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Sample records for confocal mosaicing microscopy

  1. Multimodal confocal mosaicing microscopy: an emphasis on squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nathaniel W.; Sensibaugh, Jordan; Ardeshiri, Ardaland; Blanchard, Adam; Jacques, Steven; Gareau, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Our previous study reported a sensitivity of 96.6% and a specificity of 89.2% in rapidly detecting Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCCs) when nuclei were stained with acridine orange. Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCCs) and infiltrative BCCs remain difficult to detect. More complete screening can be achieved utilizing both acridine orange for nuclei staining and eosin for cytoplasmic contrast, using two lasers to excite the two stains independently. Nuclear fluorescence is achieved by staining with acridine orange (0.5mM, 60 s), and cytoplasmic fluorescence is achieved by staining with eosin working solution (30 s). This work shows good morphological contrast of SCC and infiltrative BCC with eosin, acridine orange, and reflectance, and presents a means for rapid SCC and infiltrative BCC detection in fresh skin excisions using multimodal confocal microscopy. In addition, digital staining is shown to effectively simulate hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology with confocal mosaics.

  2. Strip mosaicing confocal microscopy for rapid imaging over large areas of excised tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeytunge, Sanjee; Li, Yongbiao; Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-03-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy is a developing technology platform for imaging tumor margins directly in fresh tissue, without the processing that is required for conventional pathology. Previously, basal cell carcinoma margins were detected by mosaicing of confocal images of 12 x 12 mm2 of excised tissue from Mohs surgery. This mosaicing took 9 minutes. Recently we reported the initial feasibility of a faster approach called "strip mosaicing" on 10 x 10 mm2 of tissue that was demonstrated in 3 minutes. In this paper we report further advances in instrumentation and software. Rapid mosaicing of confocal images on large areas of fresh tissue potentially offers a means to perform pathology at the bedside. Thus, strip mosaicing confocal microscopy may serve as an adjunct to pathology for imaging tumor margins to guide surgery.

  3. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting basal cell carcinomas in Mohs excisions with confocal fluorescence mosaicing microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gareau, Daniel S; Karen, Julie K; Dusza, Stephen W; Tudisco, Marie; Nehal, Kishwer S; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of confocal fluorescence mosaicing microscopy to rapidly detect basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) directly in thick and fresh Mohs surgical excisions. Mosaics of confocal images display large areas of tissue with high resolution and magnification equivalent to 2x, which is the standard magnification when examining pathology. Comparison of mosaics to Mohs frozen histopathology was shown to be excellent for all types of BCCs. However, comparisons in the previous studies were visual and qualitative. In this work, we report the results of a semiquantitative preclinical study in which 45 confocal mosaics are blindly evaluated for the presence (or absence) of BCC tumor. The evaluations are made by two clinicians: a senior Mohs surgeon with prior expertise in interpreting confocal images, and a novice Mohs fellow with limited experience. The blinded evaluation is compared to the gold standard of frozen histopathology. BCCs are detected with an overall sensitivity of 96.6%, specificity of 89.2%, positive predictive value of 93.0%, and negative predictive value of 94.7%. The results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of confocal mosaicing microscopy toward rapid surgical pathology at the bedside to expedite and guide surgery.

  4. Confocal microscopy with strip mosaicing for rapid imaging over large areas of excised tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeytunge, Sanjee; Li, Yongbiao; Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Seltzer, Emily; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2013-06-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy is a developing technology platform for imaging tumor margins directly in freshly excised tissue, without the processing required for conventional pathology. Previously, mosaicing on 12-×-12 mm2 of excised skin tissue from Mohs surgery and detection of basal cell carcinoma margins was demonstrated in 9 min. Last year, we reported the feasibility of a faster approach called "strip mosaicing," which was demonstrated on a 10-×-10 mm2 of tissue in 3 min. Here we describe further advances in instrumentation, software, and speed. A mechanism was also developed to flatten tissue in order to enable consistent and repeatable acquisition of images over large areas. We demonstrate mosaicing on 10-×-10 mm2 of skin tissue with 1-μm lateral resolution in 90 s. A 2.5-×-3.5 cm2 piece of breast tissue was scanned with 0.8-μm lateral resolution in 13 min. Rapid mosaicing of confocal images on large areas of fresh tissue potentially offers a means to perform pathology at the bedside. Imaging of tumor margins with strip mosaicing confocal microscopy may serve as an adjunct to conventional (frozen or fixed) pathology for guiding surgery.

  5. Confocal microscopy with strip mosaicing for rapid imaging over large areas of excised tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongbiao; Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Seltzer, Emily; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Confocal mosaicing microscopy is a developing technology platform for imaging tumor margins directly in freshly excised tissue, without the processing required for conventional pathology. Previously, mosaicing on 12-×-12  mm2 of excised skin tissue from Mohs surgery and detection of basal cell carcinoma margins was demonstrated in 9 min. Last year, we reported the feasibility of a faster approach called “strip mosaicing,” which was demonstrated on a 10-×-10  mm2 of tissue in 3 min. Here we describe further advances in instrumentation, software, and speed. A mechanism was also developed to flatten tissue in order to enable consistent and repeatable acquisition of images over large areas. We demonstrate mosaicing on 10-×-10  mm2 of skin tissue with 1-μm lateral resolution in 90 s. A 2.5-×-3.5  cm2 piece of breast tissue was scanned with 0.8-μm lateral resolution in 13 min. Rapid mosaicing of confocal images on large areas of fresh tissue potentially offers a means to perform pathology at the bedside. Imaging of tumor margins with strip mosaicing confocal microscopy may serve as an adjunct to conventional (frozen or fixed) pathology for guiding surgery. PMID:23389736

  6. Confocal mosaicing microscopy in skin excisions: a demonstration of rapid surgical pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gareau, D.S.; Patel, Y.G.; Li, Y.; Aranda, I.; Halpern, A.C.; Nehal, K.S.; Rajadhyaksha, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Precise micro-surgical removal of tumour with minimal damage to the surrounding normal tissue requires a series of excisions, each guided by an examination of frozen histology of the previous. An example is Mohs surgery for the removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in skin. The preparation of frozen histology is labour-intensive and slow. Confocal microscopy may enable rapid detection of tumours directly in surgical excisions with minimal need for frozen histology. Mosaicing of images enables observation of nuclear and cellular morphology in large areas of surgically excised tissue. In skin, the use of 10–1% acetic acid as a reflectance contrast agent brightens nuclei in 0.5–5 min and enhances nuclear-to-dermis contrast and detectability of BCCs. A tissue fixture was engineered for precisely mounting surgical excisions to enable mosaicing of 36 × 36 images to create a field of view of 12 × 12 mm. This large field of view displays the excision at 2× magnification, similar to that routinely used by Mohs surgeons when examining frozen histology. Comparison of mosaics to histology demonstrates detectability of BCCs. Confocal mosaicing presently requires 9 min, instead of 20–45 min per excision for preparing frozen histology, and thus may provide a means for rapid pathology-at-the-bedside to expedite and guide surgery. PMID:19196421

  7. Confocal mosaicing microscopy of human skin ex vivo: spectral analysis for digital staining to simulate histology-like appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Jason; Spain, James; Nehal, Kishwer; Hazelwood, Vikki; Dimarzio, Charles; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2011-07-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy enables rapid imaging of large areas of fresh tissue, without the processing that is necessary for conventional histology. Mosaicing may offer a means to perform rapid histology at the bedside. A possible barrier toward clinical acceptance is that the mosaics are based on a single mode of grayscale contrast and appear black and white, whereas histology is based on two stains (hematoxylin for nuclei, eosin for cellular cytoplasm and dermis) and appears purple and pink. Toward addressing this barrier, we report advances in digital staining: fluorescence mosaics that show only nuclei, are digitally stained purple and overlaid on reflectance mosaics, which show only cellular cytoplasm and dermis, and are digitally stained pink. With digital staining, the appearance of confocal mosaics mimics the appearance of histology. Using multispectral analysis and color matching functions, red, green, and blue (RGB) components of hematoxylin and eosin stains in tissue were determined. The resulting RGB components were then applied in a linear algorithm to transform fluorescence and reflectance contrast in confocal mosaics to the absorbance contrast seen in pathology. Optimization of staining with acridine orange showed improved quality of digitally stained mosaics, with good correlation to the corresponding histology.

  8. A machine learning method for identifying morphological patterns in reflectance confocal microscopy mosaics of melanocytic skin lesions in-vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, Kivanc; Alessi-Fox, Christi; Gill, Melissa; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    We present a machine learning algorithm that can imitate the clinicians qualitative and visual process of analyzing reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) mosaics at the dermal epidermal junction (DEJ) of skin. We divide the mosaics into localized areas of processing, and capture the textural appearance of each area using dense Speeded Up Robust Feature (SURF). Using these features, we train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier that can distinguish between meshwork, ring, clod, aspecific and background patterns in benign conditions and melanomas. Preliminary results on 20 RCM mosaics labeled by expert readers show classification with 55 - 81% sensitivity and 81 - 89% specificity in distinguishing these patterns.

  9. Implementation of fluorescence confocal mosaicing microscopy by "early adopter" Mohs surgeons: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manu; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Nehal, Kishwer

    2016-03-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy (CMM) enables rapid imaging of large areas of fresh tissue ex vivo without the processing that is necessary for conventional histology. When performed with fluorescence mode using acridine orange (nuclear specific dye) it enhances nuclei-to-dermis contrast that enables detection of all types of BCCs including thin strands of infiltrative basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Thus far, this technique has been mostly validated in research setting for the analysis of BCC tumor margins. Recently, CMM has been adopted and implemented in real clinical settings by some surgeons as an alternative tool to frozen section (FS) during Mohs surgery. In this review article we summarize the development of CMM guided imaging of ex vivo tissues from bench to bedside. We also present its current state of application in routine clinical workflow not only for the assessment of BCC margin but also for other skin cancers such as melanoma, SCC, and some infectious diseases where FS is not routinely performed. Lastly, we also discuss the potential limitations of this technology as well as future developments. As this technology advances further, it may serve as an adjunct to standard histology and enable rapid surgical pathology of skin cancers at the bedside.

  10. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2011-07-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy.

  11. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2008-01-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy. (c) 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E.

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  14. Array confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Shaun

    Confocal microscopes utilize point illumination and pinhole detection to reject out-of-focus light. Because of the point illumination and detection pinhole, confocal microscopes typically utilize point scanning for imaging, which limits the overall acquisition speed. Due to the excellent optical sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopes, they are excellent tools for the study of three-dimensional objects at the microscopic scale. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is especially useful in biomedical imaging due to its high sensitivity and specificity. However, all designs for confocal microscopes must balance tradeoffs between the numerical aperture (NA), field of view (FOV), acquisition speed, and cost during the design process. In this dissertation, two different designs for an array confocal microscope are proposed to significantly increase the acquisition speed of confocal microscopes. An array confocal microscope scans an array of beams in the object plane to parallelize the confocal microscope to significantly reduce the acquisition time. If N beams are used in the array confocal microscope, the acquisition time is reduced by a factor of N. The first design scans an array of miniature objectives over the object plane to overcome the trade-off between FOV and NA. The array of objectives is laterally translated and each objective scans a small portion of the total FOV. Therefore, the number of objectives used in the array limits the FOV, and the FOV is increased without sacrificing NA. The second design utilizes a single objective with a high NA, large FOV, and large working distance designed specifically for whole brain imaging. This array confocal microscope is designed to speed up the acquisition time required for whole brain imaging. Utilizing an objective with a large FOV and scanning using multiple beams in the array significantly reduces the time required to image large three-dimensional volumes. Both array confocal microscope designs use beam

  15. Peri-operative imaging of cancer margins with reflectance confocal microscopy during Mohs micrographic surgery: feasibility of a video-mosaicing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Eileen; Yelamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging shows promise for guiding surgical treatment of skin cancers. Recent technological advancements such as the introduction of the handheld version of the reflectance confocal microscope, video acquisition and video-mosaicing have improved RCM as an emerging tool to evaluate cancer margins during routine surgical skin procedures such as Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Detection of residual non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) tumor during MMS is feasible, as demonstrated by the introduction of real-time perioperative imaging on patients in the surgical setting. Our study is currently testing the feasibility of a new mosaicing algorithm for perioperative RCM imaging of NMSC cancer margins on patients during MMS. We report progress toward imaging and image analysis on forty-five patients, who presented for MMS at the MSKCC Dermatology service. The first 10 patients were used as a training set to establish an RCM imaging algorithm, which was implemented on the remaining test set of 35 patients. RCM imaging, using 35% AlCl3 for nuclear contrast, was performed pre- and intra-operatively with the Vivascope 3000 (Caliber ID). Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound, to simulate the Mohs surgeon's examination of pathology. Videos were taken at the epidermal and deep dermal margins. Our Mohs surgeons assessed all videos and video-mosaics for quality and correlation to histology. Overall, our RCM video-mosaicing algorithm is feasible. RCM videos and video-mosaics of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Assessment of cancer margins was affected by type of NMSC, size and location. Among the test set of 35 patients, 83% showed acceptable imaging quality, resolution and contrast. Visualization of nuclear and cellular morphology of residual BCC/SCC tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. We observed correlation between the RCM videos/video-mosaics

  16. [Confocal laser scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Ulrich, M

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows the in vivo evaluation of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumours with high sensitivity and specificity. RCM represents an optical imaging technique, which enables us to examine the skin at high resolution. Today, RCM represents not only an interesting tool for dermatologic research but has also been introduced as a diagnostic tool in every day clinical practice. As such, RCM is applied for improvement of skin cancer diagnosis adjunct to clinical and dermatoscopic examination. In combination with dermatoscopy RCM has shown an increased specificity with similar sensitivity. In this regard RCM helps to decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions. Despite its use in dermatooncology RCM may also be used for diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory diseases. Future developments include technical improvements, teledermatology solutions and the application of ex vivo RCM in Moh's micrographic surgery.

  17. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  18. Overview of confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Swaim, William D

    2010-01-01

    Born out of the need to overcome an imaging problem in the 1950s, confocal microscopes today allow researchers to go beyond simple imaging and ask biochemical questions. This chapter provides background information on the development of modern confocal microscopes, their uses and applications. Sample preparation and observation are also discussed. Information is also provided about more advanced applications such as FRAP, FRET and 2-photon imaging. The requirements for setting up a confocal laboratory and the instrumentation needs are also discussed.

  19. Bilateral fitting subtracting confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiqian; Sheng, Zhong; Qiu, Lirong; Wang, Yun; Shao, Rongjun

    2016-12-20

    This paper proposes a bilateral fitting subtracting confocal microscopy (BFSCM) based on the optical arrangement of conventional confocal microscopy (CM). BFSCM first uses the data in both sides of a confocal axial response curve, which are very sensitive to the axial position of the sample, for respective linear fitting to obtain two fitting straight lines, and then obtains a difference confocal line by subtraction of the two fitting lines. Finally, it calculates the zero position of the difference confocal line to precisely capture the focus position of the confocal system, and thereby achieving a high-precision measurement of the 3D structure of the sample. The theoretical analyses and experiments indicate that BFSCM can improve the axial resolution, and has anti-interference capability and focusing ability with bipolar absolute zero point tracking, while it does not change the structure and lateral resolution of CM. BFSCM provides a novel method for the improvement of CM axial resolution.

  20. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. Aims: The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Settings and Design: Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. Results: The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Conclusion: Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a

  1. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-05-01

    Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a specimen resulted in saving of time. It added a certain amount of objectivity to the

  2. Confocal microscopy in transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Becker, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    We developed a confocal microscope for transmitted light to visualize fine details in phase objects like unstained biological specimens. The main difficulty of confocal microscopy in transmission is the alignment of illumination and detector pinholes. This alignment was achieved by using "electronic pinholes" on the detector side. As a first step, we were able to image cells in onion skin at greater depths and with higher resolution than by using conventional microscopy.

  3. Twin-photon confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Simon, D S; Sergienko, A V

    2010-10-11

    A recently introduced two-channel confocal microscope with correlated detection promises up to 50% improvement in transverse spatial resolution [Simon, Sergienko, Optics Express 18, 9765 (2010)] via the use of photon correlations. Here we achieve similar results in a different manner, introducing a triple-confocal correlated microscope which exploits the correlations present in optical parametric amplifiers. It is based on tight focusing of pump radiation onto a thin sample positioned in front of a nonlinear crystal, followed by coincidence detection of signal and idler photons, each focused onto a pinhole. This approach offers further resolution enhancement in confocal microscopy.

  4. Confocal microscopy in microgravity research.

    PubMed

    Goede, A P; Brakenhoff, G J; Woldringh, C L; Aalders, J W; Imhof, J P; van Kralingen, P; Mels, W A; Schreinemakers, P; Zegers, A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the application and the feasibility of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) in microgravity research. Its superior spatial resolution and 3D imaging capabilities and its use of light as a probe, render this instrument ideally suited for the study of living biological material on a (sub-)cellular level. In this paper a number of pertinent biological microgravity experiments is listed, concentrating on the direct observation of developing cells and cellular structures under microgravity condition. A conceptual instrument design is also presented, aimed at sounding rocket application followed by Biorack/Biolab application at a later stage.

  5. Real-time image mosaicing with a hand-held dual-axes confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewke, Kevin; Camarillo, David; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Breeden, David; Salisbury, Kenneth

    2008-02-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in using confocal microscopy to observe tissue structure and function for in vivo pathology. Although confocal microscopy can provide image resolution that is comparable to histopathology, it can be limited by a small field-of-view as well as a low signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper we show that image mosaicing can enhance confocal microscopy by stitching multiple images together to widen the field-of-view and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Specifically, we present a real-time image mosaicing system for imaging human skin with a hand-held dual-axes confocal microscope. Our system allows the user to "paint" an image mosaic in real-time and aids navigation by localizing the current view with respect to the larger image map. We first discuss image calibration, then describe an efficient algorithm for real-time image mosaicing, and finally present experimental results obtained in vivo with a dual-axes confocal microscope.

  6. Confocal diffraction phase microscopy of live cells.

    PubMed

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Popescu, Gabriel

    2008-09-15

    We present a new quantitative phase microscopy technique, confocal diffraction phase microscopy, which provides quantitative phase measurements from localized sites on a sample with high sensitivity. The technique combines common-path interferometry with confocal microscopy in a transmission geometry. The capability of the technique for static imaging is demonstrated by imaging polystyrene microspheres and live HT29 cells, while dynamic imaging is demonstrated by quantifying the nanometer scale fluctuations of red blood cell membranes.

  7. Confocal Microscopy Of The Eye.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Barry R.

    1989-12-01

    A laser scanning confocal microscope was used to study the structure of human donor eyes and enucleated rabbit eyes. Reflected light confocal images were obtained with a Leitz water immersion objective (50X, NA 1.0). A drop of bicarbonate Ringer's was placed between the objective and the tissue to optically couple the tissue. The confocal microscope was used to image the following objects within the eye: superficial epithelial cells, super basal and basal epithelial cells, basement membrane, stromal nerve plexus, nerve fibers, nuclei and cell bodies of stromal keratocytes, cell processes of stromal keratocytes, Descemet's membrane, and the endothelial cells. In addition, the ocular lens and excised retina were imaged. The confocal microscope produces images of the eye with the following enhanced features: increased lateral resolution, decreased depth of field, and increased contrast of transparent ocular structures. It is concluded that confocal imaging systems are an improvement over traditional optical instruments, and they may develop into a new tool for basic visual science and clinical ophthalmology.

  8. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  9. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  10. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome: in vivo confocal microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Martone, Gianluca; Casprini, Fabrizio; Traversi, Claudio; Lepri, Francesca; Pichierri, Patrizia; Caporossi, Aldo

    2007-08-01

    Pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome is a common ocular disease that also affects the cornea. A case of clinical PEX syndrome, studied by in vivo corneal confocal microscopy is reported. The morphological analysis of the confocal images demonstrated hyper-reflective deposits and several dendritic cells in the basal epithelial layer. A fibrillar subepithelial structure was also found. The endothelial layer showed cell anomalies (polymegathism and pleomorphism) and hyper-reflective small endothelial deposits. Confocal microscopy is an in vivo imaging method that may provide new information on corneal alterations in PEX, and detect early corneal features.

  11. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Use in Endotheliitis.

    PubMed

    Porzukowiak, Tina Renae; Ly, Kelly

    2015-12-01

    The use of in vivo confocal microscopy has been valuable in detecting and managing corneal pathology. This case study documents endotheliitis using in vivo confocal microscopy where apparent resolution of endothelial edema on clinical examination resulted in the discovery of subclinical findings with confocal scanning. The purpose of this case study was to discuss a rare corneal pathology and the clinical value of confocal scanning. A 30-year-old Asian Indian woman presented with unilateral endotheliitis and trabeculitis of presumed varicella zoster virus etiology. She was treated successfully with oral antiviral and topical corticosteroid therapy. Subclinical endotheliitis was detected using in vivo confocal microscopy, prompting the continuation of prophylactic, low-dose, topical corticosteroid therapy and topical hyperosmotics. Further research is warranted to better understand the role of confocal microscopy in endotheliitis therapeutic management, endothelial cell count and morphology, and keratic precipitate characterization. To date, prophylactic oral antivirals and/or topical corticosteroids may play a role in immune suppression of the herpes virus, although prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials have not focused specifically on endotheliitis cases.

  12. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón, J.; Duque, D.; Alean, A.; Toledo, M.; Meneses, J.; Gharbi, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  13. Confocal microscopy of skin cancers: Translational advances toward clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in translational research in and technology for confocal microscopy of skin cancers, toward clinical applications, are described. Advances in translational research are in diagnosis of melanoma in vivo, pre-operative mapping of lentigo maligna melanoma margins to guide surgery and intra-operative imaging of residual basal cell carcinomas to guide shave-biopsy. Advances in technology include mosaicing microscopy for detection of basal cell carcinomas in large areas of excised tissue, toward rapid pathology-at-the-bedside, and development of small, simple and low-cost line-scanning confocal microscopes for worldwide use in diverse primary healthcare settings. Current limitations and future opportunities and challenges for both clinicians and technologists are discussed. PMID:19964286

  14. Multidepth imaging by chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsovsky, Cory A.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Applegate, Brian E.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has shown potential as an imaging technique to detect precancer. Imaging cellular features throughout the depth of epithelial tissue may provide useful information for diagnosis. However, the current in vivo axial scanning techniques for confocal microscopy are cumbersome, time-consuming, and restrictive when attempting to reconstruct volumetric images acquired in breathing patients. Chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy (CDCM) exploits severe longitudinal chromatic aberration in the system to axially disperse light from a broadband source and, ultimately, spectrally encode high resolution images along the depth of the object. Hyperchromat lenses are designed to have severe and linear longitudinal chromatic aberration, but have not yet been used in confocal microscopy. We use a hyperchromat lens in a stage scanning confocal microscope to demonstrate the capability to simultaneously capture information at multiple depths without mechanical scanning. A photonic crystal fiber pumped with a 830nm wavelength Ti:Sapphire laser was used as a supercontinuum source, and a spectrometer was used as the detector. The chromatic aberration and magnification in the system give a focal shift of 140μm after the objective lens and an axial resolution of 5.2-7.6μm over the wavelength range from 585nm to 830nm. A 400x400x140μm3 volume of pig cheek epithelium was imaged in a single X-Y scan. Nuclei can be seen at several depths within the epithelium. The capability of this technique to achieve simultaneous high resolution confocal imaging at multiple depths may reduce imaging time and motion artifacts and enable volumetric reconstruction of in vivo confocal images of the epithelium.

  15. Flow cytometry using spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Golan, Lior; Yelin, Dvir

    2010-07-01

    Flow cytometry techniques often rely on detecting fluorescence from single cells flowing through the cross section of a laser beam, providing invaluable information on vast numbers of cells. Such techniques, however, are often limited in their ability to resolve clusters of cells or parallel cell flow through large vessels. We present a confocal imaging technique that images unstained cells flowing in parallel through a wide channel, using spectrally encoded reflectance confocal microscopy that does not require mechanical scanning. Images of red blood cells from our system are compared to conventional transmission microscopy, and imaging of flowing red blood cells in vitro is experimentally demonstrated.

  16. Optical tweezers for confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, A.; Meyer zu Hörste, G.; Pilarczyk, G.; Monajembashi, S.; Uhl, V.; Greulich, K. O.

    2000-11-01

    In confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs), lasers can be used for image formation as well as tools for the manipulation of microscopic objects. In the latter case, in addition to the imaging lasers, the light of an extra laser has to be focused into the object plane of the CLSM, for example as optical tweezers. Imaging as well as trapping by optical tweezers can be done using the same objective lens. In this case, z-sectioning for 3D imaging shifts the optical tweezers with the focal plane of the objective along the optical axis, so that a trapped object remains positioned in the focal plane. Consequently, 3D imaging of trapped objects is impossible without further measures. We present an experimental set-up keeping the axial trapping position of the optical tweezers at its intended position whilst the focal plane can be axially shifted over a distance of about 15 μm. It is based on fast-moving correctional optics synchronized with the objective movement. First examples of application are the 3D imaging of chloroplasts of Elodea densa (Canadian waterweed) in a vigorous cytoplasmic streaming and the displacement of zymogen granules in pancreatic cancer cells (AR42 J).

  17. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-01-25

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, are characterized and compared with properties of standard confocal microscopy. The results show that the lateral resolution of RCM is ~170 nm compared to ~240 nm of confocal microscopy for 488 nm excitation and 1.49 NA. As the theory predicts, this improved lateral resolution is independent of the pinhole diameter. In standard confocal microscopy, the same lateral resolution can only be achieved with an almost closed pinhole and, consequently, with a major loss of signal. We show that the sectioning capabilities of the standard confocal microscope are preserved in RCM and that the axial resolution of RCM is slightly better (~15%) than the standard confocal microscope. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is a factor of 2 higher than in standard confocal microscopy, also due to the use of highly sensitive modern cameras. In case the pinhole of a confocal microscope is adjusted in such way that the lateral resolution is comparable to that of RCM, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is 4 times higher than standard confocal microscopy. Therefore, RCM offers a good alternative to standard confocal microscopy for higher lateral resolution with the main advantage of strongly improved sensitivity.

  18. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, are characterized and compared with properties of standard confocal microscopy. The results show that the lateral resolution of RCM is ~170 nm compared to ~240 nm of confocal microscopy for 488 nm excitation and 1.49 NA. As the theory predicts, this improved lateral resolution is independent of the pinhole diameter. In standard confocal microscopy, the same lateral resolution can only be achieved with an almost closed pinhole and, consequently, with a major loss of signal. We show that the sectioning capabilities of the standard confocal microscope are preserved in RCM and that the axial resolution of RCM is slightly better (~15%) than the standard confocal microscope. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is a factor of 2 higher than in standard confocal microscopy, also due to the use of highly sensitive modern cameras. In case the pinhole of a confocal microscope is adjusted in such way that the lateral resolution is comparable to that of RCM, the signal-to-noise ratio in RCM is 4 times higher than standard confocal microscopy. Therefore, RCM offers a good alternative to standard confocal microscopy for higher lateral resolution with the main advantage of strongly improved sensitivity.

  19. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo de; Norlin, Nils; Gunther, Stefan; Albert, Marvin; Panavaite, Laura; Fiuza, Ulla-Maj; Peri, Francesca; Hiiragi, Takashi; Krzic, Uros; Hufnagel, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Selective-plane illumination microscopy has proven to be a powerful imaging technique due to its unsurpassed acquisition speed and gentle optical sectioning. However, even in the case of multiview imaging techniques that illuminate and image the sample from multiple directions, light scattering inside tissues often severely impairs image contrast. Here we combine multiview light-sheet imaging with electronic confocal slit detection implemented on modern camera sensors. In addition to improved imaging quality, the electronic confocal slit detection doubles the acquisition speed in multiview setups with two opposing illumination directions allowing simultaneous dual-sided illumination. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy eliminates the need for specimen-specific data fusion algorithms, streamlines image post-processing, easing data handling and storage. PMID:26602977

  20. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  1. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  2. Confocal microscopy imaging of solid tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer acquired images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ...

  3. Confocal microscopy imaging of solid tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer acquired images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ...

  4. Confocal filtering in cathodoluminescence microscopy of nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Narváez, Angela C. E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Weppelman, I. Gerward C.; Moerland, Robert J.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P. E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Kruit, Pieter

    2014-06-23

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy allows optical characterization of nanostructures at high spatial resolution. At the nanoscale, a main challenge of the technique is related to the background CL generated within the sample substrate. Here, we implement confocal detection of the CL signal to minimize the background contribution to the measurement. Nano-phosphors were used as point sources to evaluate the filtering capabilities of our confocal CL system, obtaining an axial intensity profile with 2.7 μm full width at half maximum for the central peak, in good correspondence with theoretical expectations. Considering the electron interaction volume, we found that the confocal filter becomes effective for electron energies above 20 keV, when using a 25 μm pinhole (0.86 Airy units). To illustrate our approach, we present confocal CL imaging of gold nanowires and triangular shaped plates deposited on an indium-tin oxide covered glass substrate, comparing the images with those obtained in standard unfiltered CL detection. The results show that confocal CL microscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of nanostructures on highly cathodoluminescent substrates, widely used in biological and optical applications.

  5. Confocal microscopy of Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Avunduk, A M; Beuerman, R W; Varnell, E D; Kaufman, H E

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To use a confocal microscope to characterise the treated and untreated courses of fungal keratitis. Methods: In the first experiment, Aspergillus fumigatus stromal keratitis was produced in both eyes of seven New Zealand white rabbits. In the second experiment, keratitis was induced in right eyes of 20 rabbits. Group 1 rabbits were treated with topical fluconazole, group 2 rabbits received oral fluconazole, and group 3 rabbits were used as controls. The rabbits were examined with a slit lamp and confocal microscope 2, 6, 10, 14, and 20 days after inoculation. The corneal cultures were taken on days 2, 14, and 20 and biopsies were taken on days 2 and 22. Results: On days 14 and 22 confocal microscopy was more sensitive than culture technique in both treated and untreated animals, since not all cases of fungal keratitis can be cultured. Conclusion: This study indicates that confocal microscopy is a rapid and sensitive diagnostic tool for both the early diagnosis and non-invasive follow up of fungal keratitis PMID:12642300

  6. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy in Lentigo Maligna.

    PubMed

    Gamo, R; Pampín, A; Floristán, U

    2016-12-01

    Lentigo maligna is the most common type of facial melanoma. Diagnosis is complicated, however, as it shares clinical and dermoscopic characteristics with other cutaneous lesions of the face. Reflectance confocal microscopy is an imaging technique that permits the visualization of characteristic features of lentigo maligna. These include a disrupted honeycomb pattern and pagetoid cells with a tendency to show folliculotropism. These cells typically have a dendritic morphology, although they may also appear as round cells measuring over 20μm with atypical nuclei. Poorly defined dermal papillae and atypical cells may be seen at the dermal-epidermal junction and can form bridges resembling mitochondrial structures. Other characteristic findings include junctional swelling with atypical cells located around the follicles, resembling caput medusae. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a very useful tool for diagnosing lentigo maligna. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid Screening of Cancer Margins in Tissue with Multimodal Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Jeon, Hana; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-01-01

    Background Complete and accurate excision of cancer is guided by the examination of histopathology. However, preparation of histopathology is labor intensive and slow, leading to insufficient sampling of tissue and incomplete and/or inaccurate excision of margins. We demonstrate the potential utility of multimodal confocal mosaicing microscopy for rapid screening of cancer margins, directly in fresh surgical excisions, without the need for conventional embedding, sectioning or processing. Materials/Methods A multimodal confocal mosaicing microscope was developed to image basal cell carcinoma margins in surgical skin excisions, with resolution that shows nuclear detail. Multimodal contrast is with fluorescence for imaging nuclei and reflectance for cellular cytoplasm and dermal collagen. Thirtyfive excisions of basal cell carcinomas from Mohs surgery were imaged, and the mosaics analyzed by comparison to the corresponding frozen pathology. Results Confocal mosaics are produced in about 9 minutes, displaying tissue in fields-of-view of 12 mm with 2X magnification. A digital staining algorithm transforms black and white contrast to purple and pink, which simulates the appearance of standard histopathology. Mosaicing enables rapid digital screening, which mimics the examination of histopathology. Conclusions Multimodal confocal mosaicing microscopy offers a technology platform to potentially enable real-time pathology at the bedside. The imaging may serve as an adjunct to conventional histopathology, to expedite screening of margins and guide surgery toward more complete and accurate excision of cancer. PMID:22721570

  8. Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM): Combining automated Gigapixel image capture with in silico virtual microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Flaberg, Emilie; Sabelström, Per; Strandh, Christer; Szekely, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized cell biology. However, the technique has major limitations in speed and sensitivity due to the fact that a single laser beam scans the sample, allowing only a few microseconds signal collection for each pixel. This limitation has been overcome by the introduction of parallel beam illumination techniques in combination with cold CCD camera based image capture. Methods Using the combination of microlens enhanced Nipkow spinning disc confocal illumination together with fully automated image capture and large scale in silico image processing we have developed a system allowing the acquisition, presentation and analysis of maximum resolution confocal panorama images of several Gigapixel size. We call the method Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM). Results We show using the EFLCM technique that it is possible to create a continuous confocal multi-colour mosaic from thousands of individually captured images. EFLCM can digitize and analyze histological slides, sections of entire rodent organ and full size embryos. It can also record hundreds of thousands cultured cells at multiple wavelength in single event or time-lapse fashion on fixed slides, in live cell imaging chambers or microtiter plates. Conclusion The observer independent image capture of EFLCM allows quantitative measurements of fluorescence intensities and morphological parameters on a large number of cells. EFLCM therefore bridges the gap between the mainly illustrative fluorescence microscopy and purely quantitative flow cytometry. EFLCM can also be used as high content analysis (HCA) instrument for automated screening processes. PMID:18627634

  9. [In vivo confocal microscopy in blepharitis].

    PubMed

    Messmer, E M; Torres Suárez, E; Mackert, M I; Zapp, D M; Kampik, A

    2005-11-01

    Dysfunction of the meibomian glands with inflammation and obstruction has been suggested to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic blepharitis. Few objective tests are, however, available to examine the meibomian glands directly. Nineteen patients with anterior blepharitis, meibomitis, meibomian gland dysfunction or severe keratoconjunctivitis sicca associated with blepharitis as well as 10 patients with normal lid margins were examined with the HRTII/RCM in vivo confocal microscope. Scans of the tear film, the tarsal conjunctiva, the hair follicles and the meibomian glands were analysed by a masked observer. Patients with normal lid margins exhibited a minimal round cell infiltrate in the tarsal conjunctival epithelium and largely normal ducts of the meibomian glands lined with a multilayered epithelium as well as normal gland acini. In patients with anterior blepharitis, blepharitis associated with autoimmune peripheral ulcerative keratitis and blepharitis in the context of severe dry eye, confocal microscopy disclosed normal meibomian glands. In 12 patients with blepharitis/meibomitis or meibomian gland dysfunction, profound pathology was visible with dilatation and obstruction of the meibomian gland ducts. In 15 of 19 patients with blepharitis/meibomitis, but not in meibomian gland dysfunction, an intense inflammation was observed in the tarsal conjunctival epithelium and stroma. In one patient, demodex folliculorum was evident in vivo. In patients with normal lid margins as well as in patients with blepharitis, hair follicles appeared within normal limits. In vivo confocal microscopy allowed the examination of the tear film, the tarsal conjunctiva, the lid margin including the lash follicles and the meibomian glands. In patients with meibomian gland disease pathological changes could be visualised and documented objectively. The presence of an inflammatory infiltrate permitted us to differentiate between meibomitis and meibomian gland

  10. Combined Confocal and Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Majors, Paul D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Daly, Don S.; Holtom, Gary R.; Thrall, Brian D.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2002-05-12

    Confocal and magnetic resonance microscopy are both used to study live cells in a minimally invasive way. Both techniques provide complementary information. Therefore, by examining cells simultaneously with both methodologies, more detailed information is obtained than is possible with each of the microscopes individually. In this paper two configurations of a combined confocal and magnetic resonance microscope described. In both cases the sample compartment is part of a temperature regulated perfusion system. The first configuration is capable of studying large single cells or three-dimensional cell agglomerates, whereas with the second configuration monolayers of mammalian cells can be investigated . Combined images are shown of Xenopus laevis frog oocytes, model JB6 tumor spheroids, and a single layer of Chinese hamster ovary cells. Finally, potential applications of the combined microscope are discussed.

  11. Near-infrared hyperspectral reflective confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yunhai; Miao, Xin; Xue, Xiaojun; Xiao, Yun

    2016-10-01

    A Near-Infrared HyperSpectral Reflective Confocal Microscopy (NIHS-RCM) is proposed in order to get high resolution images of deep biological tissues such as skin. The microscopy system uses a super-continuum laser for illumination, an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for rapid selection of near-infrared spectrum, a resonant galvanometer scanner for high speed imaging (15f/s) and near-infrared avalanche diode as detector. Porcine skin and other experiments show that the microscopy system could get deep tissue images (180 μm), and show the different ingredients of tissue with different wavelength of illumination. The system has the ability of selectively imaging of multiple ingredients at deep tissue which can be used in skin diseases diagnosis and other fields.

  12. Anal melanosis diagnosed by reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, Elisa; Chol, Christelle; Perrot, Jean Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Forest, Fabien; Cambazard, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    Until now, in vivo reflectance-mode confocal microscopy (IVCM) has been applied only to pigmented lesions of the vulvar and oral mucosa, but not to anal mucosa lesions. We present the first case in which IVCM has been used to diagnose anal melanosis. Clinical and dermoscopic features were of concern while IVCM found the draped pattern already described for genital melanosis. IVCM adds information to the clinical and dermatoscopic examination and allows skin biopsies to be avoided. Further studies are needed to define the IVCM features of anal melanosis and to compare the performance of IVCM with the findings of histological examinations.

  13. Reflectance confocal microscopy features of facial angiofibromas

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Cayetano, José-Francisco; Yélamos, Oriol; Rossi, Anthony M.; Marchetti, Michael A.; Jain, Manu

    2017-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are benign tumors presenting as firm, dome-shaped, flesh-colored to pink papules, typically on the nose and adjoining central face. Clinically and dermoscopically they can mimic melanocytic nevi or basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive imaging tool that is useful in diagnosing melanocytic and non-melanocytic facial lesions. To date no studies have described the RCM features of facial angiofibromas. Herein, we present two cases of facial angiofibromas that were imaged with RCM and revealed tumor island-like structures that mimicked BCC, leading to skin biopsy. PMID:28243496

  14. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  15. Statistical characterization of engineered tissues using confocal mosaic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Ardeshiri, Ardalan; Ahmed, Jabeer; Gareau, Daniel S.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    Characterization of engineered tissues using optical methods often involves tradeoff between the fraction of total volume that is imaged and the spatial resolution. The limitation is not technological but rather practical, having more to do with effective probe designs and computer memory storage for large datasets. In this paper, we propose using confocal mosaicing, a technique used to characterize large volumes of excisioned biopsies from Mohs surgeries, to characterizing collagen gels. This technique stitches together high-resolution 3D images of a series adjacent millimeter sized regions that collectively make up areas that are ~cm2. Image acquisition time is approximately 5 min. The resulting high-resolution images closely resemble hematoxylin and eosin histological sections, only obtained without the time-consuming embedding and sectioning steps. Disk-shaped collagen gels that are 1 ml volume and ~1.5 cm diameter were prepared with smooth muscle cells and imaged at days 1 and 5. Using the digital staining technique, we were able to survey the spatial distribution of cells in the hydrogel and assess spatial heterogeneity in 3D from the fluorescence data. The reflectance data provided information on collagen fibril structure and matrix remodeling by the cells. Digital staining presented the data in a way that is easily interpreted by tissue engineers. Altogether, we believe confocal mosaicing and digital staining represents an important technological novelty that significantly advances nondestructive optical evaluation of engineered tissues.

  16. EVALUATION OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: PRETTY PICTURES OR CONFOCAL QA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of confocal microscopy system performance: Pretty pictures or confocal QA?

    Robert M. Zucker

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N...

  17. EVALUATION OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: PRETTY PICTURES OR CONFOCAL QA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of confocal microscopy system performance: Pretty pictures or confocal QA?

    Robert M. Zucker

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N...

  18. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis.

  19. Confocal reference free traction force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bergert, Martin; Lendenmann, Tobias; Zündel, Manuel; Ehret, Alexander E.; Panozzo, Daniele; Richner, Patrizia; Kim, David K.; Kress, Stephan J. P.; Norris, David J.; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Mazza, Edoardo; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical wiring between cells and their surroundings is fundamental to the regulation of complex biological processes during tissue development, repair or pathology. Traction force microscopy (TFM) enables determination of the actuating forces. Despite progress, important limitations with intrusion effects in low resolution 2D pillar-based methods or disruptive intermediate steps of cell removal and substrate relaxation in high-resolution continuum TFM methods need to be overcome. Here we introduce a novel method allowing a one-shot (live) acquisition of continuous in- and out-of-plane traction fields with high sensitivity. The method is based on electrohydrodynamic nanodrip-printing of quantum dots into confocal monocrystalline arrays, rendering individually identifiable point light sources on compliant substrates. We demonstrate the undisrupted reference-free acquisition and quantification of high-resolution continuous force fields, and the simultaneous capability of this method to correlatively overlap traction forces with spatial localization of proteins revealed using immunofluorescence methods. PMID:27681958

  20. Automated cellular pathology in noninvasive confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Monica; Krueger, James; Gareau, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    A computer algorithm was developed to automatically identify and count melanocytes and keratinocytes in 3D reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) images of the skin. Computerized pathology increases our understanding and enables prevention of superficial spreading melanoma (SSM). Machine learning involved looking at the images to measure the size of cells through a 2-D Fourier transform and developing an appropriate mask with the erf() function to model the cells. Implementation involved processing the images to identify cells whose image segments provided the least difference when subtracted from the mask. With further simplification of the algorithm, the program may be directly implemented on the RCM images to indicate the presence of keratinocytes in seconds and to quantify the keratinocytes size in the en face plane as a function of depth. Using this system, the algorithm can identify any irregularities in maturation and differentiation of keratinocytes, thereby signaling the possible presence of cancer.

  1. Imaging White Adipose Tissue With Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Santibañez, Gabriel; Cho, Kae Won; Lumeng, Carey N.

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is composed of a variety of cell types that include mature adipocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, adipocyte progenitors, and a range of inflammatory leukocytes. These cells work in concert to promote nutrient storage in adipose tissue depots and vary widely based on location. In addition, overnutrition and obesity impart significant changes in the architecture of adipose tissue that are strongly associated with metabolic dysfunction. Recent studies have called attention to the importance of adipose tissue microenvironments in regulating adipocyte function and therefore require techniques that preserve cellular interactions and permit detailed analysis of three-dimensional structures in fat. This chapter summarizes our experience with the use of laser scanning confocal microscopy for imaging adipose tissue in rodents. PMID:24480339

  2. Confocal reference free traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergert, Martin; Lendenmann, Tobias; Zündel, Manuel; Ehret, Alexander E; Panozzo, Daniele; Richner, Patrizia; Kim, David K; Kress, Stephan J P; Norris, David J; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Mazza, Edoardo; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-09-29

    The mechanical wiring between cells and their surroundings is fundamental to the regulation of complex biological processes during tissue development, repair or pathology. Traction force microscopy (TFM) enables determination of the actuating forces. Despite progress, important limitations with intrusion effects in low resolution 2D pillar-based methods or disruptive intermediate steps of cell removal and substrate relaxation in high-resolution continuum TFM methods need to be overcome. Here we introduce a novel method allowing a one-shot (live) acquisition of continuous in- and out-of-plane traction fields with high sensitivity. The method is based on electrohydrodynamic nanodrip-printing of quantum dots into confocal monocrystalline arrays, rendering individually identifiable point light sources on compliant substrates. We demonstrate the undisrupted reference-free acquisition and quantification of high-resolution continuous force fields, and the simultaneous capability of this method to correlatively overlap traction forces with spatial localization of proteins revealed using immunofluorescence methods.

  3. Imaging white adipose tissue with confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Santibañez, Gabriel; Cho, Kae Won; Lumeng, Carey N

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is composed of a variety of cell types that include mature adipocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, adipocyte progenitors, and a range of inflammatory leukocytes. These cells work in concert to promote nutrient storage in adipose tissue depots and vary widely based on location. In addition, overnutrition and obesity impart significant changes in the architecture of adipose tissue that are strongly associated with metabolic dysfunction. Recent studies have called attention to the importance of adipose tissue microenvironments in regulating adipocyte function and therefore require techniques that preserve cellular interactions and permit detailed analysis of three-dimensional structures in fat. This chapter summarizes our experience with the use of laser scanning confocal microscopy for imaging adipose tissue in rodents. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Deep stroma investigation by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Tatini, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Valente, Paola; Ardia, Roberta; Buzzonetti, Luca; Canovetti, Annalisa; Malandrini, Alex; Lenzetti, Ivo; Menabuoni, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Laser assisted keratoplasty is nowadays largely used to perform minimally invasive surgery and partial thickness keratoplasty [1-3]. The use of the femtosecond laser enables to perform a customized surgery, solving the specific problem of the single patient, designing new graft profiles and partial thickness keratoplasty (PTK). The common characteristics of the PTKs and that make them eligible respect to the standard penetrating keratoplasty, are: the preservation of eyeball integrity, a reduced risk of graft rejection, a controlled postoperative astigmatism. On the other hand, the optimal surgical results after these PTKs are related to a correct comprehension of the deep stroma layers morphology, which can help in the identification of the correct cleavage plane during surgeries. In the last years some studies were published, giving new insights about the posterior stroma morphology in adult subjects [4,5]. In this work we present a study performed on two groups of tissues: one group is from 20 adult subjects aged 59 +/- 18 y.o., and the other group is from 15 young subjects, aged 12+/-5 y.o.. The samples were from tissues not suitable for transplant in patients. Confocal microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) were used for the analysis of the deep stroma. The preliminary results of this analysis show the main differences in between young and adult tissues, enabling to improve the knowledge of the morphology and of the biomechanical properties of human cornea, in order to improve the surgical results in partial thickness keratoplasty.

  5. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  6. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Giulia M.R.; Breedijk, Ronald M.P.; Brandt, Rick A.J.; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H.C.; de Jong, Babette E.; Timmermans, Wendy; Azar, Leila Nahidi; Hoebe, Ron A.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity while maintaining the sectioning capability of a standard confocal microscope. This simple technology is typically useful for biological applications where the combination high-resolution and high-sensitivity is required. PMID:24298422

  7. Digital differential confocal microscopy based on spatial shift transformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Liu, C; Wilson, T; Wang, H; Tan, J

    2014-11-01

    Differential confocal microscopy is a particularly powerful surface profilometry technique in industrial metrology due to its high axial sensitivity and insensitivity to noise. However, the practical implementation of the technique requires the accurate positioning of point detectors in three-dimensions. We describe a simple alternative based on spatial transformation of a through-focus series of images obtained from a homemade beam scanning confocal microscope. This digital differential confocal microscopy approach is described and compared with the traditional Differential confocal microscopy approach. The ease of use of the digital differential confocal microscopy system is illustrated by performing measurements on a 3D standard specimen. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Anterior segment applications of in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kymionis, George D; Diakonis, Vasilios F; Shehadeh, Mohammad M; Pallikaris, Aristofanis I; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2015-07-01

    To review the current literature on in vivo confocal microscopy anterior segment applications (cornea, conjunctiva, and glaucoma) and discuss its advantages in different pathological conditions. Review of selected relevant literature on in vivo confocal microscopy and its different applications. In vivo confocal microscopy can be used to visualize most layers of the cornea and conjunctiva, providing excellent resolution. In the past, it was mainly utilized as a research tool; lately there seems to be an increasing interest for clinical applications; confocal microscopy aids the diagnosis and follow-up of many anterior segment disorders, such as corneal dystrophies, corneal and conjunctival inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, glaucoma patients, and assessment of surgical procedures. In vivo confocal microscopy is an important addition to the ophthalmic diagnostic tools with several anterior segment applications. Its clinical applications are being continuously explored and are quickly expanding to cover many new pathological aspects.

  9. In vivo confocal microscopy of toxic keratopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Le, Q; Hong, J; Gong, L; Xu, J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To explore the morphological characteristics of toxic keratopathy (TK), which clinically presented as superficial punctate keratopathy (SPK), with the application of in vivo laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), and evaluate its potential in the early diagnosis of TK. Patients and methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 16 patients with TK and 16 patients with dry eye (DE), demonstrating SPK under slit-lamp observation, and 10 normal eyes were enrolled in the study. All participants underwent history interviews, fluorescein staining, tear film break-up time (BUT) tests, Schirmer tests, and in vivo LSCM. Results The area grading of corneal fluorescein punctate staining was higher in the TK group than the DE group. Measured by in vivo LSCM, superficial epithelial cell density was lower in the TK group than that of DE group. The sub-basal nerve presented lower density and tortuosity in the TK group than the DE group. Most notably, deposits with a snow-like appearance were observed in the epithelium in 12/16 (75.0%) of the TK cases, but none in the DE group (P<0.05). Conclusion The SPK in TK patients was characterized by more widespread punctate staining, a lower density of superficial epithelial cells and sub-basal nerves, and a typical snow-like pattern of deposits in the epithelium by LSCM. These features might facilitate early diagnosis of TK from other disorders manifested as SPK. PMID:27740620

  10. Reflectance confocal microscopy for inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, M; Prow, T; Agozzino, M; Soyer, P; Berardesca, E

    2015-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy evaluation of inflammatory skin diseases represents a relatively new indication that, during the last 5 years, has shown an increasing interest with consequent progressive increment of publications in literature. The success of RCM in this filed of dermatology is directly related to the high needing of non-invasive techniques able to reduce the number of skin biopsies and support the clinical diagnosis and patient's management. RCM demonstrated to visualize microscopic descriptors of inflammatory and pigmentary skin conditions with good reproducibility between observer and high grade of correspondence with optical histology. Moreover, RCM has shown to provide sufficient data to support clinical diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory and pigmentary skin diseases. Recently, several works published in literature have opened the prospective to use RCM also for therapeutic follow-up in order to monitor the improvement of the microscopic parameters and help to prevent treatment side effects. In this review article we present some examples of RCM application in inflammatory and pigmentary diseases.

  11. EVALUATION OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND. The confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. Currently there is a subjective nature in the assessment of a confocal microscope's performance by primarily evaluating the system with a specific test slide provided by ea...

  12. EVALUATION OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND. The confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. Currently there is a subjective nature in the assessment of a confocal microscope's performance by primarily evaluating the system with a specific test slide provided by ea...

  13. Digital-micromirror-device-based confocal 4D microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, M.; Kloster, M.; Napier, J.; Peev, E.; Neu, W.

    2012-03-01

    Digital Micromirror Device based microscopy combines fast confocal 4D-microscopy along with conventional methods for light microscopy and new technological approaches to a versatile tool for the observation of in vivo processes in living biological cells and measurement of technical surfaces. Due to the use of variable size pinholes and adjustable scan patterns conditions for confocal measurement can easily be optimized to the prerequisites of the sample "on the fly".

  14. Microelectrophoresis of Silica Rods Using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility and the zeta potential (ζ) of fluorescently labeled colloidal silica rods, with an aspect ratio of 3.8 and 6.1, were determined with microelectrophoresis measurements using confocal microscopy. In the case where the colloidal particles all move at the same speed parallel to the direction of the electric field, we record a xyz-stack over the whole depth of the capillary. This method is faster and more robust compared to taking xyt-series at different depths inside the capillary to obtain the parabolic flow profile, as was done in previous work from our group. In some cases, rodlike particles do not move all at the same speed in the electric field, but exhibit a velocity that depends on the angle between the long axis of the rod and the electric field. We measured the orientation-dependent velocity of individual silica rods during electrophoresis as a function of κa, where κ–1 is the double layer thickness and a is the radius of the rod associated with the diameter. Thus, we determined the anisotropic electrophoretic mobility of the silica rods with different sized double layers. The size of the double layer was tuned by suspending silica rods in different solvents at different electrolyte concentrations. We compared these results with theoretical predictions. We show that even at already relatively high κa when the Smoluchowski limiting law is assumed to be valid (κa > 10), an orientation dependent velocity was measured. Furthermore, we observed that at decreasing values of κa the anisotropy in the electrophoretic mobility of the rods increases. However, in low polar solvents with κa < 1, this trend was reversed: the anisotropy in the electrophoretic mobility of the rods decreased. We argue that this decrease is due to end effects, which was already predicted theoretically. When end effects are not taken into account, this will lead to strong underestimation of the experimentally determined zeta potential. PMID:28045541

  15. Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy of Mung Beanleaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Liu, Dongwu

    Recently, confocal microscope has become a routine technique and indispensable tool for cell biological studies and molecular investigations. The light emitted from the point out-of-focus is blocked by the pinhole and can not reach the detector, which is one of the critical features of the confocal microscope. In present studies, the probes acridine orange (AO) and rhodamine-123 were used to research stoma and mitochondria of mung bean leaves, respectively. The results indicated that the stomatal guard cells and mitochondria were clearly seen in epidermic tissue of mung bean leaves. Taken together, it is a good method to research plant cells with confocal microscope and fluorescence probes.

  16. Fibered confocal microscopy of bladder tumors: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sonn, Geoffrey A; Mach, Kathleen E; Jensen, Kristin; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Jones, Sha-Nita; Contag, Christopher H; Wang, Thomas D; Liao, Joseph C

    2009-02-01

    The inadequacy of white-light cystoscopy to detect flat bladder tumors is well recognized. Great interest exists in developing other imaging technologies to augment or supplant conventional cystoscopy. Fibered confocal microscopy offers the promise of providing in vivo histopathologic information to help distinguish malignant from benign bladder lesions. We report the initial use of this technology to visualize tumors in the human bladder. We performed ex vivo fibered confocal imaging of fresh radical cystectomy specimens using the Mauna Kea Technologies Cellvizio system. The findings were compared with results from standard histopathology. The bladders of four patients were imaged using the fibered confocal microscope. Normal and neoplastic urothelium manifested differences in cellular and vascular density. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using fibered confocal microscopy to detect histologic differences between normal and neoplastic urothelium, and establishes a foundation for the use of fiber-based confocal microscopy in clinical studies.

  17. Confocal microscopy of corneal flap microfolds after LASIK.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Manuel; Hernández-Quintela, Everardo; Sánchez-Huerta, Valeria; Naranjo-Tackman, Ramón

    2006-02-01

    To describe the morphological characteristics of microfolds that appear at the corneal flap after LASIK, as seen under confocal microscopy. Twenty-one eyes that had undergone LASIK were examined, all within 3 weeks to 1 month after surgery. A central scan of the total corneal thickness was obtained by using confocal microscopy in vivo. Confocal images were captured and digitized. The longitudinal orientation (vertical, horizontal, and oblique) and morphological characteristics of the microfolds were described and recorded. Six eyes had folds at the central corneal flap, visible as linear distortions in the confocal images: one fold had a vertical orientation, two were horizontal, and three were oblique. The folds were visible from the epithelial basal cell layer to the stromal portion of the flap and were deeper than Bowman's layer. Confocal microscopy allowed visualization of microfolds after LASIK. With the appropriate software, it is possible to analyze the morphological characteristics of these folds. Flap microfolds after LASIK are deeper than Bowman's layer.

  18. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF RAT FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to study follicular development in millimeter pieces of rat ovary. To use this technology, it is essential to stain the tissue before laser excitation with the confocal microscope. Various fluorescent stains (Yo-Pro, Bo-Pr...

  19. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF RAT FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to study follicular development in millimeter pieces of rat ovary. To use this technology, it is essential to stain the tissue before laser excitation with the confocal microscope. Various fluorescent stains (Yo-Pro, Bo-Pr...

  20. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle...

  1. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy in Chloroquine-Induced Keratopathy

    PubMed Central

    Paladini, Iacopo; Menchini, Ugo; Mencucci, Rita

    2013-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy is becoming a mandatory examination to study corneal abnormalities such as drug deposits in systemic disease. A female diagnosed with fibromyalgia on systemic chloroquine for 9 months presented for an ophthalmic examination. Confocal microscopy was performed using the Confoscan 4 (Nidek Co. Ltd., Gamagori, Japan) and multiple highly reflective deposits in the epithelial basal cells were found, that were consistent with choloquine. Deposits were also present in the wing cell layer. In the anterior stroma these deposits were rare. Atypically shaped and branched nerves were also present in the anterior stroma. Corneal deposits of chloroquine can be evaluated by confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy provides information on corneal metabolism and physiology. Chloroquine keratopathy can affect the anterior stroma in addition to the epithelium. PMID:23580857

  2. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle...

  3. Handheld reflectance confocal microscopy for the diagnosis of conjunctival tumors.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, Elisa; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Campolmi, Nelly; Espinasse, Marine; Grivet, Damien; Thuret, Gilles; Gain, Philippe; Douchet, Catherine; Andrea, Caroline; Haouas, Maher; Cambazard, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate whether the handheld in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy that has been recently developed for the study of skin tumors is suitable for the diagnosis of conjunctival tumors. Prospective study, observational case series. We prospectively evaluated the reflectance confocal microscopy features of 53 conjunctival lesions clinically suspicious for tumors of 46 patients referred to the University Hospital of Saint-Etienne (France) by using the handheld device. Twenty-three lesions were excised (3 nevi, 10 melanomas, 5 squamous cell carcinoma, 2 lymphomas, and 3 pinguecula/pterygium) while the other 30, presenting no reflectance confocal microscopy malignant features, were under follow-up for at least 1 year. Clinical reflectance confocal microscopy and histologic diagnosis were compared. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy diagnosis was in agreement with the histologic diagnosis in all cases and none of the lesions that were not excised show any clinical progression under follow-up. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy with a handheld dermatology-dedicated microscope can play a role in the noninvasive diagnosis of conjunctival lesions. Further studies should be performed to better define the diagnostic ability of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: LASER POWER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser power abstract
    The reliability of the confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) to obtain intensity measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. The laser power test appears to be one ...

  5. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: LASER POWER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser power abstract
    The reliability of the confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) to obtain intensity measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. The laser power test appears to be one ...

  6. An alternative method of promoter assessment by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Ranjan, Rajiv; Kumar, Deepak; Kumar, Alok; Sahoo, Bhabani S; Raha, Sumita; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2009-10-01

    A rapid and useful method of promoter activity analysis using techniques of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is described in the present study. The activities of some pararetroviral promoters such as CaMV35S (Cauliflower mosaic virus), FMVSgt3 (Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript) and MMVFLt12 (Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript) coupled to GFP (green fluorescent protein) and GUS (beta-glucuronidase) reporter genes were determined simultaneously by the CLSM technique and other available conventional methods for reporter gene assay based on relevant biochemical and molecular approaches. Consistent and comparable results obtained by CLSM as well as by other conventional assay methods confirm the effectiveness of the CLSM approach for assessment of promoter activity. Hence the CLSM method can be suggested as an alternative way for promoter analysis on the basis of high throughput.

  7. Practical aspects of quantitative confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M

    2013-01-01

    Confocal microscopes are in principle well suited for quantitative imaging. The 3D fluorophore distribution in a specimen is transformed by the microscope optics and detector into the 2D intensity distribution of a digital image by a linear operation, a convolution. If multiple 2D images of the specimen at different focal planes are obtained, then the original 3D distribution in the specimen can be reconstructed. This reconstruction is a low-pass spatially filtered representation of the original, but quantitatively preserves relative fluorophore concentrations, with of course some limitations on accuracy and precision due to aberrations and noise. Given appropriate calibration, absolute fluorophore concentrations are accessible. A few simple guidelines are given for setting up confocal microscopes and checking their performance. With a little care, the images collected should be suitable for most types of quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Confocal and Two-Photon Microscopy: Foundations, Applications and Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto

    2001-11-01

    Confocal and Two-Photon Microscopy Foundations, Applications, and Advances Edited by Alberto Diaspro Confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy has provided researchers with unique possibilities of three-dimensional imaging of biological cells and tissues and of other structures such as semiconductor integrated circuits. Confocal and Two-Photon Microscopy: Foundations, Applications, and Advances provides clear, comprehensive coverage of basic foundations, modern applications, and groundbreaking new research developments made in this important area of microscopy. Opening with a foreword by G. J. Brakenhoff, this reference gathers the work of an international group of renowned experts in chapters that are logically divided into balanced sections covering theory, techniques, applications, and advances, featuring: In-depth discussion of applications for biology, medicine, physics, engineering, and chemistry, including industrial applications Guidance on new and emerging imaging technology, developmental trends, and fluorescent molecules Uniform organization and review-style presentation of chapters, with an introduction, historical overview, methodology, practical tips, applications, future directions, chapter summary, and bibliographical references Companion FTP site with full-color photographs The significant experience of pioneers, leaders, and emerging scientists in the field of confocal and two-photon excitation microscopy Confocal and Two-Photon Microscopy: Foundations, Applications, and Advances is invaluable to researchers in the biological sciences, tissue and cellular engineering, biophysics, bioengineering, physics of matter, and medicine, who use these techniques or are involved in developing new commercial instruments.

  9. Detection limits of confocal surface plasmon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Somekh, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies rigorous diffraction theory to evaluate the minimum mass sensitivity of a confocal optical microscope designed to excite and detect surface plasmons operating on a planar metallic substrate. The diffraction model is compared with an intuitive ray picture which gives remarkably similar predictions. The combination of focusing the surface plasmons and accurate phase measurement mean that under favorable but achievable conditions detection of small numbers of molecules is possible, however, we argue that reliable detection of single molecules will benefit from the use of structured surfaces. System configurations needed to optimize performance are discussed. PMID:24940537

  10. Divided-aperture differential confocal fast-imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Xiangye; Zhao, Weiqian

    2017-03-01

    A new method, laser divided-aperture differential confocal microscopy (DDCM), is proposed to achieve high-resolution 3D imaging of microstructures of large-scale sample surfaces. This method uses a divided-aperture confocal structure to significantly improve the axial resolution of confocal microscopy and keep a long working distance simultaneously; uses two radically offset point detectors to achieve differential detection to further improve the axial response sensitivity and realize fast imaging of a large-scale sample surface with a big axial scan-step interval. Theoretical analyses and experimental results show that the DDCM can reach an axial resolution of 5 nm with a 3.1 mm working distance with a 3 times imaging speed of a confocal system with the same resolution.

  11. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for detection of cervical preneoplastic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Fahime; Ward, Rabab K.; Carraro, Anita; Chen, Zhaoyang; van Niekerk, Dirk; MacAulay, Calum; Follen, Michele; Lane, Pierre; Guillaud, Martial

    2015-03-01

    We examined and established the potential of ex-vivo confocal fluorescence microscopy for differentiating between normal cervical tissue, low grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN1), and high grade CIN (CIN2 and CIN3). Our objectives were to i) use Quantitative Tissue Phenotype (QTP) analysis to quantify nuclear and cellular morphology and tissue architecture in confocal microscopic images of fresh cervical biopsies and ii) determine the accuracy of high grade CIN detection via confocal microscopy. Cervical biopsy specimens of colposcopically normal and abnormal tissues obtained from 15 patients were evaluated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Confocal images were analyzed and about 200 morphological and architectural features were calculated at the nuclear, cellular, and tissue level. For the purpose of this study, we used four features to delineate disease grade including nuclear size, cell density, estimated nuclear-cytoplasmic (ENC) ratio, and the average of three nearest Delaunay neighbors distance (3NDND). Our preliminary results showed ENC ratio and 3NDND correlated well with histopathological diagnosis. The Spearman correlation coefficient between each of these two features and the histopathological diagnosis was higher than the correlation coefficient between colposcopic appearance and histopathological diagnosis. Sensitivity and specificity of ENC ratio for detecting high grade CIN were both equal to 100%. QTP analysis of fluorescence confocal images shows the potential to discriminate high grade CIN from low grade CIN and normal tissues. This approach could be used to help clinicians identify HGSILs in clinical settings.

  12. Visualizing Cochlear Mechanics Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulfendahl, M.; Boutet de Monvel, J.; Fridberger, A.

    2003-02-01

    The sound-evoked vibration pattern of the hearing organ is based on complex mechanical interactions between different cellular structures. To explore the structural changes occurring within the organ of Corti during basilar-membrane motion, stepwise alterations of the scala tympani pressure were applied in an in vitro preparation of the guinea-pig temporal bone. Confocal images were acquired at each pressure level. In this way, the motion of several structures could be simultaneously observed with high resolution in a nearly intact system. Images were analyzed using a novel wavelet-based optical-flow estimation algorithm. Under the present experimental conditions, the reticular lamina moved as a stiff plate with a center of rotation in the region of the inner hair cells. The outer hair cells appeared non-rigid and the basal, synaptic regions of these cells displayed significant radial motion indicative of cellular bending and internal shearing.

  13. Reflectance confocal microscopy of optical phantoms.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Steven L; Wang, Bo; Samatham, Ravikant

    2012-06-01

    A reflectance confocal scanning laser microscope (rCSLM) operating at 488-nm wavelength imaged three types of optical phantoms: (1) 100-nm-dia. polystyrene microspheres in gel at 2% volume fraction, (2) solid polyurethane phantoms (INO Biomimic(TM)), and (3) common reflectance standards (Spectralon(TM)). The noninvasive method measured the exponential decay of reflected signal as the focus (z(f)) moved deeper into the material. The two experimental values, the attenuation coefficient μ and the pre-exponential factor ρ, were mapped into the material optical scattering properties, the scattering coefficient μ(s) and the anisotropy of scattering g. Results show that μ(s) varies as 58, 8-24, and 130-200 cm(-1) for phantom types (1), (2) and (3), respectively. The g varies as 0.112, 0.53-0.67, and 0.003-0.26, respectively.

  14. Confocal microscopy for visualization and characterization of porous silicon samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doia, Petronela; Petris, A.; Dancus, I.; Vlad, V. I.

    2007-08-01

    We have developed a scanning confocal microscopy (SCM) system which can be used to investigate micro-structural properties of samples with micro-geometry. We present advantages of this imaging technique for visualization and characterization of some periodic and non-periodic (porous silicon with an alveolar columnar structure (1.5 - 3 μm pores diameters)) samples. Using the confocal microscopy, we can obtain an enhancement of image resolution and contrast, in comparison with conventional optical microscopy. Therefore, it has particular advantages for the study of porous silicon. Confocal imaging method permit the "optical sectioning" of samples and lead to a sub-micron resolution both in lateral plane and axial plane.

  15. Tri-modal confocal mosaics detect residual invasive squamous cell carcinoma in Mohs surgical excisions.

    PubMed

    Gareau, Dan; Bar, Anna; Snaveley, Nicholas; Lee, Ken; Chen, Nathaniel; Swanson, Neil; Simpson, Eric; Jacques, Steve

    2012-06-01

    For rapid, intra-operative pathological margin assessment to guide staged cancer excisions, multimodal confocal mosaic scan image wide surgical margins (approximately 1 cm) with sub-cellular resolution and mimic the appearance of conventional hematoxylin and eosin histopathology (H&E). The goal of this work is to combine three confocal imaging modes: acridine orange fluorescence (AO) for labeling nuclei, eosin fluorescence (Eo) for labeling cytoplasm, and endogenous reflectance (R) for marking collagen and keratin. Absorption contrast is achieved by alternating the excitation wavelength: 488 nm (AO fluorescence) and 532 nm (Eo fluorescence). Superposition and false-coloring of these modes mimics H&E, enabling detection of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The sum of mosaic Eo+R is false-colored pink to mimic the appearance of eosin, while the AO mosaic is false-colored purple to mimic the appearance of hematoxylin in H&E. In this study, mosaics of 10 Mohs surgical excisions containing invasive SCC, and five containing only normal tissue were subdivided for digital presentation equivalent to 4 × histology. Of the total 50 SCC and 25 normal sub-mosaics presented, two reviewers made two and three type-2 errors (false positives), respectively. Limitations to precisely mimic H&E included occasional elastin staining by AO. These results suggest that confocal mosaics may effectively guide staged SCC excisions in skin and other tissues.

  16. Tri-modal confocal mosaics detect residual invasive squamous cell carcinoma in Mohs surgical excisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Dan; Bar, Anna; Snaveley, Nicholas; Lee, Ken; Chen, Nathaniel; Swanson, Neil; Simpson, Eric; Jacques, Steve

    2012-06-01

    For rapid, intra-operative pathological margin assessment to guide staged cancer excisions, multimodal confocal mosaic scan image wide surgical margins (approximately 1 cm) with sub-cellular resolution and mimic the appearance of conventional hematoxylin and eosin histopathology (H&E). The goal of this work is to combine three confocal imaging modes: acridine orange fluorescence (AO) for labeling nuclei, eosin fluorescence (Eo) for labeling cytoplasm, and endogenous reflectance (R) for marking collagen and keratin. Absorption contrast is achieved by alternating the excitation wavelength: 488 nm (AO fluorescence) and 532 nm (Eo fluorescence). Superposition and false-coloring of these modes mimics H&E, enabling detection of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The sum of mosaic Eo+R is false-colored pink to mimic the appearance of eosin, while the AO mosaic is false-colored purple to mimic the appearance of hematoxylin in H&E. In this study, mosaics of 10 Mohs surgical excisions containing invasive SCC, and five containing only normal tissue were subdivided for digital presentation equivalent to 4× histology. Of the total 50 SCC and 25 normal sub-mosaics presented, two reviewers made two and three type-2 errors (false positives), respectively. Limitations to precisely mimic H&E included occasional elastin staining by AO. These results suggest that confocal mosaics may effectively guide staged SCC excisions in skin and other tissues.

  17. Studies in Confocal Scanning Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corle, Timothy Richard

    Optical microscopes have been used as measurement tools in many areas of science of the past 300 years. Despite their maturity, there is still active research in the field. In particular the development of confocal scanning optical microscopes (CSOMs) in the 1970's has extended the usefulness of optical microscopes by giving them depth imaging capabilities. In a CSOM a defocused image disappears rather than blurring as it does with a standard microscope. The shallow depth of focus allows structures with a height difference smaller than one wavelength to be imaged independently, and thus quantitative measurements of height can be made. The design and construction of two CSOMs is discussed. The first is a mechanically scanned single pinhole microscope. This instrument was developed as a test bed on which to try out ideas relating to phase contrast imaging. The second is a Nipkow disk based real-time confocal scanning optical microscope (RSOM). These two microscopes were used to investigate the transverse and depth resolution of CSOMs. It is demonstrated that although they do not intrinsically have any better transverse resolution than a standard optical microscope, CSOMs produce a visually sharper image with increased contrast. The depth response of the CSOM is also investigated. A vector theory for the depth response is derived and compared with experimental results. It is shown that previously unexplained asymmetries in the sidelobe structure of this response can be accounted for by aberrations in the microscope objective. Phase contrast images can be generated by periodically defocusing the microscope, either mechanically or electro -optically and detecting a signal at the modulation frequency. A new electro-optic phase contrast microscope is described. The microscope is used to quantitatively measure both the height and width of thin film gratings. The depth response and point spread function of this microscope are also derived. It is shown that the sidelobe

  18. Frames-Based Denoising in 3D Confocal Microscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Kakadiaris, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel denoising method for 3D confocal microscopy data based on robust edge detection. Our approach relies on the construction of a non-separable frame system in 3D that incorporates the Sobel operator in dual spatial directions. This multidirectional set of digital filters is capable of robustly detecting edge information by ensemble thresholding of the filtered data. We demonstrate the application of our method to both synthetic and real confocal microscopy data by comparing it to denoising methods based on separable 3D wavelets and 3D median filtering, and report very encouraging results.

  19. Chromatic confocal microscopy using staircase diffractive surface.

    PubMed

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-08-10

    A chromatic confocal microscope (CCM) is a high-dynamic-range noncontact distance measurement sensor; it is based on a hyperchromatic lens. The vast majority of commercial CCMs use refractive-based chromatic dispersion to chromatically code the optical axis. This approach significantly limits the range of applications and performance of the CCM. In order to be a suitable alternative to a laser triangulation gauge and laser encoder, the performance of the CCM must be improved. In this paper, it is shown how hybrid aspheric diffractive (HAD) lenses can bring the CCM to its full potential by increasing the dynamic range by a factor of 2 and the resolution by a factor of 5 while passively athermizing and increasing the light throughput efficiency of the optical head [M. Rayer, U.S. patent 1122052.2 (2011)]. The only commercially suitable manufacturing process is single-point diamond turning. However, the optical power carried by the diffractive side of a hybrid aspheric diffractive lens is limited by the manufacturing process. A theoretical study of manufacturing losses has revealed that the HAD configuration with the highest diffraction efficiency is for a staircase diffractive surface (SDS). SDS lenses have the potential to reduce light losses associated with manufacturing limits by a factor of 5 without increasing surface roughness, allowing scalar diffraction-limited optical design with a diffractive element.

  20. Use of Digitally Stained Multimodal Confocal Mosaic Images to Screen for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mu, Euphemia W; Lewin, Jesse M; Stevenson, Mary L; Meehan, Shane A; Carucci, John A; Gareau, Daniel S

    2016-12-01

    Confocal microscopy has the potential to provide rapid bedside pathologic analysis, but clinical adoption has been limited in part by the need for physician retraining to interpret grayscale images. Digitally stained confocal mosaics (DSCMs) mimic the colors of routine histologic specimens and may increase adaptability of this technology. To evaluate the accuracy and precision of 3 physicians using DSCMs before and after training to detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in Mohs micrographic surgery fresh-tissue specimens. This retrospective study used 133 DSCMs from 64 Mohs tissue excisions, which included clear margins, residual BCC, or residual SCC. Discarded tissue from Mohs surgical excisions from the dermatologic surgery units at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Oregon Health & Science University were collected for confocal imaging from 2006 to 2011. Final data analysis and interpretation took place between 2014 and 2016. Two Mohs surgeons and a Mohs fellow, who were blinded to the correlating gold standard frozen section diagnoses, independently reviewed the DSCMs for residual nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) before and after a brief training session (about 5 minutes). The 2 assessments were separated by a 6-month washout period. Diagnostic accuracy was characterized by sensitivity and specificity of detecting NMSC using DSCMs vs standard frozen histopathologic specimens. The diagnostic precision was calculated based on interobserver agreement and κ scores. Paired 2-sample t tests were used for comparative means analyses before and after training. The average respective sensitivities and specificities of detecting NMSC were 90% (95% CI, 89%-91%) and 79% (95% CI, 52%-100%) before training and 99% (95% CI, 99%-99%) (P = .001) and 93% (95% CI, 90%-96%) (P = .18) after training; for BCC, they were 83% (95% CI, 59%-100%) and 92% (95% CI, 81%-100%) before training and 98% (95% CI, 98%-98%) (P = .18) and 97% (95% CI

  1. Spinning-disk confocal microscopy: present technology and future trends.

    PubMed

    Oreopoulos, John; Berman, Richard; Browne, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell imaging requires not only high temporal resolution but also illumination powers low enough to minimize photodamage. Traditional single-point laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is generally limited by both the relatively slow speed at which it can acquire optical sections by serial raster scanning (a few Hz) and the higher potential for phototoxicity. These limitations have driven the development of rapid, parallel forms of confocal microscopy, the most popular of which is the spinning-disk confocal microscope (SDCM). Here, we briefly introduce the SDCM technique, discuss its strengths and weaknesses against LSCM, and update the reader on some recent developments in SDCM technology that improve its performance and expand its utility for life science research now and in the future. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Video-rate Scanning Confocal Microscopy and Microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alexander J.; Evans, Conor L.

    2011-01-01

    Confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biology and the biomedical sciences, enabling rapid, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution optical sectioning of complex systems. Confocal microscopy is routinely used, for example, to study specific cellular targets1, monitor dynamics in living cells2-4, and visualize the three dimensional evolution of entire organisms5,6. Extensions of confocal imaging systems, such as confocal microendoscopes, allow for high-resolution imaging in vivo7 and are currently being applied to disease imaging and diagnosis in clinical settings8,9. Confocal microscopy provides three-dimensional resolution by creating so-called "optical sections" using straightforward geometrical optics. In a standard wide-field microscope, fluorescence generated from a sample is collected by an objective lens and relayed directly to a detector. While acceptable for imaging thin samples, thick samples become blurred by fluorescence generated above and below the objective focal plane. In contrast, confocal microscopy enables virtual, optical sectioning of samples, rejecting out-of-focus light to build high resolution three-dimensional representations of samples. Confocal microscopes achieve this feat by using a confocal aperture in the detection beam path. The fluorescence collected from a sample by the objective is relayed back through the scanning mirrors and through the primary dichroic mirror, a mirror carefully selected to reflect shorter wavelengths such as the laser excitation beam while passing the longer, Stokes-shifted fluorescence emission. This long-wavelength fluorescence signal is then passed to a pair of lenses on either side of a pinhole that is positioned at a plane exactly conjugate with the focal plane of the objective lens. Photons collected from the focal volume of the object are collimated by the objective lens and are focused by the confocal lenses through the pinhole. Fluorescence generated above or below the focal plane will

  3. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: QA TESTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: QA tests, Quantitation and Spectroscopy.

    Robert M. Zucker 1 and Jeremy M. Lerner 2,
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research Development, U.S. Environmen...

  4. FOOD SURFACE TEXTURE MEASUREMENT USING REFLECTIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used in the reflection mode to characterize the surface texture (roughness) of sliced food surfaces. Sandpapers of grit size between 150 and 600 were used as the height reference to standardize the CLSM hardware settings. Sandpaper particle sizes were v...

  5. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR MEASUREMENTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  6. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: QA TESTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: QA tests, Quantitation and Spectroscopy.

    Robert M. Zucker 1 and Jeremy M. Lerner 2,
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research Development, U.S. Environmen...

  7. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR MEASUREMENTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  8. Axial resolution of a chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon Reyes, Johnson; Meneses, J.; Plata, Arturo; Tribillon, Gilbert M.; Gharbi, Tijani

    2004-10-01

    An analysis of the axial resolution of a chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy is presented. The system is based on the principle of focus multiplexing by wavelength encoding due to a phase Fresnel lens. The axial resolution is related with the measure of the FWHM value of every spectral response.

  9. Combining confocal microscopy with precise force-scope optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew C.; Reihani, Nader; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrate an example of 'confocal-tweezers' wherein confocal images and precise optical force measurements, using photodiodes, are obtained simultaneously in the x-y plane without moving the objective lens. The optical trap is produced using a 1.064μm cw laser and is combined with Leica's TCS SP5 broadband confocal microscope to trap and image living cells. The unique method by which the confocal images are created facilitates the acquisition of images in areas far from the trapping location. In addition, because the scanning process involves moving galvanic mirrors independently of the objective, the trap is held stable in position and is not subject to any error in position for the x-y scan. We have successfully trapped and confocally imaged 80nm gold colloids, 150nm gold colloids and 1μm polystyrene beads whilst making quantitative measurements of the force applied by the trap on each bead. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that anyone has combined precise force measuring optical tweezers with confocal microscopy. We also discuss some of the technical challenges involved in advancing the experimental set up to make quantitative force measurements in combination with 3D stacking. Having proven the potential of this system in 2D, we hope to develop it further to investigate the nano-mechanics of cell division through the attachment of gold beads to fluorescently labelled organelles in S. pombe yeast cells.

  10. Improved axial resolution of FINCH fluorescence microscopy when combined with spinning disk confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Nisan; Brooker, Gary

    2014-01-01

    FINCH holographic fluorescence microscopy creates super-resolved images with enhanced depth of focus. Addition of a Nipkow disk real-time confocal image scanner is shown to reduce the FINCH depth of focus while improving transverse confocal resolution in a combined method called “CINCH”. PMID:25321701

  11. In vivo confocal microscopy in a patient with conjunctival amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Banu; Kiratli, Hayyam; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Irkec, Murat

    2008-03-01

    Conjunctival amyloidosis is a rare clinical entity. We herein reported in vivo confocal microscopic features of conjunctival amyloidosis and correlated the results with the histopathological findings. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen revealed acellular, amorphous, eosinophilic material in the substantia propria of the conjunctiva and positive staining with Congo red confirmed that the material was amyloid. Confocal microscopy with Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II Rostock Cornea Module showed hyporeflective material deposited in a lobular pattern in the substantia propria and around the blood vessels. The material seemed acellular and no inflammatory or dendriform cell accumulation was noted within or around the lesion. Further studies should be done to understand the confocal characteristics of the conjunctival diseases and find specific clues for the diagnosis.

  12. Confocal photoacoustic microscopy using a single multifunctional lens.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Song, Chaolong; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-06-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has remained one of the fastest developing biomedical imaging modalities in the past decade. The confocal strategy of optical illumination and acoustic detection is a way to boost the sensitivity of PAM. To achieve confocal PAM, current PAM systems utilize separate acoustic and optical converging devices, making the systems bulky and complicated. In this Letter, we demonstrate the use of a single-liquid lens to successfully achieve acoustic and optical confocal configuration for optical-resolution PAM (ORPAM). Using the lens with a numerical aperture of 0.43, we show that the resolution of the ORPAM system is 4.8 μm with a significantly improved sensitivity of acoustic detection. We also apply this compact ORPAM system to in vivo imaging of the vasculature of a rat ear.

  13. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  14. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  15. In vivo confocal microscopy of equine fungal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Eric C; Irby, Nita L; Kim, Sung G

    2011-01-01

    To describe in vivo corneal confocal microscopy of horses with fungal keratitis and correlate findings with clinical, histopathological, and microbiological evaluations of clinical cases and an ex vivo experimental equine fungal keratitis model. A total of 12 horses with naturally-acquired fungal keratitis and ex vivo equine corneas experimentally infected with clinical fungal isolates. Horses with naturally-acquired fungal keratitis were examined with a modified Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II and Rostock Cornea Module. Confocal microscopy images of clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus, Fusarium solani, and Candida albicans were obtained by examination of in vitro cultures and experimentally infected ex vivo equine corneas. Non-specific in vivo corneal confocal microscopic findings in horses with fungal keratitis included leukocyte infiltrates, activated keratocytes, anterior stromal dendritic cell infiltrates, and vascularization. Linear, branching, hyper-reflective structures that were 2-6 μm in width and 200 to >400 μm in length were detected in all horses with filamentous fungal keratitis. Round to oval hyper-reflective structures that were 2-8 μm in diameter were detected in a horse with yeast fungal keratitis. The in vivo confocal microscopic appearance of the organisms was consistent with fungal morphologies observed during examination of in vitro cultures and infected ex vivo equine corneas. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy is a rapid and non-invasive method of diagnosing fungal keratitis in the horse. This imaging technique is useful for both ulcerative and non-ulcerative fungal keratitis, and is particularly advantageous for confirming the presence of fungi in deep corneal stromal lesions. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  16. In vivo confocal microscopy of the human cornea

    PubMed Central

    Jalbert, I; Stapleton, F; Papas, E; Sweeney, D F; Coroneo, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To describe the optics of in vivo confocal microscopy, its advantages over previous methods, and to summarise the literature that arose from its use for the observation of the human cornea. A critical review of the clinical usefulness of this new technology for the corneal examination is undertaken. Methods: Confocal microscopes obtain increased resolution by limiting the illumination and observation systems to a single point. Rapid scanning is used to reconstruct a full field of view and allows for “real time” viewing. Results: Coronal sections of the in situ epithelium, Bowman’s membrane, stroma, and endothelium can be visualised at a resolution of 1–2 μm. A backscattered light intensity curve allows objective measurements of sublayer thickness and corneal haze to be taken. In vivo confocal microscopy is therefore particularly useful in the areas of infective keratitis, corneal dystrophies, refractive surgery, and contact lens wear, where it aids in differential diagnosis and detection of subtle short and long term changes. Real time endothelial cell assessment can also be performed. Conclusion: Because of their ability to visualise living tissue at cellular levels, confocal microscopes have proved useful additions to the current clinical tools. PMID:12543757

  17. Enlightening the Pink: Use of Confocal Microscopy in Pink Lesions.

    PubMed

    Gill, Melissa; González, Salvador

    2016-10-01

    Solitary pink lesions can pose a particular challenge to dermatologists because they may be almost or completely featureless clinically and dermoscopically, previously requiring biopsy to exclude malignancy. However, these lesions usually are not particularly challenging histopathologically. Thus, the incorporation of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy into the clinical practice, which allows for noninvasive examination of the skin at the cellular level revealing features previously seen only on histopathology, is particularly useful for this subset of clinically difficult lesions.

  18. Time lapse confocal microscopy of mitochondrial movements in ascidian embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardet, C.; Rouvière, C.; Flannery, B.; Davoust, J.

    1991-05-01

    We have analysed the complex movements of vitally stained mitochondria in living eggs of the ascidian (prochordate) embryo soon after fertilization by time lapse confocal (Laser scanning) Microscopy. Our studies clearly show that it is possible to understand how the subcortical mitochondria rich layer contracts, tears and folds to reach its final location in the future posterior pole of the embryo that gives rise to the muscle cell lineage.

  19. Calcium oxalate crystal growth modification; investigations with confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMulkin, Calum J.; Massi, Massimiliano; Jones, Franca

    2017-06-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) in combination with a photophysical investigation has been employed to give insight into the interaction between calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and a series of tetrazole containing crystal growth modifier's (CGM's), in conjunction with characterisation of morphological changes using scanning electron and optical microscopy. The tetrazole CGM's were found to interact by surface adsorption with minimal morphological changes to the COM crystals however, significant interactions via chemisorption were observed; it was discovered that the chemisorption is sufficiently strong for aggregation of the tetrazole species to occur within the crystal during crystallisation.

  20. Evaluation of breast tissue with confocal strip-mosaicking microscopy: a test approach emulating pathology-like examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeytunge, Sanjee; Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Morrow, Monica; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Murray, Melissa P.

    2017-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is an emerging technology for rapid imaging of freshly excised tissue without the need for frozen- or fixed-section processing. Initial studies have described imaging of breast tissue using fluorescence confocal microscopy with small regions of interest, typically 750×750 μm2. We present exploration with a microscope, termed confocal strip-mosaicking microscope (CSM microscope), which images an area of 2×2 cm2 of tissue with cellular-level resolution in 10 min of excision. Using the CSM microscope, we imaged 34 fresh, human, large breast tissue specimens from 18 patients, blindly analyzed by a board-certified pathologist and subsequently correlated with the corresponding standard fixed histopathology. Invasive tumors and benign tissue were clearly identified in CSM strip-mosaic images. Thirty specimens were concordant for image-to-histopathology correlation while four were discordant.

  1. Confocal microscopy patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    González, S; Sánchez, V; González-Rodríguez, A; Parrado, C; Ullrich, M

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is currently the most promising noninvasive diagnostic tool for studying cutaneous structures between the stratum corneum and the superficial reticular dermis. This tool gives real-time images parallel to the skin surface; the microscopic resolution is similar to that of conventional histology. Numerous studies have identified the main confocal features of various inflammatory skin diseases and tumors, demonstrating the good correlation of these features with certain dermatoscopic patterns and histologic findings. Confocal patterns and diagnostic algorithms have been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Possible present and future applications of this noninvasive technology are wide ranging and reach beyond its use in noninvasive diagnosis. This tool can also be used, for example, to evaluate dynamic skin processes that occur after UV exposure or to assess tumor response to noninvasive treatments such as photodynamic therapy. We explain the characteristic confocal features found in the main nonmelanoma skin tumors and discuss possible applications for this novel diagnostic technique in routine dermatology practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  2. Ex vivo confocal microscopy: a new diagnostic technique for mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, A; Cinotti, E; Labeille, B; Perrot, J L; Cambazard, F

    2016-05-01

    Skin-dedicated ex vivo confocal microscopy (EVCM) has so far mainly been employed to identify cutaneous tumours on freshly excised samples. We present two cases where EVCM has been used to diagnose cutaneous mucormycosis. The skin biopsies were evaluated by the skin-dedicated ex vivo confocal microscope VivaScope 2500(®) (MAVIG GmbH, Munich Germany) under both reflectance and fluorescence mode. Conventional direct optical examination on skin scraping and histological examination were later performed. Mucormycetes observed by EVCM presented as hyper-reflective elongated 20 μm in diameter structures with perpendicular ramifications. Fungi were found both under reflectance and fluorescence mode and were better visible with acridine orange under fluorescence EVCM. Conventional direct optical examination on skin scraping and histological examination found the same elongated and branching structures confirming the presence of Mucormycetes. Ex vivo confocal microscopy has both the advantages of being fast as the direct optical examination, and to be able to show the localisation of the fungi in the tissue like the histological examination. In our cases, EVCM allowed to rapidly confirm the clinical diagnosis of mucormycosis, which is essential for the treatment of this fungal infection. Further studies are needed to compare the performance of EVCM with the findings of conventional histological and mycological examinations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Diagnosis of microsporidial keratitis with in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Tsai, I-Lun; Kuo, Chin-Tzu; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2013-01-01

    As a rare cause of microbial keratitis, microsporidial keratitis (MK) is first described in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. As increased use of topical steroid creates a localized immunosuppressive environment of the eyes, MK occurs more commonly than expected in immunocompetent patients nowadays. Owing to initial insidious growth of pathogens and nonspecific ocular symptoms of infected patients, its frequent misdiagnosis has posed a major clinical challenge in recent decades. Without appropriate treatments, MK can progress deeply into corneal stroma, anterior and posterior segments, subsequently deteriorating vision severely and ultimately requiring corneal transplant. Related risk factors for the occurrence of MK in immunocompetent individuals include contact lens wear, topical steroid use, previous corneal trauma, and a history of laser refractive surgery. The conventional standard of MK diagnosis is based on a tissue biopsy by superficial corneal scrapping. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy can obtain images through the cornea in a plane paralleling to the vertical axis. This approach provides an effective method of identifying tissue layers that correspond to corneal histologic structures. This current study investigates the efficacy of \\textit{in vivo} confocal laser scanning microscopy in diagnosing MK in immunocompetent patients. The clinical presentations of enrolled patients, including features of slit lamp biomicroscopy and the histopathological results of corneal scrapping, were described. In these patients, the confocal microscopy identified multiple small intracellular hyper-reflective dots in the cytoplasm of corneal epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes. Additionally, the confocal microscopic images clearly revealed the enhanced cytoplasm of cell with intracellular round hyper-reflective dots. The size and morphology of hyper-reflective dots were compatible with the spores of microsporidia found in corneal tissue

  5. An investigation of striae distensae using reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Heidi; Wurm, Elisabeth; Gilmore, Stephen

    2012-08-01

      Striae distensae, otherwise known as stretch marks, are white or red scar-like streaks on the skin. Although they are not associated with adverse health outcomes, striae are associated with significant cosmetic morbidity. While they have been well characterised histopathologically, a non-invasive method of microscopic lesion assessment of striae would be welcome.   To gain insight into the small-scale morphological features associated with striae we undertook an in vivo investigation of nine patients with striae alba and one with striae rubra utilising reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM).   Here we demonstrate that features known to be present using light microscopy, such as parallel collagen bundles in the dermis, and some features that are not well recognised by light microscopy, including distortion of dermal papillae, are demonstrable using RCM.   Characterising the features of early and established striae distensae with confocal microscopy is an important foundation for future work. The potential ability to reliably identify the earliest pathological changes in skin in early lesions or before clinically manifest striae develop--a task facilitated by our findings--will increase the understanding of their pathogenesis and will have significant practical utility in monitoring the impact of future preventative interventions. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  6. Automated identification of epidermal keratinocytes in reflectance confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Keratinocytes in skin epidermis, which have bright cytoplasmic contrast and dark nuclear contrast in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), were modeled with a simple error function reflectance profile: erf( ). Forty-two example keratinocytes were identified as a training set which characterized the nuclear size a = 8.6+/-2.8 μm and reflectance gradient b = 3.6+/-2.1 μm at the nuclear/cytoplasmic boundary. These mean a and b parameters were used to create a rotationally symmetric erf( ) mask that approximated the mean keratinocyte image. A computer vision algorithm used an erf( ) mask to scan RCM images, identifying the coordinates of keratinocytes. Applying the mask to the confocal data identified the positions of keratinocytes in the epidermis. This simple model may be used to noninvasively evaluate keratinocyte populations as a quantitative morphometric diagnostic in skin cancer detection and evaluation of dermatological cosmetics.

  7. 3D Image Analysis of Geomaterials using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulukutla, G.; Proussevitch, A.; Sahagian, D.

    2009-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is one of the most significant advances in optical microscopy of the last century. It is widely used in biological sciences but its application to geomaterials lingers due to a number of technical problems. Potentially the technique can perform non-invasive testing on a laser illuminated sample that fluoresces using a unique optical sectioning capability that rejects out-of-focus light reaching the confocal aperture. Fluorescence in geomaterials is commonly induced using epoxy doped with a fluorochrome that is impregnated into the sample to enable discrimination of various features such as void space or material boundaries. However, for many geomaterials, this method cannot be used because they do not naturally fluoresce and because epoxy cannot be impregnated into inaccessible parts of the sample due to lack of permeability. As a result, the confocal images of most geomaterials that have not been pre-processed with extensive sample preparation techniques are of poor quality and lack the necessary image and edge contrast necessary to apply any commonly used segmentation techniques to conduct any quantitative study of its features such as vesicularity, internal structure, etc. In our present work, we are developing a methodology to conduct a quantitative 3D analysis of images of geomaterials collected using a confocal microscope with minimal amount of prior sample preparation and no addition of fluorescence. Two sample geomaterials, a volcanic melt sample and a crystal chip containing fluid inclusions are used to assess the feasibility of the method. A step-by-step process of image analysis includes application of image filtration to enhance the edges or material interfaces and is based on two segmentation techniques: geodesic active contours and region competition. Both techniques have been applied extensively to the analysis of medical MRI images to segment anatomical structures. Preliminary analysis suggests that there is distortion in the

  8. Imaging intracellular protein dynamics by spinning disk confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stehbens, Samantha; Pemble, Hayley; Murrow, Lindsay; Wittmann, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    The palette of fluorescent proteins has grown exponentially over the last decade, and as a result live imaging of cells expressing fluorescently tagged proteins is becoming more and more main stream. Spinning disk confocal microscopy (SDC) is a high speed optical sectioning technique, and a method of choice to observe and analyze intracellular fluorescent protein dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. In an SDC system, a rapidly rotating pinhole disk generates thousands of points of light that scan the specimen simultaneously, which allows direct capture of the confocal image with low noise scientific grade cooled charged-coupled device (CCD) cameras, and can achieve frame rates of up 1000 frames per second. In this chapter we describe important components of a state-of-the-art spinning disk system optimized for live cell microscopy, and provide a rationale for specific design choices. We also give guidelines how other imaging techniques such as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy or spatially controlled photoactivation can be coupled with SDC imaging, and provide a short protocol on how to generate cell lines stably expressing fluorescently tagged proteins by lentivirus-mediated transduction. PMID:22264541

  9. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy features of a melanoacanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Neda; Grant-Kels, Jane M.; Rabinovitz, Harold S.; Oliviero, Margaret; Scope, Alon

    2016-01-01

    Efforts have been expended to evaluate the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) features of different clinical entities in order to more thoroughly delineate benign versus malignant features. In this way, RCM can help clinicians to be more selective in regard to undertaking appropriate skin biopsies and improving their benign to malignant ratio. Herein, we report a case of a histopathologically proven melanoacanthoma, a variant of seborrheic keratosis. There are scarce reports describing the RCM features of melanoacanthoma. Our case demonstrated RCM features that were suspicious for melanoma. More RCM images of this benign entity are needed to establish definitive diagnostic criteria. PMID:27867743

  10. Telediagnosis with Confocal Microscopy: A Reality or a Dream?

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Alexander; Łudzik, Joanna; Soyer, H Peter

    2016-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is becoming more popular among dermatologists aiming to improve their bedside diagnostic accuracy and reduce unnecessary removal of benign cutaneous lesions. With increased interest in the field, limitation of experts, and dedicated training programs, telemedicine application to RCM (teleconfocal) helps to connect patients with experts at a distance. Diagnostic accuracy of store-and-forward telemedicine review of RCM images, patient safety, and cost-effectiveness are important considerations for proper acceptance and usage of the technology in the medical community. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Confocal Microscopy for Modeling Electron Microbeam Irradiation of Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-08-01

    For radiation exposures employing targeted sources such as particle microbeams, the deposition of energy and dose will depend on the spatial heterogeneity of the spample. Although cell structural variations are relatively minor for two-dimensional cell cultures, they can vary significantly for fully differential tissues. Employing high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have determined the spatial distribution, size, and shape of epidermal kerantinocyte nuclei for the full-thickness EpiDerm skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). Application of these data to claculate the microdosimetry and microdistribution of energy deposition by an electron microbeam is discussed.

  12. Automated imaging of extended tissue volumes using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sands, Gregory B; Gerneke, Dane A; Hooks, Darren A; Green, Colin R; Smaill, Bruce H; Legrice, Ian J

    2005-08-01

    Confocal microscopy enables constitutive elements of cells and tissues to be viewed at high resolution and reconstructed in three dimensions, but is constrained by the limited extent of the volumes that can be imaged. We have developed an automated technique that enables serial confocal images to be acquired over large tissue areas and volumes. The computer-controlled system, which integrates a confocal microscope and an ultramill using a high-precision translation stage, inherently preserves specimen registration, and the user control interface enables flexible specification of imaging protocols over a wide range of scales and resolutions. With this system it is possible to reconstruct specified morphological features in three dimensions and locate them accurately throughout a tissue sample. We have successfully imaged various samples at 1-mum voxel resolution on volumes up to 4 mm3 and on areas up to 75 mm2. Used in conjunction with appropriate embedding media and immuno-histochemical probes, the techniques described in this paper make it possible to routinely map the distributions of key intracellular structures over much larger tissue domains than has been easily achievable in the past. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Glowing in the Dark: Use of Confocal Microscopy in Dark Pigmented Lesions.

    PubMed

    Sardá, Susana Puig; Suárez, Rodolfo; Malvehy Guilera, Josep

    2016-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy patterns and structures of clinically dark lesions are described. Because many of the dark lesions have melanin in superficial skin layers these lesions show great semiology by confocal. Limitations and pitfalls of reflectance confocal microscopy in clinically dark lesions are also detailed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantification of transendothelial migration using three-dimensional confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cain, Robert J; d'Água, Bárbara Borda; Ridley, Anne J

    2011-01-01

    Migration of cells across endothelial barriers, termed transendothelial migration (TEM), is an important cellular process that underpins the pathology of many disease states including chronic inflammation and cancer metastasis. While this process can be modeled in vitro using cultured cells, many model systems are unable to provide detailed visual information of cell morphologies and distribution of proteins such as junctional markers, as well as quantitative data on the rate of TEM. Improvements in imaging techniques have made microscopy-based assays an invaluable tool for studying this type of detailed cell movement in physiological processes. In this chapter, we describe a confocal microscopy-based method that can be used to assess TEM of both leukocytes and cancer cells across endothelial barriers in response to a chemotactic gradient, as well as providing information on their migration into a subendothelial extracellular matrix, designed to mimic that found in vivo.

  15. Segmentation of skin strata in reflectance confocal microscopy depth stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, Samuel C.; Ardigò, Marco; Soyer, H. Peter; Bradley, Andrew P.; Prow, Tarl W.

    2015-03-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is an emerging tool for imaging human skin, but currently requires expert human assessment. To overcome the need for human experts it is necessary to develop automated tools for automatically assessing reflectance confocal microscopy imagery. This work presents a novel approach to this task, using a bag of visual words approach to represent and classify en-face optical sections from four distinct strata of the skin. A dictionary of representative features is learned from whitened and normalised patches using hierarchical spherical k-means. Each image is then represented by extracting a dense array of patches and encoding each with the most similar element in the dictionary. Linear discriminant analysis is used as a simple linear classifier. The proposed framework was tested on 308 depth stacks from 54 volunteers. Parameters are tuned using 10 fold cross validation on a training sub-set of the data, and final evaluation was performed on a held out test set. The proposed method generated physically plausible profiles of the distinct strata of human skin, and correctly classified 81.4% of sections in the test set.

  16. Precise colloids with tunable interactions for confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas E.; Guerra, Rodrigo E.; Sprakel, Joris

    2015-09-01

    Model colloidal systems studied with confocal microscopy have led to numerous insights into the physics of condensed matter. Though confocal microscopy is an extremely powerful tool, it requires a careful choice and preparation of the colloid. Uncontrolled or unknown variations in the size, density, and composition of the individual particles and interactions between particles, often influenced by the synthetic route taken to form them, lead to difficulties in interpreting the behavior of the dispersion. Here we describe the straightforward synthesis of copolymer particles which can be refractive index- and density-matched simultaneously to a non-plasticizing mixture of high dielectric solvents. The interactions between particles are accurately tuned by surface grafting of polymer brushes using Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP), from hard-sphere-like to long-ranged electrostatic repulsion or mixed charge attraction. We also modify the buoyant density of the particles by altering the copolymer ratio while maintaining their refractive index match to the suspending solution resulting in well controlled sedimentation. The tunability of the inter-particle interactions, the low volatility of the solvents, and the capacity to simultaneously match both the refractive index and density of the particles to the fluid opens up new possibilities for exploring the physics of colloidal systems.

  17. Three dimensional reconstruction of neuron morphology from confocal microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, Zian; Martinez-Perez, M. Elena

    2010-05-01

    In recent years it has been more common to see 3D visualization of objects applied in many different areas. In neuroscience research, 3D visualization of neurons acquired at different depth views (i.e. image stacks) by means of confocal microscopy are of increase use. However in the best case, these visualizations only help to have a qualitative description of the neuron shape. Since it is well know that neuronal function is intimately related to its morphology. Having a precise characterization of neuronal structures such as axons and dendrites is critical to perform a quantitative analysis and thus it allows to design neuronal functional models based on neuron morphology. Currently there exists different commercial software to reconstruct neuronal arbors, however these processes are labor intensive since in most of the cases they are manually made. In this paper we propose a new software capable to reconstruct 3D neurons from confocal microscopy views in a more efficient way, with minimal user intervention. The propose algorithm is based on finding the tubular structures present in the stack of images using a modify version of the minimal graph cut algorithm. The model is generated from the segmented stack with a modified version of the Marching Cubes algorithm to generate de 3D isosurface. Herein we describe the principles of our 3D segmentation technique and the preliminary results.

  18. Embryonic Heart Morphogenesis from Confocal Microscopy Imaging and Automatic Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Megan; Pertsov, Arkady M.; Shi, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic heart morphogenesis (EHM) is a complex and dynamic process where the heart transforms from a single tube into a four-chambered pump. This process is of great biological and clinical interest but is still poorly understood for two main reasons. On the one hand, the existing imaging modalities for investigating EHM suffered from either limited penetration depth or limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, current works typically adopted manual segmentation, which was tedious, subjective, and time consuming considering the complexity of developing heart geometry and the large size of images. In this paper, we propose to utilize confocal microscopy imaging with tissue optical immersion clearing technique to image the heart at different stages of development for EHM study. The imaging method is able to produce high spatial resolution images and achieve large penetration depth at the same time. Furthermore, we propose a novel convex active contour model for automatic image segmentation. The model has the ability to deal with intensity fall-off in depth which is characterized by confocal microscopy images. We acquired the images of embryonic quail hearts from day 6 to day 14 of incubation for EHM study. The experimental results were promising and provided us with an insight view of early heart growth pattern and also paved the road for data-driven heart growth modeling. PMID:24454530

  19. Multimodal confocal microscopy for diagnosing nonmelanoma skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Al-Arashi, Munir Y; Salomatina, Elena; Yaroslavsky, Anna N

    2007-10-01

    The standard diagnostic procedure for skin cancers is invasive biopsy followed by histopathological evaluation. The biopsy may result in scarring and infection. A reliable way to noninvasively image suspicious lesions with high resolution and contrast would be valuable. In this study, the suitability of dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for the detection of nonmelanoma skin cancers was evaluated. For the experiments we used fresh tumor material stained using 0.2 mg/ml or 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solutions of methylene blue (MB) or toluidine blue (TB), respectively. Reflectance, fluorescence, and fluorescence polarization images of skin specimens stained with MB and TB were excited by 656 nm and 633 nm light, respectively. Fluorescence emission and anisotropy were registered between 690 nm and 710 nm. In addition, reference reflectance images at 830 nm were acquired. In total we imaged, analyzed, and compared to histology at least 10 samples of each tumor-type including nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC), infiltrative basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The morphological features and appearance of skin structures in the fluorescence images correlate well with corresponding histology for all investigated tumor-types. Multi-spectral reflectance images provide information on the tissue spectral responses and are complimentary to the fluorescence images. The differences detected by fluorescence polarization in cancerous and normal structures may be used for cancerous tissue discrimination. Our results indicate the feasibility of using multimodal confocal microscopy as real-time tool for detecting skin pathology. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  20. Monitoring Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Confocal Immunofluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a protocol to detect chemokine receptor CXCR4 by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy in HeLa cells treated with its chemokine ligand CXCL12. Typically, ligand-activated chemokine receptors undergo a multistep process of desensitization and/or internalization from the plasma membrane in order to terminate signaling. Once internalized to endosomes, chemokine receptors readily enter the recycling pathway and return to the cell surface, giving rise to resensitization of signaling. The chemokine receptor CXCR4, when activated by CXCL12 is also internalized to endosomes, but in contrast to many chemokine receptors it is mainly sorted to the degradative pathway, contributing to a loss in the cellular complement of CXCR4 and long-term downregulation of signaling. The trafficking of CXCR4 from early endosomes to lysosomes can be easily detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy by immunostaining fixed cells for the receptor and with markers of these vesicular compartments. This approach is advantageous because it can be used to identify factors that regulate the trafficking of CXCR4 from early endosomes to lysosomes. The protocol described here focuses on CXCR4, but it can be easily adapted to other chemokine receptors. PMID:26921951

  1. Measurement of steep edges and undercuts in confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, T; Jordan, M; Schneider, T; Poesch, A; Reithmeier, E

    2016-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is widely used to measure the surface topography of specimen with a precision in the micrometer range. The measurement uncertainty and quality of the acquired data of confocal microscopy depends on various effects, such as optical aberrations, vibrations of the measurement setup and variations in the surface reflectivity. In this article, the influence of steep edges and undercuts on measurement results is examined. Steep edges on the specimen's surface lead to a reduced detector signal which influences the measurement accuracy and undercuts cause surface regions, which cannot be captured in a measurement. The article describes a method to overcome the negative effects of steep edges and undercuts by capturing several measurements of the surface with different angles between the surface and the optical axis of the objective. An algorithm is introduced which stitches different angle measurements together without knowledge of the exact position and orientation of the rotation axis. Thus, the measurement uncertainty due to steep edges and undercuts can be avoided without expensive high-precision rotation stages and time consuming adjustment of the measurement setup.

  2. Early confocal microscopy findings after cross-linking treatment.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, M; Hernández-Quintela, E; Naranjo-Tackman, R

    2013-05-01

    To determine the effects of in vivo cross-linking treatment of the cornea. Eighteen eyes of eighteen keratoconus patients underwent cross-linking treatment using a 0.1% riboflavin solution and ultraviolet A radiation at 370 nm at 3 mW/cm² for 30 minutes. In vivo confocal microscopy was performed before, and at 1 week and 1 month after treatment. At 1 week after treatment, keratocyte activation and collagen fiber organization showed as hyper-reflective structures and were observed from the first sub-epithelial image to a corneal stromal depth of 275.1 ± 85.9 μm. At 1 month after treatment, activated keratocytes and fiber organization were also observed from the first sub-epithelial image to a corneal stromal depth of 324.9 ± 66.0 μm. The deepest hyper-reflective structures at 1 month showed as thick, linear-shaped hyper-reflective structures. In vivo confocal microscopy in humans showed corneal stromal changes at 1 week and 1 month after cross-linking treatment, in some cases at depths in excess of 300 μm. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Precise colloids with tunable interactions for confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kodger, Thomas E.; Guerra, Rodrigo E.; Sprakel, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Model colloidal systems studied with confocal microscopy have led to numerous insights into the physics of condensed matter. Though confocal microscopy is an extremely powerful tool, it requires a careful choice and preparation of the colloid. Uncontrolled or unknown variations in the size, density, and composition of the individual particles and interactions between particles, often influenced by the synthetic route taken to form them, lead to difficulties in interpreting the behavior of the dispersion. Here we describe the straightforward synthesis of copolymer particles which can be refractive index- and density-matched simultaneously to a non-plasticizing mixture of high dielectric solvents. The interactions between particles are accurately tuned by surface grafting of polymer brushes using Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP), from hard-sphere-like to long-ranged electrostatic repulsion or mixed charge attraction. We also modify the buoyant density of the particles by altering the copolymer ratio while maintaining their refractive index match to the suspending solution resulting in well controlled sedimentation. The tunability of the inter-particle interactions, the low volatility of the solvents, and the capacity to simultaneously match both the refractive index and density of the particles to the fluid opens up new possibilities for exploring the physics of colloidal systems. PMID:26420044

  4. Handheld Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for the Detection of Recurrent Extramammary Paget Disease.

    PubMed

    Yélamos, Oriol; Hibler, Brian P; Cordova, Miguel; Hollmann, Travis J; Kose, Kivanc; Marchetti, Michael A; Myskowski, Patricia L; Pulitzer, Melissa P; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Rossi, Anthony M; Jain, Manu

    2017-07-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is commonly refractory to surgical and nonsurgical therapies. Identifying recurrent or persistent EMPD is challenging because the disease is multifocal, and multiple blind scouting biopsies are usually performed in this setting. Handheld reflectance confocal microscopy (HRCM) has been used to diagnose and map primary EMPD and therefore may be used to identify EMPD recurrences. To evaluate HRCM's diagnostic accuracy in the setting of recurrent or persistent EMPD as well as its potential diagnostic pitfalls. This prospective case series study included patients referred to the Dermatology Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2016, with biopsy-proven EMPD in whom HRCM was used to monitor treatment response. Five patients were included, and 22 sites clinically concerning for recurrent or persistent disease were evaluated using HRCM and histopathologic examination. In 2 patients, video mosaics were created to evaluate large areas. Sensitivity and specificity of HRCM in identifying recurrent or persistent EMPD; causes for false-negative results according to their location, histopathologic findings, and previous treatments. Of the 22 clinically suspicious sites evaluated in 5 patients (4 men, 1 woman; median [range] age, 70 [56-77] years), 9 (40.9%) were positive for recurrent disease on HRCM and histopathologically confirmed, and 13 (59.1%) sites were negative on HRCM, but 3 of the 13 were positive for EMPD on histopathological examination. In general, HRCM had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 100% in identifying recurrent or persistent EMPD. False-negative results were found in 2 patients and occurred at the margins of EMPD, close to previous biopsy sites. Creating video mosaics (or video mosaicking) seemed to improve the detection of EMPD. Handheld reflectance confocal microscopy is a useful auxiliary tool for diagnosing EMPD recurrences and can be used to guide scouting

  5. Rapid detection of biofilms and adherent pathogens using scanning confocal laser microscopy and episcopic differential interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Keevil, C W

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of biofilm structure and function has changed significantly in the last few years due to advances in light microscopy. One pertinent example is the use of scanning confocal laser microscopy (SCLM) to visualise corrosion pits caused by the biofilm mosaic footprint on corroding metal surfaces. Nevertheless, SCLM has some limitations as to its widespread use, including cost, inability to observe motile bacteria and eukaryotic grazers within biofilms, and difficulty to scan a curved surface. By contrast, episcopic differential interference contrast (EDIC) microscopy has provided a rapid, real time analysis of biofilms on opaque, curved, natural or man-made surfaces without the need for cover slips and oil. EDIC, coupled with epi-fluorescence (EDIC/EF), microscopy has been used successfully to visualise the 3-D biofilm structure, physiological niches, protozoal grazing and iron biomineralization, and the location of specific pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, Campylobacter jejuni and Cryptosporidium parvum. These species were identified using gold nanoparticles or fluorophores coupled to monoclonal antibodies or 16S rRNA probes, respectively. Among its many potential uses, the EDIC technique will provide a rapid procedure to facilitate the calibration of the modern generation of biofilm-sensing electrodes.

  6. Noninvasive imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic using a confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu; Norris, Jennifer L.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Williams, David R.; Carroll, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The rod photoreceptors are implicated in a number of devastating retinal diseases. However, routine imaging of these cells has remained elusive, even with the advent of adaptive optics imaging. Here, we present the first in vivo images of the contiguous rod photoreceptor mosaic in nine healthy human subjects. The images were collected with three different confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopes at two different institutions, using 680 and 775 nm superluminescent diodes for illumination. Estimates of photoreceptor density and rod:cone ratios in the 5°–15° retinal eccentricity range are consistent with histological findings, confirming our ability to resolve the rod mosaic by averaging multiple registered images, without the need for additional image processing. In one subject, we were able to identify the emergence of the first rods at approximately 190 μm from the foveal center, in agreement with previous histological studies. The rod and cone photoreceptor mosaics appear in focus at different retinal depths, with the rod mosaic best focus (i.e., brightest and sharpest) being at least 10 μm shallower than the cones at retinal eccentricities larger than 8°. This study represents an important step in bringing high-resolution imaging to bear on the study of rod disorders. PMID:21750765

  7. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.; Vdovin, G.; Verhaegen, M.

    2016-03-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront sensor. This approach is severely limited in fluorescence microscopy, as the use of a wavefront sensor requires the presence of a bright, point like source in the field of view, a condition rarely satisfied in microscopy samples. Previously reported approaches to adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy are therefore limited to the inclusion of fluorescent microspheres in the sample, to use as bright stars for wavefront sensors, or time consuming sensorless optimization procedures, requiring several seconds of optimization before the acquisition of a single image. We propose an alternative approach to the problem, implementing sensorless adaptive optics in a Programmable array microscope. A programmable array microscope is a microscope based on a digital micromirror device, in which the single elements of the micromirror act both as point sources and pinholes.

  8. Laser skin rejuvenation: epidermal changes and collagen remodeling evaluated by in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Longo, Caterina; Galimberti, Michela; De Pace, Barbara; Pellacani, Giovanni; Bencini, Pier Luca

    2013-05-01

    Fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing is an effective treatment of skin aging. Several studies investigated the morphologic changes due to this laser treatment by using skin biopsies or animal model. Recently, reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has emerged as a new tool that can "optically" scan the skin in vivo with a nearly histologic resolution and in a totally noninvasive modality. Our study aims to analyze the skin changes following the ablative fractional CO2 laser sessions by using RCM. Ten patients were subjected to ablative fractional CO2 laser sessions for skin aging. Confocal microscopic images were acquired at baseline (w0), 3 weeks (w3), 6 weeks (w6), and 12 weeks (w12) after laser session. Previously identified confocal parameters were used to assess the skin aging at baseline and after treatment. At w3, the epidermis showed a complete disappearance of the mottled pigmentation upon RCM along with the presence of few Langherans' cells. The collagen type as seen upon RCM observed at baseline was replaced by a newly formed collagen type of long, bright and straight fibers (collagen remodeling). These fibers were parallel arranged and observed throughout the entire RCM mosaic. At w6 and w12 the confocal aspects of the skin was unchanged compared to w3. RCM confirmed the presence of an intense collagen remodeling following laser resurfacing. In line with previous studies, this collagen showed a peculiar arrangement and distribution. The collagen remodeling was still present after 3 months and confirms the long-term effect of the treatment. This is the first time that the skin can be analyzed in vivo at patient's bedside. In the near future, RCM can be an essential adjunct for Clinicians to measure the effects of laser treatment and possibly to gain new insights into the development of side effects.

  9. Advantages of chromatic-confocal spectral interferometry in comparison to chromatic confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyda, W.; Gronle, M.; Fleischle, D.; Mauch, F.; Osten, W.

    2012-05-01

    Chromatic confocal microscopy (CCM) and spectral interferometry (SI) are established and robust sensor principles. CCM is a focus-based measurement principle, whose lateral and axial resolutions depend on the sensor's numerical aperture (NA), while the measurement range is given by the spectral bandwidth and the chromatic dispersion in the axial direction. Although CCM is a robust principle, its accuracy can be reduced by self-imaging effects or asymmetric illumination of the sensor pupil. Interferometric principles based on the evaluation of the optical path difference, e.g., SI, have proven to be robust against self-imaging. The disadvantage of SI is its measurement range, which is limited by the depth of focus. Hence, the usable NA and the lateral resolution are restricted. Chromatic-confocal spectral interferometry (CCSI) is a combination of SI and CCM, which overcomes these restrictions. The increase of robustness of CCSI compared to CCM due to the interferometric gain has been demonstrated before. In this contribution the advantages of CCSI in comparison to CCM concerning self-imaging artifacts will be demonstrated. Therefore, a new phase-evaluation algorithm with higher resolution concerning classical SI-based evaluation algorithms is presented. For the comparison of different sensor systems, a chirp comparison standard is used.

  10. Combined In Vivo Confocal Raman Spectroscopy and Confocal Microscopy of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, P. J.; Lucassen, G. W.; Puppels, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy is a noninvasive optical method to obtain detailed information about the molecular composition of the skin with high spatial resolution. In vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy is an imaging modality that provides optical sections of the skin without physically dissecting the tissue. A combination of both techniques in a single instrument is described. This combination allows the skin morphology to be visualized and (subsurface) structures in the skin to be targeted for Raman measurements. Novel results are presented that show detailed in vivo concentration profiles of water and of natural moisturizing factor for the stratum corneum that are directly related to the skin architecture by in vivo cross-sectional images of the skin. Targeting of skin structures is demonstrated by recording in vivo Raman spectra of sweat ducts and sebaceous glands in situ. In vivo measurements on dermal capillaries yielded high-quality Raman spectra of blood in a completely noninvasive manner. From the results of this exploratory study we conclude that the technique presented has great potential for fundamental skin research, pharmacology (percutaneous transport), clinical dermatology, and cosmetic research, as well as for noninvasive analysis of blood analytes, including glucose. PMID:12829511

  11. Single nuclear pores visualized by confocal microscopy and image processing.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Wedekind, P; Zeidler, O; Grote, M; Peters, R

    1996-01-01

    How nuclear pore complexes, mediating the transport of nucleic acids, proteins, and metabolites between cell nucleus and cytoplasm, are arranged in the nuclear envelope is essentially unknown. Here we describe a method combining high-resolution confocal imaging with image processing and pattern recognition to visualize single nuclear pore complexes (120 nm diameter), determine their relative positions with nanometer accuracy, and analyze their distribution in situ. The method was tested by means of a model system in which the very same sample areas could be imaged by confocal and electron microscopy. It was thus found that single fluorescent beads of 105 nm nominal diameter could be localized with a lateral accuracy of <20 nm and an axial accuracy of approximately 20 nm. The method was applied to digitonin-permeabilized 3T3 cells, whose nuclear pore complexes were fluorescently labeled with the anti-nucleoporin antibody mAb414. Stacks of optical sections were generated by confocal imaging at high resolution. Herein the nuclear pore complexes appeared as bright diffraction-limited spots whose centers were localized by fitting them by three-dimensional gaussians. The nearest-neighbor distribution function and the pair correlation function were calculated and found to agree well with those of randomly distributed hard cylinders of 138 +/- 17 nm diameter, but not with those of randomly distributed points or nonrandomly distributed cylinders. This was supported by a cluster analysis. Implications for the direct observation of the transport of single particles and molecules through individual nuclear pore complexes are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 PMID:9172731

  12. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  13. Cosmetic assessment of the human hair by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hadjur, Christophe; Daty, Gérard; Madry, Geneviève; Corcuff, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The optical sectioning property of the confocal microscope offers a breakthrough from the classic observation of the hair in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Confocal microscopy requires minimal sampling preparation, and the hair can be observed in its natural environment with less damage than by other microscopic methods such as SEM. While used in the reflection mode, the true morphology of the cuticle and the various exogenous deposits at the surface can be identified and quantified. This relatively noninvasive, nondestructive technique is routinely used by us to monitor the efficiency of cleansing shampoos, to assess the homogeneity of layering polymers, and to evaluate the changes they induce in the optical properties of the hair surface in terms of opacity, transparency, and brilliancy. A second important field of investigation uses the fluorescence channel which reveals the internal structure of the hair. Fluorescent probes (rhodamine and its derivatives) demonstrate the routes of penetration and outline the geometry of cortical cells and of the medulla according to their lipophilic or hydrophilic properties. A volume rendering of a hair cylinder provides a better understanding of the interrelationships between cuticle cells, cortical cells, and the medullar channel. This recent technology is becoming an invaluable tool for the cosmetic assessment of the hair.

  14. Three-dimensional visualization methods for confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, H T; Brakenhoff, G J; Baarslag, M W

    1989-02-01

    Three-dimensional images of microscopic objects can be obtained by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The imaging process in a CSLM consists of sampling a specific volume in the object and storing the result in a three-dimensional memory array of a digital computer. Methods are needed to visualize these images. In this paper three methods are discussed, each suitable in a specific area of application. For purposes where realistic rendering of solid or semi-transparent objects is required, an algorithm based on simulation of a fluorescence process is most suitable. When speed is essential, as for interactive purposes, a simple procedure to generate anaglyphs can be used. Both methods have in common that they require no previous interpretation or analysis of the image. When the study of an object imaged by CSLM involves analysis in terms of a geometrical model, sophisticated graphics techniques can be used to display the results of the analysis.

  15. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vukojevic, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-11-25

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed.

  16. Adaptive optics for confocal laser scanning microscopy with adjustable pinhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Han Woong; van Royen, Martin E.; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Verhaegen, Michel; Schitter, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The pinhole plays an important role in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for adaptive optics (AO) as well as in imaging, where the size of the pinhole denotes a trade-off between out-of-focus rejection and wavefront distortion. This contribution proposes an AO system for a commercial CLSM with an adjustable square pinhole to cope with such a trade-off. The proposed adjustable pinhole enables to calibrate the AO system and to evaluate the imaging performance. Experimental results with fluorescence beads on the coverslip and at a depth of 40 μm in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell spheroid demonstrate that the proposed AO system can improve the image quality by the proposed calibration method. The proposed pinhole intensity ratio also indicates the image improvement by the AO correction in intensity as well as resolution.

  17. Reflectance confocal microscopy: an effective diagnostic tool for dermatophytic infections.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Daniel; Friedman, Peter C; Gill, Melissa

    2015-02-01

    Current methods for diagnosing dermatophytic infections have various drawbacks. Analysis via skin scrapings and biopsies can be invasive and/or take too long to yield results. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is an emerging in vivo imaging technology that can potentially be used to diagnose cutaneous dermatophytic infections. This modality provides high-resolution images of the skin extending to the level of the superficial reticular dermis that could reveal the presence of fungal hyphae. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated the application of RCM as a diagnostic tool in the setting of a private practice. Images were used to diagnose dermatophyte infections and the results were compared to those of other established diagnostic methods. We found RCM to be a potentially effective and highly sensitive tool in the diagnosis of cutaneous dermatophytic infections.

  18. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  19. Ocular mucin visualization by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peral, Assumpta; Pintor, Jesús

    2008-05-01

    To describe a new method of visualizing human conjunctiva goblet cell mucin secretion by using a combination of impression cytology and laser scanning microscopy. By assembling a Z-stack of confocal microscopy images taken from human impression cytology samples, we obtained 3-dimensional information about the release and spread of goblet cell secretions above the conjunctival surface. After reconstruction and rendering of these images, analysis of the shape and spreading characteristics of the mucins permitted definition of the following parameters related to goblet cell secretion: mucin cloud height as the height of the top of the cloudlike mucin structure visible above the goblet cell opening and spread mucin thickness, which is the thickness of the mucin layer distributed over the surface of the conjunctiva. Several impression cytology samples of control and muco-deficient patients have been analyzed through the confocal laser scanning technique, and significant differences between these groups were found. Mucin cloud height and spread mucin thickness values for controls were 8.81 +/- 4.00 and 2.77 +/- 1.00 microm, respectively (n = 25). These values decreased by approximately 70% and 40%, respectively, for moderately mucodeficient subjects and by 84% and 48% for those with severe mucodeficiency. Classifying those individuals having mucin-related pathology may thus be possible on the basis of application of these techniques. In summary, we present a method of objectively identifying those individuals with problems associated with either a lack of mucins or a reduction in the distribution of these proteins over the ocular surface.

  20. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongkyun; Carruth, Robert W; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo.

  1. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Carruth, Robert W.; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C.; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo. PMID:24156054

  2. Mosaic acquisition and processing for optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Peng; Shi, Wei; Chee, Ryan K. W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-08-01

    In optical-resolution photo-acoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), data acquisition time is limited by both laser pulse repetition rate (PRR) and scanning speed. Optical-scanning offers high speed, but limited, field of view determined by ultrasound transducer sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a hybrid optical and mechanical-scanning OR-PAM system with mosaic data acquisition and processing. The system employs fast-scanning mirrors and a diode-pumped, nanosecond-pulsed, Ytterbium-doped, 532-nm fiber laser with PRR up to 600 kHz. Data from a sequence of image mosaic patches is acquired systematically, at predetermined mechanical scanning locations, with optical scanning. After all imaging locations are covered, a large panoramic scene is generated by stitching the mosaic patches together. Our proposed system is proven to be at least 20 times faster than previous reported OR-PAM systems.

  3. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Confocal Microscopy for Dermatologic and Mohs Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Longo, Caterina; Ragazzi, Moira; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Nehal, Kishwer; Bennassar, Antoni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Malvehy Guilera, Josep

    2016-10-01

    Confocal microscopy is a modern imaging device that has been extensively applied in skin oncology. More specifically, for tumor margin assessment, it has been used in two modalities: reflectance mode (in vivo on skin patient) and fluorescence mode (on freshly excised specimen). Although in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy is an add-on tool for lentigo maligna mapping, fluorescence confocal microscopy is far superior for basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma margin assessment in the Mohs setting. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the use of confocal microscopy for skin cancer margin evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective About 350 publications worldwide have reported the ability of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging to detect melanocytic skin lesions in vivo with specificity of 84-88% and sensitivity of 71-92%, and non-melanocytic skin lesions with specificity of 85-97% and sensitivity 100-92%. Lentigo maligna melanoma can be detected with sensitivity of 93% and specificity 82%. While the sensitivity is comparable to that of dermoscopy, the specificity is 2X superior, especially for lightly- and non-pigmented lesions. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is proving to be both highly sensitive and highly specific. Recent studies have reported that the ratio of equivocal (i.e., would have been biopsied) lesions to detected melanomas dropped by ~2X when guided by dermoscopy and RCM imaging, compared to that with dermoscopy alone. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is now being implemented to guide noninvasive diagnosis (to rule out malignancy and biopsy) and to also guide treatment, with promising initial impact: thus far, about 3,000 patients have been saved from biopsies of benign lesions. These are currently under follow-up monitoring. With fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) mosaicing, residual basal cell carcinomas can be detected in Mohs surgically excised fresh tissue ex vivo, with sensitivity of 94-97% and specificity 89-94%. FCM mosaicing is now being implemented for guiding Mohs surgery. To date, about 600 Mohs procedures have been performed, guided with mosaicing, and with pathology being performed in parallel to confirm the final outcome. These latest advances demonstrate the promising ability of RCM and FCM to guide patient care.

  5. In vivo confocal microscopy of corneal microscopic foreign bodies in horses.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Eric C; Irby, Nita L; Schaefer, Deanna M W

    2014-07-01

    To describe in vivo corneal confocal microscopy of horses with microscopic corneal foreign bodies and to correlate findings with clinical, cytological, and histopathologic evaluations of clinical cases and foreign body morphologies observed in vitro with the confocal microscope. Five horses with microscopic corneal foreign bodies. Sedated and anesthetized horses were examined with a modified Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II and Rostock Cornea Module. Confocal microscopy images were compared with images from cytologic and histopathologic corneal samples. To establish microscopic morphologic features, confocal microscopy images of burdock pappus bristles and surgical glove powder were obtained by in vitro examination. Horses were examined by in vivo confocal microscopy to assist in identifying corneal opacities detected by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, to determine the etiology of clinically idiopathic keratitis, or to localize corneal opacities presumed to be foreign bodies for surgical planning. Corneal foreign bodies presumptively identified by confocal microscopy included burdock pappus bristles, other plant foreign materials, and surgical glove powder. The corneal foreign bodies appeared as moderately or hyper-reflective linear, circular, or oval structures by confocal microscopy and did not resemble any normal anatomic structures. The confocal microscopic identification of the foreign bodies was corroborated by cytologic and histopathologic findings in some horses. The in vivo confocal microscopic appearance of the foreign bodies was consistent with morphologies observed during examination of foreign bodies in vitro. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy provides a noninvasive method for the detection, characterization, and localization of microscopic foreign bodies in the equine cornea. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  6. Unsupervised noise removal algorithms for 3-D confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roysam, Badrinath; Bhattacharjya, Anoop K.; Srinivas, Chukka; Szarowski, Donald H.; Turner, James N.

    1992-06-01

    Fast algorithms are presented for effective removal of the noise artifact in 3-D confocal fluorescence microscopy images of extended spatial objects such as neurons. The algorithms are unsupervised in the sense that they automatically estimate and adapt to the spatially and temporally varying noise level in the microscopy data. An important feature of the algorithms is the fact that a 3-D segmentation of the field emerges jointly with the intensity estimate. The role of the segmentation is to limit any smoothing to the interiors of regions and hence avoid the blurring that is associated with conventional noise removal algorithms. Fast computation is achieved by parallel computation methods, rather than by algorithmic or modelling compromises. The noise-removal proceeds iteratively, starting from a set of approximate user- supplied, or default initial guesses of the underlying random process parameters. An expectation maximization algorithm is used to obtain a more precise characterization of these parameters, that are then input to a hierarchical estimation algorithm. This algorithm computes a joint solution of the related problems corresponding to intensity estimation, segmentation, and boundary-surface estimation subject to a combination of stochastic priors and syntactic pattern constraints. Three-dimensional stereoscopic renderings of processed 3-D images of murine hippocampal neurons are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The processed images exhibit increased contrast and significant smoothing and reduction of the background intensity while avoiding any blurring of the neuronal structures.

  7. Probing chirality of a lipid tubular by confocal Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiang-ia, Jarinee; Hailong, Hu; Bin, Yan; Jantippana, Yuwathida; Pantu, Piboon; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn; Zexiang, Shen; Ting, Yu

    2010-11-01

    The chiral phospholipids 1,2-bis-(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9 PC) can self assemble into lipid nanotubules. This hollow cylindrical supramolecular structure shows promise in a number of biotechnological applications. The mechanism of lipid tubule formation was initiated by assembling of lipid bilayer sheets from amphiphilic solution. Upon cooling, small ribbons were detached from the sheets and rolled up into helical tubules. The lipid tubules obtained were 0.6-0.8 microm in diameter and approximately 50 microm in length. Raman spectra of individual polymerized lipid tubules were measured by focused laser excitation of 532 nm leading to intense and reproducible Raman spectra. The chirality of lipid tubules was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal Raman microscopy. We report the Raman mapping images revealing helical tubular profiles of C=C stretching and C[triple bond]C stretching of lipid tubules. Circular dichroism property of lipid tubules has also been probed with a 532 nm laser.

  8. Multiphoton, confocal, and lifetime microscopy for molecular imaging in cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Krakow, Deborah; Kirilova, Veneta T.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bertolotto, Cristina; Acuna, Dora; Fang, Qiyin; Krivorov, Nikola; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2005-03-01

    It has recently been shown that mutations in Filamin A and B genes produce a large spectrum of skeletal disorders in developing fetuses. However, high-resolution optical microscopy in cartilage growth plate using fluorescent antibody assays, which should elucidate molecular aspects of these disorders, is extremely difficult due to the high level of autofluoresce in this tissue. We apply multiphoton, confocal, lifetime and spectral microscopy to (i) image and characterize autofluorophores in chondrocytes and subtract their contributions to obtain a corrected antibody-marker fluorescence signal, and (ii) measure the interaction between Filamin A and B proteins by detecting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between markers of the two proteins. Taking advantage of the different fluorescence spectra of the endogenous and exogenous markers, we can significantly reduce the autofluorescence background. Preliminary results of the FRET experiments suggest no interaction between Filamin A and B proteins. However, developing of new antibodies targeting the carboxy-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain may be necessary to confirm this result.

  9. Dynamic Real-time Microscopy of the Urinary Tract Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Katherine; Liu, Jen-Jane; Adams, Winifred; Sonn, Geoffrey A.; Mach, Kathleen E.; Pan, Ying; Beck, Andrew H.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Liao, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To develop the diagnostic criteria for benign and neoplastic conditions of the urinary tract using probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), a new technology for dynamic, in vivo imaging with micron-scale resolution. The suggested diagnostic criteria will formulate a guide for pCLE image interpretation in urology. METHODS Patients scheduled for transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) or nephrectomy were recruited. After white-light cystoscopy (WLC), fluorescein was administered as contrast. Different areas of the urinary tract were imaged with pCLE via direct contact between the confocal probe and the area of interest. Confocal images were subsequently compared with standard hematoxylin and eosin analysis. RESULTS pCLE images were collected from 66 participants, including 2 patients who underwent nephrectomy. We identified key features associated with different anatomic landmarks of the urinary tract, including the kidney, ureter, bladder, prostate, and urethra. In vivo pCLE of the bladder demonstrated distinct differences between normal mucosa and neoplastic tissue. Using mosaicing, a post hoc image-processing algorithm, individual image frames were juxtaposed to form wideangle views to better evaluate tissue microarchitecture. CONCLUSIONS In contrast to standard pathologic analysis of fixed tissue with hematoxylin and eosin, pCLE provides real time microscopy of the urinary tract to enable dynamic interrogation of benign and neoplastic tissues in vivo. The diagnostic criteria developed in this study will facilitate adaptation of pCLE for use in conjunction with WLC to expedite diagnosis of urinary tract pathology, particularly bladder cancer. PMID:21601243

  10. Reflectance confocal microscopy for the evaluation of sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y-F; Yuan, C; Jiang, W-C; Wang, X-L; Humbert, P

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the diagnosis for sensitive skin relies on subjective assessment or on the combination of subjective and objective evaluation. No quantitative evaluation is available. It could be expected that confocal microscopy imaging could be of interest to better define the condition. Total 166 healthy female subjects were recruited in this study. Firstly, all subjects completed the sensitive questionnaire. Then, the cutaneous structures were measured by the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) on the face and fossa cubitalia. The lactic acid sting test was conducted finally. According to the results of self-perception sensitive skin questionnaire and lactic acid stinging test to evaluate facial skin sensitivity the both positive subjects were regarded as sensitive skin group and both negative group as healthy control group. The results of RCM indicating that the proportion of 'disarranged honeycomb pattern' and 'spongiform edema' in the sensitive group and healthy control group were statistically different (P < 0.05), respectively; The following report 'damaged dermal papilla rings' was not a distinctive pattern, with no significant statistical difference (P > 0.05). The epidermal thickness was 38.88 ± 6.81 μm, healthy control group was 40.31 ± 9.37 μm in, respectively, sensitive skin group and healthy control group, there was no significant statistical difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). The honeycomb structure depth of sensitive group was 20.57 ± 4.86 μm. It was for 23.27 ± 6.38 μm, healthy control group the difference being statistically different between the two groups (P < 0.05). Based on the RCM results, 'epidermal honeycomb structure' and 'spongiform edema' may be used as new skin signs of RCM evaluation of sensitive skin effectively. Indeed, sensitive skin honeycomb structure depth was thinner compared with healthy control group. Such a specific pattern has good clinical and monitoring value for the further exploration. RCM could provide

  11. Diffusion of photoacid generators by laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping L.; Webber, Stephen E.; Mendenhall, J.; Byers, Jeffrey D.; Chao, Keith K.

    1998-06-01

    Diffusion of the photogenerated acid during the period of time between exposure and development can cause contrast loss and ultimately loss of the latent image. This is especially relevant for chemically amplified photoresists that require a post-exposure baking step, which in turn facilitates acid diffusion due to the high temperature normally employed. It is thus important to develop techniques with good spatial resolution to monitor the photogeneration of acid. More precisely, we need techniques that provide two distinct types of information: spatial resolution on various length scales within the surface layer and also sufficient depth resolution so that one can observe the transition from very surface layer to bulk structure in the polymer blend coated on silicon substrate. Herein laser scanning confocal microscopy is used to evaluate the resist for the first time. We report the use of the confocal microscopy to map the pag/dye distribution in PHS matrices, with both reflectance images and fluorescence images. A laser beam is focused onto a small 3D volume element, termed a voxel. It is typically 200 nm X 200 nm laterally and 800 nm axially. The illuminated voxel is viewed such that only signals emanating from this voxel are detected, i.e., signal from outside the probed voxel is not detected. By adjusting the vertical position of the laser focal point, the voxel can be moved to the designated lateral plane to produce an image. Contrast caused by topology difference between the exposed and unexposed area can be eliminated. Bis-p-butylphenyl iodonium triflat (7% of polyhydroxystyrene) is used as photoacid generators. 5% - 18% (by weight, PHS Mn equals 13 k) resist in PGMEA solution is spin cast onto the treated quartz disk with thickness of 1.4 micrometers , 5 micrometers space/10 micrometers pitch chrome mask is used to generate the pattern with mercury DUV illumination. Fluoresceinamine, the pH-sensitive dye, is also used to enhance the contrast of

  12. Rapid observation of unfixed, unstained human skin biopsy specimens with confocal microscopy and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Barry R.; Aziz, David J.; Gmitro, Arthur F.; Kerr, James H.; O'Grady, Terence C.; Goldman, Leon

    1997-10-01

    The use of reflected light confocal microscopy is proposed to rapidly observe unfixed, unstained biopsy specimens of human skin. Reflected light laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to compare a freshly excised, unfixed, unstained biopsy specimen, and in vivo human skin. Optical sections from the ex vivo biopsy specimen of human skin and in vivo human skin were converted to red-green anaglyphs for 3D visualization. Contrast was derived from intrinsic differences in the scattering properties of the organelles and cells within the tissue. Individual cellular layers were observed in both tissues from the surface to the papillary dermis. Confocal microscopy of an unfixed, unstained biopsy specimen showed cells and cell nuclei of the stratum spinosum. Confocal microscopy of in vivo human skin demonstrated optical sectioning through a hair shaft on the upper hand. The combination of reflected light confocal microscopy and 3D visualization with red-green anaglyphs provides a rapid technique for observing fresh biopsies of human skin.

  13. Multimodal optical workstation for simultaneous linear, nonlinear microscopy and nanomanipulation: upgrading a commercial confocal inverted microscope.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Manoj; Santos, Susana I C O; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    In this work we propose and build a multimodal optical workstation that extends a commercially available confocal microscope (Nikon Confocal C1-Si) to include nonlinear/multiphoton microscopy and optical manipulation/stimulation tools such as nanosurgery. The setup allows both subsystems (confocal and nonlinear) to work independently and simultaneously. The workstation enables, for instance, nanosurgery along with simultaneous confocal and brightfield imaging. The nonlinear microscopy capabilities are added around the commercial confocal microscope by exploiting all the flexibility offered by this microscope and without need for any mechanical or electronic modification of the confocal microscope systems. As an example, the standard differential interference contrast condenser and diascopic detector in the confocal microscope are readily used as a forward detection mount for second harmonic generation imaging. The various capabilities of this workstation, as applied directly to biology, are demonstrated using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans.

  14. Quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal microscopy images: a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N

    2013-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is a non-invasive method of examining the living human cornea. The recent trend towards quantitative studies using IVCM has led to the development of a variety of methods for quantifying image parameters. When selecting IVCM images for quantitative analysis, it is important to be consistent regarding the location, depth, and quality of images. All images should be de-identified, randomized, and calibrated prior to analysis. Numerous image analysis software are available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Criteria for analyzing corneal epithelium, sub-basal nerves, keratocytes, endothelium, and immune/inflammatory cells have been developed, although there is inconsistency among research groups regarding parameter definition. The quantification of stromal nerve parameters, however, remains a challenge. Most studies report lower inter-observer repeatability compared with intra-observer repeatability, and observer experience is known to be an important factor. Standardization of IVCM image analysis through the use of a reading center would be crucial for any future large, multi-centre clinical trials using IVCM.

  15. Intracellular phthalocyanine localization: confocal laser scanning microscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaeva, Elena B.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Leeuwen, A. G.

    1994-02-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pc) are promising second-generation photosensitizers for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. We report on the tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS4) localization in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In these cells AlPcS4 was found in granules surrounding Golgi apparatus and in the peripheral cytoplasmic region. Peripheral Pc-containing granules partially coincided with the acidic cellular compartments. The effect of irradiation with light on Pc intracellular distribution was also studied. In the Pc-free medium disruption of some Pc- containing granules was observed followed by appearance of Pc fluorescence in the cell plasma membrane, the nuclear envelope, and the near-nuclear region. When cells were irradiated in the presence of Pc in external medium a drastic increase of membrane permeability to Pc was observed, followed by Pc binding the cell plasma membrane, nuclear envelope, and some structures in the cytoplasm. Diffusive Pc fluorescence in the nucleus was also observed. The implication of observed Pc redistribution caused by irradiation with light for the PDT protocol is discussed.

  16. Managing multiple image stacks from confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbe, Joerg; Goetze, Christian H.; Zuschratter, Werner

    1999-05-01

    A major goal in neuroanatomy is to obtain precise information about the functional organization of neuronal assemblies and their interconnections. Therefore, the analysis of histological sections frequently requires high resolution images in combination with an overview about the structure. To overcome this conflict we have previously introduced a software for the automatic acquisition of multiple image stacks (3D-MISA) in confocal laser scanning microscopy. Here, we describe a Windows NT based software for fast and easy navigation through the multiple images stacks (MIS-browser), the visualization of individual channels and layers and the selection of user defined subregions. In addition, the MIS browser provides useful tools for the visualization and evaluation of the datavolume, as for instance brightness and contrast corrections of individual layers and channels. Moreover, it includes a maximum intensity projection, panning and zoom in/out functions within selected channels or focal planes (x/y) and tracking along the z-axis. The import module accepts any tiff-format and reconstructs the original image arrangement after the user has defined the sequence of images in x/y and z and the number of channels. The implemented export module allows storage of user defined subregions (new single image stacks) for further 3D-reconstruction and evaluation.

  17. Applications of confocal laser scanning microscopy to dental bonding.

    PubMed

    Pioch, T; Stotz, S; Staehle, H J; Duschner, H

    1997-11-01

    The introduction of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has provided a valuable new technique for the visualization of bonding structures such as a hybrid layer in dentin (Watson, 1989, 1991). In the case of seven commercially-available dentin bonding systems, it could be demonstrated that the CLSM renders considerably more detailed information than the SEM because of its non-destructive nature and because of the possibility of a distinction between components of bonding agents. With most of the bonding systems, measurements of the thickness of the hybrid layer could be carried out when the primer component was labeled with rhodamine B. It was found that this thickness is significantly increased by increases in etching time and only slightly decreased by increases in the drying time of the dentin and of the primer. When rhodamine B was used for dye penetration tests on four different dentin bonding systems, a leakage within the demineralized zone in the dentin was found in each of the specimens. This structure appears similar to that which Sano et al. (1995) called "nanoleakage". The amount of nanoleakage could not be measured by this method. In the case of enamel or ceramic bonding, a penetration zone was found which corresponded to the etching patterns found in enamel and ceramics, respectively. We conclude that CLSM can offer a wealth of new information about bonding morphology and, therefore, should be used in addition to conventional methods so that the maximum information can be obtained.

  18. Reflectance confocal microscopy--state-of-art and research overview.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Wurm, Elisabeth M T; Ahlgrimm-Siess, Verena; Richtig, Erika; Koller, Silvia; Smolle, Josef; Gerger, Armin

    2009-09-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) enables in vivo imaging of human skin at a quasi histologic resolution. The black-and-white RCM images show horizontal sections of the skin, at a maximum depth of 350 microm. To date, the RCM features of a significant number of skin conditions have been described. The main focus of the research community investigating RCM, however, lies on describing and diagnosing melanocytic skin lesions. Taking into account all RCM studies dealing with diagnostic accuracy in melanocytic skin lesions, sensitivity and specificity of approximately 90% and 86% could be found. Improvement of diagnostic accuracy, improved assessment of dermoscopic-histologic correlation, in vivo biopsy side selection, surgical margin assessment, and response control of conservative therapies in skin diseases are some of the major advantages of this novel imaging method. Additionally, RCM holds inherent potential for teledermatologic application and automated image analyzing. This article describes morphologic features of diverse skin lesions and features of "normal skin," summarizes diagnostic advances of RCM, compares studies dealing with diagnostic applicability, and discusses further research goals of this exciting new imaging technique.

  19. Semiquantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy applied to marine invertebrate ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Chandler, G Thomas; Volz, David C

    2004-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents a powerful, but largely unexplored ecotoxicologic tool for rapidly assessing in vivo effects of toxicants on marine invertebrate embryo quality and development. We describe here a new semiquantitative CLSM approach for assessing relative yolk quantity in marine invertebrate embryos (harpacticoid copepods) produced by parents reared from hatching to adult in the polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon chrysene. This method is based on fluorogenic labeling of embryo yolk and subsequent statistical analysis of areal pixel intensities over multiple Z-series using a general linear model (GLM)-nested analysis of variance. The fluorescent yolk-labeling method described here was able to detect statistically significant differences in yolk concentrations in marine copepod (Amphiascus tenuiremis) eggs or embryos from females exposed to ultraviolet light and chrysene-contaminated sediments. Yolk intensities in embryos from females cultured throughout their life cycles in clean sediments were statistically identical with or without UV exposure. In contrast, yolk intensities in embryos of females cultured throughout their life cycle in chrysene-contaminated sediments were significantly higher in the non-UV-exposed treatment with chrysene at 2500 ng/g sediment (65.7% higher) and the UV-exposed treatment with chrysene at 500 ng/g sediment (76.6% higher).

  20. Morphologic features of melanophages under in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guitera, Pascale; Li, Ling-Xi L; Scolyer, Richard A; Menzies, Scott W

    2010-05-01

    To determine morphologic features of melanophages under in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and to highlight morphologic features that are important in distinguishing melanophages from melanocytes. Consecutive retrospective study. Referral center for pigmented lesions. The study group retrospectively constituted 20 consecutive patients having biopsy-proven lichen planus-like keratoses that dermoscopically and histopathologically showed many melanophages and that had been imaged under RCM before biopsy. The RCM characteristics of isolated dermal bright cells were scored blinded to dermoscopic features and histopathologic diagnosis. Under RCM, melanophages were significantly smaller than melanocytes (mean [SD] cell diameter, 13.6 [1.6] vs 18.2 [2.9] microm, P = .006). Nuclei (intracellular low-reflectance round-oval structures) were visible in only 16% (29 of 184) of the cells in melanophages vs 57% (28 of 49) of the cells in melanocytes (P < .001). When identified, nuclei were smaller in melanophages than in melanocytes (mean [SD] diameter, 3.2 [1.2] vs 6.4 [0.7] microm, P < .001). Compared with melanocytes, melanophages were significantly more ill defined (76% [140 of 184] vs 18% [9 of 49], P < .001), less round (23% [42 of 184] vs 69% [34 of 49], P < .001), and less dendritic (1% [2 of 184] vs 12% [6 of 49]) (P = .001). Observed differences in morphologic features should enable distinction between melanophages and melanocytes under RCM, thereby improving the accuracy of skin lesion diagnosis using this technique.

  1. Stored human septal chondrocyte viability analyzed by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, David L; Sage, August B; Schumacher, Barbara L; Jadin, Kyle D; Agustin, Ramses M; Sah, Robert L; Watson, Deborah

    2006-10-01

    To analyze the effects of prolonged storage time, at warm and cold temperatures, on the viability of human nasal septal chondrocytes and to understand the implications for tissue engineering of septal cartilage. Basic science. Septal cartilage was obtained from 10 patients and placed in bacteriostatic isotonic sodium chloride solution. Four specimens were kept at 23 degrees C, and 4 were kept at 4 degrees C. The viability of the chondrocytes within the cartilage was assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy every 5 days. The 2 other specimens were assessed for viability on the day of harvest. Viability on the day of harvest was 96%, implying minimal cell death from surgical trauma. After 1 week, cell survival in all specimens was essentially unchanged from the day of harvest. At 23 degrees C, the majority (54%) of cells were alive after 20 days. At 4 degrees C, 70% of cells survived 1 month and 38% were alive at 2 months. Qualitatively, chondrocytes died in a topographically uniform distribution in warm specimens, whereas cold specimens displayed a more irregular pattern of cell death. Septal chondrocytes remain viable for prolonged periods when stored in simple bacteriostatic isotonic sodium chloride solution, and such survival is enhanced by cold storage.

  2. LED uniform illumination system for DMD-based confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kaimin; Hou, Wenmei; Xu, Qixin; Peng, Bofang

    2013-10-01

    Due to the coherence of laser light source it could produce coherent noise in parallel confocal microscopy based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) and thus affect the resolution. LED light source instead of the laser light source can give full play because of its incoherence characterization. In this paper, free-form surface lens is used for LED secondary optics design. According to the LED characteristics and the law of refraction, we have established differential equations of free-form surface. We solved equations with the method of Runge-Kutta by Matlab and the model was built in Tracepro for optical simulation. The results show that the uniformity on the DMD is better than 90% and the lighting efficiency is higher than before. The measured data show us a much more uniform illumination on DMD and LED uniform illumination system successfully avoided the gray error which was caused by the uneven illumination. The LED driver circuit using DC power supply provides us a more stable light source. The axial optical tomography is more accurate and the reconstruction of three-dimensional image is more clearer.

  3. Axial scanning in confocal microscopy employing adaptive lenses (CAL).

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Nektarios; Finkeldey, Markus; Stürmer, Moritz; Leithold, Christoph; Gerhardt, Nils C; Hofmann, Martin R; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Czarske, Jürgen W; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-03-10

    In this paper we analyze the capability of adaptive lenses to replace mechanical axial scanning in confocal microscopy. The adaptive approach promises to achieve high scan rates in a rather simple implementation. This may open up new applications in biomedical imaging or surface analysis in micro- and nanoelectronics, where currently the axial scan rates and the flexibility at the scan process are the limiting factors. The results show that fast and adaptive axial scanning is possible using electrically tunable lenses but the performance degrades during the scan. This is due to defocus and spherical aberrations introduced to the system by tuning of the adaptive lens. These detune the observation plane away from the best focus which strongly deteriorates the axial resolution by a factor of ~2.4. Introducing balancing aberrations allows addressing these influences. The presented approach is based on the employment of a second adaptive lens, located in the detection path. It enables shifting the observation plane back to the best focus position and thus creating axial scans with homogeneous axial resolution. We present simulated and experimental proof-of-principle results.

  4. False-Negative Cases on Confocal Microscopy Examination: A Retrospective Evaluation and Critical Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Coco, Valeria; Farnetani, Francesca; Cesinaro, Anna Maria; Ciardo, Silvana; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Peris, Ketty; Pellacani, Giovanni; Longo, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is a second-level examination for dermoscopically equivocal melanocytic lesions. However, the number of false-negative cases on confocal microscopy and the scenarios in which confocal microscopy may fail have not been fully elucidated. To calculate the percentage of false-negative melanomas upon reflectance confocal microscopy examination in a large series of cases. A retrospective analysis on 201 melanomas, evaluated for dermoscopic/confocal criteria of melanoma, was carried out. Twenty-three melanomas out of 201 cases (11.4%) revealed a low 7-point checklist score. On confocal examination, 22 out of 23 lesions have been diagnosed correctly as melanomas. Only 1 lesion did not display melanoma features, neither upon dermoscopy nor upon confocal microscopy examination. Seven lesions out of 201 cases (3.5%) were judged as negative on confocal examination, even if 6 of them were diagnosed as melanomas by clinical and/or dermoscopic evaluation. After histopathological revision, these cases were grouped into 5 categories: (1) amelanotic melanoma (n = 1), (2) hyperkeratotic melanomas (n = 2), (3) lentiginous melanomas (n = 2), (4) melanoma with small pagetoid cells (n = 1), (5) spitzoid melanoma (n = 1). Confocal and dermoscopic examination, along with patient-related information and clinical history, can lead to an optimal patient management. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. In vivo confocal microscopy in recurrent granular dystrophy in corneal graft after penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Traversi, Claudio; Martone, Gianluca; Malandrini, Alex; Tosi, Gian Marco; Caporossi, Aldo

    2006-11-01

    Two case reports of recurrent granular dystrophy in corneal grafts after penetrating keratoplasty are presented. Slit-lamp examination and confocal microscopy (HRT II) were performed in two patients with recurrent granular dystrophy. All confocal microscopic findings of granular dystrophy were evaluated in the graft. Dystrophic lesions of the donor cornea presented the same confocal microscopic aspects in both eyes, and were similar to granular dystrophy lesions. Confocal microscopy is an imaging method that may provide new information on corneal microanatomy in dystrophies. It may be particularly useful in improving the early diagnosis of dystrophic lesions in corneal grafts.

  6. Video-mosaicking of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy images for noninvasive examination of skin lesion (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, Kivanc; Gou, Mengran; Yelamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel A.; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Camps, Octavia I.; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-02-01

    In this report we describe a computer vision based pipeline to convert in-vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) videos collected with a handheld system into large field of view (FOV) mosaics. For many applications such as imaging of hard to access lesions, intraoperative assessment of MOHS margins, or delineation of lesion margins beyond clinical borders, raster scan based mosaicing techniques have clinically significant limitations. In such cases, clinicians often capture RCM videos by freely moving a handheld microscope over the area of interest, but the resulting videos lose large-scale spatial relationships. Videomosaicking is a standard computational imaging technique to register, and stitch together consecutive frames of videos into large FOV high resolution mosaics. However, mosaicing RCM videos collected in-vivo has unique challenges: (i) tissue may deform or warp due to physical contact with the microscope objective lens, (ii) discontinuities or "jumps" between consecutive images and motion blur artifacts may occur, due to manual operation of the microscope, and (iii) optical sectioning and resolution may vary between consecutive images due to scattering and aberrations induced by changes in imaging depth and tissue morphology. We addressed these challenges by adapting or developing new algorithmic methods for videomosaicking, specifically by modeling non-rigid deformations, followed by automatically detecting discontinuities (cut locations) and, finally, applying a data-driven image stitching approach that fully preserves resolution and tissue morphologic detail without imposing arbitrary pre-defined boundaries. We will present example mosaics obtained by clinical imaging of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. The ability to combine freehand mosaicing for handheld microscopes with preserved cellular resolution will have high impact application in diverse clinical settings, including low-resource healthcare systems.

  7. Confocal microscopy in a case of crystalline keratopathy in a patient with smouldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Caragiuli, Stefano; Caporossi, Aldo

    2014-06-01

    We report the clinical and confocal microscopic findings of the cornea in a patient with smouldering multiple myeloma (SMM) using in vivo scanning laser confocal microscopy. A 72-year-old female underwent a complete ophthalmological examination including slit-lamp biomicroscopy with digital photography, HRT II laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy and haematological laboratory assessment. Corneal biomicroscopy revealed the presence of bilateral diffuse microgranular tiny grey opacities. In vivo confocal microscopy showed randomly oriented hyper-reflective needle-shaped crystals throughout all levels of the stroma, sparing epithelium and endothelium. In vivo confocal microscopy was very helpful in the differential diagnosis by allowing the nature of the corneal deposits to be established, revealing the typical aspect of the crystals, and excluding granular dystrophy, leading to a suspected diagnosis of SMM. Crystalline corneal deposits may easily be confused as crumb-like opacities typical of granular dystrophy on slit-lamp examination even by experienced ophthalmologists.

  8. Laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas guided by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Nehal, Kishwer; Rossi, Anthony; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Laser ablation offers precise and fast removal of superficial and early nodular types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Nevertheless, the lack of histological confirmation has been a limitation. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging combined with a contrast agent can offer cellular-level histology-like feedback to detect the presence (or absence) of residual BCC directly on the patient. We conducted an ex vivo bench-top study to provide a set of effective ablation parameters (fluence, number of passes) to remove superficial BCCs while also controlling thermal coagulation post-ablation to allow uptake of contrast agent. The results for an Er:YAG laser (2.9 um and pulse duration 250us) show that with 6 passes of 25 J/cm2, thermal coagulation can be effectively controlled, to allow both the uptake of acetic acid (contrast agent) and detection of residual (or absence) BCCs. Confirmation was provided with histological examination. An initial in vivo study on 35 patients shows that the uptake of contrast agent aluminum chloride) and imaging quality is similar to that observed in the ex vivo study. The detection of the presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was confirmed in 10 wounds with (additional) histology and in 25 lesions with follow-up imaging. Our results indicate that resolution is sufficient but further development and use of appropriate contrast agent are necessary to improve sensitivity and specificity. Advances in RCM technology for imaging of lateral and deep margins directly on the patient may provide less invasive, faster and less expensive image-guided approaches for treatment of BCCs.

  9. Research and application on imaging technology of line structure light based on confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wenfeng; Xiao, Zexin; Wang, Xiaofen

    2009-11-01

    In 2005, the theory of line structure light confocal microscopy was put forward firstly in China by Xingyu Gao and Zexin Xiao in the Institute of Opt-mechatronics of Guilin University of Electronic Technology. Though the lateral resolution of line confocal microscopy can only reach or approach the level of the traditional dot confocal microscopy. But compared with traditional dot confocal microscopy, it has two advantages: first, by substituting line scanning for dot scanning, plane imaging only performs one-dimensional scanning, with imaging velocity greatly improved and scanning mechanism simplified, second, transfer quantity of light is greatly improved by substituting detection hairline for detection pinhole, and low illumination CCD is used directly to collect images instead of photoelectric intensifier. In order to apply the line confocal microscopy to practical system, based on the further research on the theory of the line confocal microscopy, imaging technology of line structure light is put forward on condition of implementation of confocal microscopy. Its validity and reliability are also verified by experiments.

  10. Improved sampling and analysis of images in corneal confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schaldemose, E L; Fontain, F I; Karlsson, P; Nyengaard, J R

    2017-10-01

    Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) is a noninvasive clinical method to analyse and quantify corneal nerve fibres in vivo. Although the CCM technique is in constant progress, there are methodological limitations in terms of sampling of images and objectivity of the nerve quantification. The aim of this study was to present a randomized sampling method of the CCM images and to develop an adjusted area-dependent image analysis. Furthermore, a manual nerve fibre analysis method was compared to a fully automated method. 23 idiopathic small-fibre neuropathy patients were investigated using CCM. Corneal nerve fibre length density (CNFL) and corneal nerve fibre branch density (CNBD) were determined in both a manual and automatic manner. Differences in CNFL and CNBD between (1) the randomized and the most common sampling method, (2) the adjusted and the unadjusted area and (3) the manual and automated quantification method were investigated. The CNFL values were significantly lower when using the randomized sampling method compared to the most common method (p = 0.01). There was not a statistical significant difference in the CNBD values between the randomized and the most common sampling method (p = 0.85). CNFL and CNBD values were increased when using the adjusted area compared to the standard area. Additionally, the study found a significant increase in the CNFL and CNBD values when using the manual method compared to the automatic method (p ≤ 0.001). The study demonstrated a significant difference in the CNFL values between the randomized and common sampling method indicating the importance of clear guidelines for the image sampling. The increase in CNFL and CNBD values when using the adjusted cornea area is not surprising. The observed increases in both CNFL and CNBD values when using the manual method of nerve quantification compared to the automatic method are consistent with earlier findings. This study underlines the importance of improving the analysis of the

  11. Application of Handheld Confocal Microscopy for Skin Cancer Diagnosis: Advantages and Limitations Compared with the Wide-Probe Confocal.

    PubMed

    Que, Syril Keena T; Grant-Kels, Jane M; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Oliviero, Margaret; Scope, Alon

    2016-10-01

    The clinical diagnosis of tumors on the curved surfaces of the face, around the eyes, and on the mucosal surfaces can be difficult, while biopsies and excisions can have functional and aesthetic consequences. To avoid unnecessary surgery, clinicians have been aiming to attain accurate noninvasive diagnosis of lesions at these sites. However, acquisition of high-quality images with dermoscopy and with traditional wide-probe reflectance confocal microscopy (WP-RCM) have been hampered with technical difficulties. This article discusses the technical parameters of the handheld reflectance confocal microscope and discusses its advantages and limitations compared with the WP-RCM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical axial scanning in confocal microscopy using an electrically tunable lens.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Joey M; Malik, Bilal H; Olsovsky, Cory; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Wright, John M; Maitland, Kristen C

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the use and characterization of an electrically focus tunable lens to perform axial scanning in a confocal microscope. Lateral and axial resolution are characterized over a >250 µm axial scan range. Confocal microscopy using optical axial scanning is demonstrated in epithelial tissue and compared to traditional stage scanning. By enabling rapid axial scanning, minimizing motion artifacts, and reducing mechanical complexity, this technique has potential to enhance in vivo three-dimensional imaging in confocal endomicroscopy.

  13. Reflectance confocal microscopy of cutaneous melanoma. Correlation with dermoscopy and histopathology*

    PubMed Central

    Rstom, Silvia Arroyo; Libório, Lorena Silva; Paschoal, Francisco Macedo

    2015-01-01

    In vivo Confocal Microscopy is a method for non-invasive, real-time visualization of microscopic structures and cellular details of the epidermis and dermis, which has a degree of resolution similar to that obtained with histology. We present a case of cutaneous melanoma in which diagnosis was aided by confocal microscopy examination. We also correlate the observed features with the dermoscopic and histopathological findings. Confocal microscopy proved to be an useful adjunct to dermoscopy, playing an important role as a method 'between clinical evaluation and histopathology'. PMID:26131877

  14. Confocal imaging at the nanoscale with two-color STED microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugel, Hilmar; Giske, Arnold; Dyba, Marcus; Sieber, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    STED microscopy enables confocal imaging of biological samples with a resolution that is not limited by diffraction. It provides new insights in various fields of biology, such as membrane biology, neurobiology and physiology. Its three dimensional sectioning ability allows the acquisition of high resolution image stacks. Furthermore, STED microscopy enables the recording of dynamic processes and live cell images. We present two-color imaging in confocal STED microscopy with a single STED wavelength. Pulsed and continuous wave lasers in the visible and near infra-red wavelengths range are used for stimulated emission. The resolution enhancement is demonstrated in comparison to confocal imaging with biological specimens.

  15. Simple fiber-optic confocal microscopy with nanoscale depth resolution beyond the diffraction barrier.

    PubMed

    Ilev, Ilko; Waynant, Ronald; Gannot, Israel; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2007-09-01

    A novel fiber-optic confocal approach for ultrahigh depth-resolution (microscopy beyond the diffraction barrier in the subwavelength nanometric range below 200 nm is presented. The key idea is based on a simple fiber-optic confocal microscope approach that is compatible with a differential confocal microscope technique. To improve the dynamic range of the resolving laser power and to achieve a high resolution in the nanometric range, we have designed a simple apertureless reflection confocal microscope with a highly sensitive single-mode-fiber confocal output. The fiber-optic design is an effective alternative to conventional pinhole-based confocal systems and offers a number of advantages in terms of spatial resolution, flexibility, miniaturization, and scanning potential. Furthermore, the design is compatible with the differential confocal pinhole microscope based on the use of the sharp diffraction-free slope of the axial confocal response curve rather than the area around the maximum of that curve. Combining the advantages of ultrahigh-resolution fiber-optic confocal microscopy, we can work beyond the diffraction barrier in the subwavelength (below 200 nm) nanometric range exploiting confocal nanobioimaging of single cell and intracellular analytes.

  16. FTIR microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy for studying lateral drug diffusion from a semisolid formulation.

    PubMed

    Gotter, B; Faubel, W; Neubert, R H H

    2010-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy was applied to obtain information on lateral drug diffusion of dithranol in artificial acceptor membranes. Lateral (2D) drug distribution into an artificial membrane was investigated on an area of 300microm x 1000microm with a lateral resolution of 25microm x 25microm by integrating a specific IR band located at 1430cm(-1). The concentration profiles show a heterogeneous distribution of dithranol particles resulting in non-uniform drug diffusion. Use of the FTIR microscope either in the transmission or in the reflection mode was restricted to a thickness of the DDC membrane <15microm. The third dimension (depth profile) was analysed by means of confocal Raman microscopy (CRM). In an artificial membrane, the depth range from a minimum of 1.5microm up to a maximum of 49microm was analysed for dithranol distribution.

  17. A study of hydrogenated carbon fibers by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Cal, Antonio Madroñero; Aguado-Serrano, Juan; Rojas-Cervantes, Maria Luisa; Adame, Elena V Rosa; Marron, Belen Sarmiento; Rosende, Africa Castro; Nevshupa, Roman

    2009-06-01

    The hydrogen absorption process is studied in carbonaceous fibers produced from a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The absorption of the hydrogen was examined in two types of fibers, in "as-grown" state and after a process of desorption during an annealing to 1.473 K under vacuum. Later to its production process, the fibers withstand an oxidation in air to 973 K. The fibers were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy by reflection. Differences in the behavior during the oxidation were observed between the fibers in as-grown state and those subjected to a further annealing. It could be verified that the fibers were really constituted by two different phases. In one of the phases, the storage of the hydrogen absorbed took place, whereas in the other phase there was no alteration. The process of annealing prior to the absorption of the hydrogen has an appreciable effect on the desorption rate of the hydrogen.

  18. Progress in reflectance confocal microscopy for imaging oral tissues in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Gary; Zanoni, Daniella K.; Migliacci, Jocelyn; Cordova, Miguel; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Patel, Snehal

    2016-02-01

    We report progress in development and feasibility testing of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) for imaging in the oral cavity of humans. We adapted a small rigid relay telescope (120mm long x 14mm diameter) and a small water immersion objective lens (12mm diameter, NA 0.7) to a commercial handheld RCM scanner (Vivascope 3000, Caliber ID, Rochester NY). This scanner is designed for imaging skin but we adapted the front end (the objective lens and the stepper motor that axially translates) for intra-oral use. This adaption required a new approach to address the loss of the automated stepper motor for acquisition of images in depth. A helical spring-like cap (with a coverslip to contact tissue) was designed for approximately 150 um of travel. Additionally other methods for focusing optics were designed and evaluated. The relay telescope optics is being tested in a clinical setting. With the capture of video and "video-mosaicing", extended areas can be imaged. The feasibility of imaging oral tissues was initially investigated in volunteers. RCM imaging in buccal mucosa in vivo shows nuclear and cellular detail in the epithelium and epithelial junction, and connective tissue and blood flow in the underlying lamina propria. Similar detail, including filiform and fungiform papillae, can be seen on the tongue in vivo. Clinical testing during head and neck surgery is now in progress and patients are being imaged for both normal tissue and cancerous margins in lip and tongue mucosa.

  19. Resolution doubling using confocal microscopy via analogy with structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with a 2-fold higher lateral resolution than conventional wide-field fluorescence (WF) microscopy. Confocal fluorescence (CF) microscopy has approximately the same optical cutoff frequency as SIM; however, the maximum theoretical increase in lateral resolution over that of WF is 1.4-fold with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Quantitative comparisons based on an analytical imaging formula revealed that modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of SIM reconstructed images before postprocessing are nearly identical to those of CF images recorded with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Here, we propose a new method using an adequate pinhole diameter combined with the use of an apodized Fourier inverse filter to increase the lateral resolution of CF images to as much as that SIM images without significant noise degradation in practice. Furthermore, the proposed method does not require a posteriori parameterization and has reproducibility. This approach can be easily applied to conventional laser scanning CF, spinning disk CF, and multiphoton microscopies.

  20. Measuring Corneal Haze by Using Scheimpflug Photography and Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Jay W.; Wacker, Katrin; Kane, Katrina M.; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared corneal backscatter estimated from a Scheimpflug camera with backscatter estimated from a clinical confocal microscope across a wide range of corneal haze. Methods A total of 59 corneas from 35 patients with a range of severity of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy and 15 corneas from 9 normal participants were examined using a Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and a confocal microscope (ConfoScan 4). The mean image brightness from the anterior 120 μm, midcornea, and posterior 60 μm of the cornea across the central 2 mm recorded by the Scheimpflug camera and analogous regions from the confocal microscope were measured and standardized. Differences between instruments and correlations between backscatter and disease severity were determined by using generalized estimating equation models. Results Backscatter measured by the two instruments in the anterior and midcornea were correlated (r = 0.67 and 0.43, respectively, P < 0.001), although in the posterior cornea they were not correlated (r = 0.13, P = 0.66). Measured with the Scheimpflug camera, mean backscatter from the anterior and midcornea were greater, whereas backscatter from the posterior cornea was lower (P < 0.001) than that measured by the confocal microscope. Backscatter from the anterior cornea was correlated with disease severity for both instruments (Scheimpflug, r = 0.55, P < 0.001; confocal, r = 0.49, P = 0.003). Conclusions The Scheimpflug camera and confocal microscope should not be used interchangeably to measure corneal haze. The ability to detect changes in backscatter with disease severity is superior with the Scheimpflug camera. However, the confocal microscope provides higher resolution of corneal structure. PMID:26803798

  1. Measuring Corneal Haze by Using Scheimpflug Photography and Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Jay W; Wacker, Katrin; Kane, Katrina M; Patel, Sanjay V

    2016-01-01

    We compared corneal backscatter estimated from a Scheimpflug camera with backscatter estimated from a clinical confocal microscope across a wide range of corneal haze. A total of 59 corneas from 35 patients with a range of severity of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy and 15 corneas from 9 normal participants were examined using a Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and a confocal microscope (ConfoScan 4). The mean image brightness from the anterior 120 μm, midcornea, and posterior 60 μm of the cornea across the central 2 mm recorded by the Scheimpflug camera and analogous regions from the confocal microscope were measured and standardized. Differences between instruments and correlations between backscatter and disease severity were determined by using generalized estimating equation models. Backscatter measured by the two instruments in the anterior and midcornea were correlated (r = 0.67 and 0.43, respectively, P < 0.001), although in the posterior cornea they were not correlated (r = 0.13, P = 0.66). Measured with the Scheimpflug camera, mean backscatter from the anterior and midcornea were greater, whereas backscatter from the posterior cornea was lower (P < 0.001) than that measured by the confocal microscope. Backscatter from the anterior cornea was correlated with disease severity for both instruments (Scheimpflug, r = 0.55, P < 0.001; confocal, r = 0.49, P = 0.003). The Scheimpflug camera and confocal microscope should not be used interchangeably to measure corneal haze. The ability to detect changes in backscatter with disease severity is superior with the Scheimpflug camera. However, the confocal microscope provides higher resolution of corneal structure.

  2. In vivo confocal microscopy of meibomian glands in primary blepharospasm

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tong; Gong, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the morphological changes of meibomian glands (MGs) in primary blepharospasm (PBS) by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and to investigate the correlations between clinical data of PBS and LSCM parameters of MGs. This prospective and case–control study recruited 30 consecutive PBS patients and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. After questionnaire assessments of ocular surface disease index (OSDI), Jankovic rating scale, and blepharospasm disability index, all subjects underwent blink rate evaluation, tear film break-up time (TBUT), corneal fluorescein staining (CFS), Schirmer test, MG expressibility, meibum quality, MG dropout, and LSCM examination of the MGs. The main LSCM outcomes included the mean MG acinar area and density, orifice diameter, meibum secretion reflectivity, acinar irregularity, and inhomogeneity of interstice and acinar wall. The PBS patients had significantly higher blink rate, higher OSDI and CFS scores, lower TBUT and Schirmer test value, and worse MG expressibility than the controls (All P < 0.05), whereas meibum quality showed no difference (P > 0.05). The PBS patients showed lower values of MG acinar area, orifice diameter and meibum secretion reflectivity, and higher scores of acinar irregularity and inhomogeneity of interstices than the controls (All P < 0.05). For the PBS patients, the severity of blepharospasm evaluated by JCR scale was strong correlated with MG acinar area (P < 0.001), orifice diameter (P = 0.002), meibum secretion reflectivity (P = 0.002), and MG acinar irregularity (P = 0.013). The MG expressibility was significantly correlated to MG acinar area (P = 0.039), orifice diameter (P < 0.001), and MG acinar irregularity (P = 0.014). The OSDI score was moderate correlated with MG acinar irregularity (P = 0.016), whereas the TBUT value was positively correlated with MG acinar area (P = 0.045) and negatively correlated to MG acinar

  3. Confocal Microscopy of Jammed Matter: From Elasticity to Granular Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorjadze, Ivane

    Packings of particles are ubiquitous in nature and are of interest not only to the scientific community but also to the food, pharmaceutical, and oil industries. In this thesis we use confocal microscopy to investigate packing geometry and stress transmission in 3D jammed particulate systems. By introducing weak depletion attraction we probe the accessible phase-space and demonstrate that a microscopic approach to jammed matter gives validity to statistical mechanics framework, which is intriguing because our particles are not thermally activated. We show that the fluctuations of the local packing parameters can be successfully captured by the recently proposed 'granocentric' model, which generates packing statistics according to simple stochastic processes. This model enables us to calculate packing entropy and granular temperature, the so-called 'compactivity', therefore, providing a basis for a statistical mechanics of granular matter. At a jamming transition point at which there are formed just enough number of contacts to guarantee the mechanical stability, theoretical arguments suggest a singularity which gives rise to the surprising scaling behavior of the elastic moduli and the microstructure, as observed in numerical simulations. Since the contact network in 3D is typically hidden from view, experimental test of the scaling law between the coordination number and the applied pressure is lacking in the literature. Our data show corrections to the linear scaling of the pressure with density which takes into account the creation of contacts. Numerical studies of vibrational spectra, in turn, reveal sudden features such as excess of low frequency modes, dependence of mode localization and structure on the pressure. Chapter four describes the first calculation of vibrational density of states from the experimental 3D data and is in qualitative agreement with the analogous computer simulations. We study the configurational role of the pressure and demonstrate

  4. Impression cytology and in vivo confocal microscopy in corneas with total limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Aline Lütz de; Ricardo, José Reinaldo da Silva; Sakai, Vivian Naomi; Barros, Jeison Nadai de; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2013-10-01

    To describe corneal changes seen on in vivo confocal microscopy in patients with total limbal stem cell deficiency and to correlate them with cytological findings. A prospective case series including 13 eyes (8 patients) with total limbal deficiency was carried out. Stem cell deficiency was diagnosed clinically and by corneal impression cytology. Confocal images of the central cornea were taken with the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II, Rostock Corneal Module (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Impression cytology of the cornea revealed conjunctival epithelial cells and goblet cells in all cases. In vivo confocal microscopy showed disruption of normal layers of the corneal epithelium in all eyes. Confocal images showed cells with characteristics of conjunctival epithelium at the cornea in 76.9% of the total. These findings on confocal microscopy were compatible to limbal stem cell deficiency. Additionally, goblet cells, squamous metaplasia, inflammatory cells and dendritic cells were observed. The sub-basal nerve plexus was not identified in any of the corneas. Corneal neovessels were observed at the epithelium and stroma. All cases showed diffuse hyper-reflective images of the stroma corresponding to opacity of the tissue. Limbal stem cell deficiency had been confirmed by impression cytology in all cases, and 76.9% of the cases could also be diagnosed by in vivo confocal microscopy through the conjunctival epithelial cell visualization on the corneal surface. Frequent confocal microscopy findings were abnormal cells at the cornea (conjunctival epithelial, goblet and inflammatory cells), corneal neovessels and diffuse hyper-reflection of the stroma.

  5. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2015-11-01

    Measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient's health. In this work, we have simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns of the cell. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry that imaged the cells in a linear flow without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to confocal images of the cells, this method could be used for measuring cell morphology in three dimensions and for studying their physiology.

  6. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE AND RAT OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse and Rat Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research ...

  7. Combined confocal Raman and quantitative phase microscopy system for biomedical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeon Woong; Lue, Niyom; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara C; Goldfless, Stephen J; Niles, Jacquin C; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a novel multimodal microscopy system that incorporates confocal Raman, confocal reflectance, and quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) into a single imaging entity. Confocal Raman microscopy provides detailed chemical information from the sample, while confocal reflectance and quantitative phase microscopy show detailed morphology. Combining these intrinsic contrast imaging modalities makes it possible to obtain quantitative morphological and chemical information without exogenous staining. For validation and characterization, we have used this multi-modal system to investigate healthy and diseased blood samples. We first show that the thickness of a healthy red blood cell (RBC) shows good correlation with its hemoglobin distribution. Further, in malaria infected RBCs, we successfully image the distribution of hemozoin (malaria pigment) inside the cell. Our observations lead us to propose morphological screening by QPM and subsequent chemical imaging by Raman for investigating blood disorders. This new approach allows monitoring cell development and cell-drug interactions with minimal perturbation of the biological system of interest.

  8. WHOLE INSECT AND MAMMALIAN EMBRYO IMAGING WITH CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY: MORPHOLOGY AND APOPTOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: After fluorochromes are incorporated into cells, tissues, and organisms, confocal microscopy can be used to observe three-dimensional structures. LysoTracker Red (LT) is a paraformaldehyde fixable probe that concentrates into acidic compartments of cells and indicates...

  9. Ex Vivo (Fluorescence) Confocal Microscopy in Surgical Pathology: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Moira; Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta

    2016-05-01

    First developed in 1957, confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging tool that can be used to obtain near real-time reflected light images of untreated human tissue with nearly histologic resolution. Besides its research applications, in the last decades, confocal microscopy technology has been proposed as a useful device to improve clinical diagnosis, especially in ophthalmology, dermatology, and endomicroscopy settings, thanks to advances in instrument development. Compared with the wider use of the in vivo tissue assessment, ex vivo applications of confocal microscopy are not fully explored. A comprehensive review of the current literature was performed here, focusing on the reliable applications of ex vivo confocal microscopy in surgical pathology and on some potential evolutions of this new technique from pathologists' viewpoint.

  10. Clinical usefulness of reflectance confocal microscopy in the management of facial lentigo maligna melanoma.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, I; Carrera, C; Puig, S; Malvehy, J

    2014-04-01

    Facial lentigo maligna melanoma can be a diagnostic challenge in daily clinical practice as it has similar clinical and morphological features to other lesions such as solar lentigines and pigmented actinic keratoses. Confocal microscopy is a noninvasive technique that provides real-time images of the epidermis and superficial dermis with cellular-level resolution. We describe 3 cases of suspected facial lentigo maligna that were assessed using dermoscopy and confocal microscopy before histopathology study. In the first case, diagnosed as lentigo maligna melanoma, presurgical mapping by confocal microscopy was performed to define the margins more accurately. In the second and third cases, with a clinical and dermoscopic suspicion of lentigo maligna melanoma, confocal microscopy was used to identify the optimal site for biopsy.

  11. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE AND RAT OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse and Rat Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research ...

  12. WHOLE INSECT AND MAMMALIAN EMBRYO IMAGING WITH CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY: MORPHOLOGY AND APOPTOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: After fluorochromes are incorporated into cells, tissues, and organisms, confocal microscopy can be used to observe three-dimensional structures. LysoTracker Red (LT) is a paraformaldehyde fixable probe that concentrates into acidic compartments of cells and indicates...

  13. Generalized model for incoherent detection in confocal optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammoum, Rachid; Hamady, Sidi Ould Saad; Fontana, Marc D

    2010-06-01

    We develop a generalized model in order to calculate the point spread functions in both the focal and the detection planes for the electric field strengths. In these calculations, based on the generalized Jones matrices, we introduce all of the interdependent parameters that could influence the spatial resolution of a confocal optical microscope. Our proposed model is more nearly complete, since we make no approximations of the scattered electric fields. These results can be successfully applied to standard confocal optical techniques to get a better understanding for more quantitative interpretations of the probe.

  14. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  15. Comparative study of human erythrocytes by digital holographic microscopy, confocal microscopy, and impedance volume analyzer.

    PubMed

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Barbul, Alexander; Emery, Yves; Korenstein, Rafi; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) parameters such as morphology, volume, refractive index, and hemoglobin content are of great importance for diagnostic purposes. Existing approaches require complicated calibration procedures and robust cell perturbation. As a result, reference values for normal RBC differ depending on the method used. We present a way for measuring parameters of intact individual RBCs by using digital holographic microscopy (DHM), a new interferometric and label-free technique with nanometric axial sensitivity. The results are compared with values achieved by conventional techniques for RBC of the same donor and previously published figures. A DHM equipped with a laser diode (lambda = 663 nm) was used to record holograms in an off-axis geometry. Measurements of both RBC refractive indices and volumes were achieved via monitoring the quantitative phase map of RBC by means of a sequential perfusion of two isotonic solutions with different refractive indices obtained by the use of Nycodenz (decoupling procedure). Volume of RBCs labeled by membrane dye Dil was analyzed by confocal microscopy. The mean cell volume (MCV), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were also measured with an impedance volume analyzer. DHM yielded RBC refractive index n = 1.418 +/- 0.012, volume 83 +/- 14 fl, MCH = 29.9 pg, and MCHC 362 +/- 40 g/l. Erythrocyte MCV, MCH, and MCHC achieved by an impedance volume analyzer were 82 fl, 28.6 pg, and 349 g/l, respectively. Confocal microscopy yielded 91 +/- 17 fl for RBC volume. In conclusion, DHM in combination with a decoupling procedure allows measuring noninvasively volume, refractive index, and hemoglobin content of single-living RBCs with a high accuracy. Copyright 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  16. Laser scanning confocal microscopy: history, applications, and related optical sectioning techniques.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Stephen W; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2014-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is an established light microscopical technique for imaging fluorescently labeled specimens with significant three-dimensional structure. Applications of confocal microscopy in the biomedical sciences include the imaging of the spatial distribution of macromolecules in either fixed or living cells, the automated collection of 3D data, the imaging of multiple labeled specimens and the measurement of physiological events in living cells. The laser scanning confocal microscope continues to be chosen for most routine work although a number of instruments have been developed for more specific applications. Significant improvements have been made to all areas of the confocal approach, not only to the instruments themselves, but also to the protocols of specimen preparation, to the analysis, the display, the reproduction, sharing and management of confocal images using bioinformatics techniques.

  17. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY AND FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The reliability of the CLSM to obtain specific measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. For man...

  18. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY AND FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The reliability of the CLSM to obtain specific measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. For man...

  19. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CALIBRATION, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  20. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CALIBRATION, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  1. The use of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in materials science.

    PubMed

    Hovis, D B; Heuer, A H

    2010-12-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopes are essential and ubiquitous tools in the biological, biochemical and biomedical sciences, and play a similar role to scanning electron microscopes in materials science. However, modern laser scanning confocal microscopes have a number of advantages for the study of materials, in addition to their obvious uses for high resolution reflected and transmitted light optical microscopy. In this paper, we provide several examples that exploit the laser scanning confocal microscope's capabilities of pseudo-infinite depth of field imaging, topographic imaging, photo-stimulated luminescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic imaging. © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Epitaxial growth of mosaic diamond: Mapping of stress and defects in crystal junction with a confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Guoyang; Dai, Bing; Ralchenko, V. G.; Khomich, A. A.; Ashkinazi, E. E.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Bokova-Sirosh, S. N.; Liu, Kang; Zhao, Jiwen; Han, Jiecai; Zhu, Jiaqi

    2017-04-01

    We studied defects and stress distributions in mosaic epitaxial diamond film using a confocal Raman spectroscopy, with a special attention to the junction area between the crystals. The mosaics was grown by microwave plasma CVD on closely arranged (1 0 0)-oriented HPHT type Ib substrates. The width of stress affected and defect enriched region around the junction show a tendency of extending with the film thickness, from ≈40 μm on the film-substrate interface to ≈250 μm in the layer 500 μm above the substrate, as found from the mosaics analysis in cross-section. The stress field around the junction demonstrates a complex pattern, with mixed domains of tensile and compressive stress, with maximum value of σ ≈ 0.6 GPa. A similar non-uniform pattern was observed for defect distribution as well. No sign of amorphous sp2 carbon in the junction zone was revealed.

  3. Live cell refractometry using Hilbert phase microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Popescu, Gabriel; Yaqoob, Zahid; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2009-11-26

    Quantitative chemical analysis has served as a useful tool for understanding cellular metabolisms in biology. Among many physical properties used in chemical analysis, refractive index in particular has provided molecular concentration that is an important indicator for biological activities. In this report, we present a method of extracting full-field refractive index maps of live cells in their native states. We first record full-field optical thickness maps of living cells by Hilbert phase microscopy and then acquire physical thickness maps of the same cells using a custom-built confocal reflectance microscope. Full-field and axially averaged refractive index maps are acquired from the ratio of optical thickness to physical thickness. The accuracy of the axially averaged index measurement is 0.002. This approach can provide novel biological assays of label-free living cells in situ.

  4. Point scanning confocal microscopy facilitates 3D human hair follicle imaging in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Jennifer E; Bíró, Tamás; Paus, Ralf; Cseresnyés, Zoltán

    2010-07-01

    Efficiency is a key factor in determining whether a scientific method becomes widely accepted in practical applications. In dermatology, morphological characterisation of intact hair follicles by traditional methods can be rather inefficient. Samples are embedded, sliced, imaged and digitally reconstructed, which can be time-consuming. Confocal microscopy, on the other hand, is more efficient and readily applicable to study intact hair follicles. Modern confocal microscopes deliver and collect light very efficiently and thus allow high spatial resolution imaging of relatively thick samples. In this letter, we report that we successfully imaged entire intact human hair follicles using point scanning confocal microscopy. Light delivery and light-collection were further improved by preparing the samples in 2,2'-Thiodiethanol (TDE), thus reducing refractive index gradients. The relatively short total scan times and the high quality of the acquired 3D images make confocal microscopy a desirable method for studying intact hair follicles under normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Anti-translational research: from the bedside back to the bench for reflectance confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The reflectance confocal microscope has made translational progress in dermatology. 0.5 micrometer lateral resolution, 0.75mm field-of-view and excellent temporal resolution at ~15 frames/second serve the VivaScope well in the clinic, but it may be overlooked in basic research. This work reviews high spatiotemporal confocal microscopy and presents images acquired of various samples: zebra fish embryo where melanocytes with excellent contrast overly the spinal column, chicken embryo, where myocardium is seen moving at 15 frames/ second, calcium spikes in dendrites (fluorescence mode) just beyond the temporal resolution, and human skin where blood cells race through the artereovenous microvasculature. For an introduction to confocal microscopy, see: http://dangareau.net.s69818.gridserver.com/science/confocal-microscopy

  6. Similar but Different: How Reflectance Confocal Microscopy May Help in the Diagnosis of Pink Lesions.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Federica; Bassoli, Sara; Pellacani, Giovanni; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Cesinaro, Anna Maria; Longo, Caterina

    2017-06-29

    Among skin neoplasms, solitary pink tumors represent challenging lesions in clinical practice since they can mimic melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions or even inflammatory ones. In this case series we described dermoscopic and confocal features of 2 couples of similar lesions in order to achieve the correct diagnosis and the best therapeutic approach. During clinical routine practice, 2 couples of clinically and dermoscopically similar lesions were examined by means of confocal microscopy. All lesions revealed no clear-cut diagnostic features on dermoscopy. However, confocal microscopy revealed tumor islands with palisading cells and a dark clefting at the periphery in basal cell carcinomas. In the other "false twin" lesions, atypical cells and elongated junctional nests were observed and the diagnosis of amelanotic melanomas was rendered. In the current case series, the combined use of dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy was an optimal workup for difficult-to-diagnose lesions such as pink tumors. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Image segmentation for integrated multiphoton microscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy imaging of human skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guannan; Lui, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-invasive cellular imaging of the skin in vivo can be achieved in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) modalities to yield complementary images of the skin based on different optical properties. One of the challenges of in vivo microscopy is the delineation (i.e., segmentation) of cellular and subcellular architectural features. Methods In this work we present a method for combining watershed and level-set models for segmentation of multimodality images obtained by an integrated MPM and RCM imaging system from human skin in vivo. Results Firstly, a segmentation model based on watershed is introduced for obtaining the accurate structure of cell borders from the RCM image. Secondly,, a global region based energy level-set model is constructed for extracting the nucleus of each cell from the MPM image. Thirdly, a local region-based Lagrange Continuous level-set approach is used for segmenting cytoplasm from the MPM image. Conclusions Experimental results demonstrated that cell borders from RCM image and boundaries of cytoplasm and nucleus from MPM image can be obtained by our segmentation method with better accuracy and effectiveness. We are planning to use this method to perform quantitative analysis of MPM and RCM images of in vivo human skin to study the variations of cellular parameters such as cell size, nucleus size and other mophormetric features with skin pathologies. PMID:25694949

  8. Confocal microscopy for astrocyte in vivo imaging: Recycle and reuse in microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alvarez, Alberto; Araque, Alfonso; Martín, Eduardo D.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo imaging is one of the ultimate and fundamental approaches for the study of the brain. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) constitutes the state-of-the-art technique in current neuroscience to address questions regarding brain cell structure, development and function, blood flow regulation and metabolism. This technique evolved from laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), which impacted the field with a major improvement in image resolution of live tissues in the 1980s compared to widefield microscopy. While nowadays some of the unparalleled features of 2PLSM make it the tool of choice for brain studies in vivo, such as the possibility to image deep within a tissue, LSCM can still be useful in this matter. Here we discuss the validity and limitations of LSCM and provide a guide to perform high-resolution in vivo imaging of the brain of live rodents with minimal mechanical disruption employing LSCM. We describe the surgical procedure and experimental setup that allowed us to record intracellular calcium variations in astrocytes evoked by sensory stimulation, and to monitor intact neuronal dendritic spines and astrocytic processes as well as blood vessel dynamics. Therefore, in spite of certain limitations that need to be carefully considered, LSCM constitutes a useful, convenient, and affordable tool for brain studies in vivo. PMID:23658537

  9. Physical chemistry in a single live cell: confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amin, Md Asif; Nandi, Somen; Mondal, Prasenjit; Mahata, Tanushree; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2017-05-24

    A live cell is a complex, yet extremely important container. Understanding the dynamics in a selected intracellular component is a challenging task. We have recently made significant progress in this direction using a confocal microscope as a tool. The smallest size of the focused spot in a confocal microscope is ∼0.2 μm (200 nm). This is nearly one hundred times smaller than the size of a live cell. Thus, one can selectively study different intracellular components/organelles in a live cell. In this paper, we discuss how one can image different intracellular components/organelles, record fluorescence spectra and decay at different locations, ascertain local polarity and viscosity, and monitor the dynamics of solvation, proton transfer, red-ox and other phenomena at specified locations/organelles inside a cell. We will highlight how this knowledge enriched us in differentiating between cancer and non-cancer cells, 3D tumor spheroids and towards drug delivery.

  10. Superresolution upgrade for confocal spinning disk systems using image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbaner, Sebastian; Hähnel, Dirk; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Confocal Spinning Disk Systems are widely used for 3D cell imaging because they offer the advantage of optical sectioning at high framerates and are easy to use. However, as in confocal microscopy, the imaging resolution is diffraction limited, which can be theoretically improved by a factor of 2 using the principle of Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM) [1]. ISM with a Confocal Spinning Disk setup (CSDISM) has been shown to improve contrast as well as lateral resolution (FWHM) from 201 +/- 20 nm to 130 +/- 10 nm at 488 nm excitation. A minimum total acquisition time of one second per ISM image makes this method highly suitable for 3D live cell imaging [2]. Here, we present a multicolor implementation of CSDISM for the popular Micro-Manager Open Source Microscopy platform. Since changes in the optical path are not necessary, this will allow any researcher to easily upgrade their standard Confocal Spinning Disk system at remarkable low cost ( 5000 USD) with an ISM superresolution option. [1]. Müller, C.B. and Enderlein, J. Image Scanning Microscopy. Physical Review Letters 104, (2010). [2]. Schulz, O. et al. Resolution doubling in fluorescence microscopy with confocal spinning-disk image scanning microscopy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110, 21000-5 (2013).

  11. In vivo confocal microscopy for the detection of canine fungal keratitis and monitoring of therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Eric C; Norman, Mary L; Starr, Jennifer K

    2016-05-01

    To describe in vivo corneal confocal microscopy of dogs during the clinical course of fungal keratitis and correlate findings with clinical evaluations and an ex vivo experimental canine fungal keratitis model. Seven dogs with naturally acquired fungal keratitis and ex vivo canine corneas experimentally infected with clinical fungal isolates. Dogs with naturally acquired fungal keratitis were examined by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy. Initial confocal microscopic examinations were performed to assist in establishing the diagnosis of fungal keratitis. Serial confocal microscopic examinations were performed to guide antifungal chemotherapy. Confocal microscopy images of canine corneal fungal isolates were obtained by examination of experimentally infected ex vivo canine corneas to corroborate in vivo findings. Fungi cultured and detected by PCR from canine corneal samples included Candida albicans, Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti, Malassezia pachydermatis, and a Rhodotorula sp. Linear, branching, interlocking, hyperreflective structures were detected by confocal microscopy in dogs with filamentous fungal keratitis and round to oval hyperreflective structures were detected in dogs with yeast fungal keratitis. Antifungal chemotherapy was associated with a progressive reduction in the distribution and density of corneal fungal elements, alterations to fungal morphology, decreased leukocyte numbers, restoration of epithelial layers, and an increased number of visible keratocyte nuclei. No dogs had a recurrence of fungal keratitis following medication discontinuation. Confocal microscopic fungal morphologies were similar between in vivo and ex vivo examinations. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy is a rapid method of diagnosing fungal keratitis in dogs and provides a noninvasive mechanism for monitoring therapeutic response. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  12. In-vivo multi-spectral confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Andrew R.; Udovich, Joshua A.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2005-03-01

    A multi-spectral confocal microendoscope (MCME) for in-vivo imaging has been developed. The MCME employs a flexible fiber-optic catheter coupled to a slit-scan confocal microscope with an imaging spectrometer. The catheter consists of a fiber-optic imaging bundle linked to a miniature objective and focus assembly. The focus mechanism allows for imaging to a maximum tissue depth of 200 microns. The 3mm diameter catheter may be used on its own or routed though the instrument channel of a commercial endoscope. The confocal nature of the system provides optical sectioning with 3 micron lateral resolution and 30 micron axial resolution. The system incorporates two laser sources and is therefore capable of simultaneous acquisition of spectra from multiple dyes using dual excitation. The prism based multi-spectral detection assembly is typically configured to collect 30 spectral samples over the visible range. The spectral sampling rate varies from 4nm/pixel at 490nm to 8nm/pixel at 660nm and the minimum resolvable wavelength difference varies from 8nm to 16nm over the same spectral range. Each of these characteristics are primarily dictated by the dispersion characteristics of the prism. The MCME is designed to examine cellular structures during optical biopsy and to exploit the diagnostic information contained within the spectral domain. The primary applications for the system include diagnosis of disease in the gastro-intestinal tract and female reproductive system. In-vitro, and ex-vivo multi-spectral results are presented.

  13. Identification of focal viral infections by confocal microscopy for subsequent ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Miller, S E; Levenson, R M; Aldridge, C; Hester, S; Kenan, D J; Howell, D N

    1997-01-01

    A correlative microscopy method for the ultrastructural analysis of focal viral tissue infections is presented. Using a confocal scanning laser microscope, foci of infection are identified in tissue sections prior to embedment; a variety of techniques can be employed for viral detection, including staining with standard histochemical reagents and fluorescently labeled antibodies. Areas of infection identified using confocal microscopy are excised from the tissue sections, embedded, and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Applications of this technique in both diagnostic and basic research settings are described.

  14. Adaptive optics confocal microscopy using direct wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Garcia, Denise; Zuo, Yi; Chen, Diana C; Kubby, Joel

    2011-04-01

    Optical aberrations due to the inhomogeneous refractive index of tissue degrade the resolution and brightness of images in deep-tissue imaging. We introduce a confocal fluorescence microscope with adaptive optics, which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with a fluorescent bead used as a point source reference beacon. The results show a 4.3× improvement in the Strehl ratio and a 240% improvement in the signal intensity for fixed mouse tissues at depths of up to 100 μm.

  15. Comparison of confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy in mouse cornea in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Gho, Yong Song; Song, In Seok; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution imaging of the cornea is important for studying corneal diseases at cellular levels. Confocal microscopy (CM) has been widely used in the clinic, and two-photon microscopy (TPM) has recently been introduced in various pre-clinical studies. We compared the performance of CM and TPM in normal mouse corneas and neovascularized mouse corneas induced by suturing. Balb/C mice and C57BL/6 mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to compare modalities based on intrinsic contrast and extrinsic fluorescence contrast. CM based on reflection (CMR), CM based on fluorescence (CMF), and TPM based on intrinsic/extrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) were compared by imaging the same sections of mouse corneas sequentially in vivo. In normal mouse corneas, CMR visualized corneal cell morphologies with some background noise, and CMF visualized GFP expressing corneal cells clearly. TPM visualized corneal cells and collagen in the stroma based on fluorescence and SHG, respectively. However, in neovascularized mouse corneas, CMR could not resolve cells deep inside the cornea due to high background noise from the effects of increased structural irregularity induced by suturing. CMF and TPM visualized cells and induced vasculature better than CMR because both collect signals from fluorescent cells only. Both CMF and TPM had signal decays with depth due to the structural irregularity, with CMF having faster signal decay than TPM. CMR, CMF, and TPM showed different degrees of image degradation in neovascularized mouse corneas.

  16. Reflective confocal laser scanning microscopy and nonlinear microscopy of cross-linked rabbit cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Alexander; Hovakimyan, Marina; Ramirez, Diego F.; Stachs, Oliver; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking of the cornea with application of Ribovlavin and UV-A light is an evolving clinical treatment of the eye disease keratoconus. Despite the positive clinical track record of corneal cross-linking, the complex wound healing process after the treatment is still under investigation. In this study an animal model was used to clarify the state of wound healing 5 weeks after treatment. Cross-linked rabbit corneae were imaged with reflective confocal laser scanning and nonlinear microscopy, namely second harmonic imaging microscopy (SHIM) and two-photon excited autofluorescence. First results show that the NAD(P) H-autofluorescence of the corneal keratocytes and their scattering signal still show a signature of the treatment five weeks after the cross-linking procedure. The SHIM signals show the structural morphology of the fibrous collagen sheets in the stroma of the cornea. SHIM detected in the forward direction differs substantially from backward SHIM, but no signature of treatment was found in both detection channels of the SHIM signal.

  17. Comparison of the stratum corneum thickness measured in vivo with confocal Raman spectroscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Böhling, A; Bielfeldt, S; Himmelmann, A; Keskin, M; Wilhelm, K-P

    2014-02-01

    Thickness measurement of the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is essential for in-vivo measurement of the cutaneous bioavailability of topically applied drugs and cosmetics. Our aim was to compare SC thickness calculated from confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) data with results of SC thickness based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) measurements and with literature data, to validate CRS data with CLSM data and vice versa. SC thickness was measured with two non-invasive devices, confocal Raman spectroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, on four different areas of the body: volar forearm, leg, face and palm in 18 healthy adult subjects. Comparable results of SC thickness were obtained with both methods, structure analysis of CLSM images, and computation of Fick's first law on water gradients measured with CRS: 20 μm and 19 μm (volar forearm), 21 μm and 22 μm (lower leg), and 13 μm with both methods (cheek), respectively. For the first time it was possible to accurately determine the thickness of SC with CRS and CLSM and to validate both systems against each other and with results of literature data. Both methods, CRS and CLSM, were found to be suitable to measure SC thickness correctly. Therefore, when using CRS, for example to obtain detailed information about the molecular composition of the skin, it is additionally possible to accurately measure SC thickness with the same device to have an orientation in which skin layer molecules are found. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Quality assessment of confocal microscopy slide-based systems: instability.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Robert M

    2006-07-01

    All slide-based fluorescence cytometry detections systems basically include an excitation light source, intermediate optics, and a detection device (CCD or PMT). Occasionally, this equipment becomes unstable, generating unreliable and inferior data. A number of tests have been devised to evaluate equipment performance and instability. The following four instability tests are described: galvanometer scanning, stage drift, correct wavelength spectral detection, and long-term laser power. Quality assurance tests revealed that a confocal microscope can become unstable in the following parameters, yielding inaccurate data: laser power, PMTs functionality, spectrophotometer accuracy, galvanometer scanning and laser stability, and stage drift. Long-term laser power stability has been observed to vary greatly. Confocal systems can become unstable in the following parameters: long-term laser power, galvanometer scanning, spectrophotometer accuracy, and stage stability. Instability in any of these parameters will affect image quality. Laser power fluctuations result from either a defective Acousto-optic tunable filter or improper heat dissipation. Spectrophotometer instability will generate unreliable spectra data, extra light reflections, and poor image quality. Galvanometer scanning instability yields poor image quality while microscope stage drift results in a sample going out of the plane of focus. With minor modifications, these tests may be applicable to other slide-based systems. Copyright 2006 International Society for Analytical Cytology.

  19. Precise Longitudinal Tracking of Microscopic Structures in Melanocytic Nevi Using Reflectance Confocal Microscopy: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Scope, Alon; Selinger, Limor; Oliviero, Margaret; Farnetani, Francesca; Moscarella, Elvira; Longo, Caterina; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), a cellular-level, in vivo imaging technique, may be potentially used for monitoring melanocytic neoplasms for microscopic stability vs changes over time. To test feasibility of using RCM to track specific microscopic structures within nevi over 1 year. This was an observational study, a review of prospectively acquired RCM images, performed at a tertiary academic medical center. Seventeen patients were enrolled from adult patients presenting to pigmented lesion clinic; from each participant, 3 confirmed benign nevi were randomly selected from the upper and lower back and from the lower extremity. Nevi underwent standardized RCM imaging at baseline and after 1 year. We tested interobserver reproducibility in recognition of tissue anchors, RCM structures that can be identified at 2 time points. We used 2 tests to measure concordance between independent readers: (1) In the multiple choice matching test (n = 43 nevi), readers were shown a tissue anchor in a baseline RCM image (≤ 1 × 1-mm field-of-view) and asked to identify the same structure in 1 of 4 equally sized RCM images obtained from the same nevus at follow-up. (2) In the annotation test (n = 29 nevi), readers were shown a tissue anchor in a follow-up RCM image (≤ 1 × 1-mm field-of-view) and asked to annotate the corresponding location of this structure in the baseline RCM mosaic image (≤ 5 × 5-mm field-of-view) from the same nevus; good agreement was defined as annotations deviant by less than 10% of the mosaic's width. In total, 17 patients (mean age, 45 years [range, 28-70 years]; 10 [59%] were women) contributed a total of 51 nevi, of which 44 nevi (86%) were used for the study. Images from 7 nevi (14%) were suboptimal in quality. Tissue anchors were identified at both time points in all 44 nevi. Selected tissue anchors were located at a mean depth of 54.3 µm; the most commonly selected anchors (37 of 44 images [84.1%]) were dermal papillae. In the multiple

  20. Methods to calibrate and scale axial distances in confocal microscopy as a function of refractive index.

    PubMed

    Besseling, T H; Jose, J; Van Blaaderen, A

    2015-02-01

    Accurate distance measurement in 3D confocal microscopy is important for quantitative analysis, volume visualization and image restoration. However, axial distances can be distorted by both the point spread function (PSF) and by a refractive-index mismatch between the sample and immersion liquid, which are difficult to separate. Additionally, accurate calibration of the axial distances in confocal microscopy remains cumbersome, although several high-end methods exist. In this paper we present two methods to calibrate axial distances in 3D confocal microscopy that are both accurate and easily implemented. With these methods, we measured axial scaling factors as a function of refractive-index mismatch for high-aperture confocal microscopy imaging. We found that our scaling factors are almost completely linearly dependent on refractive index and that they were in good agreement with theoretical predictions that take the full vectorial properties of light into account. There was however a strong deviation with the theoretical predictions using (high-angle) geometrical optics, which predict much lower scaling factors. As an illustration, we measured the PSF of a correctly calibrated point-scanning confocal microscope and showed that a nearly index-matched, micron-sized spherical object is still significantly elongated due to this PSF, which signifies that care has to be taken when determining axial calibration or axial scaling using such particles. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Comparison of In Vivo Confocal Microscopy, Ultrasonic Pachymetry, and Scheimpflug Topography for Measuring Central Corneal Thickness.

    PubMed

    MeenakshiSundaram, Soundaram; Sufi, Aalia Rasool; Prajna, N Venkatesh; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2016-09-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy could be useful in cases of fungal or acanthamoeba keratitis to determine the depth of infectious elements, but its accuracy in determining corneal thickness relative to more traditional techniques has not been well characterized. In this cross-sectional observational case series, central corneal thickness was determined by in vivo confocal microscopy, ultrasonic pachymetry, and Scheimpflug topography in 47 normal corneas and 23 keratoconic corneas from November 2014 to July 2015. Analyses undertaken from July 2015 to August 2015 showed that confocal microscopy overestimated the central corneal thickness in nonkeratoconic eyes, measuring on average 5 μm thicker (95% limits of agreement [LoA], 54-64) than ultrasonic pachymetry and 14 μm thicker (95% LoA, 47-76) than Scheimpflug topography. The bias was more pronounced in keratoconic eyes, where confocal microscopy overestimated central corneal thickness by 50 μm relative to ultrasonic pachymetry (95% LoA, 77-178) and 52 μm relative to Scheimpflug topography (95% LoA, 69-174). Confocal microscopy overestimated central corneal thickness relative to the other instruments, but the magnitude of the differences were small, especially in nonkeratoconic eyes. This level of measurement bias is acceptable to us for determining the depth of fungal filaments and acanthamoeba cysts in infectious keratitis.

  2. Classifying distinct basal cell carcinoma subtype by means of dermatoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Longo, Caterina; Lallas, Aimilios; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Rabinovitz, Harold; Moscarella, Elvira; Ciardo, Silvana; Zalaudek, Iris; Oliviero, Margaret; Losi, Amanda; Gonzalez, Salvador; Guitera, Pascale; Piana, Simonetta; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The current guidelines for the management of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) suggest a different therapeutic approach according to histopathologic subtype. Although dermatoscopic and confocal criteria of BCC have been investigated, no specific studies were performed to evaluate the distinct reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) aspects of BCC subtypes. To define the specific dermatoscopic and confocal criteria for delineating different BCC subtypes. Dermatoscopic and confocal images of histopathologically confirmed BCCs were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of predefined criteria. Frequencies of dermatoscopic and confocal parameters are provided. Univariate and adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Discriminant analyses were performed to define the independent confocal criteria for distinct BCC subtypes. Eighty-eight BCCs were included. Dermatoscopically, superficial BCCs (n=44) were primarily typified by the presence of fine telangiectasia, multiple erosions, leaf-like structures, and revealed cords connected to the epidermis and epidermal streaming upon RCM. Nodular BCCs (n=22) featured the classic dermatoscopic features and well outlined large basaloid islands upon RCM. Infiltrative BCCs (n=22) featured structureless, shiny red areas, fine telangiectasia, and arborizing vessels on dermatoscopy and dark silhouettes upon RCM. The retrospective design. Dermatoscopy and confocal microscopy can reliably classify different BCC subtypes. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes.

  4. Aerial wetting contact angle measurement using confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesna, Jacob W.; Wiedmaier, Bob F.; Wang, Jinlin; Samara, Ayman; Leach, Richard K.; Her, Tsing-Hua; Smith, Stuart T.

    2016-12-01

    A method is presented in which the wetting contact angle of a sessile drop is acquired aerially using confocal techniques to measure the radius and the height of a droplet deposited on a planar surface. The repeatability of this method is typically less than 0.25°, and often less than 0.1°, for droplet diameters less than 1 mm. To evaluate accuracy of this method, an instrument uncertainty budget is developed, which predicts a combined uncertainty of 0.91° for a 1 mm diameter water droplet with a contact angle of 110°. For droplets having diameters less than 1 mm and contact angles between 15° and 160°, these droplets approach spherical shape and their contact angles can be computed analytically with less than 1% error. For larger droplets, gravitational deformation needs to be considered.

  5. Group refractive index reconstruction with broadband interferometric confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Daniel L.; Schlachter, Simon C.; Zysk, Adam M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel method of measuring the group refractive index of biological tissues at the micrometer scale. The technique utilizes a broadband confocal microscope embedded into a Mach–Zehnder interferometer, with which spectral interferograms are measured as the sample is translated through the focus of the beam. The method does not require phase unwrapping and is insensitive to vibrations in the sample and reference arms. High measurement stability is achieved because a single spectral interferogram contains all the information necessary to compute the optical path delay of the beam transmitted through the sample. Included are a physical framework defining the forward problem, linear solutions to the inverse problem, and simulated images of biologically relevant phantoms. PMID:18451922

  6. Super-resolution spinning-disk confocal microscopy using optical photon reassignment.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Takuya; Kei, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Spinning-disk confocal microscopy is a proven technology for investigating 3D structures of biological specimens. Here we report a super-resolution method based on spinning-disk confocal microscopy that optically improves lateral resolution by a factor of 1.37 with a single exposure. Moreover, deconvolution yields twofold improvement over the diffraction limit. With the help of newly modified Nipkow disk which comprises pinholes and micro-lenses on the front and back respectively, emitted photons from specimen can be optically reassigned to the most probable locations they originate from. Consequently, the improvement in resolution is achieved preserving inherent sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopy. This extremely simple implementation will enable reliable observations at super high resolution in biomedical routine research.

  7. Emulation and design of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy based on virtual pinhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-fa; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    In the practical application of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy, the size of detector pinhole is an important factor that determines the performance of spatial resolution characteristic of the microscopic system. However, the use of physical pinhole brings some inconvenience to the experiment and the adjustment error has a great influence on the experiment result. Through reasonably selecting the parameter of matrix detector virtual pinhole (VPH), it can efficiently approximate the physical pinhole. By using this approach, the difficulty of experimental calibration is reduced significantly. In this article, an imaging scheme of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy that is based on the matrix detector VPH is put forward. The influence of detector pinhole size on the axial resolution of confocal scanning microscopy is emulated and analyzed. Then, the parameter of VPH is emulated when the best axial imaging performance is reached.

  8. Rifabutin corneal deposits in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: in vivo confocal microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Traversi, Claudio; Nuti, Elisabetta; Sparano, Maria Caterina; Caporossi, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    To establish the real localization of rifabutin-related corneal deposits in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by in vivo HRT II confocal microscopy with related clinicopathologic implications. Observational case report. After Siena University Institutional Review Board approval in May 2008 and specific informed consent, a 54-year-old patient with HIV infection under rifabutin treatment for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related Mycobacterium avium complex prevention who developed diffuse corneal deposits was examined at the Department of Ophthalmology of Siena University. He underwent a complete clinical eye examination, biomicroscopy, and digital slit lamp photographs, endothelial specular microscopy, ultrasound pachymetry, and confocal microscopy by HRT II system. Confocal scans revealed the presence of deep stromal and pre descemetic hyperreflective polymorphous deposits. In vivo confocal examination excluded the presence of rifabutin-related deposits at endothelial level. Confocal microscopy enables establishment of the real localization of rifabutin deposits at deep stromal level, providing a better qualitative analysis of all corneal layers compared to biomicroscopic examination, with clinical and physiopathologic implications.

  9. Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis using in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Akira; Mori, Natsuko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To produce a two-dimensional reconstruction map of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) using in vivo confocal microscopy. Four eyes of four patients (mean 65.8 years) with HSK presenting with a dendritic lesion were enrolled. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and in vivo laser confocal microscopy were performed. Acquired confocal images at the level of the epithelium were arranged and mapped into subconfluent montages. Changes in the shape and degree of light reflection of abnormal cells and deposits around dendritic lesions as well as other corneal layers were qualitatively evaluated. Mapping of dendritic lesion was successful in all cases, and the subconfluent montages clearly showed the larger image of dendritic lesion. In all cases, the dendritic lesion consisted of hyperreflective irregular epithelial cells, and was surrounded by distorted and elongated epithelial cells. In three cases, hyperreflective deposits were noted at the midline of the lesion. The corneal stroma showed a hyperreflective honeycomb pattern. In two cases, inflammatory cells were observed at the level of endothelial cell layer. Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with HSK was successful in all patients using in vivo confocal microscopy. Cellular level observation of dendritic lesion at a relatively larger magnification may help understand the in vivo morphological change of HSK. Further study in more patients with HSK and nonherpetic dendritic lesion is needed to utilize confocal microscopy images in differential diagnosis and follow-up of the epithelial lesions with dendrite.

  10. Modulated-alignment dual-axis (MAD) confocal microscopy optimized for speed and contrast

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Steven Y.; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Modulated-alignment dual-axis (MAD) confocal microscopy combines the benefits of dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopy and focal-modulation microscopy (FMM) for rejecting out-of-focus and multiply scattered light in tissues. The DAC architecture, which utilizes off-axis and separated beam paths for illumination and detection, has previously been shown to be superior to single-axis confocal (SAC) microscopy for the spatial filtering (rejection) of unwanted background light. With the MAD approach, a modulation of the alignment between the illumination and collection beam paths tags ballistic photons emanating from the focal volume with a characteristic radio frequency that can be extracted and separated from background signal using lock-in detection. We report here an optimized form of MAD confocal microscopy where we have fully mitigated tradeoffs in performance in an initial proof-of-concept system in order to recover the imaging speed of DAC microscopy while retaining contrast enhancement of 6 dB (signal-to-background ratio) with a secondary improvement in optical-sectioning and inplane resolution. Validation is demonstrated with light-scattering tissue phantoms and freshly excised tissues. PMID:28055837

  11. Two-photon confocal microscopy in the study of the volume characteristics of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinushkin, V. P.; Uvarov, O. V.

    2016-12-01

    Zn-Se crystals are used to analyze prospects for application of two-photon confocal microscopy in the study of plane and volume interband and impurity luminescence in semiconductors. Such maps can be formed with a depth step and planar spatial resolution of several micrometers at distances of up to 1 mm from the surface. The method is used to detect luminescence-active inhomogeneities in crystals and study their structure and luminescence characteristics. Prospects for the application of the two-photon confocal microscopy in the study of direct-band-semiconductors and materials of the fourth group are discussed.

  12. Measuring skin penetration by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM): correlation to results from conventional experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunter, Dominique; Daniels, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy has become an advancing technique in the characterization of drug transport into the skin. In this study the skin penetration of a local anesthetic from a semisolid preparation was investigated. Furthermore, the effect of the chemical enhancers propylene glycol and POE-23-lauryl ether on its penetration was investigated. The results show that confocal Raman microscopy may provide detailed information on the penetration of APIs into the skin and may elucidate their distribution within the skin with high resolution. The results of the CRM analysis are fully in line with those of conventional permeation and penetration experiments.

  13. Confocal microscopy indentation system for studying in situ chondrocyte mechanics.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Kuy; Colarusso, Pina; Herzog, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Chondrocytes synthesize extracellular matrix molecules, thus they are essential for the development, adaptation and maintenance of articular cartilage. Furthermore, it is well accepted that the biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes is influenced by the mechanical environment. Therefore, their response to mechanical stimuli has been studied extensively. Much of the knowledge in this area of research has been derived from testing of isolated cells, cartilage explants, and fixed cartilage specimens: systems that differ in important aspects from chondrocytes embedded in articular cartilage and observed during loading conditions. In this study, current model systems have been improved by working with the intact cartilage in real time. An indentation system was designed on a confocal microscope that allows for simultaneous loading and observation of chondrocytes in their native environment. Cell mechanics were then measured under precisely controlled loading conditions. The indentation system is based on a light transmissible cylindrical glass indentor of 0.17 mm thickness and 1.64 mm diameter that is aligned along the focal axis of the microscope and allows for real time observation of live cells in their native environment. The system can be used to study cell deformation and biological responses, such as calcium sparks, while applying prescribed loads on the cartilage surface. It can also provide novel information on the relationship between cell loading and cartilage adaptive/degenerative processes in the intact tissue.

  14. Stress Imaging in Indented Si Wafers by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, Jeroen; Cook, Robert F.; Novotny, Lukas; Stranick, Stephan J.

    2007-03-01

    Controlling stress and strain, and consequently, carrier mobility in semiconductor devices is one of the main goals of recent electronic industry. On the other hand, fracture propagation is commonly related to performance degradation in microelectronic and microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices. As miniaturization reaches submicron scales, characterization tools with improved resolution and capable to detect buried surfaces is required. In this work we present confocal Raman imaging in Si wafers to analyze stress and fracture by means of hyperspectral measurements (typically 128x128 spectra). We analyzed indented Si wafers presenting wide range of plastic deformation and fractures. Wide scans (up to 150x150 μm^2) as well as high-resolution scans depict the stress distribution around indented regions and side fractures. Some of the samples were covered with 8 nm of Ti deposited in LN2 temperature. In these samples we acquired hyperspectral images in subsurface conditions and detected possible influences of thermal budged in the stress distribution. We also demonstrate depth sensitivity in a vertical scan. Images suggest 0.3 μm resolution.

  15. Development of an add-on kit for scanning confocal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kaikai; Zheng, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Scanning confocal microscopy is a standard choice for many fluorescence imaging applications in basic biomedical research. It is able to produce optically sectioned images and provide acquisition versatility to address many samples and application demands. However, scanning a focused point across the specimen limits the speed of image acquisition. As a result, scanning confocal microscope only works well with stationary samples. Researchers have performed parallel confocal scanning using digital-micromirror-device (DMD), which was used to project a scanning multi-point pattern across the sample. The DMD based parallel confocal systems increase the imaging speed while maintaining the optical sectioning ability. In this paper, we report the development of an add-on kit for high-speed and low-cost confocal microscopy. By adapting this add-on kit to an existing regular microscope, one can convert it into a confocal microscope without significant hardware modifications. Compared with current DMD-based implementations, the reported approach is able to recover multiple layers along the z axis simultaneously. It may find applications in wafer inspection and 3D metrology of semiconductor circuit. The dissemination of the proposed add-on kit under $1000 budget could also lead to new types of experimental designs for biological research labs, e.g., cytology analysis in cell culture experiments, genetic studies on multicellular organisms, pharmaceutical drug profiling, RNA interference studies, investigation of microbial communities in environmental systems, and etc.

  16. Improving spinning disk confocal microscopy by preventing pinhole cross-talk for intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimozawa, Togo; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kondo, Takefumi; Hayashi, Shigeo; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Konno, Daijiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Takayama, Jun; Onami, Shuichi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujita, Katsumasa; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    A recent key requirement in life sciences is the observation of biological processes in their natural in vivo context. However, imaging techniques that allow fast imaging with higher resolution in 3D thick specimens are still limited. Spinning disk confocal microscopy using a Yokogawa Confocal Scanner Unit, which offers high-speed multipoint confocal live imaging, has been found to have wide utility among cell biologists. A conventional Confocal Scanner Unit configuration, however, is not optimized for thick specimens, for which the background noise attributed to “pinhole cross-talk,” which is unintended pinhole transmission of out-of-focus light, limits overall performance in focal discrimination and reduces confocal capability. Here, we improve spinning disk confocal microscopy by eliminating pinhole cross-talk. First, the amount of pinhole cross-talk is reduced by increasing the interpinhole distance. Second, the generation of out-of-focus light is prevented by two-photon excitation that achieves selective-plane illumination. We evaluate the effect of these modifications and test the applicability to the live imaging of green fluorescent protein-expressing model animals. As demonstrated by visualizing the fine details of the 3D cell shape and submicron-size cytoskeletal structures inside animals, these strategies dramatically improve higher-resolution intravital imaging. PMID:23401517

  17. SEM/EDX and confocal Raman microscopy as complementary tools for the characterization of pharmaceutical tablets.

    PubMed

    Scoutaris, Nikolaos; Vithani, Kapilkumar; Slipper, Ian; Chowdhry, Babur; Douroumis, Dennis

    2014-08-15

    The drug distribution on the surface of hot-melt extruded, pre-mixed hot-melt extruded and direct compressed tablet formulations was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Formulations of paracetamol (PMOL) and Compritol(®) (C-888) were extruded using hot-melt extrusion at different processing temperatures and formulation compositions before being compressed into tablets. EDX and confocal Raman spectroscopy were employed to map the drug and excipient distribution, both qualitatively and quantitatively, on the surface of the tablets. The results from EDX and confocal Raman studies confirmed better uniformity and distribution of PMOL in the pre-mixed extruded formulations compared to both hot-melt extruded formulations and those obtained by means of direct compression. The quantification of the drug composition on the surface of the tablets by both EDX and confocal Raman was in good agreement with the theoretically expected values.

  18. High-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy by analog mean-delay method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Youngjae; Kim, Donguk; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    We have demonstrated the high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) by analog mean-delay (AMD) method. The AMD method is a new signal processing technique for calculation of fluorescence lifetime and it is very suitable for the high-speed confocal FLIM with good accuracy and photon economy. We achieved the acquisition speed of 7.7 frames per second for confocal FLIM imaging. Here, the highest photon detection rate for one pixel was larger than 125 MHz and averaged photon detection rate was more than 62.5 MHz. Based on our system, we successfully obtained a sequence of confocal fluorescence lifetime images of RBL-2H3 cell labeled with Fluo-3/AM and excited by 4αPDD (TRPV channel agonist) within one second.

  19. Sheet-scanned dual-axis confocal microscopy using Richardson-Lucy deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Meza, D; Wang, Y; Gao, L; Liu, J T C

    2014-09-15

    We have previously developed a line-scanned dual-axis confocal (LS-DAC) microscope with subcellular resolution suitable for high-frame-rate diagnostic imaging at shallow depths. Due to the loss of confocality along one dimension, the contrast (signal-to-background ratio) of a LS-DAC microscope is deteriorated compared to a point-scanned DAC microscope. However, by using a sCMOS camera for detection, a short oblique light-sheet is imaged at each scanned position. Therefore, by scanning the light sheet in only one dimension, a thin 3D volume is imaged. Both sequential two-dimensional deconvolution and three-dimensional deconvolution are performed on the thin image volume to improve the resolution and contrast of one en face confocal image section at the center of the volume, a technique we call sheet-scanned dual-axis confocal (SS-DAC) microscopy.

  20. Comparison of Noncontact Specular and Confocal Microscopy for Evaluation of Corneal Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianyan; Maram, Jyotsna; Tepelus, Tudor C; Sadda, Srinivas R; Chopra, Vikas; Lee, Olivia L

    2017-03-24

    To compare endothelial cell analysis obtained by noncontact specular and confocal microscopy, using the Konan NSP-9900 and Nidek ConfoScan4 systems, respectively. Three groups including 70 healthy eyes, 49 eyes with Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), and 78 eyes with glaucoma were examined with both the Konan NSP-9900 specular microscope and the Nidek ConfocScan4 confocal microscope. Certified graders at the Doheny Image Reading Center compared corneal endothelial images from both instruments side by side to assess image quality. Endothelial cell density (ECD) measurements were calculated and compared using three different modalities: (1) each instrument's fully automated analysis; (2) each instrument's semiautomatic analysis with grader input; and (3) manual grading methods by certified grader. All normal eyes yielded gradable endothelial images, and most but not all glaucomatous eyes yielded images with high enough image quality to allow grading. In addition, in corneas with severe FECD, poor image quality precluded ECD grading by specular microscopy in 20 eyes (40.8%) but in only 4 (8.2%) confocal images from the same eyes. For the gradable images, the ECD values obtained using the manual grading method from either device were comparable with no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between specular and confocal devices. Machine-generated ECD values were significantly different from manual results, measuring greater in all cases with specular microscopy. Machine-generated ECD values from confocal microscopy also differed significantly from manual determinations, but not in a consistent direction. Semiautomatic methods for both instruments obtained clinically acceptable ECD values. Automatic machine-generated ECD measurements differed significantly from manual assessments of corneal endothelium by both specular and confocal microscopy, suggesting that automated results should be used with caution. But ECD values derived manually were comparable

  1. Reflectance confocal microscopy for scarring and non-scarring alopecia real-time assessment.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, Marco; Agozzino, Marina; Franceschini, Chiara; Donadio, Carlo; Abraham, Leonardo Spagnol; Barbieri, Luca; Sperduti, Isabella; Berardesca, Enzo; González, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of alopecia represents one of the major issues in dermatology. Scalp biopsies are not easily accepted because of the high bleeding and sensitive anatomical area. Trichoscopy is routinely used for diagnosis of alopecia, but in several cases lack to provide sufficient information on the status of the disease. Recently, reflectance confocal microscopy demonstrated its usefulness for the evaluation of several inflammatory skin condition and preliminary reports about alopecia have been proposed in the literature. The aim was to identify the confocal features characterizing scarring and non-scarring alopecia. Reflectance confocal microscopy from 86 patients affected by scarring (28 lichen planopilaris and 9 lupus erythematosus) and non-scarring alopecia (30 androgenic alopecia and 19 alopecia areata), were retrospectively, blinded evaluated. Good concordance between different readers on the confocal criteria has been assessed. Statistical significant features, specific for scarring alopecia and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. In this study, data on reflectance confocal microscopy features useful for the differential diagnosis between scarring and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. Further studies focusing on the use of this non-invasive technique in the therapeutic follow-up and distinction of sub-entities of alopecia are still required.

  2. Ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed brain sample.

    PubMed

    Forest, Fabien; Cinotti, Elisa; Yvorel, Violaine; Habougit, Cyril; Vassal, François; Nuti, Christophe; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Péoc'h, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Confocal microscopy is a technique able to realize "optic sections" of a tissue with increasing applications. We wondered if we could apply an ex vivo confocal microscope designed for dermatological purpose in a routine use for the most frequent brain tumors. The aim of this work was to identify tumor tissue and its histopathological hallmarks, and to assess grading criteria used in neuropathological practice without tissue loss on freshly removed brain tissue. Seven infiltrating gliomas, nine meningiomas and three metastases of carcinomas were included. We compared imaging results obtained with the confocal microscope to frozen sections, smears and tissue sections of formalin-fixed tissue. Our results show that ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging can be applied to brain tumors in order to quickly identify tumor tissue without tissue loss. It can differentiate tumors and can assess most of grading criteria. Confocal microscopy could represent a new tool to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed sample and could help in selecting areas for biobanking of tumor tissue.

  3. The value of reflectance confocal microscopy in diagnosis of flat pigmented facial lesions: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wurm, E; Pellacani, G; Longo, C; Soyer, H P; Gonzalez, S; Hofmann-Wellenhof, R; Ahlgrimm-Siess, V; Guitera, P; Sinz, C; Kittler, H

    2017-08-01

    Flat pigmented facial lesions are difficult to diagnose even with dermatoscopy. It is controversial how additional information obtained by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) impacts the diagnosis and management. To examine what in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy of flat pigmented facial lesions adds to clinical examination using dermatoscopy including digital dermatoscopic monitoring. We prospectively collected 70 cases of flat pigmented facial lesions and recorded diagnoses and management decisions by experts based on direct clinical examination aided by dermatoscopy including digital dermatoscopic monitoring and by remote experts who reviewed the corresponding confocal images. The expert confocal readers were blinded to the clinical and dermatoscopic appearance of the lesion. The sensitivity of dermatoscopy plus digital dermatoscopic monitoring was 95.0% (95% CI 75.13% to 99.87%) and the specificity was 84.0% (95% CI 70.89% to 92.83%). The sensitivity of RCM was 95.0% (95% CI 75.13% to 99.87%) and the specificity was 82.0% (95% CI 68.56% to 91.42%). Although most flat pigmented facial lesions can be managed by clinical examination and dermatoscopy alone, confocal microscopy is a useful adjunct in selected lesions. If RCM is not correlated with clinical and dermatoscopic information, there is risk of overdiagnosis of actinic keratosis, however. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Gastric Tissue Damage Analysis Generated by Ischemia: Bioimpedance, Confocal Endomicroscopy, and Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Nohra E.; Garcia, Laura E.; Garcia-Lorenzana, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The gastric mucosa ischemic tissular damage plays an important role in critical care patients' outcome, because it is the first damaged tissue by compensatory mechanism during shock. The aim of the study is to relate bioimpedance changes with tissular damage level generated by ischemia by means of confocal endomicroscopy and light microscopy. Bioimpedance of the gastric mucosa and confocal images were obtained from Wistar male rats during basal and ischemia conditions. They were anesthetized, and stain was applied (fluorescein and/or acriflavine). The impedance spectroscopy catheter was inserted and then confocal endomicroscopy probe. After basal measurements and biopsy, hepatic and gastric arteries clamping induced ischemia. Finally, pyloric antrum tissue was preserved in buffered formaldehyde (10%) for histology processing using light microscopy. Confocal images were equalized, binarized, and boundary defined, and infiltrations were quantified. Impedance and infiltrations increased with ischemia showing significant changes between basal and ischemia conditions (P < 0.01). Light microscopy analysis allows detection of general alterations in cellular and tissular integrity, confirming gastric reactance and confocal images quantification increments obtained during ischemia. PMID:23841094

  5. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, W B

    2012-05-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460-700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  7. Confocal scanning laser microscopy and its application in biomedical health sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardaxis, Nicholas J.

    1999-07-01

    The confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) is an exciting new tool in microscopy. It offers improved rejection of out- of-focus `noise' and greater resolution than conventional imaging. By integrating a computer into the system and generating digital image data files, a rapid way of storing, processing, and analyzing images is available to the user. The production of 3D reconstruction representations is easy and effective. The technique of optical sectioning and confocal optics has revolutionized epifluorescence microscopy, the CSLM providing a highly desirable link between conventional light microscopy and electron microscopy. The use of the CSLM in biomedical health sciences is considered in this paper and the functional basics of the instrument are discussed with reference to several important applications in research and diagnostic work, with illustrations from the numerous and continually increasing publications in the area. It is veritably a `solution in search of problems' as this short review demonstrates.

  8. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a vital stain has been used to study apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos. In order to achieve optical sectioning through embryos, it was necessary to use low power objectives and to prepare the sample appropriately. Mous...

  9. Beating the Abbe diffraction limit in confocal microscopy via nonclassical photon statistics.

    PubMed

    Gatto Monticone, D; Katamadze, K; Traina, P; Moreva, E; Forneris, J; Ruo-Berchera, I; Olivero, P; Degiovanni, I P; Brida, G; Genovese, M

    2014-10-03

    We experimentally demonstrate quantum enhanced resolution in confocal fluorescence microscopy exploiting the nonclassical photon statistics of single nitrogen-vacancy color centers in diamond. By developing a general model of superresolution based on the direct sampling of the kth-order autocorrelation function of the photoluminescence signal, we show the possibility to resolve, in principle, arbitrarily close emitting centers.

  10. Confocal microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D visualizaiton of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  11. Confocal Microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D Visualization of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  12. Monitoring biofilm development in a microfluidic device using modified confocal reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yawata, Yutaka; Toda, Kensuke; Setoyama, Erika; Fukuda, Junji; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2010-09-01

    The feasibility of a method to monitor biofilm development non-destructively in a microfluidic device was addressed. Here, we report that biofilm growth could be non-destructively monitored by an image analysis technique based on modification of confocal reflection microscopy. Copyright 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTIFYING CYTOMETRIC APPLICATIONS WITH SPECTROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  14. Confocal microscopy studies of morphology and apoptosis: ovaries, limbs, embryos and insects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-stored images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ap...

  15. MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffery and Sally D. Perreault

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Prot...

  16. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTIFYING CYTOMETRIC APPLICATIONS WITH SPECTROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  17. MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffery and Sally D. Perreault

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Prot...

  18. Using Confocal Microscopy and Computational Modeling to Investigate the Cell-Penetrating Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Gabriel; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) may display the ability to penetrate cells, which may be relevant for their antibiotic activity. To investigate the relevance of the penetrating activity for the antibiotic activity of AMPs, here we describe a method based on the combined use of confocal microscopy and computational modeling coupled with cell death kinetics.

  19. Confocal Microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D Visualization of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  20. Confocal microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D visualizaiton of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  1. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy features of a large cell acanthoma: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Neda; Grant-Kels, Jane M.; Rabinovitz, Harold S.; Oliviero, Margaret; Scope, Alon

    2016-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is an FDA approved noninvasive optical imaging technique that acquires cellular level-resolution skin images in vivo. Herein, we report a case of histopathologically proven large cell acanthoma (LCA) whose RCM features simulate those of squamous cell carcinoma in situ. PMID:27648388

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a vital stain has been used to study apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos. In order to achieve optical sectioning through embryos, it was necessary to use low power objectives and to prepare the sample appropriately. Mous...

  3. MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES, EMBRYOS AND FETAL LIMBS USING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emergence of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of optically generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-stored images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure offers a viable alternative to traditional section...

  4. MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES, EMBRYOS AND FETAL LIMBS USING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emergence of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of optically generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-stored images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure offers a viable alternative to traditional section...

  5. Confocal microscopy studies of morphology and apoptosis: ovaries, limbs, embryos and insects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-stored images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ap...

  6. Direct comparison between confocal and multiphoton microscopy for rapid histopathological evaluation of unfixed human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Tadayuki; Giacomelli, Michael G.; Cahill, Lucas C.; Schmolze, Daniel B.; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid histopathological examination of surgical specimen margins using fluorescence microscopy during breast conservation therapy has the potential to reduce the rate of positive margins on postoperative histopathology and the need for repeat surgeries. To assess the suitability of imaging modalities, we perform a direct comparison between confocal fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton microscopy for imaging unfixed tissue and compare to paraffin-embedded histology. An imaging protocol including dual channel detection of two contrast agents to implement virtual hematoxylin and eosin images is introduced that provides high quality imaging under both one and two photon excitation. Corresponding images of unfixed human breast tissue show that both confocal and multiphoton microscopy can reproduce the appearance of conventional histology without the need for physical sectioning. We further compare normal breast tissue and invasive cancer specimens imaged at multiple magnifications, and assess the effects of photobleaching for both modalities using the staining protocol. The results demonstrate that confocal fluorescence microscopy is a promising and cost-effective alternative to multiphoton microscopy for rapid histopathological evaluation of ex vivo breast tissue.

  7. Swept confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy for high speed volumetric imaging of behaving organisms

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Matthew B.; Voleti, Venkatakaushik; Mendes, César S.; Lacefield, Clay; Grueber, Wesley B.; Mann, Richard S.; Bruno, Randy M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new 3D microscopy technique that allows volumetric imaging of living samples at ultra-high speeds: Swept, confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy. While confocal and two-photon microscopy have revolutionized biomedical research, current implementations are costly, complex and limited in their ability to image 3D volumes at high speeds. Light-sheet microscopy techniques using two-objective, orthogonal illumination and detection require a highly constrained sample geometry, and either physical sample translation or complex synchronization of illumination and detection planes. In contrast, SCAPE microscopy acquires images using an angled, swept light-sheet in a single-objective, en-face geometry. Unique confocal descanning and image rotation optics map this moving plane onto a stationary high-speed camera, permitting completely translationless 3D imaging of intact samples at rates exceeding 20 volumes per second. We demonstrate SCAPE microscopy by imaging spontaneous neuronal firing in the intact brain of awake behaving mice, as well as freely moving transgenic Drosophila larvae. PMID:25663846

  8. Swept confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy for high speed volumetric imaging of behaving organisms.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Matthew B; Voleti, Venkatakaushik; Mendes, César S; Lacefield, Clay; Grueber, Wesley B; Mann, Richard S; Bruno, Randy M; Hillman, Elizabeth M C

    2015-02-01

    We report a new 3D microscopy technique that allows volumetric imaging of living samples at ultra-high speeds: Swept, confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy. While confocal and two-photon microscopy have revolutionized biomedical research, current implementations are costly, complex and limited in their ability to image 3D volumes at high speeds. Light-sheet microscopy techniques using two-objective, orthogonal illumination and detection require a highly constrained sample geometry, and either physical sample translation or complex synchronization of illumination and detection planes. In contrast, SCAPE microscopy acquires images using an angled, swept light-sheet in a single-objective, en-face geometry. Unique confocal descanning and image rotation optics map this moving plane onto a stationary high-speed camera, permitting completely translationless 3D imaging of intact samples at rates exceeding 20 volumes per second. We demonstrate SCAPE microscopy by imaging spontaneous neuronal firing in the intact brain of awake behaving mice, as well as freely moving transgenic Drosophila larvae.

  9. An Interactive Visualization Tool for Multi-channel Confocal Microscopy Data in Neurobiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Hansen, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is widely used in neurobiology for studying the three-dimensional structure of the nervous system. Confocal image data are often multi-channel, with each channel resulting from a different fluorescent dye or fluorescent protein; one channel may have dense data, while another has sparse; and there are often structures at several spatial scales: subneuronal domains, neurons, and large groups of neurons (brain regions). Even qualitative analysis can therefore require visualization using techniques and parameters fine-tuned to a particular dataset. Despite the plethora of volume rendering techniques that have been available for many years, the techniques standardly used in neurobiological research are somewhat rudimentary, such as looking at image slices or maximal intensity projections. Thus there is a real demand from neurobiologists, and biologists in general, for a flexible visualization tool that allows interactive visualization of multi-channel confocal data, with rapid fine-tuning of parameters to reveal the three-dimensional relationships of structures of interest. Together with neurobiologists, we have designed such a tool, choosing visualization methods to suit the characteristics of confocal data and a typical biologist’s workflow. We use interactive volume rendering with intuitive settings for multidimensional transfer functions, multiple render modes and multi-views for multi-channel volume data, and embedding of polygon data into volume data for rendering and editing. As an example, we apply this tool to visualize confocal microscopy datasets of the developing zebrafish visual system. PMID:19834225

  10. Quantification of confocal fluorescence microscopy for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, Fahime; Ward, Rabab K; Carraro, Anita; Chen, Zhao Yang; van Niekerk, Dirk; Miller, Dianne; Ehlen, Tom; MacAulay, Calum E; Follen, Michele; Lane, Pierre M; Guillaud, Martial

    2015-10-24

    Cervical cancer remains a major health problem, especially in developing countries. Colposcopic examination is used to detect high-grade lesions in patients with a history of abnormal pap smears. New technologies are needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of this technique. We propose to test the potential of fluorescence confocal microscopy to identify high-grade lesions. We examined the quantification of ex vivo confocal fluorescence microscopy to differentiate among normal cervical tissue, low-grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), and high-grade CIN. We sought to (1) quantify nuclear morphology and tissue architecture features by analyzing images of cervical biopsies; and (2) determine the accuracy of high-grade CIN detection via confocal microscopy relative to the accuracy of detection by colposcopic impression. Forty-six biopsies obtained from colposcopically normal and abnormal cervical sites were evaluated. Confocal images were acquired at different depths from the epithelial surface and histological images were analyzed using in-house software. The features calculated from the confocal images compared well with those features obtained from the histological images and histopathological reviews of the specimens (obtained by a gynecologic pathologist). The correlations between two of these features (the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and the average of three nearest Delaunay-neighbors distance) and the grade of dysplasia were higher than that of colposcopic impression. The sensitivity of detecting high-grade dysplasia by analysing images collected at the surface of the epithelium, and at 15 and 30 μm below the epithelial surface were respectively 100, 100, and 92 %. Quantitative analysis of confocal fluorescence images showed its capacity for discriminating high-grade CIN lesions vs. low-grade CIN lesions and normal tissues, at different depth of imaging. This approach could be used to help clinicians identify high-grade CIN in clinical

  11. Skin Cancer Diagnosis With Reflectance Confocal Microscopy: Reproducibility of Feature Recognition and Accuracy of Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Farnetani, Francesca; Scope, Alon; Braun, Ralph P; Gonzalez, Salvador; Guitera, Pascale; Malvehy, Josep; Manfredini, Marco; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Moscarella, Elvira; Oliviero, Margaret; Puig, Susana; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Stanganelli, Ignazio; Longo, Caterina; Malagoli, Carlotta; Vinceti, Marco; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) studies have been performed to identify criteria for diagnosis of skin neoplasms. However, RCM-based diagnosis is operator dependent. Hence, reproducibility of RCM criteria needs to be tested. To test interobserver reproducibility of recognition of previously published RCM descriptors and accuracy of RCM-based skin cancer diagnosis. Observational retrospective web-based study of a set of RCM images collected at a tertiary academic medical center. Nine dermatologists (6 of whom had ≥3 years of RCM experience) from 6 countries evaluated an RCM study set from 100 biopsy-proven lesions, including 55 melanocytic nevi, 20 melanomas, 15 basal cell carcinomas, 7 solar lentigines or seborrheic keratoses, and 3 actinic keratoses. Between June 15, 2010, and October 21, 2010, participanting dermatologists, blinded to histopathological diagnosis, evaluated 3 RCM mosaic images per lesion for the presence of predefined RCM descriptors. The main outcome was identification of RCM descriptors with fair to good interrater agreement (κ statistic, ≥0.3) and independent correlation with malignant vs benign diagnosis on discriminant analysis. Additional measures included sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of malignant vs benign for each evaluator, for majority diagnosis (rendered by ≥5 of 9 evaluators), and for experienced vs recent RCM users. Eight RCM descriptors showed fair to good reproducibility and were independently associated with a specific diagnosis. Of these, the presence of pagetoid cells, atypical cells at the dermal-epidermal junction, and irregular epidermal architecture were associated with melanoma. Aspecific junctional pattern, basaloid cords, and ulceration were associated with basal cell carcinomas. Ringed junctional pattern and dermal nests were associated with nevi. The mean sensitivity for the group of evaluators was 88.9% (range, 82.9%-100%), and the mean specificity was 79.3% (range, 69.2%-90.8%). Majority

  12. Optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of ex vivo transgenic mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eunjoo; Ahn, YoonJoon; Ahn, Jinhyo; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Changhwan; Choi, Sanghoon; Boutilier, Richard Martin; Lee, Yongjoong; Kim, Pilhan; Lee, Ho

    2015-10-01

    We examined the optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of the transgenic mouse skin. The pinna and dorsal skin were imaged with a confocal microscope after the application of glycerol and FocusClear. In case of the glycerol-treated pinna, the clearing was minimal due to the inefficient permeability. However, the imaging depth was improved when the pinna was treated with FocusClear. In case of dorsal skin, we were able to image deeply to the subcutaneous connective tissue with both agents. Various skin structures such as the vessel, epithelium cells, cartilage, dermal cells, and hair follicles were clearly imaged.

  13. Microtomography and improved resolution in cathodoluminescence microscopy using confocal mirror optics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, D.S.H.; Liu, Y.Y.; Phang, J.C.H.; Rau, E.; Sennov, R.; Gostev, A.V.

    2004-10-01

    Cathodoluminescence in scanning electron microscopy observed using an ellipsoidal confocal light collector system can offer improved resolution and an implementation of microtomography. With this signal collection system, the resolution limit is no longer determined by the beam and specimen properties but by the system optics. This possibility is demonstrated by the modeling of light transport in cathodoluminescent materials and in the ellipsoidal confocal system which collects the light emission. The conditions for the high-resolution three-dimensional visualization of microstructure within the generation volume of cathodoluminescence emission is described.

  14. A new diagnostic technique for tinea incognito: in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy. Report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Turan, Enver; Erdemir, Asli Turgut; Gurel, Mehmet Salih; Yurt, Nurdan

    2013-02-01

    In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a modern non-invasive method for investigation of the skin that allows real-time visualization of individual cells and subcellular structures with the highest resolution imaging comparable to the routine histopathology. Our aim was to demonstrate the potential of CLSM for non-invasive diagnosis of difficult tinea incognito cases. Clinically atypical lesions in five cases of tinea incognito due to dermatophyte spp. were demonstrated using reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy (RCM), parallel to KOH preparation and fungal culture of skin scrapings performed in the same patients. The morphological features characteristic for tinea incognito, namely linear branched hyphae in the intercellular area of the stratum corneum, were readily detectable by means of CLSM. In vivo tissue imaging were performed at three different wavelengths (785, 658, 445 nm) and the best images of fungal elements were obtained at 445 nm. All of our five cases had similar reflectance confocal microscopical findings. Our findings suggest the potential of CLSM as a non-invasive tool for the diagnosis of tinea incognito having atypical clinical appearance. Although at present the reflectance confocal microscopy cannot replace the current diagnostic standards for tinea incognito, it may be successfully used as in vivo non-invasive screening tool to facilitate the diagnosis and point to the need for further investigation of the patient. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Dual-detection confocal microscopy: high-speed surface profiling without depth scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new method for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging without depth scanning that we refer to as the dual-detection confocal microscopy (DDCM). Compared to conventional confocal microscopy, DDCM utilizes two pinholes of different sizes. DDCM generates two axial response curves which have different stiffness according to the pinhole diameters. The two axial response curves can draw the characteristics curve of the system which shows the relationship between the axial position of the sample and the intensity ratio. Utilizing the characteristic curve, the DDCM reconstructs a 3-D surface profile with a single 2-D scanning. The height of each pixel is calculated by the intensity ratio of the pixel and the intensity ratio curve. Since the height information can be obtained directly from the characteristic curve without depth scanning, a major advantage of DDCM over the conventional confocal microscopy is a speed. The 3-D surface profiling time is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, DDCM can measure 3-D images without the influence of the sample condition since the intensity ratio is independent of the quantum yield and reflectance. We present two types of DDCM, such as a fluorescence microscopy and a reflectance microscopy. In addition, we extend the measurement range axially by varying the pupil function. Here, we demonstrate the working principle of DDCM and the feasibility of the proposed methods.

  16. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Apedo, K.L.; Munzer, C.; He, H.; Montgomery, P.; Serres, N.; Fond, C.; Feugeas, F.

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  17. Confocal Scanning Microscopy in Assessment of Cardiac Allograft Rejection--A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    White, R; Crossman, D J; Isaacson, M; Gibbs, H; Ruygrok, P N

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac allograft rejection is typically diagnosed on the basis of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology of endomyocardial biopsies. This diagnosis is made based on the degree of immune cell infiltrate and associated myocyte damage. However, considerable variability in rejection grading between pathologists can occur. Confocal microscopy provides high contrast and high resolution imaging that has the potential to provide detailed views of pathological features of allograft rejection. In this pilot study we sought to determine if confocal microscopy could be used to detect features of cardiac rejection. This was achieved by collection of additional sample at 30 biopsy procedures from 15 heart transplant patients. Routine pathological grading of H&E histology identified 5 gradings of 0R, 21 gradings of 1R, and 3 gradings of 2R. From these gradings, 3 samples for 0R, 9 samples for 1R, and 3 samples for 2R were imaged by confocal microscopy. This was achieved by fluorescently labeling sections with DAPI, wheat germ agglutinin, and phalloidin, to visualize the cell nuclei, cell border and extracellular matrix, and muscle cell actin, respectively. Labeling with these fluorescent markers was of high contrast. However, we did note variability in DAPI and phalloidin labeling of tissue sections. Confocal imaging of these labels revealed the following features at high resolution: perivascular and/or interstitial infiltrate, myocyte damage, and Quilty lesions. In particular increased detail of damaged myocytes reveals distortion in myofilament organization that could be exploited to distinguish between 1R and 2R grades. In conclusion, confocal microscopy provided high contrast and resolution imaging of cardiac biopsies that could be explored further to aid assessment of cardiac allograft rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of porcine skin: implications for human wound healing studies

    PubMed Central

    VARDAXIS, N. J.; BRANS, T. A.; BOON, M. E.; KREIS, R. W.; MARRES, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of porcine skin as examined by light microscopy is reviewed and its similarities to and differences from human skin are highlighted. Special imaging techniques and staining procedures are described and their use in gathering morphological information in porcine skin is discussed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was employed to examine the structure of porcine skin and the findings are presented as an adjunct to the information already available in the literature. It is concluded that CLSM provides valuable additional morphological information to material examined by conventional microscopy and is useful for wound healing studies in the porcine model. PMID:9183682

  19. Rapid diagnosis of tinea incognito using handheld reflectance confocal microscopy: a paradigm shift in dermatology?

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Bajaj, Shirin; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Marchetti, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Dermatophytoses are common skin infections. Traditional diagnostic tests such as skin scrapings for light microscopy examination, fungal cultures and biopsies remain imperfect due to false-negative test results, cost, time required to perform the procedure, time delays in test results and/or a requirement for an invasive procedure. Herein, we present a case of an 80-year-old female whose tinea incognito was non-invasively diagnosed within seconds using handheld reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). As non-invasive skin imaging continues to improve, we expect light-based office microscopy to be replaced with technologies such as RCM, which has multiple and continually expanding diagnostic applications.

  20. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community. PMID:24921725

  1. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, WB

    2012-01-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460–700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser. PMID:22432542

  2. CINCH (confocal incoherent correlation holography) super resolution fluorescence microscopy based upon FINCH (Fresnel incoherent correlation holography)

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Nisan; Storrie, Brian; Bruce, Marc

    2016-01-01

    FINCH holographic fluorescence microscopy creates high resolution super-resolved images with enhanced depth of focus. The simple addition of a real-time Nipkow disk confocal image scanner in a conjugate plane of this incoherent holographic system is shown to reduce the depth of focus, and the combination of both techniques provides a simple way to enhance the axial resolution of FINCH in a combined method called “CINCH”. An important feature of the combined system allows for the simultaneous real-time image capture of widefield and holographic images or confocal and confocal holographic images for ready comparison of each method on the exact same field of view. Additional GPU based complex deconvolution processing of the images further enhances resolution. PMID:26839443

  3. Comparison of calcium imaging in dorsal root ganglion neurons by using laser scanning confocal and two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Shen, Xiuqiu; Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Xie, Shusen

    2012-03-01

    As one of the most important second messengers, calcium in nerve cells plays a critical role in neuronal processes, including excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity. Modulation of the calcium concentration is an important means of regulating diverse neuronal functions. To evaluate the role of calcium, quantitative measurement of cytosolic free calcium concentrations is necessary. There are several optical techniques that are available for measurement of calcium in live cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy are two prevalent techniques for their advantage in spatial resolution. In this paper, calcium in dorsal root ganglion neurons was imaged by laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy with Fluo-3, a calcium specific fluorescence probe. Both of spatial resolution and photobleaching, two common limitations of optical image modality, were compared between laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, respectively. Three dimension images showed that laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy had not only similar lateral resolution but also parallel vertical resolution. However, Laser scanning confocal microscopy had an advantage over the two-photon microcopy in photobleaching. These results indicated that laser scanning confocal microscopy was more suitable than two-photon microscopy to be applied in imaging calcium in dorsal root ganglion neurons with Fluo-3.

  4. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy 1 Year after Autologous Cultured Limbal Stem Cell Grafts.

    PubMed

    Pedrotti, Emilio; Passilongo, Mattia; Fasolo, Adriano; Nubile, Mario; Parisi, Graziella; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Ficial, Sara; Bertolin, Marina; Di Iorio, Enzo; Ponzin, Diego; Marchini, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    To correlate clinical, impression cytologic, and in vivo confocal microscopy findings on the corneal surface after cultured limbal stem cell transplantation. Prospective, interventional, noncomparative, masked case series. Thirteen patients with limbal stem cell deficiency after unilateral (9 eyes) or bilateral (2 eyes) chemical burn, liquid nitrogen injury (1 eye), or herpes simplex virus infection (1 eye). Limbal cells were harvested from healthy or less affected eyes, cultured on 3T3 cells and fibrin glue, and transplanted to the patient's injured eye. Patients underwent clinical examination and impression cytologic examination of the central cornea before and 1 year after intervention. In vivo confocal microscopy scans were obtained in all corneal quadrants after 1 year. The interexamination agreement was established by calculation of the Cohen's κ coefficient. Results of surgery were assessed considering clinical signs (successful: restoration of transparent, avascular, and stable corneal epithelium without neovascularization in central corneal surface; partially successful: recurrence of superficial neovascularization; failed: recurrent epithelial defects, pannus, and inflammation), phenotype of cells covering the corneal surface (conjunctivalized corneal surface: cytokeratin 12 [cK12]-negative and mucin 1 [MUC1]-positive cells; mixed epithelium: cK12-positive and MUC1-positive cells; corneal epithelium: cK12-positive and MUC1-negative cells), and cell morphologic features (corneal epithelium: multilayered polygonal and flat cells with hyperreflective nuclei; conjunctival epithelium: stratified cuboidal or polygonal cells, hyperreflective cytoplasm, and barely defined borders; epithelial transition: transition of epithelial cells from the cornea to the conjunctiva over the corneal surface). We found a moderate to substantial degree of concordance between confocal microscopy and clinical evaluation (κ = 0.768) and between confocal microscopy and impression

  5. Real-time, non-invasive microscopic confirmation of clinical diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, M; Agozzino, M; Amorosi, B; Moscarella, E; Cota, C; de Abreu, L; Berardesca, E

    2014-05-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune disease affecting prevalently the elder. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy is a non-invasive technique for real-time imaging of the skin with cellular-level resolution. No previous data has been reported about confocal microscopy of bullous pemphigoid. Aim of this preliminary study is the evaluation of the potential of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy for real-time, microscopical confirmation of clinical bullous pemphigoid diagnosis. A total of nine lesions from patients affected by pemphigoid underwent in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy before histological examination. In our preliminary study, confocal microscopy showed high grade of correspondence to histopathology. In particular, presence of sub-epidermal cleft and variable amount of oedema of the upper dermis associated with inflammatory cells infiltration were seen as prevalent confocal features in the bullous lesions considered. Differently, in urticarial lesions, no specific features could be appreciated at confocal analysis beside the presence of signs of spongiosis and perivascular inflammation. Confocal microscopy seems to be useful for in vivo, microscopical confirmation of the clinical suspect of bullous pemphigoid and for biopsy site selection in urticarial lesions to obtain a more significant specimen for histopathological examination. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of porous media using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shah, S M; Crawshaw, J P; Boek, E S

    2017-02-01

    In the last decade, imaging techniques capable of reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D) pore-scale model have played a pivotal role in the study of fluid flow through complex porous media. In this study, we present advances in the application of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to image, reconstruct and characterize complex porous geological materials with hydrocarbon reservoir and CO2 storage potential. CLSM has a unique capability of producing 3-D thin optical sections of a material, with a wide field of view and submicron resolution in the lateral and axial planes. However, CLSM is limited in the depth (z-dimension) that can be imaged in porous materials. In this study, we introduce a 'grind and slice' technique to overcome this limitation. We discuss the practical and technical aspects of the confocal imaging technique with application to complex rock samples including Mt. Gambier and Ketton carbonates. We then describe the complete workflow of image processing to filtering and segmenting the raw 3-D confocal volumetric data into pores and grains. Finally, we use the resulting 3-D pore-scale binarized confocal data obtained to quantitatively determine petrophysical pore-scale properties such as total porosity, macro- and microporosity and single-phase permeability using lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations, validated by experiments. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. In-vivo immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Stephen C.; Laird, Jeffery A.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    1996-05-01

    The white-light confocal microscope offers an in vivo, cellular-level resolution view of the cornea. This instrument has proven to be a valuable research and diagnostic tool for the study of infectious keratitis. In this study, we investigate the direct visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected corneal epithelium, with in vivo confocal microscopy, using HSV-1 immunofluorescent antibodies. New Zealand white rabbits were infected with McKrae strain of HSV-1 in one eye; the other eye of each rabbit was used as an uninfected control. Four days later, the rabbits were anesthetized and a cellulose sponge was applied to each cornea, and a drop of direct HSV fluorescein-tagged antibody was placed on each sponge every 3 to 5 minutes for 1 hour. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was then performed. The HSV-infected corneas showed broad regions of hyperfluorescent epithelial cells. The uninfected corneas revealed no background fluorescence. Thus, using the confocal microscope with a fluorescent cube, we were able to visualize HSV-infected corneal epithelial cells tagged with a direct fluorescent antibody. This process may prove to be a useful clinical tool for the in vivo diagnosis of HSV keratitis.

  8. Darkfield-Confocal Microscopy detection of nanoscale particle internalization by human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Concerns over the health effects of nanomaterials in the environment have created a need for microscopy methods capable of examining the biological interactions of nanoparticles (NP). Unfortunately, NP are beyond the diffraction limit of resolution for conventional light microscopy (~200 nm). Fluorescence and electron microscopy techniques commonly used to examine NP interactions with biological substrates have drawbacks that limit their usefulness in toxicological investigation of NP. EM is labor intensive and slow, while fluorescence carries the risk of photobleaching the sample and has size resolution limits. In addition, many relevant particles lack intrinsic fluorescence and therefore can not be detected in this manner. To surmount these limitations, we evaluated the potential of a novel combination of darkfield and confocal laser scanning microscopy (DF-CLSM) for the efficient 3D detection of NP in human lung cells. The DF-CLSM approach utilizes the contrast enhancements of darkfield microscopy to detect objects below the diffraction limit of 200 nm based on their light scattering properties and interfaces it with the power of confocal microscopy to resolve objects in the z-plane. Results Validation of the DF-CLSM method using fluorescent polystyrene beads demonstrated spatial colocalization of particle fluorescence (Confocal) and scattered transmitted light (Darkfield) along the X, Y, and Z axes. DF-CLSM imaging was able to detect and provide reasonable spatial locations of 27 nm TiO2 particles in relation to the stained nuclei of exposed BEAS 2B cells. Statistical analysis of particle proximity to cellular nuclei determined a significant difference between 5 min and 2 hr particle exposures suggesting a time-dependant internalization process. Conclusions DF-CLSM microscopy is an alternative to current conventional light and electron microscopy methods that does not rely on particle fluorescence or contrast in electron density. DF-CLSM is

  9. [Confocal microscopy as an early relapse marker after keratoplasty due to Fusarium solani keratitis].

    PubMed

    Daas, L; Bischoff-Jung, M; Viestenz, A; Seitz, B; Viestenz, A

    2017-01-01

    In the case of therapy-resistant keratitis an infection with Fusarium solani should be taken into consideration as a rare but very severe eye disease. In the majority of cases Fusarium solani keratitis will result in a protracted clinical course despite aggressive medicinal and surgical interventions. We describe the case of a referred patient after intensive topical, intracameral and systemic antibacterial and antimycotic therapy as well as surgical treatment with emergency keratoplasty à chaud because of Fusarium solani keratitis. The patient presented to our department with persistent discomfort for further therapeutic interventions. Using confocal microscopy we were able to demonstrate the presence of fungal hyphae in the host cornea and the graft, which was important for making further surgical decisions. Furthermore, this emphasizes the role of confocal microscopy as an early relapse marker during the clinical monitoring.

  10. Confocal Raman microscopy to monitor extracellular matrix during dental pulp stem cells differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2015-07-01

    Regenerative medicine brings promising applications for mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a noninvasive technique, is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800 to 3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and the 960 cm-1 peak (ν1 PO43-) were collected (to image cells and phosphate, respectively), and the ratio of two peaks 1660 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) to measure the collagen cross-linking has been calculated. Raman spectra of DPSCs after 21 days differentiation reveal several phosphate peaks: ν1 (first stretching mode) at 960 cm-1, ν2 at 430 cm-1, and ν4 at 585 cm-1 and collagen cross-linking can also be calculated. Confocal Raman microscopy enables monitoring osteogenic differentiation in vitro and can be a credible tool for clinical stem cell based research.

  11. Near-IR fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy for imaging of quantum dots in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Glazowski, Christopher E.; Zavislan, James M.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the skin penetration of nanoparticles (NPs) is an important concern due to the increasing presence of NPs in consumer products, including cosmetics. Technical challenges have slowed progress in evaluating skin barrier and NP factors that contribute to skin penetration risk. To limit sampling error and other problems associated with histological processing, many researchers are implementing whole tissue confocal or multiphoton microscopies. This work introduces a fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy system that utilizes near-IR excitation and emission to detect near-IR lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) through ex vivo human epidermis. We provide a detailed prediction and experimental analysis of QD detection sensitivity and demonstrate detection of QD skin penetration in a barrier disrupted model. The unique properties of near-IR lead-based QDs will enable future studies that examine the impact of further barrier-disrupting agents on skin penetration of QDs and elucidate mechanistic insight into QD tissue interactions at the cellular level. PMID:21698023

  12. Confocal Raman Microscopy on in-situ Structural Evolution of Polyolefin Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wansoo; Jeon, Byungho; Lee, Jong-Won; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2011-03-01

    Polyolefins account for more than half of world-wide consumption of plastic materials, and are typically blended with fillers and other types of polymers in applications. In particular, understanding the miscibility and phase behaviors of polyolefin blends is important for the advancement of a wide array of new applications in medicine, packaging, and other fields. We have used Confocal Raman Microscopy to take the advantages of it capability to locally probe the transformation of physical states in polymeric materials and to characterize morphology of polyolefin blends in-situ for lateral and in-depth imaging with a micron-scale spatial resolution. Upon distinct changes of Raman spectra associated with the melting of semicrystaline polyolefins, we report the in-situ morphological changes upon heating and cooling of polyethylene-polyethylene and polypropylene-polyethylene using confocal Raman microscopy with heating stage. NSF MRI-0722563.

  13. Confocal scanning laser microscopy and quantitative image analysis: application to cream cheese microstructure investigation.

    PubMed

    Fenoul, F; Le Denmat, M; Hamdi, F; Cuvelier, G; Michon, C

    2008-04-01

    The naked eye observation of cream cheese confocal scanning laser microscopy images only provides qualitative information about its microstructure. Because those products are dense dairy gels, confocal scanning laser microscopy images of 2 different cream cheeses may appear close. Quantitative image analysis is then necessary to compensate for human eye deficiency (e.g., lack of precision, subjectivity). Two kinds of quantitative image analysis were performed in this study: high-order statistical methods and grayscale mathematical morphology. They were applied to study the microstructure of 3 different cream cheeses (same manufacturing process, same dry matter content, but different fat and protein contents). Advantages and drawbacks of both methods are reviewed. The way they may be used to describe cream cheese microstructure is also presented.

  14. Evaluation of human sclera after femtosecond laser ablation using two photon and confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-08-01

    Glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness worldwide and is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Partial thickness intrascleral channels can be created with a femtosecond laser operating at a wavelength of 1700 nm. Such channels have the potential to increase outflow facility and reduce elevated IOP. Analysis of the dimensions and location of these channels is important in understanding their effects. We describe the application of two-photon microscopy and confocal microscopy for noninvasive imaging of the femtosecond laser created partial-thickness scleral channels in human cadaver eyes. High-resolution images, hundreds of microns deep in the sclera, were obtained to allow determination of the shape and dimension of such channels. This demonstrates that concept of integrating femtosecond laser surgery, and two-photon and confocal imaging has the future potential for image-guided high-precision surgery in transparent and translucent tissue.

  15. The role of confocal microscopy in the dermato-oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Diaconeasa, A; Boda, D; Neagu, M; Constantin, C; Căruntu, C; Vlădău, L; Guţu, D

    2011-01-01

    Reflectance-mode confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new in vivo skin imaging technique. We present our one-year experience in RCM examinations in skin tumors and the retrospective analysis of patients enrolled in the Dermatological Department of 'N. Paulescu' Institute using the Fotofinder Dermoscope IIŴ for the dermatoscopy analysis and VivaScope 1500Ŵ for in vivo RCM. We established the rank of RCM in the complex algorithm of skin cancer diagnose, showing that the presented experience can open new possibilities to implement this automated image analyzing system in the routine practice. Our analyzed cases clearly showed that confocal microscopy, therefore, optical biopsy, could guide the clinician towards an accurate diagnosis before surgical removal. Moreover, we emphasized that the development of this technique increases the potential of future teledermatologic applications.

  16. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  17. Actin restructuring during Salmonella typhimurium infection investigated by confocal and super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jason J; Kunde, Yuliya A; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Werner, James H

    2014-01-01

    We have used super-resolution optical microscopy and confocal microscopy to visualize the cytoskeletal restructuring of HeLa cells that accompanies and enables Salmonella typhimurium internalization. Herein, we report the use of confocal microscopy to verify and explore infection conditions that would be compatible with super-resolution optical microscopy, using Alexa-488 labeled phalloidin to stain the actin cytoskeletal network. While it is well known that actin restructuring and cytoskeletal rearrangements often accompany and assist in bacterial infection, most studies have employed conventional diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy to explore these changes. Here we show that the superior spatial resolution provided by single-molecule localization methods (such as direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) enables more precise visualization of the nanoscale changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany bacterial infection. In particular, we found that a thin (100-nm) ring of actin often surrounds an invading bacteria 10 to 20 min postinfection, with this ring being transitory in nature. We estimate that a few hundred monofilaments of actin surround the S. typhimurium in this heretofore unreported bacterial internalization intermediate.

  18. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  19. Actin restructuring during Salmonella typhimurium infection investigated by confocal and super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jason J.; Kunde, Yuliya A.; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Werner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    We have used super-resolution optical microscopy and confocal microscopy to visualize the cytoskeletal restructuring of HeLa cells that accompanies and enables Salmonella typhimurium internalization. Herein, we report the use of confocal microscopy to verify and explore infection conditions that would be compatible with super-resolution optical microscopy, using Alexa-488 labeled phalloidin to stain the actin cytoskeletal network. While it is well known that actin restructuring and cytoskeletal rearrangements often accompany and assist in bacterial infection, most studies have employed conventional diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy to explore these changes. Here we show that the superior spatial resolution provided by single-molecule localization methods (such as direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) enables more precise visualization of the nanoscale changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany bacterial infection. In particular, we found that a thin (100-nm) ring of actin often surrounds an invading bacteria 10 to 20 min postinfection, with this ring being transitory in nature. We estimate that a few hundred monofilaments of actin surround the S. typhimurium in this heretofore unreported bacterial internalization intermediate.

  20. Evaluation of conjunctival inflammatory status by confocal scanning laser microscopy and conjunctival brush cytology in patients with atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC)

    PubMed Central

    Wakamatsu, Tais Hitomi; Okada, Naoko; Kojima, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Ibrahim, Osama M.A.; Adan, Enrique Sato; Fukagawa, Kazumi; Katakami, Chikako; Tsubota, Kazuo; Shimazaki, Jun; Fujishima, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the status of the conjunctival inflammation in atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) using laser scanning confocal microscopy and compare the relevant findings with conjunctival brush cytology in a prospective controlled study. Methods Twenty eyes from 20 AKC patients as well as 16 eyes from 16 age and sex matched normal subjects were studied. The subjects underwent tear film break-up time (BUT), fluorescein and Rose Bengal staining of the ocular surface, conjunctival confocal microscopy, Schirmer test, and brush cytology. Brush cytology specimens and in vivo confocal microscopy scans underwent evaluation for inflammatory cell densities. Results Brush cytology specimens and in vivo confocal microscopy scans from AKC patients revealed significantly higher numbers of inflammatory cells (p<0.05). Conjunctival inflammatory cell density showed a negative correlation with tear stability and a positive correlation with vital staining scores and conjunctival injection grades. The extent of conjunctival inflammation assessed by in vivo confocal microscopy showed a strong positive linear correlation with the inflammation status evaluated by brush cytology. The corneal inflammatory cell density assessed by in vivo confocal microscopy showed a significant negative correlation with tear stability and a positive linear correlation with corneal fluorescein staining. Conclusions Confocal scanning laser microscopy is an efficient, noninvasive, and a promising tool for the quantitative assessment of conjunctival inflammation, a parameter of this new technology which correlated well with subjective and objective ocular surface clinical findings. PMID:19693288

  1. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  2. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT ADDITION ON RHEOLOGY USING LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    White, T

    2007-05-08

    The effectiveness of three dispersants to modify rheology was examined using rheology measurements and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in simulated waste solutions. All of the dispersants lowered the yield stress of the slurries below the baseline samples. The rheology curves were fitted reasonably to a Bingham Plastic model. The three-dimensional LSCM images of simulants showed distinct aggregates were greatly reduced after the addition of dispersants leading to a lowering of the yield stress of the simulated waste slurry solutions.

  3. Chondrocytes provide a model for in-situ confocal microscopy and 3D reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michelle S.; Svoboda, Kathy K. H.

    1994-04-01

    Hyaline cartilage is composed of chondrocytes that reside in lacunae surrounded by extracellular matrix molecules. Microscopic and histochemical features of cartilage have been studied with many techniques. Many of these techniques can be time consuming and may alter natural cartilage characteristics. In addition, the orientation and order of sectioned tissue must be maintained to create 3D reconstructions. We show that confocal laser scanning microscopy may replace traditional methods for studying cartilage.

  4. Template confined synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes and its confocal Raman microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Supratim; Roychowdhury, Tuhin; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) were synthesized by AAO (anodic aluminum oxide) template at a temperature 500 °C in nitrogen atmosphere using the citric acid as a carbon source without the help of any catalyst particles. Morphological analysis of the as prepared samples was carried out by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Confocal Raman imaging has been studied and an attempt has been made to find out the graphitic (sp{sup 2}) and disordered phase of the CNTs.

  5. Application of confocal laser microscopy for monitoring mesh implants in herniology

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V P; Belokonev, V I; Bratchenko, I A; Timchenko, P E; Vavilov, A V; Volova, L T

    2011-04-30

    The state of the surface of mesh implants and their encapsulation region in herniology is investigated by laser confocal microscopy. A correlation between the probability of developing relapses and the size and density of implant microdefects is experimentally shown. The applicability limits of differential reverse scattering for monitoring the post-operation state of implant and adjacent tissues are established based on model numerical experiments. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  6. Error analysis and tolerance allocation for confocal scanning microscopy using the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hongki; Kang, Dong-Kyun; Lee, SeungWoo; Lee, Junhee; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2004-07-01

    The errors can cause the serious loss of the performance of a precision machine system. In this paper, we propose the method of allocating the alignment tolerances of the components and apply this method to Confocal Scanning Microscopy (CSM) to get the optimal tolerances. CSM uses confocal aperture, which blocks the out-of-focus information. Thus, it provides images with superior resolution and has unique property of optical sectioning. Recently, due to these properties, it has been widely used for measurement in biological field, medical science, material science and semiconductor industry. In general, tight tolerances are required to maintain the performance of a system, but a high cost of manufacturing and assembling is required to preserve the tight tolerances. The purpose of allocating the optimal tolerances is minimizing the cost while keeping the performance of the system. In the optimal problem, we set the performance requirements as constraints and maximized the tolerances. The Monte Carlo Method, a statistical simulation method, is used in tolerance analysis. Alignment tolerances of optical components of the confocal scanning microscopy are optimized, to minimize the cost and to maintain the observation performance of the microscopy. We can also apply this method to the other precision machine system.

  7. Visualization and quantification of dentin structure using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Wilder-Smith, Petra B.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Matsumoto, Koukichi

    1997-07-01

    Dentin was visualized using a new fluorescence technique and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Thirty extracted human teeth showing no clinical signs of caries were investigated. All teeth were horizontally sectioned to approximately 200 micrometers thickness and sections were subjected to different pretreatment conditions as follows: vacuum only, ultrasonication only, sodium hypochlorite only, sodium hypochlorite and vacuum, sodium hypochlorite and ultrasonication, and a combination of sodium hypochlorite, vacuum, and ultrasonication. Some samples were left untreated to serve as control. Following pretreatment, rhodamine 123 fluorescent dye was used for staining at concentrations ranging from 10-3 to 10-7 M for 1 to 24 h at pH 6.0, 6.5, or 7.4. Optical staining occurred at pH 7.4 and concentrations >= 10-5 M over 3 h or longer. Surface images obtained using confocal laser scanning microscopy were similar to those observed by scanning electron microscopy without the need for sample- altering conventional scanning electron microscope preparation techniques. Subsurface imaging to a depth of approximately 60 micrometers was achieved using confocal laser microscope techniques. This fluorescence technique offers a useful new alternative for visualization and quantification of dentin.

  8. In vivo Confocal Microscopy in Differentiating Ipilimumab-Induced Anterior Uveitis from Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiratli, Hayyam; Mocan, Mehmet C.; İrkeç, Murat

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to describe the facilitating role of in vivo confocal microscopy in differentiating inflammatory cells from a metastatic process in a patient with uveal melanoma and multiple systemic metastases who developed anterior uveitis while under ipilimumab treatment. A 43-year-old woman developed systemic metastases 11 months after treatment of amelanotic choroidal melanoma in her right eye with 30 Gy fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. She first received temozolomide and then 4 cycles of ipilimumab 3 mg/kg/day. After the third cycle, severe anterior uveitis with coarse pigment clumps on the lens was seen in the left eye. Her left visual acuity declined from 20/20 to 20/80. Confocal microscopy revealed globular keratic precipitates with hyperreflective inclusions and endothelial blebs all suggestive of granulomatous uveitis. The uveitic reaction subsided after a 3-week course of topical corticosteroids, and her visual acuity was 20/20 again. Although uveal melanoma metastatic to the intraocular structures of the fellow eye is exceedingly rare and metastasis masquerading uveitis without any identifiable uveal lesion is even more unusual, it was still mandatory to rule out this distant possibility in our particular patient who already had widespread systemic metastases. Confocal microscopy was a useful complementary tool by identifying the inflammatory features of the keratic precipitates. PMID:27790127

  9. [Revealing the chemical changes of tea cell wall induced by anthracnose with confocal Raman microscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-li; Luo, Liu-bin; Hu, Xiao-qian; Lou, Bing-gan; He, Yong

    2014-06-01

    Healthy tea and tea infected by anthracnose were first studied by confocal Raman microscopy to illustrate chemical changes of cell wall in the present paper. Firstly, Raman spectra of both healthy and infected sample tissues were collected with spatial resolution at micron-level, and ultrastructure of healthy and infected tea cells was got from scanning electron microscope. These results showed that there were significant changes in Raman shift and Raman intensity between healthy and infected cell walls, indicating that great differences occurred in chemical compositions of cell walls between healthy and infected samples. In details, intensities at many Raman bands which were closely associated with cellulose, pectin, esters were reduced after infection, revealing that the content of chemical compounds such as cellulose, pectin, esters was decreased after infection. Subsequently, chemical imaging of both healthy and infected tea cell walls were realized based on Raman fingerprint spectra of cellulose and microscopic spatial structure. It was found that not only the content of cellulose was reduced greatly after infection, but also the ordered structure of cellulose was destroyed by anthracnose infection. Thus, confocal Raman microscopy was shown to be a powerful tool to detect the chemical changes in cell wall of tea caused by anthracnose without any chemical treatment or staining. This research firstly applied confocal Raman microscopy in phytopathology for the study of interactive relationship between host and pathogen, and it will also open a new way for intensive study of host-pathogen at cellular level.

  10. The Unique Pollen Morphology of Duparquetia (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae): Developmental Evidence of Aperture Orientation Using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    BANKS, HANNAH; FEIST-BURKHART, SUSANNE; KLITGAARD, BENTE

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The phylogenetic affinities of the aberrant monotypic genus Duparquetia (subfamily Caesalpinioideae) are at present unresolved. Preliminary results from molecular analyses suggest a basal, isolated position among legumes. A study of Duparquetia pollen was carried out to provide further morphological characters to contribute to multi-data set analyses. Understanding the development of Duparquetia pollen was necessary to clarify the orientation of the apertures. • Methods Pollen grains and developing microspores were examined using light microscopy, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Evidence for the orientation of the apertures was provided by the examination of microspores within developing tetrads, using (a) confocal microscopy to locate the position of the ectoapertures, and (b) light microscopy and Alcian blue stain to locate the position of the endoapertures. • Key Results Confocal microscopy has been used for the first time to examine developing microspores in order to obtain information on ectoapertures that was unavailable using other techniques. Pollen in Duparquetia develops in tetrahedral tetrads as in other eudicots, with the apertures arranged in a modified pattern following Fischer's rule. Pollen grains are asymmetrical and have one equatorial-encircling ectoaperture with two equatorial endoapertures, a unique feature in Leguminosae, and in eudicots. • Conclusions The pollen morphology of Duparquetia is so unusual that it provides little information to help determine its closest relatives. However, it does fit with a pattern of greater pollen morphological diversity in the first-branching caesalpinioid legume groups than in the more derived clades. The latitudinal ectoaperture of Duparquetia is unique within the Fabales and eudicot clades, resembling more closely the monosulcate pollen found in monocots and basal angiosperms; however, developmental patterns are recognizably similar to those of all other

  11. Application of Confocal and Spectrally Resolved Techniques to Scanning Laser Photoluminescence Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowron, John William

    Both confocal microscopes and photoluminescence wafer mapping systems are well-developed technologies, however the application of confocal techniques to photoluminescence microscopy is not common in the literature. While developing this microscope a novel design for a spectrally-resolved detection arm was implemented. The microscope shows full confocal capabilities in reflected light operation, good spectral sensitivity in the visible region and a range of possible spectral resolutions between 10 nm and 0.1 nm, however the axial response in photoluminescence operation was found to be broader than expected by a factor of two. Calculations were performed to model and understand the new microscope. Simulations of the axial-response of an infinity-connected microscope in reflected light agreed well with experimental data. A new prediction showed that under certain circumstances the maximum signal is not always obtained at best focus. This prediction was confirmed later by experiment. These calculations were extended to understand the broadening observed in photoluminescence imaging. Three factors were considered: absorption in the material, diffusion of photo-excited carriers and the high refractive index of the material. The utility of the microscope was demonstrated by using it to image several different samples. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging was demonstrated for a stained biological specimen. Auto-fluorescence imaging was demonstrated using an ultra-violet laser and spectrally-resolved images were used to distinguish between various materials in the specimen. Confocal image stacking was demonstrated in photoluminescence on a CuO sample. Confocal photoluminescence images were shown to have higher spatial resolution than non-confocal images. Quantitative information was obtained for a SiC sample containing several polytypes. The optical measurements were then correlated with X-ray diffraction measurements in order to arrive at a polytype identification scheme

  12. 3D imaging of lung tissue by confocal microscopy and micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, Andres; Breithecker, Andreas; Rau, Wigbert D.

    2001-07-01

    Two complementary techniques for the imaging of tissue subunits are discussed. A computer guided light microscopic imaging technique is described first, which confocally resolves thick serial sections axially. The lateral area of interest is increased by scanning a mosaic of images in each plane. Subsequently, all images are fused digitally to form a highly resolved volume exhibiting the fine structure of complete respiratory units of lung. A different technique described is based on microtomography. This method allows to image volumes up to 3x3x3 cm at a resolution of up to 7 microns. Due to the lack of strong density differences, a contrast enhancement procedure is introduced which makes this technique applicable for the imaging of lung tissue. Imaging, visualization and analysis described here are parts of an ongoing project to model structure and to simulate function of tissue subunits and complete organs.

  13. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conventional and confocal epi-reflection and fluorescence microscopy of the rat kidney in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A; Capasso, G; Unwin, R J

    1998-01-01

    To visualize superficial and accessible renal tubule cells functioning in situ and to relate what we can 'see' to what we know of their function from more invasive in vivo or less direct in vitro studies means applying and adapting recent advances in epifluorescence and confocal microscopy to improve image resolution and to combine this with the use of fluorescent labels to monitor the handling of specific molecules by the proximal and distal renal tubule cells in vivo. Doing this in living tissue is novel, especially in the kidney. Application of confocal microscopy to the imaging of living tissue, as opposed to isolated cells, has not been widely reported. The kidney surface has been imaged before using the confocal microscope and in preliminary studies we have extended this by using a different confocal system with and without fluorescence. While the studies published up to now have been morphological, comparing standard renal (structural) histology of surface glomeruli and renal tubules with the corresponding in vivo confocal images, more dynamic, real-time studies have been limited. Individual red blood cells can be seen flowing around the peritubule capillary network and nucleated white blood cells can also be distinguished. Tubule cells, endothelial cells, the proximal tubule cell brush border and cell mitochondria can be visualized. Filtration and secretion can be observed, and the early and late parts of the proximal tubule distinguished, and the distal tubule recognized. Localization of fluorescently labeled insulin to the luminal brush border and progressive uptake of label and distribution within proximal tubule cells toward the basolateral (blood side) membrane can be demonstrated. The possibility of monitoring hemodynamic changes and tracking the filtration, uptake, secretion and absorption of fluorescently tagged molecules, as well as intracellular fluorescence, e.g. calcium or pH, is an exciting prospect and is ripe for detailed exploration.

  15. Multi-beam confocal microscopy based on a custom image sensor with focal-plane pinhole array effect.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Keiichiro; Seo, Min-Woong; Yasutomi, Keita; Terakawa, Susumu; Kawahito, Shoji

    2013-01-28

    Multi-beam confocal microscopy without any physical pinhole was demonstrated. As a key device, a custom CMOS image sensor realizing a focal-plane pinhole array effect by special pixel addressing and discarding of the unwanted photocarriers was developed. The axial resolution in the confocal mode measured by FWHM for a planar mirror was 8.9 μm, which showed that the confocality has been achieved with the proposed CMOS image sensor.

  16. Evaluation of the therapeutic results of actinic keratosis treated with topical 5% fluorouracil by reflectance confocal laser microscopy: preliminary study*

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Priscila; Maia, Marcus; Rodrigues, Sarita Bartholomei; Marta, Alessandra Cristina; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Topical treatment for actinic keratosis with 5% fluorouracil has a recurrence rate of 54% in 12 months of follow-up. This study analyzed thirteen actinic keratoses on the upper limbs through confocal microscopy, at the time of clinical diagnosis and after 4 weeks of treatment with fluorouracil. After the treatment was established and evidence of clinical cure was achieved, in two of the nine actinic keratoses, confocal microscopy enabled visualization of focal areas of atypical honeycomb pattern in the epidermis indicating therapeutic failure. Preliminary data suggest the use of confocal microscopy as a tool for diagnosis and therapeutic control of actinic keratosis. PMID:26131881

  17. Modulated-alignment dual-axis (MAD) confocal microscopy for deep optical sectioning in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Steven Y.; Chen, Ye; Liu, Jonathan T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A strategy is presented to enable optical-sectioning microscopy with improved contrast and imaging depth using low-power (0.5 - 1 mW) diode laser illumination. This technology combines the inherent strengths of focal-modulation microscopy and dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopy for rejecting out-of-focus and multiply scattered background light in tissues. The DAC architecture is unique in that it utilizes an intersecting pair of illumination and collection beams to improve the spatial-filtering and optical-sectioning performance of confocal microscopy while focal modulation selectively ‘labels’ in-focus signals via amplitude modulation. Simulations indicate that modulating the spatial alignment of dual-axis beams at a frequency f generates signals from the focal volume of the microscope that are modulated at 2f with minimal modulation of background signals, thus providing nearly an order-of-magnitude improvement in optical-sectioning contrast compared to DAC microscopy alone. Experiments show that 2f lock-in detection enhances contrast and imaging depth within scattering phantoms and fresh tissues. PMID:24940534

  18. A new method for imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea by fluorescent confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Natalie A; MacDonald, Glen; Rubel, Edwin W

    2004-03-12

    Traditional methods for anatomical and morphometric studies of cochlear tissues have relied upon either microdissection of the organ of Corti or the generation of serial sections of the cochlea. Such methods are time-consuming, disruptive to three-dimensional relationships and often restrict sampling to very limited numbers of cells. We have found that cells and tissue components of the cochlear duct may be labelled by fluorescent markers within intact cochleae, which are then embedded in epoxy resin for subsequent viewing by fluorescent microscopy methods. This approach allows imaging through thick optical volumes with preservation of three-dimensional relationships. Unlike sectioned tissue, alignment of the sample relative to the focal axis may be easily corrected by re-orientation of the optical volume with common image processing software. Fluorescently labelled cochleae embedded in epoxy can be viewed by most fluorescent microscopy methods including laser scanning confocal microscopy, multi-photon confocal microscopy and widefield epi-fluorescence microscopy with deconvolution. Furthermore, semi-thin sections made from these preparations are compatible with traditional histological stains, as well as allowing brightly labelled epi-fluorescent images.

  19. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy of shave biopsy wounds: feasibility of intra-operative mapping of cancer margins

    PubMed Central

    Scope, A; Mahmood, U; Gareau, DS; Kenkre, M; Lieb, JA; Nehal, KS; Rajadhyaksha, M

    2010-01-01

    Background Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) images skin at cellular resolution and has shown utility for the diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer in-vivo. Topical application of Aluminum Chloride (AlCl3) enhances contrast in RCM images by brightening nuclei. Objective To investigate feasibility of RCM imaging of shave biopsy wounds using AlCl3 as a contrast agent. Methods AlCl3 staining was optimized, in terms of concentration versus immersion time, on excised tissue ex-vivo. RCM imaging protocol was tested in patients undergoing shave biopsies. The RCM images were retrospectively analyzed and compared to the corresponding histopathology. Results For 35% AlCl3, routinely used for hemostasis in clinic, minimum immersion time was determined to be 1 minute. We identified 3 consistent patterns of margins on RCM mosaic images by varying depths: epidermal margins, peripheral dermal margins, and deep dermal margins. Tumour islands of basal cell carcinoma were identified at peripheral or deep dermal margins, correlating on histopathology with aggregates of neoplastic basaloid cells. Atypical cobblestone or honeycomb pattern were identified at the epidermal margins, correlating with a proliferation of atypical keratinocytes extending to biopsy margins. Conclusions RCM imaging of shave biopsy wounds is feasible and demonstrates the future possibility of intra-operative mapping in surgical wounds. PMID:20874785

  20. Towards real-time image deconvolution: application to confocal and STED microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, R.; Zanghirati, G.; Cavicchioli, R.; Zanni, L.; Boccacci, P.; Bertero, M.; Vicidomini, G.

    2013-01-01

    Although deconvolution can improve the quality of any type of microscope, the high computational time required has so far limited its massive spreading. Here we demonstrate the ability of the scaled-gradient-projection (SGP) method to provide accelerated versions of the most used algorithms in microscopy. To achieve further increases in efficiency, we also consider implementations on graphic processing units (GPUs). We test the proposed algorithms both on synthetic and real data of confocal and STED microscopy. Combining the SGP method with the GPU implementation we achieve a speed-up factor from about a factor 25 to 690 (with respect the conventional algorithm). The excellent results obtained on STED microscopy images demonstrate the synergy between super-resolution techniques and image-deconvolution. Further, the real-time processing allows conserving one of the most important property of STED microscopy, i.e the ability to provide fast sub-diffraction resolution recordings. PMID:23982127

  1. Fast imaging with inelastically scattered electrons by off-axis chromatic confocal electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changlin; Zhu, Ye; Lazar, Sorin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2014-04-25

    We introduce off-axis chromatic scanning confocal electron microscopy, a technique for fast mapping of inelastically scattered electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope without a spectrometer. The off-axis confocal mode enables the inelastically scattered electrons to be chromatically dispersed both parallel and perpendicular to the optic axis. This enables electrons with different energy losses to be separated and detected in the image plane, enabling efficient energy filtering in a confocal mode with an integrating detector. We describe the experimental configuration and demonstrate the method with nanoscale core-loss chemical mapping of silver (M4,5) in an aluminium-silver alloy and atomic scale imaging of the low intensity core-loss La (M4,5@840  eV) signal in LaB6. Scan rates up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than conventional methods were used, enabling a corresponding reduction in radiation dose and increase in the field of view. If coupled with the enhanced depth and lateral resolution of the incoherent confocal configuration, this offers an approach for nanoscale three-dimensional chemical mapping.

  2. Dual-slit confocal light sheet microscopy for in vivo whole-brain imaging of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Mei, Li; Xia, Fei; Luo, Qingming; Fu, Ling; Gong, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In vivo functional imaging at single-neuron resolution is an important approach to visualize biological processes in neuroscience. Light sheet microscopy (LSM) is a cutting edge in vivo imaging technique that provides micron-scale spatial resolution at high frame rate. Due to the scattering and absorption of tissue, however, conventional LSM is inadequate to resolve cells because of the attenuated signal to noise ratio (SNR). Using dual-beam illumination and confocal dual-slit detection, here a dual-slit confocal LSM is demonstrated to obtain the SNR enhanced images with frame rate twice as high as line confocal LSM method. Through theoretical calculations and experiments, the correlation between the slit’s width and SNR was determined to optimize the image quality. In vivo whole brain structural imaging stacks and the functional imaging sequences of single slice were obtained for analysis of calcium activities at single-cell resolution. A two-fold increase in imaging speed of conventional confocal LSM makes it possible to capture the sequence of the neurons’ activities and help reveal the potential functional connections in the whole zebrafish’s brain. PMID:26137381

  3. Reflectance confocal microscopy analysis of equivocal melanocytic lesions with severe regression.

    PubMed

    Agozzino, M; Ferrari, A; Cota, C; Franceschini, C; Buccini, P; Eibenshutz, L; Ardigò, M

    2017-05-21

    The differential diagnosis between regressing nevi and melanoma might be challenging; regressing areas can represent a confounding factor for the diagnosis and the histology still remain mandatory to rule out melanoma. Reflectance confocal microscopy may add valuable information by revealing features suggestive of the nature of the melanocytic proliferation. To assess the impact of confocal microscopy in the management of regressive melanocytic lesions. The dermoscopic analysis of 92 melanocytic lesions showing that more than 30% of regressions have been retrospectively considered, among them, 32 melanocytic lesions with a 7 check point list ≥3 they were assessed at the rcm and subsequently excised. For each selected lesion, dermoscopic features of regression (white scar-like areas, blue areas, blue white areas), distribution of regressing areas (central, peripheral, or both) and the percentage of regression have been examined by an expert in dermoscopy, blinded to the histological and confocal diagnosis. Subsequently, two experts in confocal microscopy revaluated, blinded from histology, RCM images. Of the 32 lesions analyzed, 23 (71.5%) were diagnosed histologically as nevi, and 9 (28.5%) as melanomas. 26 of 32 lesions (81.5%) exhibited regression >50% of the overall. On RCM, 11 lesions have been interpreted as malignant and 21 as benign. On RCM the majority of nevi exhibited regular architecture without cytological atypia. Epidermal disarray, pagetoid infiltration, disarranged dermo-epidermal junction architecture and atypical nests were considered as suspicious for malignancy. Good concordance between confocal readers has been detected. A combined dermoscopic/confocal approach can be used for the management of lesions exhibiting dermoscopic features of regression in order to provide a more conclusive pre-histological diagnosis avoiding a high number of unnecessary excisions. Limits of this study were represented by the relatively small number of lesions and

  4. [In vivo imaging of the conjunctival epithelium using confocal laser scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Rath, R; Stave, J; Guthoff, R; Giebel, J; Tost, F

    2006-05-01

    In various ocular diseases, cytomorphological findings of the ocular surface are an essential component of clinical diagnostics. When evaluating the conjunctival epithelium, minimally invasive acquisition of biomaterial is necessary for lab and technical processing and in vitro histological examination. To examine corneal structures in vivo, confocal laser scanning microscopy is a successful standard method. Our aim was to employ in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy also for examining the conjunctival epithelium. Results were analyzed and compared with cytomorphological findings of impression cytology. Accordingly, the basic features of conjunctival in vivo examination using RLSM were described and defined. In vivo images were analyzed and compared with impression cytological slide preparations (n=110) of 23 healthy test persons. Examination was standardized. Finally, the confocal laser scan images were compared to the impression cytological patterns. Due to the distribution of reflectors (pixel brightness), diagnostic analysis of important morphological structures (cell nucleus, cytoplasm, nucleus/plasma relation) of the conjunctiva is possible. Secretory cells of the epithelium (goblet cells) can be easily recognized by their size. Highly reflective pixels depict cell walls or wide intercellular spaces with high contrast. The in vivo investigation of important anatomical and morphological structures of the conjunctival epithelium is possible using RLSM. The distribution pattern of goblet cell pixel brightness may correlate with various secretion contents or suggest distinct, recognizable, functional conditions (hypo- or hypersecretion).

  5. Assessing the Reproducibility of Quantitative In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of Corneal Nerves in Different Corneal Locations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gene; Singleton, J Robinson; Mifflin, Mark D; Digre, Kathleen B; Porzio, Michael T; Smith, A Gordon

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of in vivo confocal microscopy for quantitative corneal nerve analysis in different corneal locations. Corneal confocal microscopy was performed on 10 healthy participants, and the corneal nerve fiber length, corneal nerve fiber density, corneal nerve branch density, and tortuosity coefficient were measured at 5 predetermined locations for only the right eye. Bland-Altman plots, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and coefficient of variation of all 4 corneal nerve measurements were compared between 2 visits and between readers to assess reproducibility. Two technicians performed a masked analysis of images from both visits. Ten participants with a mean age of 31.3 ± 2.8 years were imaged at 2 different time points separated by a mean of 4.3 ± 4.3 weeks. The interobserver agreements were better than the intervisit agreements for all the 4 corneal nerve measurements as evaluated using Bland-Altman plots. The intervisit ICC ranged from 0.13 to 0.45, and the interobserver ICC ranged from 0.55 to 0.94. The differences between observers and the differences between sessions were not statistically different among all the 5 locations (P > 0.1) for each corneal nerve measurement. Single confocal images have poor reliability for any of the 4 corneal nerve measurements, and there is no single location on the cornea that has improved reproducibility. Averaging 5 images, from different locations, improves the reproducibility and is essential for obtaining clinically meaningful data.

  6. Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) for subsurface microscopy of the colon in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, P M; King, R G; Lambert, J R; Harris, M R

    1994-01-01

    Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) is a new type of microscopy which has been recently developed (Delaney et al. 1993). In contrast to conventional light microscopy, FOCI and other confocal techniques allow clear imaging of subsurface structures within translucent objects. However, unlike conventional confocal microscopes which are bulky (because of a need for accurate alignment of large components) FOCI allows the imaging end to be miniaturised and relatively mobile. FOCI is thus particularly suited for clear subsurface imaging of structures within living animals or subjects. The aim of the present study was to assess the suitability of using FOCI for imaging of subsurface structures within the colon, both in vitro (human and rat biopsies) and in vivo (in rats). Images were obtained in fluorescence mode (excitation 488 nm, detection above 515 nm) following topical application of fluorescein. By this technique the glandular structure of the colon was imaged. FOCI is thus suitable for subsurface imaging of the colon in vivo. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8157487

  7. [In-vivo Confocal Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid].

    PubMed

    Hecht, E; Pitz, S; Renieri, G

    2015-09-01

    An early diagnosis is crucial for the outcome of mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP). The sensitivity of the so-called diagnostic gold standard, direct and indirect immune fluorescence (DIF/IIF) ranges from 30 to 80 %, and is thus lower than desirable. Moreover, conjunctival biopsy, mandatory in most cases, entails the risks of exacerbation. The purpose of this study is to establish the contribution of non-invasive in vivo confocal microscopy to the recognition of MMP. We examined the conjunctiva of ten patients and ten control subjects with the confocal microscope Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II/Rostock Cornea Module and checked for differences in qualitative and quantitative structure of the connective tissue. Pemphigoid patients showed an increase and/or aggregation of reticular connective tissue with hyperreflective strands in the substantia propria, as well as an increased subepithelial fibrosis compared to controls. The basal membrane zone was thicker and more hyperreflective than in the healthy subjects. In-vivo confocal microscopy may serve as a useful additional diagnostic method in the detection of MMP. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Next-generation endomyocardial biopsy: the potential of confocal and super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Crossman, David J; Ruygrok, Peter N; Hou, Yu Feng; Soeller, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy and super-resolution microscopy provide high-contrast and high-resolution fluorescent imaging, which has great potential to increase the diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy (EMB). EMB is currently the gold standard for identification of cardiac allograft rejection, myocarditis, and infiltrative and storage diseases. However, standard analysis is dominated by low-contrast bright-field light and electron microscopy (EM); this lack of contrast makes quantification of pathological features difficult. For example, assessment of cardiac allograft rejection relies on subjective grading of H&E histology, which may lead to diagnostic variability between pathologists. This issue could be solved by utilising the high contrast provided by fluorescence methods such as confocal to quantitatively assess the degree of lymphocytic infiltrate. For infiltrative diseases such as amyloidosis, the nanometre resolution provided by EM can be diagnostic in identifying disease-causing fibrils. The recent advent of super-resolution imaging, particularly direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), provides high-contrast imaging at resolution approaching that of EM. Moreover, dSTORM utilises conventional fluorescence dyes allowing for the same structures to be routinely imaged at the cellular scale and then at the nanoscale. The key benefit of these technologies is that the high contrast facilitates quantitative digital analysis and thereby provides a means to robustly assess critical pathological features. Ultimately, this technology has the ability to provide greater accuracy and precision to EMB assessment, which could result in better outcomes for patients.

  9. A 3D imaging and visualization workflow, using confocal microscopy and advanced image processing for brachyuran crab larvae.

    PubMed

    Kamanli, S A; Kihara, T C; Ball, A D; Morritt, D; Clark, P F

    2017-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy is an excellent tool for nondestructive imaging of arthropods and can provide detailed information on morphology including fine surface detail. A methodology is presented here for the visualization by confocal microscopy of arthropods, using brachyuran crab zoeal stages as examples and postprocessing techniques derived from micro-CT protocols to improve the final images. This protocol is divided into description of the preprocessing steps (cleaning, staining, digesting and mounting), confocal laser scanning microscopy and data visualization using open-source, freeware programs ImageJ and Drishti. The advantages of using ImageJ to standardize stack data and Drishti for surface rendering are discussed. The methodology has been comprehensively tested using data acquired from all four brands of confocal microscope (Leica, Nikon, Olympus and Zeiss). © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. The use of reflectance confocal microscopy for examination of benign and malignant skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wielowieyska-Szybińska, Dorota; Białek-Galas, Kamila; Podolec, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a modern, non-invasive diagnostic method that enables real-time imaging of epidermis and upper layers of the dermis with a nearly histological precision and high contrast. The application of this technology in skin imaging in the last few years has resulted in the progress of dermatological diagnosis, providing virtual access to the living skin erasing the need for conventional histopathology. The RCM has a potential of wide application in the dermatological diagnostic process with a particular reference to benign and malignant skin tumors. This article provides a summary of the latest reports and previous achievements in the field of RCM application in the diagnostic process of skin neoplasms. A range of dermatological indications and general characteristics of confocal images in various types of tumors are presented. PMID:25610353

  11. In vivo observation of papillae of the human tongue using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Just, Tino; Stave, Joachim; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Guthoff, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to visualize the epithelial structures of the tongue using confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The human tongue epithelium of 28 healthy subjects, aged 21-67 years, mean age 38 years, 14 women and 14 men, was examined in vivo by LSM. Using LSM, a combination of the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph HRT II and the Rostock Cornea Module, up to 800-fold magnifications were obtained. On the tongue surface both filiform and fungiform papillae and their taste pores were easily identified. The epithelium of the tongue with its subcellular structures could be observed up to a depth of 50 microm, cellular structures up to 150 microm and subepithelial vessels up to 300 microm. Additionally the papillary crests and blood flow were visible. Confocal LSM seems suitable for noninvasive in vivo examination of the tongue. The hydraulic z scan, the manual start setting and the measurement of the depth allow a clear classification of the observed structures.

  12. Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy of Calcium Signalling in Blood Vessel Walls

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mark; Ledoux, Jonathan; Taylor, Mark; Bonev, Adrian; Hannah, Rachael; Solodushko, Viktoriya; Shui, Bo; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Spinning disk confocal laser microscopy systems can be used for observing fast events occurring in a small volume when they include a sensitive electron-multiplying CCD camera. Such a confocal system was recently used to capture the first pictures of intracellular calcium signalling within the projections of endothelial cells to the adjacent smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel wall. Detection of these calcium signals required high spatial and temporal resolution. A newly developed calcium ion (Ca2+) biosensor was also used. This exclusively expressed in the endothelium and fluoresced when Ca2+ concentrations increased during signalling. This work gives insights into blood vessel disease because Ca2+ signalling is critical for blood flow and pressure regulation. PMID:22506097

  13. Compensation of phase aberration by using a virtual confocal scheme in digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yang-Kun; Shiu, Min-Tzung; Wang, Je-Chung; Chang, Chi-Ching

    2014-09-20

    This work presents cost-effective, simple arbitrary phase-step digital holographic microscopy to suppress both zero-order and twin-image terms. A virtual confocal offset lens under in-line configuration is also used to compensate for the introduced quadratic phase by using a microscope objective lens. In addition to reducing the difficulties of physical confocal configurations, the proposed method significantly increases the magnification power, ultimately achieving the purposes of an optical zoom. An attempt is also made to reduce the noise interference of a high magnification system by developing a long focal lens to reduce light detection size, subsequently gaining an approximately plane wave light source to illuminate the object within the effective depth of focus. Experimental results indicate that the proposed high magnification system can be elevated with low noise interference, and image reconstruction without quadratic phase terms.

  14. Feedback phase correction of Bessel beams in confocal line light-sheet microscopy: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, S Hoda; Gohn-Kreuz, Cristian; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2013-08-10

    Confocal line detection has been shown to improve contrast in light-sheet-based microscopy especially when illuminating the sample by Bessel beams. Besides their self-reconstructing capability, the stability in propagation direction of Bessel beams allows to block the unwanted emission light from the Bessel beam's ring system. However, due to phase aberrations induced especially at the border of the specimen, Bessel beams may not propagate along lines parallel to the slit detector. Here we present a concept of how to correct the phase of each incident Bessel beam such that the efficiency of confocal line detection is improved by up to 200%-300%. The applicability of the method is verified by the results obtained from numerical simulations based on the beam propagation method.

  15. Performance of line-scanning confocal microscopy in human skin: investigation of potential for clinical translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Abeytunge, Sanjeewa; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2011-03-01

    Line-scanning, using 8-10 optical components, linear-array detectors and custom-FPGA electronics, may enable smaller, simpler and lower-cost confocal microscopes to accelerate translation to the clinic. The adaptability of commercially available low-cost array detectors for confocal microscopy is being investigated. Measurements of optical sectioning and lateral resolution showed good agreement with theory, and are comparable to that of point-scanning systems. LSFs through full thickness of human epidermis show a two-fold degradation in sectioning performance. Imaging of human epidermis in vivo demonstrates nuclear and cellular detail down to the basal layer with a bench top setup and also a compact clinical prototype. Blood flow in oral mucosa can be imaged using the clinical prototype. However, speckle and background noise degrade contrast and resolution of the image.

  16. High temporal and spatial resolution studies of bone cells using real-time confocal reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A; Vesely, P; Gray, C; Jones, S J

    1994-01-01

    Chick and rat bone-derived cells were mounted in sealed coverslip-covered chambers; individual osteoclasts (but also osteoblasts) were selected and studied at 37 degrees C using three different types of high-speed scanning confocal microscopes: (1) A Noran Tandem Scanning Microscope (TSM) was used with a low light level, cooled CCD camera for image transfer to a Noran TN8502 frame store-based image analysing computer to make time lapse movie sequences using 0.1 s exposure periods, thus losing some of the advantage of the high frame rate of the TSM. Rapid focus adjustment using computer controlled piezo drivers permitted two or more focus planes to be imaged sequentially: thus (with additional light-source shuttering) the reflection confocal image could be alternated with the phase contrast image at a different focus. Individual cells were followed for up to 5 days, suggesting no significant irradiation problem. (2) Exceptional temporal and spatial resolution is available in video rate laser confocal scanning microscopes (VRCSLMs). We used the Noran Odyssey unitary beam VRCSLM with an argon ion laser at 488 nm and acousto-optic deflection (AOD) on the line axis: this instrument is truly and adjustably confocal in the reflection mode. (3) We also used the Lasertec 1LM11 line scan instrument, with an He-Ne laser at 633 nm, and AOD for the frame scan. We discuss the technical problems and merits of the different approaches. The VRCSLMs documented rapid, real-time oscillatory motion: all the methods used show rapid net movement of organelles within bone cells. The interference reflection mode gives particularly strong contrasts in confocal instruments. Phase contrast and other interference methods used in the microscopy of living cells can be used simultaneously in the TSM.

  17. Confocal Raman microscopy for in depth analysis in the field of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, G.; Striova, J.; Zoppi, A.; Castellucci, E. M.

    2011-05-01

    In the field of cultural heritage, the main concern when a sample is analyzed is its safeguard, and this means that non-destructive techniques are required. In this work, we show how confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) may be successfully applied in the study of works of art as a valuable alternative to other well established techniques. CRM with a metallurgical objective was tested for the in depth study of thin samples that are of interest in the field of cultural heritage. The sensitivity of the instrumentation was first evaluated by analyzing single layers of pure polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films having a thickness of 12, 25, and 50 μm, respectively, and a multilayer sample of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE). Subsequently, the technique was applied to the analysis of historical dyed cotton yarns in order to check whether it was possible to achieve a better discrimination of the fibres' signals for an easier identification. A substantial improvement of the signal to noise ratio was found in the confocal arrangement with respect to the non-confocal one, suggesting the use of this technique for this kind of analysis in the field of cultural heritage. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy in confocal configuration was exploited in the evaluation of cleaning performed on the mural painting specimens, treated with acrylic resin (Paraloid B72). Confocal Raman experiments were performed before and after laser cleaning (at different conditions) in order to monitor the presence and to approximate the polymer thickness: the method proved to be a valid comparative tool in assessment of cleaning efficiencies.

  18. Determination of sex by exfoliative cytology using acridine orange confocal microscopy: A short study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, D Shyam Prasad; Sherlin, Herald J; Ramani, Pratibha; Prakash, P Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Context: Establishing individuality is an imperative aspect in any investigation procedure. Sometimes, in identifying an individual, it becomes necessary to determine the sex of that particular individual. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using a confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. In the present study, we have determined the sex of the individual from buccal mucosal scrapings. The exfoliative cells were observed for Barr bodies under a confocal microscope, and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. Aims: The main objective of this study is to assess confocal microscopy for the determination of sex by observing Barr bodies in the exfoliative cells of both men and women. Settings and Design: Samples of buccal mucosa smears were made followed by acridine orange staining. The stained slides were observed under a confocal microscope and the data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from 20 men and 20 women were obtained by scraping with flat wooden sticks (exfoliative cytology). The smears were fixed in 100% alcohol for 15 min, followed by acridine orange (AO) staining as described by Von Bertalanffy et al. Smears stained with AO were examined under a confocal microscope and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Results: Two non-overlapping ranges for the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells have been obtained for men and women. It was observed that in the male samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 0-3%. In the female samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 18-72%, and all the females showed the presence of Barr bodies. Conclusion: The study showed that the presence of Barr body in buccal

  19. Advances in combined endoscopic fluorescence confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risi, Matthew D.

    Confocal microendoscopy provides real-time high resolution cellular level images via a minimally invasive procedure. Results from an ongoing clinical study to detect ovarian cancer with a novel confocal fluorescent microendoscope are presented. As an imaging modality, confocal fluorescence microendoscopy typically requires exogenous fluorophores, has a relatively limited penetration depth (100 μm), and often employs specialized aperture configurations to achieve real-time imaging in vivo. Two primary research directions designed to overcome these limitations and improve diagnostic capability are presented. Ideal confocal imaging performance is obtained with a scanning point illumination and confocal aperture, but this approach is often unsuitable for real-time, in vivo biomedical imaging. By scanning a slit aperture in one direction, image acquisition speeds are greatly increased, but at the cost of a reduction in image quality. The design, implementation, and experimental verification of a custom multi-point-scanning modification to a slit-scanning multi-spectral confocal microendoscope is presented. This new design improves the axial resolution while maintaining real-time imaging rates. In addition, the multi-point aperture geometry greatly reduces the effects of tissue scatter on imaging performance. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has seen wide acceptance and FDA approval as a technique for ophthalmic retinal imaging, and has been adapted for endoscopic use. As a minimally invasive imaging technique, it provides morphological characteristics of tissues at a cellular level without requiring the use of exogenous fluorophores. OCT is capable of imaging deeper into biological tissue (˜1-2 mm) than confocal fluorescence microscopy. A theoretical analysis of the use of a fiber-bundle in spectral-domain OCT systems is presented. The fiber-bundle enables a flexible endoscopic design and provides fast, parallelized acquisition of the optical coherence tomography

  20. Identification of nodal tissue in the living heart using rapid scanning fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2013-09-01

    Risks associated with pediatric reconstructive heart surgery include injury of the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrioventricular node (AVN), requiring cardiac rhythm management using implantable pacemakers. These injuries are the result of difficulties in identifying nodal tissues intraoperatively. Here we describe an approach based on confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores to quantify tissue microstructure and identify nodal tissue. Using conventional 3-dimensional confocal microscopy we investigated the microstructural arrangement of SAN, AVN, and atrial working myocardium (AWM) in fixed rat heart. AWM exhibited a regular striated arrangement of the extracellular space. In contrast, SAN and AVN had an irregular, reticulated arrangement. AWM, SAN, and AVN tissues were beneath a thin surface layer of tissue that did not obstruct confocal microscopic imaging. Subsequently, we imaged tissues in living rat hearts with real-time fiber-optics confocal microscopy. Fiber-optics confocal microscopy images resembled images acquired with conventional confocal microscopy. We investigated spatial regularity of tissue microstructure from Fourier analysis and second-order image moments. Fourier analysis of fiber-optics confocal microscopy images showed that the spatial regularity of AWM was greater than that of nodal tissues (37.5 ± 5.0% versus 24.3 ± 3.9% for SAN and 23.8 ± 3.7% for AVN; P<0.05). Similar differences of spatial regularities were revealed from second-order image moments (50.0 ± 7.3% for AWM versus 29.3 ± 6.7% for SAN and 27.3 ± 5.5% for AVN; P<0.05). The study demonstrates feasibility of identifying nodal tissue in living heart using extracellular fluorophores and fiber-optics confocal microscopy. Application of the approach in pediatric reconstructive heart surgery may reduce risks of injuring nodal tissues.

  1. Real-Time Interaction between Antimicrobial Peptide and Lipid Membrane Using Atomic Force Microscopy and Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie; Gordon, Vernita; Touhami, Ahmed

    2011-10-01

    Peptidyl-glycylleucine-carboxyamide (PGLa) is a helical cationic amphiphilic antimicrobial peptide known to interact with bacterial membranes. The electrostatic interaction is the major determinant that triggers the affinity of the PGLa towards bacterial membranes. Here, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Confocal Microscopy (CM) were used to investigate this interaction. Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUV) mimicking E. coli membranes were prepared by the natural swelling method that allows the fluorescence dye to be capsulated in the GUVs. After GUVs were incubated with PGLa in medium with low ionic strength, excessive leakage of the internal contents of GUVs was detected. Our results demonstrate that AFM and CM, as well as appropriate sample preparation protocols, are needed to obtain detailed mechanistic insights into antimicrobial function.

  2. Cross-Sectional Shape of Rat Mesenteric Arterioles at Branching Studied by Confocal Laser Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Atushi; Minamiyama, Motomu; Niimi, Hideyuki

    This study was aimed to investigate the cross-sectional shape of mesenteric arterioles at branching, using confocal laser microscopy. Wistar rats (8 weeks, male) were anesthetized with thiobutabarbital sodium. Blood flow and microvascular network in the mesentery were observed using video microscopy. The rat intestine with mesentery was extracted and the intestinal vasculature was perfused with Krebs-Ringer and then fixed with paraformaldehyde under a static pressure of 100mmHg. A section of mesentery was isolated from the intestine, and spread up to the in vivo geometry based on the intravital microscopic observation. The mesentery section was stained with tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-phalloidin. The samples were observed under a confocal laser microscope. The cross-sectional image was re-sliced to measure the cross-sectional area and major/minor axes of the best fitting ellipse. The aspect ratio was defined in terms of the minor/major diameter ratio. The extended focus image of mesenteric arterioles showed that the cross-sectional shape was not circular but elliptic-like. The cross-sectional area of the parent vessel decreased from proximal to distal positions. The mean aspect ratio of the parent vessel was approximately 0.5, while that of the branching vessel was approximately 0.8. The flattened shape and variation of the cross-sectional area of arterioles requires some correction of in vivo data of the two-dimensional mesenteric microvasculature obtained using intravital microscopy.

  3. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology. PMID:24639675

  4. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marina; Te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m(-1), force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  5. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marina; te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m-1, force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  6. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology.

  7. Elastic moduli of collagen gels can be predicted from two-dimensional confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Li; Leone, Lindsay M; Kaufman, Laura J

    2009-10-07

    We quantitatively compare data obtained from imaging two-dimensional slices of three-dimensional unlabeled and fluorescently labeled collagen gels with confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and/or confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM). Different network structures are obtained by assembling the gels over a range of concentrations at various temperatures. Comparison between CRM and CFM shows that the techniques are not equally sensitive to details of network structure, with CFM displaying higher fidelity in imaging fibers parallel to the optical axis. Comparison of CRM of plain and labeled collagen gels shows that labeling itself induces changes in gel structure, chiefly through inhibition of fibril bundling. Despite these differences, image analyses carried out on two-dimensional CFM and CRM slices of collagen gels reveal identical trends in structural parameters as a function of collagen concentration and gelation temperature. Fibril diameter approximated from either CRM or CFM is in good accord with that determined via electron microscopy. Two-dimensional CRM images are used to show that semiflexible polymer theory can relate network structural properties to elastic modulus successfully. For networks containing bundled fibrils, it is shown that average structural diameter, rather than fibril diameter, is the length scale that sets the magnitude of the gel elastic modulus.

  8. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  9. Insights into esophagus tissue architecture using two-photon confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Wang, Yue; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, microstructures of human esophageal mucosa were evaluated using the two-photon laser scanning confocal microscopy (TPLSCM), based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). The distribution of epithelial cells, muscle fibers of muscularis mucosae has been distinctly obtained. Furthermore, esophageal submucosa characteristics with cancer cells invading into were detected. The variation of collagen, elastin and cancer cells is very relevant to the pathology in esophagus, especially early esophageal cancer. Our experimental results indicate that the MPM technique has the much more advantages for label-free imaging, and has the potential application in vivo in the clinical diagnosis and monitoring of early esophageal cancer.

  10. Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

  11. High-speed bioimaging with frequency-division-multiplexed fluorescence confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Hideharu; Harmon, Jeffrey; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    We present methods of fluorescence confocal microscopy that enable unprecedentedly high frame rate of > 10,000 fps. The methods are based on a frequency-division multiplexing technique, which was originally developed in the field of communication engineering. Specifically, we achieved a broad bandwidth ( 400 MHz) of detection signals using a dual- AOD method and overcame limitations in frame rate, due to a scanning device, by using a multi-line focusing method, resulting in a significant increase in frame rate. The methods have potential biomedical applications such as observation of sub-millisecond dynamics in biological tissues, in-vivo three-dimensional imaging, and fluorescence imaging flow cytometry.

  12. Re-description of Craspodema reflectans (Nematoda, Cyatholaimidae) using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Semprucci, Federica; Burattini, Sabrina

    2015-06-12

    Craspodema reflectans, erected by Gerlach 1964, is here re-described from some specimens recently found in the Maldivian archipelago and the implication of the new findings for the taxonomy of the Craspodema genus is discussed. Accordingly, an emended diagnosis of Craspodema genus and C. reflectans species are proposed. New data are also provided with the aid of the confocal laser scanning microscopy, using the natural fluorescence of the nematodes. The approach described here lays new foundations for the study of Museum collection material and it may be decisive for capture of new morphological details.

  13. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  14. Characterization of microporous membranes using confocal scanning laser microscopy in fluorescence mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charcosset, C.; Bernengo, J.-C.

    2000-12-01

    Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) in fluorescence mode was used to characterize microporous membranes. Two microfiltration membranes were investigated: a mixed ester (cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate) 1.2 μm-rated membrane and a polycarbonate track-etched membrane with cylindrical pores of 2 μm diameter. Optical sections of the membranes stained with rhodamine and mounted in glycerol were performed at 1 μm intervals, from 0 to 10 μm. CSLM was found useful for microporous membrane characterization, as it gives some insight into bulk membrane morphology.

  15. Acquired anhidrosis associated with systemic sarcoidosis: Quantification of nerve fibers around eccrine glands by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, M; Namiki, T; Sone, Y; Hashimoto, T; Tokoro, S; Hanafusa, T; Yokozeki, H

    2017-08-10

    Neurological disorders can cause hypohidrosis and/or anhidrosis by disturbing either the central or the peripheral nervous systems.(1-3) Although a syringotropic variant of cutaneous sarcoidosis causes dysfunction of sweating, systemic sarcoidosis rarely causes hypohidrosis or anhidrosis.(4,5) Here we present a novel case of an acquired anhidrosis in a patient with systemic sarcoidosis. Furthermore, we developed a novel methodology to quantify nerve fibers around eccrine glands using confocal microscopy and found that nerve fibers around eccrine glands in anhidrotic areas are significantly decreased compared to hidrotic areas. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative analysis of the metaphase II spindle of human oocytes through polarized light and high-performance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Coticchio, Giovanni; Sciajno, Raffaella; Hutt, Karla; Bromfield, John; Borini, Andrea; Albertini, David F

    2010-04-01

    To determine whether Polscope analysis can predict different spindle and chromosome configurations of the oocyte metaphase II (MII) spindle. Comparison of Polscope and confocal microscopy analysis of the MII spindle. Private IVF unit. Women undergoing IVF treatment for male or unexplained infertility. Fresh and frozen-thawed mature oocytes were analyzed through the Polscope and, immediately afterward, fixed for confocal microscopy assessment. Comparison of retardance values, derived from Polscope analysis, between spindles with different microtubule and chromosome configurations, defined by confocal microscopy evaluation. Measurements of spindle longitudinal axis through the Polscope and confocal microscopy. The mean retardance values of different categories of spindle configuration were not statistically significant in almost all cases, allowing only the identification of spindles with highly disorganized microtubules and chromosomes in frozen-thawed oocytes. In spindles with bipolar organization, the Polscope produced measurements of the spindle main axis which were in all cases statistically smaller compared with confocal microscopy evaluation. Retardance measurements have limited predictive value of the degree of spindle fiber order and chromosome position in routine clinical settings. Also, under the conditions tested, morphometric evaluation of the spindle through the Polscope is not consistent with confocal analysis. This suggests that the Polscope may still be a rather inefficient method for assessing the metaphase II spindle and, as a result, for noninvasive oocyte selection. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-speed addressable confocal microscopy for functional imaging of cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vivek; Patel, Saumil; Saggau, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Due to cellular complexity, studying fast signaling in neurons is often limited by: 1. the number of sites that can be simultaneously probed with conventional tools, such as patch pipettes, and 2. the recording speed of imaging tools, such as confocal or multiphoton microscopy. To overcome these spatiotemporal limitations, we develop an addressable confocal microscope that permits concurrent optical recordings from multiple user-selected sites of interest at high frame rates. Our system utilizes acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) for rapid positioning of a focused laser beam and a digital micromirror device (DMD) for addressable spatial filtering to achieve confocality. A registration algorithm synchronizes the AODs and DMD such that point illumination and point detection are always colocalized in conjugate image planes. The current system has an adjustable spatial resolution of approximately 0.5 to 1 microm. Furthermore, we show that recordings can be made at an aggregate frame rate of approximately 40 kHz. The system is capable of optical sectioning; this property is used to create 3-D reconstructions of fluorescently labeled test specimens and visualize neurons in brain slices. Additionally, we use the system to record intracellular calcium transients at several sites in hippocampal neurons using the fluorescent calcium indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1.

  18. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.

  19. In vivo Confocal Microscopy Report after Lasik with Sequential Accelerated Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Traversi, Claudio; Caragiuli, Stefano; Caporossi, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    We report the first pilot qualitative confocal microscopic analysis of a laser in situ keratomileusis (Lasik) treatment combined with sequential high-fluence accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking, denominated Lasik XTra, by means of HRT II laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy after a 6-month follow-up. After obtaining approval from the Siena University Hospital Institutional Review Board, a 33-year-old female patient underwent a Lasik XTra procedure in her left eye. Confocal analysis demonstrated induced slight corneal microstructural changes by the interaction between UV-A, riboflavin and corneal stromal collagen, beyond the interface to a depth of 160 µm, without adverse events at the interface and endothelial levels. This application may be considered a prophylactic biomechanical treatment, stiffening the intermediate corneal stroma to prevent corneal ectasia and stabilizing the clinical results of refractive surgery. According to our preliminary experiences, this combined approach may be useful in higher-risk Lasik patients for hyperopic treatments, high myopia and lower corneal thicknesses. PMID:24847258

  20. In vivo Confocal Microscopy Report after Lasik with Sequential Accelerated Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Traversi, Claudio; Caragiuli, Stefano; Caporossi, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    We report the first pilot qualitative confocal microscopic analysis of a laser in situ keratomileusis (Lasik) treatment combined with sequential high-fluence accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking, denominated Lasik XTra, by means of HRT II laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy after a 6-month follow-up. After obtaining approval from the Siena University Hospital Institutional Review Board, a 33-year-old female patient underwent a Lasik XTra procedure in her left eye. Confocal analysis demonstrated induced slight corneal microstructural changes by the interaction between UV-A, riboflavin and corneal stromal collagen, beyond the interface to a depth of 160 µm, without adverse events at the interface and endothelial levels. This application may be considered a prophylactic biomechanical treatment, stiffening the intermediate corneal stroma to prevent corneal ectasia and stabilizing the clinical results of refractive surgery. According to our preliminary experiences, this combined approach may be useful in higher-risk Lasik patients for hyperopic treatments, high myopia and lower corneal thicknesses.

  1. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  2. Non-invasive in vivo visualization of enamel defects by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM).

    PubMed

    Contaldo, Maria; Di Stasio, Dario; Santoro, Rossella; Laino, Luigi; Perillo, Letizia; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lauritano, Dorina; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2015-05-01

    The enamel defects (EDs) may present with a variety of clinical manifestations with increasing severity from the sole appearance of pale discoloration to remarkable structural alterations. EDs are responsible for higher caries receptivity. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows to image in vivo at microscopic resolution of the dental surface, thus avoiding the tooth extraction and the sample preparation because of its ability to optically scan living tissues along their depth. Aim of this study is the in vivo assessment at microscopic resolution of dental surfaces affected by EDs without resorting to invasive methods such as teeth extractions, to define histological findings occurring in chromatic and/or structural EDs. For the purpose, 15 children, referring at the Dental Clinic of the Second University of Naples, affected by several degrees of EDs, were enrolled and underwent in vivo RCM imaging to microscopically define the ED confocal features using a commercially available hand-held reflectance confocal microscope with neither injuries nor discomfort. Totally, 29 teeth were imaged. Results demonstrated images good in quality and the capability to detect EDs such as unevenness, grooves, and lack of mineralization according to their clinical degree of disarray. The present in vivo microscopic study on EDs allowed to highlight structural changes in dental enamel at microscopic resolution in real-time and in a non-invasive way, with no need for extraction or processing the samples. Further experiments could define the responsiveness to remineralizing procedures as therapeutic treatments.

  3. Simultaneous confocal fluorescence microscopy and optical coherence tomography for drug distribution and tissue integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; LaCroix, Jeffrey; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of microbicidal gels, topical products developed to prevent infection by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, is governed by extent of gel coverage, pharmacokinetics of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and integrity of vaginal epithelium. While biopsies provide localized information about drug delivery and tissue structure, in vivo measurements are preferable in providing objective data on API and gel coating distribution as well as tissue integrity. We are developing a system combining confocal fluorescence microscopy with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to simultaneously measure local concentrations and diffusion coefficients of APIs during transport from microbicidal gels into tissue, while assessing tissue integrity. The confocal module acquires 2-D images of fluorescent APIs multiple times per second allowing analysis of lateral diffusion kinetics. The custom Fourier domain OCT module has a maximum a-scan rate of 54 kHz and provides depth-resolved tissue integrity information coregistered with the confocal fluorescence measurements. The combined system is validated by imaging phantoms with a surrogate fluorophore. Time-resolved API concentration measured at fixed depths is analyzed for diffusion kinetics. This multimodal system will eventually be implemented in vivo for objective evaluation of microbicide product performance.

  4. Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Needle core biopsy, often in conjunction with ultrasonic or stereotactic guided techniques, is frequently used to diagnose breast carcinoma in women. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) is a technology that provides real-time digital images of tissues with cellular resolution. This paper reports the progress in developing techniques to rapidly screen needle core breast biopsy and surgical specimens at the point of care. CSLM requires minimal tissue processing and has the potential to reduce the time from excision to diagnosis. Following imaging, specimens can still be submitted for standard histopathological preparation. Methods Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS) as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology. Results The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS), 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Conclusion CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and infiltrating carcinoma, and

  5. Mosaicism

    MedlinePlus

    ... different genetic makeup. This condition can affect any type of cell, including: Blood cells Egg and sperm cells Skin cells Causes Mosaicism is caused by an error in cell division very early in the development of the unborn baby. Examples of mosaicism include: ...

  6. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for rapid evaluation of invasive tumor cellularity of inflammatory breast carcinoma core needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Jessica; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Kyrish, Matthew; Benveniste, Ana Paula; Yang, Wei; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Tissue sampling is a problematic issue for inflammatory breast carcinoma, and immediate evaluation following core needle biopsy is needed to evaluate specimen adequacy. We sought to determine if confocal fluorescence microscopy provides sufficient resolution to evaluate specimen adequacy by comparing invasive tumor cellularity estimated from standard histologic images to invasive tumor cellularity estimated from confocal images of breast core needle biopsy specimens. Grayscale confocal fluorescence images of breast core needle biopsy specimens were acquired following proflavine application. A breast-dedicated pathologist evaluated invasive tumor cellularity in histologic images with hematoxylin and eosin staining and in grayscale and false-colored confocal images of cores. Agreement between cellularity estimates was quantified using a kappa coefficient. 23 cores from 23 patients with suspected inflammatory breast carcinoma were imaged. Confocal images were acquired in an average of less than 2 min per core. Invasive tumor cellularity estimated from histologic and grayscale confocal images showed moderate agreement by kappa coefficient: κ = 0.48 ± 0.09 (p < 0.001). Grayscale confocal images require less than 2 min for acquisition and allow for evaluation of invasive tumor cellularity in breast core needle biopsy specimens with moderate agreement to histologic images. We show that confocal fluorescence microscopy can be performed immediately following specimen acquisition and could indicate the need for additional biopsies at the initial visit.

  7. Programmable Illumination and High-Speed, Multi-Wavelength, Confocal Microscopy Using a Digital Micromirror

    PubMed Central

    Martial, Franck P.; Hartell, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is routinely used for high-resolution fluorescence imaging of biological specimens. Most standard confocal systems scan a laser across a specimen and collect emitted light passing through a single pinhole to produce an optical section of the sample. Sequential scanning on a point-by-point basis limits the speed of image acquisition and even the fastest commercial instruments struggle to resolve the temporal dynamics of rapid cellular events such as calcium signals. Various approaches have been introduced that increase the speed of confocal imaging. Nipkov disk microscopes, for example, use arrays of pinholes or slits on a spinning disk to achieve parallel scanning which significantly increases the speed of acquisition. Here we report the development of a microscope module that utilises a digital micromirror device as a spatial light modulator to provide programmable confocal optical sectioning with a single camera, at high spatial and axial resolution at speeds limited by the frame rate of the camera. The digital micromirror acts as a solid state Nipkov disk but with the added ability to change the pinholes size and separation and to control the light intensity on a mirror-by-mirror basis. The use of an arrangement of concave and convex mirrors in the emission pathway instead of lenses overcomes the astigmatism inherent with DMD devices, increases light collection efficiency and ensures image collection is achromatic so that images are perfectly aligned at different wavelengths. Combined with non-laser light sources, this allows low cost, high-speed, multi-wavelength image acquisition without the need for complex wavelength-dependent image alignment. The micromirror can also be used for programmable illumination allowing spatially defined photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the use of this system for high-speed calcium imaging using both a single wavelength calcium indicator and a genetically encoded, ratiometric, calcium

  8. Programmable illumination and high-speed, multi-wavelength, confocal microscopy using a digital micromirror.

    PubMed

    Martial, Franck P; Hartell, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is routinely used for high-resolution fluorescence imaging of biological specimens. Most standard confocal systems scan a laser across a specimen and collect emitted light passing through a single pinhole to produce an optical section of the sample. Sequential scanning on a point-by-point basis limits the speed of image acquisition and even the fastest commercial instruments struggle to resolve the temporal dynamics of rapid cellular events such as calcium signals. Various approaches have been introduced that increase the speed of confocal imaging. Nipkov disk microscopes, for example, use arrays of pinholes or slits on a spinning disk to achieve parallel scanning which significantly increases the speed of acquisition. Here we report the development of a microscope module that utilises a digital micromirror device as a spatial light modulator to provide programmable confocal optical sectioning with a single camera, at high spatial and axial resolution at speeds limited by the frame rate of the camera. The digital micromirror acts as a solid state Nipkov disk but with the added ability to change the pinholes size and separation and to control the light intensity on a mirror-by-mirror basis. The use of an arrangement of concave and convex mirrors in the emission pathway instead of lenses overcomes the astigmatism inherent with DMD devices, increases light collection efficiency and ensures image collection is achromatic so that images are perfectly aligned at different wavelengths. Combined with non-laser light sources, this allows low cost, high-speed, multi-wavelength image acquisition without the need for complex wavelength-dependent image alignment. The micromirror can also be used for programmable illumination allowing spatially defined photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the use of this system for high-speed calcium imaging using both a single wavelength calcium indicator and a genetically encoded, ratiometric, calcium

  9. New bone formation and microstructure assessed by combination of confocal laser scanning microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Qin, Ling; Liang, Weiguo; Wang, Wen; Tan, Jianrong; Liang, Peihong; Xu, Jiake; Li, Siming; Cui, Shuliang

    2014-03-01

    Bone is a mineralized connective tissue that is continuously and microstructurally remodeled. Altered bone formation and microstructure arise in pathological bone conditions such as osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, fracture repair, and Paget disease of bone. A proper and objective assessment of bone formation and microstructure will provide insight into the understanding of bone pathogenesis and remodeling. Here, new bone formation ex vitro and its microstructure were evaluated in in vivo multiple sequential polychrome-labeled samples using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which generated clearer and more reliable images of thick bone sections than conventional fluorescence microscopy (CFM). Intriguingly, fine details of the bone microstructural features, including the mineralization fronts, quiescent versus active osteons, and Volkmann's channel, were elucidated using CLSM, which defines the relationship between morphological changes and function, when combined with differential interference contrast microscopy. Furthermore, CLSM provided objective evaluations of bone formation, such as the ratio of labeled areas of new bone formation in a rabbit model when compared with CFM. Altogether, new bone formation and its microstructure can be evaluated more adequately using a combination of CLSM and DIC microscopies.

  10. Microstructural evaluation by confocal and electron microscopy in thrombi developed in central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Thabata Coaglio; Silva, Eliata Ester da; Souza, Danilo Olzon Dionysio; Santos, Amanda Rodrigues Dos; Lara, Maristela Oliveira

    2017-08-28

    Evaluating thrombi microstructure developed in central venous catheters using confocal and electron microscopy. An experimental, descriptive study carrying out a microstructural evaluation of venous thrombi developed in central venous catheters using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. A total of 78 venous catheters were collected over a period of three months. Different fibrin structures were distinguished: fibrin plates, fibrin network, and fibrin fibers. It was observed that the thrombus had thick fibrin plates adhered to the catheter wall openings in both a catheter with three days of permanence as well as in a catheter with 20 days of insertion in the patient. However, a greater amount of erythrocytes and fibrin fibers were found in the central region of the thrombus. This study contributes to improving health care and can have a positive impact on clinical practice, as easy adherence of platelets and fibrins to the catheter wall demonstrated in this study makes it possible to adopt thrombus prevention strategies such as therapy discontinuation for an extended period, blood reflux by a catheter, slow infusion rate and hypercoagulo pathyclinical conditions. Avaliar a microestrutura por microscopia confocal e eletrônica em trombos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais. Pesquisa experimental, descritiva, em que foi feita uma avaliação microestrutural de trombos venosos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais por Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura e Microscopia Confocal de Varredura a Laser. Foram coletados 78 cateteres venosos centrais num período de três meses. Distinguiram-se diferentes estruturas de fibrina: a placa de fibrina, a rede de fibrina e as fibras de fibrina. Observou-se que tanto em um cateter com três dias de permanência quanto em um cateter com 20 dias inserido no paciente o trombo apresentou placas de fibrina espessas aderidas às paredes dos orifícios dos cateteres. Na região central do

  11. Adaptive optics loop for en-face optical coherence tomography and laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuohy, Simon; Bradu, Adrian; Harms, Fabrice; Chateau, Nicolas; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-09-01

    The capabilities of a novel deformable mirror and wave-front sensor combination to correct aberrations in microscopy are analyzed. The deformable mirror, (Mirao52-D, Imagine Eyes) is incorporated with a Shack-Hartmann sensor (HASO, Imagine Optic) within a complex imaging system able to produce simultaneous en-face Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy images as well as B-scan OCT images. A large angle imaging along one of the scanning directions is demonstrated using the AO loop to correct for the interface optics aberration. The image is split into three panels, and each panel is imaged using its own set of corrections. The three images are subsequently collaged into a final image and preliminary promising results are presented.

  12. Comparative three-dimensional imaging of living neurons with confocal and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    McNally, Helen A; Rajwa, Bartek; Sturgis, Jennie; Robinson, J Paul

    2005-03-30

    Atomic force microscopy applications extend across a number of fields; however, limitations have reduced its effectiveness in live cell analysis. This report discusses the use of AFM to evaluate the three-dimensional (3-D) architecture of living chick dorsal root ganglia and sympathetic ganglia. These data sets were compared to similar images acquired with confocal laser scanning microscopy of identical cells. For this comparison we made use of visualization techniques which were applicable to both sets of data and identified several issues when coupling these technologies. These direct comparisons offer quantitative validation and confirmation of the character of novel images acquired by AFM. This paper is one in a series emphasizing various new applications of AFM in neurobiology.

  13. Optical and confocal microscopy observations of screw dislocations in smectic-A liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lelidis, I; Blanc, C; Kléman, M

    2006-11-01

    We present experimental evidence of the presence of isolated screw dislocations in smectic-A liquid crystals observed by polarizing microscopy. In a wedge-shaped homeotropic cell, the edge and screw dislocations interaction gives rise to a strong-enough optical contrast and makes visible their mutual intersections at temperatures close to the smectic-A to smectic-C phase transition temperature. The nature of the defects is confirmed by confocal microscopy observations. At large scale we observe a forest of screw dislocations, perpendicular to the smectic layers, across the thickness of the cell (end-on configuration). Their density varies between 10(9) and 10(12) m-2. In situ observations of dislocations under stress, in the optical microscope, provide quantitative information about the screw-edge dislocation interactions. The latter interaction is calculated in the unharmonic approximation and it gives rise to an observed yield stress.

  14. Multiple excitation nano-spot generation and confocal detection for far-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2010-03-01

    An imaging technique is developed for the controlled generation of multiple excitation nano-spots for far-field microscopy. The system point spread function (PSF) is obtained by interfering two counter-propagating extended depth-of-focus PSF (DoF-PSF), resulting in highly localized multiple excitation spots along the optical axis. The technique permits (1) simultaneous excitation of multiple planes in the specimen; (2) control of the number of spots by confocal detection; and (3) overcoming the point-by-point based excitation. Fluorescence detection from the excitation spots can be efficiently achieved by Z-scanning the detector/pinhole assembly. The technique complements most of the bioimaging techniques and may find potential application in high resolution fluorescence microscopy and nanoscale imaging.

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Kaza, Aditya K.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2±0.3% and 98.0±0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2±0.3% and 94.0±2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  16. Confocal microscopy of corneal wound healing after deep lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Almamoun; Elewah, El-Sayed M; Kaufman, Herbert E

    2010-01-01

    To compare wound healing and morphologic characteristics of the host-donor interface in rabbit corneas after maximum-depth and near-Descemet membrane anterior lamellar keratoplasty. Descriptive analysis of confocal microscopy images after 2 types of deep lamellar keratoplasty (deep stromal dissection vs total stromal resection). Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) was performed in 16 rabbit eyes, with exposure of the Descemet membrane in 8 eyes (deep group) and deep stromal dissection to near the Descemet membrane in 8 eyes (near group). A full-thickness graft devoid of endothelium and Descemet membrane was sutured in place. Confocal examination of lamellar interface and wound edge was performed throughout 6 months. Four days postoperatively, confocal microscopy revealed numerous highly reflective keratocytes at and adjacent to the interface in all eyes, fewer in the deep than the near group. Keratocyte density and reflectivity returned to normal at 4 to 6 weeks (deep) and 8 to 10 weeks (near) postoperatively. In the deep group, the smooth interface showed less scarring. In the near group, stroma-to-stroma healing stimulated more activated keratocytes and hence more haze. Successful DALK requires minimal central healing for clarity but significant suture-stimulated healing at the edge to prevent corneal bulge. Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty is rarely accompanied by rejection, avoids entrance into the anterior chamber, and can be performed with tissue that does not have living keratocytes. Interface healing is a determinant of the final visual acuity; depth of the lamellar bed is a major determinant of the healing response. Although dissection to bare the Descemet membrane is more difficult, there is less keratocyte activation and scarring.

  17. Confocal Microscopy and Molecular-Specific Optical Contrast Agents for the Detection of Oral Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Alicia L.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Richards-Kortum, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    Using current clinical diagnostic techniques, it is difficult to visualize tumor morphology and architecture at the cellular level, which is necessary for diagnostic localization of pathologic lesions. Optical imaging techniques have the potential to address this clinical need by providing real-time, sub-cellular resolution images. This paper describes the use of dual mode confocal microscopy and optical molecular-specific contrast agents to image tissue architecture, cellular morphology, and sub-cellular molecular features of normal and neoplastic oral tissues. Fresh tissue slices were prepared from 33 biopsies of clinically normal and abnormal oral mucosa obtained from 14 patients. Reflectance confocal images were acquired after the application of 6% acetic acid, and fluorescence confocal images were acquired after the application of a fluorescence contrast agent targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The dual imaging modes provided images similar to light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry staining, but from thick fresh tissue slices. Reflectance images provided information on the architecture of the tissue and the cellular morphology. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio from the reflectance images was at least 7.5 times greater for the carcinoma than the corresponding normal samples, except for one case of highly keratinized carcinoma. Separation of carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia was achieved using this ratio (p<0.01). Fluorescence images of EGFR expression yielded a mean fluorescence labeling intensity (FLI) that was at least 2.7 times higher for severe dysplasia and carcinoma samples than for the corresponding normal sample, and could be used to distinguish carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia (p<0.01). Analyzed together, the N/C ratio and the mean FLI may improve the ability to distinguish carcinoma from normal squamous epithelium. PMID:17877424

  18. Cuticle and subsurface ornamentation of intact plant leaf epidermis under confocal and superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael A; Barclay, Richard S; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Punyasena, Surangi W

    2016-04-25

    Plant cuticle micromorphology is an invaluable tool in modern ecology and paleoecology. It has expanded our knowledge of systematic relationships among diverse plant groups and can be used to identify fossil plants. Furthermore, fossil plant leaf micromorphology is used for reconstructing past environments, most notably for estimating atmospheric CO2 concentration. Here we outline a new protocol for imaging plant cuticle for archival and paleoecological applications. Traditionally, both modern reference and fossil samples undergo maceration with subsequent imaging via environmental SEM, widefield fluorescence, or light microscopy. In this paper, we demonstrate the capabilities of alternative preparation and imaging methods using confocal and superresolution microscopy with intact leaf samples. This method produces detailed three-dimensional images of surficial and subsurface structures of the intact leaf. Multiple layers are captured simultaneously, which previously required independent maceration and microtome steps. We compared clearing agents (chloral hydrate, KOH, and Visikol); mounting media (Eukitt and Hoyer's); fluorescent stains (periodic acid Schiff, propidium iodide); and confocal vs. superresolution microscopes. We conclude that Eukitt is the best medium for long-term preservation and imaging. Because of nontoxicity and ease of procurement, Visikol made for the best clearing agent. Staining improves contrast and under most circumstances PAS provided the clearest images. Supperresolution produced higher clarity images than traditional confocal, but the information gained was minimal. This new protocol provides the botanical and paleobotanical community an alternative to traditional techniques. Our proposed workflow has the net benefit of being more efficient than traditional methods, which only capture the surface of the plant epidermis. Microsc. Res. Tech., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Corneal wound healing after photorefractive keratectomy: a 3-year confocal microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Erie, Jay C

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To perform a sequential quantitative analysis of corneal wound healing after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) by using confocal microscopy in vivo. METHODS: In a prospective, nonrandomized, comparative trial performed in an institutional setting, 24 eyes of 14 patients received PRK to correct refractive errors between -1.25 and -5.75 D. Central corneas were examined preoperatively and at 1 day, 5 days, and 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after PRK by using confocal microscopy. A masked observer randomly examined 3 to 6 confocal scans per eye per visit to determine epithelial and stromal thickness, keratocyte density in 5 anterior-posterior stromal layers, corneal nerve density in the subbasal region and the stroma, and corneal light backscattering (corneal haze). RESULTS: Epithelial thickness increased 21% (P < .001) by 12 months after PRK and thereafter remained unchanged to 36 months after PRK. There was no change in stromal thickness between 1 and 36 months after PRK (P = .35). The dense keratocyte population in the preoperative anterior 10% of the stroma (32,380 +/- 5,848 cells/mm3) that was partially or completely removed during photoablation was not reconstituted at 36 months in the anterior 10% of the post-PRK stroma (17,720 +/- 4,308 cells/mm3, P < .001). Subbasal nerve fiber bundle density was decreased 60% at 12 months after PRK (P < .001) before returning to densities at 24 and 36 months after PRK that were not significantly different from preoperative values (P = 1.0). Activated keratocytes and corneal haze peaked at 3 months after PRK. CONCLUSIONS: Wounding of the cornea by PRK alters the normal structure, cellularity, and innervation of the cornea for up to 36 months. PMID:14971584

  20. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease.

  1. Imaging of Scleral Collagen Deformation Using Combined Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy and Polarized Light Microscopy Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Nilay; Wang, Mian; Solocinski, Jason; Kim, Wonsuk; Argento, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an optospectroscopic characterization technique for soft tissue microstructure using site-matched confocal Raman microspectroscopy and polarized light microscopy. Using the technique, the microstructure of soft tissue samples is directly observed by polarized light microscopy during loading while spatially correlated spectroscopic information is extracted from the same plane, verifying the orientation and arrangement of the collagen fibers. Results show the response and orientation of the collagen fiber arrangement in its native state as well as during tensile and compressive loadings in a porcine sclera model. An example is also given showing how the data can be used with a finite element program to estimate the strain in individual collagen fibers. The measurements demonstrate features that indicate microstructural reorganization and damage of the sclera’s collagen fiber arrangement under loading. The site-matched confocal Raman microspectroscopic characterization of the tissue provides a qualitative measure to relate the change in fibrillar arrangement with possible chemical damage to the collagen microstructure. Tests and analyses presented here can potentially be used to determine the stress-strain behavior, and fiber reorganization of the collagen microstructure in soft tissue during viscoelastic response. PMID:27806070

  2. Ultrahigh-speed, phase-sensitive full-field interferometric confocal microscopy for quantitative microscale physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sencan, Ikbal; Huang, Brendan K.; Bian, Yong; Mis, Emily; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Cao, Hui; Choma, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We developed ultra-high-speed, phase-sensitive, full-field reflection interferometric confocal microscopy (FFICM) for the quantitative characterization of in vivo microscale biological motions and flows. We demonstrated 2D frame rates in excess of 1 kHz and pixel throughput rates up to 125 MHz. These fast FFICM frame rates were enabled by the use of a low spatial coherence, high-power laser source. Specifically, we used a dense vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) array that synthesized low spatial coherence light through a large number of narrowband, mutually-incoherent emitters. Off-axis interferometry enabled single-shot acquisition of the complex-valued interferometric signal. We characterized the system performance (~2 μm lateral resolution, ~8 μm axial gating depth) with a well-known target. We also demonstrated the use of this highly parallelized confocal microscopy platform for visualization and quantification of cilia-driven surface flows and cilia beat frequency in an important animal model (Xenopus embryos) with >1 kHz frame rate. Such frame rates are needed to see large changes in local flow velocity over small distance (high shear flow), in this case, local flow around a single ciliated cell. More generally, our results are an important demonstration of low-spatial coherence, high-power lasers in high-performance, quantitative biomedical imaging. PMID:27896006

  3. Corneal confocal microscopy reveals trigeminal small sensory fiber neuropathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Giulio; Grisan, Enrico; Scarpa, Fabio; Fazio, Raffaella; Comola, Mauro; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Rama, Paolo; Riva, Nilo

    2014-01-01

    Although subclinical involvement of sensory neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously demonstrated, corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy has not been reported to-date. We examined a group of sporadic ALS patients with corneal confocal microscopy, a recently developed imaging technique allowing in vivo observation of corneal small sensory fibers. Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) examination revealed a reduction of corneal small fiber sensory nerve number and branching in ALS patients. Quantitative analysis demonstrated an increase in tortuosity and reduction in length and fractal dimension of ALS patients' corneal nerve fibers compared to age-matched controls. Moreover, bulbar function disability scores were significantly related to measures of corneal nerve fibers anatomical damage. Our study demonstrates for the first time a corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy in ALS patients. This finding further suggests a link between sporadic ALS and facial-onset sensory and motor neuronopathy (FOSMN) syndrome, a rare condition characterized by early sensory symptoms (with trigeminal nerve distribution), followed by wasting and weakness of bulbar and upper limb muscles. In addition, the finding supports a model of neurodegeneration in ALS as a focally advancing process.

  4. In vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy: indocyanine green enhances the contrast of epidermal and dermal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvara, Hans; Kittler, Harald; Schmid, Johannes A.; Plut, Ulrike; Jonak, Constanze

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, in vivo skin imaging devices have been successfully implemented in skin research as well as in clinical routine. Of particular importance is the use of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) that enable visualization of the tissue with a resolution comparable to histology. A newly developed commercially available multi-laser device in which both technologies are integrated now offers the possibility to directly compare RCM with FCM. The fluorophore indocyanine green (ICG) was intradermally injected into healthy forearm skin of 10 volunteers followed by in vivo imaging at various time points. In the epidermis, accurate assessment of cell morphology with FCM was supplemented by identification of pigmented cells and structures with RCM. In dermal layers, only with FCM connective tissue fibers were clearly contoured down to a depth of more than 100 μm. The fluorescent signal still provided a favorable image contrast 24 and 48 hours after injection. Subsequently, ICG was applied to different types of skin diseases (basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, seborrhoeic keratosis, and psoriasis) in order to demonstrate the diagnostic benefit of FCM when directly compared with RCM. Our data suggest a great impact of FCM in combination with ICG on clinical and experimental dermatology in the future.

  5. Metabolic changes of cultured DRG neurons induced by adenosine using confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine exerts multiple effects on pain transmission in the peripheral nervous system. This study was performed to use confocal microscopy to evaluate whether adenosine could affect dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro and test which adenosine receptor mediates the effect of adenosine on DRG neurons. After adding adenosine with different concentration, we compared the metabolic changes by the real time imaging of calcium and mitochondria membrane potential using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the effect of 500 μM adenosine on the metabolic changes of DRG neurons was more significant than others. Furthermore, four different adenosine receptor antagonists were used to study which receptor mediated the influences of adenosine on the cultured DRG neurons. All adenosine receptor antagonists especially A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX) had effect on the Ca2+ and mitochondria membrane potential dynamics of DRG neurons. The above studies demonstrated that the effect of adenosine which may be involved in the signal transmission on the sensory neurons was dose-dependent, and all the four adenosine receptors especially the A1R may mediate the transmission.

  6. Three-dimensional simultaneous optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy for investigation of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Meissner, Sven; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-07-01

    Although several strategies exist for a minimal-invasive treatment of patients with lung failure, the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome still reaches 30% at minimum. This striking number indicates the necessity of understanding lung dynamics on an alveolar level. To investigate the dynamical behavior on a microscale, we used three-dimensional geometrical and functional imaging to observe tissue parameters including alveolar size and length of embedded elastic fibers during ventilation. We established a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy system that is able to monitor the distension of alveolar tissue and elastin fibers simultaneously within three dimensions. The OCT system can laterally resolve a 4.9 μm line pair feature and has an approximately 11 μm full-width-half-maximum axial resolution in air. confocal fluorescence microscopy visualizes molecular properties of the tissue with a resolution of 0.75 μm (laterally), and 5.9 μm (axially) via fluorescence detection of the dye sulforhodamine B specifically binding to elastin. For system evaluation, we used a mouse model in situ to perform lung distension by application of different constant pressure values within the physiological regime. Our method enables the investigation of alveolar dynamics by helping to reveal basic processes emerging during artificial ventilation and breathing.

  7. Rapid automated diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with in vivo corneal confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Alam, Uazman; Fadavi, Hassan; Marshall, Andrew; Asghar, Omar; Dabbah, Mohammad A; Chen, Xin; Graham, James; Ponirakis, Georgios; Boulton, Andrew J M; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Rayaz A

    2014-04-03

    To assess the diagnostic validity of a fully automated image analysis algorithm of in vivo confocal microscopy images in quantifying corneal subbasal nerves to diagnose diabetic neuropathy. One hundred eighty-six patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1/T2DM) and 55 age-matched controls underwent assessment of neuropathy and bilateral in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM). Corneal nerve fiber density (CNFD), branch density (CNBD), and length (CNFL) were quantified with expert, manual, and fully-automated analysis. The areas under the curve (AUC), odds ratios (OR), and optimal thresholds to rule out neuropathy were estimated for both analysis methods. Neuropathy was detected in 53% of patients with diabetes. A significant reduction in manual and automated CNBD (P < 0.001) and CNFD (P < 0.0001), and CNFL (P < 0.0001) occurred with increasing neuropathic severity. Manual and automated analysis methods were highly correlated for CNFD (r = 0.9, P < 0.0001), CNFL (r = 0.89, P < 0.0001), and CNBD (r = 0.75, P < 0.0001). Manual CNFD and automated CNFL were associated with the highest AUC, sensitivity/specificity and OR to rule out neuropathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with significant corneal nerve loss detected with IVCCM. Fully automated corneal nerve quantification provides an objective and reproducible means to detect human diabetic neuropathy.

  8. Rapid Automated Diagnosis of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy With In Vivo Corneal Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Alam, Uazman; Fadavi, Hassan; Marshall, Andrew; Asghar, Omar; Dabbah, Mohammad A.; Chen, Xin; Graham, James; Ponirakis, Georgios; Boulton, Andrew J. M.; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the diagnostic validity of a fully automated image analysis algorithm of in vivo confocal microscopy images in quantifying corneal subbasal nerves to diagnose diabetic neuropathy. Methods. One hundred eighty-six patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1/T2DM) and 55 age-matched controls underwent assessment of neuropathy and bilateral in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM). Corneal nerve fiber density (CNFD), branch density (CNBD), and length (CNFL) were quantified with expert, manual, and fully-automated analysis. The areas under the curve (AUC), odds ratios (OR), and optimal thresholds to rule out neuropathy were estimated for both analysis methods. Results. Neuropathy was detected in 53% of patients with diabetes. A significant reduction in manual and automated CNBD (P < 0.001) and CNFD (P < 0.0001), and CNFL (P < 0.0001) occurred with increasing neuropathic severity. Manual and automated analysis methods were highly correlated for CNFD (r = 0.9, P < 0.0001), CNFL (r = 0.89, P < 0.0001), and CNBD (r = 0.75, P < 0.0001). Manual CNFD and automated CNFL were associated with the highest AUC, sensitivity/specificity and OR to rule out neuropathy. Conclusions. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with significant corneal nerve loss detected with IVCCM. Fully automated corneal nerve quantification provides an objective and reproducible means to detect human diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24569580

  9. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development. PMID:20459268

  10. Concurrent Imaging of Receptor Trafficking and Calcium Dynamics by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, DeLaine D; Choy, Regina Wai-Yan; Park, Minjong

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic activity is modulated by the activation of neuromodulator receptors present in dendrites of neurons. The majority of neuromodulator receptors are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), in which membrane trafficking regulates their activities. Membrane trafficking of neuromodulator receptors and their signaling occurs on a rapid time scale and emerging studies indicate that neuromodulator receptors function not just from the plasma membrane but also from the endocytic compartments. Here, we describe a live cell imaging approach using spinning disk confocal microscopy to investigate the effect of neuromodulator receptor activation on synaptic activity by measuring calcium dynamics in primary rat striatal neurons. The advantages of spinning disk confocal microscopy and recent improvements in the genetically encoded calcium sensor, GCaMP6, provide an imaging approach to image both the receptor membrane trafficking to endocytic compartments, and calcium dynamics at a high spatial and temporal resolution. We believe this approach of imaging both the neuromodulator receptor membrane trafficking and synaptic activity using GCaMP6 is a powerful tool to address many questions regarding possible roles of membrane trafficking of neuromodulator receptors in synaptic activity.

  11. Imaging of Scleral Collagen Deformation Using Combined Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy and Polarized Light Microscopy Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Nilay; Wang, Mian; Solocinski, Jason; Kim, Wonsuk; Argento, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an optospectroscopic characterization technique for soft tissue microstructure using site-matched confocal Raman microspectroscopy and polarized light microscopy. Using the technique, the microstructure of soft tissue samples is directly observed by polarized light microscopy during loading while spatially correlated spectroscopic information is extracted from the same plane, verifying the orientation and arrangement of the collagen fibers. Results show the response and orientation of the collagen fiber arrangement in its native state as well as during tensile and compressive loadings in a porcine sclera model. An example is also given showing how the data can be used with a finite element program to estimate the strain in individual collagen fibers. The measurements demonstrate features that indicate microstructural reorganization and damage of the sclera's collagen fiber arrangement under loading. The site-matched confocal Raman microspectroscopic characterization of the tissue provides a qualitative measure to relate the change in fibrillar arrangement with possible chemical damage to the collagen microstructure. Tests and analyses presented here can potentially be used to determine the stress-strain behavior, and fiber reorganization of the collagen microstructure in soft tissue during viscoelastic response.

  12. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy in diabetes: Where we are and where we can get

    PubMed Central

    Maddaloni, Ernesto; Sabatino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM) is a novel, reproducible, easy and noninvasive technique that allows the study of the different layers of the cornea at a cellular level. As cornea is the most innervated organ of human body, several studies investigated the use of corneal confocal microscopy to detect diabetic neuropathies, which are invalidating and deadly complications of diabetes mellitus. Corneal nerve innervation has been shown impaired in subjects with diabetes and a close association between damages of peripheral nerves due to the diabetes and alterations in corneal sub-basal nerve plexus detected by IVCCM has been widely demonstrated. Interestingly, these alterations seem to precede the clinical onset of diabetic neuropathies, paving the path for prevention studies. However, some concerns still prevent the full implementation of this technique in clinical practice. In this review we summarize the most recent and relevant evidences about the use of IVCCM for the diagnosis of peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and of autonomic neuropathy in diabetes. New perspectives and current limitations are also discussed. PMID:27660697

  13. High throughput, detailed, cell-specific neuroanatomy of dendritic spines using microinjection and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Dani; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Morrison, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Morphological features such as size, shape and density of dendritic spines have been shown to reflect important synaptic functional attributes and potential for plasticity. Here we describe in detail a protocol for obtaining detailed morphometric analysis of spines using microinjection of fluorescent dyes, high resolution confocal microscopy, deconvolution and image analysis using NeuronStudio. Recent technical advancements include better preservation of tissue resulting in prolonged ability to microinject, and algorithmic improvements that compensate for the residual Z-smear inherent in all optical imaging. Confocal imaging parameters were probed systematically for the identification of both optimal resolution as well as highest efficiency. When combined, our methods yield size and density measurements comparable to serial section transmission electron microscopy in a fraction of the time. An experiment containing 3 experimental groups with 8 subjects in each can take as little as one month if optimized for speed, or approximately 4 to 5 months if the highest resolution and morphometric detail is sought. PMID:21886104

  14. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  15. [Clinical forms of acanthamoeba keratitis as viewed from the standpoint of biomicroscopy and confocal microscopy].

    PubMed

    Maĭchuk, Iu F; Maĭchuk, D Iu

    2004-01-01

    Clinical cases of 60 patients with acanthamebic keratitis examined by biomicroscopy and of 22 patients largely examined by confocal microscopy are generalized. Acanthamebic keratitis is a slowly progressing infectious lesion of the cornea, which is caused by acanthamebas freely residing in soil and water. Contaminated contact lenses are the key risk factor. The main clinical features of acanthamebic keratitis are defined; they are presence of risk factors; a unilateral lesion in young, healthy and immune-competent persons; a typical clinical pattern of surface keratitis mainly of the ring shape; corneal neuritis without corneal neovascularization but with a severe pain in the eye; and a slow chronic clinical course, i.e. lasting for several weeks and months. Confocal microscopy is the most effective and fast diagnostic tool because it ensures the detection of acanthamebic cysts and trophozoids in all strata of the corneal stroma. The authors isolate, within the clinical course of acanthamebic keratitis, 5 stages; they are surface epithelial keratitis; surface epithelial punctate keratitis; stromal ring-shaped keratitis; ulcerous keratitis; and keratoscleritis.

  16. Quantification of whey in fluid milk using confocal Raman microscopy and artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Alves da Rocha, Roney; Paiva, Igor Moura; Anjos, Virgílio; Furtado, Marco Antônio Moreira; Bell, Maria José Valenzuela

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we assessed the use of confocal Raman microscopy and artificial neural network as a practical method to assess and quantify adulteration of fluid milk by addition of whey. Milk samples with added whey (from 0 to 100%) were prepared, simulating different levels of fraudulent adulteration. All analyses were carried out by direct inspection at the light microscope after depositing drops from each sample on a microscope slide and drying them at room temperature. No pre- or posttreatment (e.g., sample preparation or spectral correction) was required in the analyses. Quantitative determination of adulteration was performed through a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). Different ANN configurations were evaluated based on their coefficient of determination (R2) and root mean square error values, which were criteria for selecting the best predictor model. In the selected model, we observed that data from both training and validation subsets presented R2>99.99%, indicating that the combination of confocal Raman microscopy and ANN is a rapid, simple, and efficient method to quantify milk adulteration by whey. Because sample preparation and postprocessing of spectra were not required, the method has potential applications in health surveillance and food quality monitoring. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  18. Coherent artifact suppression in line-field reflection confocal microscopy using a low spatial coherence light source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Cao, Hui; Choma, Michael A

    2016-10-15

    Line-field reflection confocal microscopy (LF-RCM) has the potential to add a dimension of parallelization to traditional confocal microscopy while reducing the need for two-axis beam scanning. LF-RCM systems often employ light sources with a high degree of spatial coherence. This high degree of spatial coherence potentially leads to unwanted coherent artifact in the setting of nontrivial sample scattering. Here, we (a) confirm that a coherent artifact is a nontrivial problem in LF-RCM when using spatially coherent light, and (b) demonstrate that such a coherent artifact can be mitigated through the use of reduced spatial coherence line-field sources. We demonstrate coherent noise suppression in a full-pupil line-field confocal microscope using a large number of mutually incoherent emitters from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) array. The coherent noise from a highly scattering sample is significantly suppressed by the use of this synthesized reduced spatial coherence light source compared to a fully coherent light source. Lastly, with scattering samples, the axial confocality of line-field confocal microscopy is compromised independent of the source spatial coherence, as demonstrated by our experimental result. Our results highlight the importance of spatial coherence engineering in parallelized reflection confocal microscopy.

  19. Concomitant use of Congo red staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect amyloidosis in oral biopsy: A clinicopathological study of 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Scivetti, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco; Fatone, Laura; Maiorano, Eugenio; Crincoli, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Twenty oral biopsies from 16 patients were analyzed both by traditional microscopy and by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Using conventional histopathological techniques, the diagnosis of amyloidosis was confirmed only in 15 biopsies. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, amyloid deposits were detected in all of the samples. The current study shows that confocal laser scanning analysis helps to identify minimal amyloid deposits that could be overlooked using traditional microscopy, thus raising the sensitivity of oral biopsy up to 100%.

  20. Quantifying light scattering with single-mode fiber -optic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Jeffrey T; Haidekker, Mark A

    2009-11-19

    Confocal microscopy has become an important option for examining tissues in vivo as a diagnostic tool and a quality control tool for tissue-engineered constructs. Collagen is one of the primary determinants of biomechanical stability. Since collagen is also the primary scattering element in skin and other soft tissues, we hypothesized that laser-optical imaging methods, particularly confocal scattered-light scanning, would allow us to quantify scattering intensity and determine collagen content in biological layers. We built a fully automated confocal scattered-light scanner to examine how light scatters in Intralipid, a common tissue phantom, and three-dimensional collagen gels. Intralipid with 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% concentration was filled between precisely spaced glass coverslips. Collagen gels at collagen concentrations from 0.30 mg/mL to 3.30 mg/mL were prepared, and all samples underwent A-mode scanning with multiple averaged scans. In Intralipid samples, light reflected from the upper fluid-glass interface was measured. In collagen gels, average scattering intensity inside the actual gel was measured. In both cases, intensity was correlated with concentration. By measuring light attenuation at interface reflections of various thicknesses using our device, we were able to determine that the scattering coefficient at 660 nm of Intralipid at increasing concentrations in water to be 39 cm-1 for each percent increase of Intralipid. We were also able to measure the amount of scattering of various concentrations of collagen in gels directly using backscattered light. The results show a highly linear relationship with an increase of 8.2 arbitrary units in backscattering intensity for every 1 mg increase of collagen within a 1 mL gel volume. The confocal scattered-light scanner allows to accurately quantify scattering in Intralipid and collagen gels. Furthermore, a linear relationship between collagen concentration and intensity was found. Confocal scattered

  1. Improving and Understanding Three Dimensional Spatial Resolution in a Confocal Raman Microscopy and Raman Hyperspectral Imaging I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunah; Roussel, Bernard; Froigneux, Emmanuel; Adar, Fran; Mamedov, Sergey; Whitley, Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy provides a high spatial resolution because it operates in short wavelength region and utilizes confocal optics. However, the spatial resolution of a confocal Raman microscopy is not well understood, and often confused with the smallest measurable sample size. When performing Raman hyperspectral imaging with a confocal Raman microscope, it is also confused with the smallest distance a mapping stage can step. While all these parameters are pertinent to record a good Raman spectrum or a good Raman map, they are not spatial resolution, and thus have different impacts to the data and results. In this and subsequent papers, we will begin with the theoretical definition, examine the instrumental implementations and present the empirical applications of these parameters with examples.

  2. Development of Useful Recombinant Promoter and Its Expression Analysis in Different Plant Cells Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Sahoo, Dipak K.; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2011-01-01

    Background Designing functionally efficient recombinant promoters having reduced sequence homology and enhanced promoter activity will be an important step toward successful stacking or pyramiding of genes in a plant cell for developing transgenic plants expressing desired traits(s). Also basic knowledge regarding plant cell specific expression of a transgene under control of a promoter is crucial to assess the promoter's efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings We have constructed a set of 10 recombinant promoters incorporating different up-stream activation sequences (UAS) of Mirabilis mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript (MS8, -306 to +27) and TATA containing core domains of Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS3, −271 to +31). Efficacies of recombinant promoters coupled to GUS and GFP reporter genes were tested in tobacco protoplasts. Among these, a 369-bp long hybrid sub-genomic transcript promoter (MSgt-FSgt) showed the highest activity in both transient and transgenic systems. In a transient system, MSgt-FSgt was 10.31, 2.86 and 2.18 times more active compared to the CaMV35S, MS8 and FS3 promoters, respectively. In transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum, var. Samsun NN) and Arabidopsis plants, the MSgt-FSgt hybrid promoter showed 14.22 and 7.16 times stronger activity compared to CaMV35S promoter respectively. The correlation between GUS activity and uidA-mRNA levels in transgenic tobacco plants were identified by qRT-PCR. Both CaMV35S and MSgt-FSgt promoters caused gene silencing but the degree of silencing are less in the case of the MSgt-FSgt promoter compared to CaMV35S. Quantification of GUS activity in individual plant cells driven by the MSgt-FSgt and the CaMV35S promoter were estimated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and compared. Conclusion and Significance We propose strong recombinant promoter MSgt-FSgt, developed in this study, could be very useful for high-level constitutive expression of transgenes in a wide variety

  3. Validation study of automated dermal/epidermal junction localization algorithm in reflectance confocal microscopy images of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurugol, Sila; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.

    2012-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has seen increasing clinical application for noninvasive diagnosis of skin cancer. Identifying the location of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) in the image stacks is key for effective clinical imaging. For example, one clinical imaging procedure acquires a dense stack of 0.5x0.5mm FOV images and then, after manual determination of DEJ depth, collects a 5x5mm mosaic at that depth for diagnosis. However, especially in lightly pigmented skin, RCM images have low contrast at the DEJ which makes repeatable, objective visual identification challenging. We have previously published proof of concept for an automated algorithm for DEJ detection in both highly- and lightly-pigmented skin types based on sequential feature segmentation and classification. In lightly-pigmented skin the change of skin texture with depth was detected by the algorithm and used to locate the DEJ. Here we report on further validation of our algorithm on a more extensive collection of 24 image stacks (15 fair skin, 9 dark skin). We compare algorithm performance against classification by three clinical experts. We also evaluate inter-expert consistency among the experts. The average correlation across experts was 0.81 for lightly pigmented skin, indicating the difficulty of the problem. The algorithm achieved epidermis/dermis misclassification rates smaller than 10% (based on 25x25 mm tiles) and average distance from the expert labeled boundaries of ~6.4 μm for fair skin and ~5.3 μm for dark skin, well within average cell size and less than 2x the instrument resolution in the optical axis.

  4. Reflectance confocal microscopy for monitoring the density of Demodex mites in patients with rosacea before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Sattler, E C; Hoffmann, V S; Ruzicka, T; Braunmühl, T V; Berking, C

    2015-07-01

    Demodex mites seem to serve as a pathogenic trigger in many Demodex-associated diseases such as rosacea. In facial skin of patients with rosacea significantly higher numbers of Demodex mites have been shown compared with healthy controls. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows the detection and quantification of Demodex mites in vivo noninvasively. It is hypothesized that a reduction of Demodex mites under rosacea therapy can be monitored by RCM. To use RCM to monitor the density of Demodex mites in patients with rosacea before and after treatment. In 25 patients with facial rosacea RCM was performed before and after therapy. Mosaics of 5 × 5 mm(2) and 8 × 8 mm(2) were scanned, and the total numbers of mites per follicle and per area were counted, along with the number of follicles per area. In all patients Demodex folliculorum could be detected and quantified using RCM. RCM showed significant differences pre- and post-treatment (P = 0.0053 for 5 × 5 mm(2) and P < 0.001 for 8 × 8 mm(2)). The mean numbers of mites per follicle were 0.63 (range 0.16-2.28) per 8 × 8 mm(2) area and 0.70 (range 0.11-2.20) per 5 × 5 mm(2) area before treatment, and 0.41 (range 0.074-1.75) and 0.51 (range 0.094-1.70), respectively, after treatment. The corresponding mean numbers of mites were 155 (range 45-446) and 86.2 (range 12-286), respectively, before treatment and 96.2 (range 18-363) and 58.5 (range 12-230), respectively, after treatment. By RCM, a reduction in the density of Demodex mites in facial skin of patients with rosacea under therapy, correlating to clinical improvement, can be quantified and monitored noninvasively. Possible reasons for this therapeutic effect are discussed. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Correlative analysis of immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Nakatani, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Yo; Unzai, Tomo; Matsuda, Wakoto; Iwai, Haruki; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Uemura, Masanori; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of the brain has been realized with minimal effort by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with focused ion beam (FIB) milling (FIB-SEM). Application of immunohistochemical staining in electron microscopy (EM) provides a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures. Thus, we applied immunocytochemistry for FIB-SEM and correlated this immunoreactivity with that in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM). Dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in the rat neostriatum were visualized using a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion. Moreover, the thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). After detection of the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites by using CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for EM by using immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB) methods, respectively. In contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitations and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were as easily recognizable as those in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Furthermore, in the sites of interest, some appositions displayed synaptic specializations of an asymmetric type. Thus, the present method was useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connections in the central neural circuit.

  6. Prototype study on a miniaturized dual-modality imaging system for photoacoustic microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    It is beneficial to study tumor angiogenesis and microenvironments by imaging the microvasculature and cells at the same time. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is capable of sensitive three-dimensional mapping of microvasculature, while fluorescence microscopy may be applied to assessment of tissue pathology. In this work, a fiber-optic based PAM and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) dual-modality imaging system was designed and built, serving as a prototype of a miniaturized dual-modality imaging probe for endoscopic applications. As for the design, we employed miniature components, including a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner, a miniature objective lens, and a small size optical microring resonator as an acoustic detector. The system resolutions were calibrated as 8.8 μm in the lateral directions for both PAM and CFM, and 19 μm and 53 μm in the axial direction for PAM and CFM, respectively. Images of the animal bladders ex vivo were demonstrated to show the ability of the system in imaging not only microvasculature but also cellular structure.

  7. The potential role of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy for evaluating oral cavity lesions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Gentile, Enrica; Romano, Antonio; Maio, Claudio; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2016-11-01

    Since the early 2000s, several studies have examined the application of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) to the oral cavity. This review gives an overview of the literature on reflectance confocal microscopy analysis of the oral cavity in vivo and identifies flaws in the studies, providing guidance to improve reflectance confocal microscopy applications and inform the design of future studies. The PubMed, ISI, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for publications on RCM using the terms 'reflectance confocal microscopy' in combination with 'mouth' and other terms related to the topic of interest. The search gave 617 results. Seventeen studies were included in our final analysis. We decided to organize the selected articles according to four topics: healthy mucosa, autoimmune diseases, cancer and precancerous lesions, and hard dental tissues. Although reflectance confocal microscopy is promising for diagnosing and monitoring oral pathology, it has shortcomings and there are still too few publications on this topic. Further studies are needed to increase the quantity and quality of the results, to translate research into clinical practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Sachse, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5–9 lines, which is comparable to 4–8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery. PMID:25309455

  9. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  10. Confocal Raman microscopy for investigation of the level of differentiation in living neuroblastoma tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Jauss, Andrea; Hollricher, Olaf; Fulda, Simone; Hauser, Carmen; Steiner, Rudolf; Rück, Angelika

    2007-07-01

    The investigation of living cells at physiological conditions requires very sensitive, sophisticated, non invasive methods. In this study, Raman spectral imaging is used to identify different biomolecules inside of cells. Raman spectroscopy, a chemically and structurally sensitive measuring technique, is combined with high resolution confocal microscopy. In Raman spectral imaging mode, a complete Raman spectrum is recorded at every confocal image point, giving insight into the chemical composition of each sample compartment. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid extra-cranial tumor in children. One of the unique features of neuroblastoma cells is their ability to differentiate spontaneously, eventually leading to complete remission. Since differentiation agents are currently used in the clinic for neuroblastoma therapy, there is a special need to develop non-invasive and sensitive new methods to monitor neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Neuroblastoma cells at different degrees of differentiation were analysed with the confocal Raman microscope alpha300 R (WITec GmbH, Germany), using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and 10 mW for excitation. Integration time per spectrum was 80-100 ms. A lateral resolution in submicrometer range was achieved by using a 60x water immersion lens with a numerical aperture of 1,0. Raman images of cells were generated from these sets of data by either integrating over specific Raman bands, by basis analysis using reference spectra or by cluster analysis. The automated evaluation of all spectra results in spectral unmixed images providing insight into the chemical composition of the sample. With these procedures, different cell organelles, cytosol, membranes could be distinguished. Since neuroblastoma cells at high degree of differentiation overproduce noradrenaline, an attempt was made to trace the presence of this neurotransmitter as a marker for differentiation. The results of this work may have applications in the

  11. A CMOS imager using focal-plane pinhole effect for confocal multibeam scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Wang, An; Li, Zhuo; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2012-03-01

    A CMOS imager for confocal multi-beam scanning microscopy, where the pixel itself works as a pinhole, is proposed. This CMOS imager is suitable for building compact, low-power, and confocal microscopes because the complex Nipkow disk with a precisely aligned pinhole array can be omitted. The CMOS imager is composed of an array of sub-imagers, and can detect multiple beams at the same time. To achieve a focal-plane pinhole effect, only one pixel in each subimager, which is at the conjugate position of a light spot, accumulates the photocurrent, and the other pixels are unread. This operation is achieved by 2-dimensional vertical and horizontal shift registers. The proposed CMOS imager for the confocal multi-beam scanning microscope system was fabricated in 0.18-μm standard CMOS technology with a pinned photodiode option. The total area of the chip is 5.0mm × 5.0mm. The number of effective pixels is 256(Horizontal) × 256(Vertical). The pixel array consists of 32(H) × 32(V) sub-imagers each of which has 8(H) × 8(V) pixels. The pixel is an ordinary 4-transistor active pixel sensor using a pinned photodiode and the pixel size is 7.5μm × 7.5μm with a fillfactor of 45%. The basic operations such as normal image acquisition and selective pixel readout were experimentally confirmed. The sensitivity and the pixel conversion gain were 25.9 ke-/lx•sec and 70 μV/e- respectively.

  12. Micron-scale Resolution Optical Tomography of Entire Mouse Brains with Confocal Light Sheet Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Bria, Alessandro; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Peng, Hanchuan; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the architecture of mammalian brain at single-cell resolution is one of the key issues of neuroscience. However, mapping neuronal soma and projections throughout the whole brain is still challenging for imaging and data management technologies. Indeed, macroscopic volumes need to be reconstructed with high resolution and contrast in a reasonable time, producing datasets in the TeraByte range. We recently demonstrated an optical method (confocal light sheet microscopy, CLSM) capable of obtaining micron-scale reconstruction of entire mouse brains labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Combining light sheet illumination and confocal detection, CLSM allows deep imaging inside macroscopic cleared specimens with high contrast and speed. Here we describe the complete experimental pipeline to obtain comprehensive and human-readable images of entire mouse brains labeled with fluorescent proteins. The clearing and the mounting procedures are described, together with the steps to perform an optical tomography on its whole volume by acquiring many parallel adjacent stacks. We showed the usage of open-source custom-made software tools enabling stitching of the multiple stacks and multi-resolution data navigation. Finally, we illustrated some example of brain maps: the cerebellum from an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are selectively labeled, and the whole brain from a thy1-GFP-M mouse, characterized by a random sparse neuronal labeling. PMID:24145191

  13. Chromatic confocal microscopy for multi-depth imaging of epithelial tissue

    PubMed Central

    Olsovsky, Cory; Shelton, Ryan; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Applegate, Brian E.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel chromatic confocal microscope capable of volumetric reflectance imaging of microstructure in non-transparent tissue. Our design takes advantage of the chromatic aberration of aspheric lenses that are otherwise well corrected. Strong chromatic aberration, generated by multiple aspheres, longitudinally disperses supercontinuum light onto the sample. The backscattered light detected with a spectrometer is therefore wavelength encoded and each spectrum corresponds to a line image. This approach obviates the need for traditional axial mechanical scanning techniques that are difficult to implement for endoscopy and susceptible to motion artifact. A wavelength range of 590-775 nm yielded a >150 µm imaging depth with ~3 µm axial resolution. The system was further demonstrated by capturing volumetric images of buccal mucosa. We believe these represent the first microstructural images in non-transparent biological tissue using chromatic confocal microscopy that exhibit long imaging depth while maintaining acceptable resolution for resolving cell morphology. Miniaturization of this optical system could bring enhanced speed and accuracy to endomicroscopic in vivo volumetric imaging of epithelial tissue. PMID:23667789

  14. Automated detection of malignant features in confocal microscopy on superficial spreading melanoma versus nevi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Dan; Hennessy, Ricky; Wan, Eric; Pellacani, Giovanni; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-11-01

    In-vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) shows promise for the early detection of superficial spreading melanoma (SSM). RCM of SSM shows pagetoid melanocytes (PMs) in the epidermis and disarray at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), which are automatically quantified with a computer algorithm that locates depth of the most superficial pigmented surface [DSPS(x,y)] containing PMs in the epidermis and pigmented basal cells near the DEJ. The algorithm uses 200 noninvasive confocal optical sections that image the superficial 200 μm of ten skin sites: five unequivocal SSMs and five nevi. The pattern recognition algorithm automatically identifies PMs in all five SSMs and finds none in the nevi. A large mean gradient ψ (roughness) between laterally adjacent points on DSPS(x,y) identifies DEJ disruption in SSM ψ = 11.7 +/- 3.7 [-] for n = 5 SSMs versus a small ψ = 5.5 +/- 1.0 [-] for n = 5 nevi (significance, p = 0.0035). Quantitative endpoint metrics for malignant characteristics make digital RCM data an attractive diagnostic asset for pathologists, augmenting studies thus far, which have relied largely on visual assessment.

  15. First experiences using reflectance confocal microscopy on equivocal skin lesions in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Curchin, Claudia E S; Wurm, Elisabeth M T; Lambie, Duncan Lj; Longo, Caterina; Pellacani, Giovanni; Soyer, H Peter

    2011-05-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive method of imaging human skin in vivo. The purpose of this study was to observe the experience of using RCM on equivocal skin lesions in a tertiary clinical setting in Queensland. Fifty equivocal lesions on 42 patients were imaged using a reflectance confocal microscope immediately prior to being excised. The images were then analysed blind to the histopathological diagnosis. The experience and problems encountered when using RCM on skin lesions for the first time was also observed. On RCM analysis 12/13 melanomas (92.3% sensitivity, 75% specificity), 19/22 benign naevi (86% sensitivity, 95% specificity), 6/9 basal cell carcinomas (66.7% sensitivity, 100% specificity)and 6/6 squamous cell carcinomas and its precursors (100% sensitivity, 75% specificity) were diagnosed correctly when using histology as the gold standard. We identified three common problems that affected image quality: object artefacts; positioning artefacts; and movement artefacts. Using simple techniques we found that common RCM features were readily identifiable and common artefacts could be minimized, making RCM a useful tool to aid the diagnosis of equivocal skin lesions in a clinical setting. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  16. Structure and chemical composition of the dentin-enamel junction analyzed by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desoutter, A.; Salehi, H.; Slimani, A.; Marquet, P.; Jacquot, B.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the human dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) was studied using confocal Raman microscopy - a chemical imaging technique. Slices of non-fixed, sound teeth were prepared with an Isomet diamond saw and scanned with Witec Alpha300R system. The combination of different characteristics peaks of phosphate, carbonate and organic matrix (respectively 960, 1072 and 1545 cm-1), generates images representing the chemical composition of the DEJ area. Images are also calculated using peak ratios enabling precise determination of the chemical composition across the DEJ. Then, with two characterized peaks, different pictures are calculated to show the ratio of two components. The images of the spatial distribution of mineral phosphate (960cm-1) to organic matrix (1545 cm-1) ratios, mineral carbonates (1072cm-1) to mineral phosphate ratios; and mineral carbonates to organic matrix ratios were reconstructed. Cross sectional and calculated graphic profile show the variations of the different chemical component ratios through the enamel and the dentin. Phosphate to organic ratio shows an accumulation of organic material under the enamel surface. The cross sectional profile of these pictures shows a high phosphate content compared to enamel in the vicinity of the DEJ. The Confocal Raman imaging technique can be used to further provide full chemical imaging of tooth, particularly of the whole DEJ and to study enamel and dentin decay.

  17. Structure and function relationship of Zebrafish embryonic heart from confocal microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Forouhar, Arian; Liebling, Michael; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Gharib, Morteza

    2006-03-01

    Confocal microscopy enables us to track myocytes in the embryonic zebrafish heart. The Zeiss LSM 5 Live high speed confocal microscope has been used to take optical sections (at 3 μm intervals and 151 frames per second) through a fluorescently labeled zebrafish heart at two developmental stages (26 and 34 hours post fertilization (hpf)). This data provides unique information allowing us to conjecture on the morphology and biomechanics of the developing vertebrate heart. Nevertheless, the myocytes, whose positions could be determined in a reliable manner, were located sparsely and mostly in one side of the heart tube. This difficulty was overcome using computational methods, that give longitudinal, radial and circumferential displacements of the myocytes as well as their contractile behavior. Applied strain analysis has shown that in the early embryonic heart tube, only the caudal region (near the in-flow) and another point in the middle of the tube can be active; the rest appears to be mostly passive. This statement is based on the delay between major strain and displacement which a material point experiences. Wave-like propagation of all three components of the displacement, especially in the circumferential direction, as well as the almost-periodic changes of the maximum strain support the hypothesis of helical muscle structure embedded in the tube. Changes of geometry in the embryonic heart after several hours are used to verify speculations about the structure based on the earlier images and aforementioned methods.

  18. Adhesive improvement in optical coherence tomography combined with confocal microscopy for class V cavities investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rominu, Mihai; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Rominu, Roxana O.; Pop, Daniela M.; Topala, Florin; Stoia, Adelina; Petrescu, Emanuela; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a non invasive method for the marginal adaptation evaluation in class V composite restorations. Standardized class V cavities prepared in human extracted teeth were filled with composite resin (Premise, Kerr). The specimens were thermocycled. The interfaces were examined by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) combined with confocal microscopy and fluorescence. The optical configuration uses two single mode directional couplers with a superluminiscent diode as the source at 1300 nm. The scanning procedure is similar to that used in any confocal microscope, where the fast scanning is en-face (line rate) and the depth scanning is much slower (at the frame rate). Gaps at the interfaces as well as on the inside of the composite resin were identified. OCT has numerous advantages that justify its in vivo and in vitro use compared to conventional techniques. One of the main concerns was the fact that at the adhesive layer site it was very hard to tell the adhesive apart from material defects. For this reason the adhesive was optimized in order to be more scattering. This way we could make a difference between the adhesive layer and the material defects that could lead to microleakages.

  19. Internal features of graphite in cast irons. Confocal microscopy: useful tool for graphite growth imaging.

    PubMed

    Llorca-Isern, N; Tartera, J; Espanol, M; Marsal, M; Bertran, G; Castel, S

    2002-01-01

    Spherulitic crystallisation is a mode of growth of crystals from the melt. Considerable attention has been given to spheroidal graphite formation, providing detailed information about the internal microstructure of the spherulites in spheroidal (SG irons) and compacted graphite irons (CG irons) (Stefanescu, D., 1990. Cast Irons. ASM Handbook, 10th ed., vol. 1). Nevertheless, the mechanisms responsible for this mode of crystallisation are not fully understood. This study deals with the inoculation mechanisms, with particular emphasis on the study of the inclusions for the heterogeneous nucleation of graphite. It is shown that the graphite nuclei are sulfide products of the nodularizing treatment. It has been observed that when rare-earth treatment is applied, the central nucleus consists of a core and an envelope from which the graphite grows. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM), in reflection mode, was used to study the internal features of the spheroidal graphite growth. Confocal reflection imaging, which has a capacity for optical sectioning of the sample, provides high-resolution images of surface and subsurface regions of interest contained within a semi-transparent sample. Furthermore, three-dimensional reconstruction of these optical sections can provide insight into the mechanism of graphite growth mechanism interpretation. With CSLM the radial growth of graphite was seen. Other techniques, such as TEM, SEM-EDS, WDS, AES and SAM were also used to corroborate the results.

  20. Chromatic confocal microscopy for multi-depth imaging of epithelial tissue.

    PubMed

    Olsovsky, Cory; Shelton, Ryan; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Applegate, Brian E; Maitland, Kristen C

    2013-05-01

    We present a novel chromatic confocal microscope capable of volumetric reflectance imaging of microstructure in non-transparent tissue. Our design takes advantage of the chromatic aberration of aspheric lenses that are otherwise well corrected. Strong chromatic aberration, generated by multiple aspheres, longitudinally disperses supercontinuum light onto the sample. The backscattered light detected with a spectrometer is therefore wavelength encoded and each spectrum corresponds to a line image. This approach obviates the need for traditional axial mechanical scanning techniques that are difficult to implement for endoscopy and susceptible to motion artifact. A wavelength range of 590-775 nm yielded a >150 µm imaging depth with ~3 µm axial resolution. The system was further demonstrated by capturing volumetric images of buccal mucosa. We believe these represent the first microstructural images in non-transparent biological tissue using chromatic confocal microscopy that exhibit long imaging depth while maintaining acceptable resolution for resolving cell morphology. Miniaturization of this optical system could bring enhanced speed and accuracy to endomicroscopic in vivo volumetric imaging of epithelial tissue.

  1. Fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of steroid using confocal synchrotron radiation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Jones, Gareth R.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1994-08-01

    The Confocal Synchrotron Radiation Microscope at Daresbury was used in a study of the transport and distribution of the steroid Coumestrol in single Leydig cells. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with UV compatible microscope optics affords the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. Consequently fluorescent molecules with absorption bands in the UV can be imaged. In addition the pulsed nature of the light source allows us to perform time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on microscopic volumes. Coumestrol is a naturally fluorescing plant steroid exhibiting estrogenic activity. In physiological environments it has an absorption peak in the UV at 340 nm and it emits around 440 nm. First results indicate that the Coumestrol transport through the cell membrane is diffusion limited. The weak fluorescence observed in the nuclei of the Leydig cells may be due to fluorescence quenching arising from the interaction of the Coumesterol with nuclear components. However, micro-volume time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on cell nuclei have revealed the same decay behavior for Coumesterol in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  2. Probing effects of pressure release on virus capture during virus filtration using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dishari, Shudipto K; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Zydney, Andrew L

    2015-10-01

    Virus filtration is used to ensure drug safety in the production of biotherapeutics. Several recent studies have shown a dramatic decrease in virus retention as a result of a process disruption, e.g., a transient pressure release. In this work, a novel two-label fluorescence technique was developed to probe virus capture within virus filtration membranes using confocal microscopy. Experiments were performed with Ultipor® DV20, Viresolve® Pro, and Viresolve® NFP membranes using bacteriophage φx174 as a model virus. The filters were challenged with two batches of fluorescently labeled phage: one labeled with red dye (Cy5) and one with green dye (SYBR Gold) to visualize captured phage from before and after the pressure release. The capture patterns seen in the confocal images were a strong function of the underlying membrane morphology and pore structure. The DV20 and Viresolve® NFP showed migration of previously captured phage further into the filter, consistent with the observed loss of virus retention after the pressure release. In contrast, there was no migration of captured virus in the Viresolve® Pro membranes, and these filters were also the only ones to show stable virus retention after a pressure release. The direct visualization of virus capture using the two-label fluorescence technique provides unique insights into the factors controlling the retention characteristics of virus filters with different pore structure.

  3. The method of axial drift compensation of laser differential confocal microscopy based on zero-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajie; Cui, Han; Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-08-01

    Laser differential confocal microscopy (DCM) has advantages of high axial resolution and strong ability of focus identification. However, the imaging mechanism of point scanning needs long measurement time, in the process due to itself mechanical instability and the influence of environment vibration the axial drift of object position is inevitable, which will reduce lateral resolution of the DCM. To ensure the lateral resolution we propose an axial drift compensation method based on zero-tracking in this paper. The method takes advantage of the linear region of differential confocal axial response curve, gets axial drift by detecting the laser intensity; uses grating sensor to monitor the real-time axial drift of lifting stage and realizes closed-loop control; uses capacitive sensor of objective driver to measure its position. After getting the axial drift of object, the lifting stage and objective driver will be driven to compensate position according to the axial drift. This method is realized by using Visual Studio 2010, and the experiment demonstrates that the compensation precision of the proposed method can reach 6 nm. It is not only easy to implement, but also can compensate the axial drift actively and real-timely. Above all, this method improves the system stability of DCM effectively.

  4. Impaired Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics in Live Cardiomyocytes Revealed by Rapid Line Scan Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, David M.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    Altered intracellular Ca2+ dynamics are characteristically observed in cardiomyocytes from failing hearts. Studies of Ca2+ handling in myocytes predominantly use Fluo-3 AM, a visible light excitable Ca2+ chelating fluorescent dye in conjunction with rapid line-scanning confocal microscopy. However, Fluo-3 AM does not allow for traditional ratiometric determination of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and has required the use of mathematic correction factors with values obtained from separate procedures to convert Fluo-3 AM fluorescence to appropriate Ca2+ concentrations. This study describes methodology to directly measure intracellular Ca2+ levels using inactivated, Fluo-3-AM-loaded cardiomyocytes equilibrated with Ca2+ concentration standards. Titration of Ca2+ concentration exhibits a linear relationship to increasing Fluo-3 AM fluorescence intensity. Images obtained from individual myocyte confocal scans were recorded, average pixel intensity values were calculated, and a plot is generated relating the average pixel intensity to known Ca2+ concentrations. These standard plots can be used to convert transient Ca2+ fluorescence obtained with experimental cells to Ca2+ concentrations by linear regression analysis. Standards are determined on the same microscope used for acquisition of unknown Ca2+ concentrations, simplifying data interpretation and assuring accuracy of conversion values. This procedure eliminates additional equipment, ratiometric imaging, and mathematic correction factors and should be useful to investigators requiring a straightforward method for measuring Ca2+ concentrations in live cells using Ca2+-chelating dyes exhibiting variable fluorescence intensity.

  5. Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of dynamic processes by multifocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Nikolić, Stanko N.; Vitali, Marco; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Oasa, Sho; Thyberg, Per; Tisa, Simone; Kinjo, Masataka; Nilsson, Lennart; Gehring, Walter J.; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf; Vukojevic, Vladana

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging without scanning is developed for the study of fast dynamical processes. The method relies on the use of massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mpFCS). Simultaneous excitation of fluorescent molecules across the specimen is achieved by passing a single laser beam through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to generate a quadratic illumination matrix of 32×32 light sources. Fluorescence from 1024 illuminated spots is detected in a confocal arrangement by a matching matrix detector consisting of the same number of single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). Software was developed for data acquisition and fast autoand cross-correlation analysis by parallel signal processing using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). Instrumental performance was assessed using a conventional single-beam FCS instrument as a reference. Versatility of the approach for application in biomedical research was evaluated using ex vivo salivary glands from Drosophila third instar larvae expressing a fluorescently-tagged transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr) and live PC12 cells stably expressing the fluorescently tagged mu-opioid receptor (MOPeGFP). We show that quantitative mapping of local concentration and mobility of transcription factor molecules across the specimen can be achieved using this approach, which paves the way for future quantitative characterization of dynamical reaction-diffusion landscapes across live cells/tissue with a submillisecond temporal resolution (presently 21 μs/frame) and single-molecule sensitivity.

  6. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-11-01

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity.

  7. Assessment of iontophoretic and passive ungual penetration by laser scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutet, Julie; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña

    2012-12-01

    To estimate the in vitro ungual penetration depth of sodium fluorescein and nile blue chloride by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The depth, uniformity and pathways of penetration of both markers into human nail during passive and iontophoretic experiments were investigated. The penetration of sodium fluorescein into the dorsal, ventral and intermediate layers of the nail was also studied. Transversal images were used to estimate directly the relative penetration of the markers with respect to the complete thickness of the nail. "Exposed layer" images allowed estimating the depth of penetration by taking xy-plans, starting by the exposed layer, and following the z axis into the nail. The fluorescent markers penetrated 7-12% of the nail thickness. Iontophoresis increased penetration of both markers compared to passive diffusion. However, ungual penetration was not modified by the intensity of current applied. Penetration into the dorsal, ventral, and intermediate nail layers was similar. The method developed allowed inter- and intra- nail variability to be accounted for. Iontophoresis enhanced moderately the penetration of the two markers into the nail plate as compared to passive diffusion. The confocal images suggested the transcellular pathway to be predominant during both passive and iontophoretic experiments.

  8. Low-power laser effects at the single-cell level: a confocal microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandratou, Eleni; Yova, Dido M.; Atlamazoglou, Vassilis; Handris, Panagiotis; Kletsas, Dimitris; Loukas, Spyros

    2000-11-01

    Confocal microscopy was used for irradiation and observation of the same area of interest, allowing the imaging of low power laser effects in subcellular components and functions, at the single cell level. Coverslips cultures of human fetal foreskin fibroblasts (HFFF2) were placed in a small incubation chamber for in vivo microscopic observation. Cells were stimulated by the 647 nm line of the Argon- Krypton laser of the confocal microscope (0.1 mW/cm2). Membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential ((delta) Psim), intracellular pHi, calcium alterations and nuclear chromatin accessibility were monitored, at different times after irradiation, using specific fluorescent vital probes. Images were stored to the computer and quantitative evaluation was performed using image- processing software. After irradiation, influx and efflux of the appropriate dyes monitored changes in cell membrane permeability. Laser irradiation caused alkalizatoin of the cytosolic pHi and increase of the mitochondrial membrane potential ((delta) Psim). Temporary global Ca2+ responses were also observed. No such effects were noted in microscopic fields other than the irradiated ones. No toxic effects were observed, during time course of the experiment.

  9. Confocal raman microscopy as a non-invasive tool to investigate the phase composition of frozen complex cryopreservation media.

    PubMed

    Kreiner-Møller, A; Stracke, F; Zimmermann, H

    2013-01-01

    Various cryoprotective agents (CPA) are added to cell media in order to avoid cell injury during cryo preservation. The resulting complex environment of the preserved cell, consisting of crystalline and liquid phases can however not be investigated non-invasively by established methods in cryobiology. This study shows how scanning confocal Raman microscopy can non-invasively extract information on chemical composition, phase domain and distribution at cryogenic temperatures. The formation of the salt hydrate, hydrohalite NaCl∙H2O, in solutions comprised of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) is studied in particular. Scanning confocal Raman microscopy can be used to unambiguously identify hydrohalite in a medium containing DMSO and saline. The confocal Raman microscopy imaging along with differential scanning calorimetric measurements further show that the hydrohalite is formed without eutectic formation. This method also allows for discrimination between closely packed hydrohalite crystals that are oriented differently.

  10. In vivo analysis of solar lentigines by reflectance confocal microscopy before and after Q-switched ruby laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Richtig, Erika; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Kopera, Daisy; El-Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Ahlgrimm-Siess, Verena

    2011-03-01

    Solar lentigines are benign lesions usually found on sun-damaged skin. We investigated twelve cases of solar lentigines through dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy, performed before, and 30 min and 10 days after, a single treatment with a Q-switched ruby laser. At baseline, all lesions showed characteristic features of solar lentigines in reflectance confocal microscopy analysis: regular honeycomb patterns, edged dermal papillae and cord-like rete ridges at the dermoepidermal junction. Thirty minutes post-laser treatment, blurred epidermal intercellular connections, dark structureless areas of different sizes and shapes in the lower epidermal layers, and hyporeflective dermal papillae, reflecting epidermal and dermal oedema, were observed. Ten days post-treatment highly reflective round-to polygonal areas and aggregated granules, representing extracellular melanin, were detected in all epidermal layers featuring regular honeycomb patterns. Reflectance confocal microscopy can be used to visualise dynamic skin processes, allowing non-invasive in vivo follow-up of skin lesions after treatment.

  11. Trypan blue as a fluorochrome for confocal laser scanning microscopy of arbuscular mycorrhizae in three mangroves.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T; Majumdar, A; Das, P; Sarafis, V; Ghose, M

    2008-06-01

    Roots of three mangroves, Acanthus ilicifolius, Ceriops tagal and Excoecaria agallocha, collected from forests of the Sundarbans of India were stained with trypan blue to observe arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi isolated from rhizospheric soil, collected together with the root samples, also were stained for testing the suitability of the dye as a fluorochrome. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were constructed. A. ilicifolius and E. agallocha exhibited "Arum" type colonization with highly branched arbuscules, whereas C. tagal showed "Paris" type association with clumped and collapsed arbuscules. We demonstrated that trypan blue is a suitable fluorochrome for staining arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spores, fungal hyphae, arbuscules and vesicles, which presumably have a considerable amount of surface chitin. It appears that as the integration of chitin into the fungal cell wall changes, its accessibility to trypan blue dye also changes.

  12. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  13. In vivo confocal microscopy in the acute phase of corneal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akira; Maeda, Ari; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    Two cases of noninfectious keratitis were studied using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy in addition to routine slit-lamp biomicroscopy. A 10-year-old boy suffered from keratitis in his left eye due to a bee sting and a 20-year-old man had keratitis following corneal blunt trauma. In both cases, we found a honeycomb pattern at the anterior and mid-stromal level of the middle cornea. This honeycomb pattern disappeared in 1 week with steroid treatment. This pattern might be caused by syncytial cell bodies of activated keratocytes, by focal corneal stroma edema, or by polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration along with the keratocytes or along preformed channels within the corneal stroma known as Bowman channels. Further analysis in a large number of patients may aid in further understanding in vivo human corneal inflammation.

  14. In vivo amyloid aggregation kinetics tracked by time-lapse confocal microscopy in real-time.

    PubMed

    Villar-Piqué, Anna; Espargaró, Alba; Ventura, Salvador; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid polymerization underlies an increasing number of human diseases. Despite this process having been studied extensively in vitro, aggregation is a difficult process to track in vivo due to methodological limitations and the slow kinetics of aggregation reactions in cells and tissues. Herein we exploit the amyloid properties of the inclusions bodies (IBs) formed by amyloidogenic proteins in bacteria to address the kinetics of in vivo amyloid aggregation. To this aim we used time-lapse confocal microscopy and a fusion of the amyloid-beta peptide (A β42) with a fluorescent reporter. This strategy allowed us to follow the intracellular kinetics of amyloid-like aggregation in real-time and to discriminate between variants exhibiting different in vivo aggregation propensity. Overall, the approach opens the possibility to assess the impact of point mutations as well as potential anti-aggregation drugs in the process of amyloid formation in living cells.

  15. Visual Understanding of Light Absorption and Waveguiding in Standing Nanowires with 3D Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rune; Tutuncuoglu, Gozde; Matteini, Federico; Martinez, Karen L; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Alarcon-Llado, Esther

    2017-09-20

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising building blocks for next-generation photonics. Indirect proofs of large absorption cross sections have been reported in nanostructures with subwavelength diameters, an effect that is even more prominent in vertically standing nanowires. In this work we provide a three-dimensional map of the light around vertical GaAs nanowires standing on a substrate by using fluorescence confocal microscopy, where the strong long-range disruption of the light path along the nanowire is illustrated. We find that the actual long-distance perturbation is much larger in size than calculated extinction cross sections. While the size of the perturbation remains similar, the intensity of the interaction changes dramatically over the visible spectrum. Numerical simulations allow us to distinguish the effects of scattering and absorption in the nanowire leading to these phenomena. This work provides a visual understanding of light absorption in semiconductor nanowire structures, which is of high interest for solar energy conversion applications.

  16. Visual Understanding of Light Absorption and Waveguiding in Standing Nanowires with 3D Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising building blocks for next-generation photonics. Indirect proofs of large absorption cross sections have been reported in nanostructures with subwavelength diameters, an effect that is even more prominent in vertically standing nanowires. In this work we provide a three-dimensional map of the light around vertical GaAs nanowires standing on a substrate by using fluorescence confocal microscopy, where the strong long-range disruption of the light path along the nanowire is illustrated. We find that the actual long-distance perturbation is much larger in size than calculated extinction cross sections. While the size of the perturbation remains similar, the intensity of the interaction changes dramatically over the visible spectrum. Numerical simulations allow us to distinguish the effects of scattering and absorption in the nanowire leading to these phenomena. This work provides a visual understanding of light absorption in semiconductor nanowire structures, which is of high interest for solar energy conversion applications. PMID:28966933

  17. Confocal laser scanning microscopy detection of chlorophylls and carotenoids in chloroplasts and chromoplasts of tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Lucio; Amenós, Montse; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells are unique among eukaryotic cells because of the presence of plastids, including chloroplasts and chromoplasts. Chloroplasts are found in green tissues and harbor the photosynthetic machinery (including chlorophyll molecules), while chromoplasts are present in non-photosynthetic tissues and accumulate large amounts of carotenoids. During tomato fruit development, chloroplasts are converted into chromoplasts that accumulate high levels of lycopene, a linear carotenoid responsible for the characteristic red color of ripe fruit. Here, we describe a simple and fast method to detect both types of fully differentiated plastids (chloroplasts and chromoplasts), as well as intermediate stages, in fresh tomato fruits. The method is based on the differential autofluorescence of chlorophylls and carotenoids (lycopene) detected by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

  18. The use of reflectance confocal microscopy for monitoring response to therapy of skin malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Summary Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new non-invasive imaging technique that enables visualizing cells and structures in living skin in real-time with resolution close to that of histological analysis. RCM has been successfully implemented in the assessment of benign and malignant lesions. Most importantly, it also enables monitoring dynamic changes in the skin over time and in response to different therapies, e.g., imiquimod, photodynamic therapy, and others. Given the often traumatic nature of skin cancer that affects both the physiology and the psychology of the patients, it is crucial to have methods that enable monitoring the response to treatment but that minimize the distress and discomfort associated with such process. This article provides a very brief overview of the fundamentals of RCM and then focuses on its recent employment as a monitoring tool in skin cancer and other pathologies that may require frequent follow-up. PMID:23785598

  19. Consistency and distribution of reflectance confocal microscopy features for diagnosis of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Babilli, Jasmin; Beyer, Marc; Ríus-Diaz, Francisca; González, Salvador; Stockfleth, Eggert; Ulrich, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) represents a noninvasive imaging technique that has previously been used for characterization of mycosis fungoides (MF) in a pilot study. We aimed to test the applicability of RCM for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MF in a clinical study. A total of 39 test sites of 15 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of either MF, parapsoriasis, Sézary syndrome, or lymphomatoid papulosis were analyzed for presence and absence of RCM features of MF. Cochran and Chi2 analysis were applied to test the concordance between investigators and the distribution of RCM features, respectively. For selected parameters, the Cochran analysis showed good concordance between investigators. Inter-observer reproducibility was highest for junctional atypical lymphocytes, architectural disarray, and spongiosis. Similarly, Chi2 analysis demonstrated that selected features were present at particularly high frequency in individual skin diseases, with values ranging from 73% to 100% of all examined cases.

  20. Parallel deconvolution of large 3D images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pawliczek, Piotr; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna; Soltys, Zbigniew

    2010-03-01

    Various deconvolution algorithms are often used for restoration of digital images. Image deconvolution is especially needed for the correction of three-dimensional images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Such images suffer from distortions, particularly in the Z dimension. As a result, reliable automatic segmentation of these images may be difficult or even impossible. Effective deconvolution algorithms are memory-intensive and time-consuming. In this work, we propose a parallel version of the well-known Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm developed for a system with distributed memory and implemented with the use of Message Passing Interface (MPI). It enables significantly more rapid deconvolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional images by efficiently splitting the computation across multiple computers. The implementation of this algorithm can be used on professional clusters provided by computing centers as well as on simple networks of ordinary PC machines.

  1. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.

  2. Orientation of erythrocytes in optical trap revealed by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Khyati; Mohanty, Samarendra; Monajembashi, Shamci; Greulich, Karl Otto

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable current interest in the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in optical tweezers. However, the mechanism of rotation in polarized tweezers is still not well understood and conflicts exist in the understanding of this phenomenon. Therefore, we reexamined the underlying phenomenon by use of confocal fluorescence microscopy in combination with optical tweezers. Under different osmolarities of the buffer, the three-dimensionally reconstructed images showed that the trapped RBC maintains its shape and is oriented in the vertical direction. Using dual optical tweezers, the RBC could also be oriented three-dimensionally in a controlled manner. The mechanism of orientation and alignment of RBCs with the polarization of the tweezers' beam was attributed to its form-birefringence rather than optical birefringence.

  3. Measurement of buried undercut structures in microfluidic devices by laser fluorescent confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shiguang; Liu Jing; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Fang Zhongping; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2009-11-20

    Measuring buried, undercut microstructures is a challenging task in metrology. These structures are usually characterized by measuring their cross sections after physically cutting the samples. This method is destructive and the obtained information is incomplete. The distortion due to cutting also affects the measurement accuracy. In this paper, we first apply the laser fluorescent confocal microscopy and intensity differentiation algorithm to obtain the complete three-dimensional profile of the buried, undercut structures in microfluidic devices, which are made by the soft lithography technique and bonded by the oxygen plasma method. The impact of material wettability and the refractive index (n) mismatch among the liquid, samples, cover layer, and objective on the measurement accuracy are experimentally investigated.

  4. In vivo reflectance-mode confocal microscopy in clinical dermatology and cosmetology.

    PubMed

    González, S; Gilaberte-Calzada, Y

    2008-02-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive imaging tool that allows real-time visualization of cells and structures in living skin with near histological resolution. RCM has been used for the assessment of benign and malignant lesions, showing great potential for applications in basic skin research and clinical dermatology. RCM also reveals dynamic changes in the skin over time and in response to specific stimuli, like ultraviolet exposure, which makes it a promising tool in cosmetology, as it allows repetitive sampling without biopsy collection, causing no further damage to the areas under investigation. This review summarizes the latest advances in RCM, and its applications in the characterization of both normal and pathological skin.

  5. Measuring membrane potential and electric field of brainstem neurons in vitro by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Cui, F Z

    2004-06-01

    A method of measuring transmembrane potential and electric field of neural cells cultured in vitro is described in this paper. The high resolution and scanning speed of the method make it considerable to be used to observe the viability of the neurons cultured on opaque substrate. Rhodamine 123 was used to stain the cells in order to display different intensity corresponding to transmembrane potential. The fluorescence data were collected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Then the data were processed to create the graphs of transmembrane potential and electric field. This is the first paper describes a reliable method for three-dimensional visualization of potential voltage of neurons at the best of our knowledge. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Further study of trichosanthin's effect on mouse embryos with confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-09-01

    Trichosanthin(TCS), a ribosome inactivating protein extracted from the root tuber of a traditional Chinese medicine herb Tian Huo Fen(THF), possessed abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) activities. For centuries in China, THF has been used as an effective folk medicine to terminate early and midtrimester pregnancies and to treat ectopic pregnancies, hydatidiform moles and trophoblastic tumor. We observed the changes in reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium in mouse embryos induced by TCS with confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with the fluorescene diacetate (DCFHDA) and Fluo-3-AM. The results indicated that TCS induced increase in intracellular calcium and production of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryos , and TCS inhibited the development of mouse embryos effectively. Mouse embryos of different developmental stages before implantation are used in the experiments. This provides new insight into mechanism for abortifacient activity of TCS.

  7. HIV detection by in-situ hybridization based on confocal reflected light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Louis C.; Jericevic, Zeljko; Cuellar, Roland; Paddock, Stephen W.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    1991-05-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis of AIDS is confounded by the finding that few actively infected CD4+ cells (1 in 104-105) can be detected in the peripheral blood, even though there is dramatic depletion (often >90%) of CD4+ cells as the disease progresses. A sensitive, 35S-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mRNA in situ hybridization technique was coupled with a new detection method, confocal laser scanning microscopy, to examine transcriptionally active HIV-infected cells from individuals at different disease stages. An algorithm for image segmentation and analysis has been developed to determine the proportion of HIV-positive cells. Data obtained using this improved detection method suggest that there are more HIV mRNA-producing cells in HIV-infected individuals than previously thought, based on other detection methods.

  8. Mapping Li(+) Concentration and Transport via In Situ Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jason D; Harris, Stephen J; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2014-06-05

    We demonstrate confocal Raman microscopy as a general, nonperturbative tool to measure spatially resolved lithium ion concentrations in liquid electrolytes. By combining this high-spatial-resolution technique with a simple microfluidic device, we are able to measure the diffusion coefficient of lithium ions in dimethyl carbonate in two different concentration regimes. Because lithium ion transport plays a key role in the function of a variety of electrochemical devices, quantifying and visualizing this process is crucial for understanding device performance. This method for detecting lithium ions should be immediately useful in the study of lithium-ion-based devices, ion transport in porous media, and at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, and the analytical framework is useful for any system exhibiting a concentration-dependent Raman spectrum.

  9. Investigating Effects of Proteasome Inhibitor on Multiple Myeloma Cells Using Confocal Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeon Woong; Singh, Surya P.; Nguyen, Freddy T.; Lue, Niyom; Sung, Yongjin; So, Peter T. C.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its label-free and non-destructive nature, applications of Raman spectroscopic imaging in monitoring therapeutic responses at the cellular level are growing. We have recently developed a high-speed confocal Raman microscopy system to image living biological specimens with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. In the present study, we have applied this system to monitor the effects of Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor drug, on multiple myeloma cells. Cluster imaging followed by spectral profiling suggest major differences in the nuclear and cytoplasmic contents of cells due to drug treatment that can be monitored with Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were also acquired from group of cells and feasibility of discrimination among treated and untreated cells using principal component analysis (PCA) was accessed. Findings support the feasibility of Raman technologies as an alternate, novel method for monitoring live cell dynamics with minimal external perturbation. PMID:27983660

  10. Localization of puroindoline-a and lipids in bread dough using confocal scanning laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dubreil, Laurence; Biswas, Samares C; Marion, Didier

    2002-10-09

    Puroindolines are lipid-binding proteins from wheat flour that play a significant role in bread crumb texture. The localization of wheat flour lipids and puroindoline-a (PIN-a) in bread dough was studied by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). Wheat lipids were located around gas cells (GC) and embedded within the protein-starch matrix (SPM) of the dough. PIN-a was mainly located in the matrix of dough, where it was associated with lipids. In contrast, in defatted dough, PIN-a was found around GC. Addition of puroindolines in bread dough induced a defatting of the gas bubble surface and a decrease of the lipid vesicles and/or droplet size embedded within the SPM. Therefore, puroindolines control the lipid partitioning within the different phases of dough, a phenomenon that should have important consequence on the gas bubble expansion and GC formation in the further stages (fermentation, baking) of the bread-making process.

  11. Pharmaceutical applications of confocal laser scanning microscopy: the physical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Pygall, Samuel R; Whetstone, Joanne; Timmins, Peter; Melia, Colin D

    2007-12-10

    The application of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to the physicochemical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems is not as widespread as its application within the field of cell biology. However, methods have been developed to exploit the imaging capabilities of CLSM to study a wide range of pharmaceutical systems, including phase-separated polymers, colloidal systems, microspheres, pellets, tablets, film coatings, hydrophilic matrices, and chromatographic stationary phases. Additionally, methods to measure diffusion in gels, bioadhesives, and for monitoring microenvironmental pH change within dosage forms have been utilised. CLSM has also been used in the study of the physical interaction of dosage forms with biological barriers such as the eye, skin and intestinal epithelia, and in particular, to determine the effectiveness of a plethora of pharmaceutical systems to deliver drugs through these barriers. In the future, there is continuing scope for wider exploitation of existing techniques, and continuing advancements in instrumentation.

  12. Fluorescence decay kinetics and localization of disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine in fibroblasts: a confocal fluorescence microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasek, Zdenek; Ostler, Richard B.; Eigenbrot, Ilya V.; Phillips, David

    1999-05-01

    Steady state and time resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy, using a point scanning system, is applied to an investigation of the early stages of photo-induced changes in 3T3-L1 murine fibroblasts using di-sulphonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS2) as a photosensitizer. A comparison is made with data obtained using a line scan system and V79-4 Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The steady state data obtained in this work demonstrate that intracellular AlPcS2 fluorescence intensity increases progressively on photoirradiation. Time-resolved studies indicate that this could result from a progressive decrease in the concentration of the self-quenched membrane-associated form of AlPcS2 following its conversion into the fluorescent monomeric form.

  13. Live Cell Refractometry Using Hilbert Phase Microscopy and Confocal Reflectance Microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Popescu, Gabriel; Yaqoob, Zahid; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative chemical analysis has served as a useful tool for understanding cellular metabolisms in biology. Among many physical properties used in chemical analysis, refractive index in particular has provided molecular concentration that is an important indicator for biological activities. In this report, we present a method of extracting full-field refractive index maps of live cells in their native states. We first record full-field optical thickness maps of living cells by Hilbert phase microscopy and then acquire physical thickness maps of the same cells using a custom-built confocal reflectance microscope. Full-field and axially averaged refractive index maps are acquired from the ratio of optical thickness to physical thickness. The accuracy of the axially averaged index measurement is 0.002. This approach can provide novel biological assays of label-free living cells in situ. PMID:19803506

  14. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection.

  15. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy imaging of melanocytic skin lesions: consensus terminology glossary and illustrative images.

    PubMed

    Scope, Alon; Benvenuto-Andrade, Cristiane; Agero, Anna-Liza C; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Busam, Klaus J; Marra, Diego E; Torres, Abel; Propperova, Iva; Langley, Richard G; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Pellacani, Giovanni; Seidenari, Stefania; Halpern, Allan C; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2007-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been used for over 10 years for in vivo skin imaging. However, to date no standard RCM terminology has been published. To establish a glossary of terms for RCM evaluation of melanocytic lesions. Prominent RCM researchers were presented with RCM images of melanocytic lesions. Reviewers evaluated RCM images for image quality, lesion architecture, and cellular details. Reviewers could utilize published descriptors or contribute unpublished terminology to describe lesion attributes. An online meeting was conducted to reach consensus that integrates and defines existing and new RCM descriptive terms. We present a glossary with descriptors of image quality, normal skin morphology, lesion architecture, and cellular details for RCM evaluation of melanocytic lesions. Usefulness of the glossary in RCM diagnosis of melanocytic lesions needs to be assessed. Standardization of terminology is important toward implementation of RCM in the clinical setting.

  16. Three-dimensional reconstructions from optical sections of thick mouse inner ears using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, B J; Duncan, J S; Elliott, K L; Fritzsch, B

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the vertebrate inner ear have provided novel insights into the development of this complex organ. 3D reconstructions enable superior analysis of phenotypic differences between wild type and mutant ears but can result in laborious work when reconstructed from physically sectioned material. Although nondestructive optical sectioning light sheet microscopy may ultimately prove the ideal solution, these technologies are not yet commercially available, or in many instances are not monetarily feasible. Here we introduce a simple technique to image a fluorescently labelled ear at different stages throughout development at high resolution enabling 3D reconstruction of any component of the inner ear using confocal microscopy. We provide a step-by-step manual from tissue preparation to imaging to 3D reconstruction and analysis including a rationale and troubleshooting guide at each step for researchers with different equipment, protocols, and access to resources to successfully incorporate the principles of this method and customize them to their laboratory settings. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Conventional, confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy investigations of polymer-supported oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Bowman, R D; Kneas, K A; Demas, J N; Periasamy, A

    2003-08-01

    Luminescence-based, polymer-supported oxygen sensors, particularly those based on platinum group complexes, continue to be of analytical importance. Commercial applications range from the macroscopic (e.g. aerodynamic investigations in wind tunnels, monitoring of oxygen concentration during fermentation, and measurement of biological oxygen demand) to the microscopic (e.g. imaging of oxygen in blood, tissue, cells and other biological samples). Problems hindering the design of improved oxygen sensors include non-linear Stern-Volmer calibration plots and the multi-exponentiality of measured lifetime decays, both of which are attributed primarily to heterogeneity of the sensor molecule in the polymer support matrix. Conventional, confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy have proven to be invaluable tools with which the microscale heterogeneity and response of luminescence-based oxygen sensors can be investigated and compared to the macroscopic response. Results obtained for three ruthenium(II) alpha-diimine complexes in polydimethylsiloxane polymer supports indicate the presence of unquenched microcrystals within the polymer matrix that probably degrade oxygen quenching sensitivity and linearity of the Stern-Volmer quenching plot. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy proved most useful for imaging microcrystals within sensor films, and conventional microscopy allowed direct comparison between microscopic and macroscopic sensor response. The implications of the results in the rational design and mass production of luminescence-based oxygen sensors are significant.

  18. The investigation of the dynamic morphology of block copolymer solutions by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjung

    2005-03-01

    Recently we applied laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) for the study of block copolymer 3D morphology. Besides static measurement of microstructures (direct 3-D imaging of block copolymer morphology), LSCM also enables the tracking of the fast dynamic process which has been impossible by conventional microscopic techniques such as TEM (transmission electron microscopy) or AFM (atomic force microscopy). In this study, in-situ LSCM investigation of the morphology of confined photonic BCP solution was performed in conjunction with spectroscopic measurement for the first time. When a lamellar forming polystyrene-b-isoprene (480k-360k, PS/PI) in cumene was placed between cover glasses, the continuous evaporation of the solvent induced a shear field along the radial direction (evaporation direction). As a result, the photonic lamellar BCP solution over the whole area developed a series of concentric ring pattern covering entire visible colors (blue to red). Comparison of the experimental result with theoretical calculation (transfer matrix method) revealed that this phenomenon mainly comes from the change of the orientation of BCP lamella based on the reflectivity at each region along the radius..

  19. Elastomeric photo-actuators and their investigation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Ilčíková, Markéta; Krupa, Igor; Mičušík, Matej; Kasák, Peter; Pavlova, Ewa; Mosnáček, Jaroslav; Chorvát, Dušan, Jr.; Omastová, Mária

    2013-10-01

    The photo-actuation behavior of nanocomposites based on ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) block copolymer filled with well-dispersed and modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is discussed in this paper. The nanocomposites were prepared by casting from solution. To improve the dispersion of the MWCNTs in EVA, the MWCNT surface was modified with a non-covalent surfactant, cholesteryl 1-pyrenecarboxylate (PyChol). To prepare SIS nanocomposites, the MWCNT surface was covalently modified with polystyrene chains. The good dispersion of the filler was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Special, custom-made punch/die molds were used to create a Braille element (BE)-like shape, which under shear forces induces a uniaxial orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrix. The uniaxial orientation of MWCNTs is an essential precondition to ensure the photo-actuating behavior of MWCNTs in polymeric matrices. The orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrices was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite BEs were illuminated from the bottom by a red light-emitting diode (LED), and the photo-actuation was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). When the BEs were exposed to light, a temporary increase in the height of the element was detected. This process was observed to be reversible: after switching off the light, the BEs returned to their original shape and height.

  20. A fiber-optic system for dual-modality photoacoustic microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy using miniature components☆

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    Imaging of the cells and microvasculature simultaneously is beneficial to the study of tumor angiogenesis and microenvironments. We designed and built a fiber-optic based photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) dual-modality imaging system. To explore the feasibility of this all-optical device for future endoscopic applications, a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner, a miniature objective lens, and a small size optical microring resonator as an acoustic detector were employed trying to meet the requirements of miniaturization. Both the lateral resolutions of PAM and CFM were quantified to be 8.8 μm. Axial resolutions of PAM and CFM were experimentally measured to be 19 μm and 53 μm, respectively. The experiments on ex vivo animal bladder tissues demonstrate the good performance of this system in imaging not only microvasculature but also cellular structure, suggesting that this novel imaging technique holds potential for improved diagnosis and guided treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:24466507

  1. Multicentre study on inflammatory skin diseases from The International Confocal Working Group: specific confocal microscopy features and an algorithmic method of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ardigo, M; Longo, C; Gonzalez, S

    2016-08-01

    The real value of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) for the evaluation of inflammatory skin conditions remains unclear. A project on RCM for inflammatory skin diseases involving international centres was designed by a coordinating centre and executed under the supervision of the International Confocal Working Group. To identify specific confocal features useful for distinction between the three main groups of superficial inflammatory skin diseases. Nineteen different RCM features were evaluated in a total of 155 lesions, diagnosed as spongiotic (45), interface (52) or psoriasiform (58) dermatitis, collected by a consortium of 19 different centres. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified RCM descriptors for the three main superficial inflammatory disease groups. Later, a multivariate method was employed to define a scoring system to be applied on an algorithmic method of analysis for fast clinical application. Our preliminary evaluation supports the use of RCM for the identification of confocal patterns consistent with the major features of the diagnostic groups of inflammatory skin diseases. Moreover, an efficient multivariate method for clinical in vivo RCM diagnosis using a tree decision diagram has been established. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Demonstrates Bilateral Loss of Endothelial Cells in Unilateral Herpes Simplex Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Rodrigo T.; Pourmirzaie, Roxanna; Pavan-Langston, Deborah; Cavalcanti, Bernardo M.; Aggarwal, Shruti; Colón, Clara; Jamali, Arsia; Cruzat, Andrea; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report bilateral corneal endothelial cell density (ECD), as well as its correlation with subbasal nerve changes, in patients with unilateral herpes simplex keratitis (HSK). Methods Thirty-six eyes of 36 patients with corneal scarring caused by HSK, as well as their respective contralateral clinically unaffected eyes, were prospectively studied and compared with 26 eyes of 26 healthy volunteers. In vivo confocal microscopy and corneal sensation of the central cornea were performed bilaterally in all patients and in one random eye of controls. The ECD and subbasal corneal nerve density, including the lengths of total nerves, main trunks, and branches were evaluated and correlated to central corneal sensation. Results The ECD was significantly lower in eyes affected with HSK than in controls (2304 ± 578 vs. 2940 ± 370 cells/mm2, P < 0.0001). Surprisingly, lower ECD was also detected in contralateral clinically unaffected eyes (2548 ± 423), compared to controls (P = 0.02). Both affected and contralateral eyes showed decrease in total nerve length, compared to controls (10.0 ± 6.3 vs. 17.6 ± 6.3 vs. 21.9 ± 4.3 mm/mm2, respectively; P < 0.05 for all). The ECD correlated positively with total nerve length (r = 0.39, P = 0.0009) and with corneal sensation (r = 0.31, P = 0.009). Conclusions In vivo confocal microscopy findings demonstrated alterations in corneal ECD in both affected and clinically unaffected contralateral eyes of patients with unilateral HSK. Moreover, the positive significant correlation between the ECD and the subbasal nerve density may suggest a potential link between corneal innervation and corneal endothelial cell homeostasis. PMID:26225629

  3. Automated Microscopy: Macro Language Controlling a Confocal Microscope and its External Illumination: Adaptation for Photosynthetic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Gábor; Kaňa, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthesis research employs several biophysical methods, including the detection of fluorescence. Even though fluorescence is a key method to detect photosynthetic efficiency, it has not been applied/adapted to single-cell confocal microscopy measurements to examine photosynthetic microorganisms. Experiments with photosynthetic cells may require automation to perform a large number of measurements with different parameters, especially concerning light conditions. However, commercial microscopes support custom protocols (through Time Controller offered by Olympus or Experiment Designer offered by Zeiss) that are often unable to provide special set-ups and connection to external devices (e.g., for irradiation). Our new system combining an Arduino microcontroller with the Cell⊕Finder software was developed for controlling Olympus FV1000 and FV1200 confocal microscopes and the attached hardware modules. Our software/hardware solution offers (1) a text file-based macro language to control the imaging functions of the microscope; (2) programmable control of several external hardware devices (light sources, thermal controllers, actuators) during imaging via the Arduino microcontroller; (3) the Cell⊕Finder software with ergonomic user environment, a fast selection method for the biologically important cells and precise positioning feature that reduces unwanted bleaching of the cells by the scanning laser. Cell⊕Finder can be downloaded from http://www.alga.cz/cellfinder. The system was applied to study changes in fluorescence intensity in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells under long-term illumination. Thus, we were able to describe the kinetics of phycobilisome decoupling. Microscopy data showed that phycobilisome decoupling appears slowly after long-term (>1 h) exposure to high light.

  4. [Corneal changes after wearing orthokeratology contact lenses: an investigation using in vivo, confocal laser scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Knappe, S; Stachs, O; Guthoff, R

    2007-08-01

    Wearing orthokeratology contact lenses (OCL, Hecht-see free; Hecht, Germany) overnight can change corneal refraction by up to -4.5 dioptre (dpt) based on corneal adaptation to the double reverse surface of the OCL. This allows a temporary independence on glasses or contact lenses. It is known that the central corneal thickness decreases while the corneal thickness in the periphery probably increases. The aim of this study was to investigate the corneal changes of volunteers wearing OCL with in vivo confocal microscopy. Five young adults (mean 22.8 years, three female, two male) with low to moderate myopia (range -1.75 to -3.5 dpt; sphere equivalent -2.7+/-0.59 dpt) were fitted with OCL of reverse-geometry design in both eyes. Lenses were worn in both eyes overnight and were removed immediately in the morning. The volunteers were examined with in vivo confocal microscopy using a combination of Heidelberg retina tomograph II and the Rostock cornea module before wearing the OCL and after the 1(st), 3(rd), 5(th), 7(th), 13(th), 20(th) and 25(th) nights. The central and mid-peripheral total corneal thickness as well as the epithelial thickness were examined in the morning between 7.30 am and 9.30 am. The central and the mid-peripheral epithelial corneal thickness was reduced significantly (p<0.05) from day 1 to the 13(th) day. This stabilized later until the the examination was concluded. No significant changes (p>0.05) were found in the central or mid-peripheral total corneal thickness after 25 days of wearing the OCL. Wearing OCL leads to a reduction in the central corneal epithelial thickness. Our inability to find an increase in mid-peripheral total and epithelial corneal thickness may be because the expected increase of the mid-peripheral cornea is limited to a defined area, which makes repeated measurements at a particular point difficult.

  5. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of the Ocular Surface: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Villani, Edoardo; Baudouin, Christophe; Efron, Nathan; Hamrah, Pedram; Kojima, Takashi; Patel, Sanjay V.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Zhivov, Andrey; Dogru, Murat

    2014-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is an emerging technology that provides minimally invasive, high resolution, steady-state assessment of the ocular surface at the cellular level. Several challenges still remain but, at present, IVCM may be considered a promising technique for clinical diagnosis and management. This mini-review summarizes some key findings in IVCM of the ocular surface, focusing on recent and promising attempts to move “from bench to bedside”. IVCM allows prompt diagnosis, disease course follow-up, and management of potentially blinding atypical forms of infectious processes, such as acanthamoeba and fungal keratitis. This technology has improved our knowledge of corneal alterations and some of the processes that affect the visual outcome after lamellar keratoplasty and excimer keratorefractive surgery. In dry eye disease, IVCM has provided new information on the whole-ocular surface morphofunctional unit. It has also improved understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms and helped in the assessment of prognosis and treatment. IVCM is particularly useful in the study of corneal nerves, enabling description of the morphology, density, and disease- or surgically induced alterations of nerves, particularly the subbasal nerve plexus. In glaucoma, IVCM constitutes an important aid to evaluate filtering blebs, to better understand the conjunctival wound healing process, and to assess corneal changes induced by topical antiglaucoma medications and their preservatives. IVCM has significantly enhanced our understanding of the ocular response to contact lens wear. It has provided new perspectives at a cellular level on a wide range of contact lens complications, revealing findings that were not previously possible to image in the living human eye. The final section of this mini-review provides a focus on advances in confocal microscopy imaging. These include 2D wide-field mapping, 3D reconstruction of the cornea and automated image analysis. PMID

  6. Spectrally Encoded Confocal Microscopy (SECM) for Diagnosing of Breast Cancer in Excision and Margin Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Brachtel, Elena F.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Huck, Amelia E.; Rice-Stitt, Travis L.; Vangel, Mark G.; Smith, Barbara L.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Kang, Dongkyun

    2016-01-01

    A large percentage of breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery need to undergo multiple surgeries due to positive margins found during post-operative margin assessment. Carcinomas could be removed completely during the initial surgery and additional surgery avoided if positive margins can be determined intra-operatively. Spectrally-encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that has a potential to rapidly image the entire surgical margin at sub-cellular resolution and accurately determine margin status intra-operatively. In this paper, in order to test feasibility of using SECM for intra-operative margin assessment, we have evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of SECM for detecting various types of breast cancers. Forty-six surgically-removed breast specimens were imaged with a SECM system. Side-by-side comparison between SECM and histologic images showed that SECM images can visualize key histomorphologic patterns of normal/benign and malignant breast tissues. Small (500 µm × 500 µm) spatially-registered SECM and histologic images (n=124 for each) were diagnosed independently by three pathologists with expertise in breast pathology. Diagnostic accuracy of SECM for determining malignant tissues was high, average sensitivity of 0.91, specificity of 0.93, positive predictive value of 0.95, and negative predictive value of 0.87. Intra-observer agreement and inter-observer agreement for SECM were also high, 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. Results from this study suggest that SECM may be developed into an intra-operative margin assessment tool for guiding breast cancer excisions. PMID:26779830

  7. Confocal microscopy and electrophysiological study of single patient corneal endothelium cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatini, Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Coppi, Elisabetta; Magni, Giada; Fusco, Irene; Menabuoni, Luca; Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pini, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of the ion channels in corneal endothelial cells and the elucidation of their involvement in corneal pathologies would lead to the identification of new molecular target for pharmacological treatments and to the clarification of corneal physiology. The corneal endothelium is an amitotic cell monolayer with a major role in preserving corneal transparency and in regulating the water and solute flux across the posterior surface of the cornea. Although endothelial cells are non-excitable, they express a range of ion channels, such as voltage-dependent Na+ channels and K+ channels, L-type Ca2 channels and many others. Interestingly, purinergic receptors have been linked to a variety of conditions within the eye but their presence in the endothelium and their role in its pathophysiology is still uncertain. In this study, we were able to extract endothelial cells from single human corneas, thus obtaining primary cultures that represent the peculiarity of each donor. Corneas were from tissues not suitable for transplant in patients. We characterized the endothelial cells by confocal microscopy, both within the intact cornea and in the primary endothelial cells cultures. We also studied the functional role of the purinergic system (adenosine, ATP and their receptors) by means of electrophysiological recordings. The experiments were performed by patch clamp recordings and confocal time-lapse microscopy and our results indicate that the application of purinergic compounds modulates the amplitude of outward currents in the isolated endothelial cells. These findings may lead to the proposal of new therapies for endothelium-related corneal diseases.

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Mice: Comparison with Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy and Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Giannakaki-Zimmermann, Helena; Kokona, Despina; Wolf, Sebastian; Ebneter, Andreas; Zinkernagel, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A