Science.gov

Sample records for congenital intrapulmonary bronchogenic

  1. Mediastinal bronchogenic cyst mimicking congenital lobar emphysema.

    PubMed

    Arun, Sumitha; Kumar, Manish; Ross, Benjamin Jeyanth

    2016-09-08

    Bronchogenic cyst (BC) is a rare congenital malformation of the lung. Most patients remain asymptomatic until adulthood while some are symptomatic in the first few years of life. However, symptoms in newborn period are rare. We report a case of a 3-day-old preterm baby with respiratory distress diagnosed as congenital lobar emphysema on chest X-ray. A CT scan revealed a mediastinal cyst causing obstructive lobar emphysema. The cyst was excised and pathological examination was suggestive of BC.

  2. Intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst and cerebral gas embolism in an aircraft flight passenger.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Francisco Aécio; Desouza, Bryan X; Meyer, Thomas; Gregory, Susan; Greenspon, Lee

    2006-08-01

    Although it is estimated that > 1 billion passengers travel by air worldwide each year, the incidence of in-flight emergencies is low. However, due to nonstandardized reporting requirements for in-flight medical emergencies, the true incidence of pulmonary barotrauma in airplane passengers is unknown. We describe the case of a passenger with an asymptomatic intrapulmonary cyst in whom a severe case of cerebral gas embolism developed during an aircraft flight. The decrease in ambient pressure during the aircraft climb resulted in expansion of the cyst volume based on Boyle's law (pressure x volume = constant). Due to the cyst expansion, we believe tears in the wall led to the leakage of air into the surrounding vessels followed by brain gas emboli. Adult patients with intrapulmonary cysts should be strongly considered for cyst resection or should at least be advised to abstain from activities leading to considerable changes in ambient pressure.

  3. Intramedullary bronchogenic cyst of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cem; Gulsen, Salih; Sonmez, Erkin; Ozger, Ozkan; Unlukaplan, Muge; Caner, Hakan

    2009-10-01

    Spinal bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital lesions. The authors describe their experience in the treatment of a 17-year-old boy who presented with back pain and paresthesia in both lower extremities. Lumbar MR imaging revealed the presence of an intramedullary cystic lesion at the conus medullaris and histopathological analysis revealed a bronchogenic cyst. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an intramedullary spinal bronchogenic cyst arising at the conus; all previously reported spinal bronchogenic cysts were either intradural extramedullary or not located at the conus.

  4. [Bronchogenic cysts of the mediastinum in childhood].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, V; Drebov, R

    1993-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital anomalies result of abnormal development of the tracheobronchial tree. They develop in the lung parenchyma or in the mediastinum. For a period of 17 years (1975-1991) a total of 46 children with bronchogenic cysts have been treated; in 6 the cysts were localized in the mediastinum. Two patients were one-year-old, 3 were in the age group 1 to 3 years and 1 was older than 3 years. Four patients were boys and 2 girls. Two children had hacking cough and attacks of dyspnea; one had swallowing difficulties. In 3 children the disease produced no symptoms and was detected on examination for pneumonia (1 child) and acute upper respiratory tract infection (2 children). All children had conventional X-ray; 5 had esophagography as well, 4--computer axial tomography, 3--echography. All children were operated (total extirpation of the cyst) and left the hospital cured.

  5. Left ventricular bronchogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiang; Omo, Alfred; Pan, Tiecheng; Li, Jun; Liu, Ligang; Hu, Min

    2006-04-01

    Bronchogenic cysts occurring in the left ventricle are a medical rarity. One successfully operated case is reported herein. The location of the cyst was just between the epicardium and myocardium of the inferior left ventricular wall, adjacent to the apex of the heart. Complete excision was achieved through a left anterolateral thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation.

  6. Bronchogenic cyst in a patient with difficult asthma.

    PubMed

    Ben Razavi, Soheil; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Taghipoor, Shokooh; Moghadam, Reza Nafisi; Behnamfar, Zahra

    2010-03-01

    Difficult to treat asthma is an asthma syndrome that brings in our mind other differentials. Mediastinal masses are not common findings, but are important variables. Bronchogenic cyst is a congenital anomaly of the foregut that is typically found in the mediastinum and diagnosed accidentally. We present a 4-year-old girl with allergic asthma that began at 8-months of age and finally a bronchogenic cyst was detected in this patient. The patient had history of asthma since she was eight months old. She had a history of several asthma attacks which had partly responded to asthma management. During the last episodes of asthma attacks, she was hospitalized in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Imaging studies showed a 4x3 cm mass in the posterior part of the thoracic cavity that had led to tracheal narrowing was found for which the patient underwent thoracotomy and in surgical exploration a cyst that had compressed the thoracic trachea. Pathological examination of the cyst revealed a bronchogenic cyst. Bronchogenic cyst is an uncommon developmental abnormality but in a patient with obstructive pattern of airways it should be considered in differential diagnosis of asthma, especially if the asthma management is not successful.

  7. Presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung Mo; Lee, Sang Min; Kang, Haeyoun; Choi, Hye Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts have been described rarely, particularly among adolescents. Only a few reports have described the ultrasonographic features of bronchogenic cysts, characterizing them as nonspecific cystic masses with or without internal echogenic foci or debris. Therefore, it is hard to differentiate subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts from other subcutaneous cystic tumors ultrasonographically. We report a case of presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in an 18-year-old man with unusual ultrasonographic findings. Ultrasonography revealed a small, oval, cystic mass containing a well-circumscribed, heterogeneously hypoechoic, egg-shaped lesion in the dependent portion of the mass within the subcutaneous fat layer overlying the sternum. Surgical excision was performed, and the cystic mass was diagnosed as a bronchogenic cyst. On pathological examination, the internal, heterogeneously hypoechoic, ball-like lesion was found to be mucous material within the cyst. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst presenting with a ball-like lesion inside of the cyst. This unusual ultrasonographic feature can be a clue to the diagnosis of subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst. In conclusion, if an anechoic cyst containing an internal, well-circumscribed, hypoechoic ball-like lesion is seen in the presternal subcutaneous fat layer, subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous cystic masses. PMID:28151916

  8. Giant bronchogenic cyst with pericardial defect: a case report & literature review in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Toshiko; Iwata, Takekazu; Nakatani, Yukio; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pericardial defects are a rare anomaly, found during autopsy and cardiothoracic surgery. We describe a case of a 69-year-old female, with a right-sided congenital pericardial defect associated with a giant bronchogenic cyst (BC) found during surgery. The cyst was resected and the patient developed arrhythmia following surgery. A review of the literature in Japan was performed, focusing on congenital anomalies associated with pericardial defects and its pathogenesis. We paid particular attention to complications following thoracic surgery in patients with pericardial defects and indications of pericardial reconstruction in such patients. PMID:27621900

  9. Retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst mimicking hydatid liver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Sherwani, Afak Yusuf; Dangroo, Sajad Ahmad; Bisati, Rafia Aziz; Malik, Nighat Shaffi

    2012-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts frequently occur in the mediastinum. They may be rarely encountered in the abdomen and retroperitoneum. Bronchogenic cysts can in fact mimic hydatid cysts. We report a case of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst below the right hemidiaphragm mimicking a hydatid cyst of the liver in a 30-year-old female.

  10. Retroperitoneal Bronchogenic Cyst Mimicking Hydatid Liver: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q.; Sherwani, Afak Yusuf; Dangroo, Sajad Ahmad; Bisati, Rafia Aziz; Malik, Nighat Shaffi

    2012-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts frequently occur in the mediastinum. They may be rarely encountered in the abdomen and retroperitoneum. Bronchogenic cysts can in fact mimic hydatid cysts. We report a case of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst below the right hemidiaphragm mimicking a hydatid cyst of the liver in a 30-year-old female. PMID:22606600

  11. Fibrosing mediastinitis mimicking bronchogenic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayiz, Hulya; Mutluay, Neslihan; Koyuncu, Adem; Demirag, Funda; Dagli, Gulfidan; Berktas, Bahadir; Berkoglu, Mine

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosing mediastinitis is a rare but benign disorder characterized by an excessive fibrotic reaction in the mediastinum which can result in compromise of airways, great vessels, and other mediastinal structures. In this paper we presented a patient with fibrosing mediastinitis mimicking bronchogenic carcinoma. The patient was a 32-year-old diabetic male admitting with cough and hemoptysis. There was a right hilar mass and multiple mediastinal conglomerated lymph nodes on chest computed tomography. Positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) scan demonstrated increased fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake at the right hilar mass lesion and mediastinal lymph nodes. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed mucosal distortion of right upper lobe. Pathologic examination of the mucosal biopsy revealed inflammation. Endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle and cervical mediastinoscopic lymph node biopsies were undiagnostic. Diagnostic thoracotomy confirmed the diagnosis fibrosing mediastinitis. Administration of six months of systemic corticosteroid and antituberculous therapy was not beneficial. In conclusion, despite being a rare clinical entity, fibrosing mediastinitis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass lesions of unknown etiology. The diagnosis is exceptionally difficult in the presence of atypical radiological findings. The treatment is particularly challenging without any proven effective therapy. PMID:23372962

  12. Bronchogenic cyst of the conus medullaris with spinal cord tethering: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming-Xiang; Hu, Jia-Rui; Kang, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing; Lv, Guo-Hua; She, Xiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts (BCs) are congenital malformations that originate from remnants of the primitive foregut. Intraspinal BCs, especially those of the conus medullaris are rare with only one case reported until now. To date, a bronchogenic cyst with spinal cord tethering has not been previously reported. We reviewed the clinical course of a 44-year-old woman, who presented with low back pain and leg weaknesss as well as sphincter disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradural oval mass located at the conus medullaris. A tethered cord was also observed, as well as a dermal sinus tract. The mass was totally removed after an L3-L4 laminectomy without detethering during operation. Pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of bronchogenic cyst. By six months after treatment, the patient had experienced nearly complete recovery. The review of literature indicated that detethering was performed in most reported cases of neurenteric cysts with spinal cord tethering, and one of six patients was diagnosed with a postoperative recurrence. The co-existence of bronchogenic cyst and a tethered spinal cord would imply associated developmental errors in embryogenesis. It is worth noting that whether detethering is necessary after the cyst removal. PMID:26097578

  13. Bronchogenic cysts with high CT numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Rose, J.S.; Efremidis, S.C.; Kirschner, P.A.; Cohen, B.A.

    1983-03-01

    Four patients with mediastinal masses are described. CT examinations demonstrated masses of high attenuation, and solid masses were suspected. At thoracotomy each patient had a cystic mass containing a brownish, turbid, mucoid material. The pathologic diagnosis in each case was a bronchogenic cyst. The possibility of such a cyst should not be excluded because of a high CT number, which reflects the turbid contents of the cyst.

  14. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary vasculature resulting in intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cuntaeous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  15. Isolated adrenal masses in nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, T.W. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.; Miller, J.I.; Mansour, K.; Greene, D.; Davis, W.A.

    1984-10-01

    Computed tomography has become an important diagnostic modality in the preoperative staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. The adrenal glands represent one of the most frequent sites of metastasis. Therefore, an isolated adrenal mass discovered on preoperative thoracoabdominal CT poses a diagnostic problem. Three hundred thirty patients with histologically proved nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated. Thirty-two had adrenal masses without further evidence of disease in the abdomen, Eight of these 32 masses were metastases, 17 were proved adenomas, and 7 did not undergo biopsy. Thus an isolated adrenal mass is more likely benign than metastatic, and biopsy is advocated prior to withholding potentially curative surgery.

  16. Gastric bronchogenic cysts: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    TU, CHAOYONG; ZHU, JINGDE; SHAO, CHUXIAO; MAO, WEIBO; ZHOU, XINGMU; LIN, QIAOMEI; LI, ZHUKAI; ZHANG, JIE; ZHOU, QINGYUE; CHEN, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Gastric bronchogenic cysts are rare lesions, first described in 1956, with only 34 cases reported in the literature to date. The present study described a case of bronchogenic cyst of the stomach in a 17-year-old female who presented with periodic epigastric pain. In addition, the study analyzed the existing literature on these lesions. Gastric bronchogenic cysts are more common in females (female:male ratio, 21:14) and the median age of their development is 43 years. In total, 48.57% of the 34 previously reported cases were identified incidentally, and the remainder presented mainly with epigastric pain. Cyst sizes varied between 1.7 and 15 cm. In 3 cases, preoperative diagnosis was performed using needle biopsy, whereas several studies were initially misdiagnosed as stromal tumors. In 85% of the cases (31/35), cyst resection was performed, with laparoscopy used in 4 of the cases. The findings of the present study and literature review suggested that bronchogenic cysts of the stomach are rare, and surgical resection is warranted to treat symptoms and prevent malignant transformation. PMID:27073434

  17. Prophylactic irradiation in bronchogenic small cell anaplastic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, H.H.; Dombernowsky, P.; Hirsch, F.R.; Hansen, M.; Rygard, J.

    1980-07-15

    A total of 114 patients with bronchogenic small cell anaplastic carcinoma and staged as having regional disease all underwent combination chemotherapy consisting of CCNU, cyclophosphamide, and methotrexate. They were randomized to receive either radiotherapy to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes (4000 rad) or extensive radiotherapy, which included the brain, adrenals, and upper retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Fifteen patients were free of disease after 18 months of chemotherapy and the treatment was discontinued. Only 3 patients subsequently relapsed. No difference was observed between the two groups of patients in median survival time, response rate, duration of response, or relapse pattern, including the frequency of brain metastasis.

  18. Primary Intrapulmonary Thymoma Presenting as a Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woohyun; Kang, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Tae; Park, In Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Primary intrapulmonary thymoma (PIT) is a very rare lesion of uncertain pathogenesis. PIT should be considered when the histopathological appearance of a lung tumor shows features that are uncommon but similar to those of a thymoma. In this case report, we discuss the case of a 59-year-old female with a solitary pulmonary nodule that was confirmed to be PIT on the basis of pathological tests. Treatment with complete resection showed good results. PMID:28180106

  19. Bronchogenic Cyst Rupture and Pneumonia after Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Goohyeon; Song, Junwhi; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-01-01

    We report a 54-year-old woman who presented with a well-defined, homogeneous, and non-enhancing mass in the retrobronchial region of the bronchus intermedius. The patient underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for histological confirmation. Serous fluid was aspirated by EBUS-TBNA. Cytological examination identified an acellular smear with negative microbiological cultures. The patient was finally diagnosed with bronchogenic cysts by chest computed tomography (CT) and EBUS-TBNA findings. However, 1 week after EBUS-TBNA, the patient developed bronchogenic cyst rupture and pneumonia. Empirical antibiotics were administered, and pneumonia from the bronchogenic cyst rupture had resolved on follow-up chest CT. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pneumonia from bronchogenic cyst rupture after EBUS-TBNA. PMID:23678359

  20. Co-existing Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Helen M.; Quinlan, J. J.; Hiltz, J. E.

    1965-01-01

    Eighty patients with carcinoma of the lung have been treated at the Nova Scotia Sanatorium since 1940; in 15, coexisting active pulmonary tuberculosis was present. No characteristic clinical or roentgenological findings indicated that the tuberculous individual also had lung cancer. In four cases cancer was not diagnosed until the lung was examined by the pathologist. In the others a considerable interval elapsed before carcinoma was suspected. Only four patients with known cancer were considered suitable for thoracotomy. In three, an attempt at curative resection was made. One survived over seven years before accidental death; one is alive less than one year after operation; the third died as a result of the surgery. Bronchogenic carcinoma should be suspected in every tuberculous patient over the age of 50; diagnostic investigations should include bronchoscopy and cytological studies of bronchial secretion and sputum. Suspicion of carcinoma in any such patient constitutes an indication for early resection of the tuberculous disease. PMID:5843871

  1. Single-Dose Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Rifapentine in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Conte, John E.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; McQuitty, Mari; Kipps, Juliana; Lin, Emil T.; Zurlinden, Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    The intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of rifapentine were studied in 30 volunteers who received a single, oral dose of rifapentine (600 mg). Subgroups of five subjects each underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at timed intervals following drug administration. Drug concentrations, including the concentration of the primary metabolite 25-desacetyl rifapentine, were determined in plasma, BAL fluid, and alveolar cells (AC) by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The concentrations in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were calculated by the urea diffusion method. The concentration-time data were fit to two-compartment (plasma) or one-compartment (AC and ELF) models. The peak concentrations in plasma, ELF, and AC, 26.2, 3.7, and 5.3 μg/ml, respectively, occurred at 5, 5, and 7 h after drug administration, respectively. The half-lives and areas under the curve for plasma, ELF, and AC were 18.3 h and 520 μg · h/ml, 20.8 h and 111 μg · h/ml, and 13.0 h and 133 μg · h/ml, respectively. Although the intrapulmonary rifapentine concentrations were less than the plasma rifapentine concentrations at all time periods, they remained above the proposed breakpoint for M. tuberculosis (0.5 μg/ml) for the 48-h observation period. These data provide a pharmacokinetic rationale for extended-interval dosing. The optimum dosing regimen for rifapentine will have to be determined by controlled clinical trials. PMID:10722501

  2. Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Aspiration of an Endotracheal Bronchogenic Cyst: Case Report and Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Venkata N; Dhooria, Sahajal; Agarwal, Ritesh; Behera, Digambar

    2016-04-01

    The most common location of bronchogenic cysts is the mediastinum, adjacent to the major airways. Endotracheal bronchogenic cysts are rare and most present in infancy with respiratory failure. Although surgical resection has remained the treatment of choice, there is increasing interest in the management of these cysts with therapeutic aspiration alone. In this article, we describe a 68-year-old man with endotracheal bronchogenic cyst who was managed with endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle aspiration. We also systematically review the literature for reports of endotracheal bronchogenic cysts. The review identified 9 reports (10 patients) with endotracheal bronchogenic cysts. The most common age at presentation was infancy (n=8) and surgical resection was the most common treatment modality used (n=7).

  3. Intrapulmonary and intracardiac shunting with exercise at altitude.

    PubMed

    Imray, Chris H E; Pattinson, Kyle T S; Myers, Steve; Chan, Colin W; Hoar, Helen; Brearey, Steve; Collins, Phil; Wright, Alex D

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies in normal participants have shown that right to left shunt blood vessels in the lung open up during exercise. We describe the first field study to investigate this phenomenon at altitude. This study aimed to assess the effect of altitude and partial acclimatization on inducible right to left shunting at rest and with exercise. A contrast-enhanced transcranial Doppler imaging technique to detect microbubbles after injection of blood and saline agitated with air was used to measure right to left shunting in 10 normal participants at rest and immediately after exercising to maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) at 80 m, on acute exposure to 3450 m, and finally after a week above 3450 m. At 80 m, exercising resulted in right to left shunting via patent foramen ovale in 2 participants, but there was no evidence of shunting in the remaining 8 participants. Cerebral microbubbles were detected at rest in the 2 participants with patent foramen ovale on acute exposure to 3450 m, and the shunting increased on exercise (P = .04). In 5 of the remaining 8 participants without patent foramen ovale, cerebral microbubbles were detected on exercise (P = .04) but not at rest. Partial acclimatization had minimal effect on the prevalence or magnitude of the intrapulmonary or intracardiac shunts. Oxygenation was similar in those with shunts compared with those without shunts. Intrapulmonary shunting occurs on exercise at altitude, but the clinical and physiologic significances have yet to be determined. Despite the occurrence of shunting in most participants, our results suggest that this phenomenon is not a significant factor in altitude and exercise-induced hypoxia.

  4. Intracardiac bronchogenic cyst in a 2-year-old Nigerian boy

    PubMed Central

    Ogunkunle, Oluwatoyin Oluwafunmilayo; Animashaun, Deola

    2012-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumours are rare in the paediatric age group. Bronchogenic cysts, although relatively rare, represent the most common cystic lesion of the mediastinum. Intracardiac bronchogenic cysts however, are extremely rare. The authors are unaware of any case previously reported in a Nigerian child and hence report the case of a 2-year-old boy for its rarity and interest. The boy was referred for evaluation of a cardiac murmur. Clinical, radiological and electrographic findings were suggestive of mild pulmonary stenosis or an atrial septal defect (ASD). 2-dimensional echocardiography however, revealed in addition to a small ASD, an intracardiac mass attached to the tricuspid valve. The mass was surgically removed and found on histology to be a bronchogenic cyst. Our experience highlights the importance of echocardiography in the evaluation of asymptomatic patients with cardiac murmurs, in whom a rare lesion might have otherwise been missed. PMID:22605814

  5. Intrapulmonary Hartmannella vermiformis: a potential niche for Legionella pneumophila replication in a murine model of legionellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J; McClain, M; LeGendre, M; Engleberg, C

    1997-01-01

    The potential role of inhaled protozoa as a niche for intrapulmonary replication of Legionella pneumophila was investigated in vivo with mutant strains of L. pneumophila which have reduced virulence for the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis. L. pneumophila AA488 and AA502 were derived from wild-type strain AA100 after transposon mutagenesis. These mutants have reduced virulence for H. vermiformis but are fully virulent for mononuclear phagocytic cells. A/J mice, which are susceptible to replicative L. pneumophila lung infections, were inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila AA100, AA488, or AA502 (10[6] bacteria per mouse) or were coinoculated with one of the L. pneumophila strains (10[6] bacteria per mouse) and uninfected H. vermiformis (10[6] amoebae per mouse). The effect of coinoculation with H. vermiformis on intrapulmonary growth of each L. pneumophila strain was subsequently assessed. In agreement with our previous studies, coinoculation with H. vermiformis significantly enhanced intrapulmonary growth of the parent L. pneumophila strain (AA100). In contrast, intrapulmonary growth of L. pneumophila AA488 or AA502 was not significantly enhanced by coinoculation of mice with H. vermiformis. These studies demonstrate that L. pneumophila virulence for amoebae is required for maximal intrapulmonary growth of the bacteria in mice coinoculated with H. vermiformis and support the hypothesis that inhaled amoebae may potentiate intrapulmonary growth of L. pneumophila by providing a niche for bacterial replication. PMID:9353084

  6. Computed tomography evaluation of the adrenal gland in the preoperative assessment of bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.; Madrazo, B.L.; Gitschlag, K.F.; Gross, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    One hundred ten patients with proved bronchogenic carcinoma who were undergoing computed tomography (CT) of the thorax also underwent CT of the adrenals to determine the value of routine preoperative assessement of this gland. Sixteen adrenal masses were found in 11 patients. In five patients the adrenals were the only site of metastasis. CT of the adrenals should be performed routinely when the thorax is examined pre-operatively in patients with non-oat-cell bronchogenic carcinoma to improve patient selection for thoractomy.

  7. Thoracoscopic resection of a bronchogenic cyst in a 17-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Pułtorak, Roksana; Pasierbek, Michał; Grabowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts comprise approximately 6% of mediastinal tumors in children. The treatment consists in surgical resection of the cyst. The authors present the case of a 17-year-old girl who was accidentally diagnosed with a mediastinal cyst. The patient was successfully treated with thoracoscopic surgery with good early and late clinical outcomes. PMID:28096839

  8. Alcohol Ablation Therapy of an Atypically Located Symptomatic Bronchogenic Cyst: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lakadamyali, Hatice Ergun, Tarkan; Lakadamyali, Huseyin; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2007-11-15

    Bronchogenic cyst is a rare developmental lesion. It is usually asymptomatic and most frequently located in the middle mediastinum and lung parenchyma. It can cause symptoms only when infected or pressing on neighboring structures. The MRI findings in a 34-year-old woman with an 8 months history of back pain were evaluated and revealed a cystic lesion in the left paravertebral area. The histopathologic evaluation of the material aspirated with CT guidance was reported to be bronchogenic cyst. A simultaneous alcohol ablation was accomplished. After the procedure the patient's pain disappeared and the follow-up MRI scan 1 year later revealed no relapse. Paravertebrally located bronchogenic cysts are very rare and only 3 cases were found to be reported in the medical literature prior to this one. While aspiration alone is sufficient for diagnosis, it is insufficient to treat the lesion and prevent the recurrences. This paper reports a paravertebral bronchogenic cyst which was symptomatic despite of its small size. CT-guided aspiration was accomplished and simultaneous alcohol ablation was carried out to prevent recurrences.

  9. Intrapulmonary shunt and SCUBA diving: another risk factor?

    PubMed

    Madden, Dennis; Ljubkovic, Marko; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory and field investigations have demonstrated that intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) may provide an additional means for venous gas emboli (VGE) to cross over to the arterial circulation due to their larger diameter compared to pulmonary microcirculation. Once thought to be the primary cause of decompression sickness (DCS), it has been demonstrated that, even in large quantities, their presence does not always result in injury. Normally, VGE are trapped in the site of gas exchange in the lungs and eliminated via diffusion. When VGE crossover takes place in arterial circulation, they have the potential to cause more harm as they are redistributed to the brain, spinal column, and other sensitive tissues. The patent foramen ovale (PFO) was once thought to be the only risk factor for an increase in arterialization; however, IPAVAs represent another pathway for this crossover to occur. The opening of IPAVAs is associated with exercise and hypoxic gas mixtures, both of which divers may encounter. The goal of this review is to describe how IPAVAs may impact diving physiology, specifically during decompression, and what this means for the individual diver as well as the future of commercial and recreational diving. Future research must continue on the relationship between IPAVAs and the environmental and physiological circumstances that lead to their opening and closing, as well as how they may contribute to diving injuries such as DCS.

  10. Intrapulmonary concentration of levofloxacin in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanxun; Jiang, Chunguo; Lang, Liwei; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Yang; Xu, Zuojun

    2014-06-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have significantly impaired pulmonary diffusion, which may affect the pulmonary concentration of many drugs, including antibiotics. In this study, we compared the difference in pulmonary levofloxacin (LVFX) concentration between patients with normal lung function and IPF. The IPF group included 10 patients with a proven diagnosis of IPF and a diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide ranging from 40% to 70% of predicted values. The control group included 10 patients with normal pulmonary function. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were taken at 3-3.5 h after fasting. LVFX (500 mg) was administered orally. LVFX concentrations in the serum and BALF were determined using HPLC-MS/MC. The level of LVFX in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) was calculated using the following formula: LVFX ELF = LVFX BALF × (Urea serum/Urea BALF). No significant differences in age, body weight, height, and calculated creatinine clearance and BALF retrieval rate were observed between groups. LVFX serum concentrations in the IPF and control groups were (5.97 ± 1.28) μg/ml and (6.84 ± 3.43) μg/ml, respectively (P = 0.4727). ELF concentration of LVFX in the control group was (27.81 ± 21.36) μg/ml, while the concentration in the IPF group was (10.17 ± 2.46) μg/ml, less than half of that in the controls (P = 0.0058). The intrapulmonary concentration of LVFX in IPF patients was lower than those with normal lung function. Notably, however, the ELF LVFX concentration following 500 mg once-daily exceeded the MIC90 of common respiratory pathogens. Excellent antibacterial efficacy of LVFX can be expected for IPF patients in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  11. Intrapulmonary receptors in the Tegu lizard: I. Sensitivity to CO2.

    PubMed

    Feede, M R; Kuhlmann, W D; Scheid, P

    1977-02-01

    Single unit vagal recordings from intrapulmonary receptors were obtained in decerebrate, paralyzed lizards both during pump ventilation and during unidirectional ventilation on the cannulated, sack-shaped lung. Two types of receptors were identified: (1) CO2-receptors, which increased their discharge frequency as intrapulmonary CO2 concentration decreased but were not sensitive to stretch of the lung. (2) Mechanoreceptors, which rapidly increased discharge frequency when the lung was stretched. These receptors' CO2 sensitivity varied. Lungs of lizards thus appeared to possess both CO2 receptors, which have functional characteristics similar to those in birds, and mechanoreceptors with properties similar to stretch receptors in mammals.

  12. Compartmentalized Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Amphotericin B and Its Lipid Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Groll, Andreas H.; Lyman, Caron A.; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Armstrong, Derek; Mickiene, Diana; Alfaro, Raul M.; Schaufele, Robert L.; Sein, Tin; Bacher, John; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the compartmentalized intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of amphotericin B and its lipid formulations in healthy rabbits. Cohorts of three to seven noninfected, catheterized rabbits received 1 mg of amphotericin B deoxycholate (DAMB) per kg of body weight or 5 mg of either amphotericin B colloidal dispersion (ABCD), amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC), or liposomal amphotericin B (LAMB) per kg once daily for a total of 8 days. Following sparse serial plasma sampling, rabbits were sacrificed 24 h after the last dose, and epithelial lining fluid (ELF), pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), and lung tissue were obtained. Pharmacokinetic parameters in plasma were derived by model-independent techniques, and concentrations in ELF and PAM were calculated based on the urea dilution method and macrophage cell volume, respectively. Mean amphotericin B concentrations ± standard deviations (SD) in lung tissue and PAM were highest in ABLC-treated animals, exceeding concurrent plasma levels by 70- and 375-fold, respectively (in lung tissue, 16.24 ± 1.62 versus 2.71 ± 1.22, 6.29 ± 1.17, and 6.32 ± 0.57 μg/g for DAMB-, ABCD-, and LAMB-treated animals, respectively [P = 0.0029]; in PAM, 89.1 ± 37.0 versus 8.92 ± 2.89, 5.43 ± 1.75, and 7.52 ± 2.50 μg/ml for DAMB-, ABCD-, and LAMB-treated animals, respectively [P = 0.0246]). By comparison, drug concentrations in ELF were much lower than those achieved in lung tissue and PAM. Among the different cohorts, the highest ELF concentrations were found in LAMB-treated animals (2.28 ± 1.43 versus 0.44 ± 0.13, 0.68 ± 0.27, and 0.90 ± 0.28 μg/ml in DAMB-, ABCD-, and ABLC-treated animals, respectively [P = 0.0070]). In conclusion, amphotericin B and its lipid formulations displayed strikingly different patterns of disposition in lungs 24 h after dosing. Whereas the disposition of ABCD was overall not fundamentally different from that of DAMB, ABLC showed prominent accumulation in lung tissue and PAM, while LAMB

  13. A case-control study of bidi smoking and bronchogenic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, R.; Ahuja, R. C.; Singhal, S.; Srivastava, A. N.; James, P.; Kesarwani, V.; Singh, D.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risks imposed by tobacco smoking, in particular, bidi smoking, in the development of lung cancer. METHODS: Two hundred eighty-four histologically confirmed patients of bronchogenic carcinoma and 852 controls matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic status were interviewed according to a predesigned questionnaire. Effects of individual variables defining the various aspects of tobacco smoking, in particular, bidi smoking, were assessed using logistic regression models. RESULTS: 81.3% cases of bronchogenic carcinoma were ever smokers as compared with 42.2% among controls. The odd ratios for ever smoking, bidi smoking, and cigarette smoking were 5.9 (confidence interval [CI] 4.3, 8.4), 6.1 (CI 4.3, 8.7), and 5.3 (CI 2.7, 10.4), respectively. CONCLUSION: Bidi smoking poses a very high risk for lung cancer even more than that of cigarette smoking. PMID:20981185

  14. Differential diagnosis between freshwater drowning and saltwater drowning based on intrapulmonary aquaporin-5 expression.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ishida, Yuko; Mizunuma, Shinya; Kimura, Akihiko; Kondo, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    The intrapulmonary expression of aquaporin-5 (AQP5) was examined in an experimental drowning model and forensic autopsy cases to discuss the possibility for differentiation between freshwater drowning (FWD) and saltwater drowning (SWD). In animal experiments, mice were classified into four groups: (group I: FWD; group II: SWD; group III: postmortem immersion (PI); and group IV: cervical dislocation as controls. In group I, intrapulmonary AQP5 expression was significantly suppressed at both gene and protein levels, compared with the other three groups, and there was no significant difference in AQP5 expression among groups II to IV. In the next series, we examined AQP5 gene expression in human lung samples obtained from forensic autopsies at less than 48 h postmortem (nine FWD cases, five SWD cases, and 14 other cases). Although AQP5 mRNA could be detected in all lung samples under the employed experimental conditions, the intrapulmonary gene expression of AQP5 in FWD was significantly attenuated compared with the other groups. These observations imply that AQP5 expression in type I alveolar epithelial cells was suppressed by hypotonic water to prevent hemodilution from the physiological aspect. Moreover, the analysis of intrapulmonary AQP5 expression would be forensically useful for differentiation between FWD and SWD, or between FWD and PI.

  15. Effect of right ventricular bypass peak flow-rate on intrapulmonary shunt ratio.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Moriya, H

    1988-02-01

    The effect of total right ventricular bypass peak flow-rate on the intrapulmonary shunt ratio was quantitatively investigated in animal tests. To give variations in the peak flow-rate (from pulsatile to intermediate to non-pulsatile), three types of blood pump (piston-bellows, screw, and centrifugal) were applied to dogs. The intrapulmonary shunt ratio was calculated from blood oxygen content drawn every 30 min from the outlet of the right ventricular bypass pump and from the femoral artery, while the canine lung was ventilated with 100% oxygen gas by an artificial respirator. The results show that when the intrapulmonary shunt ratio ranged between 0.095 and 0.392 there is no clear relation to the peak-flow-rate index (which varied from 1.1-17.0 l min-1 m-2) over the preceding 30 min. This study demonstrates that the intrapulmonary shunt ratio is able to be kept within the range of control values for 6 h even with a peak-flow-rate index of less than 4.0 l min-1 m-2.

  16. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Maury, Wendy; McCray, Paul B; Sinn, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN) responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction. PMID:23360952

  17. Heterogeneity of tight junction morphology in extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary airways of the rat.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, E E

    1980-10-01

    In the present study morphology of tight junctions was related to the various cell types lining extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary airways of the rat. Freeze fracture replicas were prepared from extrapulmonary airway epithelium derived from the cartilagenous and membranous sides of upper, middle, and lower thirds of the trachea. Intrapulmonary airway epithelium was obtained from airways less than 1 mm in diameter. Tight junction fibrils on the P fracture face were organized into three types of patterns. Type 1: parallel sparsely interconnected lumenal fibrils with large ablumenal fibril loops. Type 2: richly interconnected lumenal fibrils with large ablumenal fibril loops. Type 3: narrow network of interconnected fibrils. On the E fracture face complementary grooves were organized in a similar pattern. Ciliated cells on both sides and all levels of the trachea were associated with type 1 junctions. In intrapulmonary airways, however, the junctional pattern of ciliated cells changed to type 2. Brush cells at all levels of the airways were bounded by type 2 and occasionally by type 1 junctions. Secretory cell junctions displayed the following patterns: Mucous cells were bounded solely by type 3, serous cells by either types 2 or 3, and Clara cells predominantly by type 2. Cells tentatively identified as intermediate cells displayed all three junctional patterns. The number of parallel fibrils comprising tight junctions was higher in extrapulmonary as compared to intrapulmonary airways. No difference was seen in the various locations sampled in the trachea. Gap junctions were observed between secretory cells of extrapulmonary but not intrapulmonary airways. These observations are discussed in relation to current physiologic data.

  18. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  19. Intrapulmonary vascular shunt pathways in alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins.

    PubMed

    Galambos, Csaba; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Ali, Noorjahan; Gien, Jason; Dishop, Megan K; Abman, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a lethal neonatal lung disease characterised by severe pulmonary hypertension, abnormal vasculature and intractable hypoxaemia. Mechanisms linking abnormal lung vasculature with severe hypoxaemia in ACD/MPV are unknown. We investigated whether bronchopulmonary anastomoses form right-to-left shunt pathways in ACD/MVP. We studied 2 infants who died of ACD/MPV postmortem with direct injections of coloured ink into the pulmonary artery, bronchial artery and pulmonary veins. Extensive histological evaluations included serial sectioning, immunostaining and 3-dimensional reconstruction demonstrated striking intrapulmonary vascular pathways linking the systemic and pulmonary circulations that bypass the alveolar capillary bed. These data support the role of prominent right-to-left intrapulmonary vascular shunt pathways in the pathophysiology of ACD/MPV.

  20. Reversibility of intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunts in liver cirrhosis documented by serial radionuclide perfusion lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.S.; Barnett, C.A.; Farrer, P.A.

    1984-05-01

    Using serial perfusion lung scans, the opening up and closure of right-to-left intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunts has been documented over a period of several weeks in a patient with chronic alcoholic liver disease. The presence of the shunts correlates well with the severity of hypoxemia and the presence of nodular mottling on chest radiographs. The time course of these changes with clinical status suggests lability and the functional nature of these shunts.

  1. Radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma. Analysis of a treatment schedule designed for use with hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sause, W T; Sweeney, R A; Plenk, H P; Thomson, J W

    1981-07-01

    All cases of bronchogenic carcinoma treated with curative intent over an eight-year period were reviewed. Most were treated with 12 X 400 rad in 32 days using 60Co, a schedule designed to optimize the radiation-sensitizing properties of hyperbaric oxygen. While O2 gave no obvious benefit, overall four-year survival was 10.6% and that of patients with good prognostic indicators was 18%. No radiation myelitis was observed. This protocol delivers an adequate tumor dose and appears to be tolerated well by most patients.

  2. Metastasis of greater wing of sphenoid bone in bronchogenic carcinoma: a unusual case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant K; Mital, Mukta; Dwivedi, Amit; Gupta, Kumkum

    2011-01-01

    Orbital metastasis in systemic cancer is known to occur and occurs in up to 7% of all systemic cancers. Orbital features typically present after the diagnosis of the primary tumor. In about 20% of cases, there is no known primary cancer at the time of presentation with orbital metastatic disease. Here we report a case of a 60-year-old male smoker, in whom proptosis, due to metastasis in greater wing of left sphenoid bone secondary to bronchogenic carcinoma, was the initial symptom. We could not find in literature metastasis to greater wing of sphenoid bone due to small cell carcinoma of lung.

  3. Comparison of immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 168 strain in pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengcheng; Li, Yunfeng; Shao, Guoqing; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) 168 strain in the local respiratory tract in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: an intranasal immunization group, an intrapulmonary immunization group, an intramuscular immunization group and a control group. The levels of local respiratory tract cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6 in the early stage of immunization (P<0.01), local specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in nasal swab samples (P<0.01); and IgA- and IgG-secreting cells in the nasal mucosa and trachea were higher after intranasal vaccination (P<0.01) than in the control group. Interestingly, intrapulmonary immunization induced much stronger immune responses than intranasal immunization. Intrapulmonary immunization also significantly increased the secretion of IL-6 and local specific sIgA and the numbers of IgA- and IgG-secreting cells. The levels of IL-10 and interferon-γ in the nasal swab samples and the numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the lung and hilar lymph nodes were significantly increased by intrapulmonary immunization compared with those in the control group (P<0.01). These data suggest that intrapulmonary immunization with attenuated Mhp is effective in evoking local cellular and humoral immune responses in the respiratory tract. Intrapulmonary immunization with Mhp may be a promising route for defense against Mhp in pigs.

  4. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Pediatric Endocrine Society MedlinePlus (NIH) What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  5. Simple mechanical thrombectomy with intrapulmonary arterial thrombolysis in pulmonary thromboembolism: a small case series

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khurshid; Munawar, Muhammad; Andina Munawar, Dian; Hartono, Beny

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is a life-threatening condition with a high early mortality rate caused by acute right ventricular failure and cardiogenic shock. We report a series of three patients who presented with acute and subacute submassive PTE. They were successfully treated by simple catheter-based mechanical thrombectomy and intrapulmonary arterial thrombolysis. Mechanical fragmentation and aspiration of thrombus was performed by commonly used J-wire, multi-purpose and Judkin Right guiding catheters and this obviated the need of specific thrombectomy devices. PMID:25593584

  6. Preoperative CT evaluation of adrenal glands in non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.E. Jr.; Heaston, D.K.; Dunnick, N.R.; Korobkin, M.

    1982-08-01

    Preoperative chest computed tomographic (CT) scans in 84 patients with biopsy-proven non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma were reviewed. At least one adrenal gland was visualized in 70 of these. Evidence of a solid adrenal mass was present in 18 (14.5%) glands in 15 (21.4%) patients. Percutaneous needle aspiration under CT guidance confirmed metastatic malignancy in the four patients who were biopsied. Because the documented presence of adrenal metastases in non-small cell lung cancer makes surgical resection or local irradiation inappropriate, it is recommended that both adrenal glands in their entirety be specifically included whenever a staging chest CT examination is performed in patients with such tumors. Percutaneous needle biopsy for pathologic confirmation of the nature of solid adrenal masses discovered in this process is also useful.

  7. Intrapulmonary receptors in the Tegu lizard: II. Functional characteristics and localization;.

    PubMed

    Scheid, P; Kuhlmann, W D; Fedde, M R

    1977-02-01

    Intrapulmonary receptors identified in the Tegu lizard by single-unit vagal recording (Fedde et al., 1977) were subjected to a number of stimuli and localized within the lung. Some carbon dioxide receptors could follow periodic changes in intrapulmonary CO2 concentrations as rapidly as 1.3 Hz; No oxygen sensitivity was observed with this receptor type, and halothane markedly depressed the discharge frequency. In response to intravenously injected acetazolamide they increased their discharge frequency and became almost totally insensitive to CO2, suggesting molecular per se is not the direct controller of receptor discharge; These receptors show many of the functional characteristics described for those in the avian lung. Afferent activity from both CO2 and mechanoreceptors could be elicited by electrically stimulating the lung surface. The CO2 receptors appeared to be organized in a receptive field covering more than 1 cm2 of lung surface, multiple receptors being innervated by a single afferent fiber. Activity in afferent fibers from mechanoreceptors could be evoked from only one distinct spot on the lung surface. Conduction velocities of afferent fibers from CO2 receptors ranged from 1 to 3 m-sec-1; from mechanoreceptors, from 1.9 to 5.2 m-sec-1.

  8. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-09-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed.

  9. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin.

  10. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congenital and inherited cataracts. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ... Cataracts and systemic disease. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ...

  11. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  12. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at birth. ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; ...

  13. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital lues; Fetal syphilis ... which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all ... Saunders; 2014:chap 143. Duff P. Maternal and fetal infections. In: Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, ...

  14. [Congenital diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Friedman-Gruszczyńska, Joanna; Książyk, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Congenital diarrhoea of heterogenic etiology is a rare cause of chronic diarrhoea. Characteristic features are: onset in the first weeks of life, life-threatening severe dehydratation and electrolyte disorders leading to a necessity of long-term parenteral nutrition. The clinical onset may be delayed and the degree of diarrhoea may be modest, making the diagnosis difficult. The main causes of congenital diarrhoea such as intestine electrolytes, carbohydrates, lipid and protein transport disorders and congenital enzymatic deficiencies, enterocyte polarization disorders, hormonal, immunological, metabolic, genetic and congenital anatomic disorders are presented in the paper. Some of them, such as: microvillus inclusion disease, tufting enteropathy, intestinal anedocrynosis, IPEX syndrome (immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome) have been described recently. One of the basic investigations, when congenital diarrhea is suspected, is general examination of the stool, its electrolyte concentration and serum electrolytes and blood gas analysis. Often, small bowel biopsy with histological examination (with the use of electronic microscopy and PAS staining) is indicated. In some cases molecular examination is possible and indicated. In differential diagnosis other, more frequent causes of chronic diarrhea of infancy, have to be excluded. In most of the cases of congenital diarrhoea there is no casual treatment available - usually long-term parenteral nutrition is necessary.

  15. The Mayo Lung Project for early detection and localization of bronchogenic carcinoma: a status report.

    PubMed

    Fontana, R S; Sanderson, D R; Woolner, L B; Miller, W E; Bernatz, P E; Payne, W S; Taylor, W F

    1975-05-01

    The Mayo Lung Project (MLP) is a screening program designed to detect bronchogenic carcinoma at a curable stage. Screening tests include chest roentgenograms, three-day "pooled" sputum cytology studies, and lung-health questionnaires. These are being applied every four months to a study population of outpatients who have a high probability of developing lung cancer. Initial patient acceptance of the screening program has been excellent. Small asymptomatic lung cancers have been detected both roentgenographically and cytologically. The two procedures have complemented each other with little overlap. Chest roentgenography has proved most useful in diagnosing peripherally situated cancers, whereas sputum cytology studies have been most effective in identifying early squamous cancer involving major airways. At present, more cancers have been detected roentgenographically than cytologically, but the cytologically detected cases appear to have a better prognosis. Roentgenographically occult cancers have been localized with regularity, although the localization process is complicated. Theoretically, vigorous application of radiologic and cytologic screening, combined with optimum use of localizing procedures and treatment, could increase the five-year survival rate among lung cancer patients to nearly 50 percent. However, the actual survivorship attained will ultimately be determined by currently imponderable factors such as patient acceptance of longterm screening, frequency of multicentric respiratory cancers, and incidence of noncancerous smoking-related diseases, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ischemic heart disease.

  16. Class I major histocompatibility complex antigens and tumor ploidy in breast and bronchogenic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Redondo, M; Concha, A; Ruiz-Cabello, F; Morell, M; Esteban, F; Talavera, P; Garrido, F

    1997-01-01

    We determined the frequency of expression of the major histocompatibility complex antigens HLA-A,B,C in tumor cells from 207 primary tumor lesions of breast and bronchogenic carcinomas, to see if the expression of theses antigens was linked with several clinicopathological parameters associated with tumor aggressivity, such as abnormal cellular DNA content. We compared tumor tissues with nonneoplastic tissues and tissues from 15 benign breast lesions. HLA class I expressor and nonexpressor tumor cells were determined by using immunohistochemical stains (PAP and APAAP methods) and antibodies against these antigens. Reduction of HLA class I antigen was detected in 65 tumors (31.7%) and was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation and abnormal cellular DNA content (p < 0.001). These characteristics might define a group of aggressive tumors in which the decrease of HLA class I antigens would enable tumor cells to avoid eliciting host immune responses. On the other hand, the altered regulatory mechanisms, of tumors with abnormal cellular DNA content, might modulate the expression of HLA class I molecules.

  17. Prenatal presentation and postnatal management of congenital thoracic malformations.

    PubMed

    Bush, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    The antenatal finding of a congenital thoracic malformation (CTM) leads to anxiety in the parents and uncertainty as to the optimal management. The antenatal spectrum of CTM includes congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, sequestration, congenital lobar emphysema, enteric and bronchogenic cysts, and bronchial atresia. Most lesions require no antenatal intervention, and shrink substantially in the third trimester, but if fetal hydrops develops, then antenatal intervention is required, occasionally medical but more usually surgical, because mortality is high. If the baby is symptomatic in the newborn period, then some form of surgical intervention is clearly required. The asymptomatic baby presents a therapeutic dilemma. Advocates of early surgery point to the complications of CTM, which include infection, pneumothorax, bleeding and malignant transformation. Those who are proponents of conservative management retort that some CTM disappear postnatally, and that the complication rate is unknown; many children appear never to need surgery. Furthermore, there is clearcut evidence that excision of a CTM does not totally eliminate the risk of a subsequent malignancy. It is clear that, both antenatally and postnatally, counselling of the family on a case by case basis is needed. The limitations of present evidence should be stressed. Different families will make different decisions about postnatal surgery in an asymptomatic baby. If surgery is performed, morbidity is low, particularly with a video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) procedure.

  18. Prediction of Susceptibility to Acute Mountain Sickness Using Hypoxia-Induced Intrapulmonary Arteriovenous Shunt and Intracardiac Shunt Fractions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    TITLE: Prediction of Susceptibility to Acute Mountain Sickness Using Hypoxia-Induced Intrapulmonary Arteriovenous Shunt and Intracardiac Shunt...01October2012-30September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prediction of Susceptibility to Acute Mountain Sickness Using...following organizations have approved our protocol: a) Sacred Heart Medical Center IRB, the review board for Oregon Heart and Vascular Institute; b) Oregon

  19. Changes in the biophysical properties and ultrastructure of lungs, and intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Davies, G C; Millar, A M; Taylor, T V

    1983-01-01

    Using an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in the rat, we have studied changes in the biophysical properties of lungs and intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in this condition. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant decrease in pulmonary compliance (p less than 0.01) and a significant increase in lung weight (p less than 0.01) compared with a control sham operation group. These changes are associated with a 24% increase in intrapulmonary 125I fibrinogen deposition (p less than 0.01), and an 18% increase in 125I fibrinogen deposition per gram of lung tissue (p less than 0.05) in acute pancreatitis, compared with a control sham operation group. The increased fibrinogen deposition is abolished by treatment with low dose heparin. Using the same animal model changes in pulmonary ultrastructure are shown using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that pulmonary abnormalities are associated with intrapulmonary fibrin deposition in experimental acute pancreatitis and these findings may be relevant to the well described respiratory complications of the condition in man. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 PMID:6618271

  20. [Congenital torticollis].

    PubMed

    Wicart, P

    2012-03-01

    Congenital torticollis is a very common postural deformity, characterized by a more or less severe retraction of sternocleidomastoid muscle. Any treatment, else that "good sense" counsels given to the parents, is indicated. The evolution is spontaneously favorable in the majority of cases before the age of one year old. The elimination of differential diagnosis (vertebral and/or neurological malformations, ocular, tumor) is the key-point. Screening of congenital hip dislocation is mandatory because the physiopathology is the same in both diseases. A remaining torticolis after 18 months of age may be an indication to sternocleidomastoid muscle lengthening.

  1. [Congenital epulis].

    PubMed

    Braga-Tavares, H; Santos, H; M-Pinto, I; Ramos, M; de Sousa, P

    2009-01-01

    Congenital epulis or gingival granular cell tumor is an uncommon benign tumor, usually diagnosed at birth as a pediculated maxilar gingival mass. Although some cases of spontaneous regression have been described, most of the lesions are surgically removed with excelent prognosis and cosmetic final result. The authors describe a case report as well as a short revision on this pathology.

  2. Tracheomalacia - congenital

    MedlinePlus

    ... are floppy. Because the windpipe is the main airway, breathing difficulties begin soon after birth. Congenital tracheomalacia is very uncommon. Symptoms Symptoms can range from mild to severe, and may include: Breathing noises that may change with position and improve during ...

  3. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  4. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap."

  5. FISH analysis of intrapulmonary malignant mesothelioma without a clinically detectable primary pleural lesion: an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Sato, Akitoshi; Tsubomizu, Sayuri; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Wu, Di; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-12-01

    Patients with malignant mesothelioma typically present with a pleural effusion or pleural thickening and masses. A rare autopsy case of mesothelioma presenting with multiple bilateral lung nodules without clinically detectable pleural lesions is presented. A definitive diagnosis of the video-assisted thoracic surgery specimen could not be made, though a pattern of fibrosis mimicking organizing pneumonia was identified. Despite corticosteroid therapy, follow-up chest computed tomography showed enlargement of multiple nodules accompanied by the appearance of pleural thickening and effusions. The patient died of respiratory failure 11 months after initial presentation. Autopsy and retrospective analysis of the video-assisted thoracic surgery specimen using a p16 fluorescence in situ hybridization assay showed p16 homozygous deletion. The final diagnosis was sarcomatoid mesothelioma, and the lung nodules were intrapulmonary metastases from a clinically undetectable pleural sarcomatoid mesothelioma. It is important both to consider the possibility of mesothelioma with unusual clinical, radiological and pathological presentations and to remember that p16 fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis can play an important role in the diagnosis of mesothelioma.

  6. Effect of intrapulmonary hematocrit maldistribution on O2, CO2, and inert gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Young, I H; Wagner, P D

    1979-02-01

    The potential effect of intrapulmonary variations in hematocrit on gas exchange has been studied in theoretical models of the lung containing maldistribution of both hematocrit (Hct) and ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) ratio. Hematocrit inequality enhanced gas exchange when units of low VA/Q were given a low Hct, arterial PO2 rising by as much as 14 Torr and PCO2 falling by up to 2 Torr depending on the particular distributions of Hct and VA/Q, whereas gas exchange was depressed when units of low VA/Q had a high Hct. After measuring inert gas solubilities in both dog and human blood of different Hct, the effect of Hct inequality on inert gas exchange was similarly assessed. Solubility was found to increase with HCT for less soluble gases. Because of this, conditions for enhancement of inert and O2 exchange by HCt inequality coincided, and it was found that in general the effects on O2 and inert gas transfer were quantitatively internally consistent. Even when Hct inequality was extreme, the resulting perturbation of inert gas concentrations was sufficiently small that the main features of the recovered VA/Q distributions were unaltered.

  7. Intrapulmonary vascular remodeling: MSCT-based evaluation in COPD and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosnier, Adeline; Fetita, Catalin; Thabut, Gabriel; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-03-01

    Whether COPD is generally known as a small airway disease, recent investigations suggest that vascular remodeling could play a key role in disease progression. This paper develops a specific investigation framework in order to evaluate the remodeling of the intrapulmonary vascular network and its correlation with other image or clinical parameters (emphysema score or FEV1) in patients with smoking- or genetic- (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency - AATD) related COPD. The developed approach evaluates the vessel caliber distribution per lung or lung region (upper, lower, 10%- and 20%- periphery) in relation with the severity of the disease and computes a remodeling marker given by the area under the caliber distribution curve for radii less than 1.6mm, AUC16. It exploits a medial axis analysis in relation with local caliber information computed in the segmented vascular network, with values normalized with respect to the lung volume (for which a robust segmentation is developed). The first results obtained on a 34-patient database (13 COPD, 13 AATD and 8 controls) showed significant vascular remodeling for COPD and AATD versus controls, with a negative correlation with the emphysema degree for COPD, but not for AATD. Significant vascular remodeling at 20% lung periphery was found both for the severe COPD and AATD patients, but not for the moderate groups. Also the vascular remodeling in AATD did not correlate with the FEV1, nor with DLCO, which might suggest independent mechanisms for bronchial and vascular remodeling in the lung.

  8. Congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Kose, Nusret; Campbell, Robert M

    2004-05-01

    The management of congenital scoliosis requires a systematic approach with careful attention to detail. Any fortuitous diagnosis of vertebral anomalies in infancy, even if there is no significant scoliosis at that time on x-ray, requires frequent clinical and radiographic follow-up to detect progression. The presence of associated anomalies of the spinal cord, the kidneys and the heart should be evaluated by MRI, renal ultrasound or IVP, with cardiology evaluation as indicated. Curve progression or severe vertebral anomalies known to cause curve progression require immediate treatment to prevent deformity. Significant thoracic deformity, especially in a patient with thoracic insufficiency syndrome, is best treated with expansion thoracoplasty. The patient with congenital scoliosis requires a long term commitment to care with frequent orthopaedic follow-up throughout the growing years along with routine pulmonary function assessment once the patient is able to cooperate with testing.

  9. [Congenital ranula].

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Inês; Morais, Sofia; Coutinho, Sílvia; de Castro, Ochoa; Rei, Ana Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of congenital ranula diagnosed by a routine prenatal ultrasonography at 21 weeks of gestation. The fetal kariotype was normal. Follow-up ultrasound scans revealed no changes in the size or the position of the cyst. Fetal growth was normal as was the amniotic fluid volume. Surgical treatment was performed 3 days after a normal vaginal delivery, with excellent results.

  10. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure.

  11. [Congenital aniridia].

    PubMed

    Chiruţa, Daria; Stan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Aniridia is a rare congenital, hereditary, bilateral disease which is associated with various systemic and ocular defects. We present the case of a 61 year old patient who was admitted in the hospital of ophthalmology Cluj Napoca, for the symptoms caused by the ocular defects associated with aniridia. In this case, aniridia is autosomal dominant transmitted with incomplete penetrance and it is not accompanied by any systemic defects. The disease also affects three of her sons and two nephews of the patient.

  12. Video-assisted thoracic surgery compared with posterolateral thoracotomy for mediastinal bronchogenic cysts in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenglin; Mei, Jiandong; Liu, Chengwu; Deng, Senyi; Pu, Qiang; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Mediastinal bronchogenic cyst (MBC) is the most common primary cystic lesion of the mediastinum. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) compared with posterolateral thoracotomy (PLT) for the treatment of MBCs in a large series. Methods Patients with MBCs who underwent surgical resection between August 2005 and December 2015 were identified from the electronic database of the Department of Thoracic Surgery, West China Hospital. The patient demographic characteristics, intraoperative findings, postoperative outcomes and follow-up information were reviewed and analyzed. Results A total of 99 patients underwent cystectomy were enrolled for the present study. Of those patients, 65 underwent VATS cystectomy (VATS group) and 34 underwent PLT cystectomy (PLT group) during the same period. The VATS group had shorter operative time than the PLT group (108.77±47.81 vs. 144.62±55.16, P=0.001), less intraoperative blood loss (median 20 vs. 100 mL, P<0.001), and less pleural drainage of the first three days after surgery (median 240 vs. 400 mL, P=0.002). In addition, the length of postoperative hospital stay and duration of chest drainage for the VATS group was also shorter than those of the PLT group (4.94±2.01 vs. 8.64±5.52 days, P=0.001; 2.52±1.29 vs. 3.71±1.55 days, P<0.001, respectively). No statistical significance was revealed among the two groups with regard to the maximum diameter of the cysts, pleural atresia, incomplete resection, surgery-related complications, duration of intensive care unit stay, and postoperative complications. Conclusions Both VATS and PLT are reliable approaches for the surgical resection of MBCs. The VATS approach is superior to PLT with shorter operative time, shorter duration of chest drainage, shorter postoperative hospital stay, less intraoperative blood loss, and less pleural drainage of the first three days after surgery. We conclude that VATS should be the

  13. Temperature effects on CO2-sensitive intrapulmonary chemoreceptors in the lizard, Tupinambis nigropunctatus.

    PubMed

    Douse, M A; Mitchell, G S

    1988-06-01

    Body temperature (Tb) effects on CO2 responses of 17 intrapulmonary chemoreceptors (IPC) were investigated in 9 anesthetized (pentobarbital; 30 mg/kg) and unidirectionally ventilated tegu lizards (Tupinambis nigropunctatus). At 30 degrees C, all IPC (n = 15) had a stable discharge pattern. At 20 degrees C, IPC discharge (n = 14) was stable at high PCO2 but irregular at low PCO2 and often (10/14) consisted of bursts of activity separated by one or more seconds of quiescence. Responses of IPC to static and dynamic changes in PCO2 were quantified at both Tb and the discharge rate vs PCO2 response curves were compared. Static discharge frequency (fSTAT) decreased as PCO2 increased at both Tb. At 20 degrees C: (1) fSTAT was diminished at all PCO2 levels relative to 30 degrees C; and (2) the slope of the fSTAT vs PCO2 relationship was markedly attenuated. The Q10 was 3.7 +/- 0.5 and was independent of PCO2. The peak discharge associated with a step decrease in PCO2 (dynamic response; fDYN) also decreased as PCO2 increased. At 20 degrees C: (1) fDYN was diminished at all PCO2 levels relative to 30 degrees C; but (2) the slope of the fDYN vs PCO2 relationship was similar at both Tb. The Q10 was 2.6 +/- 0.3 and was significantly less than the Q10 of fSTAT (P less than 0.05). Acute changes in Tb exert large effects on the CO2 response and discharge pattern of IPC; these effects on IPC may be important in ventilatory control at different Tb in lizards.

  14. Micron-sized intrapulmonary particle deposition in the developing rat lung.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Holger; Eder, Gunter; Bolle, Ines; Tsuda, Akira; Karrasch, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of postnatal developmental changes in lung architecture and breathing patterns on intrapulmonary particle deposition. We measured deposition in the developing Wistar-Kyoto rat, whose lung development largely parallels that of humans. Deposition of 2-μm sebacate particles was determined in anesthetized, intubated, spontaneously breathing rats on postnatal days (P) 7 to 90 by aerosol photometry (Karrasch S, Eder G, Bolle I, Tsuda A, Schulz H. J Appl Physiol 107: 1293-1299, 2009). Respiratory parameters were determined by body plethysmography. Tidal volume increased substantially from P7 (0.19 ml) to P90 (2.1 ml) while respiratory rate declined from 182 to 107/min. Breath-specific deposition was lowest (9%) at P7 and P90 and markedly higher at P35 (almost 16%). Structural changes of the alveolar region include a ninefold increase in surface area (Bolle I, Eder G, Takenaka S, Ganguly K, Karrasch S, Zeller C, Neuner M, Kreyling WG, Tsuda A, Schulz H. J Appl Physiol 104: 1167-1176, 2008). Particle deposition per unit of time and surface area peaked at P35 and showed a minimum at P90. At an inhaled particle number concentration of 10(5)/cm(3), there was an estimated 450, 690, and 330 particles/(min × cm(2)) at P7, P35, and P90, respectively. Multiple regression models showed that deposition depends on the mean linear intercept as structural component and the breathing parameters, tidal volume, and respiratory rate (r(2) > 0.9). In conclusion, micron-sized particle deposition was dependent on the stage of postnatal lung development. A maximum was observed during late alveolarization (P35), which corresponds to human lungs of about eight years of age. Children at this age may therefore be more susceptible to micron-sized airborne environmental health hazards.

  15. Effect of engineered nanoparticles on vasomotor responses in rat intrapulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, Arnaud; Andujar, Pascal; Ladeiro, Yannick; Ducret, Thomas; Rogerieux, Francoise; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Baudrimont, Isabelle; Guibert, Christelle; Roux, Etienne; Canal-Raffin, Mireille; Brochard, Patrick; Marano, Francelyne; Marthan, Roger; Muller, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary circulation could be one of the primary vascular targets of finest particles that can deeply penetrate into the lungs after inhalation. We investigated the effects of engineered nanoparticles on vasomotor responses of small intrapulmonary arteries using isometric tension measurements. Acute in vitro exposure to carbon nanoparticles (CNP) decreased, and in some case abolished, the vasomotor responses induced by several vasoactive agents, whereas acute exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}NP) did not. This could be attributed to a decrease in the activity of those vasoactive agents (including PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, serotonin, endothelin-1 and acetylcholine), as suggested when they were exposed to CNP before being applied to arteries. Also, CNP decreased the contraction induced by 30 mM KCl, without decreasing its activity. After endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores depletion (by caffeine and thapsigargin), CaCl{sub 2} addition induced a contraction, dependent on Store-Operated Calcium Channels that was not modified by acute CNP exposure. Further addition of 30 mM KCl elicited a contraction, originating from activation of Voltage-Operated Calcium Channels that was diminished by CNP. Contractile responses to PGF{sub 2{alpha}} or KCl, and relaxation to acetylcholine were modified neither in pulmonary arteries exposed in vitro for prolonged time to CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP, nor in those removed from rats intratracheally instilled with CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP. In conclusion, prolonged in vitro or in vivo exposure to CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP does not affect vasomotor responses of pulmonary arteries. However, acute exposure to CNP decreases contraction mediated by activation of Voltage-Operated, but not Store-Operated, Calcium Channels. Moreover, interaction of some vasoactive agents with CNP decreases their biological activity that might lead to misinterpretation of experimental data.

  16. Relaxation of intrapulmonary artery and vein by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Ignarro, L.J.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present study examines the relationship between tissue cyclic nucleotide levels and relaxation of bovine intrapulmonary arterial and venous smooth muscle in response to nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and isoproterenol. Recent studies have suggested that cyclic GMP may be involved in the relaxation of vascular smooth muscle produced by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and that S-nitrosothiols may act as intermediates of the latter agents. In the present study, nitroglycerin, nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine were more potent as relaxants of venous than arterial segments. Each of these agents elevated tissue cyclic GMP levels, but not cyclic AMP levels, before relaxation. These nitrogen oxide-containing agents were more potent as elevators of cyclic GMP levels in venous than arterial tissue and this correlated generally with their effects on vascular smooth muscle tone. Methylene blue antagonized both relaxation and increased cyclic GMP levels elicited by nitroglycerin, nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. In contrast to the nitrogen oxide vasodilators, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP was equally effective in reducing induced tone in arterial or venous segments. Similarly, isoproterenol relaxed arterial and venous segments with equivalent sensitivities. Relaxation by isoproterenol was preceded by or occurred concomitantly with increased levels of cyclic AMP but not cyclic GMP and both effects were antagonized by propranolol. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that vascular smooth muscle relaxation in response to nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators or isoproterenol may be mediated or modulated by the intracellular accumulation of cyclic GMP or cyclic AMP, respectively.

  17. Rapid progression of intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting in polysplenia syndrome associated with biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takuya; Hasegawa, Toshimichi; Sasaki, Takashi; Okada, Akira; Mushiake, Sotarou

    2003-06-01

    This report describes a patient with biliary atresia (BA) associated with polysplenia syndrome who showed a rapid progression of intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting (IPS), resulting in a fatal outcome. Intrauterine ultrasonography at 36 weeks of gestation revealed fetal abnormalities, including situs inversus, absent retrohepatic inferior vena cava, and azygous connection. She was diagnosed postnatally as BA because of persistent acholic stool and neonatal jaundice. She underwent hepatic portoenterostomy at age 158 days. The gallbladder and the hepatic ducts were hypoplastic, and the common bile duct was absent. Magnetic resonance image and operative findings also identified polysplenia and an absent portal trunk. Liver histology showed cirrhotic changes and bile duct proliferation. Postoperatively, she achieved good bile secretion, with gradual decrease of total bilirubin. However, she had repeated febrile episodes, and computerized tomography at age 7 months showed multiple liver cysts. Thereafter, she presented with exertional dyspnea. Contrast-enhanced echocardiography showed IPS with a degree of 2/III at age 8 months and 3/III at 10 months. (99m)Technetium-labeled macroaggregated albumin ((99m)Tc-MAA) scintigraphy revealed a shunt ratio of 25.5% at 9 months and 39.7% at 10 months. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the bile cysts was performed without success. Sludged bile was obtained. However, respiratory distress rapidly progressed, and she died at age 11 months. In the present patient, the association of polysplenia syndrome and absent portal vein with BA, as well as liver cirrhosis, seemed to be contributing factors to rapid progression of IPS in early life.

  18. Sequential assessment of pulmonary epithelial diethylene triamine penta-acetate clearance and intrapulmonary transferrin accumulation during Escherichia coli peritonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizaka, A.; Stephens, K.E.; Segall, G.M.; Hatherill, J.R.; McDougall, I.R.; Wu, Z.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The individual roles of pulmonary capillary endothelial and alveolar epithelial permeability in the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are unclear. We developed a method for the sequential assessment of pulmonary macromolecule accumulation and small solute clearance in vivo using a gamma camera. We measured the exponential clearance coefficient of 111In-labeled diethylene triamine penta-acetate (111In-DTPA) to assess airway clearance of small solutes. We also calculated the exponential equilibration coefficient of 111In-labeled transferrin (111In-TF) to assess intrapulmonary accumulation of transferrin. We determined these parameters in guinea pigs with Escherichia coli peritonitis and compared them with a saline-treated control group, oleic-acid-treated groups, and a group treated with low molecular weight dextran Ringer solution. The pulmonary DTPA clearance and the intrapulmonary transferrin accumulation were significantly increased in the peritonitis group (29.4 +/- 8.2 x 10(-3) min-1, p less than 0.02, and 15.1 +/- 3.1 x 10(-3) min-1, p less than 0.02) when compared with the control group (3.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-3) min-1 and 4.5 +/- 0.5 x 10(-3) min-1). These changes developed within 5.5 h of the initial insult. Neither increased extravascular lung water nor elevated pulmonary artery and left atrial pressures were detected in the peritonitis group. The low molecular weight dextran Ringer group did not show a significant increase in the pulmonary DTPA clearance and the intrapulmonary transferrin accumulation.

  19. Congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Kunisaki, Shaun M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have emerged as a novel, experimental approach for the treatment of a wide variety of congenital anomalies diagnosed either in utero or postnatally. There are a number of unique properties of amniotic fluid stem cells that have allowed it to become a major research focus. These include the relative ease of accessing amniotic fluid cells in a minimally invasive fashion by amniocentesis as well as the relatively rich population of progenitor cells obtained from a small aliquot of fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells, c-kit positive stem cells, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells have all been derived from human amniotic fluid in recent years. This article gives a pediatric surgeon’s perspective on amniotic fluid stem cell therapy for the management of congenital anomalies. The current status in the use of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, particularly as they relate as substrates in tissue engineering-based applications, is described in various animal models. A roadmap for further study and eventual clinical application is also proposed. PMID:22986340

  20. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  1. [New surgical approach "intrapulmonary septation technic" for Fontan candidates with unilateral pulmonary arterial hypoplasia and/or pulmonary venous obstruction].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K; Nishioka, M; Fujimoto, K; Ohta, N; Murata, M; Nakada, T; Sekine, Y; Yokota, M

    2003-04-01

    Unilateral pulmonary arterial hypoplasia and/or pulmonary venous obstruction are serious hazards for Fontan candidates. For these patients, we have started new surgical approach "intrapulmonary septation technic". This consists of 3 components; (A) partial right heart bypass to well-grown side, (B) mandatory pulmonary blood flow to low-capacity side, (aorto-pulmonary shunt or others) and (C) a patch between partial right heart bypass and mandatory pulmonary blood flow. Thirteen patients underwent the approach. The source of partial right heart bypass was brought from superior vena cava (11 patients), inferior vena cava (1 patient) and fenestrated Fontan (1 patient). The mandatory pulmonary blood flow was supplied by aorto-pulmonary shunt (11 patients), pulmonary arterial banding (1 patient) and native pulmonary valve stenosis (1 patient). We added pulmonary artery enlargement (9 patients), release of pulmonary venous obstruction (8 patients) and/or atrio-ventricular valve plasty (5 patients), simultaneously. No hospital death. Early post-operative course was uneventful in all cases except 1, as pulmonary blood flow to low-capacity side had increased gradually after this intervention. Eight patients had reached Fontan operation. In this approach, nearly whole pulmonary artery can grow without any affect of volume overload through well-grown side from collateral arteries of low-capacity side. All procedures of "intrapulmonary septation technic" and reconstruction of pulmonary artery in Fontan operation can be easily performed in larger pulmonary artery of well-grown side, eliminating need for extensive dissection.

  2. Expression of the atrial natriuretic peptide gene in the cardiac muscle of rat extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary veins.

    PubMed Central

    Springall, D R; Bhatnagar, M; Wharton, J; Hamid, Q; Gulbenkian, S; Hedges, M; Meleagros, L; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M

    1988-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is a peptide regulating salt and water balance, originally isolated from the cardiac atrium, where it is synthesised as part of a precursor molecule in specialised myocardial cells. The myocardium extends into the extrapulmonary part of the pulmonary veins in many species, including man. In some small mammals, however, such as the rat, mouse, and bat, it extends further to veins in the peripheral parts of the lung. Since this myocardial layer is continuous with that in the atrium, we have looked for the possible expression of the atrial natriuretic peptide gene in this tissue in rats. Strong immunoreactivity was seen for both the peptide and the N terminal sequence (cardiodilatin) of its precursor in extrapulmonary veins and in intrapulmonary veins extending into the lung as far as the second branching point, where it was localised in the dense cored granules by electron microscopy; in situ hybridisation showed atrial natriuretic peptide messenger RNA at identical sites. Chromatography and radioimmunoassay of extracts of extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary veins showed most of the atrial natriuretic peptide immunoreactivity to be in the uncleaved (precursor molecule) form. Thus the peptide is synthesised in veins both outside and inside the lung, and these extra-atrial sites may be an important additional source of circulating atrial natriuretic peptide. Images PMID:2965426

  3. Assessment of the intrapulmonary ventilation-perfusion distribution after the Fontan procedure for complex cardiac anomalies: Relation to pulmonary hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, T.; Matsuda, H.; Ogawa, M.; Ohno, K.; Sano, T.; Nakano, S.; Shimazaki, Y.; Nakahara, K.; Arisawa, J.; Kozuka, T. )

    1990-03-15

    In 12 patients who underwent the Fontan procedure for complex cardiac anomalies, lung scanning with xenon-133 was performed to assess the intrapulmonary ventilation-perfusion distribution, and comparison was made with a control group. All data were then analyzed in relation to either pre- or postoperative pulmonary hemodynamic data. In ventilation scans, the intrapulmonary distribution in the right lung was almost normal. In perfusion scans, an abnormal increased upper to lower lobe perfusion ratio greater than the normal value found in the control group was noted in seven patients (58.3%). There was a significant correlation (p less than 0.02) between the upper to lower lobe perfusion ratio and postoperative pulmonary vascular resistance. Furthermore, this perfusion ratio correlated inversely with the preoperative (p less than 0.005) and postoperative (p less than 0.02) right pulmonary artery area index, defined as the ratio of cross-sectional area to the normal value. Of five patients with less than 90% arterial oxygen saturation, four showed an abnormal distribution of pulmonary blood flow greater than the normal perfusion ratio. No patient had evidence of a pulmonary arteriovenous fistula by the echocardiographic contrast study. These results suggest that abnormal distribution of pulmonary blood flow to the upper lung segment may develop in patients after the Fontan procedure, and that insufficient size of the pulmonary artery before operation and the consequent postoperative elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance may be responsible for this perfusion abnormality.

  4. Ultrastructure of nerve endings and synaptic junctions in rabbit intrapulmonary neuroepithelial bodies: a single and serial section analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lauweryns, J M; Van Lommel, A

    1987-01-01

    This study on the innervation of rabbit intrapulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEB) was undertaken to obtain more information about the detailed ultrastructure of morphologically afferent and efferent intracorpuscular NEB nerve endings, the extent to which they are in cytoplasmic continuity with one another, and the structure of the synaptic junctions they form with the NEB corpuscular cells. As in earlier studies, NEB exhibit intracorpuscular nerve endings containing predominantly either mitochondria (morphologically afferent) or synaptic vesicles (morphologically efferent). Both types of nerve endings form synaptic junctions with the NEB corpuscular cells, arranged so that a NEB corpuscular cell is the presynaptic element and the nerve ending the postsynaptic element. This arrangement implies that NEB can transmit nerve impulses to the central nervous system, thus arguing in favour of their hypothetical neuroreceptor function. Moreover, on serial sections, the morphologically afferent and efferent intracorpuscular nerve endings are often found in cytoplasmic continuity. Hence, transduction of stimuli in the NEB implies concomitant efferent modulation of the NEB corpuscular cells. In conclusion, intrapulmonary NEB apparently function as neuroreceptors that are locally modulated by axon reflexes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 (cont.) Fig. 6 (cont.) Fig. 6 PMID:3654362

  5. A program for calculation of intrapulmonary shunts, blood-gas and acid-base values with a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, B C; Tucker, W K; Kirby, R R

    1975-01-01

    With a desk-top, programmable calculator, it is now possible to do complex, previously time-consuming computations in the blood-gas laboratory. The authors have developed a program with the necessary algorithms for temperature correction of blood gases and calculation of acid-base variables and intrapulmonary shunt. It was necessary to develop formulas for the Po2 temperature-correction coefficient, the oxyhemoglobin-dissociation curve for adults (withe necessary adjustments for fetal blood), and changes in water vapor pressure due to variation in body temperature. Using this program in conjuction with a Monroe 1860-21 statistical programmable calculator, it is possible to temperature-correct pH,Pco2, and Po2. The machine will compute alveolar-arterial oxygen tension gradient, oxygen saturation (So2), oxygen content (Co2), actual HCO minus 3 and a modified base excess. If arterial blood and mixed venous blood are obtained, the calculator will print out intrapulmonary shunt data (Qs/Qt) and arteriovenous oxygen differences (a minus vDo2). There also is a formula to compute P50 if pH,Pco2,Po2, and measured So2 from two samples of tonometered blood (one above 50 per cent and one below 50 per cent saturation) are put into the calculator.

  6. Stability of Markers Used for Real-Time Tumor Tracking After Percutaneous Intrapulmonary Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Water, Steven van de; Levendag, Peter C.; Holt, Bronno van der; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the stability of markers used for real-time tumor tracking after percutaneous intrapulmonary placement. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with 44 lesions, 111 markers, and {>=}2 repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were studied. The tumor on the repeat CT scans was registered with the tumor on the planning CT scan. Next, the three-dimensional marker coordinates were determined on the planning CT scan and repeat CT scans. Marker stability was analyzed by the displacement of the markers and the displacement of the center of mass (COM) of the marker configurations. In addition, we assessed the reliability of using the intermarker distance as a check for displacements in the COM of the marker configurations. Results: The median marker displacement was 1.3 mm (range, 0.1-53.6). The marker displacement was >5 mm in 12% of the markers and >10 mm in 5% of the markers. The causes of marker displacement >5 mm included marker migration (2 of 13) and target volume changes (5 of 13). Nonsynchronous tumor and marker movement during breathing might have been responsible for the displacements >5 mm in the other 6 of 13 markers. The median displacement in the COM of the marker configurations was 1.0 mm (range, 0.1-23.3). Displacements in the COM of the marker configurations of {>=}2.0 mm were detected by changes in the intermarker distance of >1.5 mm in 96% of the treatment fractions. Conclusion: The median marker displacement was small (1.3 mm). Nevertheless, displacements >5 mm occurred in 12% of the markers. Therefore, we recommend the implantation of multiple markers because multiple markers will enable a quick and reliable check of marker displacement by determining the change in the intermarker distance. A displacement in the COM of the marker configuration of {>=}2.0 mm was almost always detected (96%) by a change in the distance between the markers of >1.5 mm. This enabled the displaced marker to be disabled, such that tumor localization

  7. Single-dose intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of azithromycin, clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and cefuroxime in volunteer subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Conte, J E; Golden, J; Duncan, S; McKenna, E; Lin, E; Zurlinden, E

    1996-01-01

    The intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of azithromycin, clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and cefuroxime were studied in 68 volunteers who received single, oral doses of azithromycin (0.5 g), clarithormycin (0.5 g), ciprofloxacin (0.5 g), or cefuroxime (0.5 g). In subgroups of four subjects each, the subjects underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage at timed intervals following drug administration. Drug concentrations, including those of 14-hydroxyclarithromycin (14H), were determined in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and alveolar cells (ACs) by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Concentrations in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were calculated by the urea diffusion method. The maximum observed concentrations (mean +/- standard deviation) of azithromycin, clarithromycin, 14H, ciprofloxacin, and cefuroxime in serum were 0.13 +/- 0.07, 1.0 +/- 0.6, 0.60 +/- 0.41, 0.95 +/- 0.32, and 1.1 +/- 0.3 microgram/ml, respectively (all at 6 h). None of the antibiotics except clarithromycin (39.6 +/- 41.1 micrograms/ml) was detectable in ELF at the 6-h bronchoscopy. The movement into and persistence in cells was different for azithromycin and clarithromycin. In ACs azithromycin was not detectable at 6 h, reached its highest concentration at 120 h, and exhibited the greatest area under the curve (7,403 micrograms.hr ml-1). The peak concentration of clarithromycin (181 +/- 94.1 micrograms/ml) was greater and occurred earlier (6 h), but the area under the curve (2,006 micrograms.hr ml-1) was less than that observed for azithromycin. 14H was detectable in ACs at 6 h (40.3 +/- 5.2 micrograms/ml) and 12 h (32.8 +/- 57.2 micrograms/ml). The peak concentration of ciprofloxacin occurred at 6 h (4.3 +/- 5.2 micrograms/ml), and the area under the curve was 35.0 micrograms.hr ml-1. The data indicate that after the administration of a single dose, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and ciprofloxacin penetrated into ACs in therapeutic concentrations and that only clarithromycin was

  8. Novel intrapulmonary model for orthotopic propagation of human lung cancers in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    McLemore, T L; Liu, M C; Blacker, P C; Gregg, M; Alley, M C; Abbott, B J; Shoemaker, R H; Bohlman, M E; Litterst, C C; Hubbard, W C

    1987-10-01

    A major impediment to the study of human lung cancer pathophysiology, as well as to the discovery and development of new specific antitumor agents for the treatment of lung cancer, has been the lack of appropriate experimental animal models. This paper describes a new model for the propagation of human lung tumor cells in the bronchioalveolar regions of the right lungs of athymic NCr-nu/nu mice via an intrabronchial (i.b.) implantation procedure. Over 1000 i.b. implantations have been performed to date, each requiring 3 to 5 min for completion and having a surgery-related mortality of approximately 5%. The model was used successfully for the orthotopic propagation of four established human lung cancer cell lines including: an adenosquamous cell carcinoma (NCI-H125); an adenocarcinoma (A549); a large cell undifferentiated carcinoma (NCI-H460), and a bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma (NCI-H358). When each of the four cell lines was implanted i.b. using a 1.0 X 10(6) tumor cell inoculum, 100 +/- 0% (SD) tumor-related mortality was observed within 9 to 61 days. In contrast, when the conventional s.c. method for implantation was used at the same tumor cell inoculum, only minimal (2.5 +/- 5%) tumor-related mortality was observed within 140 days (P less than 0.001). Similarly, when a 1.0 X 10(5) or 1.0 X 10(4) cell inoculum was used, a dose-dependent, tumor-related mortality was observed when cells were implanted i.b. (56 +/- 24% or 25 +/- 17%) as compared with the s.c. method (5 +/- 5.7% or 0.0 +/- 0%) (P less than 0.02 and P less than 0.05, respectively). Most (greater than 90%) of the lung tumors propagated by i.b. implantation were localized to the right lung fields as documented by necropsy and/or high-resolution chest roentgenography techniques which were developed for these studies. The intrapulmonary model was also used for establishment and propagation of xenografts derived directly from enzymatically digested, fresh human lung tumor specimens obtained at the

  9. Congenital anomalies associated with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Dott, B; Alembik, Y; Koehl, C

    1999-01-01

    The French national neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) was initiated in 1978. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the incidence of congenital extrathyroid anomalies (ETAs) among the infants with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and to compare it with the Northeastern France Birth Defect Monitoring System data from 1979 to 1996. Among 129 CH infants on whom adequate data were available, 20 infants (15.5%) had associated congenital anomalies. Eight out of 76 infants with persistent CH had ETAs (10.5%) whereas 12 out of 53 children with transient hypothyroidism had ETAs (22.6%, p < 0.05). Some additional anomalies were considerably more common than in the general population. Nine infants had congenital cardiac anomalies (6.9%). This rises the question if teratogenic effects active during organogenesis may affect simultaneously many organs, including the developing thyroid, causing a relatively high percentage of CH infants with congenital ETAs.

  10. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  11. Intrapulmonary arteries respond to serotonin and adenosine triphosphate in broiler chickens susceptible to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kluess, H A; Stafford, J; Evanson, K W; Stone, A J; Worley, J; Wideman, R F

    2012-06-01

    This study examined factors contributing to increased vascular resistance and plexiform lesion formation in broiler chickens susceptible to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). A diet supplemented with excess tryptophan (high-Trp diet), the precursor for serotonin, was used to accelerate the development of IPAH. Broilers fed the high-Trp diet had higher pulmonary arterial pressures than broilers fed the control diet, and plexiform lesion incidences tended to be higher (P = 0.11) in the high-Trp group than in the control group at 30 d of age. The intrapulmonary arteries were assessed for vasoconstriction in response to serotonin and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and for activities of key metabolic enzymes for serotonin and ATP. The pulmonary artery (defined as the first major branch of the pulmonary artery inside the lung) and the primary pulmonary arterial rami (defined as the second major branch of the pulmonary artery inside the lung) both exhibited vasoconstriction in response to serotonin and ATP. This is the first study to demonstrate purinergic-mediated vasoconstriction in intrapulmonary arteries from broilers. Arteriole responsiveness did not differ between broilers fed the control diet or the high-Trp diet. Therefore, the high-Trp diet enhanced the development of IPAH but did not affect the artery's sensitivity to serotonin or ATP. Monoamine oxidase activity, responsible for the breakdown of serotonin, was severely impaired in pulmonary arteries from broilers in the high-Trp group. Accordingly, serotonin may persist longer and elicit an amplified response in broilers fed the high-Trp diet.

  12. Intrapulmonary uptake, disposition, and n-nitrosamine formation with ventilation of nitrogen dioxide in isolated rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Postlethwait, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The pulmonary uptake, transformation, and nitrosation ability of inhaled NO/sub 2/ were studied using an isolated perfused rat lung (IPL) preparation. Initially, NO/sub 2/ uptake and transformation, determined as NO/sub 2//sup -/ in perfusing medium (PM), as a function of dose were examined by altering either the inspired concentration (IC) or minute ventilation (MV). Both uptake and transformation were proportional to IC (4-20 ppm; 100 ml MV) and MV (45-130 ml; 5 ppm IC). Mean data showed linear correlations between total dose and uptake and transformation. Fractional uptake was 66%, and of the absorbed NO/sub 2/, 55% appeared as PM NO/sub 2//sup -/, regardless of the dose. NO/sub 2/ and its transformation product NO/sub 2//sup -/ are known to nitrosate amines in vitro. It was therefore determined if intrapulmonary nitrosation occurred during NO/sub 2/ inhalation and amine administration (10mM morphline in PM). N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) formation occurred in PM during NO/sub 2//sup -/ addition, was dose-dependent on NO/sub 2//sup -/, and partitioned evenly between lung and PM. NO/sub 2/ ventilation produced NMOR in both lung tissue and PM; NMOR content was greater with 20 ppm than with 9 ppm exposures. Maximum NMOR formation accounted for only 0.0008% of the morpholine. However, NO/sub 2/ exposure produced high tissue concentrations of NMOR with partitioning heavily in favor of lung. The results indicate that ventilation of IPL with NO/sub 2/ resulted in nitrosation of an amine in both the intrapulmonary and PM compartments.

  13. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  14. [Genetics of congenital cardiopathies].

    PubMed

    Moreno García, M; Gómez Rodríguez, M J; Barreiro Miranda, E

    2000-07-01

    Congenital heart malformations are the most common of all birth defects, affecting 0.5-1% of all live births. Some of these malformations are due to genetic anomalies. Patterns of autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance have been described. Mitochondrial inheritance and chromosomal anomalies can also be responsible for congenital heart malformations. Several genes for congenital heart defects have been identified. We review current knowledge on the genetic etiology of congenital heart disease.

  15. Tc-99m MAA total-body imaging to detect intrapulmonary right-to-left shunts and to evaluate the therapeutic effect in pulmonary arteriovenous shunts.

    PubMed

    Lu, G; Shih, W J; Chou, C; Xu, J Y

    1996-03-01

    The appearance of radiotracer in the systemic circulation to document the visualization of the brain, kidneys, and spleen after intravenous administration of Tc-99m MAA indicates right-to-left shunts because MAA particles (20-60 microns) are supposedly trapped in the pulmonary bed (less than 15 microns). Six hypoxemia patients (1 male, 5 females; age range, 12-52 years) with intrapulmonary right-to-left shunts were evaluated by Tc-99m MAA dynamic perfusion imaging and total-body scans. Tc-99m MAA total-body imaging of the six patients with intrapulmonary right-to-left shunts (3 patients with chronic liver disease/cirrhosis of the liver and 3 patients with pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae) revealed significant radiotracer uptake in extrapulmonary organs such as the brain, kidneys, and spleen; a shunt ratio, estimated by a semiquantitative method, ranged from 17.8% to 52%. All dynamic pulmonary perfusion scans showed a normal sequence of cardiopulmonary flow without intracardiac shunts. Three patients with pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae underwent a second Tc-99m MAA total-body imaging after embolization therapy (2 patients) or lobectomy (1 patient). The result in lobectomized patients were negative for uptake in extrapulmonary organs; the two patients who underwent embolization therapy demonstrated only mild improvement. As a consequence of these findings, the authors conclude that Tc-99m MAA total-body imaging can be used for the diagnosis of intrapulmonary right-to-left shunts, as well as for the evaluation of postshunt therapy.

  16. Chemoimmunotherapy of small cell bronchogenic carcinoma with VP-16-213, ifosfamide, vincristine, adriamycin, and Corynebacterium parvum

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivieso, M.; Tenczynski, T.F.; Rodriguez, V.; Burgess, M.A.; Mountain, C.F.; Barkley, H.T. Jr.; Hersh, E.M.; Bodey, G.P.

    1981-07-15

    Thirty-five consecutive patients with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma (SCBC) received chemoimmunotherapy with VP-16-213, Ifosfamide, vincristine, Adriamycin, and Corynebacterium parvum. Of 33 evaluable patients, 26 (79%) responded with complete (55%) or partial (24%) remissions. Complete remissions were more common among patients with limited disease (11/14 patients, 79%) compared with those with extensive disease (7/19 patients, 37%) and among patients (11/14 patients, 79%) compared with those with extensive disease (7/19 patients, 37%) and among patients who were ambulatory prior to therapy (16/25 patients, 64%) compared with those who were nonambulatory (2/8 patients, 25%). Myelosuppression consisted primarily of neutropenia. Eight percent of the treatment courses in 29% of the patients were associated with hematuria and/or documented episodes of infection during neutropenia. There were three deaths possibly related to treatment, in two of which there was no evidence of disease at post-mortem examination. Six patients relapsed in the central nervous system (CNS). In four instances, CNS relapse was the only site of tumor progression. Central nervous system relapse was more common among evaluable patients who did not receive prophylactic brain irradiation (5/17 patients, 29%, vs. 1/15 patients, 7%; P . 0.23). The median survival duration for all patients was 63 weeks, being slightly longer for patients with limited disease than for those with extensive disease (70.9 weeks vs. 56 weeks; P . 0.18). This was also true for patients who achieved complete rather than partial remissions (71 weeks vs. 50 weeks; P . 0.09). Patients receiving prophylactic brain irradiation experienced longer survival (100.8 weeks vs. 48 weeks; P . 0.01).

  17. Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with congenital cervical dislocation: report of an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Wada, Kyosuke; Koyama, Takashi; Kohno, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hida, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is an uncommon congenital anomaly that is characterized by abnormal fusion of the cervical vertebrae and occasionally accompanied by various anomalies of other bones and internal organs. We report the autopsy case of a 5-year-old girl with this syndrome ssociated with congenital cervical dislocation, with special reference to the pathological findings of the vertebral column and spinal cord. Principal anomalies of the cranio-spinal axis were as follows: partial defect of the clivus, scoliosis, hypoplasia of the whole cervical vertebrae, anterior dislocation of C7 with S-shaped deformity of the spinal canal, fusion of the spinous processes of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae, fusion of the vertebral bodies of C6 and C7 with collapse of C7, and spina bifida occulta of L5 and S1. In addition to these skeletal anomalies, subarachnoid vascular malformation in the medulla oblongata, a bronchogenic cyst in the posterior mediastinum, anomalous lobation of the lungs, and the mobile cecum were found at autopsy. The cervical cord showed an increase of the antero-posterior diameter, multifocal spongy changes of the white matter, and partial branching or duplication of the central canal. The brain showed features of anoxic encephalopathy. The partial defect of the clivus, C7 dislocation, and various lesions of the medulla oblongata and cervical cord were interpreted as integral components of, or lesions closely associated with, Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  18. Congenital defects of sheep.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S M

    1993-03-01

    With increasing incrimination of viruses, plants, and drugs as causes of ovine congenital defects, concerted efforts are required to identify environmental teratogens. Expanding knowledge of congenital defects requires studying as many defective lambs as possible; recording and documenting; detailed diagnostic examinations; genetic analyses and chromosomal examinations, whenever possible; and field investigations. Adopting standardized classification, terminology, and diagnostic procedures should improve descriptions, diagnoses, and interdisciplinary exchange of information. That, in turn, should improve our knowledge of and diagnosis of congenital defects of sheep in the future. Finally, veterinary clinicians and diagnosticians are encouraged to take an interest in congenital defects and teratology.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  20. Multifocal Congenital Hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Robl, Renata; Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Uber, Marjorie; Lichtvan, Leniza Costa Lima; Werner, Betina; Mehrdad Nadji, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with less aggressive behavior and a more favorable prognosis than similar tumors in adults. Multifocal presentation is even less common than isolated HPC and hence its clinical and histologic recognition may be challenging. A newborn infant with multifocal congenital HPC causing severe deformity but with a favorable outcome after chemotherapy and surgical removal is reported.

  1. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  2. Localization of keratin mRNA in human tracheobronchial epithelium and bronchogenic carcinomas by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Obara, T.; Baba, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Fuchs, E.; Resau, J. H.; Trump, B. F.; Klein-Szanto, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    An in situ hybridization technique was applied to detect expression of keratin mRNAs in xenotransplanted human tracheobronchial epithelium and lung carcinomas. Tissues from eight tracheas repopulated with cells from five different noncancerous donors and 15 squamous cell carcinomas were used. Using a K6 (56 kd) human keratin cDNA (KA-1) and a K14 (50 kd) cDNA (KB-2) as probes, radiolabeled by nick-translation with 3H-dATP/TTP, the specificity and significant differences in the levels of silver grains on various epithelial lesions in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were demonstrated. In situ hybridization with either KA-1 or KB-2 probe showed similar localization of silver grains in all histologic types in consecutive tissue sections. In xenotransplanted tracheobronchial epithelia, very few grains were seen over cells of simple, pseudostratified, or stratified epithelia two to three cell layers thick. Nonkeratinizing stratified hyperplastic epithelia of more than three cell layers showed uniform localization of numerous grains throughout the lesions. In contrast, epidermoid metaplasias exhibited a dense and localized pattern of grains on the basal and parabasal cell layers with a decrease in grain density toward the surface layers. Carcinoma cells from bronchogenic squamous cell carcinomas showed a higher density and more uniform localization of grains. Well-differentiated carcinoma cells contained more keratin mRNAs than moderately to poorly differentiated carcinoma cells. This evidence obtained with the KA-1 and KB-2 probes demonstrates the different localization patterns of keratin mRNAs in different epithelial lesions. In addition, the levels of mRNA expressed show a positive correlation with the degree of squamous differentiation. It was of particular interest that an ordered program of keratin mRNA expression proportional to the level of cellular differentiation was observed in epidermoid metaplasias. Both of these probes serve as

  3. Intrapulmonary Vascular Dilatation Evaluated by 99mTc-MAA Scintigraphy and Its Association with Portal Hypertension in Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    de Queirós, Andréa Simone Siqueira; Brandão, Simone Cristina Soares; Domingues, Ana Lúcia Coutinho; Macedo, Liana Gonçalves; Ourem, Maira Souto; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background Portal hypertension is responsible for various complications in patients with schistosomiasis, among them intrapulmonary vascular dilations (IPVD). In cirrhotic patients the presence of IPVD is a sign of poor prognosis, but in patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis (HSS) there are no studies assessing the significance of this change. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of IPVD through 99mTc-MAA scintigraphy in patients with HSS and its relationship with clinical, laboratory, endoscopic and ultrasound parameters. Methods Cross-sectional study evaluating 51 patients with HSS. Patients were diagnosed with IPVD when the brain uptake of 99mTc-MAA was higher than 6%. Subsequently, they were divided according to presence (G1) or absence (G2) of IPVD and variables were compared between groups. Results Overall, 51 patients with mean age of 56±12 years were assessed. IPVD was observed in 31 patients (60%). There was no statistically significant differences between groups when clinical, laboratory and endoscopic parameters were compared. Regarding ultrasound parameters, the splenic vein diameter was smaller in G1 (0.9±0.3 cm) compared to G2 (1.2±0.4 cm), p = 0.029. Conclusion In patients with HSS, the occurrence of IPVD by 99mTc-MAA scintigraphy was high and was associated with lower splenic vein diameter, which can be a mechanism of vascular protection against portal hypertension. However, more studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of the early diagnosis and natural evolution of IPVD in this population. PMID:24967578

  4. Short term exposure to NO sup 2 decreases intrapulmonary killing of Mycoplasma pulmonis by damaging alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.K.; Davidson, M.K.; Schoeb, T.R.; Lindsey, J.R. Veteran Administration Medical Center, Birmingham, AL )

    1991-03-11

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of pathogen free C57BL/6N mice to 5 or 10 ppm of NO{sub 2} increased severity of murine respiratory mycoplasmosis and that this effect was associated with decreased intrapulmonary killing (IPK) of Mycoplasma pulmonis (MP). The purposes of the present studies were to titrate the NO{sub 2} effect and to determine if the changes in IPK were due to the effects of NO{sub 2} on alveolar macrophages. Exposure to less than 5 ppm NO{sub 2} had no effect on IPK of MP. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells killed MP in vitro only if they were allowed to associate with mycoplasmas in vivo. Prior exposure to NO{sub 2} abrogated killing in this in vivo-in vitro model. Exposure to NO{sub 2} did not increase the protein content of BAL within 24 hours. Greater than 95% of the BAL cells were macrophages, and greater than 98% of the cell-associated mycoplasmas were on or in alveolar macrophages. Immediately after exposure, viability of alveolar macrophages, as measured by trypan blue exclusion and fluorescein diacetate uptake, was 89 {plus minus} 4% and 88 {plus minus} 4% in the control group, respectively; 56 {plus minus} 19% and 64 {plus minus} 11% in the group receiving MP alone; 23 {plus minus} 7% and 48 {plus minus} 9% in the group receiving 10 ppm NO{sub 2}; and 16 {plus minus} 6% and 25 {plus minus} 6% in the group receiving both MP and NO{sub 2} exposures. Viability was significantly decreased following exposure to 5 or 10 ppm NO{sub 2}, but not following exposure to 2 ppm. Viability did not return to normal until 7 days after exposure to NO{sub 2}, at which time IPK also returned to normal. The cellular target of NO{sub 2} exposure in relation to IPK of MP appears to be the alveolar macrophage.

  5. TASK-1 potassium channel is not critically involved in mediating hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction of murine intra-pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Mermer, Petra; Goldenberg, Anna; Pfeil, Uwe; Paddenberg, Renate; Weissmann, Nobert; Lochnit, Guenter; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The two-pore domain potassium channel KCNK3 (TASK-1) is expressed in rat and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. There, it is associated with hypoxia-induced signalling, and its dysfunction is linked to pathogenesis of human pulmonary hypertension. We here aimed to determine its role in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in the mouse, and hence the suitability of this model for further mechanistic investigations, using appropriate inhibitors and TASK-1 knockout (KO) mice. RT-PCR revealed expression of TASK-1 mRNA in murine lungs and pre-acinar pulmonary arteries. Protein localization by immunohistochemistry and western blot was unreliable since all antibodies produced labelling also in TASK-1 KO organs/tissues. HPV was investigated by videomorphometric analysis of intra- (inner diameter: 25–40 μm) and pre-acinar pulmonary arteries (inner diameter: 41–60 μm). HPV persisted in TASK-1 KO intra-acinar arteries. Pre-acinar arteries developed initial HPV, but the response faded earlier (after 30 min) in KO vessels. This HPV pattern was grossly mimicked by the TASK-1 inhibitor anandamide in wild-type vessels. Hypoxia-provoked rise in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) in isolated ventilated lungs was affected neither by TASK-1 gene deficiency nor by the TASK-1 inhibitor A293. TASK-1 is dispensable for initiating HPV of murine intra-pulmonary arteries, but participates in sustained HPV specifically in pre-acinar arteries. This does not translate into abnormal rise in PAP. While there is compelling evidence that TASK-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension in humans, the mouse does not appear to serve as a suitable model to study the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:28301582

  6. Sildenafil, nifedipine and acetazolamide do not allow for blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise while breathing 100% oxygen.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jonathan E; Friedman, Jonathan M; Futral, Joel E; Goodman, Randall D; Lovering, Andrew T

    2014-12-01

    Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVAs) is known to increase in healthy humans during exercise while breathing room air, but is prevented or significantly reduced during exercise while breathing 100% O2, potentially due to vasoconstriction of IPAVAs. Thus, pharmacological interventions that target known pathways regulating the cardiopulmonary circulation may be able to prevent the hyperoxia-induced reduction in IPAVA blood flow (Q̇ IPAVA ) during exercise. In nine healthy human subjects, we investigated the effects of sildenafil (100 mg p.o.), nifedipine (20 mg p.o.) and acetazolamide (250 mg p.o. three times a day for 3 days) on Q̇ IPAVA at rest and during cycle ergometer exercise at 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 W, while breathing room air (normoxia) and 100% O2 (hyperoxia). Transthoracic saline contrast echocardiography and a 0-5 bubble scoring system were used to detect and assess Q̇ IPAVA qualitatively; ultrasound was used to assess the blood flow velocity oftricuspid regurgitation and the left ventricular outflow tract blood flow to calculate pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and cardiac output, respectively. Without drugs, bubble scores increased significantly to ≥2 at 150 W in normoxia and to ≤2 at 200 W in hyperoxia. Only nifedipine consistently increased cardiac output at rest and during low-intensity exercise in normoxia and hyperoxia. However, there was no detectable effect of any drug on Q̇ IPAVA ; specifically, bubble scores were the same during exercise in either normoxia or hyperoxia. Accordingly, the reduction in Q̇ IPAVA during exercise while breathing 100% O2 is likely not to be due to the independent pharmacological mechanisms of action associated with sildenafil, nifedipine or acetazolamide.

  7. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  8. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, S; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causing dyshormonogenesis. Genes associated with thyroid gland dysgenesis include the TSH receptor in non-syndromic congenital hypothyroidism, and Gsα and the thyroid transcription factors (TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax-8), associated with different complex syndromes that include congenital hypothyroidism. Among those causing dyshormonogenesis, the thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin genes were initially described, and more recently PDS (Pendred syndrome), NIS (sodium iodide symporter), and THOX2 (thyroid oxidase 2) gene defects. There is also early evidence for a third group of congenital hypothyroid conditions associated with iodothyronine transporter defects associated with severe neurological sequelae. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of primary congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:15863666

  9. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  10. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. It is ... rare. Symptoms A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the following: Brown ...

  11. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect - heartbeat Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series References Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend ... ASD) Coarctation of the aorta Ellis-van Creveld syndrome Fetal alcohol syndrome Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Marfan ...

  12. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  13. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  14. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  15. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy.

  16. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  17. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  18. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  19. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  20. Environmental aspects of congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Yu, Xin; Shen, Jianxiong

    2015-04-01

    Growing evidence has proved that many aspects of our lifestyle and the environment contribute to the development of congenital disease. Congenital spinal deformities are due to anomalous development of the vertebrae including failure of formation and segmentation during embryogenesis. The causes of congenital scoliosis have not been fully identified. A variety of factors are implicated in the development of vertebral abnormalities. Previous studies have demonstrated that both genetics and environmental factors are implicated in the development of vertebral abnormalities. However, no specific cause for congenital scoliosis has been identified. In our review, we focus on the environmental factors for the development of congenital scoliosis. Various maternal exposures during pregnancy including hypoxia, alcohol use, vitamin deficiency, valproic acid, boric acid, and hyperthermia have been observed to be associated with the occurrence of congenital scoliosis. This review describes the major environmental contributors of congenital scoliosis with an emphasis on treatment aspects associated with environmental disposition in congenital scoliosis.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hyperinsulinism

    MedlinePlus

    ... of infancy Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (UK) Merck Manual Consumer Version: Hypoglycemia Orphanet: Congenital isolated ... Diseases Congenital Hyperinsulinism International The Children's Hyperinsulinism Fund (UK) GeneReviews (1 link) Familial Hyperinsulinism ClinicalTrials.gov (1 ...

  2. Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, K; Takei, Y; Sears, M L; Peterson, W S; Carr, R E; Jampol, L M

    1977-01-01

    An early stage of Leber's congenital amaurosis, characterized by white spots or lines in the fundus, occurred in two children. Light microscopic examination of eyes obtained from one child, a 16-month-old Japanese girl, revealed subretinal deposits corresponding to the white spots and lines in the fundus deposits. Light and electron microscopic examination of the eye showed distinctive changes in the outer retinal layers and choroid, while the inner retinal layers were nearly normal. Characteristic early lesions of congenital amaurosis appeared to be produced by deposits consisting of loose outer segments and apical processes of the pigmental epithelial cell and macrophages. Undifferentiation in the nuclei of the photoreceptor cell, the inner segment, the pigment epithelial cell, and the choriocapillaris were likely characteristics of the early changes of congenital amaurosis.

  3. Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    De Laey, J J

    1991-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the onset of blindness before the age of 6 months, a variable fundus aspect and an absent or extremely pathological ERG. The disorder may be isolated or associated with systemic involvement, such as nephronophtisis (Senior-Loken syndrome), nephronophtisis, cone-shaped epiphyses of the hand and cerebellar ataxia (Saldino-Mainzer syndrome), vermis hypoplasia, oculomotor anomalies and respiratory problems in the neonatal period (Joubert syndrome) or cardiomyopathy. It should be differentiated from other forms or chorioretinal dystrophies (juvenile retinitis pigmentosa or congenital stationary night blindness), cortical blindness or maturation delay and metabolic disorders. Children with possible congenital Leber amaurosis should not only have a thorough ophthalmological examination, but should also be seen by a paediatrician experienced in metabolic disorders.

  4. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated.

  5. Congenital brain infections.

    PubMed

    Arbelaez, Andres; Restrepo, Feliza; Davila, Jorge; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric congenital intracranial infections are a group of different and important entities that constitute a small percentage of all pediatric infections. The causal factors and clinical presentations are different in children compared with adults. They require early recognition because delay diagnosis and initiation of treatment may have catastrophic consequences. Despite improvements in prenatal screening, vaccine safety, and antibiotics, infections of the central nervous system remain an important cause of neurological disabilities worldwide. This article reviews the most common congenital infections and their imaging findings.

  6. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  7. Congenital Toxoplasmosis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Marissa Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Acute infection of toxoplasmosis during pregnancy is detrimental to the developing fetus. In the United States, approximately 1 in 10,000 live births are affected by congenital toxoplasmosis. Although multifactorial in etiology, maternal infection is primarily attributed to the consumption of contaminated meat or water. Infection and transmission to the fetus may result in devastating neurologic impairment. Screening methods for all pregnant women should be implemented in routine prenatal care. This article will highlight the inherent dangers of congenital toxoplasmosis, while including general care of the fetus for prevention of transmission, medical management, and long-term outcomes.

  8. Efficiency of a New Mesh-Type Nebulizer (NE-SM1 NEPLUS) for Intrapulmonary Delivery of Ipratropium Bromide in Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hun; Kwon, Gu-Youn; Park, Do-Yang; Bang, Ji-Yeon; Jang, Dong-Min; Lee, Soo-Han; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Byung-Moon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficiency of a new mesh-type nebulizer for the intrapulmonary delivery of ipratropium bromide in surgical patients under mechanical ventilation. A total of 20 patients were randomly allocated to receive 0.5 mg ipratropium bromide using either a control (Pariboy SX, Pari, Co., Starnberg, Germany, n = 10) or test (NE-SM1 NEPLUS, KTMED INC., Seoul, Korea, n = 10) nebulizer during general anaesthesia. Ipratropium bromide was nebulized continuously for 20 min. in each group. Plasma concentrations of ipratropium bromide were obtained from blood samples at preset intervals. Non-compartmental analysis of ipratropium bromide was performed to compare the efficiency of pulmonary drug delivery in both nebulizers. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of ipratropium bromide was performed. Additionally, the noise level during the nebulizer operation and the aerosol particle size for each device were measured. The dose-normalized AUC(last) was 0.10 min/L for both nebulizers. The pharmacokinetics of nebulized ipratropium bromide can be described best by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption. The apparent volume of distribution and metabolic clearance were 1340 L and 6.78 L/min, respectively. Type of nebulizer was a significant covariate for absorption rate constant. The equivalent sound level and median aerosol particle diameter were 35.0 dB and 4.52 μm for the test nebulizer, and 60.2 dB and 3.85 μm for the control nebulizer, respectively. From the standpoint of the dose-normalized AUC(last) , a new vibrating mesh-type nebulizer shows similar performance in the intrapulmonary delivery of ipratropium bromide to that of a jet-type nebulizer in surgical patients.

  9. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... my congenital heart … Read More Let's Talk About Love... BY Kelly DiMaggio Being in love and in a relationship is one of the ... are born they have … Read More Learning to Love the Scar BY Clare Almand I wrote about ...

  10. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  11. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T. E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com Calderón, A. Torres E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com M, V. Tovar E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com

    2014-11-07

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) {sup vs} {sup DW}, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  12. Biomarker assessments in asbestos-exposed workers as indicators for selective prevention of mesothelioma or bronchogenic carcinoma: rationale and practical implementations.

    PubMed

    Pluygers, E; Baldewyns, P; Minette, P; Beauduin, M; Gourdin, P; Robinet, P

    1992-02-01

    In the first part of this study we have shown how the serum levels of four selected tumour markers, namely tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), hyaluronic acid (HA) and ferritin, display patterns characteristic of mesothelioma (M) or bronchogenic carcinoma (BC) in asbestos-exposed workers, and we hypothesize that the differences in marker patterns correspond to differences in carcinogenesis mechanisms. In a preliminary study, we found these specific marker patterns in 5/19 exposed workers of whom only one demonstrated any radiological signs of disease. Thus these specific marker patterns may be early events, occurring long (possibly years) before the classical radiological signs of exposure to asbestos. Accordingly they afford an optimal opportunity for prevention which should be adapted to the carcinogenesis mechanism as it is revealed by the marker pattern; it is aimed at antagonizing free radical carcinogenesis in all persons with TPA levels in excess of 100 U/l or Ferritin in excess of 400 ng/ml, and at inhibiting chemical carcinogenesis in those having elevated CEA levels (over 3 ng/ml). The mechanisms involved in these inhibitory processes are described and discussed, as well as the practical implementations that proceed from them. A prevention trial is now being started among 300 active and retired workers of an asbestos-cement works in northern France; the design of the study is presented. This prevention programme should be maintained over many years and holds a strong potential for reducing the untoward effects of exposure to asbestos.

  13. Biomarker assessments in asbestos-exposed workers as indicators for selective prevention of mesothelioma or bronchogenic carcinoma: rationale and practical implementations.

    PubMed

    Pluygers, E; Baldewyns, P; Minette, P; Beauduin, M; Gourdin, P; Robinet, P

    1991-10-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies are one of the major industrial hazards of recent decades and will continue to be so until beyond the end of the century. It has been estimated that, in the United States alone, there will be 131,200 cancer deaths as a result of asbestos exposure. At present the early lesions are detected radiologically, by which time intervention is no longer effective. The aim of this study was to test the value of a battery of serum biomarkers in the early detection of malignancy and in distinguishing between the early stages of mesothelioma and bronchogenic carcinoma. Many of the biomarkers had no discriminating value but on the basis of four such markers (namely TPA, CEA, HA and ferritin) it has been possible to distinguish between the late stages of the two malignancies and asbestosis. The results are discussed in terms of their possible application to the detection of early pre-malignant lesions in a screened population of asbestos-exposed persons, with the aim of attempting to prevent cancer death in such early detected cases.

  14. Congenital omental cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Sah, Suresh; Sah, Panna Lal; Shah, Birendra Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Congenital omental cysts are rare intra-abdominal pathology, which are difficult to diagnose preoperatively; as such a high index of suspicion is required for accurate preoperative diagnosis. We present a case of congenital omental cyst in a 3-year-old girl who presented with huge abdominal distension. We performed diagnostic examinations including ultrasonography and CT of the abdomen. An omental cyst was diagnosed because of its position and connection to the surrounding tissues. She was operated and cyst was excised completely. Histological examination revealed an omental cyst with endothelial lining and haemorrhagic fluid inside. She had an uneventful recovery and doing well, without recurrence at follow-up of 24 months. Clinicians must rigorously pursue a preoperative diagnosis, as it may prevent a surprise upon laparotomy and result in proper management. PMID:22865812

  15. Congenital Orbital Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Pellerano, Fernando; Guillermo, Elvis; Garrido, Gloreley; Berges, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of congenital orbital teratoma. A 3-day-old male, born at 39 weeks’ gestation without relevant prenatal history, presented with a large vascularized proptotic mass distorting the left midface. Laboratory studies showed elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (12,910 ng/ml). Computed tomography showed a multiloculated heterogeneous lesion composed of hypodense and hyperdense calcified areas encompassing the whole orbital cavity with expansion of the bony walls, as well as forward displacement and compression of the eyeball without extension to surrounding structures. Clinical, imaging and laboratory features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to pronounced proptosis with exposure keratopathy and corneal perforation, no motility of the globe and no vision in the affected eye in a resource-limited setting, the patient underwent orbital exenteration. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma. We describe the clinical course, radiographic and histopathological findings of this rare orbital tumor. PMID:28275597

  16. Congenital Orbital Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Pellerano, Fernando; Guillermo, Elvis; Garrido, Gloreley; Berges, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of congenital orbital teratoma. A 3-day-old male, born at 39 weeks' gestation without relevant prenatal history, presented with a large vascularized proptotic mass distorting the left midface. Laboratory studies showed elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (12,910 ng/ml). Computed tomography showed a multiloculated heterogeneous lesion composed of hypodense and hyperdense calcified areas encompassing the whole orbital cavity with expansion of the bony walls, as well as forward displacement and compression of the eyeball without extension to surrounding structures. Clinical, imaging and laboratory features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to pronounced proptosis with exposure keratopathy and corneal perforation, no motility of the globe and no vision in the affected eye in a resource-limited setting, the patient underwent orbital exenteration. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma. We describe the clinical course, radiographic and histopathological findings of this rare orbital tumor.

  17. Possible rare congenital dysinnervation disorder: congenital ptosis associated with adduction.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Sílvia; Beselga, Diana; Campos, Sónia; Neves, Arminda; Campos, Joana; Carvalho, Sílvia; Silva, Eduardo; Castro Sousa, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Ptosis is defined as an abnormally low position of the upper eyelid margin. It can be congenital or acquired, uni or bilateral, and isolated or associated with other ocular and nonocular defects. We report a case of a female child, aged 8 years, with congenital right ptosis increased on right adduction and with left ptosis on left adduction. There was no horizontal ocular movement limitation. Apparent underaction of the right inferior oblique muscle was also present. We believe that within the possible mechanisms it is more likely that it is a congenital innervation dysgenesis syndrome (CID)/congenital cranial dysinnervation disorder (CCDD).

  18. Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Perrault, I; Rozet, J M; Gerber, S; Ghazi, I; Leowski, C; Ducroq, D; Souied, E; Dufier, J L; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    1999-10-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe form of all inherited retinal dystrophies responsible for congenital blindness. Genetic heterogeneity of LCA has been suspected since the report by Waardenburg of normal children born to affected parents. In 1995, we localized the first disease causing gene, LCA1, to chromosome 17p13 and confirmed the genetic heterogeneity. In 1996, we ascribed LCA1 to mutations in the photoreceptor-specific guanylate cyclase gene (retGC1). RetGC1 is an essential protein implicated in the phototransduction cascade, especially in the recovery of the dark state after the excitation process of photoreceptor cells by light stimulation. In 1997, mutations in a second gene were reported in LCA, the RPE65 gene, which is the first specific retinal pigment epithelium gene. The protein RPE65 is implicated in the metabolism of vitamin A, the precursor of the photoexcitable retinal pigment (rhodopsin). Finally, a third gene, CRX, implicated in photoreceptor development, has been suspected of causing a few cases of LCA. Taken together, these three genes account for only 27% of LCA cases in our series. The three genes encode proteins that are involved in completely different physiopathologic pathways. Based on these striking differences of physiopathologic processes, we reexamined all clinical physiopathological discrepancies and the results strongly suggested that retGC1 gene mutations are responsible for congenital stationary severe cone-rod dystrophy, while RPE65 gene mutations are responsible for congenital severe but progressive rod-cone dystrophy. It is of tremendous importance to confirm and to refine these genotype-phenotype correlations on a large scale in order to anticipate the final outcome in a blind infant, on the one hand, and to further guide genetic studies in older patients on the other hand.

  19. Congenital amaurosis of Leber.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, F D

    1966-05-01

    In two families with congenital amaurosis of Leber, keratoglobus was found in all affected members and posterior subcapsular cataracts in most of them. Consanguinity was present in one family. Pathologic findings in one enucleated eye were presented. The literature on this disease was briefly reviewed. Whether the disease is a definite clinical or genetic entity and whether it might be an agenesis or an abiotrophy, or both, were discussed.

  20. Congenital hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Korver, Anna M H; Smith, Richard J H; Van Camp, Guy; Schleiss, Mark R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria A K; Lustig, Lawrence R; Usami, Shin-Ichi; Boudewyns, An N

    2017-01-12

    Congenital hearing loss (hearing loss that is present at birth) is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in children. In the majority of developed countries, neonatal hearing screening programmes enable early detection; early intervention will prevent delays in speech and language development and has long-lasting beneficial effects on social and emotional development and quality of life. A diagnosis of hearing loss is usually followed by a search for an underlying aetiology. Congenital hearing loss might be attributed to environmental and prenatal factors, which prevail in low-income settings; congenital infections, particularly cytomegalovirus infection, are also a common risk factor for hearing loss. Genetic causes probably account for the majority of cases in developed countries; mutations can affect any component of the hearing pathway, in particular, inner ear homeostasis (endolymph production and maintenance) and mechano-electrical transduction (the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into electrochemical activity). Once the underlying cause of hearing loss is established, it might direct therapeutic decision making and guide prevention and (genetic) counselling. Management options include specific antimicrobial therapies, surgical treatment of craniofacial abnormalities and implantable or non-implantable hearing devices. An improved understanding of the pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms that underlie hearing loss and increased awareness of recent advances in genetic testing will promote the development of new treatment and screening strategies.

  1. [Congenital insensitivity to pain].

    PubMed

    Popko, Janusz; Karpiński, Michał; Guszczyn, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain belongs to rare diseases called hereditary sensory neuropathy (HSN). The disturbance of sense and secondary harms are creating clinical picture. The aim of this report was to describe therapeutic problems with which we met with a three siblings with congenital insensitivity to pain. The authors have described three children with congenital insensitivity to pain. The disease was diagnosed at the age of 3-5. These children painlessly have broken their lower limbs. These fractures were late diagnosed what resulted in a badly healed deformation of legs. For this reason, the right knee of the oldest boy had to be stiffened. This boy had also late diagnosed the left hip luxation, and hematomas had arisen, which become filled with pus. The boy was in sepsis and a dramatic life-and-death struggle was performed. A purulent focuses were removed from abdomen and femoral head was also resected. The other two siblings had fractures and infections, but not such severe as the oldest boy. It is well known that a causal treatment of this disease in unknown. Patients must learn to avoid mechanical and thermal trauma. It is the only way to prevent complications of this disease.

  2. [Congenital knee dislocation: case report].

    PubMed

    Arvinius, C; Luque, R; Díaz-Ceacero, C; Marco, F

    2016-01-01

    Congenital knee dislocation is an infrequent condition with unknown etiology. In some cases it occurs as an isolated condition, while in others it coexists with associated conditions or syndromes. The treatment of congenital knee dislocation is driven by the severity and flexibility of the deformity. The literature includes from serial casting or the Pavlik harness to quadriceps tendon plasty or femoral osteotomies. We report herein the case of a congenital dislocation treated with serial casting with a good outcome.

  3. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  4. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  5. Congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is an essential process by which sugars are attached to proteins and lipids. Complete lack of glycosylation is not compatible with life. Because of the widespread function of glycosylation, inherited disorders of glycosylation are multisystemic. Since the identification of the first defect on N-linked glycosylation in the 1980s, there are over 40 different congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases. This review will include defects of N-linked glycosylation, O-linked glycosylation and disorders of combined N- and O-linked glycosylation. PMID:23776380

  6. Congenital syphilis: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Dzebolo, N N

    1980-08-01

    Congenital syphilis was discovered in a neonate with the unusual radiographic presentation of unilateral involvement of three bones showing lytic lesions and periostitis. Congenital syphilis should be considered in a newborn infant with these radiographic manifestations, especially when a suggestive history is obtained.

  7. Comparison of intrapulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) and colistin after aerosol delivery and intravenous administration of CMS in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Couet, William; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients.

  8. Acute effects of intrapulmonary percussive ventilation in COPD patients assessed by using conventional outcome parameters and a novel computational fluid dynamics technique

    PubMed Central

    Ides, Kris; Vos, Wim; De Backer, Lieve; Vissers, Dirk; Claes, Rita; Leemans, Glenn; Ongena, Kevin; Peters, Oswald; De Backer, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chest physiotherapy enhances sputum evacuation in COPD patients. It can be applied as a single technique or as a combination of techniques including intrapulmonary percussive ventilation (IPV). Recently developed assessment techniques may provide new insights into the effect of airway clearance techniques. Participants: Five moderate to severe COPD patients (three females and two males; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 39.49% predicted) who were admitted in the hospital for an acute exacerbation were included in this study. Methods: A novel imaging technique was used, together with other conventional techniques, to visualize the short-term effects of a single IPV treatment in COPD patients. Results: No significant changes were noted in the lung function parameters or arterial blood gases measured within 1 hour after the end of the IPV session. Computed tomography images detected changes in the airway patency after the IPV treatment compared with before treatment. Local resistances, calculated for the three-dimensional models, showed local changes in airway resistance. Conclusion: The effects of a single IPV session can be visualized by functional imaging. This functional imaging allows a calculation of changes in local airway resistance and local changes in airway volume in COPD patients without affecting conventional lung function parameters. PMID:23055715

  9. Cataracts in Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Veena; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Latkany, Paul; Troia, Robert N.; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Kasza, Kristen; Karrison, Ted; Cezar, Simone; Sautter, Mari; Greenwald, Mark J.; Mieler, William; Mets, Marilyn B.; Alam, Ambereen; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Roizen, Nancy; Rabiah, Peter; Del Monte, Monte A.; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and natural history of cataracts in children with congenital toxoplasmosis. Methods Children referred to the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) between 1981 and 2005 were examined by ophthalmologists at predetermined times according to a specific protocol. The clinical course and treatment of patients who developed cataracts was reviewed. Results In the first year of life, 134 of 173 children examined were treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and Leucovorin, while the remaining 39 were not treated. Cataracts occurred in 27 eyes of 20 patients (11.6%, 95% confidence interval [7.2%, 17.3%]). Fourteen cataracts were present at birth, and 13 developed postnatally. Locations of the cataracts included anterior polar (3 eyes), anterior subcapsular (6), nuclear (5), posterior subcapsular (7), and unknown (6). Thirteen cataracts were partial, 9 total, and 5 with unknown complexity. Twelve cataracts remained stable, 12 progressed, and progression was not known for 3. Five of 27 eyes had cataract surgery, with 2 of these developing glaucoma. Sixteen eyes of 11 patients had retinal detachment and cataract. All eyes with cataracts had additional ocular lesions. Conclusions In the NCCCTS cohort, 11.6% of patients were diagnosed with cataracts. There was considerable variability in the presentation, morphology, and progression of the cataracts. Associated intraocular pathology was an important cause of morbidity. PMID:18086432

  10. [Congenital defects and incapacity].

    PubMed

    Jouve de la Barreda, Nicolás

    2009-01-01

    As a whole the congenital defects constitute an important section of the medical attention affecting near 3% of the population. A 15% of spontaneous abortions take place of which the greater frequency corresponds to the chromosome anomalies (25%) and the monogenic mutations (20%) and in a lesser extent to the effects of teratogenic agents. Between the genetic causes determining the congenital defects the mutations that affect genes acting in the early stages of development occupy a main place. These alterations can affect to homeotic genes or monogenic systems that act during the critical phases of the organogenesis. It seems evident that an alteration in the expression of a necessary gene for the appearance of a morphogenetic change constitutes the angular stone to understand resurging of a malformation or discapacity. In the last years has been demonstrated the importance of the teratogenic or environmental agents on the delicate internal physiological balance during the critical stages of the development. In this context must be included the inductive environmental factors inducing epigenetic modifications in the early stage of the development of the embryos produced by fertilization in vitro.

  11. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    PubMed

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.

  12. Congenital stationary night blindness presenting as Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Weleber, R G; Tongue, A C

    1987-03-01

    Two siblings with autosomal-recessive congenital stationary night blindness were clinically blind in infancy. Both had markedly abnormal electroretinograms that, in the first child, led consultants at two university centers to make the diagnosis of Leber's congenital amaurosis. The patients had intermittent nystagmus and esotropia, but good photopic vision developed eventually. Scotopic vision was clearly defective in each child. Refractive error in both patients was close to emetropic in early infancy but became myopic by 1 year of age. Congenital stationary night blindness must be considered in the differential diagnosis of the blind infant.

  13. Congenital lobar emphysema: 30-year case series in two university hospitals*

    PubMed Central

    Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Rodrigues, Olavo Ribeiro; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Schmidt, Aurelino Fernandes; Cataneo, Antonio José Maria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the cases of patients with congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) submitted to surgical treatment at two university hospitals over a 30-year period. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of children with CLE undergoing surgical treatment between 1979 and 2009 at the Botucatu School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas or the Mogi das Cruzes University Hospital. We analyzed data regarding symptoms, physical examination, radiographic findings, diagnosis, surgical treatment, and postoperative follow-up. RESULTS: During the period studied, 20 children with CLE underwent surgery. The mean age at the time of surgery was 6.9 months (range, 9 days to 4 years). All of the cases presented with symptoms at birth or during the first months of life. In all cases, chest X-rays were useful in defining the diagnosis. In cases of moderate respiratory distress, chest CT facilitated the diagnosis. One patient with severe respiratory distress was misdiagnosed with hypertensive pneumothorax and underwent chest tube drainage. Only patients with moderate respiratory distress were submitted to bronchoscopy, which revealed no tracheobronchial abnormalities. The surgical approach was lateral muscle-sparing thoracotomy. The left upper and middle lobes were the most often affected, followed by the right upper lobe. Lobectomy was performed in 18 cases, whereas bilobectomy was performed in 2 (together with bronchogenic cyst resection in 1 of those). No postoperative complications were observed. Postoperative follow-up time was at least 24 months (mean, 60 months), and no late complications were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Although CLE is an uncommon, still neglected disease of uncertain etiology, the radiological diagnosis is easily made and surgical treatment is effective. PMID:24068262

  14. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  15. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  16. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P; Bornstein, Stefan R

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to deficiency of 21-hydroxylase is a disorder of the adrenal cortex characterised by cortisol deficiency, with or without aldosterone deficiency, and androgen excess. Patients with the most severe form also have abnormalities of the adrenal medulla and epinephrine deficiency. The severe classic form occurs in one in 15,000 births worldwide, and the mild non-classic form is a common cause of hyperandrogenism. Neonatal screening for CAH and gene-specific prenatal diagnosis are now possible. Standard hormone replacement fails to achieve normal growth and development for many children with CAH, and adults can experience iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, hyperandrogenism, infertility, or the development of the metabolic syndrome. This Seminar reviews the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of CAH, and provides an overview of clinical challenges and future therapies.

  17. Congenital heart defects and medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Gehin, Connie; Ragsdale, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists perform imaging studies that are useful in the diagnosis of congenital heart defects in infants and adults. These studies also help to monitor congenital heart defect repairs in adults. This article describes the development and functional anatomy of the heart, along with the epidemiology and anatomy of congenital heart defects. It also discusses the increasing population of adults who have congenital heart defects and the most effective modalities for diagnosing, evaluating, and monitoring congenital heart defects.

  18. Congenital Hypothyroidism: Facts, Facets & Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kollati, Yedukondalu; Ambati, Ranga Rao; Reddy, Prakash Narayana; Kumar, N Satya Sampath; Patel, Rajesh K; Dirisala, Vijaya R

    2017-02-06

    Back ground: Thyroid hormone (T3) is essential for normal development of children enabling brain development and somatic growth. However, certain individuals are genetically predisposed with insufficient or no thyroid hormones. Such a condition is termed congenital hypothyroidism (CH).

  19. Photoaversion in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, E I; Maumenee, I H

    1995-03-01

    Photoaversion is a prominent symptom of a number of infantile genetic ocular disorder such as congenital glaucoma, aniridia, albinism, and cone dystrophies including achromatopsia. Photoaversion has not been widely recognized as a clinical feature of Leber's congenital amaurosis. We present two patients who were diagnosed clinically with achromatopsia because of nystagmus, absent color vision, reduced visual acuity, and moderately severe photoaversion in the absence of anterior segment abnormalities. The photopic and scotopic responses of the electroretinogram (E R G) were nonrecordable in both patients indicating involvement of both cone and rod systems. The diagnosis was then revised to one of Leber's congenital amaurosis. Photoaversion can be a prominent clinical feature in some patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis. The E R G clinches the diagnosis. These patients may constitute a distinct genetic subtype of the disease and molecular genetic studies will help resolve this issue.

  20. Why Search for Congenital Defects?

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John F.

    1966-01-01

    The causation of congenital malformation is receiving increased study. In Canada, epidemiologic surveys are being planned, based upon the institution of Provincial Registries to which physicians and other agencies will voluntarily report cases coming to their attention. The literature in regard to prevalence studies of congenital cardiac defects in school children is reviewed. Over the past 25 years, studies employing the proposed technique demonstrated a rising trend, from 1.4 per 1000 to 2.6 per 1000. By contrast, specific surveys for congenital cardiac defect carried out by expert personnel using radiographs and electrocardiographs, resulted in essentially uniform rates, approximating 5 to 6 per 1000. It is concluded that the latter is a superior technique of epidemiologic survey over the “Central Registry” method, and should command a due proportion of health resources directed towards congenital malformation research. PMID:5914837

  1. Congenital Syngnathia; Turmoils and Tragedy

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Yogesh Kumar; Raj, Prince; Arya, Mona; Dali, Jaspal Singh

    2017-01-01

    Congenital syngnathia is an extremely rare condition with no standardized treatment. We hereby report a case highlighting the difficulties faced in its management and the postoperative complications. PMID:28083498

  2. [Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Adults].

    PubMed

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a life-long disease requiring an integrated therapy. It may negatively influence the quality of life. In childhood, the main problems of the care of these patients involve sex determination and ensuring optimum growth and puberty. The therapeutic goals for adults are the prevention of Addisonian crisis and ensuring the best possible quality of life, including fertility.Key words: androgens - cardiovascular risk - congenital adrenal hyperplasia - bone density - testicular rest tumors.

  3. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  4. Immunotherapy of Congenital SIV Infection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Immunotherapy of Congenital SIV Infection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ruth M. Ruprecht, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer...SUBTITLE Immunotherapy of Congenital SIV 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Infection DAMD17-94-J-4431 6. AUTHOR(S) Ruth M. Ruprecht. M.D-. Ph.D 7. PERFORMING...period of several weeks, this strategy was adopted to avoid potential bias because of season or other factors. Because the staff at the Yerkes Regional

  5. [Congenital heart diseases in women].

    PubMed

    Putotto, Carolina; Unolt, Marta; Caiaro, Angela; Marino, Dario; Massaccesi, Valerio; Marino, Bruno; Digilio, Maria Cristina

    2013-02-01

    Are there gender differences in prevalence, surgical results and long-term survival of patients with congenital heart disease? Available literature data allow us to state what follows. At birth there is a mild but significant prevalence of congenital heart disease in females. The most severe congenital heart diseases are less frequent in girls, but when they are present in females, they are linked to a higher surgical mortality rate, due perhaps to lower weight at birth and to the prevalence of extracardiac malformations and/or of associated genetic syndromes. On the other hand, in adults, surgery for congenital heart disease is at higher risk in males, and so the long-term survival rate is higher in females. Particular psychological attitudes, a higher incidence of pulmonary hypertension, as well as specific problems linked to the reproductive function characterize congenital heart disease in adult women. The knowledge and analysis of these data are essential for a correct management of congenital heart disease in neonates, children and adults.

  6. Congenital prothrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Stefano; De Cristofaro, Raimondo

    2009-06-01

    Prothrombin deficiency is among the rarest inherited coagulation disorders, with a prevalence of approximately 1:2,000,000. Two main phenotypes can be distinguished: (1) hypoprothrombinemia (type I deficiency), characterized by concomitantly low levels of activity and antigen; and (2) dysprothrombinemia (type II deficiency), characterized by the normal or near-normal synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. In some cases, hypoprothrombinemia associated with dysprothrombinemia was also described in compound heterozygous defects. No living patient with undetectable plasma prothrombin has been reported to date. Prothrombin is encoded by a gene of approximately 21 kb located on chromosome 11 and containing 14 exons. Forty different mutations have been identified and characterized in prothrombin deficiency. Many of them surround the catalytic site, whereas another "hot spot" is localized in the recognition domain called anion binding exosite I, also called fibrinogen recognition site. Recently, mutations were identified also in the Na (+)-binding loop and in the light A-chain of thrombin. Most hypoprothrombinemia-associated mutations are missense, but there are also nonsense mutations leading to stop codons and one single nucleotide deletion. Finally, the main aspects of clinical manifestations and therapy of congenital prothrombin deficiency are presented and discussed.

  7. Singing in congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Dalla Bella, Simone; Giguère, Jean-François; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a musical disorder characterized by impaired pitch perception. To examine to what extent this perceptual pitch deficit may compromise singing, 11 amusic individuals and 11 matched controls were asked to sing a familiar tune with lyrics and on the syllable /la/. Acoustical analysis of sung renditions yielded measures of pitch accuracy (e.g., number of pitch errors) and time accuracy (e.g., number of time errors). The results revealed that 9 out of 11 amusics were poor singers, mostly on the pitch dimension. Poor singers made an anomalously high number of pitch interval and contour errors, produced pitch intervals largely deviating from the score, and lacked pitch stability; however, more than half of the amusics sang in-time. Amusics' variability in singing proficiency was related to their residual pitch perceptual ability. Thus, their singing deficiency might be a consequence of their perceptual deficit. Nevertheless, there were notable exceptions. Two amusic individuals, despite their impoverished perception, sang proficiently. The latter findings are consistent with the existence of separate neural pathways for auditory perception and action.

  8. [Congenital insensitivity to pain].

    PubMed

    Danziger, N; Willer, J-C

    2009-02-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare syndrome with various clinical expressions, characterized by a dramatic impairment of pain perception since birth. In the 1980s, progress in nerve histopathology allowed to demonstrate that CIP was almost always a manifestation of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) involving the small-calibre (A-delta and C) nerve fibres which normally transmit nociceptive inputs along sensory nerves. Identification of the genetic basis of several clinical subtypes has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, emphasizing in particular the crucial role of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the development and survival of nociceptors. Recently, mutations of the gene coding for the sodium channel Nav1.7--a voltage-dependent sodium channel expressed preferentially on peripheral nociceptors and sympathetic ganglia--have been found to be the cause of CIP in patients showing a normal nerve biopsy. This radical impairment of nociception mirrors the hereditary pain syndromes associated with "gain of function" mutations of the same ion channel, such as familial erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder. Future research with CIP patients may identify other proteins specifically involved in nociception, which might represent potential targets for chronic pain treatment. Moreover, this rare clinical syndrome offers the opportunity to address interesting neuropsychological issues, such as the role of pain experience in the construction of body image and in the empathic representation of others' pain.

  9. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH) is the most fatal form of CAH, as it disrupts adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis. Most cases of lipoid CAH are caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Affected patients typically present with signs of severe adrenal failure in early infancy and 46,XY genetic males are phenotypic females due to disrupted testicular androgen secretion. The StAR p.Q258X mutation accounts for about 70% of affected alleles in most patients of Japanese and Korean ancestry. However, it is more prevalent (92.3%) in the Korean population. Recently, some patients have been showed that they had late and mild clinical findings. These cases and studies constitute a new entity of 'nonclassic lipoid CAH'. The cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, P450scc (CYP11A1), plays an essential role converting cholesterol to pregnenolone. Although progesterone production from the fetally derived placenta is necessary to maintain a pregnancy to term, some patients with P450scc mutations have recently been reported. P450scc mutations can also cause lipoid CAH and establish a recently recognized human endocrine disorder. PMID:25654062

  10. Canine congenital portosystemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Maddison, J E

    1988-08-01

    The case records of 21 dogs with congenital portosystemic encephalopathy are reviewed. The disorder was most common in Australian cattledogs (blue heelers; 8 cases), Old English sheepdogs (3 cases) and Maltese terriers (3 cases). Extra-hepatic shunts occurred in small breeds, with the exception of 1 cattledog, while intra-hepatic shunts occurred in the medium to large breeds. The most common clinical pathology abnormalities were abnormal ammonia tolerance, mild to moderate increases in plasma alanine aminotransferase or alkaline phosphatase concentrations, decreased total serum protein concentrations, increased fasting ammonia concentrations and ammonium biurate crystalluria. Radiological examination revealed that all the dogs had a small liver. The kidneys were enlarged in 5 of 10 dogs in which kidney size could be estimated. Surgical ligation of an extra-hepatic shunt was successful in 2 of 4 dogs in which it was attempted. Medical management resulted in alleviation of clinical signs in 5 of 8 dogs. The period of successful treatment ranged from a few months to over a year.

  11. [Consanguinity and congenital abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Marie; Vedsted-Jakobsen, Agnete

    2003-04-28

    Knowledge of consanguinity is relevant for employees in the Danish national health service, since about 7.5% of the Danish population has another ethnic background than Danish and the majority comes from cultures where consanguineous marriages are not unusual. In the literature it is found that consanguineous couples have a higher risk of having children with congenital malformations. The risk is increased by a factor 2 to 2 1/2. The average risk in Denmark is about 3%. Primarily, the autosomal recessive diseases are expressed in children with consanguineous parents. In order to advise and diagnose it is essential to clarify the consanguinity state. In case of pregnancy with consanguineous parents, we recommend: 1) Counselling to estimate the risk of foetal illness and information about possible examination possibilities. 2) An ultrasound scan at the gestational age of 11-14 weeks in order to measure nuchal translucency and an early malformation scan. 3) An ultrasound scan for malformations at the gestational age of 18-20 weeks. 4) An ultrasound scan especially in order to detect foetal heart malformations at the gestational age of 20-24 weeks.

  12. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  13. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported.

  14. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  15. Congenital parasitic infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine; Deloron, Philippe; Peyron, François

    2012-02-01

    This review defines the concepts of maternal-fetal (congenital) and vertical transmissions (mother-to-child) of pathogens and specifies the human parasites susceptible to be congenitally transferred. It highlights the epidemiological features of this transmission mode for the three main congenital parasitic infections due to Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium sp. Information on the possible maternal-fetal routes of transmission, the placental responses to infection and timing of parasite transmission are synthesized and compared. The factors susceptible to be involved in parasite transmission and development of congenital parasitic diseases, such as the parasite genotypes, the maternal co-infections and parasitic load, the immunological features of pregnant women and the capacity of some fetuses/neonates to overcome their immunological immaturity to mount an immune response against the transmitted parasites are also discussed and compared. Analysis of clinical data indicates that parasitic congenital infections are often asymptomatic, whereas symptomatic newborns generally display non-specific symptoms. The long-term consequences of congenital infections are also mentioned, such as the imprinting of neonatal immune system and the possible trans-generational transmission. The detection of infection in pregnant women is mainly based on standard serological or parasitological investigations. Amniocentesis and cordocentesis can be used for the detection of some fetal infections. The neonatal infection can be assessed using parasitological, molecular or immunological methods; the place of PCR in such neonatal diagnosis is discussed. When such laboratory diagnosis is not possible at birth or in the first weeks of life, standard serological investigations can also be performed 8-10 months after birth, to avoid detection of maternal transmitted antibodies. The specific aspects of treatment of T. gondii, T. cruzi and Plasmodium congenital infections are

  16. Congenital Esophageal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Dysphagia in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S; Surude, Ravindra G; Mohite, Ashok R; Rathi, Pravin M

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital embryonal gastrointestinal (GI) malformation which is diagnosed most commonly in childhood. In adults, they can present with a variety of symptoms ranging from dysphagia, chest pain, epigastric discomfort, and vomiting to more serious complications including infections, hemorrhage, and ulcerations. A 30-year-old male presented with gradually progressive dysphagia to solids for 4 months without significant weight loss. Clinical examination and routine laboratory examination were unrevealing. Upper GI endoscopy revealed a well-defined submucosal lesion bulging into the esophageal lumen involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal esophagus. The overlying mucosa was normal with mild luminal narrowing but gastroscope could be negotiated across this narrowing. Differential diagnosis included lipoma, leiomyoma or GI stromal tumors. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of thorax revealed a 3.5 × 2.3 × 3 cm well-defined homogenous hypodense lesion involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal thoracic esophagus with likely possibility of submucosal or intramural lesion. Subsequently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed a 3.3 × 2.8 cm homogenous hypoechoic lesion without any vascularity involving the distal esophagus wall suggestive of duplication cyst. The lesion was intramural in location as muscularis propria was seen to go around the lesion. Bronchogenic cyst was excluded due to absence of cartilage and close proximity of the cyst to lumen. Fine-needle aspiration was not attempted in view of high risk of introducing infection. Being symptomatic, the patient underwent complete surgical excision of the cyst with exteriorization of the base which on histopathology confirmed duplication cyst. Esophageal duplication cysts are exceedingly rare congenital embryonal malformations with estimated prevalence of 0.0122% arising from aberration of posterior division of embryonic foregut at 3 - 4 weeks of

  17. Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  18. How Are Congenital Heart Defects Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  19. How Are Congenital Heart Defects Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  20. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  3. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26, ... person with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital leptin deficiency congenital leptin ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 links) Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (UK) MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: End- ... Version National Health Service: Nephrotic Syndrome in Children (UK) Orphanet: Congenital nephrotic syndrome, Finnish type Patient Support ...

  6. Treatment Options for Congenital Pigmented Nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Now Open Conference Schedule Highlights Fundraiser Advice Holiday Shopping at Amazon Happy In My Skin Congenital Nevus ... Now Open Conference Schedule Highlights Fundraiser Advice Holiday Shopping at Amazon Happy In My Skin Congenital Nevus ...

  7. Vision following extended congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Yuri; Andalman, Aaron; Sinha, Pawan

    2006-12-01

    Animal studies suggest that early visual deprivation can cause permanent functional blindness. However, few human data on this issue exist. Given enough time for recovery, can a person gain visual skills after several years of congenital blindness? In India, we recently had an unusual opportunity to work with an individual whose case history sheds light on this question. S.R.D. was born blind, and remained so until age 12. She then underwent surgery for the removal of dense congenital cataracts. We evaluated her performance on an extensive battery of visual tasks 20 years after surgery. We found that although S.R.D.'s acuity is compromised, she is proficient on mid- and high-level visual tasks. These results suggest that the human brain retains an impressive capacity for visual learning well into late childhood. They have implications for current conceptions of cortical plasticity and provide an argument for treating congenital blindness even in older children.

  8. Congenital nystagmus and negative electroretinography

    PubMed Central

    Roussi, Mirella; Dalens, Hélène; Marcellier, Jean Jacques; Bacin, Franck

    2011-01-01

    Congenital nystagmus is a pathologic oculomotor state appearing at about three to four months of age. The precise diagnosis requires detailed clinical examination and electrophysiological findings. This case report presents two male patients with congenital nystagmus examined longitudinally from the age of six months until 17–18 years of age. Clinical and electrophysiological protocols were detailed. The first results showed electronegative electroretinography in the two cases and examination combined with electroretinographic findings helped us to make the diagnosis of Congenital Night Stationary Blindness (CSNB). This diagnosis was confirmed by genetic studies. CSNB is interesting to study because through electrophysiological findings, it enables a better understanding of the physiology of neural transmission in the outer part of the retina. PMID:21573087

  9. Adult Congenital Heart Disease in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Kathryn J; Conner, Shayna N; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-06-01

    With the success of modern surgical techniques for congenital heart disease, the population of women of childbearing age with congenital heart disease is growing. Because of the significant hemodynamic load of pregnancy, labor, and delivery, women with congenital heart disease require preconceptual risk assessment and expert multidisciplinary care throughout pregnancy. The aim of this review is to discuss the management of cardiovascular, obstetric, and fetal care issues that are commonly encountered during pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease.

  10. Leber's congenital amaurosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Fazzi, Elisa; Signorini, Sabrina Giovanna; Scelsa, Barbara; Bova, Stefania Maria; Lanzi, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by severe loss of vision at birth. It accounts for 10-18% of cases of congenital blindness. Some patients exhibit only blindness of retinal origin whereas others show evidence of a multi-systemic involvement. We review the literature relating to this severe disorder, highlighting unresolved questions, in particular the nature of the association of LCA with mental retardation and with systemic findings and syndromic pictures. In recent years, genetic advances in the diagnosis of LCA have opened up new horizons, also from a therapeutic point of view. A better understanding of this pathology would be valuable for paediatric neurologists.

  11. Lengthening of congenital forearm stumps.

    PubMed

    Jasiewicz, Barbara; Tesiorowski, Maciej; Kacki, Wojciech; Kasprzyk, Marcin; Zarzycki, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    The Ilizarov device and distraction osteogenesis method became very useful in correction and elongation of forearm defects. Two cases of forearm elongation with congenital transverse defect are described. The construction of the device is provided. During follow-up examination, 2 and 7 years after the treatment, good clinical results were achieved in both patients with the use of upper limb prosthesis employing the patient's own elbow joint. Presented application of the Ilizarov method can significantly improve possibilities for the use of prosthesis in patients with congenital upper limb defects and result in better cosmetic and functional outcome.

  12. Leber's congenital amaurosis as conceived by Leber.

    PubMed

    Pinckers, A J

    1979-01-01

    Not being satisfied with the present-day diagnosis of Leber's congenital amaurosis, the original papers written by Leber were studied. It gradually became clear that what Leber had in mind with congenital amaurosis is roughly the same as what we know as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. The present diagnosis of Leber's congenital amaurosis is not a clinical syndrome but an aspecific symptom complex.

  13. Accelerate Genomic Aging in Congenital Neutropenia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    myeloid leukemia (AML) is perhaps the major clinical concern in patients with severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) and Shwachman- Diamond syndrome (SDS... Diamond syndrome (SDS), cyclic neutropenia, or age-matched healthy controls. Aim 2. To determine whether increased G-CSF signaling accelerates the...agents, such as radiation. 2. KEYWORDS Congenital neutropenia Severe congenital neutropenia Shwachman Diamond syndrome Cyclic neutropenia

  14. Congenital Absence of the Pericardium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Choi, Sang Il

    2014-01-01

    Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic. It is usually discovered as an incidental finding. Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable. Echocardiography provides valuable information, and sometimes computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is needed for subsequent confirmation. PMID:24753808

  15. [Congenital ranula in a newborn].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M K; Hückel, D; Hamala, D

    2007-05-01

    Ranulas are cystic lesions in the floor of the mouth. They are either retention cysts of the excretory duct of the sublingual gland or pseudocysts formed by excretory duct rupture followed by extravasation and accumulation of mucus in the surrounding tissue. We report the case of a premature newborn with a congenital ranula in the floor of mouth. The ranula caused no discomfort or complications, so that immediate intervention was not necessary. The cyst resolved completely by the age of 4 months. Complications in newborns especially include airway obstruction and feeding difficulties. Surgical treatment options are needle aspiration, excision of the ranula, marsupialization, cryosurgery, and--in addition to excision of the cyst--removal of the ipsilateral sublingual gland. Sclerotherapy has shown good results as well. As many congenital cysts resolve or rupture spontaneously, they should be observed for potential resolution for several months in uncomplicated cases.

  16. Congenital syphilis: The continuing scourge

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Prachi G.; Joshi, Rajesh; Kharkar, Vidya D.; Bhaskar, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is a severe, disabling infection that occurs due to the transmission of Treponema pallidum across the placenta during pregnancy or from contact with an infectious genital lesion during delivery. However, its early diagnosis is often difficult because more than half of the affected infants are asymptomatic, and the signs in symptomatic infants may be subtle and nonspecific. Although its incidence is declining, this long-forgotten disease continues to affect pregnant women, resulting in considerable perinatal morbidity and mortality. We hereby report a case of a 2-month-old infant with early congenital syphilis presenting with joint swellings and Parrot's pseudoparalysis, a comparative rarity in the present scenario. The report also stresses upon the importance of implementing the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation that all the pregnant women should be screened for syphilis in the first antenatal visit in the first trimester and again in late pregnancy. PMID:26396451

  17. Operative treatment of congenital torticollis.

    PubMed

    Shim, J S; Jang, H P

    2008-07-01

    There were 47 patients with congenital muscular torticollis who underwent operative release. After a mean follow-up of 74 months (60 to 90), they were divided into two groups, one aged one to four years (group 1) and the other aged five to 16 years (group 2). The outcomes were assessed by evaluating the following parameters: deficits of lateral flexion and rotation, craniofacial asymmetry, surgical scarring, residual contracture, subjective evaluation and degree of head tilt. The craniofacial asymmetry, residual contracture, subjective evaluation and overall scores were similar in both groups. However, group 2 showed superior results to group 1 in terms of the deficits of movement, surgical scarring and degree of head tilt. It is recommended that operative treatment for congenital muscular torticollis is postponed until the patient can comply successfully with post-operative bracing and an exercise programme.

  18. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Ashleigh A; Garg, Vidu

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are the most common type of birth defect and result in significant mortality worldwide. The etiology for the majority of these anomalies remains unknown but genetic factors are being recognized as playing an increasingly important role. Advances in our molecular understanding of normal heart development have led to the identification of numerous genes necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. This work has aided the discovery of an increasing number of monogenic causes of human cardiovascular malformations. More recently, studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms and submicroscopic copy number abnormalities as having a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease. This review discusses these discoveries and summarizes our increasing understanding of the genetic basis of congenital heart disease. PMID:21532774

  19. Congenital heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Swan, Lorna

    2014-05-01

    The story of congenital heart disease is one of the major successes of medicine in the last 50 years. Heart conditions previously associated with early death are now successfully treated. Many of these women are now in their child-bearing years wishing to have children of their own. All of these women should be offered comprehensive pre-conception counselling by a dedicated multi-disciplinary team. Each woman will present a unique set of cardiac and obstetric challenges that require an individualised assessment of risk and a carefully documented care plan. In this chapter, I describe the most common forms of congenital heart disease and the specific issues that should be assessed before conception. I present a systematic approach to risk stratification and care planning. These lesions range from mild disease with little implications for pregnancy to those with a sizable risk of maternal mortality or complications. I will also discuss fetal risk factors.

  20. Congenital myotonia in related kittens.

    PubMed

    Hickford, F H; Jones, B R; Gething, M A; Pack, R; Alley, M R

    1998-06-01

    Four closely related domestic shorthair kittens were investigated following the detection of abnormalities in their gait, difficulty opening their mouths and muscle hypertrophy. They walked with a stiff, stilted gait, with the stiffness reducing during exercise. Startling of the kittens resulted in hyperextension of the limbs and falling to lateral recumbency, or spasm of the orbicularis oculi muscle, prolonged prolapse of the nictitating membranes and flattening of the ears. One kitten was intermittently dysphonic. Endotracheal intubation of the anaesthetised kittens was difficult due to an inability to open the mouth to a wide angle, and narrowing of the glottis due to muscle spasm. A diagnosis of congenital myotonia was made based on the clinical signs, the kittens' ages, typical myotonic discharges on electromyography, and the histopathological and histochemical findings in muscle. This is the first report of congenital myotonia in this species.

  1. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. [Radiological evaluation of congenital tumors].

    PubMed

    Aguado del Hoyo, A; Ruiz Martín, Y; Lancharro Zapata, Á; Marín Rodríguez, C; Gordillo Gutiérrez, I

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we consider tumors that are diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first three months of life. This is a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with special biological and epidemiological characteristics that differentiate them from tumors arising in children or adults. In the last two decades, the prenatal detection of congenital tumors has increased due to the generalized use of prenatal sonographic screening. Advances in imaging techniques, especially in fetal magnetic resonance imaging, have enabled improvements in the diagnosis, follow-up, clinical management, and perinatal treatment of these tumors. This image-based review of the most common congenital tumors describes their histologic types, locations, and characteristics on the different imaging techniques used.

  3. [Congenital heart diseases and sports].

    PubMed

    Martínez Quintana, E; Agredo Muñoz, J; Rodríguez González, F; Nieto Lago, V

    2008-04-01

    Congenital heart diseases are a frequent cause of cardiology consultation. New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have allowed greater survival and quality of life of patients who wish to participate in sports. What they can do is not always easy to determine. Guidelines are helpful at the time of deciding, although finally is the doctor the one that must determine in each case the situation of the patient and the type of exercise they can do depending on the severity and type of cardiopathy.

  4. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    PubMed

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  5. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in congenital shunts.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2010-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension frequently arises in patients with congenital heart disease. The vast majority present with congenital cardiac shunts. Initially these may manifest as left-to-right (i.e. systemic-to-pulmonary) shunts. The natural history of disease progression involves vascular remodeling and dysfunction that lead to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and, finally, to the development of Eisenmenger's syndrome, which is the most advanced form. The anatomical, pathological and structural abnormalities occurring in the pulmonary circulation of these patients are, to some extent, similar to those observed in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This understanding has recently led to significant changes in the management of Eisenmenger's syndrome, with the introduction of treatment specifically targeting pulmonary vascular disease. Early closure of the cardiac shunt remains the best way of preventing pulmonary vascular lesions. However, it is still not clear which preoperative parameters predict safe and successful repair, though hemodynamic evaluation is still routinely used for assessment. Postoperative pulmonary hypertension, both in the immediate period after surgical repair and during long-term follow-up, remains a real therapeutic challenge. The clinical situation of a single ventricle with Fontan circulation also presents difficulties when pulmonary vascular lesions are present. This article reviews pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital shunts and discusses a number of the specific problems encountered.

  7. Congenital Portosystemic Shunt: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Timpanaro, Tiziana; Passanisi, Stefano; Sauna, Alessandra; Trombatore, Claudia; Pennisi, Monica; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Smilari, Pierluigi; Greco, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital portosystemic venous malformations are rare abnormalities in which the portal blood drains into a systemic vein and which are characterized by extreme clinical variability. Case Presentations. The authors present two case reports of a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (Type II). In the first patient, apparently nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, proved to be secondary to hypoglycemic episodes related to the presence of a portosystemic shunt, later confirmed on imaging. During portal vein angiography, endovascular embolization of the portocaval fistula achieved occlusion of the anomalous venous tract. In the second patient, affected by Down's syndrome, the diagnosis of a portosystemic malformation was made by routine ultrasonography, performed to rule out concurrent congenital anomalies. Because of the absence of symptoms, we chose to observe this patient. Conclusions. These two case reports demonstrate the clinical heterogeneity of this malformation and the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As part of a proper workup, clinical evaluation must always be followed by radiographic diagnosis. PMID:25709849

  8. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Diseases Foundation for Ichthyosis and Related Skin Types (FIRST): Congenital Ichthyosiform Erythroderma National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Ichthyosis University of Kansas ...

  10. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    van der Bom, Teun; Zomer, A Carla; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Meijboom, Folkert J; Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart failure and arrhythmias are the most prominent. Accordingly, these patients need frequent follow-up by physicians with specific knowledge in the field of congenital heart disease. However, planning of care for this population is difficult, because the number of patients currently living with congenital heart disease is difficult to measure. Birth prevalence estimates vary widely according to different studies, and survival rates have not been well recorded. Consequently, the prevalence of congenital heart disease is unclear, with estimates exceeding the number of patients currently seen in cardiology clinics. New developments continue to influence the size of the population of patients with congenital heart disease. Prenatal screening has led to increased rates of termination of pregnancy. Improved management of complications has changed the time and mode of death caused by congenital heart disease. Several genetic and environmental factors have been shown to be involved in the etiology of congenital heart disease, although this knowledge has not yet led to the implementation of preventative measures. In this Review, we give an overview of the etiology, birth prevalence, current prevalence, mortality, and complications of congenital heart disease.

  11. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic congenital nail disorder 10

    MedlinePlus

    ... congenital nail disorder 10 nonsyndromic congenital nail disorder 10 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Nonsyndromic congenital nail disorder 10 is a condition that affects the fingernails and ...

  13. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD.

  14. A Case Series: Congenital Hyperinsulinism

    PubMed Central

    Alaei, Mohammad Reza; Akbaroghli, Susan; Keramatipour, Mohammad; Alaei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congenital hyperinsulinism is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations in genes responsible for β-cell’s function in glucose hemostasis leading to profound and recurrent hypoglycemia. The incidence of the disease is about 1 in 50000 newborns. Mutations in at least 8 genes have been reported to cause congenital hyperinsulinism. Mutations in ABCC8 gene are the most common cause of the disease that account for approximately 40% of cases. Less frequently KCNJ11 gene mutations are responsible for the disease. Mutations in other genes such as HADH account for smaller fractions of cases. In nearly half of the cases the cause remains unknown. Case Presentation During the period between 2005 and 2010, a total of six patients with persistent hyperinsulinism were investigated at Mofid Children’s Hospital. In this study all of the patients had early onset hyperinsulinemia. Five patients had consanguineous parents. After failure of medical treatment in three patients, They were undergone pancreatectomy. Two diffuse types and one focal type had been recognized in pathological analysis of intra-operative frozen specimens of pancreas in these patients. Genetic analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction followed by Sanger sequencing for ABCC8, KCNJ11and HADH genes. In five patients homozygous mutations in these genes were identified that indicated an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. In one patient a heterozygous mutation in ABCC8 was identified, indicating possible autosomal dominant inheritance of the disease. Conclusions Congenital hyperinsulinism can have different inheritance pattern. Autosomal recessive inheritance is more common but less frequently autosomal dominant inheritance can be seen. It appears that mutations in ABCC8 gene can show both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance of the disease. PCR followed by Sanger sequencing proved to be an efficient method for mutation detection in three investigated genes

  15. Immunohistochemical study of congenital gingival granular cell tumor (congenital epulis).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Fujita, S; Satoh, H; Okabe, H

    1990-11-01

    The congenital gingival granular cell tumor (CGGT) or congenital epulis is a rare lesion of unknown origin found only in newborn infants. The tumor consists mainly of large eosinophilic granular cells arranged in solid nests that are separated by thin fibrovascular areas. In addition, there are some spindle-shaped cells and medium-sized polygonal cells (so-called interstitial cells) among the neoplastic granular cells. Three CGGTs were investigated with a panel of poly- and monoclonal antibodies, using immunoperoxidase methods on formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections. Neoplastic granular cells of these three cases show cytoplasmic staining for neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and vimentin. However, all other reactions were negative. Our results suggest that the lesion may be derived from uncommitted nerve-related mesenchymal cells. On the other hand, interstitial cells show strong S-100 protein-, cytokeratin-, vimentin-, and NSE-immunostainings, and these cells are consistent with neuroendocrine nature. The presence of a biphasic cell population with granular cells and interstitial cells must be considered the main immunohistochemical feature.

  16. Congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    We report two patients, one with congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles and one with absence of the medial rectus muscles; in addition, one of them had absence of the lateral rectus muscles. While absence of the superior oblique and superior rectus has been more commonly reported in literature, especially with craniofacial syndromes, our patients were nonsyndromic. Considering the risk of anterior segment ischemia, correction of the large-angle exotropia was performed by horizontal rectus muscle surgery where possible, along with transfer of the superior oblique tendon to the superior part of the normal medial rectus muscle insertion area to create a tethering effect with a good outcome. PMID:28300745

  17. CONGENITAL PSEUDARTHROSIS OF THE CLAVICLE

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Marina Juliana Pita Sassioto Silveira; dos Reis Braga, Susana; Akkari, Miguel; Prado, José Carlos Lopes; Santili, Cláudio

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pseudarthrosis of the clavicle (PCC) is a rare affection, that can be diagnosed at birth and represent a disturbance of union of the ossification centers. It's more common in girls and in the right side. This study objectives to proceed a revision about the subject, that was searched in online database of LILACS and MEDLINE. We found 56 articles till present data. Besides be a bit infrequent, the PCC must not be missed or even forgotten, especially as differential diagnosis with acute fracture of the clavicle at birth by trauma in the childbirth. The diagnostic is relatively easy and the treatment can be just observation or even surgical. PMID:27047839

  18. Laboratory Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that screening and treatment for toxoplasmosis during gestation result in a decrease of vertical transmission and clinical sequelae. Early treatment was associated with improved outcomes. Thus, laboratory methods should aim for early identification of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). Diagnostic approaches should include, at least, detection of Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA and a comprehensive review of maternal history, including the gestational age at which the mother was infected and treatment. Here, we review laboratory methods for the diagnosis of CT, with emphasis on serological tools. A diagnostic algorithm that takes into account maternal history is presented. PMID:27147724

  19. Short stature with congenital ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Som J; Lakhani, Om J

    2015-12-09

    PIBIDS syndrome (photosensitivity, ichthyosis, brittle hair, intellectual impairment, decreased fertility and short stature) is a variant of trichothiodystrophy. It is a rare form of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis. Short stature is a vital component of PIBIDS syndrome. We present the cases of two siblings in whom we diagnosed PIBIDS syndrome. On evaluation for short stature, they were found to have severe vitamin D deficiency, which on correction led to the patients having considerable gain in stature. With this case, we would also like to propose that vitamin D deficiency could be one of the treatable causes of short stature in PIBIDS syndrome.

  20. Purpura-associated congenital lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Berti, Samantha; Pieri, Alessandro; Lotti, Torello; Duranti, Alberto; Panelos, John; De Martino, Maurizio; Moretti, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    An 8-year-old girl referred to our Department for a two-month worsening of congenital primary lymphedema of the lower limb and for the appearance of several purpuric lesions on the right thigh and knee. We diagnosed a lichenoid pigmented purpura of Gougerot and Blum in a patient with Milroy disease, complicated by an insufficiency of anterior saphena. We treated the patient with topical steroids and compression stockings, until surgical intervention of phlebectomy. We report this case for the rarity of the disease, for the even more rare association with lichenoid pigmented purpura and for cutaneous immunopathological findings.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... on PubMed Berry-Kravis EM, Zhou L, Rand CM, Weese-Mayer DE. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B ... Abara SG, Zhou L, Berry-Kravis EM, Rand CM, Weese-Mayer DE. Later-onset congenital central hypoventilation ...

  2. Congenital psoriasis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rahil, Anudeep K

    2008-01-01

    While childhood psoriasis is fairly common, congenital psoriasis appears to be rare and has not been well characterized. We present a patient with histologically confirmed congenital psoriasis. By reviewing the literature, we aim to both define this disease and compare it to infantile and childhood psoriasis. Electronic searches found articles reporting patients with biopsy-proven congenital psoriasis. We recorded clinical features, such as family history, anatomic involvement, and disease severity. We compared these data with previous descriptions of infantile and childhood psoriasis. We included nine patients with congenital psoriasis in our analysis. No patient had a first-degree family history of psoriasis. While the face, scalp, chest, and trunk were frequently involved, the buttocks generally were spared. Several patients had persistent disease despite therapy. In this series, congenital psoriasis differed from infantile and childhood psoriasis in several respects. Specifically, congenital psoriasis was associated with a lower prevalence of relevant family history, which could increase over time, and a different pattern of anatomic involvement, which may reflect exposure to age-associated environmental factors. Although several patients with congenital psoriasis had severe disease, this likely represents publication bias. Additional reports of congenital psoriasis with extended follow-up are needed to better characterize this condition.

  3. Macular colobomas in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Margolis, S; Scher, B M; Carr, R E

    1977-01-01

    Two siblings with Leber's congenital amaurosis had the unusual association of bilateral macular colobomas. In addition to the colobomas, the patients also had deafmutism, severe myopia, large corneas, and an unusual discrete area of peripapillary tapetoretinal sheen. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of patients with congenitally poor visual ascuity and a central retinal defect differentiated a localized loss of funciton from a degeneration involving the entire retina.

  4. A case and review of congenital leukonychia.

    PubMed

    Pathipati, Akhilesh S; Ko, Justin M; Yost, John M

    2016-10-15

    Leukonychia refers to a white discoloration of the nails. Although several conditions may cause white nails, a rare, isolated, congenital form of the disease is hypothesized to stem from disordered keratinization of the nail plate. Herein, we report a case of a 41-year-old woman with congenital leukonychia and review prior cases.

  5. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness: a new disorder?

    PubMed

    Dikkers, Frederik G; Verheij, Joke B G M; van Mechelen, Monique

    2005-04-01

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral deafness must have a lower prevalence. The purpose of this research was to present a new disorder, hereditary congenital unilateral deafness. A pedigree is presented in which both male and female members display symptoms of congenital unilateral deafness. Two affected persons and a normal-hearing member of the family have vestibular abnormalities without dysequilibrium. The inheritance pattern of this new syndrome is not clear. We hypothesize that the disorder might be new. A family like this has never before been presented in the medical literature.

  6. Congenital PCB poisoning: a reevaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    A review of the literature reveals a need to clarify the pathologic physiology of congenital polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) poisoning, which is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, brown staining of the skin and mucous membranes as in Addison's disease, natal teeth, widely open fontanelles and sagittal suture and apparent overgrowth of the gingiva. The skull abnormalities may represent irregular calcification, with natal teeth appearing because the bone of the mandible is penetrated more easily than usual. Some fetuses were poisoned at the time the mothers ingested the oil; others were affected in the subsequent years from residual contamination in the mothers' bodies. The misadventure in Japan was repeated in Taiwan in 1979. The seven congenital cases in Taiwan reported thus far seem to differ from those in Japan. In Taiwan the noses were somewhat black, two of the infants did not have low birth weight and the osseous abnormalities of the skull and gingival hyperplasia were not observed. Systematic followup studies should be made in Taiwan of the children born within 2 years of maternal poisoning with PCBs. Special attention should be given to age at first dentition and skull-X-rays for spotty calcification, among other measures of physical, neurologic and intellectual development.

  7. Norrbottnian congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Minde, Jan K

    2006-04-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare hereditary neuropathy. We present patients from a large family in Norrbotten, Sweden with a mutation in the nerve growth factor beta gene (NGFbeta). Using a model of recessive inheritance, we identified an 8.3-Mb region on chromosome 1p11.2-p13.2 shared by the affected individuals in the family. Analysis of candidate genes in the disease-critical region revealed a mutation in the coding region of the NGFbeta gene specific for the disease haplotype. All three severely affected individuals were homozygous for the mutation. The disease haplotype was also observed in both unaffected and mildly affected family members, but in heterozygote form. We have identified 43 patients, 3 homozygous and 40 heterozygous. The homozygous patients have a severe congenital form with onset of symptoms at an early age, most often affecting the lower extremities with insidious progressive joint swellings or painless fractures. Fracture healing was normal, but the arthropathy was progressive, resulting in disabling Charcot joints with gross deformity and instability. These patients lacked deep pain perception in bones and joints and had no protective reflexes, leading to gross bone and joint complications. They also had abnormal temperature perception but normal ability to sweat. There was no mental retardation. Clinically, they fit best into the group HSAN type V. Sural nerve biopsies showed a moderate loss of thin myelinated fibers (Adelta-fibers) and a severe reduction of unmyelinated fibers (C-fibers). 14 of the 40 heterozygous adult patients had mild or moderate problems with joint deformities, usually with only slight discomfort. Treatment was conservative with (if needed) different kinds of orthosis and in three cases joint replacement. Nine patients had neuropathy, and nine patients had no symptoms. In congenital disorders like these, it is important to evaluate the age and also the slowly progressive nature, when considering treatment

  8. Large bimedial rectus recessions in congenital esotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Szmyd, S. M.; Nelson, L. B.; Calhoun, J. H.; Spratt, C.

    1985-01-01

    The success rate of large (6 and 7 mm) bimedial rectus recessions in 45 congenital esotropes with deviations of 50 prism dioptres or greater was found to be 91%. Judgment of final alignment was made six weeks postoperatively, with an average follow-up of 13 months. Large bimedial rectus recessions are an effective surgical treatment for congenital esotropia. This procedure does not significantly alter adduction, and leaves other muscles available should further surgery be necessary. These findings show that initial surgery on three or more muscles is unnecessary in congenital esotropia. PMID:3994944

  9. Public health research in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, Diego A; Lopez, Keila N

    2014-01-01

    Public health research is an integral part of the study of congenital heart disease. While this type of research has become more popular, particularly over the past decade, it has a history that stretches back to almost the beginnings of pediatric cardiology as a field. This review aims to introduce the concepts and methodologies of public health and how they relate to congenital heart disease, describe some of the challenges of traditional research methods in congenital heart disease, describe the history of public health research, and demonstrate the relevance of public health research, particularly databases, to pediatric cardiology fellows.

  10. High hyperopia in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R S; Caputo, A R; Nelson, L B; Zanoni, D

    1985-10-01

    Few studies comment on the type of refractive errors found in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis. The association of an uncomplicated infantile form of this condition with high hyperopia but without systemic complications has been suggested. In a retrospective study, we identified 11 patients who satisfied the criteria for the diagnosis of this subtype of Leber's congenital amaurosis. All of our cases were found to have at least +6.00 diopters of hyperopia on cycloplegic refraction. No systemic abnormalities were found in any of these children. We suggest that high hyperopia be included in the diagnostic criteria of this specific form of Leber's congenital amaurosis.

  11. Hyperopia in complicated Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Dagi, L R; Leys, M J; Hansen, R M; Fulton, A B

    1990-05-01

    We studied the refractive status of 13 children with Leber's congenital amaurosis. Seven had the disease complicated by neurological or other systemic abnormalities, while the other 6 patients had only ophthalmic abnormalities. All 13 patients were hyperopic. The magnitude of hyperopia did not differ significantly between the complicated and uncomplicated groups. Therefore, one cannot, as previously suggested, use the presence of high hyperopia to differentiate an uncomplicated form of Leber's congenital amaurosis from one complicated by neurologic or other systemic abnormalities. The concurrence of hyperopia with Leber's congenital amaurosis should not steer the physician away from careful neurologic systemic or biochemical evaluation of the child.

  12. [Congenital hepatic fibrosis: apropos of 12 cases].

    PubMed

    Murga, M L; Jara, P; Díaz, M C; de la Rubia, L; Arroba, M L; Larrauri, J; Vázquez, C

    1988-02-01

    Twelve patients with congenital hepatic fibrosis have been retrospectively studied and followed for 1 to 14 years. Clinical features, hepatic function tests and biopsy have been analyzed. Presence of portal hypertension and congenital malformation have been investigated. Clinical presentations varies from newborn to nine years of age without male or female predominance. Most frequent clinical form has been hypertensive type. Cholangitic type has worse prognosis. Familiar recurrence rate is 20%. Congenital malformations are associated in 92% most frequently infantile polycystic kidney disease. Hepatic biopsy has confirmed diagnosis in all patients.

  13. Unilateral straight hair and congenital horner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Frederick M; Wertenbaker, Christian; Cho, Hyung; Marmor, Maury A; Ahn-Lee, Sandra S; Bernard, Bruno A

    2012-06-01

    Congenital Horner syndrome is a rare disorder that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of Horner syndrome. Like Horner syndrome in general, it consists primarily of ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis. Congenital Horner syndrome may manifest some special features such as iris heterochromia since the sympathetic nervous system is an essential component for the development and maintenance of eye color. We present 3 cases of unilateral straight hair in association with congenital Horner syndrome in which the patients had straight hair ipsilateral to the Horner syndrome, whereas on the contralateral side, it was curly, and we discuss possible mechanisms for this phenomenon.

  14. Postural deformities in congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, G; Postlethwaite, R J; Lendon, M; Houston, I B; Savage, J M

    1981-01-01

    Six successive cases of congenital nephrotic syndrome are described. Each one showed flexion deformities of the knees and hips, widely open anterior and posterior fontanelles, and wide separation of the skull sutures. These abnormalities were present not only in cases in which the renal histology was of the microcystic Finnish type of congenital nephrotic syndrome, but also in those in which the histological picture was one of the variants associated with congenital nephrotic syndrome. It is suggested that such abnormalities are postural deformities, possibly produced by the large placenta. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7332344

  15. Congenital onychoheterotopia involving multiple toe nails.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Savita; Khullar, Geeti; Dogra, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Onychoheterotopia is an uncommon condition in which nail tissue is found beyond the common nail unit of the digits of the hands and feet, most often on the fifth digit of the hand. It represents an extra and independent nail that can be present either congenitally, or more commonly, acquired following trauma. The exact pathogenesis of the congenital type is undetermined. We report a 25-year-old male with multiple congenital ectopic nails of the toes since birth, which has not been reported before.

  16. Congenital anomalies surveillance in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lowry, R Brian

    2008-01-01

    Congenital anomalies (CA) are present in approximately 3% of all newborn babies and account for about 12% of paediatric hospital admissions. They represent an important public health problem. Surveillance is especially important so that preventive measures such as folic acid fortification can be properly assessed without resorting to a series of ad hoc studies. Canada's surveillance of CAs is weak, with only Alberta and British Columbia having established sytems. Most provinces have perinatal systems but their CA data are incomplete and they do not capture terminations of pregnancy. The same is true of the Public Health Agency of Canada's system. A new system, the Fetal Alert Network, has been proposed for Ontario, which represents a start but will require additional sources of ascertainment if it is to be a truly population-based system for Ontario.

  17. Congenital dental disease of horses.

    PubMed

    DeBowes, R M; Gaughan, E M

    1998-08-01

    Equine congenital dental deformities are not limited merely to those presented here; however, the examples discussed offer the reader an appreciation for the range of severity and complexity that may be found in affected horses. The veterinarian is obligated to provide the best possible care for the patient and to relieve animal suffering. The lack of definitive evidence for heritability of many of these defects can place the veterinarian in an untenable position, particularly when presented with literature that proclaims or suggests without evidence that a particular condition is inherited. In such cases, the veterinarian is encouraged to counsel owners, citing substantiated medical information, and to recommend that owners make the decision to eliminate the affected animals' ability to reproduce.

  18. X-linked congenital retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Kellner, U; Brümmer, S; Foerster, M H; Wessing, A

    1990-01-01

    The natural history and electrophysiological findings of 52 patients with X-linked congenital retinoschisis with a follow-up of up to 26 years are described. The mean visual acuity was reduced to 0.24 +/- 0.2 and remained unchanged in most patients during this time. If visual loss occurred, it usually happened in the first decennium. The complications were retinal detachments in 11% and vitreous hemorrhages in 4% of the eyes. In general, the vitreous hemorrhages resolved spontaneously. Retinal detachments were treated successfully with conventional buckling procedures. Redetachments occurred in about 40%. Prophylactic laser coagulation was of no use because it was complicated by detachment in 43% of our series. The electro-oculogram was usually normal. In addition to the known electrorentinographic findings of normal a-wave and reduced b-wave amplitudes, we found prolonged b-wave latencies and implicit times, as well as a reduced 30 Hz flicker response.

  19. [Congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. The last 20 years by the example of congenital neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Zeidler, C; Welte, K

    2007-12-01

    Congenital bone marrow failure syndromes are rare diseases characterised by a reduction of mature blood cells (erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils). Examples of such disorders include congenital aplastic anemia (Fanconi anemia), congenital hypoplastic anemia (Diamond-Blackfan anemia), congenital neutropenias (Kostmann syndrome, cyclic neutropenia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and others), and congenital thrombocytopenias (TAR syndrome, amegacaryocytic thrombocytopenia). In Germany the prevalence of congenital bone marrow failure syndromes can be estimated to be 10/1,000,000 children and adolescents. Although rare, these diseases contributed significantly to the current knowledge on normal haematopoiesis. The documentation of rare diseases by patient registries and the cooperation of clinical centres within networks are most important for the resolution of such disorders. In the following, congenital neutropenia will be presented as an example: Until the 1980s congenital neutropenia could only be classified clinically. Few cases had been reported in the literature. All subtypes were therefore collected under the general term "congenital neutropenia". The establishment of an international network of experts and the long-term documentation of the courses of disease in a common database allowed for statistically workable data in response to therapy, secondary diagnoses and the long-term prognosis. A close cooperation with scientists finally led to the characterisation of genetically different disorders with common pathomechanisms.

  20. Intrapulmonary activation of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7/G-protein-coupled Mas receptor axis attenuates pulmonary hypertension in Ren-2 transgenic rats exposed to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hampl, V; Herget, J; Bíbová, J; Baňasová, A; Husková, Z; Vaňourková, Z; Jíchová, Š; Kujal, P; Vernerová, Z; Sadowski, J; Červenka, L

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the role of intrapulmonary activity of the two axes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS): vasoconstrictor angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (ANG II)/ANG II type 1 receptor (AT₁) axis, and vasodilator ACE type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7)/Mas receptor axis, in the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in Ren-2 transgenic rats (TGR). Transgene-negative Hannover Sprague-Dawley (HanSD) rats served as controls. Both TGR and HanSD rats responded to two weeks´ exposure to hypoxia with a significant increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), however, the increase was much less pronounced in the former. The attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in TGR as compared to HanSD rats was associated with inhibition of ACE gene expression and activity, inhibition of AT₁receptor gene expression and suppression of ANG II levels in lung tissue. Simultaneously, there was an increase in lung ACE2 gene expression and activity and, in particular, ANG 1-7 concentrations and Mas receptor gene expression. We propose that a combination of suppression of ACE/ANG II/AT₁receptor axis and activation of ACE2/ANG 1-7/Mas receptor axis of the RAS in the lung tissue is the main mechanism explaining attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in TGR as compared with HanSD rats.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital insensitivity to pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a complete loss of the sense of smell (anosmia). Congenital insensitivity to pain is considered a ... to cells that detect sensations such as touch, smell, and pain. Related Information What does it mean ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fujii T, Aiba H, Toda T. Seizure-genotype relationship in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy. Brain Dev. ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: congenital mirror movement disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital mirror movement disorder is a condition in which intentional movements of one side of the body are mirrored by involuntary movements ...

  4. Congenital and Genetic Disease in Domestic Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, John J.

    1972-01-01

    Reviews observations on domestic animals that have led to the identification of environmental teratogens, and have provided insight into the pathogenesis of congenital defects and genetic diseases in man." (Author/AL)

  5. Ancient history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    New, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    Although there are many erudite reports on the history of endocrinology and endocrine disorders, the history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia has not been published. I have tried to review ancient as well as modern history of CAH.

  6. Congenital Insensitivity to Pain (HSNA type IV).

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-04-01

    Investigators from New York University, NY, studied 14 patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA), compared to 10 patients with chronically deficient sympathetic activity (pure autonomic failure), and 15 normal age-matched controls.

  7. Living with a Congenital Heart Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... well the heart’s chambers and valves are working. Health Insurance and Employment Adults who have congenital heart defects ... carefully consider how changing jobs will affect their health insurance coverage. Some health plans have waiting periods or ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe visual impairment beginning in infancy. The visual impairment tends to be stable, although it may worsen very slowly over time. Leber congenital amaurosis is also associated with other vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), ...

  9. [Congenital toxoplasmosis: severe ocular and neurological complications].

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Franka; Buzing, Cecile; Sporken, Jan M J; Erasmus, Corry E; van der Flier, Michiel; Semmekrot, Ben A

    2011-01-01

    Two infants with congenital toxoplasmosis are presented. A girl born prematurely was treated postnatally after the mother had received antimicrobial treatment during pregnancy for acute toxoplasmosis. Apart from being small for gestational age, she remained without symptoms and treatment was ceased after 13 months. A 2-month-old boy presented with hydrocephalus and chorioretinitis, consistent with congenital toxoplasmosis. Despite antimicrobial treatment, at 12 months of age he suffered from epilepsy, cerebral palsy and vision impairment. Most infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (2 per 1000 live births in the Netherlands) are asymptomatic at birth. The education of pregnant women is crucial for the prevention of congenital toxoplasmosis. Awareness of antenatal and postnatal presenting signs and symptoms is important for clinicians, because early diagnosis and treatment may minimize sequelae. Untreated, the majority of affected infants will develop chorioretinitis, deafness and/or neurological symptoms.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it alters a molecule within these cells called hemoglobin . Hemoglobin carries oxygen to cells and tissues throughout the ... autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia , some of the normal hemoglobin is replaced by an abnormal form called methemoglobin, ...

  11. Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Folic Acid : Helping to Ensure a Healthy Pregnancy. ( English or Spanish ) Ten Tips to Prevent Infections during ...

  12. Submacular hemorrhage secondary to congenital toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Luiza Fontes de Azevedo; Martins, Thiago Gonçalves dos Santos; Moncada, Francisco Javier Solano; Motta, Mário Martins dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the case of a patient with congenital toxoplasmosis and submacular hemorrhage caused by a neovascular membrane who underwent an intravitreal injection of C3F8 and bevacizumab, and had a good visual recovery. PMID:24728255

  13. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  14. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... health and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern The various syndromes that include congenital hepatic fibrosis can have different inheritance patterns. Most of these disorders are inherited in an ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries , Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome , interrupted aortic arch, ... Testing Registry: Congenital heart disease Genetic Testing Registry: Ebstein's anomaly Genetic Testing Registry: Hypoplastic left heart syndrome ...

  16. Cervicobrachialgia with congenital vertebral anomalies and diastematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Roosen, N; De Moor, J

    1984-05-01

    A case of diastematomyelia in an adult female patient is reported. The relationship of the cervicobrachialgia, which was the presenting sign, to the diastematomyelia and the congenital vertebral anomalies is discussed.

  17. Congenital lung lesions: Postnatal management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Dakshesh H; Rasiah, Shree Vishna

    2015-08-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of lung lesion has become more accurate resulting in dilemma and controversies of its antenatal and postnatal management. Majority of antenatally diagnosed congenital lung lesions are asymptomatic in the neonatal age group. Large lung lesions cause respiratory compromise and inevitably require urgent investigations and surgery. The congenital lung lesion presenting with hydrops requires careful postnatal management of lung hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Preoperative stabilization with gentle ventilation with permissive hypercapnia and delayed surgery similar to congenital diaphragmatic hernia management has been shown to result in good outcome. The diagnostic investigations and surgical management of the asymptomatic lung lesions remain controversial. Postnatal management and outcome of congenital cystic lung lesions are discussed.

  18. Congenital hemangiopericytoma: two cases of familiar presentation.

    PubMed

    Margarit, J; Rodó, J; Costa, J M; Vives, E; Escorihuela, F; Cardesa, A; Ribalta, T

    1997-08-01

    We report two cases of congenital hemangiopericytoma localized in the abdominal wall in the first patient and scalp in the second. The treatment of both cases consisted in the complete resection of the tumor mass. Four and two years later the patients remain asymptomatic. The special interest in this case report lies in the extremely low incidence of congenital hemangiopericytoma and that this is the first reference to affected siblings.

  19. Leber's congenital amaurosis with associated nephronophthisis.

    PubMed

    Roizenblatt, J; Peduti Cunha, L A

    1980-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 15-year-old girl with Leber's congenital amaurosis with associated nephronophthisis. The main findings in this case are: congenital blindness; enophthalmos; photophobia; nystagmus; keratoconus; cataracts; pigmentary degeneration in the fundus of both eyes; progressive uremia with absence of hematuria, proteinuria, pyuria, and glycosuria; low urinary density, normal lipidic profile; osteoporosis; absence of edema; polydipsia; polyuria; and a history of consanguinity between her parents. Tranmission of this entity allows an autosomal recessive pattern.

  20. Screening programme for congenital toxoplasmosis in France.

    PubMed

    Thulliez, P

    1992-01-01

    The high prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in France led to the establishment of a national screening programme. Preventive measures were progressively introduced, and these became compulsory in 1978 with the result that the incidence of congenital toxoplasmosis is now markedly reduced. Further improvements may include more systematic sampling from women before pregnancy, better and adequate health education and centralized notification of both maternal and congenital cases of toxoplasmosis.

  1. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  2. Congenital bilateral sternocleidomastoid contracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Manohar K V; Lee, Peter; Mahadev, Arjandas; Lee, Eng Hin

    2009-05-01

    Unilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle contracture causing torticollis and other secondary deformities such as facial scoliosis, plagiocephaly and scoliosis of cervical spine are well known. The aetiology and pathogenesis is still intriguing. Although unilateral contracture of sternocleidomastoid is seen quite often, bilateral sternocleidomastoid contracture is almost unheard of. A review of the English literature revealed no cases of bilateral congenital sternocleidomastoid contracture being reported. We present a case report of a 19-year-old girl with congenital bilateral sternocleidomastoid contracture.

  3. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  4. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-05-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin.

  5. Congenital Symmastia: A 3-Step Approach

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Atef A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Congenital symmastia is a medial confluence of the breasts. It is a rare anomaly with few reports in the literature and no standard treatment. In this article, we present a case of congenital symmastia treated by 3 steps: liposuction, fixation of the skin to the chest wall in the area of the intermammary sulcus, and postoperative intermammary compression. A successful result was achieved with normal cleavage between the breasts. So, this is considered the ideal treatment for this condition.

  6. Microtia and congenital aural atresia.

    PubMed

    Genc, Selahattin; Kahraman, Erkan; Ozel, Halil Erdem; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Demir, Ahmet; Selcuk, Adin

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the clinical characteristics of microtia and congenital aural atresia cases in Turkey and to make the classification. For this purpose, records of 28 patients with microtia who were admitted to the ENT Clinic of Eskisehir Military Hospital, Turkey, between 1995 and 2011 and 3 patients admitted to the ENT outpatient clinic of Kocaeli Derince Education and Research Hospital, Turkey, were analyzed retrospectively. Of the total 31 patients with microtia (35 microtic ears), involvement of the right ear of 20 patients (64.5%), the left ear of 7 patients (22.5%), and bilateral involvement in 4 patients (12.9%) were observed. There was a unilateral involvement in 27 patients (87.1%). According to the Marx grading, 2 patients (5.7%) had grade 1 malformation, 3 (8.6%) had grade 2 malformation, 29 (82.9%) had grade 3 malformation, and 1 (2.9%) had grade 4 malformation (anotia). Although the characteristics of microtia vary in different population, the results in Turkey are consistent with those in the literature.

  7. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  8. Diagnosis of congenital fibrinogen disorders.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Aurélien; Casini, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Congenital fibrinogen disorders comprise quantitative disorders defined by a complete absence (afibrinogenemia) or by a decreased level (hypofibrinogenemia) of circulating fibrinogen and qualitative disorders characterized by a discrepancy between the activity and the antigenic levels of fibrinogen (dysfibrinogenemia and hypodysfibrinogenemia). The biological diagnosis is based on a standard haemostasis assessment. All the coagulation tests that depend on the formation of fibrin as the end point are affected; although in dysfibrinogenemia the specificity and sensitivity of routine test depend on reagent and techniques. A genetic exploration permits to confirm the diagnosis and may enhance the prediction of the patient's phenotype. Homozygous or composite heterozygous null mutations are most often responsible for afibrinogenemia while hypofibrinogenemic patients are mainly heterozygous carrier of an afibrinogenemic allele. Heterozygous missense mutations are prevalent in dysfibrinogenemia, with two hot spot localized in exon 2 of the FGA and in the exon 8 of the FGG. The correlation between phenotype and genotype has been identified in some fibrinogen variants, including six mutations clustered in exons 8 and 9 of the FGG leading to hypofibrinogenemia with hepatic inclusions of abnormal fibrinogen aggregates as well as a few mutations associated with an increase risk of thrombotic events. A familial screening and additional functional assays should be carried out when possible.

  9. [Congenital muscular dystrophies in children].

    PubMed

    Scavone-Mauro, Cristina; Barros, Graciela

    2013-09-06

    From the clinical and genetic point of view, congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogenic group of diseases within neuromuscular pathologies. The best known forms are: merosin deficiency CMD, collagen VI deficiency CMD, LMNA-related CMD, selenoprotein-related CMD (SEPN1) and alpha-dystroglycan-related CMD. They present with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Most of them are transmitted by recessive autosomal inheritance. The initial manifestations very often begin in infancy or in the neonatal period. There are clinical suspicions of the existence of hypotonia and paresis, and they are characterised by a dystrophic pattern in the muscular biopsy (muscle replaced by fibroadipose tissue, with necrosis and cell regeneration). Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CMD have made it possible to make further progress in the classification of the different subtypes. The aim of this review is to comment on the advances made in recent years as regards the classification of CMD in terms of genetics, the proteins involved and their clinical presentation.

  10. Congenital malaria in Urabá, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital malaria has been considered a rare event; however, recent reports have shown frequencies ranging from 3% to 54.2% among newborns of mothers who had suffered malaria during pregnancy. There are only a few references concerning the epidemiological impact of this entity in Latin-America and Colombia. Objective The aim of the study was to measure the prevalence of congenital malaria in an endemic Colombian region and to determine some of its characteristics. Methods A prospective, descriptive study was carried out in the mothers who suffered malaria during pregnancy and their newborns. Neonates were clinically evaluated at birth and screened for Plasmodium spp. infection by thick smear from the umbilical cord and peripheral blood, and followed-up weekly during the first 21 days of postnatal life through clinical examinations and thick smears. Results 116 newborns were included in the study and 80 umbilical cord samples were obtained. Five cases of congenital infection were identified (four caused by P. vivax and one by P. falciparum), two in umbilical cord blood and three in newborn peripheral blood. One case was diagnosed at birth and the others during follow-up. Prevalence of congenital infection was 4.3%. One of the infected newborns was severely ill, while the others were asymptomatic and apparently healthy. The mothers of the newborns with congenital malaria had been diagnosed with malaria in the last trimester of pregnancy or during delivery, and also presented placental infection. Conclusions Congenital malaria may be a frequent event in newborns of mothers who have suffered malaria during pregnancy in Colombia. An association was found between congenital malaria and the diagnosis of malaria in the mother during the last trimester of pregnancy or during delivery, and the presence of placental infection. PMID:21846373

  11. Congenital tumors of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Severino, Mariasavina; Schwartz, Erin S; Thurnher, Majda M; Rydland, Jana; Nikas, Ioannis; Rossi, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Congenital tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are often arbitrarily divided into "definitely congenital" (present or producing symptoms at birth), "probably congenital" (present or producing symptoms within the first week of life), and "possibly congenital" (present or producing symptoms within the first 6 months of life). They represent less than 2% of all childhood brain tumors. The clinical features of newborns include an enlarged head circumference, associated hydrocephalus, and asymmetric skull growth. At birth, a large head or a tense fontanel is the presenting sign in up to 85% of patients. Neurological symptoms as initial symptoms are comparatively rare. The prenatal diagnosis of congenital CNS tumors, while based on ultrasonography, has significantly benefited from the introduction of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging studies. Teratomas constitute about one third to one half of these tumors and are the most common neonatal brain tumor. They are often immature because of primitive neural elements and, rarely, a component of mixed malignant germ cell tumors. Other tumors include astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, and medulloblastomas. Less common histologies include craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas. There is a strong predilection for supratentorial locations, different from tumors of infants and children. Differential diagnoses include spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage that can occur in the presence of coagulation factor deficiency or underlying vascular malformations, and congenital brain malformations, especially giant heterotopia. The prognosis for patients with congenital tumors is generally poor, usually because of the massive size of the tumor. However, tumors can be resected successfully if they are small and favorably located. The most favorable outcomes are achieved with choroid plexus tumors, where aggressive surgical treatment leads to disease-free survival.

  12. Prevention and avoidance of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Nevin, N C

    1988-06-15

    Many congenital abnormalities do not have either a Mendelian pattern of inheritance or an identifiable chromosome abnormality and are described as 'multifactorial' as it is assumed they are determined by several genes, each with added effects and modified to a greater or lesser extent by environmental factors. They include spina bifida and anencephaly, cleft lip or cleft palate or both, congenital heart defect and congenital dislocation of the hip, and they constitute a major community health problem. Developments in genetics, biochemistry and cytogenetics have presented new approaches to the prevention and avoidance of congenital abnormalities. The approaches available for the avoidance of congenital malformations include the avoidance of harmful environmental factors, the screening of the newborn and early treatment, genetic counselling and antenatal monitoring with selective termination. The prevention of neural-tube defects in 'high risk' mothers can be achieved by periconceptional vitamin supplementation. In Northern Ireland, of 438 fully supplemented women, only 4 (0.98%) infants or fetuses among 407 infants and fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect, whereas of 356 unsupplemented women, 16 (4.7%) infants or fetuses among 337 infants or fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect.

  13. Congenital lacrimal fistula: A major review.

    PubMed

    Chaung, Jia Quan; Sundar, Gangadhara; Ali, Mohammad Javed

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and summarize the etiopathogenesis, symptomatology, systemic associations, management, complications and clinical outcomes of congenital lacrimal fistulae. The authors performed an electronic database (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library) search of all articles published in English on congenital lacrimal fistulae. Congenital subsets of patients from series of mixed lacrimal fistulae were included in the review. These articles were reviewed along with their relevant cross-references. Data reviewed included demographics, presentations, investigations, management, complications and outcomes. The prevalence of congenital lacrimal fistulae is reported to be around 1 in 2000 live births. They are frequently unilateral, although familial cases tend to be bilateral. Lacrimal and systemic anomalies have been associated with lacrimal fistulae. Exact etiopathogenesis is unknown but mostly believed to be an accessory out budding from the lacrimal drainage system during embryogenesis. Treatment is indicated when significant epiphora or discharge is present and is mostly achieved by various fistulectomy techniques with or without a dacryocystorhinostomy. Congenital lacrimal fistulae are a distinct clinical entity with unique features. Surgical management can be challenging and successful outcomes are usually achieved with widely accepted protocols.

  14. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  15. [Evaluation of congenital heart disease in adults].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María; Mateos García, Marta; Bret Zurita, Montserrat

    2003-06-01

    Improvements in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital heart disease during infancy and childhood have resulted in an outstanding increase in the prevalence of these entities during adulthood. Congenital heart disease in the adult represents a new diagnostic challenge to the consultant cardiologist, unfamiliar with the anatomical and functional complexities of cardiac malformations. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with imaging techniques can be as accurate as in children. However, these techniques cannot substitute for a detailed clinical assessment. Physical examination, electrocardiography and chest x-rays remain the three main pillars of bedside diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography is undoubtedly the imaging technique which provides most information, and in many situations no additional studies are needed. Nevertheless, ultrasound imaging properties in adults are not as favorable as in children, and prior surgical procedures further impair image quality. Despite recent advances in ultrasound technologies such as harmonic or contrast imaging, other diagnostic procedures are sometimes required. Fortunately, transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are easily performed in the adult, and do not require anaesthetic support, in contrast to pediatric patients. These techniques, together with nuclear cardiology and cardiac catheterization, complete the second tier of diagnostic techniques for congenital heart disease. To avoid unnecessary repetition of diagnostic procedures, the attending cardiologist should choose the sequence of diagnostic techniques carefully; although the information this yields is often redundant, it is also frequently complementary. This article aims to compare the diagnostic utility of different imaging techniques in adult patients with congenital heart disease, both with and without prior surgical repair.

  16. [Congenital heart disease in Mexico. Regionalization proposal].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge Luis; Curi-Curi, Pedro José; Ramírez-Marroquín, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. Reports of its prevalence around the world range from 2.1 to 12.3 for every 1000 newborns. Prevalence in our country remains unknown, but it probably occupies sixth place for mortality in infants less than a year old, and third place for mortality in those aged between 1 and 4 years. Based on birthrate, it is calculated that 10 to 12 000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. To understand the magnitude of the problem, it is important to identify the global number of newborns with some congenital cardiopathy each year and the type of malformation that they have, in order to determine the necessary resources and to plan their distribution. The main objective of regionalization is the justification of the resources with an emphasis in the specialized medical services to provide the best results for the patients. Hence, reason, based on the resources of each state, as well as their natality and infant mortality rates related to congenital cardiovascular pathology, we should proceed to regionalize the attention, and to simultaneously create a trustworthy database of the congenital cardiopathies. This should have many benefits, such as increase the number of total attended cases, improve the quality of attention, use appropriately the existent resources, and -surely- decrease the infant mortality.

  17. Congenital scoliosis: an up-to-date

    PubMed Central

    Burnei, G; Gavriliu, S; Vlad, C; Georgescu, I; Ghita, RA; Dughilă, C; Japie, EM; Onilă, A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis represents a spinal malformation due to defects of formation, segmentation or mixed ones. It is characterized by a longitudinal and rotational imbalance. 54 patients were analyzed and 39 out of them were operated by various approaches with anterior and posterior instrumentations during 2000 and 2012. The impossibility to appoint some patients encountered in the daily practice into the known classifications, allowed us to purpose two categories of congenital scoliosis related to the predominance of spinal deviances in the coronal and transversal views. No certain etiology of congenital scoliosis has been identified until today. The susceptibility of some polygenic defects is obvious due to the presence of a sum of defects associated to most of the congenital scoliosis cases and the rarity of the presence of a unique defect. The diagnosis requires a thorough clinical and imaging examination in order to establish an individualized therapeutic strategy. The treatment of congenital scoliosis is different from the adolescent idiopathic one. Therapeutic criteria are significantly different. It is essential to assess the difference in growth of the concavity related to the convexity when choosing a particular procedure. The magnitude of the curve and the progressive rate are fundamental issues to the surgeon PMID:26351546

  18. Molecular Pathophysiology of Congenital Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bohnen, M S; Peng, G; Robey, S H; Terrenoire, C; Iyer, V; Sampson, K J; Kass, R S

    2017-01-01

    Ion channels represent the molecular entities that give rise to the cardiac action potential, the fundamental cellular electrical event in the heart. The concerted function of these channels leads to normal cyclical excitation and resultant contraction of cardiac muscle. Research into cardiac ion channel regulation and mutations that underlie disease pathogenesis has greatly enhanced our knowledge of the causes and clinical management of cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review the molecular determinants, pathogenesis, and pharmacology of congenital Long QT Syndrome. We examine mechanisms of dysfunction associated with three critical cardiac currents that comprise the majority of congenital Long QT Syndrome cases: 1) IKs, the slow delayed rectifier current; 2) IKr, the rapid delayed rectifier current; and 3) INa, the voltage-dependent sodium current. Less common subtypes of congenital Long QT Syndrome affect other cardiac ionic currents that contribute to the dynamic nature of cardiac electrophysiology. Through the study of mutations that cause congenital Long QT Syndrome, the scientific community has advanced understanding of ion channel structure-function relationships, physiology, and pharmacological response to clinically employed and experimental pharmacological agents. Our understanding of congenital Long QT Syndrome continues to evolve rapidly and with great benefits: genotype-driven clinical management of the disease has improved patient care as precision medicine becomes even more a reality.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  20. Handicapping Conditions Associated with the Congenital Rubella Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, McCay; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence of impairments diagnosed among children with congenital rubella syndrome. Approximately 73 percent are hearing impaired, at least 35 percent have congenital heart disorders, and 33 percent have visual defects. (Author)

  1. Precalcaneal congenital fibrolipomatous hamartomas: report of occurrence in half brothers.

    PubMed

    Fangman, William L; Prose, Neil S

    2004-01-01

    Precalcaneal congenital fibrolipomatous hamartomas are uncommon, congenital, nontender papules located on the medial plantar aspects of the heel. We report the occurrence of this rare disorder in two half brothers, suggesting that it may occur in a familial pattern.

  2. Frequently Asked Questions about Congenital Melanocytic Nevus (CMN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Now Open Conference Schedule Highlights Fundraiser Advice Holiday Shopping at Amazon Happy In My Skin Congenital Nevus ... Now Open Conference Schedule Highlights Fundraiser Advice Holiday Shopping at Amazon Happy In My Skin Congenital Nevus ...

  3. Psychological Challenges Associated with Congenital Melanocytic Nevus (CMN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Now Open Conference Schedule Highlights Fundraiser Advice Holiday Shopping at Amazon Happy In My Skin Congenital Nevus ... Now Open Conference Schedule Highlights Fundraiser Advice Holiday Shopping at Amazon Happy In My Skin Congenital Nevus ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 1 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 is a disorder characterized ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 2 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 is a disorder characterized ...

  6. Cytogenomic Aberrations in Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Azamian, Mahshid; Lalani, Seema R.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cardiovascular malformations are the most common birth defects, with a complex multifactorial etiology. Genetic factors play an important role, illuminated by numerous cytogenetically visible abnormalities, as well as submicroscopic genomic imbalances affecting critical genomic regions in the affected individuals. Study of rare families with Mendelian forms, as well as emerging next-generation sequencing technologies have uncovered a multitude of genes relevant for human congenital cardiac diseases. It is clear that the complex embryology of human cardiac development, with an orchestrated interplay of transcription factors, chromatin regulators, and signal transduction pathway molecules can be easily perturbed by genomic imbalances affecting dosage-sensitive regions. This review focuses on chromosomal abnormalities contributing to congenital heart diseases and underscores several genomic disorders linked to human cardiac malformations in the last few decades. PMID:27385961

  7. Congenital narrowing of the cervical spinal canal.

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, J T

    1975-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings in six patients with congenital narrowing of the cervical spinal canal and neurological symptoms are described. A variable age of onset and an entirely male occurrence were found. Signs and symptoms of spinal cord dysfunction predominated in all but one patient. Symptoms were produced in five patients by increased physical activity alone. Congenital narrowing of the cervical spinal canal may result in cord compression without a history of injury and occasionally without evidence of significant bony degenerative changes. The clinical features may be distinguishable from those found in cervical spondylosis without congenital narrowing. Intermittent claudication of the cervical spinal cord appears to be an important feature of this syndrome. Surgery improved four out of five people. PMID:1219087

  8. New Genetic Insights into Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Stephanie M.; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2012-01-01

    There has been remarkable progress in understanding the genetic basis of cardiovascular malformations. Chromosome microarray analysis has provided a new tool to understand the genetic basis of syndromic cardiovascular malformations resulting from microdeletion or microduplication of genetic material, allowing the delineation of new syndromes. Improvements in sequencing technology have led to increasingly comprehensive testing for aortopathy, cardiomyopathy, single gene syndromic disorders, and Mendelian-inherited congenital heart disease. Understanding the genetic etiology for these disorders has improved their clinical recognition and management and led to new guidelines for treatment and family-based diagnosis and surveillance. These new discoveries have also expanded our understanding of the contribution of genetic variation, susceptibility alleles, and epigenetics to isolated congenital heart disease. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic basis of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart disease and highlights new diagnostic and management recommendations. PMID:22822471

  9. Deprivation amblyopia and congenital hereditary cataract.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Behzad; Stacy, Rebecca C; Kruger, Joshua; Cestari, Dean M

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision associated with decreased visual acuity, poor or absent stereopsis, and suppression of information from one eye.(1,2) Amblyopia may be caused by strabismus (strabismic amblyopia), refractive error (anisometropic amblyopia), or deprivation from obstructed vision (deprivation amblyopia). 1 In the developed world, amblyopia is the most common cause of childhood visual impairment, 3 which reduces quality of life 4 and also almost doubles the lifetime risk of legal blindness.(5, 6) Successful treatment of amblyopia greatly depends on early detection and treatment of predisposing disorders such as congenital cataract, which is the most common cause of deprivational amblyopia. Understanding the genetic causes of congenital cataract leads to more effective screening tests, early detection and treatment of infants and children who are at high risk for hereditary congenital cataract.

  10. Treatment of Common Congenital Hand Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Takashi; Pushman, Allison G.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Recognize the clinical features associated with five common congenital hand conditions. 2. Describe the indications and appropriate timing for various surgical procedures used to treat congenital hand anomalies. 3. Identify the pearls and pitfalls of these surgical treatments in order to avoid complications. 4. Understand the expected post-operative outcomes associated with these surgical procedures. Summary This article will provide an introduction to congenital hand differences by focusing on practical surgical strategies for treating five commonly encountered conditions including syndactyly, constriction ring syndrome, duplicated thumb, hypoplastic thumb and trigger thumb. The accompanying videos will demonstrate common and reliable surgical techniques for syndactyly release, duplicated thumb reconstruction and pollicization for hypoplastic thumb. PMID:20811188

  11. Congenital malformations of the brain and spine.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Prashant; Zamora, Carlos; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we briefly address the most common congenital brain and spinal anomalies as well as their most salient imaging, especially magnetic resonance, findings. Some of them, such as Chiari II, and open spinal defects, have become relatively rare due to their detection in utero and repair of the spinal malformation. Regardless of the type of brain anomaly, the most common clinical symptoms are mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and seizure; the latter two may need to be surgically and medically addressed. The most commonly found spinal congenital anomalies include the filum terminale lipoma which is generally asymptomatic and incidental and the caudal regression syndrome for which no primary treatment exists. Any spinal congenital anomaly may present in adulthood as a consequence of spinal cord tethering and/or development of syringomyelia.

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations.

  13. Congenital chylothorax in newborn with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Lomauri, Kh

    2014-11-01

    Neonatal chylothorax results from the accumulation of chyle in the pleural space and may be either congenital or an acquired condition. Congenital chylothorax is most likely due to abnormal development or obstruction of the lymphatic system. It is often associated with hydrops fetalis. It can be idiopathic or may be associated with various chromosomal anomalies including Trisomy 21, Turner syndrome, Noonan syndrome, and other genetic abnormalities. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia and generalized lymphangiomatosis have also been reported to be associated with congenital chylothorax. Several case reports indicate that congenital chylothorax can recur in subsequent offspring, suggesting a possible underlying genetic etiology. It is important to identify infants with chylothorax, as there are specific issues that need to be addressed in the management of these patients. We present a case of newborn with trysomy 21 (trisomy 21 was diagnosed antenatally by amniocentesis with support of Association "Perinatology"), who developed moderate Respiratory Distress Syndrome, chest X-ray and US reveal pleural effusion on right side rapid intervention was made before deterioration, requiring intensive life-saving measures. In the neonate, chylous effusion is not a common cause of pleural effusions. It is characterized as an exudate because of the high protein and lipid content once the infant is fed. The fluid will be clear/yellow to slightly cloudy in the unfed state and will quickly become milky following feeding, as chylomicrons appear in the fluid. Lymphocytes predominate in the differential cell count of chyle. The volume of fluid output can be high, and management can be challenging. We review the common manifestations of congenital chylotoraxes and emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and intervention in preventing devastating outcomes from this condition.

  14. Air pollution and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Agay-Shay, Keren; Friger, Michael; Linn, Shai; Peled, Ammatzia; Amitai, Yona; Peretz, Chava

    2013-07-01

    Environmental factors such as ambient air pollution have been associated with congenital heart defects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between gestational exposure to air pollution and the risk of congenital heart defects. We conducted a registry-based cohort study with a total of 135,527 live- and still-births in the Tel-Aviv region during 2000-2006. We used a Geographic Information System-based spatiotemporal approach with weekly inverse distance weighting modeling to evaluate associations between gestational exposure to ambient air pollution during weeks 3-8 of pregnancy and the risk for congenital heart defects. The following pollutants were studied: carbon monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, ozone, sulfur-dioxide and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm and 2.5 μm (PM10, PM2.5 respectively). Logistic models, adjusted for socio-demographic covariates were used to evaluate the associations. We found that maternal exposure to increased concentrations of PM10 was associated with multiple congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10 for 10 μg/m(3) increment). An inverse association was observed between concentrations of PM2.5 and isolated patent ductus arteriosus (adjusted OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.91 for 5 µg/m(3) increment). Sensitivity analyses showed that results were consistent. Generally there were no evidence for an association between gaseous air pollutants and congenital heart defects.Our results for PM10 and congenital heart defects confirm results from previous studies. The results for PM2.5 need further investigations.

  15. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto Júnior, Valdester Cavalcante; Branco, Klébia Magalhães P. Castello; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Carvalho Junior, Waldemiro; Lima, José Rubens Costa; de Freitas, Sílvia Maria; Fraga, Maria Nazaré de Oliveira; de Souza, Nayana Maria Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007. Objective To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes. Methods The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables. Results The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498); atrial septal defect (4,693); persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490); pulmonary stenosis (1,431); tetralogy of Fallot (973); coarctation of the aorta (973); transposition of the great arteries (887); and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults. Conclusion In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration. PMID:26107454

  16. Giant congenital diverticulum of the right atrium.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Munesh; Radhakrishnan, Sitaraman; Iyer, Krishna Subramony; Shrivastava, Savitri

    2008-01-01

    Congenital diverticulum of heart is a rare entity, which may arise from the atria, atrial appendages, coronary sinus or the ventricles. A 3-year-old child presented with history of early fatigability for 6 months and recent upper respiratory tract infection. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram revealed marked right atrial enlargement. At surgery, a right atrial diverticulum was excised under cardiopulmonary bypass. Pathology revealed thickened endocardium with edema and myocardial fiber hypertrophy. Our experience with this rare congenital disease is presented along with a review of the literature.

  17. New approaches to managing congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Felicia A; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2004-06-01

    A number of new techniques have been studied for managing newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and respiratory insufficiency. Among these have been the techniques of delayed approach to the repair of the diaphragmatic hernia; permissive hypercapnia; nitric oxide and surfactant administration; intratracheal pulmonary ventilation; liquid ventilation; perfluorocarbon-induced lung growth; and lung transplantation. These interventions are at various stages of development and evaluation of effectiveness. All, however, are being explored in the hopes of improving outcome in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia who continue to have significant morbidity and mortality in the newborn period.

  18. Bone lesions in early congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E U; Solomon, A

    1976-01-31

    A radiological study of bone changes in 112 children with congenital syphilis was undertaken. A similar number of normal children acted as a control group. Radiological examination of 5 syphilitic children showed that their bones were normal. Combined metaphyseal and periosteal lesions were the commonest bone disorders seen and are thus the most convincing radiological evidence of congenital syphilis. Transverse metaphyseal lucencies occur early in the disease, and with Wimburger's sign they are the prime evidence of pathology in syphilitic bone. Other radiographic changes are probably owing to minimal trauma in fragile disorganized bone. The occurrence of periosteal lesions alone has also been evaluated.

  19. [Radionuclide studies of congenital kidney abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Vlakhov, N

    1984-06-01

    Using the potentialities of isotope nephrograms as a screening test a total of 4746 patients suspected of renal abnormalities were examined. The author established pathological deviations in 561 cases (11.8%). During further verification using scintigraphy unsuspected congenital renal abnormalities (aplasia, hypoplasia, dystopia, double kidney, horseshoe kidney, solitary cyst and polycystic renal disease) were found in 46 patients (8.2%). The diagnosis was confirmed at subsequent venous x-ray urography. A conclusion has been made as to the role of comprehensive nephrographic-scintigraphic examination in the diagnosis of congenital renal abnormalities.

  20. Congenital agminated melanocytic nevus - case report*

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Camila Roos Mariano; Grazziotin, Thaís Corsetti; Rey, Maria Carolina Widholzer; Luzzatto, Laura; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel

    2013-01-01

    Agminated nevus is a cluster group of melanocytic nevi confined to a localized area of the body. There are many pigmented lesions described in the literature as agminated, such as blue nevi, multiple lentigines and Spitz nevi, but only a few cases of congenital agminated melanocytic nevi have been described. We report a case of a male child who presented with congenital agminated nevi, emphasizing the importance of physical examination, dermoscopy, histopathological evaluation, differential diagnosis and follow up to rule out the possibility of dysplastic or malignant changes. PMID:24346910

  1. Leber's congenital amaurosis associated with hyperthreoninemia.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, S; Hara, S; Mizuno, K; Narisawa, K; Tada, K

    1986-04-15

    Two siblings had Leber's congenital amaurosis. The girl (Patient 1) showed blindness shortly after birth, absent pupillary light reflex, and multiple round, white spots in both fundi. Her serum threonine level was increased (2.0 to 5.3 mg/dl; normal, 0.78 to 1.82 mg/dl). She died of massive pericardial effusion four months after birth. Her brother (Patient 2) was nearly blind shortly after birth. He had a poor pupillary light reflex and a nearly extinguished electroretinographic response. He also had hyperthreoninemia, hyperthreoninuria, hepatomegaly, and mental and physical retardation. We suspect a close relationship between hyperthreoninemia and Leber's congenital amaurosis in these siblings.

  2. Leber's congenital amaurosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gago, M; Pintos-Martínez, E; Beiras-Iglesias, A; Maroto, S; Campos, Y; Arenas, J; Eirís-Puñal, J

    1996-03-01

    We report the case histories of two 6-month-old girls, both with young, nonconsanguineous parents, referred to us for suspected blindness. In both cases, Leber's congenital amaurosis was diagnosed. Due to persistently high lactic acid levels in blood, muscle biopsies were taken. Analysis of biopsies revealed that both patients had low levels of complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain; one patient additionally had low levels of complex III. Microscopic and ultrastructural alterations of muscle, typically observed in mitochondrial disorders, were observed only in the second patient. These observations raise the possibility that at least some cases of Leber's congenital amaurosis may be due to alterations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  3. Congenital glaucoma in cutis marmorata teleangiectatica congenita.

    PubMed

    Mayatepek, E; Krastel, H; Völcker, H E; Pfau, B; Almasan, K

    1991-01-01

    A case of congenital glaucoma in cutis marmorata teleangiectatica congenita (CMTC, van Lohuizen syndrome) is described. The cutaneous anomaly and heterochromia iridium were noticed at birth. Brown discoloration of one iris was due to iris anterior layer dysplasia, resulting in unilateral glaucoma. Two trabeculotomies were performed until persistent normalization of intraocular pressure could be achieved. The possibility of a genetic basis and hereditary condition of CMTC and its association with congenital glaucoma is discussed. Patients with CMTC should regularly undergo ophthalmological follow-up to rule out development of glaucoma.

  4. NEW BORN SCREENING IN PREVENTING CONGENITAL HYPOTHYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mazahir; Zia, Aisha; Siddiqui, Saad Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Congenital Hypothyroidism is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation which is highly prevalent in our society due to lack of a national neonatal screening program, lack of education of the parents, increased consanguinity, and lack of suspicion from doctor's leads to delayed diagnosis and an increased incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in our society. This Menace can be easily tackled with a mass neonatal screening program and effective legislation which would make sure that serious efforts are being made to eradicate this preventable disease from Pakistan.

  5. Congenital malformations of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shraddha S; Parmar, Hemant A; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Mukherji, Suresh K

    2011-08-01

    Congenital ear or temporal bone malformations are a diagnostic challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Newer imaging techniques can detect subtle changes in middle ear and cochlear anatomy. This information is invaluable with increasing use of hearing restoration surgeries and/or cochlear implants in such patients. This article discusses the embryogenesis, classification system, and salient imaging findings of congenital outer, middle ear, and inner ear anomalies in children. Both high-resolution computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the temporal bones are described.

  6. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  7. Congenital color blindness in young Turkish men.

    PubMed

    Citirik, Mehmet; Acaroglu, Golge; Batman, Cosar; Zilelioglu, Orhan

    2005-04-01

    We investigated a healthy population of men from different regions of Turkey for the presence of congenital red-green color blindness. Using Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates, 941 healthy men from the Turkish army were tested for congenital red-green color blindness. The prevalence of red-green color blindness was 7.33 +/- 0.98% (5.10% protans and 2.23% deutans). These ratios were higher than other reported samples from Mediterranean Europe. Higher percentages of color blindness were found in regions with a lower education level and more consanguineous marriages.

  8. Congenital dislocation of the patella - clinical case.

    PubMed

    Miguel Sá, Pedro; Raposo, Filipa; Santos Carvalho, Manuel; Alegrete, Nuno; Coutinho, Jorge; Costa, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Congenital patellar dislocation is a rare condition in which the patella is permanently dislocated and cannot be reduced manually. The patella develops normally as a sesamoid bone of the femur. This congenital dislocation results from failure of the internal rotation of the myotome that forms the femur, quadriceps muscle and extensor apparatus. It usually manifests immediately after birth, although in some rare cases, the diagnosis may be delayed until adolescence or adulthood. Early diagnosis is important, thereby allowing surgical correction and avoiding late sequelae, including early degenerative changes in the knee. A case of permanent dislocation of the patella is presented here, in a female child aged seven years.

  9. Congenital Minamata disease: warnings from Japan's experience.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K

    2000-07-01

    Minamata disease is alkylmercury poisoning causing Hunter-Russell syndrome due to ingestion of seafood polluted by industrial waste. Two epidemics occurred in Minamata (1956) and Niigata (1965), Japan. Many infants with "cerebral palsy" in villages where adult cases occurred were established as having congenital Minamata disease. Developing brains were affected by alkylmercury through transplacental exposure and even by breastfeeding. This report reviews the history, clinical features, pathology, epidemiology, metal analysis, experiments, and sociolegal aspects of congenital Minamata disease. Many victims are still alive and their present conditions are reviewed.

  10. Giant congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an adult

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia is the most common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It appears frequently in infants but rarely in adults. We present the case of a 50-year-old female han patient with tremendous left-sided congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek hernia) who also has a pair of supernumerary breasts and pulmonary hypoplasia of the lower-left lobe. The patient had an experience of misdiagnosis and she was treated for bronchitis for one year until being admitted to our hospital. This case study emphasizes the rare presentation of Bochdalek hernia in adults and the necessity of high clinical attention to similar cases. PMID:24512974

  11. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K.; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  12. Radiographic findings in congenital lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, M.; Boxt, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    Because lead crosses the placenta throughout pregnancy, the fetus is at risk for lead poisoning. A full term, asymptomatic child was born with congenital lead poisoning secondary to maternal pica. Radiographic findings of a dense cranial vault, lead lines, and delayed skeletal and deciduous dental development were noted at birth. After chelation therapy, when the patient was seven months old, radiographs revealed normal skeletal maturation. Tooth eruption did not occur until 15 months of age. Newborn infants with these radiographic findings should be screened for subclinical, congenital lead poisoning.

  13. [Congenital lobar hyperinflation: conservative management as an alternative therapy].

    PubMed

    Hermoso Torregrosa, C; Moreno Medinilla, E; Pérez Ruiz, E; Caro Aguilera, P; Pérez Frías, F J

    2014-07-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema used to be treated surgically. Congenital lobar hyperinflation is the currently recommended term, as it involves pathologically healthy lung tissue, which is why conservative management may be an option. Four cases of diagnosed congenital lobar hyperinflation are presented in which conservative treatment was chosen due to their clinical stability. Their outcome has been satisfactory with progressively normal radiology.

  14. Congenital torticollis caused by unilateral absence of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Subha; Takhtani, Deepak; Wallace, E Christine

    2009-01-01

    Congenital torticollis is most commonly caused by benign fibrosis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Absence of the sternocleidomastoid muscle is a rare cause of congenital torticollis. There have been fewer than a dozen reported cases of agenesis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We describe a case of congenital absence of the sternocleidomastoid diagnosed by US and confirmed on MRI.

  15. Symptoms of Autism among Children with Congenital Deafblindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Associations between congenital deafness or blindness and autism have been found. The main consequences of congenital sensory impairment, being barriers for communication, language and social interaction development, may lead to symptoms of autism. To date only few studies have been reported concerning individuals with congenital deafblindness.…

  16. Outcome of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kuhnle, U; Bullinger, M

    1997-09-01

    In congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, affected girls are born with ambiguous genitalia due to increased secretion of androgens in utero by the defective adrenal gland. Even though it is generally accepted that there are differences between male and female brain development, determining factors have been difficult to identify. Girls with CAH have frequently been studied to evaluate the impact of prenatal androgen exposure on psychological, psychosocial, and psychosexual development, and impairments in various areas have been identified. However, there is no comprehensive study available regarding the outcome of this chronic disorder in adult life. We studied the quality of life in women with CAH, with particular emphasis on how they cope with genital malformations, genital operations, and chronic disease as well as lifelong medication. The patients filled out questionnaires covering their physical state, psychological well-being, social relationships, and functional capacity, as well as questionnaires on psychosexual identification and psychosocial integration. The results were evaluated using a computerized statistical program for social studies. Out of a total of 94 patients above 18 years of age, 45 agreed to participate and were compared to 46 healthy, age-matched controls. Age at diagnosis was 2. 31 +/- 1.55 years and 38% suffered from the simple-virilizing, 45% from the salt-wasting, and 17.0% from the late-onset form of CAH. About one-third of patients had Prader stage 3 or 4 genital virilization. While the overall quality of life did not differ significantly, CAH patients were more often single (47.8% vs. 66.7%) and fewer of them had children (22.2% vs. 38.6%) compared to controls. Significant impairments were found in regard to body image and attitudes toward sexuality, but there was no increased homosexual preference. The women were successful in adjusting to illness and receiving social support. It is speculated that

  17. Congenital glioblastoma coexisting with vascular developmental anomaly.

    PubMed

    Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Szymanska, Krystyna; Biekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Gierowska-Bogusz, Barbara; Michalak, Elżbieta; Klepacka, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Congenital central nervous tumours form a unique group of neoplasms. They are different from other tumour groups not only due to the onset time but also to their histopathology, anatomic location, and biologic behaviour. Congenital glioblastoma is one of the rarest types of congenital brain tumours and is uncommon in the prenatal period. We report a rare case of congenital glioblastoma detected prenatally by ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging at 26 gestational weeks. Based on MRI findings and consultation of a team of specialists, pregnancy was terminated at 28 weeks. The newborn presented hydrops foetal. The child died shortly after birth due to cardiorespiratory insufficiency. At autopsy a large tumour with a spongy-like appearance was found. The tumour involved nearly the whole right cerebral hemisphere and led to marked hydrocephalus. In the histological and immunohistochemical examination, the tumour presented features of glioblastoma. Neoplastic cells were immunopositive for GFAP, S-100 protein and negative for neuronal markers. Frequent mitoses and high MIB-1 labelling index were seen in the tumour areas. The coexistence of tumour and vascular developmental anomaly was stated. The conglomerates of numerous, distended, thin-walled foetal-like blood vessels were located beside the tumour tissue, which presented disturbance in differentiation and maturation of the vascular net. Such coexistence of malignant glioma with vascular developmental anomaly is unique.

  18. Unilateral congenital elbow luxation in a dachshund

    PubMed Central

    Fafard, Alain R.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital elbow luxation was diagnosed in a 12-week-old, intact male, dachshund with a lateral elbow prominence and mild lameness of the right forelimb. Closed reduction of the radial head, ulnar ostectomy, and external stabilization of the joint were performed. Function was returned to the limb, but radial head and ulnar subluxation persisted. PMID:17017659

  19. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-09-24

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered.

  20. Why prevent, diagnose and treat congenital toxoplasmosis?

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Rima; Kieffer, Francois; Sautter, Mari; Hosten, Tiffany; Pelloux, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Evidence that prevention, diagnosis and treatment of toxoplasmosis is beneficial developed as follows: antiparasitic agents abrogate Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite growth, preventing destruction of infected, cultured, mammalian cells and cure active infections in experimental animals, including primates. They treat active infections in persons who are immune-compromised, limit destruction of retina by replicating parasites and thereby treat ocular toxoplasmosis and treat active infection in the fetus and infant. Outcomes of untreated congenital toxoplasmosis include adverse ocular and neurologic sequelae described in different countries and decades. Better outcomes are associated with treatment of infected infants throughout their first year of life. Shorter intervals between diagnosis and treatment in utero improve outcomes. A French approach for diagnosis and treatment of congenital toxoplasmosis in the fetus and infant can prevent toxoplasmosis and limit adverse sequelae. In addition, new data demonstrate that this French approach results in favorable outcomes with some early gestation infections. A standardized approach to diagnosis and treatment during gestation has not yet been applied generally in the USA. Nonetheless, a small, similar experience confirms that this French approach is feasible, safe, and results in favorable outcomes in the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study cohort. Prompt diagnosis, prevention and treatment reduce adverse sequelae of congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:19430661

  1. Bilateral macular colobomas in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Murayama, K; Adachi-Usami, E

    1989-06-01

    Two siblings with Leber's congenital amaurosis had bilateral macular colobomas, nystagmus, extinguished ERGs, and degenerative salt and pepper like changes in the fundus. They had non-recordable or non-meaningful visually evoked cortical potentials in response to both flash and pattern stimuli. The ophthalmic conditions were thought to be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.

  2. Congenital pancreatic anomalies, variants, and conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lauren F

    2012-05-01

    Understanding pancreatic development and the congenital anomalies and variants that result from alterations in normal development allows for better recognition of these anomalies at diagnostic imaging. This article reviews normal pancreatic embryology and anatomy, and the appearance of the more common developmental anomalies and ductal variants, with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Common mimics of masses are also covered.

  3. Amblyopia Associated with Congenital Facial Nerve Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Iwamura, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kenji; Sawamura, Hiromasa; Baba, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The association between congenital facial paralysis and visual development has not been thoroughly studied. Of 27 pediatric cases of congenital facial paralysis, we identified 3 patients who developed amblyopia, a visual acuity decrease caused by abnormal visual development, as comorbidity. These 3 patients had facial paralysis in the periocular region and developed amblyopia on the paralyzed side. They started treatment by wearing an eye patch immediately after diagnosis and before the critical visual developmental period; all patients responded to the treatment. Our findings suggest that the incidence of amblyopia in the cases of congenital facial paralysis, particularly the paralysis in the periocular region, is higher than that in the general pediatric population. Interestingly, 2 of the 3 patients developed anisometropic amblyopia due to the hyperopia of the affected eye, implying that the periocular facial paralysis may have affected the refraction of the eye through yet unspecified mechanisms. Therefore, the physicians who manage facial paralysis should keep this pathology in mind, and when they see pediatric patients with congenital facial paralysis involving the periocular region, they should consult an ophthalmologist as soon as possible.

  4. Congenital oesophageal achalasia in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Earlam, Richard J.; Zollman, Paul E.; Ellis, F. Henry

    1967-01-01

    A 3-month-old German shepherd puppy with a congenitally dilated oesophagus had radiographic, cinefluoroscopic, and oesophageal motility studies before a modified Heller operation was performed. Subsequent examination of the oesophagus revealed no ganglion cells, and the condition was considered to be identical with human achalasia. In dogs, this appears to be more common in the German shepherd breed. Images PMID:6069217

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  6. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: severe congenital neutropenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alter BP, Link DC, Stein S, Rodger E, Bolyard AA, Aprikyan AA, Bonilla MA, Dror Y, Kannourakis G, Newburger PE, ... PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Schäffer AA, Klein C. Genetic heterogeneity in severe congenital neutropenia: ...

  8. [Congenital left sinus of Valsalva aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Simões, M V; Figueira, R R; Barbato, D; Miziara, H L

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of left sinus of Valsalva congenital aneurysm (SVCA), incidentally found are described. The authors call attention on rarity of them, and present new concepts about their morphogenesis and incidence. They also suggested a higher incidence of asymptomatic and undiagnosed cases of SVCA should be considered.

  9. Congenital tuberculosis: presentation of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Şen, Velat; Selimoğlu Şen, Hadice; Aktar, Fesih; Uluca, Ünal; Karabel, Müsemma; Fuat Gürkan, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Congenital tuberculosis is a rare disease with a high mortality rate. Congenital tuberculosis is considered the result of mother-to-child transmission from the placenta to the fetus, through the ingestion of the amniotic fluid, or via transplacental transmission through the umbilical vein. Given the non-specific clinical signs of tuberculosis, it is usually difficult to diagnose it. The case of a 48-day-old male infant hospitalized due to weight loss, fever, cough, hemoptysis, and respiratory distress for the past 20 days, is presented. In this period, he had received broad spectrum antibiotics but with no improvement. A chest x-ray showed the presence of consolidation and a cavitary lesion in the upper and middle left lung fields. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction in a bronchoalveolar lavage specimen. Congenital tuberculosis was diagnosed based on this finding; hence, a tuberculostatic regimen was started accordingly. The patient died 13 days after treatment initiation. Congenital tuberculosis should be considered in infants with weight loss, fever, cough, hemoptysis and respiratory distress.

  10. Congenitally Blind Counselor, Adventitiously Blind Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    A counselor blind from birth describes personal difficulties in fully understanding the experience of clients who are adventitiously blind. Congenitally blind counselors are urged to recognize that adaptive methods cannot compensate for the panoramic view of the environment provided by vision and that recently blinded individuals need to deal with…

  11. Congenital Cystic Malformation of the Bile Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Jean; Laird, R. C.

    1966-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman had a cyst of the proximal part of the common bile duct and a cyst of the left hepatic duct; these lesions were diagnosed preoperatively by intravenous cholangiography and successfully operated upon. At the time of writing, she has been followed up for one year. Congenital defects in the biliary system are rare and, in a review of the literature, only two cases were found similar to this one. It is generally accepted that these lesions are congenital, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. Alonso-Lej, Rever and Pessagno2 reviewed the literature in 1959 and found 403 authentic congenital cysts of the hepatic ducts. The most common congenital defect is a single choledochal cyst of the lower end of the common bile duct. Pain, jaundice and tumour are the main symptoms. Until the advent of intravenous cholangiography, these lesions were seldom recognized preoperatively. Means of operative repair as well as complications and prognosis are reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5937201

  12. Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lynne A.; Krasnewich, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a rapidly growing group of inborn errors of metabolism that result from defects in the synthesis of glycans. Glycosylation is a major post-translational protein modification and an estimated 2% of the human genome encodes proteins for glycosylation. The molecular bases for the current 60…

  13. Medullary sponge kidney associated with congenital hemihypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Indridason, O S; Thomas, L; Berkoben, M

    1996-08-01

    Medullary sponge kidney is a developmental disorder characterized by ectatic and cystic malformation of the collecting ducts and tubules. Clinical manifestations include urinary tract infections, renal stones, and hematuria. It can be associated with other developmental disorders. A case of medullary sponge kidney associated with congenital hemihypertrophy, complicated by nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, is reported here.

  14. Congenital hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qingqiang; Zhang, Minfeng; Yang, Cheng; Cai, Wenchang; Zhao, Qian; Shen, Weifeng; Yang, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fast-growing congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage are rare in clinical practice. Additionally, the clinical manifestations of and laboratory and imaging findings for this condition are often nonspecific and are particularly difficult to differentiate from those of hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma, thus posing great challenges for diagnosis and treatment. The 2 case reports presented here aim to analyze the diagnosis and treatment of 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage in the Chinese Han population to provide an important reference for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Diagnoses: These 2 case reports present 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage. Case 1 involved a 31-year-old patient with a very large, fast-growing hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and elevated carbohydrate antigen 199. Case 2 involved a patient with intense, paroxysmal right upper abdominal pain; computed tomography suggested a hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and possibly hepatobiliary cystadenoma. Outcomes: Both patients underwent liver resection. Postoperative follow-up showed that for both patients, the symptoms improved, the laboratory findings returned to normal levels, and the surgical outcomes were satisfactory. Conclusion: Liver resection is an ideal treatment for patients with congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage, and especially those with fast-growing, symptomatic hepatic cysts or hepatic cysts that are difficult to differentiate from hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:27759646

  15. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  16. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection – An update

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Smadar; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    1999-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is estimated to be the leading infectious cause of nonheriditary sensorneural loss and a significant cause of mental retardation. Approximately 1% of newborn infants are congenitally infected with the virus. This review summarizes recent developments concerning this infection, including clinical outcome, risk factors for aquisition diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20212987

  17. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  18. Congenital epulis: A rare benign tumour.

    PubMed

    Wong, D K C; Ramli, R; Muhaizan, W M; Primuharsa Putra, S H A

    2016-10-01

    Congenital epulis is a rare benign pedunculated tumour of the oral cavity arising from the alveolar ridges. It is usually detected in newborns and can be successfully resected surgically. We report a case of a newborn baby who had a 5x3x3cm pedunculated lobar mass arising from the upper alveolar ridge.

  19. Congenital toxoplasmosis and prenatal care state programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Control programs have been executed in an attempt to reduce vertical transmission and the severity of congenital infection in regions with a high incidence of toxoplasmosis in pregnant women. We aimed to evaluate whether treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin associated with a lack of monitoring for toxoplasmosis seroconversion affects the prognosis of patients. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study with 246 newborns (NB) at risk for congenital toxoplasmosis in Goiânia (Brazil) between October 2003 and October 2011. We analyzed the efficacy of maternal treatment with spiramycin. Results A total of 40.7% (66/162) of the neonates were born seriously infected. Vertical transmission associated with reactivation during pregnancy occurred in 5.5% (9/162) of the NB, with one showing severe infection (systemic). The presence of specific immunoglobulins (fetal IgM and NB IgA) suggested the worst prognosis. Treatment of pregnant women by spiramycin resulted in reduced vertical transmission. When infected pregnant women did not undergo proper treatment, the risk of severe infection (neural-optical) in NB was significantly increased. Fetal IgM was associated with ocular impairment in 48.0% (12/25) of the fetuses and neonatal IgA-specific was related to the neuro-ophthalmologic and systemic forms of the disease. When acute toxoplasmosis was identified in the postpartum period, a lack of monitoring of seronegative pregnant women resulted in a higher risk of severe congenital infection. Conclusion Treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin reduces the possibility of transmission of infection to the fetus. However, a lack of proper treatment is associated with the onset of the neural-optical form of congenital infection. Primary preventive measures should be increased for all pregnant women during the prenatal period and secondary prophylaxis through surveillance of seroconversion in seronegative pregnant woman should be introduced to reduce the

  20. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  1. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-03-04

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD.

  2. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nisreen Feroz; Zafar, Farhana; Bangash, Areeb Sohail; Malik, Abdul; Mohammedi, Karimunnisa

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by a decrease in Cortisol production. 11 beta hydroxylase deficiencies is the second most common form. However, its presentation with cholestatic jaundice is extremely rare. We present a case of a 29-day-old infant who came to us with unusual dark complexion, persistent jaundice, and electrolyte imbalance. On investigation he was diagnosed as a case of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Treatment with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone cleared his jaundice and complexion with subsequent improvement in electrolytes. The aim of this report is to illustrate an unusual presentation of CAH with Cholestatic jaundice. This is the first case to be reported from Pakistan. The case outlines the difficult workup that was encountered in the diagnosis and management of the patient.

  3. Congenital amusia in childhood: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Marie-Andrée; Moreau, Patricia; McNally-Gagnon, Andréane; Mignault Goulet, Geneviève; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Here we describe the first documented case of congenital amusia in childhood. AS is a 10-year-old girl who was referred to us by her choir director for persisting difficulties in singing. We tested her with the child version of the Montreal Battery for the Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) which confirmed AS's severe problems with melodic and rhythmic discrimination and memory for melodies. The disorder appears to be limited to music since her audiometry as well as her intellectual and language skills are normal. Furthermore, the musical disorder is associated to a severe deficit in detecting small pitch changes. The electrical brain responses point to an anomaly in the early stages of auditory processing, such as reflected by an abnormal mismatch negativity (MMN) response to small pitch changes. In singing, AS makes more pitch than time errors. Thus, despite frequent and regular musical practice, AS's profile is similar to the adult form of congenital amusia.

  4. [Thoracic kidney: congenital or traumatic origin?].

    PubMed

    Esquis, P; Osmak, L; Ognois, P; Goudet, P; Cougard, P

    2006-04-01

    The discovery of a thoracic kidney in adult patients can lead to three diagnoses, yielding different prognoses and treatment. It can either mean traumatic or congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or a congenital ectopic kidney. Intrathoracic herniation of the left kidney trough a left diaphragmatic rupture is an exceptional discovery. We report the case of a 44 year-old man who met with a car accident 20 years ago, and presented abdominal pain. CT-scan showed an intrathoracic herniation of the left kidney trough a left posterior diaphragmatic rupture. Laparoscopic approach in lateral position showed a traumatic hernia of the left costo-diaphragmatic hiatus only containing the left kidney and its pedicle. After reduction of herniated left kidney into the abdomen, the hiatus was closed by non-resorbable prosthetic mesh. Postoperative course was uneventful.

  5. Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenail.

    PubMed

    Fierro-Arias, Leonel; Morales-Martínez, André; Zazueta-López, Rosa María; Ramírez-Dovala, Silvia; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Ponce-Olivera, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Congenital malalignment of the great toenail (CMA) is a disorder of the anatomic orientation of the ungual apparatus, in which the longitudinal axis of the nail plate is not parallel with the axis of the distal phalanx but is deflected sideways. This disorder is understood to arise from multiple factors. Although many theories have been proposed about its origin, its pathogenesis is not fully known. Besides the cosmetic impact, this disorder causes such problems in the medium and long term as onychocryptosis and difficulty in motion. Some cases may regress spontaneously, although persistent cases may require a specialized surgical approach. Congenital malalignment of the great toenail is poorly understood and described medical condition that is often treated incorrectly; thus, reviewing the subject is important. A symptombased clinical classification system is proposed to guide diagnosis and treatment modality decisions.

  6. Congenital Melanocytic Nevus Syndrome: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Recio, A; Sánchez-Moya, A I; Félix, V; Campos, Y

    2017-01-19

    Congenital melanocytic nevus syndrome (CMNS) is the result of an abnormal proliferation of melanocytes in the skin and central nervous system caused by progenitor-cell mutations during embryonic development. Mutations in the NRAS gene have been detected in many of these cells. We present 5 cases of giant congenital melanocytic nevus, 3 of them associated with CMNS; NRAS gene mutation was studied in these 3 patients. Until a few years ago, surgery was the treatment of choice, but the results have proved unsatisfactory because aggressive interventions do not improve cosmetic appearance and only minimally reduce the risk of malignant change. In 2013, trametinib was approved for use in advanced melanoma associated with NRAS mutations. This drug, which acts on the intracellular RAS/RAF/MEK/pERK/MAPK cascade, could be useful in pediatric patients with CMNS. A better understanding of this disease will facilitate the development of new strategies.

  7. Assessment for congenital long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Wayne F

    2003-01-01

    A 29-year-old male presented for an evaluation of his risk for having congenital long QT syndrome. Despite being asymptomatic and having a normal QTc interval on the resting ECG, a suggestive family history was an indication for a thorough cardiac evaluation. A geneticist reviewed this workup and recommended against genetic testing. While up to 10% of affected carriers of a congenital long QT syndrome gene mutation can be asymptomatic with a normal QTc, consideration of all of the clinical factors allowed for further risk stratification. The evaluation of an ECG for the long QT syndrome includes calculating a corrected QT interval for the heart rate and assessing the T-waves for morphology associated with this syndrome.

  8. [Macular coloboma type Leber's congenital amaurosis].

    PubMed

    Kiratli, H; Bozkurt, B

    2002-01-01

    Three brothers, with the macular coloboma type Leber's congenital amaurosis aged 10, 8, and 6 years respectively, are described in this report. Only the two elder brothers were symptomatic while the third patient had no complaint at the time of diagnosis. The patients had no associated systemic or ocular disorders, including nystagmus. They had mild myopic astigmatism. All three had a relatively well-circumscribed bilateral macular atrophy with a seemingly normal peripheral retina. The electroretinogram was non recordable but the visualy evoked potential responses were within normal limits. During three years of follow-up, the macular lesions did not progress and the visual acuity did not deteriorate further. Our experience with these three familial cases supports the general view that the macular coloboma variant does not necessarily have the typical signs and symptoms and perhaps also the dismal prognosis of classic Leber's congenital amaurosis, and as such should stand as a distinct subtype of the disease.

  9. Congenital cardiovascular malformations and the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, A M

    2010-03-01

    After birth, gas exchange is achieved in the lung, whereas prenatally it occurs in the placenta. This is associated with differences in blood flow patterns in the fetus as compared with the postnatal circulation. Congenital cardiovascular malformations are associated with haemodynamic changes in the fetus, which differ from those occurring postnatally. Obstruction to cardiac outflow may alter myocardial development, resulting in progressive ventricular hypoplasia. Alteration of oxygen content may profoundly influence pulmonary vascular and ductus arteriosus responses. Interference in blood flow and oxygen content may affect cerebral development as a result of inadequate oxygen or energy substrate supply. The circulatory effects may be gestational dependent, related to maturation of vascular responses in different organs. These prenatal influences of congenital cardiac defects may severely affect immediate, as well as longterm, postnatal prognosis and survival. This has stimulated the development of techniques for palliation of disturbed circulation during fetal life.

  10. [Familial congenital hypomagnesemia revealed by neonatal convulsions].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, M; Dehanin, T; Sow, A-D; Sène, M-S; Basse, A-M; Fall, A-L; Seck, L-B; Touré, K; Diop, A-G; Sow, H-D; Ndiaye, M-M

    2013-11-01

    Congenital hypomagnesemia is a rare disease, with an impact on cognitive and neurological development. We report on three familial cases of congenital hypomagnesemia, two boys and one girl who belong to the same consanguineous family. They all presented neonatal seizures and a psychomotor developmental delay. Cerebral computed tomography showed cerebral atrophy and calcifications in one case and magnetic resonance imaging found predominant cerebellar atrophy in the two other cases. All three patients also had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphoremia, and hypomagnesemia. The parathyroid hormone blood level was low in two cases and normal in the third. One 7-month old patient died. The others received a supplementation of calcium and magnesium, which normalized calcemia, phosphatemia but not magnesemia, which remained low despite high doses. They have both developed cognitive and behavioral impairments.

  11. Congenital lobar emphysema associated with polysplenia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choh, Naseer A.; Choh, Suhil A.; Jehangir, Majid; Naikoo, Bashir A.

    2010-01-01

    Polysplenia, or left isomerism, is a rare heterotaxy syndrome characterized by bilateral bi-lobed lungs, bilateral pulmonary atria, a symmetrical midline liver, and multiple aberrant splenic nodules. We report a case of polysplenia associated with congenital lobar emphysema apart from other typical anomalies. Such an association has not been previously reported. The patient was a young male with progressive exertional breathlessness referred for high resolution CT of the lungs. CT, MRI and echocardiography revealed (in addition to congenital lobar emphysema of right lung) a hemiazygos continuation of the inferior vena cava, a persistent left superior vena cava, multiple splenunculi in the right hypochondrium, midline liver, bilateral bilobed lungs, a large pulmonary artery (suggestive of severe pulmonary artery hypertension) and a large VSD—a typical constellation of findings described in polysplenia syndrome. PMID:20864788

  12. Congenital myasthenic syndromes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Andrew G.; Shen, Xin-Ming; Selcen, Duygu; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital myasthenic syndromes are diverse disorders linked by abnormal signal transmission at the motor endplate that stem from defects in single or multiple proteins. Multiple endplate proteins are affected by mutations of single enzymes required for protein glycosylation, and deletion of PREPL exerts its effect by activating adaptor protein 1. Finally, neuromuscular transmission is also impaired in some congenital myopathies. The specific diagnosis of some syndromes is facilitated by clinical clues pointing to a disease gene. In absence of such clues, exome sequencing is a useful tool for finding the disease gene. Deeper understanding of disease mechanisms come from structural and in vitro electrophysiologic studies of the patient endplate, and from engineering the mutant and wild-type gene into a suitable expression system that can be interrogated by appropriate electrophysiologic and biochemical studies. Most CMS are treatable. Importantly, however, some medication beneficial in one syndrome can be detrimental in another. PMID:25792100

  13. Minor congenital anomalies and ataxic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of minor congenital anomalies was examined in 36 patients with ataxic cerebral palsy, in unaffected family members, and in 100 unrelated control subjects. None of the control subjects or family members had more than four anomalies, and 25 of 36 (69%) of the patients had more than four. The distribution of anomalies differed considerably, with 60% of the index cases having seven or more, and 94% of the controls having three or less. The number occurring in the patients was significantly more than in their relatives. Of the 25 patients with more than four anomalies, 16 (64%) had undergone potentially adverse perinatal or early postnatal events. Thus minor congenital anomalies were considerably more frequent in those with ataxic cerebral palsy than in related or unrelated control subjects. These anomalies may be markers of early prenatal factors that contributed to the adverse outcome either directly or by predisposing to perinatal difficulties. PMID:2751330

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicates the course of many children and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). The increase in pulmonary pressure associated with CHD is secondary to either increased pulmonary blood flow or increased postcapillary pressures. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is in the vast majority associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Despite major advances in the understanding of the regulation of the pulmonary vascular bed and the pulmonary endothelial lesions leading to pulmonary vascular disease, despite the advances in surgical repair and the discovery of potential therapies in the pre- and postoperative period, pulmonary hypertension still carries a significant mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. The recent introduction of targeted therapies in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to a renewed interest in pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD and this particularly for the most advanced form, the so-called Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD, focusing on the pathophysiology and treatment of ES.

  15. The global burden of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien Ie

    2013-05-01

    Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates. In a country with a fertility rate of about eight per woman, the population has to support four times as many children with CHD as in a country with a fertility rate of two. Countries with the highest fertility rates tend to have the lowest incomes per capita, thus accentuating the disparity. Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner. Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

  16. Congenital anomalies of the optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J.; Pérez-Rueda, Mario A.; Tellez, Carlos H.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital optic nerve head anomalies are a group of structural malformations of the optic nerve head and surrounding tissues, which may cause congenital visual impairment and blindness. Each entity in this group of optic nerve anomalies has individually become more prevalent as our ability to differentiate between them has improved due to better characterization of cases. Access to better medical technology (e.g., neuroimaging and genetic analysis advances in recent years) has helped to expand our knowledge of these abnormalities. However, visual impairment may not be the only problem in these patients, some of these entities will be related to ophthalmologic, neurologic and systemic features that will help the physician to identify and predict possible outcomes in these patients, which sometimes may be life-threatening. Herein we present helpful hints, associations and management (when plausible) for them. PMID:25859137

  17. Congenital prosopagnosia: face-blind from birth.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Marlene; Avidan, Galia

    2005-04-01

    Congenital prosopagnosia refers to the deficit in face processing that is apparent from early childhood in the absence of any underlying neurological basis and in the presence of intact sensory and intellectual function. Several such cases have been described recently and elucidating the mechanisms giving rise to this impairment should aid our understanding of the psychological and neural mechanisms mediating face processing. Fundamental questions include: What is the nature and extent of the face-processing deficit in congenital prosopagnosia? Is the deficit related to a more general perceptual deficit such as the failure to process configural information? Are any neural alterations detectable using fMRI, ERP or structural analyses of the anatomy of the ventral visual cortex? We discuss these issues in relation to the existing literature and suggest directions for future research.

  18. Stress imaging in congenital cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Robbers-Visser, Daniëlle; Luijnenburg, Saskia E; van den Berg, Jochem; Moelker, Adriaan; Helbing, Willem A

    2009-12-01

    In patients with coronary arterial disease, stress imaging is able to demonstrate abnormalities in the motion of the ventricular walls, and abnormalities in coronary arterial perfusion not apparent at rest. It can also provide information on prognostic factors. In patients with congenitally malformed hearts, stress imaging is used to determine contractile reserve, abnormalities of mural motion, and global systolic function, but also to assess diastolic and vascular function. In most of these patients, stress is usually induced using pharmacological agents, mainly dobutamine given in varying doses. The clinical usefulness of abnormal responses to the stress induced in such patients has to be addressed in follow-up studies. The abnormal stress might serve as surrogate endpoints, predicting primary endpoints at an early stage, which are useful for stratification of risk in this population of growing patients. We review here the stress imaging studies performed to date in patients with congenitally malformed hearts, with a special emphasis on echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Congenital varicella associated with multiple defects

    PubMed Central

    McKendry, J. B. J.; Bailey, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Only two previous reports in the medical literature record the association of multiple congenital defects in the baby and varicella in the mother during the first trimester of pregnancy. The case is reported of a female infant born to a mother who contracted varicella in the 11th week of pregnancy. The infant was premature, small for dates, and had skin and localized muscular defects and respiratory difficulty. Subsequently she was found to be retarded. She failed to thrive and was subject to frequent infections. Further investigation revealed a unilateral diaphragmatic weakness, scoliosis and abnormalities of the ocular fundi. Several non-febrile seizures occurred. A pneumoencephalogram revealed dilated ventricles. She died at 20 months of age following a seizure. Consideration of maternal infections, especially viral, occurring early in pregnancy, augmented by antibody studies in the newborn and mother should be part of the investigation of multiple congenital defects in the newborn. PMID:4682642

  20. [Chagas disease in Peru: congenital transmission].

    PubMed

    Velarde, César Náquira

    2005-01-01

    American Trypanosomosis is an important parasitic infection in Peru. Human cases, reservoirs and vectors have been showed in two known geographic areas in the endemic zones: southwestern and northern and northeastern regions of the country; however vectors belonging to the three genera of triatominae: Triatoma, Panstrongylus and Rhodnius have been collected in almost all the territory. The serological surveys in blood banks in the southwestern region is 2-6% and human cases found out of the endemic areas show the possibility of congenital cases. The study of the prevalence is starting. This preliminary study performed on 3000 pregnant of Arequipa shows serological positives in 22 (0.7%) and only a newborn positive at IgM. This result indicates a probable low rate of congenital transmission and necessary to perform more studies.

  1. Congenital cystic eye with optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Holland, Lee; Haridas, Anjana; Phillips, Gael; Sullivan, Timothy

    2015-07-15

    Congenital cystic eye (CCE) is a rare condition caused by failure of invagination of the optic vesicle resulting in a persistent cyst replacing the eye. An associated optic nerve attached to the cyst is a rarely reported phenomenon that has been sparsely described histologically, with no immunohistochemistry reported previously. The authors present a case of CCE with optic nerve tissue inserting into the cyst, and present the histological and immunohistochemical findings.

  2. Congenital muscular torticollis: experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, B K; Matin, A; Hassan, G Z; Hossain, M Z; Zaman, M A

    2010-10-01

    Congenital Muscular Torticollis (CMT) is a postural deformity of head and neck detected at birth or shortly after birth, primarily resulting from unilateral shortening of Sternocleidomastoid Muscle (SCM). In neonates and infants, patient may cure conservatively by physiotherapy but surgery is the treatment of choice for children and adolescents. There are various techniques of surgery. Here we show our experience regarding management of congenital muscular torticollis. In the present retrospective case series, fourteen patients of congenital muscular torticollis were treated. The cases were enrolled between Nov' 2005 to Oct' 2007 in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Gonosasthaya Somaj Vittik Medical College Hospital, Dhaka and different private clinics of Dhaka city of Bangladesh. Neonates and infants were treated conservatively with physiotherapy and others treated surgically by transection of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM under general anesthesia. Operated patients were released on following post operative day with advised to do physiotherapy. Patients age range from 7 days to 15 years of which ten were female and four male. SCM was shortened in all cases (8 on right side and 6 on left side). Eleven were female and three male. Of 14 patients, 2 neonates, 7 infants and 5 were more than 1 year age. There was no associated anomaly. Out of 9 neonates and infants 8 cured conservatively with physiotherapy and another one significantly improved. Six were treated surgically including one failed physiotherapy. Post operative period was uneventful and there was no complication. Results were evaluated clinically and comments of peers. Most of the patient of congenital muscular torticollis can be treated conservatively during infancy. Division of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM is easy and safe surgical technique for the treatment of CMT of older children and adolescents.

  3. Congenital cholesteatoma of the petrous pyramid.

    PubMed

    Horn, K L; Shea, J J; Brackmann, D E

    1985-09-01

    A 20-year follow-up was done on a patient with a large congenital cholesteatoma of the petrous apex. The patient was treated successfully with marsupialization through a radical mastoidectomy and sphenoid sinusotomy. Cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated continued cholesteatoma growth. Bone-conduction thresholds remained normal despite replacement of the internal auditory canal by cholesteatoma matrix. The patient continues to have chronic otorrhea, but is otherwise asymptomatic.

  4. Pregnancy and Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen

    2015-11-01

    Most women with known congenital heart disease can have successful pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Preconception assessment is essential in understanding anatomy, repairs, and current physiology, all of which can influence risk in pregnancy. With that foundation, a multidisciplinary cardio-obstetric team can predict and prepare for complications that may occur with superimposed hemodynamic changes of pregnancy. Individuals with Eisenmenger syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, significant left heart obstruction, ventricular dysfunction, or prior major cardiac event are among the highest risk for complications.

  5. [Congenital neck mass. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Proto, F; Sarría-Echegaray, P; Epprecht-González, M P; Alba-Mesquida, J

    2016-01-01

    Congenital neck masses are a challenge for general practitioners and specialists. Although some of them are diagnosed in utero, most of them remain silent until complications appear in the adult age. The anatomical location, consistency and age are determinants in guiding the possible diagnosis. A midline infrahyoid mass may be a thyroglossal cyst, however a lateral neck mass is more possible to result in a brachial cyst. Complementary imaging studies are essential such as pathological tests like needle aspiration fine needle aspiration (FNA).

  6. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  7. Variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Brien, W F; Mant, M J; Etches, W S

    1985-01-01

    A family is described with mild anaemia characterized by marked dyserythropoiesis and by prominent ringed sideroblasts. Inheritance is autosomal recessive. Other features include marked microcytosis, poikilocytosis, mild haemolysis, slightly increased haemoglobin A2, bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia and non-specific structural abnormalities of erythroid precursors on electron microscopy. This appears to be a previously unreported type of hereditary anaemia with both dyserythropoiesis and ringed sideroblasts. We propose the designation 'variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts'.

  8. Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Transesophageal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Rupa

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of congenital heart disease (CHD) seen in the adult varies widely. Malformations range from mild anomalies requiring no intervention to extremely complex pathologies characterized by the presence of multiple coexistent defects. Echocardiography represents the primary noninvasive imaging modality in the assessment of these lesions. The transesophageal approach expands the applications of echocardiography by allowing the acquisition of anatomic and functional information that may not be obtainable by transthoracic imaging. PMID:28074821

  9. Congenital insensitivity to pain in one family.

    PubMed

    Svec, Andrey; Feldinszka, Jana; Kokavec, Milan

    2016-12-09

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutation in several different genes. The diagnosis requires the combined skills and cooperation of pediatricians, neurologists, radiologists, pathologists, and orthopedic surgeons. Orthopedic manifestations of CIP include delayed diagnosis of fractures, nonunions, Charcot arthropathy, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, joint dislocations, and heterotopic ossifications. We present case reports of two brothers with CIP with various orthopedic manifestations and methods of surgical treatment with 10 years of follow-up.

  10. Thoracic kidney associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Kamal N; Rohilla, Seema; Narang, Rajat; Rattan, Simmi K; Maggu, Sarita; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara B

    2009-09-01

    We report three cases of ectopic thoracic (or superior ectopic) kidney; one in a neonate and two in 6-month-old children, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In all cases the diagnosis was made during surgery and confirmed by intravenous pyelography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the postoperative period. Because of the rarity of this condition we report these cases together with a wide review of the published reports.

  11. Management of complications of congenital hand disorders.

    PubMed

    Comer, Garet C; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews treatment and presents complications seen in the treatment of 7 common congenital hand differences, including syndactyly, camptodactyly, ulnar and radial polydactyly, thumb hypoplasia, radial longitudinal deficiency, and epidermolysis bullosa. The management of these conditions is challenging but has evolved over the last several decades with refined understanding of the disease processes and treatments. The goal of this article is to synthesize prior knowledge and provide further insights into these conditions that will help the surgeon avoid treatment complications.

  12. Severe congenital malaria acquired in utero.

    PubMed

    Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R; Hasanuddin, Afdal; Fobia, Wendelina; Sugiarto, Paulus; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2010-04-01

    Vertical transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is under-recognized and usually associated with asymptomatic low-level parasitemia at birth. We report symptomatic congenital malaria presenting as a neonatal sepsis syndrome. The presence at birth of a high asexual parasitemia, gametocytemia, and splenomegaly indicated in utero rather than intrapartum transmission. The neonate was successfully treated with intravenous artesunate followed by oral dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, without apparent adverse effects.

  13. Aortoiliac aneurysm with congenital right pelvic kidney.

    PubMed

    Date, Kazuma; Okada, Shuuichi; Ezure, Masahiko; Takihara, Hitomi; Okonogi, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yasushi; Kaneko, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    The association of congenital pelvic kidney with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysm is an extremely rare clinical finding. Previous reports have described various methods of aneurysm repair with successful preservation of the function of pelvic kidney. However, to our knowledge, reconstruction of more than two renal arteries has not been established. We report a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by congenital right pelvic kidney in a 72-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 54 mm and a right common iliac aneurysm of 45 mm. In addition, he had a congenital right pelvic kidney and CT angiography identified three right pelvic renal arteries. The upper artery originated from the bifurcation of the terminal aorta and the lower two originated from the right common iliac artery. Three-dimensional CT was helpful for the accurate planning of the operation. Open surgical repair of the aortoiliac aneurysm with a Dacron bifurcated graft replacement was decided and reimplantation of all three right pelvic kidney arteries to the right limb of the graft was also performed. For renal preservation, the right pelvic kidney arteries were perfused with cold Ringer's lactate using a rapid infusion pump and coronary perfusion cannula. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and worsening of renal function was not observed. The perfusion of renal arteries with cold Ringer's solution was thought to be a simple and appropriate procedure for renal protection.

  14. Congenital muscular torticollis: evaluation and classification.

    PubMed

    Tatli, Burak; Aydinli, Nur; Caliskan, Mine; Ozmen, Meral; Bilir, Feride; Acar, Gonul

    2006-01-01

    In this investigation of congenital muscular torticollis, 311 infants treated consecutively for congenital torticollis over an 8-year period (1995-2003) at the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Turkey were reviewed retrospectively. The clinical presentation, associated abnormalities, treatment, and outcomes of the overall group and of subgroups divided according to an ultrasonography-based classification were evaluated. All patients were evaluated using a standard approach: cervical ultrasonography was performed, and the patients were divided into two subgroups. Each group was scanned for other anomalies, and outcomes were compared. The mean age at diagnosis was 2.3 months; patients included in this study were 138 males and 173 females. Two clinical subgroups, comprised of sternomastoid tumors 85% and postural torticollis 15%, were identified. Passive range of motion was the initial treatment recommended for all of the patients. Follow-up data were available for all 311 patients; 95% experienced total resolution and 5% experienced subtotal resolution. We conclude that the majority of children with congenital muscular torticollis experience total resolution of symptoms. The success rate of conservative treatment is primarily dependent on the patients' age at the initiation of exercises and ultrasonographic findings.

  15. Surgical Treatment of Congenital Hallux Varus

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jong Sup; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Do Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report outcomes of congenital hallux varus deformity after surgical treatment. Methods We evaluated ten feet of eight patients with a congenital hallux varus deformity, including four feet combined with a longitudinal epiphyseal bracket (LEB). There were seven male patients and one female patient with a mean age of 33 months (range, 7 to 103 months) at the time of surgery. Two patients were bilaterally involved. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.9 years (range, 2.3 to 13.8 years). Clinical outcomes were assessed according to the criteria of Phelps and Grogan. Surgical procedures included the Farmer procedure, the McElvenny procedure or an osteotomy at the first metatarsal or proximal phalanx. Results The clinical results were excellent in two feet, good in six and poor in two feet. The LEB was associated with hallux varus in four feet and were treated by osteotomy alone or in conjunction with soft tissue procedure. Conclusions Congenital hallux varus was successfully corrected by surgery with overall favorable outcome. Preoperatively, a LEB should be considered as a possible cause of the deformity in order to prevent recurrent or residual varus after surgery. PMID:24900905

  16. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached. PMID:7437804

  17. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D'Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-02-10

    The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital malformations most frequently reported in literature or signaled by breeders to the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production of the University Federico II (Naples, Italy) in river buffalo are: musculoskeletal defects (transverse hemimelia, arthrogryposis, umbilical hernia) and disorders of sexual development. In conclusion this review put in evidence that river buffalo have a great variety of malformations due to genetic causes, and TH and omphalocele are the most frequent and that several cases are still not reported, leading to an underestimation of the real weight of genetic diseases in this species.

  18. Congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Toka, Hakan R; Toka, Okan; Hariri, Ali; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2010-07-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract anatomy (CAKUT) are common in children and represent approximately 30% of all prenatally diagnosed malformations. CAKUT is phenotypically variable and can affect the kidney(s) alone and/or the lower urinary tract. The spectrum includes more common anomalies such as vesicoureteral reflux and, rarely, more severe malformations such as bilateral renal agenesis. In young children, congenital anomalies are the leading cause of kidney failure and for kidney transplantation or dialysis. CAKUT can also lead to significant renal problems in adulthood and may present itself with hypertension and/or proteinuria. Congenital renal anomalies can be sporadic or familial, syndromic (also affecting nonrenal or non-urinary tract tissues), or nonsyndromic. Genetic causes have been identified for the syndromic forms and have shed some light into the molecular mechanisms of kidney development in human beings. The genetic causes for the more common nonsyndromic forms of CAKUT are unknown. The role of prenatal interventions and postnatal therapies as well as the benefits of screening affected individuals and their family members are not clear.

  19. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-11-22

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached.

  20. Diagnostic approach to the congenital muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Wang, Ching H.; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Deconinck, Nicolas; Bertini, Enrico; Ferreiro, Ana; Muntoni, Francesco; Sewry, Caroline; Béroud, Christophe; Mathews, Katherine D.; Moore, Steven A.; Bellini, Jonathan; Rutkowski, Anne; North, Kathryn N.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are early onset disorders of muscle with histological features suggesting a dystrophic process. The congenital muscular dystrophies as a group encompass great clinical and genetic heterogeneity so that achieving an accurate genetic diagnosis has become increasingly challenging, even in the age of next generation sequencing. In this document we review the diagnostic features, differential diagnostic considerations and available diagnostic tools for the various CMD subtypes and provide a systematic guide to the use of these resources for achieving an accurate molecular diagnosis. An International Committee on the Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies composed of experts on various aspects relevant to the CMDs performed a review of the available literature as well as of the unpublished expertise represented by the members of the committee and their contacts. This process was refined by two rounds of online surveys and followed by a three-day meeting at which the conclusions were presented and further refined. The combined consensus summarized in this document allows the physician to recognize the presence of a CMD in a child with weakness based on history, clinical examination, muscle biopsy results, and imaging. It will be helpful in suspecting a specific CMD subtype in order to prioritize testing to arrive at a final genetic diagnosis. PMID:24581957

  1. Clinical presentation and management of congenital ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Marenco, Marco; Macchi, Ilaria; Macchi, Iacopo; Galassi, Emilio; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Congenital ptosis is a rare condition characterized by lower positioning of the upper eyelid that is present at birth and is a clinical condition that is persistent if not treated. It may be unilateral or bilateral and may be associated with other ocular disorders or systemic conditions, including Marcus Gunn, Horner, and Duane syndromes. It is a benign condition but causes functional, cosmetic, and psychological problems in children. However, not all patients need to undergo surgery, and usually only patients at risk of amblyopia need a prompt surgical correction, while in other cases, surgery can be postponed. The grade of ptosis, the eyelid function, and the amblyopic risk are the parameters that affect the ophthalmologist’s decision on timing of surgery and the surgical technique to be used. In fact, there are several types of surgical techniques to correct a congenital ptosis, although very often more than one is needed to obtain an acceptable result. This paper reviews the causes of congenital ptosis and associated diseases. Particular emphasis is given to surgical management and different procedures available to correct the upper eyelid anomaly and avoid permanent damage to visual function. PMID:28280295

  2. Sequential segmental classification of feline congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Scansen, Brian A; Schneider, Matthias; Bonagura, John D

    2015-12-01

    Feline congenital heart disease is less commonly encountered in veterinary medicine than acquired feline heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy. Understanding the wide spectrum of congenital cardiovascular disease demands a familiarity with a variety of lesions, occurring both in isolation and in combination, along with an appreciation of complex nomenclature and variable classification schemes. This review begins with an overview of congenital heart disease in the cat, including proposed etiologies and prevalence, examination approaches, and principles of therapy. Specific congenital defects are presented and organized by a sequential segmental classification with respect to their morphologic lesions. Highlights of diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis are offered. It is hoped that this review will provide a framework for approaching congenital heart disease in the cat, and more broadly in other animal species based on the sequential segmental approach, which represents an adaptation of the common methodology used in children and adults with congenital heart disease.

  3. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  4. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    PubMed

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce.

  5. Quality measures for congenital and pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Austin, Erle H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Pasquali, Sara K; Lacour-Gayet, Francois G; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Hal; Bacha, Emile A; Nido, Pedro J Del; Fraser, Charles D; Gaynor, J William; Hirsch, Jennifer C; Morales, David L S; Pourmoghadam, Kamal K; Tweddell, James S; Prager, Richard L; Mayer, John E

    2012-01-01

    This article presents 21 "Quality Measures for Congenital and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery" that were developed and approved by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and endorsed by the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society (CHSS). These Quality Measures are organized according to Donabedian's Triad of Structure, Process, and Outcome. It is hoped that these quality measures can aid in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical quality assessment and quality improvement initiatives.

  6. Review of congenital inner ear abnormalities on CT temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Yiin, R S Z; Tang, P H; Tan, T Y

    2011-09-01

    The aetiology of profound hearing loss in children is complex and multifactorial. Congenital inner ear abnormality is a major cause of hearing loss in children. CT temporal bone imaging is the modality of choice in the investigation of hearing loss. Recognising the congenital abnormalities of the inner ear guides the clinician's management of the condition. This pictorial essay illustrates the congenital abnormalities of the inner ear on high resolution CT temporal bone images and correlation with developmental arrest during embryology.

  7. Congenital mesenteric hernia in neonates: Still a dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Alshahwani, Noora; Al-Balushi, Zainab; Arain, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction with devastating outcomes and still remains a challenge to diagnose pre-operatively. Patients are often managed with emergency surgical exploration and may need bowel resection. We present 2 neonates with small bowel obstruction secondary to strangulated transmesenteric hernia through a congenital defect in the small bowel mesentery, which were managed successfully. We have also reviewed the literature about congenital transmesenteric hernia in neonates. PMID:26612129

  8. [Congenital dislocation of the knee: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Gómez, L; Sánchez Gimeno, J; García Barrecheguren, E; Marulanda Del Valle, K; Almonte Adón, K; Guerrero Laleona, C

    2015-01-01

    Congenital dislocation of the knee is a rare disease. The diagnosis is made at birth by clinical findings, and confirmed radiologically. It has been associated with various etiologies from intrauterine fetal malpositions to genetic disorders. The prognosis depends on early treatment and whether there are other congenital anomalies. We report two new cases of congenital dislocation of the knee, observed in our hospital during the period of a month, diagnosed immediately after birth, and both with a good clinical outcome.

  9. Semantic information can facilitate covert face recognition in congenital prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Davide; Schmalzl, Laura; Coltheart, Max; Palermo, Romina

    2010-11-01

    People with congenital prosopagnosia have never developed the ability to accurately recognize faces. This single case investigation systematically investigates covert and overt face recognition in "C.," a 69 year-old woman with congenital prosopagnosia. Specifically, we: (a) describe the first assessment of covert face recognition in congenital prosopagnosia using multiple tasks; (b) show that semantic information can contribute to covert recognition; and (c) provide a theoretical explanation for the mechanisms underlying covert face recognition.

  10. Prevalence of congenital anomalies in newborns with congenital heart disease diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Egbe, Alexander; Lee, Simon; Ho, Deborah; Uppu, Santosh; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a known association between congenital heart disease (CHD) and other congenital anomalies (CA). These associations have been altered by changes in prenatal factors in recent time. We reviewed the largest database of inpatient hospitalization information and analyzed the current association between common CHD diagnoses and other congenital anomalies. Materials and Methods: Case-control study design. We reviewed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 1998 to 2008 and identified all live births with CHD diagnosis (case) and live births without CHD diagnosis (control). We compared prevalence of associated congenital anomalies between the case and control groups. Results: Our cohort consisted of 97,154 and 12,078,482 subjects in the case and control groups, respectively. In the CHD population, prevalence of non-syndromic congenital anomaly (NSCA), genetic syndrome (GS), and overall extra-cardiac congenital anomaly (CA) were 11.4, 2.2, and 13.6%, respectively. In the control group, prevalence of NSCA, GS, and CA were 6.7, 0.3, and 7.0%, respectively. NSCA (odds ratio (OR): 1.88, confidence interval (CI): 1.73-1.94), GS (OR 2.52, CI 2.44-2.61), and overall CA (OR: 2.01, CI: 1.97-2.14) were strongly associated with CHD. Prevalence of GS and multiple organ-system CA decreased significantly over the study period. Conclusions: This is the largest and most comprehensive population-based study evaluating association between CHD and extra-cardiac malformation (ECM) in newborns. There was significant decrease in prevalence of GS and multiple CA over the study period. PMID:24987252

  11. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D’Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Congenital malformations (due to genetic causes) represent a hidden danger for animal production, above all when genetic selection is undertaken for production improvements. These malformations are responsible for economic losses either because they reduce the productivity of the farm, or because their spread in the population would decrease the total productivity of that species/breed. River buffalo is a species of increasing interest all over the world for its production abilities, as proved by the buffalo genome project and the genetic selection plans that are currently performed in different countries. The aim of this review is to provide a general view of different models of congenital malformations in buffalo and their world distribution. This would be useful either for those who performed buffalo genetic selection or for researchers in genetic diseases, which would be an advantage to their studies with respect to the knowledge of gene mutations and interactions in this species. Abstract The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital

  12. Congenital costo-vertebral fibrous band and congenital kyphoscoliosis: a previously unreported combination.

    PubMed

    Eid, Tony; Ghostine, Bachir; Kreichaty, Gaby; Daher, Paul; Ghanem, Ismat

    2013-05-01

    Congenital kyphoscoliosis (CKS) results from abnormal vertebral chondrification. Congenital fibrous bands occur in several locations with variable impact on vertebral development. We report a previously unreported case of a female infant with CKS presenting with an L2 hypoplastic vertebra and a costo-vertebral fibrous band extending to the skin in the form of a dimple. We also describe the therapeutic approach, consisting of surgical excision of the fibrous band and postoperative fulltime bracing, with a 7-year follow-up. We recommend a high index of suspicion in any unusual presentation of CKS and insist on case by case management in such cases.

  13. Radionuclide imaging of rare congenital renal fusion anomalies.

    PubMed

    Volkan, Bilge; Ceylan, Emel; Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen

    2003-03-01

    Demonstration of a congenital renal anomaly plays an important role in the treatment of patients with renal infection. These patients are prone to infections because of coexisting urinary tract anomalies such as duplicated ureter, ureter opening anomalies, and urinary stasis. Assessment of renal parenchymal damage resulting from acute or chronic renal infection is the primary indication for radionuclide imaging with Tc-99m DMSA. In addition, this technique allows congenital anomalies to be identified. The authors review congenital renal fusion anomalies identified in children through Tc-99m DMSA imaging. They conclude that Tc-99m DMSA imaging can reveal important diagnostic information about various congenital anomalies, including fusion anomalies.

  14. [Current gene study in etiological analysis of congenital craniofacial abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi-miao; Fang, Bing

    2007-04-01

    The cause of congenital craniofacial abnormalities are very complicated. Understanding of the gene mechanisms of abnormalities taking place are very important for prevention and therapy.DNA sequence analysis provides the fundaments of gene study of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities. Human genome project (HGP) paved the confirmation of candidate gene of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities.Transgenic animal models and gene knockout techniques are effective methods in study of gene function. This paper reviews current gene study in etiopathogenisis analysis of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities.

  15. Free radicals and antioxidants status in neonates with congenital malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Bedabrata; Gongopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Rani, Anjali; Gavel, Roshni; Mishra, Surendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies using animal models have shown that oxidative stress during pregnancy may play an important role in causing birth defects. Congenital anomalies affect an estimated 270,000 newborns who die during the first 28 days of life every year from different birth defects. Hence, at present many research works are going on to reduce the infant mortality from congenital anomaly.[1] Objective: The objective was to measure the oxidant and antioxidant level in the serum of newborn babies with the congenital anomaly and compare these levels with age and sex matched normal neonates. This is to identify any role of oxidative stress in the causation of congenital anomaly. Materials and Methods: This case-control study included 159 participants: 106 newborns with the congenital anomaly and 53 healthy newborns. The markers of oxidative stress like serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level, protein carbonyl (PC) level, and the activity of antioxidants such as Vitamin C, glutathione were measured in both cases (neonates with congenital anomaly) and controls (normal healthy neonates). These parameters were statistically compared. Results: MDA levels and PC levels were significantly higher (P < 0.0001), and Vitamin C and reduced glutathione levels were significantly lower (P < 0.0001), in newborns with congenital malformation than in healthy newborns. Conclusions: Increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation might play an important role in the pathogenesis of congenital anomaly. Impairment of the free radical/antioxidant balance is leading to increased free radical damage in neonates with congenital malformation. PMID:26628809

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital fiber-type disproportion

    MedlinePlus

    ... health and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern Congenital fiber-type disproportion can have multiple inheritance patterns. When this condition is caused by mutations in ...

  17. EGFR mutation of adenocarcinoma in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-03-01

    An 80-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy for the resection of multiple cysts accompanied by a nodule. The pathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma with surrounding atypical epithelial cell proliferation in a Type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation. There was epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in the adenocarcinoma and surrounding atypical epithelial cells that had proliferated. Malignant transformation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation may be related to the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in this case, with atypical epithelial cell proliferation as a precursor. We emphasize the importance of complete resection of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation and the possibility of treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated cases.

  18. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggrregated albumin (/sup 99m/Tc MAA) labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cutaneous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  19. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  20. Complete congenital heart block in a neonate with a complex congenital heart defect in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wawo, Edvine Yonta; Mfeukeu, Liliane Kuate; Makamte, Larissa; Edie, Sandrine Dikosso; Balana, Flore Esiene

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is rare disorder that has a higher mortality when associated with structural congenital heart defects. Very few cases have been reported in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We present a case of complete CHB associated with a complex congenital heart defect in a neonate in Cameroon. A 1-month-old neonate in Cameroon was referred for the evaluation of bradycardia. The obstetrical ultrasound done during pregnancy revealed fetal bradycardia without further evaluation. Clinical examination showed well a developed neonate with bradycardia at 62 beats/minute, and mild cyanosis with oxygen saturation at 93% at room air. There were no signs of heart failure. Twelve lead electrocardiogram (ECG) demonstrated a complete atrioventricular conduction block with a junctional escape rhythm at 59/minute, left axis deviation and bi-ventricular hypertrophy. Two-dimensional echocardiography revealed a complex congenital heart disease with the following abnormalities: dextrocardia, complete atrioventricular canal with a single atrium and mild atrioventricular valve regurgitation and malposition of the great vessels with a posterior aorta and an anterior pulmonary artery. This case report highlights the challenges in the diagnosis and management of complex CHBs in low resource settings. A properly performed pregnancy follow-up with serial echocardiograms could aid in antenatal diagnosis and plan perinatal management when appropriate in order to optimize outcome. This emphasizes the clinical value of high quality antenatal care and proper screening. PMID:27904846

  1. Prognostic markers of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro; Magny, Jean François; Jacquemard, François

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this research was to identify maternal and fetal characteristics as prognostic markers of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. This is a descriptive study of 13 cases of congenital CMV infection referred to Institute de Puericulture et Perinatologie de Paris (IPP) from January 2005 to October 2006. Amniotic fluid puncture was performed to research CMV polimerase chain reaction (PCR). Cordocentesis and cord blood samples at delivery were also analyzed to determinate fetal platelets count, GGT, ASAT, ALAT, CMV-DNA and IgM antibody. Variables of symptomatic and asymptomatic infants were then compared. Data were analyzed by SPSS--15.0. Mean gestational age of amniocentesis was 24.6 weeks and there was no difference of mean viral load in amniotic fluid considering infant features. Mean gestational age of cordocentesis was 26.1 weeks. There were no statistical differences of fetal viral load, IgM, platelets, GGT, ASAT and ALAT analyzed at cordocentesis samples, but at delivery, mean values of IgM and ASAT of fetal blood were increased in symptomatic ones (p= 0.03 for both parameters). When considering groups with normal and abnormal parameters, ASAT of cordon samples was also increased in symptomatic infants (p= 0.02). Sensibility, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of fetal ultrasound anomalies to detect symptomatic infants were, respectively, 80%, 62.5%, 57.1% and 83.3%. Thus, identification of markers of CMV symptomatic infants should be aimed. Prenatal diagnosis, identification and follow up of congenital CMV infected infants are important to consider treatment for symptomatic infants, trying to avoid or reducing some possible sequels.

  2. Further Observations in Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Andrew G.; Shen, Xin-Ming; Selcen, Duygu; Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    During the past five years many patients suffering from congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) have been identified worldwide and novel causative genes and mutations have been discovered. The disease genes now include those encoding each subunit of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), the ColQ part of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), choline acetyltransferase, Nav 1.4, MuSK, and Dok-7. Moreover, emerging genotype-phenotype correlations are providing clues for targeted mutation analysis. This review focuses on the recent observations in selected CMS. PMID:18567859

  3. Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nimkarn, Saroj; Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2011-10-01

    Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The severity of this disorder depends on the extent of impaired enzymatic activity, which is caused by various mutations of the 21 hydroxylase gene. This article reviews adrenal steroidogenesis and the pathophysiology of 21 hydroxylase deficiency. The three forms of CAH are then discussed in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment, and genetic basis. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed. The goal of therapy is to correct the deficiency in cortisol secretion and suppress androgen overproduction. Glucocorticoid replacement has been the mainstay of treatment for CAH, but new treatment strategies continue to be developed and studied.

  4. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  5. Yellowish flecks in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Chew, E; Deutman, A; Pinckers, A; Aan de Kerk, A

    1984-10-01

    The fundus abnormalities of Leber's congenital amaurosis are extremely variable, from normal to salt-and-pepper changes to typical retinitis pigmentosa. A less commonly seen appearance is that of multiple, irregular shaped, yellowish white flecks deep in the midperipheral retina in a periarteriolar distribution. The nasal fundus as well as the posterior pole are spared. Such a case is presented along with a four-year follow-up together with the fluorescein angiographic findings. The flecks appear to be specific for this entity.

  6. Ectopia cordis: a rare congenital anomaly.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Abigail; Donnelly, Joseph; Kuc, Alexander; Good, Daniel; Doros, Gabriela; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2014-11-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is a rare congenital anomaly associated with the heart positioned outside of the thoracic cavity either partially or completely. The ectopic heart can be found along a spectrum of anatomical locations, including the cervical, thoracic and abdominal regions and in most cases, it protrudes outside the chest through a split sternum. Although the first case of EC was identified during the early 1600s only 91 cases have been reported since then in the literature. This review will discuss the history and prevalence of EC, its etiology, morphology, presentation and symptoms, complications, diagnosis, treatment and management and prognosis.

  7. Genetic causes of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Julia; Yu, Lan; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a moderately prevalent birth defect that, despite advances in neonatal care, is still a significant cause of infant death, and surviving patients have significant morbidity. The goal of ongoing research to elucidate the genetic causes of CDH is to develop better treatment and ultimately prevention. CDH is a complex developmental defect that is etiologically heterogeneous. This review summarizes the recurrent genetic causes of CDH including aneuploidies, chromosome copy number variants, and single gene mutations. It also discusses strategies for genetic evaluation and genetic counseling in an era of rapidly evolving technologies in clinical genetic diagnostics. PMID:25447988

  8. Genetic aspects of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pober, BR

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common major malformation affecting 1/3000–1/4000 births, which continues to be associated with significant perinatal mortality. Much current research is focused on elucidating the genetics and pathophysiology contributing to CDH to develop more effective therapies. The latest data suggest that many cases of CDH are genetically determined and also indicate that CDH is etiologically heterogeneous. The present review will provide a brief summary of diaphragm development and model organism work most relevant to human CDH and will primarily describe important human phenotypes associated with CDH and also provide recommendations for diagnostic evaluation of a fetus or infant with CDH. PMID:18510546

  9. Postnatal management of congenital bilateral renal hypodysplasia.

    PubMed

    La Scola, Claudio; Hewitt, Ian; Pasini, Andrea; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Montini, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    Renal hypodysplasia (RHD) is a congenital disorder, characterized by an abnormally developed kidney. Mutations in genes such as PAX2, HNF1-beta, TCF2, EYA1, that encode factors critical in early renal development, are being found. RHD is the leading cause of chronic renal failure in childhood, with or without associated urologic abnormalities such as vesicoureteric reflux and urinary tract obstruction. Antenatal detection has improved understanding of this disorder, resulting in enhanced outcomes through earlier intervention, including peritoneal dialysis. Management requires a multidisciplinary team approach that commences prior to the birth of the child.

  10. [Congenital gastrointestinal diseases with manifestations in adulthood].

    PubMed

    Rösch, W

    1977-02-03

    A genetic background is discussed in many disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with a disposition in addition to environmental factors. The pathophysiology of most hereditary diseases is unknown although the mode of inheritance is established. Biochemical analysis may show molecular defects or inborn lack of enzymes, cytogenetic studies may reveal chromosomal abnormalities. The knowledge of genetic factors in gastrointestinal disorders may contribute to the early detection of persons afflicted but not yet symptomatic, in some rare syndromes genetic counseling may become mandatory. Finally, there are many congenital malformations which may not cause symptoms for many years so that doubts may arise whether they are developmental anomalies or acquired conditions.

  11. Reconstruction of congenital defects of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Eldor, Liron; Friedman, Jeffrey D

    2011-05-01

    Congenital absence of the vagina is a relatively rare condition most commonly associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. Historically, several reconstructive techniques have been described to provide for functional vaginal reconstruction on these patients, both operative and nonoperative. Although there are many advantages and disadvantages of the various procedures, one experience with the use of split thickness skin grafts to reconstruct the vagina has produced acceptable functional results with limited donor site morbidity. Careful planning and timing of this form of reconstruction can produce predictable results in patients who are nearing sexual maturity.

  12. Hepatic heterotopia in congenital diaphragmatic anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramnik V; Wadhwani, Veena; Wyatt-Ashmead, Josephine; Abel, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    An antenatally diagnosed case of a left congenital diaphragmatic hernia is reported. The diaphragmatic eventration hernia sac consisted of a sheet of ectopic liver tissue in continuity with a hypoplastic left lobe which formed the medial anterior and posterior walls of the hernia is presented. The operative management of this combination of defects has not previously been described in English literature. Embryological considerations, limitations of accurate preoperative diagnosis, technical challenge in the operative repair of the defect and need for drainage is discussed. PMID:24042207

  13. [Perineal Groove: A Rare Congenital Anomaly].

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Manuel; Alves, Nuno; Fontes, Natacha

    2016-10-01

    Perineal groove is a rare congenital anorectal malformation, with incidence yet undetermined. It is almost exclusive to the female newborn and its embryogenic origin remains uncertain. We present a case-report of a newborn girl that was discharged from the nursery without complications. At her first appointment at primary care we noted a wet sulcus connecting the posterior vaginal commissure and the anus. This case report emphasizes the rarity of the perineal groove and the importance of a good quality history and physical examination at primary care.

  14. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: Multiple Congenital Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Ornek, Nurettin Irem; Caglar, Cagkan

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a syndrome characterized by nonprogressive multiple congenital joint contractures. The etiology of disease is multifactorial; it is most commonly suspected from absent fetal movements and genetic defects. AMC affects mainly limbs; also it might present with other organs involvement. It is crucial that the diagnosis of AMC should be kept in mind by musculoskeletal physicians in newborns with multiple joint contractures and patients must begin rehabilitation in early stage after accurate diagnosis in terms of functional independence. We present the diagnosis, types, clinical features, and treatment approaches of this disease in our case with literature reviews. PMID:26604929

  15. Anatomical assessment of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wood, John C

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) is replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization as the modality of choice for anatomic and functional characterization of congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiographic imaging is insufficient. In this manuscript, we discuss the principles of anatomic imaging of CHD, placing emphasis on the appropriate choice and modification of pulse sequences necessary to evaluate infants and small children. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate the relative strengths and shortcomings of different CMR imaging techniques. Although cardiovascular function and flow techniques are not described, their role in evaluating the severity of anatomic defects is emphasized. Anatomic characterization represents the first component of a carefully-planned, integrated CMR assessment of CHD.

  16. [Conservative treatment of congenital patellar dislocation].

    PubMed

    Zajonz, D; Schumann, E; Wojan, M; Moche, M; Heyde, C-E

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the rare case of a boy who was born in our hospital with valgus deformity and external rotation of the right lower leg because of congenital patellar dislocation. In the case presented a stable repositioning of the patella could be achieved by redressment with a plaster cast and leg brace. During a 4-year follow-up there were no tendencies towards dislocation during the clinical examination and no dislocation events were documented. In selected cases an attempt at conservative repositioning and retention treatment appears to be worthwhile before surgical treatment is indicated.

  17. Long term management of congenital cataracts.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, E C; Jones, R B

    1985-01-01

    Presentation and outcome, particularly in terms of development, nursery, and school placement of 55 children with treated congenital cataracts was studied. Results indicate that although most children have satisfactory vision many of their parents would have welcomed more support at the time of the diagnosis, an opportunity to talk to parents of similarly affected children, and further advice on their child's early development and educational placement. It is suggested that improved communications between clinicians, therapists, and teachers, and parents' support groups would be helpful to these families. PMID:3923944

  18. Congenital nystagmus cosegregating with a balanced 7;15 translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, M A; Jeffery, S; Lee, N; Hogg, C

    1993-01-01

    We report a family in which autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus cosegregates with a balanced 7;15 translocation. Ophthalmic investigation showed predominantly horizontal nystagmus with a small rotatory component and no significant loss of visual function. This finding suggests a possible localisation for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus (McKusick 164100). Images PMID:8326501

  19. Primary congenital glaucoma associated with Patau syndrome with long survival.

    PubMed

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Pimkwan; Kuchtey, John; Dev, V G; Kuchtey, Rachel

    2010-06-23

    Ocular abnormalities are common in Patau syndrome (trisomy 13), but only a few cases with congenital glaucoma have been reported, some of which were associated with other ocular defects. This report describes a case of primary congenital glaucoma in an 11-year-old patient with full trisomy 13.

  20. Congenital subclavian arteriovenous malformation causing cardiac failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Anoop, T M; Sreejith, P; Thomas, Joby K; Gailin, B; Jabbar, P K; Ittycheria, Cherian C; George, Raju

    2009-07-01

    Congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the thoracic region are rarely reported in adults. The authors report an unusual case of a 30-year-old man who presented with a large congenital AVM and heart failure. The diagnosis was made using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and computed tomography. Embolization followed by surgical resection of the AVM resulted in the prompt relief of heart failure.

  1. Spitz nevus arising upon a congenital glomuvenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Arica, Deniz A; Arica, Ibrahim E; Yayli, Savas; Cobanoglu, Umit; Akay, Bengu N; Anadolu, Rana; Bahadir, Sevgi

    2013-01-01

    There are several reports of the collision of vascular and pigmentary anomalies (e.g., phakomatosis pigmentovascularis) and the association between congenital melanocytic nevi and infantile hemangiomas. We report a case of Spitz nevus arising in skin overlying a congenital plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (GVM). This is the first report of a Spitz nevus arising in direct contiguity to a GVM.

  2. Characteristics of Individuals with Congenital and Acquired Deaf-Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, Dawn M.; Hirdes, John P.; Stolee, Paul; Strong, J. Graham; Poss, Jeff; Tjam, Erin Y.; Bowman, Lindsay; Ashworth, Melody

    2009-01-01

    Using a standardized assessment instrument, the authors compared 182 adults with congenital deaf-blindness and those with acquired deaf-blindness. They found that those with congenital deaf-blindness were more likely to have impairments in cognition, activities of daily living, and social interactions and were less likely to use speech for…

  3. Mental and Behavioral Disorders among People with Congenital Deafblindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The population of people with congenital deafblindness faces challenges concerning communication and mobility. Due to the significance of the sensory loss it is difficult to diagnose mental and behavioral disorders. This article investigates the prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders among 95 congenitally deafblind adults. Seventy-four…

  4. Keratoconus and Leber's congenital amaurosis: a clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Flanders, M; Lapointe, M L; Brownstein, S; Little, J M

    1984-12-01

    A 42-year-old man with Leber's congenital amaurosis, cataracts and keratoconus died following abdominal surgery. Postmortem pathological examination of the globes disclosed cone-shaped corneas with unusual central subepithelial scars and a retinopathy consistent with retinitis pigmentosa. A review of the family history revealed two siblings with congenital blindness.

  5. Congenital medium sternal cleft with partial ectopia cordis repair.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Paulo Rego; Antunes, Sónia; Couto, Alexandra; Santos, Gonçalo Cassiano; Leal, Luis Gagp; Magalhães, Manuel Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Congenital sternal malformation is a rare anomaly often diagnosed as an asymptomatic condition at birth. The authors report a clinical case of a full-term female neonate with congenital sternal cleft and partial ectopia cordis. Successful surgical repair was accomplished at 6 days of age. When surgery is performed shortly after birth, the procedure is easier and better results are achieved.

  6. Autism in a Child with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Phillip I.

    1983-01-01

    A case study is described in which early infantile autism was diagnosed in a child with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMU) infection. It is suggested that congenital infection should be considered as an etiological agent in autism. The case's synergistic effect of CMU-induced brain damage, deafness, and maternal deprivation in noted. (CL)

  7. Spatial Orientation and Congenital Blindness: A Neuropsychological Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, I.

    1995-01-01

    Tests of a neuropsychological model for spatial orientation in the absence of vision were developed and administered to 31 children with congenital blindness. Results support the neuropsychological model and indicate that some congenitally blind subjects had focal brain damage, sufficient to impair their capacity to be accurately oriented in…

  8. Isolated congenital palatal fistula without submucous cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet; Olgun, Haşim; Tan, Onder; Caner, Ibrahim

    2009-09-01

    Congenital fistula of the palate is a rare deformity. It has been generally associated with cleft palate. Treatment of cleft palate is surgical intervention. We present a child with congenital fistula of palate that was not associated with submucous cleft and closed spontaneously at 18 months.

  9. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee.

  10. Clinical approach to the diagnosis of congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    North, Kathryn N

    2011-12-01

    In this issue of Seminars in Pediatric Neurology, each chapter will focus on the features and management of individual congenital myopathies. This introductory chapter will provide an overview of the clinical features that alert the clinician to the likely diagnosis of a congenital myopathy, and specific features on history and examination that are characteristic of a specific genetic subtype. Most congenital myopathies share a common pattern of clinical features, which makes it difficult to predict the genetic cause in a patient by clinical assessment alone. Although no single feature is specific for the congenital myopathies, the presence of this common pattern highlights patients in whom a muscle biopsy is likely to provide important diagnostic information. The diagnosis of a specific congenital myopathy should only be made when the defining morphologic feature is the predominant pathologic change, other possible causes have been excluded, and the clinical course is nonprogressive or only slowly progressive.

  11. Consensus Statement on Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching H.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M.; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M.; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O.; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D.; Connolly, Anne M.; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L.; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  12. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  13. [Congenital heart defects in adulthood : Supraventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Hebe, J

    2016-06-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) based on congenital substrates, such as accessory pathways or dual atrioventricular nodal properties, occur with an increased probability linked to specific congenital heart defects (CHDs). In the literature, the association of Ebstein's anomaly with accessory pathways and with Mahaim fibers is most prominent. Compared with patients with otherwise normal hearts, the clinical relevance of SVT is typically more severe and therefore antiarrhythmia treatment is a necessity in many cases. Diagnostics, pharmaceutical treatment, and interventional therapy of SVT in patients with CHD are often demanding owing to anatomical, hemodynamic, and electro-anatomical peculiarities. The use of antiarrhythmic medication is often limited because of intolerable side effects and a lack of reliability in suppressing arrhythmia relapses in the long term. Within the last 15-20 years catheter ablation has thus become established as the first-choice treatment for SVT, even in patients with CHD. However, rates of success, recurrence, and risks are still inferior to those observed in patients with a normally functioning heart owing to the co-existence of vascular and cardiac anomalies, surgically created alterations, an unusual electro-anatomy, and lower tolerance to hemodynamic changes. Successful treatment in patients with CHDs and SVT requires a deep understanding and knowledge of all the disciplines discussed above and should only be practiced in dedicated centers, as patient numbers are small and therefore experience is limited.

  14. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  15. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  16. Congenital subtalar dislocation--a case report.

    PubMed

    Saini, Raghav; Dhillon, M S; Gill, S S

    2009-09-01

    Congenital dislocation of the subtalar joint is one of the rarest forms of presentation of a calcaneo-valgus foot. We report the second case of this type published; an 18-month female child aged was seen with calcaneo-valgus deformity of left foot since birth. She was walking over the medial malleolus and medial border of foot. Radiographs and 3D CT scan of the left foot confirmed the diagnosis of a congenital subtalar dislocation. Surgical correction was achieved through a posterolateral incision, and the reduced joint was fixed with a k-wires for 6 weeks; the foot was immobilized in below knee cast for another 6 weeks, and an ankle foot orthosis was used for another 3 years. At 3 years post-surgical follow up, the child has a plantigrade foot with no functional impairment. Follow up radiographs and 3D CT scan confirmed the maintenance of well aligned talo-calcaneal joint. This type of dislocation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of calcaneo-valgus foot; a clear understanding of the pathology, a precise operative reduction, and long-term use of orthosis results in a favourable outcome.

  17. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  18. Congenital Ulnar Drift in a Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Desirae; Eliasson, Shannon; Griswold, John

    2015-01-01

    Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations. In 1994 Wood reviewed all of the descriptions of cases of windblown hand and pointed out how many variants of congenital ulnar drift there are, suggesting that the many variations seen may all belong to a larger type of arthrogryposis. While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud's arthropathy. While most hand surgeons are familiar with presentations of congenital ulnar drift, few of them are knowledgeable about Jaccoud's arthropathy as this is usually discussed within medical communities such as Rheumatology. We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s. We propose that the current case is a demonstration of a type of windblown hand that has some hereditary component but is not immediately obvious at birth and presents physically more like Jaccoud's arthropathy than traditional windblown hand. PMID:26167318

  19. Fellow Eye in Unilateral Primary Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim This is a report of the incidence of bilateral cases in a cohort of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) cases and a study of the biometric characteristics of the fellow normal eyes in unilateral cases. Materials and methods The charts of 134 PCG children were reviewed, of which 78 cases (58.2%) were found to have bilateral disease. The remaining 56 patients (41.8%) with unilateral disease had their fellow normal eyes compared with an age-matched cohort of ophthalmologically free children. Results There were no differences between the normal fellow eyes of PCG cases and the control eyes in the corneal diameter and central corneal thickness (CCT), whereas the normal fellow eyes of PCG cases had higher intraocular pressure (IOP) and cup/disc (C/D) ratios. Conclusion The fellow eyes of apparently unilateral PCG cases are not typically normal anatomically like other children unaffected by PCG. Clinical significance A very high index of suspicion has to be kept for PCG cases that present apparently unilaterally, and meticulous prolonged follow-up is mandatory. How to cite this article Bayoumi NHL. Fellow Eye in Unilateral Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2017;11(1):28-30. PMID:28138215

  20. Congenital hand anomalies in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abulezz, Tarek; Talaat, Mohamed; Elsani, Asem; Allam, Karam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hand anomalies are numerous and markedly variant. Their significance is attributed to the frequent occurrence and their serious social, psychological and functional impacts on patient's life. Patients and Methods: This is a follow-up study of 64 patients with hand anomalies of variable severity. All patients were presented to Plastic Surgery Department of Sohag University Hospital in a period of 24 months. Results: This study revealed that failure of differentiation and duplication deformities were the most frequent, with polydactyly was the most common anomaly encountered. The mean age of presentation was 6 years and female to male ratio was 1.46:1. Hand anomalies were either isolated, associated with other anomalies or part of a syndrome. Conclusion: Incidence of congenital hand anomalies in Upper Egypt is difficult to be estimated due to social and cultural concepts, lack of education, poor registration and deficient medical survey. Management of hand anomalies should be individualised, carefully planned and started as early as possible to achieve the best outcome. PMID:27833283

  1. Evaluation of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Francesca; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana

    2016-03-01

    The clinical approach to adults with congenital heart diseases (ACHDs) is unique in cardiovascular medicine because these patients encompass a broad range of presentations. Each patient, despite having similar diagnosis, will be anatomically and physiologically unlike others within ACHD population, in relation to the type of repair, age at repair, associated defects, with specific long-term risk factors and complications. Furthermore, as many patients will not complain of symptoms, clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing must also be based on the underlying main diagnostic category, with complete standardized lesion-specific clinical protocols, investigating all known risk factors specific for each congenital heart disease and performed as part of screening for significant long-term complications. The first part of this review will focus on clinical history, physical examination, and the most important diagnostic testing in ACHD population. The second part of the article will focus on some clinical issues we have to face in our daily practice, such as heart failure, cyanosis, and pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, as survival rates of ACHD population continue to improve and patients with this condition live longer, we will briefly report on a new clinical concern regarding the impact of acquired morbidities like coronary artery disease that appear to be of greater importance in defining outcome in older patients with ACHD.

  2. Auditory Spatial Recalibration in Congenital Blind Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Finocchietti, Sara; Cappagli, Giulia; Gori, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Blind individuals show impairments for auditory spatial skills that require complex spatial representation of the environment. We suggest that this is partially due to the egocentric frame of reference used by blind individuals. Here we investigate the possibility of reducing the mentioned auditory spatial impairments with an audio-motor training. Our hypothesis is that the association between a motor command and the corresponding movement's sensory feedback can provide an allocentric frame of reference and consequently help blind individuals in understanding complex spatial relationships. Subjects were required to localize the end point of a moving sound before and after either 2-min of audio-motor training or a complete rest. During the training, subjects were asked to move their hand, and consequently the sound source, to freely explore the space around the setup and the body. Both congenital blind (N = 20) and blindfolded healthy controls (N = 28) participated in the study. Results suggest that the audio-motor training was effective in improving space perception of blind individuals. The improvement was not observed in those subjects that did not perform the training. This study demonstrates that it is possible to recalibrate the auditory spatial representation in congenital blind individuals with a short audio-motor training and provides new insights for rehabilitation protocols in blind people. PMID:28261053

  3. Right ventricular failure in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Kuk; Ma, Jae Sook

    2013-03-01

    Despite developments in surgical techniques and other interventions, right ventricular (RV) failure remains an important clinical problem in several congenital heart diseases (CHD). RV function is one of the most important predictors of mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. RV failure is a progressive disorder that begins with myocardial injury or stress, neurohormonal activation, cytokine activation, altered gene expression, and ventricular remodeling. Pressure-overload RV failure caused by RV outflow tract obstruction after total correction of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary stenosis, atrial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, and systemic RV failure after the Fontan operation. Volume-overload RV failure may be caused by atrial septal defect, pulmonary regurgitation, or tricuspid regurgitation. Although the measurement of RV function is difficult because of many reasons, the right ventricle can be evaluated using both imaging and functional modalities. In clinical practice, echocardiography is the primary mode for the evaluation of RV structure and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used for evaluating RV structure and function. A comprehensive evaluation of RV function may lead to early and optimal management of RV failure in patients with CHD.

  4. The phenotypic spectrum of congenital Zika syndrome.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Miguel; Feitosa, Ian M L; Ribeiro, Erlane M; Horovitz, Dafne D G; Pessoa, André L S; França, Giovanny V A; García-Alix, Alfredo; Doriqui, Maria J R; Wanderley, Hector Y C; Sanseverino, Maria V T; Neri, João I C F; Pina-Neto, João M; Santos, Emerson S; Verçosa, Islane; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Medeiros, Paula F V; Kerbage, Saile C; Silva, André A; van der Linden, Vanessa; Martelli, Celina M T; Cordeiro, Marli T; Dhalia, Rafael; Vianna, Fernanda S L; Victora, Cesar G; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2017-04-01

    In October 2015, Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH). In response, the Brazilian Society of Medical Genetics established a task force (SBGM-ZETF) to study the phenotype of infants born with microcephaly due to ZIKV congenital infection and delineate the phenotypic spectrum of this newly recognized teratogen. This study was based on the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging of 83 infants born during the period from July, 2015 to March, 2016 and registered by the SBGM-ZETF. All 83 infants had significant findings on neuroimaging consistent with ZIKV congenital infection and 12 had confirmed ZIKV IgM in CSF. A recognizable phenotype of microcephaly, anomalies of the shape of skull and redundancy of the scalp consistent with the Fetal Brain Disruption Sequence (FBDS) was present in 70% of infants, but was most often subtle. In addition, features consistent with fetal immobility, ranging from dimples (30.1%), distal hand/finger contractures (20.5%), and feet malpositions (15.7%), to generalized arthrogryposis (9.6%), were present in these infants. Some cases had milder microcephaly or even a normal head circumference (HC), and other less distinctive findings. The detailed observation of the dysmorphic and neurologic features in these infants provides insight into the mechanisms and timings of the brain disruption and the sequence of developmental anomalies that may occur after prenatal infection by the ZIKV.

  5. Lateral superior olive function in congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Couchman, Kiri; Garrett, Andrew; Deardorff, Adam S; Rattay, Frank; Resatz, Susanne; Fyffe, Robert; Walmsley, Bruce; Leão, Richardson N

    2011-07-01

    The development of cochlear implants for the treatment of patients with profound hearing loss has advanced considerably in the last few decades, particularly in the field of speech comprehension. However, attempts to provide not only sound decoding but also spatial hearing are limited by our understanding of circuit adaptations in the absence of auditory input. Here we investigate the lateral superior olive (LSO), a nucleus involved in interaural level difference (ILD) processing in the auditory brainstem using a mouse model of congenital deafness (the dn/dn mouse). An electrophysiological investigation of principal neurons of the LSO from the dn/dn mouse reveals a higher than normal proportion of single spiking (SS) neurons, and an increase in the hyperpolarisation-activated I(h) current. However, inhibitory glycinergic input to the LSO appears to develop normally both pre and postsynaptically in dn/dn mice despite the absence of auditory nerve activity. In combination with previous electrophysiological findings from the dn/dn mouse, we also compile a simple Hodgkin and Huxley circuit model in order to investigate possible computational deficits in ILD processing resulting from congenital hearing loss. We find that the predominance of SS neurons in the dn/dn LSO may compensate for upstream modifications and help to maintain a functioning ILD circuit in the dn/dn mouse. This could have clinical repercussions on the development of stimulation paradigms for spatial hearing with cochlear implants.

  6. Congenital fiber type disproportion--30 years on.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N

    2003-10-01

    Thirty years ago, M. H. Brooke coined the term "congenital fiber type disproportion" (CFTD) to describe 12 children who had clinical features of a congenital myopathy and relative type 1 fiber hypotrophy on muscle biopsy. It is now clear that this histological pattern can accompany a wide range of neurological disorders, leading to disillusionment with CFTD as a distinct nosological entity. To determine whether the CFTD has clinical utility as a diagnostic entity, we have reviewed the literature for cases of type 1 fiber hypotrophy and have used strict exclusion criteria to identify 67 cases of CFTD. Most patients presented at birth with weakness and hypotonia, had normal intelligence, and followed a static or improving clinical course. In 43% of families, more than 1 individual was affected. Failure to thrive was common and 25% of patients had contractures or spinal deformities. Bulbar weakness and ophthalmoplegia were less common and cardiac involvement was rare. Twenty-five percent followed a severe course and 10% had died at the time of reporting, all from respiratory failure. Ophthalmoplegia and facial and bulbar weakness were significantly associated with a poorer prognosis. The relatively homogeneous phenotype supports the retention of CFTD as a distinct diagnostic entity and familial occurrence suggests a genetic basis. Regarding the diagnosis of CFTD, we found no strong evidence that the minimum difference between type 1 and type 2 fiber sizes should be increased from 12% to 25%. We also list the other reported causes of relative type 1 fiber hypotrophy to aid their exclusion from CFTD.

  7. Surgical management of congenital coronary artery fistulas.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, J E; Oldham, H N; Sabiston, D C

    1981-01-01

    Congenital fistulas are the most common of the coronary arterial malformations and with the widespread use of selective coronary arteriography are being recognized with increasing frequency. Twenty-eight patients with congenital coronary fistulas have been evaluated at the Duke University Medical Center between 1960 and 1981. An additional 258 patients have previously been reported in the literature, making a total of 286 available for review. The right coronary artery is most commonly involved, and the fistulous communication is most often to the right ventricle, right atrium or pulmonary artery. Slightly more than half of the patients with coronary fistulas are symptomatic at the time the diagnosis is made. Surgical correction is strongly recommended to prevent the development of congestive heart failure, angina, subacute bacterial endocarditis, myocardial infarction, and pulmonary hypertension, as well as coronary aneurysm formation, with subsequent rupture or embolization. There were no operative or late deaths in the patients who underwent operations. Moreover, there have been no recurrent fistulas during a mean follow-up period of ten years. The risks of operative correction appear to be considerably less than the potential for development of serious and potentially fatal complications, even in asymptomatic patients. Images Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b. Fig. 3. PMID:7283502

  8. Congenital peripheral developing odontoma accompanied by congenital teratomatous fibroma in a 9-month-old boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Toshinari; Yagi, Masaatsu; Mizuki, Harumi; Takeda, Yasunori

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral odontoma is rare, and only two cases of congenital peripheral odontoma have been reported. Congenital oral fibroma is also rare. We describe a unique case of congenital peripheral developing odontoma accompanied by congenital teratomatous fibroma in an infant. Both tumors were difficult to detect on radiography. Two small masses were seen in the median anterior portion of the palatal mucosa of a 9-month-old boy. The masses had been present since birth and were surgically removed at age 28 months, when one of the masses had grown to a diameter of 8 mm. Histopathologic examination showed a fibrous lesion and a tooth germ-like rounded lesion composed of dental papilla, enamel organ, dentin, and cementum. Although congenital odontoma is rare, it should be considered when selecting appropriate treatment, as early radiographic detection is difficult.

  9. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  10. Congenital midline cervical cleft: clinical approach to a congenital anterior neck defect.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Cantarella, Giovanna; Colombo, Lorenzo; Agosti, Viola; Amodeo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Monica; Mazzola, Isabella; Mosca, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Numerous malformations can affect the anterior part of the neck presenting at birth as a real diagnostic challenge for the pediatrician or the primary care physician who initially evaluate the baby. Congenital midline cervical cleft represents a rare defect of the midline neck, which is sometimes wrongly diagnosed as a thyroglossal duct anomaly, dermoid cyst, branchial cleft anomaly or "birthmark". A prompt clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment during early infancy are essential to ensure both functional and aesthetic outcome. We report a case of a female neonate with a midline cervical cleft diagnosed immediately after birth. The main features of other congenital anomalies of the anterior neck are also discussed referring to their embryologic origin.

  11. De novo mutations in congenital heart disease with neurodevelopmental and other congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Homsy, Jason; Zaidi, Samir; Shen, Yufeng; Ware, James S; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Karczewski, Konrad J; DePalma, Steven R; McKean, David; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Josh; Jin, Sheng Chih; Deanfield, John; Giardini, Alessandro; Porter, George A; Kim, Richard; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Tikhonova, Irina; Mane, Shrikant; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Qi, Hongjian; Vardarajan, Badri; Ma, Lijiang; Daly, Mark; Roberts, Amy E; Russell, Mark W; Mital, Seema; Newburger, Jane W; Gaynor, J William; Breitbart, Roger E; Iossifov, Ivan; Ronemus, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Kaltman, Jonathan R; Seidman, Jonathan G; Brueckner, Martina; Gelb, Bruce D; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Lifton, Richard P; Seidman, Christine E; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-12-04

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients have an increased prevalence of extracardiac congenital anomalies (CAs) and risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs). Exome sequencing of 1213 CHD parent-offspring trios identified an excess of protein-damaging de novo mutations, especially in genes highly expressed in the developing heart and brain. These mutations accounted for 20% of patients with CHD, NDD, and CA but only 2% of patients with isolated CHD. Mutations altered genes involved in morphogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation, including multiple mutations in RBFOX2, a regulator of mRNA splicing. Genes mutated in other cohorts examined for NDD were enriched in CHD cases, particularly those with coexisting NDD. These findings reveal shared genetic contributions to CHD, NDD, and CA and provide opportunities for improved prognostic assessment and early therapeutic intervention in CHD patients.

  12. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-02-22

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes.

  13. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  14. Congenital pouch colon: is it really a rare pathology?

    PubMed

    Atabek, Cüneyt; Demirbağ, Suzi; Sürer, Ilhami; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Ongürü, Onder; Calişkan, Bahadir; Oztürk, Haluk

    2007-12-01

    Congenital pouch colon is a condition of a shortened and pouch-like dilated colon and it is usually associated with an anorectal malformation. The pathogenesis and embryology of congenital pouch colon are not well understood, but dietary, environmental factors and familial inheritance may be contributing factors in this pathology. Most of the cases in the literature have been reported from India. This increased regional incidence may be attributed to the lack of awareness of this pathology or its mislabeling rather than regional distribution. Congenital pouch colon is classified into four types based on the length of the abnormal colon. A variable dilatation of the rectum and sigmoid is always present in anorectal malformation. However, there is no clear definition of a limit for the dilatation of the rectum and sigmoid observed in anorectal malformation. Furthermore, many surgeons do not routinely take a biopsy from a dilated rectum or sigmoid during a colostomy procedure in anorectal malformation cases. For these reasons, type IV congenital pouch colon can be easily underdiagnosed. Surgical treatment options in type IV congenital pouch colon include resection of the affected sites of the colon or excisional tapering coloplasty. In the undiagnosed cases, congenital pouch colon results in severe constipation and overflow incontinence. We herein report two additional new cases of type IV congenital pouch colon.

  15. Valganciclovir for Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kimberlin, D.W.; Jester, P.M.; Sánchez, P.J.; Ahmed, A.; Arav-Boger, R.; Michaels, M.G.; Ashouri, N.; Englund, J.A.; Estrada, B.; Jacobs, R.F.; Romero, J.R.; Sood, S.K.; Whitworth, M.S.; Abzug, M.J.; Caserta, M.T.; Fowler, S.; Lujan-Zilbermann, J.; Storch, G.A.; DeBiasi, R.L.; Han, J.-Y.; Palmer, A.; Weiner, L.B.; Bocchini, J.A.; Dennehy, P.H.; Finn, A.; Griffiths, P.D.; Luck, S.; Gutierrez, K.; Halasa, N.; Homans, J.; Shane, A.L.; Sharland, M.; Simonsen, K.; Vanchiere, J.A.; Woods, C.R.; Sabo, D.L.; Aban, I.; Kuo, H.; James, S.H.; Prichard, M.N.; Griffin, J.; Giles, D.; Acosta, E.P.; Whitley, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The treatment of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease with intravenous ganciclovir for 6 weeks has been shown to improve audiologic outcomes at 6 months, but the benefits wane over time. METHODS We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of valganciclovir therapy in neonates with symptomatic congenital CMV disease, comparing 6 months of therapy with 6 weeks of therapy. The primary end point was the change in hearing in the better ear (“best-ear” hearing) from baseline to 6 months. Secondary end points included the change in hearing from baseline to follow-up at 12 and 24 months and neurodevelopmental outcomes, with each end point adjusted for central nervous system involvement at baseline. RESULTS A total of 96 neonates underwent randomization, of whom 86 had follow-up data at 6 months that could be evaluated. Best-ear hearing at 6 months was similar in the 6-month group and the 6-week group (2 and 3 participants, respectively, had improvement; 36 and 37 had no change; and 5 and 3 had worsening; P = 0.41). Total-ear hearing (hearing in one or both ears that could be evaluated) was more likely to be improved or to remain normal at 12 months in the 6-month group than in the 6-week group (73% vs. 57%, P = 0.01). The benefit in total-ear hearing was maintained at 24 months (77% vs. 64%, P = 0.04). At 24 months, the 6-month group, as compared with the 6-week group, had better neurodevelopmental scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition, on the language-composite component (P = 0.004) and on the receptive-communication scale (P = 0.003). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred in 19% of the participants during the first 6 weeks. During the next 4.5 months of the study, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred in 21% of the participants in the 6-month group and in 27% of those in the 6-week group (P = 0.64). CONCLUSIONS Treating symptomatic congenital CMV disease with valganciclovir for 6 months, as compared

  16. Congenital joint laxity and dwarfism: A feed-associated congenital anomaly of beef calves in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ribble, Carl S.; Janzen, Eugene D.; Proulx, Julien G.

    1989-01-01

    Five feeding trials were performed on three ranches to determine if a distinctive, recurring, congenital anomaly in beef calves was associated with feeding clover or grass silage without supplementation to pregnant cows overwinter. The anomaly, termed congenital joint laxity and dwarfism, was characterized at birth by generalized joint laxity, disproportionate dwarfism, and occasionally, superior brachygnathia. The anomaly had been documented for several consecutive years on these ranches and affected 2-46% of the calf crop. Pregnant cows were divided randomly into feeding groups, and the number of abnormal calves in each group was tabulated. Supplementation of the overwinter grass/clover silage diet with hay (2.5-4.5 kg/head/day) and rolled barley (0.75-1.5 kg/head/day) eliminated the problem. Supplementation of grain, without hay, was not as effective. Varying the proportions of grass and clover in the silage, and the age of the silage, did not alter the teratogenic potency of silage. Vitamin D3 supplementation did not reduce the risk of the condition. The definitive cause of congenital joint laxity and dwarfism was not determined. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17423291

  17. Congenital giant right atrium in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Das, Shubhabrata; Datta, Arnab; Pradhan, Sourav; Sarkar, R N

    2014-07-01

    Enlargement of right atrium is usually secondary to pulmonary hypertension due to valvular heart diseases or obstructive pulmonary disorders, atrial septal defect, tricuspid atresia or stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, primary pulmonary hypertension, Ebstein's anomaly. Congenital enlargement of right atrium is rare and it commonly presents in children. Our patient presented with congenital giant right atrium at 65 years of age, other cardiac diseases being excluded. Patient developed tricuspid regurgitation, but pulmonary hypertension was absent till the date. Congenital giant right atrium has rarely been reported from India.

  18. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kimberly Y; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    On March 16, 2012, the Ethics of the Heart 2012: Ethical and Policy Challenges in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Conference took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The first session focused on the ethics surrounding genetic testing in patients with congenital heart disease. Summarized here is the introductory presentation given by Dr Elizabeth Goldmuntz entitled "The Role of Genetic Testing in Congenital Heart Disease," followed by a case presentation given by Dr Lisa D'Alessandro. The case and the panel discussion that ensued highlight several ethical principles and challenges in this unique patient population.

  19. Global Challenges in the Management of Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Phoebe D.; Courtright, Paul; Wilson, M. Edward; Taylor, David Samuel; Lewallen, Susan; Ventura, Marcelo C.; Bowman, Richard; Woodward, Lee; Ditta, Lauren C.; Kruger, Stacey; Haddad, Danny; El Shakankiri, Nihal; Rai, Salma KC; Bailey, Tehara; Lambert, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Childhood cataracts have become a leading cause of preventable childhood blindness in many areas of the world. Here we summarize regional focus group discussions from the 4th Annual International Congenital Cataract Symposium on the current situation, challenges, and recommendations for the management of congenital cataracts in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, Central America, South America, and developed nations. Strategies for managing congenital cataracts must be adapted and developed according to regional conditions. A basic framework for acceptable outcomes must focus on developing systems to address the critical components of education, access, quality care, and good follow-up. PMID:25892047

  20. Abdominal Problems in Children with Congenital Cardiovascular Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Güney, Lütfi Hakan; Araz, Coşkun; Beyazpınar, Deniz Sarp; Arda, İrfan Serdar; Arslan, Esra Elif; Hiçsönmez, Akgün

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital cardiovascular abnormality is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Both the type of congenital cardiovascular abnormality and cardiopulmonary bypass are responsible for gastrointestinal system problems. Aims: Intra-abdominal problems, such as paralytic ileus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intestinal perforation, are common in patients who have been operated or who are being followed for congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. Besides the primary congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, ischemia secondary to cardiac catheterization or surgery contributes to the incidence of these problems. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: In this study, we aimed to screen the intra-abdominal problems seen in patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities who had undergone surgical or angiographical intervention(s). Patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities who had been treated medically or surgically between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed retrospectively in terms of intra-abdominal problems. The patients’ demographic data, type of congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, the intervention applied (surgical, angiographic), the incidence of intra-abdominal problem(s), the interventions applied for the intra-abdominal problems, and the results were evaluated. Results: Fourteen (Group I) of the 76 patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities diagnosis were operated due to intra-abdominal problems, and 62 (Group II) were followed-up clinically for intra-abdominal problems. In Group I (10 boys and 4 girls), 11 patients were aged between 0 and 12 months, and three patients were older than 12 months. Group II included 52 patients aged between 0 and 12 months and 10 patients older than 12 months. Cardiovascular surgical interventions had been applied to six patients in Group I and 40 patients in Group II. The most frequent intra-abdominal problems were necrotizing enterocolitis and intestinal perforation

  1. Congenital Atrichia Associated with Situs Inversus and Mesocardia

    PubMed Central

    Sacchidanand, S; Sahana, MS; Hiremagalore, Ravi; Asha, GS

    2012-01-01

    Congenital alopecia includes a broad differential diagnosis and presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the physician. Congenital atrichia is a rare form of irreversible alopecia that is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a 2-year-old male child presenting with total alopecia of scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, and body hair since birth. The child had cardiac malposition with situs inversus of the viscera. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen revealed median position of the heart with transposition of abdominal viscera. To our knowledge, this is the first case of congenital atrichia associated with situs inversus and mesocardia. PMID:23180933

  2. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  3. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Feki, Mouna Mnif; Sfar, Mohamed Habib; Abid, Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders where there is impairment of cortisol biosynthesis. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95% of cases and shows a wide range of clinical severity. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapies are the mainstays of treatment of CAH. The optimal treatment for adults with CAH continues to be a challenge. Important long-term health issues for adults with CAH affect both men and women. These issues may either be due to the disease or to steroid treatment and may affect final height, fertility, cardiometabolic risk, bone metabolism, neuro-cognitive development and the quality-of-life. Patients with CAH should be regularly followed-up from childhood to adulthood by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH. Optimal replacement therapy, close clinical and laboratory monitoring, early life-style interventions, early and regular fertility assessment and continuous psychological management are needed to improve outcome.

  4. Diagnosis and management of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    PubMed

    Gambale, Antonella; Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited disorders hallmarked by chronic hyporegenerative anemia, relative reticulocytopenia, hemolytic component and iron overload. They represent a subtype of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, characterized by impaired differentiation and proliferation of the erythroid lineage. Three classical types were defined by marrow morphology, even if the most recent classification recognized six different genetic types. The pathomechanisms of CDAs are different, but all seem to involve the regulation of DNA replication and cell division. CDAs are often misdiagnosed, since either morphological abnormalities or clinical features can be commonly identified in other clinically-related anemias. However, differential diagnosis is essential for guiding both follow up and management of the patients.

  5. [Neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism and phenylketonuria].

    PubMed

    Velázquez, A; Loera-Luna, A; Aguirre, B E; Gamboa, S; Vargas, H; Robles, C

    1994-01-01

    A newborn screening program for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and phenylketonuria (PKU) was conducted in 140 163 infants from the Federal District and the states of Mexico and Tlaxcala. These children were born mainly in hospitals for the non-insured population, although some were social security beneficiaries. Their filter-paper blood TSH and phenylalanine concentrations were determined 48 hours after birth. The frequency of CH was 1:1 797, with a 95 per cent confidence interval of 1:1 470 to 1:2 315, and was quite similar in the different types of hospitals. Only two PKU cases were found, for a frequency of 1:70 082, with a 95 per cent confidence interval of 0 to 1:4 762. This work demonstrates the feasibility of newborn screening programs in Mexico, identifies the problems to be solved in order to achieve a wide coverage and establishes the high frequency of CH in the Mexican population.

  6. Congenital defects of the ruminant nervous system.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kevin E; Streeter, Robert N

    2004-07-01

    Abnormalities of the nervous system are common occurrences among congenital defects and have been reported in most ruminant species. From a clinical standpoint, the signs of such defects create difficulty in arriving at an antemortem etiology through historical and physical examination alone. By first localizing clinical signs to their point of origin in the nervous system, however, a narrower differential list can be generated so that the clinician can pursue a definitive diagnosis. This article categorizes defects of the ruminant nervous system by location of salient clinical signs into dysfunction of one of more of the following regions: cerebrum, cerebellum,and spinal cord. A brief review of some of the more recognized etiologies of these defects is also provided. It is important to make every attempt to determine the cause of nervous system defects because of the impact that an inherited condition would have on a breeding program and for prevention of defects caused by infectious or toxic teratogen exposure.

  7. Congenital muscular torticollis and positional plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Alice A; Tritasavit, Sophie; Graham, John M

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners in primary care settings should consider the diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT)in infants with risk factors from birth history for intrauterine malpositioning or constraint (C). On the basis of observational studies, CMT is often associated with other conditions, including positional plagiocephaly and gross motor delays from weakened truncal muscles and/or lack of head control in early infancy (C). On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners should counsel parents that infants should be on their stomachs frequently whenever they are awake and under direct adult supervision to develop their prone motor skills (C). On the basis of consensus, early identification of CMT(with or without positional plagiocephaly) and prompt referral to a physical therapist experienced in the treatment of CMT should be considered to avoid more costly or invasive treatments, such as cranial orthoses or surgery (D).

  8. Singing proficiency in congenital amusia: imitation helps.

    PubMed

    Tremblay-Champoux, Alexandra; Dalla Bella, Simone; Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Lebrun, Marie-Andrée; Peretz, Isabelle

    2010-09-01

    Singing out of tune characterizes congenital amusia. Here, we examine whether an aid to memory improves singing by studying vocal imitation in 11 amusic adults and 11 matched controls. Participants sang a highly familiar melody on the original lyrics and on the syllable /la/ in three conditions. First, they sang the melody from memory. Second, they sang it after hearing a model, and third, they sang in unison with the model. Results show that amusic individuals benefit from singing by imitation, whether singing after the model or in unison with the model. The amusics who were the most impaired in memory benefited most, particularly when singing on the syllable /la/. Nevertheless, singing remains poor on the pitch dimension; rhythm was intact and unaffected by imitation. These results point to memory as a source of impairment in poor singing, and to imitation as a possible aid for poor singers.

  9. A pedigree of Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, S; Ohba, N

    1988-03-01

    A pedigree of Leber's congenital amaurosis compatible with autosomal recessive trait is reported. Two male infants from consanguineous parents had remarkable visual loss within the first year of life, with sluggish pupillary responses, poor fixations, minimal eyeground changes and absent electroretinograms on presentations at the ages of four or 14 months. Follow-up studies revealed definite progressions of eyeground abnormalities consisting of attenuated retinal arterioles, pepper- and salt-like appearance with numerous yellowish-white punctate lesions in the midperiphery, and pale optic nerves. Fluorescein angiographic study performed on one case showed multiple hyperfluorescent spots over the posterior and midperipheral eyegrounds suggesting alterations of the retinal pigment epithelium. These functional and morphological abnormalities of the retina were similar in the two siblings. Cycloplegic refractions revealed slight myopic or mixed astigmatism, but no marked hyperopia. The patients had normal physical and mental developments with no obvious systemic complications.

  10. Congenital anomalies of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Paul; Rao, Ganesh; Brockmeyer, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    There are numerous congenital anomalies of the cervical spine. They can be simple and clinically inconsequential to complex with serious neurologic and structural implications. They can occur in isolation or as one of several maldeveloped organs in the patients. Many are discovered incidentally. The more common anomalies seen by pediatric spine surgeons include defects of the anterior or posterior arches of C1, occipital assimilation of the atlas, basilar invagination or impression, os odontoideum, and Klippel-Feil syndrome. Management begins with a detailed history, physical examination, and imaging studies. In general, those lesions that are causing or have caused neurologic injury, chronic pain, or spinal deformity or place the patient at high risk for developing these require treatment.

  11. Congenital paralytic vertical talus. An anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Specht, E E

    1975-09-01

    Dissections of the feet of a three-month-old infant with paralytic congenital vertical talus secondary to lumbar myelomeningocele were compared with a dissection of a normal foot. The major differences appeared to be absence of the plantar intrinsic muscles and dorsal dislocation of the talonavicular joint. It is postulated that the pathological process begins as a failure of the intrinsic muscles to oppose the unbalanced, active dorsiflexion forces of the anterior crural muscles. This imbalance then allows disruption of the talonavicular joint, mechanically the least stable joint in the mid-part of the foot. All dorsiflexion forces acting on the ankle then become ineffective and plantar flexion forces serve only to pull the calcaneus and talus into equinus, causing a "vertical" talus. Treatment must be directed at reducing the talonavicular dislocation, correcting the equinus deformity of the hind part of the foot, and substituting for the undeveloped plantar intrinsic muscles.

  12. Genetic Factors in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, A. M.; Klaassens, M.; Tibboel, D.; de Klein, A.; Lee, B.; Scott, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a relatively common birth defect associated with high mortality and morbidity. Although the exact etiology of most cases of CDH remains unknown, there is a growing body of evidence that genetic factors play an important role in the development of CDH. In this review, we examine key findings that are likely to form the basis for future research in this field. Specific topics include a short overview of normal and abnormal diaphragm development, a discussion of syndromic forms of CDH, a detailed review of chromosomal regions recurrently altered in CDH, a description of the retinoid hypothesis of CDH, and evidence of the roles of specific genes in the development of CDH. PMID:17436238

  13. Modeling Syndromic Congenital Heart Defects in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Grant, Meagan G; Patterson, Victoria L; Grimes, Daniel T; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac development is a dynamic process regulated by spatial and temporal cues that are integrated to effect molecular, cellular, and tissue-level events that form the adult heart. Disruption of these highly orchestrated events can be devastating for cardiac form and function. Aberrations in heart development result in congenital heart defects (CHDs), which affect 1 in 100 infants in the United States each year. Zebrafish have proven informative as a model organism to understand both heart development and the mechanisms associated with CHDs due to the similarities in heart morphogenesis among vertebrates, as well as their genetic tractability and amenability to live imaging. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of zebrafish heart development and the utility of zebrafish for understanding syndromic CHDs, those cardiac abnormalities that occur in the context of multisystem disorders. We conclude with avenues of zebrafish research that will potentially inform future therapeutic approaches for the treatment of CHDs.

  14. Epidermolysis bullosa and congenital pyloric atresia

    PubMed Central

    Mithwani, Anwar Adil; Hashmi, Asif; Adil, Salman

    2013-01-01

    The association between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and pyloric atresia (PA) is rare but well documented. Herein, we report a case of EB associated with congenital PA. A female baby, weighing 1480 g, was born vaginally to a 31-year-old gravida 7 lady at 33 weeks of gestation. Polyhydramnios was detected on antenatal assessment. The parents were non-consanguineous Saudis with no family history of significant illness. At birth, well-demarcated areas of peeled skin were present over knees, left leg and periumbilical region. Systemic examination revealed no other abnormality. On second day, the patient developed recurrent vomiting and abdominal distension. An abdominal X-ray revealed a single gastric gas bubble suggesting pyloric obstruction. Following gastroduodenostomy, the baby developed severe sepsis with multiorgan dysfunction and expired on 25th day of life. Skin biopsy showed cleavage within lamina lucida. PMID:24068383

  15. Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Sasnur, Ashok H; Sasnur, Prakash A; Ghaus-Ul, Raza Shamikh Muneer

    2011-05-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare reported entity characterised by disturbance in the pain and temperature perception due to involvement of the autonomic and sensory nervous system. It is an autosomal recessive trait with several defects of the gene NTRK1 coding for the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase - a nerve growth factor receptor on chromosome 1q21-q22. Traumatic fractures are common and, because of lack of pain, may go unrecognised for prolonged periods, resulting in nonunion or pseudoarthrosis. A Charcot joint may be the end result. Treatment complications are very common in these patients and range from infection to wound breakdown to failure of fixation. We report here a rare case of CIPA in a 9-year-old girl and her younger male sibling with generalised absence of pain, anhidrosis and its orthopaedic implications.

  16. [Congenital pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis in a newborn].

    PubMed

    Sposito Cavallo, Sandra L; Macias Sobrino, Luciano A; Marenco Altamar, Luifer J; Mejía Alquichire, Andrés F

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis is a rare entity characterized by the proliferation of capillaries into alveolar walls, interlobular septa, pleura and pulmonary interstitium, without malignant characteristics, with almost constant association with pulmonary hypertension. Until now two cases of congenital presentation have been reported in the literature. This is the third case in a newborn; he has not followed the usual pattern associated with pulmonary hypertension as occurs in most patients with this pathology; the highest incidence is among 20-40 years old. We report a preterm newborn patient of 36 weeks of gestation with progressive respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation by constant desaturation during his clinical evolution without clinical, radiological or ultrasonographic signs of pulmonary hypertension.

  17. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Greutmann, Matthias; Pieper, Petronella G

    2015-10-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Major advances in open-heart surgery have led to rapidly evolving cohorts of adult survivors and the majority of affected women now survive to childbearing age. The risk of cardiovascular complications during pregnancy and peripartum depends on the type of the underlying defect, the extent and severity of residual haemodynamic lesions and comorbidities. Careful individualized, multi-disciplinary pre-pregnancy risk assessment and counselling, including assessment of risks in the offspring and estimation on long-term outcomes of the underlying heart defect, will enable informed decision making. Depending on the estimated risks, a careful follow-up plan during pregnancy as well as a detailed plan for delivery and postpartum care can reduce the risks and should be made by the multi-disciplinary team.

  18. [Congenital medulloblastoma associated with intracranial arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Gelabert González, Miguel; Serramito-García, Ramón; Liñares Paz, Mercedes; Aran-Echabe, Eduardo; García-Allut, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are very common lesions in paediatric patients, with treatment depending on their location and symptomatology. They are usually solitary cysts but may be associated with other central nervous system diseases such as tumours and congenital deformities. We describe the case of a neonate diagnosed with an arachnoid cyst of the quadrigeminal cistern treated by endoscopy. After the operation, the child's condition worsened; a CT scan revealed a midline posterior fossa tumour not visible in the preoperative neuroradiological tests. The tumour, a medulloblastoma, was partially removed. Given the child's age and the poor prognosis, oncological treatment was not undertaken. The association between medulloblastoma and arachnoid cyst is very rare, and we could find only one such case in the literature.

  19. Cochlear implantation in congenital cochlear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R L; Lokman, S

    2005-08-01

    Many children have benefited from cochlear implant device including those with congenital malformation of the inner ear. The results reported in children with malformed cochlea are very encouraging. We describe 2 cases of Mondini's malformation with severe sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implantation was performed and both of them underwent post-implantation speech rehabilitation. Post-implantation, both of them were noted to respond to external sound. But the second case developed facial twitching a few months after the device was switched on. It is important to evaluate the severity of the inner ear deformity and the other associated anomalies in pre-implantation radiological assessment in order to identify the problem that may complicate the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  20. Imagery limitations in totally congenitally blind subjects.

    PubMed

    De Beni, R; Cornoldi, C

    1988-10-01

    Research on totally blind subjects performing tasks that involve visual imagery has often shown that they do not behave differently from matched sighted subjects, even when their blindness is congenital. If visual imagery is based on visual perception, such tasks may not required visual imagery. In the present article visual images are considered as representations maintaining some properties of visible objects and constructed on the basis of information from various sources. Owing to the absence of visual experience, the limitations of such representations are explored in a series of experiments requiring memorization of single nouns, pairs of nouns, or triplets of nouns associated with a cue noun. Recall by blind subjects was impaired when multiple interactive images (with noun pairs and triplets) are formed. The poorer recall of blind subjects reflected also loss of order information. Recall was better for both groups with locative noun cues and high-imagery targets.

  1. Visual mental imagery in congenital prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Grüter, Thomas; Grüter, Martina; Bell, Vaughan; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2009-04-10

    Congenital prosopagnosia (cPA) is a selective impairment in the visual learning and recognition of faces without detectable brain damage or malformation. There is evidence that it can be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. We assessed the capacity for visual mental imagery in 53 people with cPA using an adapted Marks' VVIQ (Vividness of Visual Imaging Questionnaire). The mean score of the prosopagnosic group showed the lowest mental imagery scores ever published for a non-brain damaged group. In a subsample of 12 people with cPA, we demonstrated that the cPA is a deficit of configural face processing. We suggest that the 'VVIQ-PA' (VVIQ-Prosopagnosia) questionnaire can help to confirm the diagnosis of cPA. Poor mental imagery, a configural face processing impairment and clinical prosopagnosia should be considered as symptoms of a yet poorly understood hereditary cerebral dysfunction.

  2. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria with Undescended Testis.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep; Harith, Arun Kumar; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis pathway that are characterized by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions, or both. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an extremely rare disease with a mutation in the gene that codes for uroporphyrinogen III synthase leading to accumulation of porphyrin in different tissues and marked cutaneous photosensitivity. We report a case of CEP with infancy onset blistering, photosensitivity, red colored urine, and teeth along with scarring. Examination revealed an undescended testis of the left side. Mutation analysis revealed mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS) resulting in c. 56 A > G (Tyr19Cys). The presence of undescended testis with a rare mutation in a case of CEP which itself is an extremely rare condition make the case interesting.

  3. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria with Undescended Testis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Harith, Arun Kumar; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis pathway that are characterized by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions, or both. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an extremely rare disease with a mutation in the gene that codes for uroporphyrinogen III synthase leading to accumulation of porphyrin in different tissues and marked cutaneous photosensitivity. We report a case of CEP with infancy onset blistering, photosensitivity, red colored urine, and teeth along with scarring. Examination revealed an undescended testis of the left side. Mutation analysis revealed mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS) resulting in c. 56 A > G (Tyr19Cys). The presence of undescended testis with a rare mutation in a case of CEP which itself is an extremely rare condition make the case interesting. PMID:27512208

  4. Huge congenital haemangioma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Ulku; Pala, Emel Ebru; Bayol, Umit; Cakir, Ebru; Cukurova, Ibrahim; Gumussoy, Murat

    2014-12-01

    Haemangiomas, the most common type of benign vascular tumours, are rare in the oral cavity. Some of these lesions are congenital and show symptoms in late childhood or early adult life. A 32-years-old woman presented with a huge lesion on her tongue which caused dysphagia and dysphasia. She had first noticed the lesion when she was 6. Her obstructive symptoms started when she was 28 and, despite various medical treatments, the size of the lesion gradually increased. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 7 x 5 x 3 cm mass on the right side of the tongue. Because of severe functional and cosmetic problems, the lesion was excised with partial haemiglossectomy. Histopathological examination was consistent with intramuscular haemangioma. Haemangiomas are benign tumours with a benign course and are rarely seen on the tongue. They have clinical importance when localised in the oral cavity. Different treatment modalities exist, but in cases of large tumours, surgery may be the mainstay treatment.

  5. Neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Cacciari, E; Balsamo, A; Cassio, A; Piazzi, S; Bernardi, F; Salardi, S; Cicognani, A; Pirazzoli, P; Zappulla, F; Capelli, M

    1983-01-01

    Capillary blood samples from 42930 infants born in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna were collected for 17-hydroxyprogesterone radioimmunoassays on days 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, or between days 7 and 15 of life. A microfilter paper method modified from that of Pang et al.1 was used for this assay. Pathologic values of 17-hydroxyprogesterone were found in 5 infants giving an incidence in this homogeneous Caucasian population of 1:8586. We also investigated 17-hydroxyprogesterone values in relation to the day of sampling and the possible correlation between 17-hydroxyprogesterone values and birthweight and gestational age. We concluded that neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency was possible by this method and that the infants' maturity and the particular day of collection of the samples affect the values but not the validity of the screening. PMID:6639129

  6. [Clinical aspects of congenital maxillofacial deformities].

    PubMed

    Sólya, Kitti; Dézsi, Csilla; Vanya, Melinda; Szabó, János; Sikovanyecz, János; Kozinszky, Zoltán; Szili, Károly

    2015-09-13

    The cleft lip and palate deformity is one of the most common type of congenital abnormalities. The aim of this paper is to summarise the literature knowledge about cleft lip and/or palate. The authors review and discuss international literature data on the prevention, genetic and environmental predisposing factors, anatomical and embryological features, as well as pre- and post-natal diagnosis and treatment of these deformities. The aetiology is multifactorial, driven by both genetic and environmental factors which lead to multifaceted phenotypes and clinical features of these malformations. The lack of the multidisciplinary knowledge about prenatal diagnosis, prevention, genetic aspects and treatment strategy could result in serious diagnostic errors, hence clinical teamwork is critically important to solve the problems of this pathology. Only the professional teamwork and multidisciplinary cooperation can guarantee the optimal level of health care and better quality of life for these patients and their families.

  7. Congenital Aberrant Tearing: A Re-Look

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T.; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Congenital aberrant tearing is characterized by tearing when eating (“crocodile tears”), lack of emotional tearing, or both. Most reported cases are associated with Duane syndrome. In our previous studies we observed aberrant tearing in individuals with thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence. This report summarizes the literature on the subject and adds 3 new studies that give information on this unusual condition. Methods Twenty-eight individuals with Möbius sequence were interviewed about tearing symptoms at a support group meeting in Italy. In Sweden 30 adults primarily from the original thalidomide series were reexamined. In this latter study, a Schirmer test was done at baseline and repeated 5 minutes after eating. Twenty families in Brazil who have children with Möbius sequence were questioned about tearing symptoms and exposure to misoprostol during pregnancy. Results In the 28 Italian individuals, either “crocodile tears” or lack of emotional tearing was noted in 7 cases. In the thalidomide study, 10 of 30 patients had tearing when eating and 7 had no emotional tearing. Low Schirmer scores or increased tearing after eating was noted in a few asymptomatic individuals. Among the 20 Brazilian children with Möbius sequence, 10 had some tearing abnormality. Conclusion Congenital anomalous lacrimation is rare but usually associated with Duane syndrome or abduction deficits, as in Möbius sequence and, less frequently, facial nerve palsy. Studies implicate an early insult in development at 4 to 6 weeks. At that time the facial nerve, sixth nerve, and lacrimal nucleus are in close proximity in the embryo. PMID:19277226

  8. Congenital rubella syndrome with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shyh-Jou; Chen, Ying-Sheue

    2010-02-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) consists of a group of abnormalities that develop in children as a result of maternal infection with rubella virus. CRS may lead to new physical symptoms during adolescence or adulthood, referred to as "late manifestations". Psychiatric disorders are often seen among CRS patients, with an incidence of 4.12-7.3% for autism. We report a case of adolescent CRS with autism. A 20-year-old man had received treatment with antipsychotics and antidepressants since the age of 12 years because of unstable moods, violence, and stereotypic behavior. During follow-up, he developed some insidious-onset physical problems, including hyperlipidemia, dyspnea, constipation, torticollis and a tilted trunk. Under careful survey and evaluation, some physical problems were recognized as side effects of psychotropics, which gradually subsided after adjustment of the medications, and some of the problems were considered partially as manifestations of CRS, such as progressive pulmonary artery stenosis-related dyspnea. We managed some of the patient's physical problems and then he received catheterization for pulmonary artery stenosis. His general physical condition improved and some further improvement in psychiatric status was noted thereafter. Because of a high comorbidity rate for patients with autistic disorder, the clinician should be aware of the possibility of CRS if the patient has multiple congenital physical abnormalities with a history of maternal rubella infection. If patients develop physical symptoms in adolescence, awareness of late manifestations of CRS and differentiation from the adverse effects of psychotropic medications are essential. In addition to psychiatric treatment, management of physical problems associated with CRS would be beneficial for the patients' psychiatric condition.

  9. Severe congenital RYR1-associated myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha-Goebel, Diana Xerxes; Santi, Mariarita; Medne, Līvija; Zukosky, Kristin; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Shieh, Perry B.; Winder, Thomas; Tennekoon, Gihan; Finkel, Richard S.; Dowling, James J.; Monnier, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To report a series of 11 patients on the severe end of the spectrum of ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene–related myopathy, in order to expand the clinical, histologic, and genetic heterogeneity associated with this group of patients. Methods: Eleven patients evaluated in the neonatal period with severe neonatal-onset RYR1-associated myopathy confirmed by genetic testing were ascertained. Clinical features, molecular testing results, muscle imaging, and muscle histology are reviewed. Results: Clinical features associated with the severe neonatal presentation of RYR1-associated myopathy included decreased fetal movement, hypotonia, poor feeding, respiratory involvement, arthrogryposis, and ophthalmoplegia in 3 patients, and femur fractures or hip dislocation at birth. Four patients had dominant RYR1 mutations, and 7 had recessive RYR1 mutations. One patient had a cleft palate, and another a congenital rigid spine phenotype—findings not previously described in the literature in patients with early-onset RYR1 mutations. Six patients who underwent muscle ultrasound showed relative sparing of the rectus femoris muscle. Histologically, all patients with dominant mutations had classic central cores on muscle biopsy. Patients with recessive mutations showed great histologic heterogeneity, including fibrosis, variation in fiber size, skewed fiber typing, very small fibers, and nuclear internalization with or without ill-defined cores. Conclusions: This series confirms and expands the clinical and histologic variability associated with severe congenital RYR1-associated myopathy. Both dominant and recessive mutations of the RYR1 gene can result in a severe neonatal-onset phenotype, but more clinical and histologic heterogeneity has been seen in those with recessive RYR1 gene mutations. Central cores are not obligatory histologic features in recessive RYR1 mutations. Sparing of the rectus femoris muscle on imaging should prompt evaluation for RYR1-associated

  10. [Congenital atrioventricular block and maternal autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Herreman, G; Sauvaget, F; Généreau, T; Galezowski, N

    1990-01-01

    Congenital heart block is rare; it is acquired in utero, definitive and, more often than not, complete. It can be diagnosed by the appearance of fetal bradycardia around the 23rd week of gestation, during ultrasonographic monitoring of pregnancy. Heart block is usually associated with the presence of anti-Ro and/or anti-La antibodies in the mother's serum. These maternal immunological abnormalities can be isolated or associated with an autoimmune disease, usually systemic lupus erythematosus, but also Sjögren's syndrome, or more rarely still, an as yet unclassified connective tissue disease. Anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies cross the placental barrier and react with a fetal heart, leading to acute fetal myocarditis by the 17th week of gestation. When severe, it is lethal, otherwise it can result in degeneration and endocardial fibroelastosis, disrupting conduction and leading to congenital heart block. The ideal treatment would be prevention with corticosteroids. When the mother is Ro or La antibody-positive before pregnancy, elimination of these circulating antibodies can be attempted by treatment with 0.5 mg/kg body wt/d of prednisolone for 3 months. If the treatment is successful, corticotherapy can be prescribed early in the pregnancy to try to protect the fetus. However, there is not always a relationship between maternal anti-Ro antibodies and fetal heart block. If the Ro/La antibody-positive woman is already pregnant, but before her 17th week, it is possible to prescribe dexamethasone, which crosses the placenta and remains active, sometimes in association with plasmapheresis.

  11. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  12. Pellagra revealing a congenital duodenal diaphragm in an adult.

    PubMed

    Khouloud, Bouslama; Haykel, Bedioui; Ahmed, Saidani; Houcine, Maghrebi; Yacine, Ben Safta; Farah, Jokho; Zoubeir, Ben Safta

    2013-12-01

    Pellagra is a nutritional disease caused by the deficiency of niacin. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by four "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia and ultimately death. We describe a case of pellagra as the initial presentation of congenital duodenal diaphragm.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: ALG6-congenital disorder of glycosylation

    MedlinePlus

    ... also known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ic) is an inherited condition that affects many parts ... Condition ALG6-CDG carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type Ic carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type V CDG syndrome ...

  14. A patient with congenital hypertrichosis, gum hyperplasia and macromastia.

    PubMed

    Sood, A; Garg, R K; Saily, R; Dash, R J

    2000-05-01

    A syndrome of congenital hypertrichosis, hirsutism, gum hyperplasia and macromastia is described. The patient was demonstrated to have mild hyperinsulinemia with normal oral glucose tolerance test. This is the second such patient reported in the literature.

  15. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborns. 2 Physiology of Pulse Oximetry Oxygen breathed in through the ... Previous Article Next Article Jump to Article Introduction Physiology of Pulse Oximetry The Ductus Arteriosus in CCHD ...

  16. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  17. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  18. Congenital Malaria in Calabar, Nigeria: The Molecular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Oduwole, Olabisi A.; Ejezie, G. C.; Odey, Friday A.; Oringanje, Chioma M.; Nwakanma, Davis; Bello, Segun; Oriero, Eniyou; Okebe, Joseph; Alaribe, Anyawu A.; Etuk, Saturday; Meremikwu, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been shown to be more sensitive in detecting low-level parasitemia than conventional blood film microscopy. We estimated the prevalence of congenital malaria using nested PCR amplification of the small subunit 18S RNA gene to detect low-level parasitemia and identify Plasmodium species in 204 mother–neonate pairs. Cord-blood parasitemia was detected in four babies by PCR, giving a prevalence of 2.0%. The newborns of primidgravidae were more susceptible to congenital malaria than those of multigravidae (P < 0.0001). There was a strong correlation between placental malaria and congenital malaria (odds ratio = 10.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.3–76.1, P = 0.0487). We conclude that the prevalence of congenital malaria in Calabar detected by PCR is lower than has been reported in this environment through microscopy. PMID:21363974

  19. Congenital ankyloblepharon in a leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius).

    PubMed

    Rival, Franck

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old leopard gecko with unilateral partially fused eyelids since birth was presented for examination. A diagnosis of congenital ankyloblepharon was made and surgical correction was performed successfully.

  20. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: Clinical presentation, epidemiology, diagnosis and prevention

    PubMed Central

    van Zuylen, Wendy J; Hamilton, Stuart T; Naing, Zin; Hall, Beverly; Shand, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common congenital infection causing serious disease in infants. It is the leading infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss and neurodevelopmental disability in developed countries. Despite the clinical importance of congenital cytomegalovirus, surveys show there is limited awareness and knowledge in the medical and general community about congenital cytomegalovirus infection. This article reviews the clinical features, global epidemiology, transmission and risk factors for cytomegalovirus infections. It also highlights several major advances made in recent years in the diagnosis and prevention of cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy. Although research is ongoing, no therapy is currently proven to prevent or treat maternal, fetal or neonatal cytomegalovirus infection. Education of women regarding hygiene measures can help prevent cytomegalovirus infection and are currently the best strategy to prevent congenital cytomegalovirus disease. PMID:27512442