assume that Tangkuban Perahu was categorized as cheap attraction (< Rp. 100,000 pervisit), but the benefits, comfort and safety are considerable (> 50%). Most visitors have a good perception of the facilities (66.2%), ticket price (64.6%), and ecosystems (78.5%). However this is not followed by magnitude of willingness to pay from the visitor to keep the preserved area (61.5% of visitors want to pay < 100,000). Most argue that the management of the area classified as good (78.5%), but approximately 38.5% of visitors said that need additional facilities such as children's play facilities in the area. This shows the lack of understanding of visitor of the meaning of natural recreation. Some visitors (47.69%) mentioned the need of management system implementation to ensure the region sustainability. The causes and alternative conflict resolution also discussed in this study.« less

  17. Mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management: Associations with diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Erica D.; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan; Rohan, Jennifer M.; Pulgaron, Elizabeth; Drotar, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management to diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control. Methods 136 mothers and fathers of youth with type 1 diabetes reported on the youth's diabetes management, diabetes-specific family conflict, and amount of paternal involvement in diabetes care. Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was used to measure glycemic control. Results As hypothesized, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management were positively associated with frequency of diabetes-specific family conflict. Contrary to hypotheses, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management predicted poorer glycemic control for youth with less involved fathers only. Conclusions Results highlight the importance of caregivers being consistent about pediatric illness management and support the idea that informant discrepancies represent an important window into the functioning of the family system. PMID:22823070

  18. Mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management: associations with diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Sood, Erica D; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan M; Rohan, Jennifer M; Pulgaron, Elizabeth R; Drotar, Dennis

    2012-09-01

    To examine the relationship of mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management to diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control. One hundred thirty-six mothers and fathers of youth with Type 1 diabetes reported on the youth's diabetes management, diabetes-specific family conflict, and amount of paternal involvement in diabetes care. Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was used to measure glycemic control. As hypothesized, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management were positively associated with frequency of diabetes-specific family conflict. Contrary to hypotheses, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management predicted poorer glycemic control for youth with less involved fathers only. Results highlight the importance of caregivers being consistent about pediatric illness management and support the idea that informant discrepancies represent an important window into the functioning of the family system. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. A holistic strategy for adaptive land management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adaptive management is widely applied to natural resources management. Adaptive management can be generally defined as an iterative decision-making process that incorporates formulation of management objectives, actions designed to address these objectives, monitoring of results, and repeated adapta...

  20. Oiling the friction: environmental conflict management in the Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ibeanu, O

    2000-01-01

    The Niger Delta, a sensitive ecosystem rich in biodiversity, has witnessed considerable violence as a result of the tense relationship among oil companies, the Nigerian state, and oil-bearing communities. Environmental damage from the extraction and movement of fossil fuels is a central point of dispute among the parties while the precise extent of ecological damage remains unknown. Drawing on numerous interviews while living and working in the Niger Delta, Doctor Okechukwu Ibeanu analyzes the management of conflicts surrounding petroleum production in the region, including the role of state violence and contradictory perceptions of security held by Delta communities and the oil companies and their partners in the Nigerian federal government.