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Sample records for congenital myasthenic syndromes

  1. Congenital myasthenic syndromes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Andrew G.; Shen, Xin-Ming; Selcen, Duygu; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital myasthenic syndromes are diverse disorders linked by abnormal signal transmission at the motor endplate that stem from defects in single or multiple proteins. Multiple endplate proteins are affected by mutations of single enzymes required for protein glycosylation, and deletion of PREPL exerts its effect by activating adaptor protein 1. Finally, neuromuscular transmission is also impaired in some congenital myopathies. The specific diagnosis of some syndromes is facilitated by clinical clues pointing to a disease gene. In absence of such clues, exome sequencing is a useful tool for finding the disease gene. Deeper understanding of disease mechanisms come from structural and in vitro electrophysiologic studies of the patient endplate, and from engineering the mutant and wild-type gene into a suitable expression system that can be interrogated by appropriate electrophysiologic and biochemical studies. Most CMS are treatable. Importantly, however, some medication beneficial in one syndrome can be detrimental in another. PMID:25792100

  2. Mutations in GMPPB cause congenital myasthenic syndrome and bridge myasthenic disorders with dystroglycanopathies.

    PubMed

    Belaya, Katsiaryna; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M; Liu, Wei Wei; Maxwell, Susan; McGowan, Simon; Farrugia, Maria E; Petty, Richard; Walls, Timothy J; Sedghi, Maryam; Basiri, Keivan; Yue, Wyatt W; Sarkozy, Anna; Bertoli, Marta; Pitt, Matthew; Kennett, Robin; Schaefer, Andrew; Bushby, Kate; Parton, Matt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Palace, Jacqueline; Muntoni, Francesco; Beeson, David

    2015-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited disorders that arise from impaired signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in at least 20 genes are known to lead to the onset of these conditions. Four of these, ALG2, ALG14, DPAGT1 and GFPT1, are involved in glycosylation. Here we identify a fifth glycosylation gene, GMPPB, where mutations cause congenital myasthenic syndrome. First, we identified recessive mutations in seven cases from five kinships defined as congenital myasthenic syndrome using decrement of compound muscle action potentials on repetitive nerve stimulation on electromyography. The mutations were present through the length of the GMPPB, and segregation, in silico analysis, exon trapping, cell transfection followed by western blots and immunostaining were used to determine pathogenicity. GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome cases show clinical features characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome subtypes that are due to defective glycosylation, with variable weakness of proximal limb muscle groups while facial and eye muscles are largely spared. However, patients with GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome had more prominent myopathic features that were detectable on muscle biopsies, electromyography, muscle magnetic resonance imaging, and through elevated serum creatine kinase levels. Mutations in GMPPB have recently been reported to lead to the onset of muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy. Analysis of four additional GMPPB-associated muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy cases by electromyography found that a defective neuromuscular junction component is not always present. Thus, we find mutations in GMPPB can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical features where deficit in neuromuscular transmission is the major component in a subset of cases. Clinical recognition of GMPPB-associated congenital myasthenic syndrome may be complicated by the presence of myopathic features, but correct diagnosis is important because affected

  3. Mutations in GMPPB cause congenital myasthenic syndrome and bridge myasthenic disorders with dystroglycanopathies

    PubMed Central

    Belaya, Katsiaryna; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Liu, Wei Wei; Maxwell, Susan; McGowan, Simon; Farrugia, Maria E.; Petty, Richard; Walls, Timothy J.; Sedghi, Maryam; Basiri, Keivan; Yue, Wyatt W.; Sarkozy, Anna; Bertoli, Marta; Pitt, Matthew; Kennett, Robin; Schaefer, Andrew; Bushby, Kate; Parton, Matt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Palace, Jacqueline; Muntoni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited disorders that arise from impaired signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in at least 20 genes are known to lead to the onset of these conditions. Four of these, ALG2, ALG14, DPAGT1 and GFPT1, are involved in glycosylation. Here we identify a fifth glycosylation gene, GMPPB, where mutations cause congenital myasthenic syndrome. First, we identified recessive mutations in seven cases from five kinships defined as congenital myasthenic syndrome using decrement of compound muscle action potentials on repetitive nerve stimulation on electromyography. The mutations were present through the length of the GMPPB, and segregation, in silico analysis, exon trapping, cell transfection followed by western blots and immunostaining were used to determine pathogenicity. GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome cases show clinical features characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome subtypes that are due to defective glycosylation, with variable weakness of proximal limb muscle groups while facial and eye muscles are largely spared. However, patients with GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome had more prominent myopathic features that were detectable on muscle biopsies, electromyography, muscle magnetic resonance imaging, and through elevated serum creatine kinase levels. Mutations in GMPPB have recently been reported to lead to the onset of muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy. Analysis of four additional GMPPB-associated muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy cases by electromyography found that a defective neuromuscular junction component is not always present. Thus, we find mutations in GMPPB can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical features where deficit in neuromuscular transmission is the major component in a subset of cases. Clinical recognition of GMPPB-associated congenital myasthenic syndrome may be complicated by the presence of myopathic features, but correct diagnosis is important because affected

  4. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, Gary E; Alicea-Vázquez, Vivianette; Grajales-Reyes, Jose G; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-08-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca(2+) overload, the activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective.

  5. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, E.; Vázquez, Vivianette Alicea; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca2+ overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca2+ overload, activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective. PMID:25448156

  6. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Rodriguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Fischmann, Arne; Thornton, John S.; Knight, Steve; Norbury, Ray; White, Mel; Al‐hajjar, Michal; Carboni, Nicola; Jayawant, Sandeep; Robb, Stephanie A.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Beeson, David; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction In this study we investigated muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). Methods Twenty‐six patients with 9 CMS subtypes and 10 controls were imaged. T1‐weighted (T1w) and short‐tau inversion recovery (STIR) 3‐Tesla MRI images obtained at thigh and calf levels were scored for severity. Results Overall mean the T1w score was increased in GFPT1 and DPAGT1 CMS. T1w scans of the AChR‐deficiency, COLQ, and CHAT subjects were indistinguishable from controls. STIR images from CMS patients did not differ significantly from those of controls. Mean T1w score correlated with age in the CMS cohort. Conclusions MRI appearances ranged from normal to marked abnormality. T1w images seem to be especially abnormal in some CMS caused by mutations of proteins involved in the glycosylation pathway. A non‐selective pattern of fat infiltration or a normal‐appearing scan in the setting of significant clinical weakness should suggest CMS as a potential diagnosis. Muscle MRI could play a role in differentiating CMS subtypes. Muscle Nerve 54: 211–219, 2016 PMID:26789134

  7. Identification of mutations in the MYO9A gene in patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Emily; Töpf, Ana; Müller, Juliane S.; Cox, Daniel; Evangelista, Teresinha; Colomer, Jaume; Abicht, Angela; Senderek, Jan; Hasselmann, Oswald; Yaramis, Ahmet; Laval, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a group of rare and genetically heterogenous disorders resulting from defects in the structure and function of the neuromuscular junction. Patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome exhibit fatigable muscle weakness with a variety of accompanying phenotypes depending on the protein affected. A cohort of patients with a clinical diagnosis of congenital myasthenic syndrome that lacked a genetic diagnosis underwent whole exome sequencing in order to identify genetic causation. Missense biallelic mutations in the MYO9A gene, encoding an unconventional myosin, were identified in two unrelated families. Depletion of MYO9A in NSC-34 cells revealed a direct effect of MYO9A on neuronal branching and axon guidance. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of the two MYO9A orthologues in zebrafish, myo9aa/ab, demonstrated a requirement for MYO9A in the formation of the neuromuscular junction during development. The morphants displayed shortened and abnormally branched motor axons, lack of movement within the chorion and abnormal swimming in response to tactile stimulation. We therefore conclude that MYO9A deficiency may affect the presynaptic motor axon, manifesting in congenital myasthenic syndrome. These results highlight the involvement of unconventional myosins in motor axon functionality, as well as the need to look outside traditional neuromuscular junction-specific proteins for further congenital myasthenic syndrome candidate genes. PMID:27259756

  8. Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes with Predominant Limb Girdle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Hanna, Mike; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined disorders characterized by impaired neuromuscular transmission. They usually present from birth to childhood and are characterised by exercise induced weakness and fatigability. Genotype-phenotype correlations are difficult. However, in some patients particular phenotypic aspects may point towards a specific genetic defect. The absence of ptosis and ophthalmoparesis in patients with limb-girdle weakness makes the diagnosis of a neuromuscular transmission defect particularly challenging (LG-CMS). This is illustrated by a well-documented case published by Walton in 1956. The diagnosis of LG-CMS is secured by demonstrating a neuromuscular transmission defect with single fibre EMG or repetitive nerve stimulation, in the absence of auto-antibodies. Ultimately, a genetic test is required to identify the underlying cause and assure counselling and optimization of treatment. LG-CMS are inherited in autosomal recessive traits, and are often associated with mutations in DOK7 and GFPT1, and less frequently with mutations in COLQ, ALG2, ALG14 and DPAGT. Genetic characterization of CMS is of the upmost importance when choosing the adequate treatment. Some of the currently used drugs can either ameliorate or aggravate the symptoms depending on the underlying genetic defect. The drug most frequently used for the treatment of CMS is pyridostigmine an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. However, pyridostigmine is not effective or is even detrimental in DOK7- and COLQ-related LG-CMS, while beta-adrenergic agonists (ephedrine, salbutamol) show some sustained benefit. Standard clinical trials may be difficult, but standardized follow-up of patients and international collaboration may help to improve the standards of care of these conditions. PMID:26870666

  9. Congenital myasthenic syndromes due to mutations in ALG2 and ALG14.

    PubMed

    Cossins, Judith; Belaya, Katsiaryna; Hicks, Debbie; Salih, Mustafa A; Finlayson, Sarah; Carboni, Nicola; Liu, Wei Wei; Maxwell, Susan; Zoltowska, Katarzyna; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Seidhamed, Mohammed Zain; Donnelly, Peter; Bentley, David; McGowan, Simon J; Müller, Juliane; Palace, Jacqueline; Lochmüller, Hanns; Beeson, David

    2013-03-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that arise from impaired signal transmission at the neuromuscular synapse. They are characterized by fatigable muscle weakness. We performed linkage analysis, whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to determine the underlying defect in patients with an inherited limb-girdle pattern of myasthenic weakness. We identify ALG14 and ALG2 as novel genes in which mutations cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome. Through analogy with yeast, ALG14 is thought to form a multiglycosyltransferase complex with ALG13 and DPAGT1 that catalyses the first two committed steps of asparagine-linked protein glycosylation. We show that ALG14 is concentrated at the muscle motor endplates and small interfering RNA silencing of ALG14 results in reduced cell-surface expression of muscle acetylcholine receptor expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. ALG2 is an alpha-1,3-mannosyltransferase that also catalyses early steps in the asparagine-linked glycosylation pathway. Mutations were identified in two kinships, with mutation ALG2p.Val68Gly found to severely reduce ALG2 expression both in patient muscle, and in cell cultures. Identification of DPAGT1, ALG14 and ALG2 mutations as a cause of congenital myasthenic syndrome underscores the importance of asparagine-linked protein glycosylation for proper functioning of the neuromuscular junction. These syndromes form part of the wider spectrum of congenital disorders of glycosylation caused by impaired asparagine-linked glycosylation. It is likely that further genes encoding components of this pathway will be associated with congenital myasthenic syndromes or impaired neuromuscular transmission as part of a more severe multisystem disorder. Our findings suggest that treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors may improve muscle function in many of the congenital disorders of glycosylation. PMID:23404334

  10. A recessive Nav1.4 mutation underlies congenital myasthenic syndrome with periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Habbout, Karima; Poulin, Hugo; Rivier, François; Giuliano, Serena; Sternberg, Damien; Fontaine, Bertrand; Eymard, Bruno; Morales, Raul Juntas; Echenne, Bernard; King, Louise; Hanna, Michael G.; Männikkö, Roope; Chahine, Mohamed; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the molecular basis of a complex phenotype of congenital muscle weakness observed in an isolated but consanguineous patient. Methods: The proband was evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically over a period of 15 years. Genetic testing of candidate genes was performed. Functional characterization of the candidate mutation was done in mammalian cell background using whole cell patch clamp technique. Results: The proband had fatigable muscle weakness characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acute and reversible attacks of most severe muscle weakness as observed in periodic paralysis. We identified a novel homozygous SCN4A mutation (p.R1454W) linked to this recessively inherited phenotype. The p.R1454W substitution induced an important enhancement of fast and slow inactivation, a slower recovery for these inactivated states, and a frequency-dependent regulation of Nav1.4 channels in the heterologous expression system. Conclusion: We identified a novel loss-of-function mutation of Nav1.4 that leads to a recessive phenotype combining clinical symptoms and signs of congenital myasthenic syndrome and periodic paralysis, probably by decreasing channel availability for muscle action potential genesis at the neuromuscular junction and propagation along the sarcolemma. PMID:26659129

  11. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago.

  12. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago. PMID:26429099

  13. Choline acetyltransferase mutations causing congenital myasthenic syndrome: molecular findings and genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Gospe, Sídney M.; Mazia, Claudio G.; Vaccarezza, Maria; Garcia-Erro, Marcela; Bowe, Constance; Chang, Celia; Mezei, Michelle; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase catalyzes the synthesis of acetylcholine at cholinergic nerves. Mutations in human CHAT cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to impaired synthesis of ACh; this severe variant of the disease is frequently associated with unexpected episodes of potentially fatal apnea. The severity of this condition varies remarkably, and the molecular factors determining this variability are poorly understood. Furthermore, genotype–phenotype correlations have been difficult to establish in patients with biallelic mutations. We analyzed the protein expression of seven ChAT mutations, p.Val136Met, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp, p.Val194Leu, p.Pro211Ala, p.Arg566Cys and p.Ser694Cys, in HEK-293 cells to phosphorylated ChAT, determined their enzyme kinetics and thermal instability, and examined their structural changes. Three mutations, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp and p.Arg566Cys, are novel, and p.Val136Met and p.Arg207His are homozygous in three families and associated with severe disease. The characterization of mutants showed a decrease in the overall catalytic efficiency of ChAT; in particular, those located near the active-site tunnel produced the most seriously disruptive phenotypic effects. On the other hand, p.Val136Met is located far from both active and substrate-binding sites produced the most drastic reduction of ChAT expression. Overall, CHAT mutations producing low enzyme expression and severe kinetic effects are associated with the most severe phenotypes. PMID:26080897

  14. Defective Fast Inactivation Recovery of Nav1.4 in Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, W. David; Feldman, Daniel H.; Ramirez, Sandra; He, Liuyuan; Kassar, Darine; Quick, Adam; Klassen, Tara L.; Lara, Marian; Nguyen, Joanna; Kissel, John T.; Lossin, Christoph; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the unique phenotype and genetic findings in a 57-year-old female with a rare form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) associated with longstanding muscle fatigability, and to investigate the underlying pathophysiology. Methods We used whole-cell voltage clamping to compare the biophysical parameters of wild-type and Arg1457His-mutant Nav1.4. Results Clinical and neurophysiological evaluation revealed features consistent with CMS. Sequencing of candidate genes indicated no abnormalities. However, analysis of SCN4A, the gene encoding the skeletal muscle sodium channel Nav1.4, revealed a homozygous mutation predicting an arginine-to-histidine substitution at position 1457 (Arg1457His), which maps to the channel’s voltage sensor, specifically D4/S4. Whole-cell patch clamp studies revealed that the mutant required longer hyperpolarization to recover from fast inactivation, which produced a profound use-dependent current attenuation not seen in the wild type. The mutant channel also had a marked hyperpolarizing shift in its voltage dependence of inactivation as well as slowed inactivation kinetics. Interpretation We conclude that Arg1457His compromises muscle fiber excitability. The mutant fast-inactivates with significantly less depolarization, and it recovers only after extended hyperpolarization. The resulting enhancement in its use dependence reduces channel availability, which explains the patient’s muscle fatigability. Arg1457His offers molecular insight into a rare form of CMS precipitated by sodium channel inactivation defects. Given this channel’s involvement in other muscle disorders such as paramyotonia congenita and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, our study exemplifies how variations within the same gene can give rise to multiple distinct dysfunctions and phenotypes, revealing residues important in basic channel function. PMID:25707578

  15. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse. PMID:27569547

  16. A COLQ missense mutation in Labrador Retrievers having congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Levine, Jonathan; Minor, Katie M; Humphries, Hammon D; Lara, Renee; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Guo, Ling T; Williams, D Colette; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2014-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by skeletal muscle weakness caused by disruption of signal transmission across the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). CMSs are rarely encountered in veterinary medicine, and causative mutations have only been identified in Old Danish Pointing Dogs and Brahman cattle to date. Herein, we characterize a novel CMS in 2 Labrador Retriever littermates with an early onset of marked generalized muscle weakness. Because the sire and dam share 2 recent common ancestors, CMS is likely the result of recessive alleles inherited identical by descent (IBD). Genome-wide SNP profiles generated from the Illumina HD array for 9 nuclear family members were used to determine genomic inheritance patterns in chromosomal regions encompassing 18 functional candidate genes. SNP haplotypes spanning 3 genes were consistent with autosomal recessive transmission, and microsatellite data showed that only the segment encompassing COLQ was inherited IBD. COLQ encodes the collagenous tail of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for termination of signal transduction in the NMJ. Sequences from COLQ revealed a variant in exon 14 (c.1010T>C) that results in the substitution of a conserved amino acid (I337T) within the C-terminal domain. Both affected puppies were homozygous for this variant, and 16 relatives were heterozygous, while 288 unrelated Labrador Retrievers and 112 dogs of other breeds were wild-type. A recent study in which 2 human CMS patients were found to be homozygous for an identical COLQ mutation (c.1010T>C; I337T) provides further evidence that this mutation is pathogenic. This report describes the first COLQ mutation in canine CMS and demonstrates the utility of SNP profiles from nuclear family members for the identification of private mutations. PMID:25166616

  17. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse.

  18. A COLQ Missense Mutation in Sphynx and Devon Rex Cats with Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Marie; Hitte, Christophe; Bossé, Philippe; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Thomas, Anne; Martignat, Lionel; Blot, Stéphane; Tiret, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    An autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, fatigability and variable electromyographic or muscular histopathological features has been described in the two related Sphynx and Devon Rex cat breeds (Felis catus). Collection of data from two affected Sphynx cats and their relatives pointed out a single disease candidate region on feline chromosome C2, identified following a genome-wide SNP-based homozygosity mapping strategy. In that region, we further identified COLQ (collagen-like tail subunit of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase) as a good candidate gene, since COLQ mutations were identified in affected humans and dogs with endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency leading to a synaptic form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). A homozygous c.1190G>A missense variant located in exon 15 of COLQ, leading to a C397Y substitution, was identified in the two affected cats. C397 is a highly-conserved residue from the C-terminal domain of the protein; its mutation was previously shown to produce CMS in humans, and here we confirmed in an affected Sphynx cat that it induces a loss of acetylcholinesterase clustering at the neuromuscular junction. Segregation of the c.1190G>A variant was 100% consistent with the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of the disorder in our cat pedigree; in addition, an affected, unrelated Devon Rex cat recruited thereafter was also homozygous for the variant. Genotyping of a panel of 333 cats from 14 breeds failed to identify a single carrier in non-Sphynx and non-Devon Rex cats. Finally, the percentage of healthy carriers in a European subpanel of 81 genotyped Sphynx cats was estimated to be low (3.7%) and 14 control Devon Rex cats were genotyped as wild-type individuals. Altogether, these results strongly support that the neuromuscular disorder reported in Sphynx and Devon Rex breeds is a CMS caused by a unique c.1190G>A missense mutation, presumably transmitted through a founder effect, which

  19. A COLQ Missense Mutation in Sphynx and Devon Rex Cats with Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Marie; Hitte, Christophe; Bossé, Philippe; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Thomas, Anne; Martignat, Lionel; Blot, Stéphane; Tiret, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    An autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, fatigability and variable electromyographic or muscular histopathological features has been described in the two related Sphynx and Devon Rex cat breeds (Felis catus). Collection of data from two affected Sphynx cats and their relatives pointed out a single disease candidate region on feline chromosome C2, identified following a genome-wide SNP-based homozygosity mapping strategy. In that region, we further identified COLQ (collagen-like tail subunit of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase) as a good candidate gene, since COLQ mutations were identified in affected humans and dogs with endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency leading to a synaptic form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). A homozygous c.1190G>A missense variant located in exon 15 of COLQ, leading to a C397Y substitution, was identified in the two affected cats. C397 is a highly-conserved residue from the C-terminal domain of the protein; its mutation was previously shown to produce CMS in humans, and here we confirmed in an affected Sphynx cat that it induces a loss of acetylcholinesterase clustering at the neuromuscular junction. Segregation of the c.1190G>A variant was 100% consistent with the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of the disorder in our cat pedigree; in addition, an affected, unrelated Devon Rex cat recruited thereafter was also homozygous for the variant. Genotyping of a panel of 333 cats from 14 breeds failed to identify a single carrier in non-Sphynx and non-Devon Rex cats. Finally, the percentage of healthy carriers in a European subpanel of 81 genotyped Sphynx cats was estimated to be low (3.7%) and 14 control Devon Rex cats were genotyped as wild-type individuals. Altogether, these results strongly support that the neuromuscular disorder reported in Sphynx and Devon Rex breeds is a CMS caused by a unique c.1190G>A missense mutation, presumably transmitted through a founder effect, which

  20. Congenital myasthenic syndromes: I. Deficiency and short open-time of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Engel, A G; Nagel, A; Walls, T J; Harper, C M; Waisburg, H A

    1993-12-01

    A 5.5-year-old girl had myasthenic symptoms since birth. Tests for antiacetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies were negative. To investigate the character of the neuromuscular transmission defect, an intercostal muscle specimen was obtained at age 27 months. Immune deposits were absent from the endplates. On electron microscopy, most postsynaptic regions appeared normal, but the density of AChR on the junctional folds was diffusely reduced. In vitro microelectrode studies revealed that the number of transmitter quanta released by nerve impulse was normal. The amplitude of miniature of endplate potentials and currents was abnormally low. A study of the kinetic properties of AChR by analysis of acetylcholine-induced current noise demonstrated a significant decrease in mean channel open-time; the mean channel conductance was normal. The safety margin of neuromuscular transmission in this disorder is likely to be compromised by the deficiency and abnormal kinetic properties of AChR. The findings are unique among those patients with congenital AChR deficiency described to date. PMID:8232383

  1. LG2 Agrin Mutation Causing Severe Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Mimics Functional Characteristics of Non-neural (z−) Agrin

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Ricardo A.; Fernandez, Jose M.; Arredondo, Juan; Navarro, Carmen; Ngo, Maian; Beeson, David; Cagney, Órla; Williams, D. Colette; Wollmann, Robert L.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Ferns, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We describe a severe form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) caused by two heteroallelic mutations: a nonsense and a missense mutation in the gene encoding agrin (AGRN). The identified mutations, Q353X and V1727F, are located at the N-terminal and at the second laminin G-like (LG2) domain of agrin respectively. A motor-point muscle biopsy demonstrated severe disruption of the architecture of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), including: dispersion and fragmentation of endplate areas with normal expression of acetylcholinesterase; simplification of postsynaptic membranes; pronounced reduction of the axon terminal size; widening of the primary synaptic cleft; and, collection of membranous debris material in the primary synaptic cleft and in the subsynaptic cytoplasm. Expression studies in heterologous cells revealed that the Q353X mutation abolished expression of full-length agrin. Moreover, the V1727F mutation decreased agrin-induced clustering of the AChR in cultured C2 muscle cells by >100-fold, and phosphorylation of the MuSK receptor and AChR beta subunit by ~10-fold. Surprisingly, the V1727F mutant also displayed increased binding to α-dystroglycan but decreased binding to a neural (z+) agrin-specific antibody. Our findings demonstrate that agrin mutations can associate with a severe form of CMS and cause profound distortion of the architecture and function of the NMJ. The impaired ability of V1727F agrin to activate MuSK and clusters AChRs, together with its increased affinity to α-dystroglycan, mimics non-neural (z−) agrin and are important determinants of the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:22205389

  2. Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Type 19 Is Caused by Mutations in COL13A1, Encoding the Atypical Non-fibrillar Collagen Type XIII α1 Chain

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Clare V.; Cossins, Judith; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Parry, David A.; Maxwell, Susan; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Riepsaame, Joey; Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Lake, Alice V.R.; Moran, Maria; Robb, Stephanie; Chow, Gabriel; Sewry, Caroline; Hopkins, Philip M.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Jayawant, Sandeep; Palace, Jacqueline; Johnson, Colin A.; Beeson, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) consists of a tripartite synapse with a presynaptic nerve terminal, Schwann cells that ensheathe the terminal bouton, and a highly specialized postsynaptic membrane. Synaptic structural integrity is crucial for efficient signal transmission. Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that result from impaired neuromuscular transmission, caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are involved in synaptic transmission and in forming and maintaining the structural integrity of NMJs. To identify further causes of CMSs, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in families without an identified mutation in known CMS-associated genes. In two families affected by a previously undefined CMS, we identified homozygous loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, which encodes the alpha chain of an atypical non-fibrillar collagen with a single transmembrane domain. COL13A1 localized to the human muscle motor endplate. Using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, modeling of the COL13A1 c.1171delG (p.Leu392Sfs∗71) frameshift mutation in the C2C12 cell line reduced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering during myotube differentiation. This highlights the crucial role of collagen XIII in the formation and maintenance of the NMJ. Our results therefore delineate a myasthenic disorder that is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, encoding a protein involved in organization of the NMJ, and emphasize the importance of appropriate symptomatic treatment for these individuals. PMID:26626625

  3. Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Type 19 Is Caused by Mutations in COL13A1, Encoding the Atypical Non-fibrillar Collagen Type XIII α1 Chain.

    PubMed

    Logan, Clare V; Cossins, Judith; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M; Parry, David A; Maxwell, Susan; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Riepsaame, Joey; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Lake, Alice V R; Moran, Maria; Robb, Stephanie; Chow, Gabriel; Sewry, Caroline; Hopkins, Philip M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Jayawant, Sandeep; Palace, Jacqueline; Johnson, Colin A; Beeson, David

    2015-12-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) consists of a tripartite synapse with a presynaptic nerve terminal, Schwann cells that ensheathe the terminal bouton, and a highly specialized postsynaptic membrane. Synaptic structural integrity is crucial for efficient signal transmission. Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that result from impaired neuromuscular transmission, caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are involved in synaptic transmission and in forming and maintaining the structural integrity of NMJs. To identify further causes of CMSs, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in families without an identified mutation in known CMS-associated genes. In two families affected by a previously undefined CMS, we identified homozygous loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, which encodes the alpha chain of an atypical non-fibrillar collagen with a single transmembrane domain. COL13A1 localized to the human muscle motor endplate. Using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, modeling of the COL13A1 c.1171delG (p.Leu392Sfs(∗)71) frameshift mutation in the C2C12 cell line reduced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering during myotube differentiation. This highlights the crucial role of collagen XIII in the formation and maintenance of the NMJ. Our results therefore delineate a myasthenic disorder that is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, encoding a protein involved in organization of the NMJ, and emphasize the importance of appropriate symptomatic treatment for these individuals. PMID:26626625

  4. Congenital myasthenic syndrome due to mutation in CHRNE gene with clinical worsening and thymic hyperplasia attributed to association with autoimmune-myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ernestina; Moreira, Isabel; Coutinho, Ester; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Lopes, Carlos; Lopes Lima, José; Leite, M Isabel

    2015-12-01

    We report a patient with congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to mutation in CHRNE with symptoms since the age of 4; mild to moderate fatigable weakness involved mainly ocular, bulbar and limb muscles; functional impact of the disease in their development and physical activity was modest. By the age of 34, the patient experienced gradual worsening of fatigue with dyspnoea and pronounced limb weakness, requiring significant increase of pyridostigmine. Further, a remarkable and sustained clinical improvement followed thymectomy with hyperplastic thymus. Despite of the absence of detectable antibodies to acetyl-choline receptor (AChR) (including clustered-AChR), muscle-specific kinase and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 antibodies in the serum obtained nine years after thymectomy, the clinical, genetic and histological features are in keeping with the extremely rare association of two rare neuromuscular junction disorders - CMS and myasthenia gravis (MG). The inexistence of other conditions that could potentially associate with thymic hyperplasia also supports the diagnosis of MG. PMID:26363966

  5. Global N-linked Glycosylation is Not Significantly Impaired in Myoblasts in Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes Caused by Defective Glutamine-Fructose-6-Phosphate Transaminase 1 (GFPT1)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiushi; Müller, Juliane S.; Pang, Poh-Choo; Laval, Steve H.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Dell, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1) is the first enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. It transfers an amino group from glutamine to fructose-6-phosphate to yield glucosamine-6-phosphate, thus providing the precursor for uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) synthesis. UDP-GlcNAc is an essential substrate for all mammalian glycosylation biosynthetic pathways and N-glycan branching is especially sensitive to alterations in the concentration of this sugar nucleotide. It has been reported that GFPT1 mutations lead to a distinct sub-class of congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) termed “limb-girdle CMS with tubular aggregates”. CMS are hereditary neuromuscular transmission disorders in which neuromuscular junctions are impaired. To investigate whether alterations in protein glycosylation at the neuromuscular junction might be involved in this impairment, we have employed mass spectrometric strategies to study the N-glycomes of myoblasts and myotubes derived from two healthy controls, three GFPT1 patients, and four patients with other muscular diseases, namely CMS caused by mutations in DOK7, myopathy caused by mutations in MTND5, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A), and Pompe disease. A comparison of the relative abundances of bi-, tri-, and tetra-antennary N-glycans in each of the cell preparations revealed that all samples exhibited broadly similar levels of branching. Moreover, although some differences were observed in the relative abundances of some of the N-glycan constituents, these variations were modest and were not confined to the GFPT1 samples. Therefore, GFPT1 mutations in CMS patients do not appear to compromise global N-glycosylation in muscle cells. PMID:26501342

  6. Improved plasma membrane expression of the trafficking defective P344R mutant of muscle, skeletal, receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) causing congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Milhem, Reham M; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Ali, Bassam R

    2015-03-01

    Muscle, skeletal, receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is a key organizer at the postsynaptic membrane and critical for proper development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in MUSK result in congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). We hypothesized that the CMS-causing missense mutation (P344R), found within the cysteine-rich domain of the protein, will affect its conformational tertiary structure. Consequently, the protein will misfold, get retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lose its biological function through degradation by the highly conserved ER associated degradation (ERAD) machinery. We report that P344R-MuSK mutant is trafficking-deficient when expressed at 37°C in HeLa, COS-7 and HEK293 cell lines. It colocalized with the ER marker calnexin in contrast to wild-type MuSK which localized to the plasma membrane. The N-glycosylation status of P344R-MuSK is that of an immature and not properly post-translationally modified protein. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the P344R mutant's half-life is shorter than wild-type MuSK protein. Proteasomal inhibition resulted in the stabilization of the mutant protein. The mutant protein is highly ubiquitinated compared to wild-type confirming targeting for proteasomal degradation. The mutant showed around 50% of its in vivo autophosphorylation activity. P344R-MuSK mutant's trafficking defect is correctable by culturing the expressing cells at 27°C. Moreover, chemical compounds namely 2.5% glycerol, 1% dimethyl sulfoxide, 10 μM thapsigargin and 1 μM curcumin improved the maturation and exit of the mutant protein from the ER. These findings open perspectives for potential therapeutic intervention for patients with CMS harboring the P344R-MuSK mutation.

  7. Myasthenia Gravis, Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome & Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... In most cases of MG, the immune system origins of MG have gradually unfolded, targets the acetylcholine ... is a rare autoimmune disease whose symptoms and origins are some- what similar to those of MG. ...

  8. Long-term follow-up in infantile-onset lambert-eaton myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Portaro, S; Parisi, D; Polizzi, A; Ruggieri, M; Andreetta, F; Bernasconi, P; Toscano, A; Rodolico, C

    2014-09-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is a neuromuscular junction disorder characterized by proximal limb muscle weakness, fatigability, decreased deep-tendon reflexes, and autonomic symptoms. There are 2 forms of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: one most frequently associated with small-cell lung cancer (P-Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome) and the other that is a pure autoimmune form (NP-Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome). Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is a very rare disorder in children younger than age 12 years. Herein, we report a 25-year-old man with NP-Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, which onset was at the age of 10 years. To date, this is the most long-term follow-up of NP-Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in childhood. In our patient, the only symptomatic treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine phosphate has been sufficient to guarantee him a good quality of life. Our data remind physicians to keep in mind the diagnosis of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in children with a proximal myopathic pattern and they confirm the specificity of compound muscle action potential incremental pattern after brief maximal effort in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome.

  9. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome; Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2011-01-01

    Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS) is a rare disease with a well-characterized pathogenesis. In 50% of the patients, LEMS is a paraneoplastic manifestation and caused by a small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Both LEMS patients with SCLC and those without this tumour have in 85% of cases pathogenetic antibodies of very high LEMS specificity against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the cell membrane of the presynaptic motor nerve terminal. Better understanding of LEMS pathogenesis has lead to targeted symptomatic therapy aimed at the neuromuscular junction and to semispecific immuno-suppression. For SCLC LEMS, tumour therapy is essential. PMID:21969911

  10. Presynaptic Disorders: Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome and Botulism.

    PubMed

    Gable, Karissa L; Massey, Janice M

    2015-08-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and botulism are acquired presynaptic nerve terminal disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is an idiopathic or paraneoplastic autoimmune syndrome in which autoantibodies of the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel play a role in decreasing the release of acetylcholine, resulting in clinical symptoms of skeletal muscle weakness, diminished reflexes, and autonomic symptoms. Paraneoplastic LEMS is most often associated with small cell lung cancer. Diagnosis is confirmed by positive serologic testing and electrophysiological studies, which display characteristic features of low compound muscle action potentials, a decrement at 3Hz repetitive nerve stimulation, and facilitation with exercise or high-frequency repetitive stimulation. Treatment involves cancer monitoring and treatment, 3,4-diaminopyridine, immunosuppressive medications, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Botulism is another presynaptic disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Clinical features classically involve cranial and bulbar palsies followed by descending weakness of the limbs, respiratory failure, and autonomic dysfunction. Electrodiagnostic testing is important in the evaluation and diagnosis. Treatment is supportive, and administration of antitoxin is beneficial in selected cases.

  11. Presynaptic Disorders: Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome and Botulism.

    PubMed

    Gable, Karissa L; Massey, Janice M

    2015-08-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and botulism are acquired presynaptic nerve terminal disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is an idiopathic or paraneoplastic autoimmune syndrome in which autoantibodies of the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel play a role in decreasing the release of acetylcholine, resulting in clinical symptoms of skeletal muscle weakness, diminished reflexes, and autonomic symptoms. Paraneoplastic LEMS is most often associated with small cell lung cancer. Diagnosis is confirmed by positive serologic testing and electrophysiological studies, which display characteristic features of low compound muscle action potentials, a decrement at 3Hz repetitive nerve stimulation, and facilitation with exercise or high-frequency repetitive stimulation. Treatment involves cancer monitoring and treatment, 3,4-diaminopyridine, immunosuppressive medications, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Botulism is another presynaptic disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Clinical features classically involve cranial and bulbar palsies followed by descending weakness of the limbs, respiratory failure, and autonomic dysfunction. Electrodiagnostic testing is important in the evaluation and diagnosis. Treatment is supportive, and administration of antitoxin is beneficial in selected cases. PMID:26502758

  12. A mouse model of the slow channel myasthenic syndrome: Neuromuscular physiology and effects of ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G; Cossins, J; Lashley, D; Maxwell, S; Liu, W W; Wickens, J R; Martinez-Martinez, P; de Baets, M; Beeson, D

    2013-10-01

    In the slow channel congenital myasthenic syndrome mutations in genes encoding the muscle acetylcholine receptor give rise to prolonged ion channel activations. The resulting cation overload in the postsynaptic region leads to damage of synaptic structures, impaired neuromuscular transmission and fatigable muscle weakness. Previously we identified and characterised in detail the properties of the slow channel syndrome mutation εL221F. Here, using this mutation, we generate a transgenic mouse model for the slow channel syndrome that expresses mutant human ε-subunits harbouring an EGFP tag within the M3-M4 cytoplasmic region, driven by a ~1500 bp region of the CHRNB promoter. Fluorescent mutant acetylcholine receptors are assembled, cluster at the motor endplates and give rise to a disease model that mirrors the human condition. Mice demonstrate mild fatigable muscle weakness, prolonged endplate and miniature endplate potentials, and variable degeneration of the postsynaptic membrane. We use our model to investigate ephedrine as a potential treatment. Mice were assessed before and after six weeks on oral ephedrine (serum ephedrine concentration 89 ± 3 ng/ml) using an inverted screen test and in vivo electromyography. Treated mice demonstrated modest benefit for screen hang time, and in measures of compound muscle action potentials and mean jitter that did not reach statistical significance. Ephedrine and salbutamol show clear benefit when used in the treatment of DOK7 or COLQ congenital myasthenic syndromes. Our results highlight only a modest potential benefit of these β2-adrenergic receptor agonists for the treatment of the slow channel syndrome.

  13. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  14. Update on treatment options for Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome: focus on use of amifampridine

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Sabine; Stangel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), antibodies against presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels reduce the quantal release of acetylcholine, causing muscle weakness and autonomic dysfunction. More than half of the affected patients have associated small cell lung cancer, and thorough screening for an underlying malignancy is crucial. The mainstay of treatment for LEMS is symptomatic but immunotherapy is needed in more severely affected patients. Symptomatic therapies aim at increasing the concentration of acetylcholine at the muscle endplate. While acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were the first drugs to be used for the amelioration of symptoms, 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP, amifampridine) has been shown to be more effective. 3,4-DAP blocks presynaptic potassium channels, thereby prolonging the action potential and increasing presynaptic calcium concentrations. This then results in increased quantal release of acetylcholine. The efficacy of 3,4-DAP for increasing muscle strength and resting compound muscle action potentials has been demonstrated by four placebo-controlled trials. Side effects are usually mild, and the most frequently reported are paresthesias. The most common serious adverse events are epileptic seizures. 3,4-DAP is currently the treatment of choice in patients with Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome. PMID:21822385

  15. Selective inhibition of caspases in skeletal muscle reverses the apoptotic synaptic degeneration in slow-channel myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haipeng; Pytel, Peter; Gomez, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Slow-channel syndrome (SCS) is a congenital myasthenic disorder caused by point mutations in subunits of skeletal muscle acetylcholine receptor leading to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the postsynaptic membrane, nuclei and mitochondria of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In both SCS muscle biopsies and transgenic mouse models for SCS (mSCS), the endplate regions are shrunken, and there is evidence of DNA damage in the subsynaptic region. Activated caspase-9, -3 and -7 are intensely co-localized at the NMJ, and the Ca(2+)-activated protease, calpain, and the atypical cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk5) are overactivated in mSCS. Thus, the true mediator(s) of the disease process is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that selective inhibition of effector caspases, caspase-3 and -7, or initiator caspase, caspase-9, in limb muscle in vivo by localized expression of recombinant inhibitor proteins dramatically decreases subsynaptic DNA damage, increases endplate area and improves ultrastructural abnormalities in SCS transgenic mice. Calpain and Cdk5 are not affected by this treatment. On the other hand, inhibition of Cdk5 by expression of a dominant-negative form of Cdk5 has no effect on the degeneration. Together with previous studies, these results indicate that focal activation of caspase activity at the NMJ is the principal pathological process responsible for the synaptic apoptosis in SCS. Thus, treatments that reduce muscle caspase activity are likely to be of benefit for SCS patients.

  16. Action of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome IgG at mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Prior, C; Lang, B; Wray, D; Newsom-Davis, J

    1985-06-01

    We have studied the electrophysiological effects of IgG obtained from four patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) (two with small cell carcinoma), using the mouse passive transfer model. Mice received LEMS or control IgG or plasma, 10 to 60 mg daily. Microelectrode intracellular recordings were made from diaphragm muscle. LEMS IgG and plasma decreased end-plate potential quantal content similarly, confirming IgG as the active factor. LEMS IgG was equally effective in C5-deficient mice, indicating that late complement components are not required. The time course of decline and recovery of quantal content closely followed that of the human IgG in the mouse serum, with time to half-maximal effect of about 1.5 days in each case. Binding/dissociation of IgG or down/up regulation of the antigenic determinants, possibly Ca2+ channels, has a half-life of between 2 and 36 hours. The results confirm our concept that IgG antibody to nerve terminal determinants underlies the disorder of transmitter release in LEMS.

  17. [Molecular immunology of voltage-gated calcium channel and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Iwasa, K; Komai, K; Yasukawa, Y; Maruta, T; Takamori, M

    1997-12-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome(LEMS), an autoimmune disease that is often associated with small cell lung carcinoma(SCLC), impairs the quantal release of acetylcholine by directing antibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in the motor nerve terminal. We focused attention on the P/Q type VGCC, to which there are antibodies in LEMS patients in higher frequency than antibodies to other types of VGCC. To search for antigenic sites in the molecular structure of alpha 1A subuuit of P/Q type VGCC in LEMS, we synthesized 4 peptides corresponding to the extracellular region (S5-S6 linker) of each of 4 domains that form alpha 1A subunit of VGCC. Also, LEMS patients' sera were studied by immunoprecipitation assay using these antigens. Peptides corresponding to the extracellular region (S5-S6 linker) of domains II and IV were specifically reactive with LEMS antibodies; their titiers respectively correlated with those of anti-P/Q type calcium channel (omega-conotoxin MVIIC-sensitive human cerebellum extret). Lewis rats were immunized with the domain II S5-S6 linker peptides conjugated with KLH. The immunized rats showed LEMS features characterized by reduced acetylcholine quantum content of endplate potentials and antibodies reactive with P/Q type VGCC. Our observations suggest 2 potential epitopes of LEMS antibodies. Synaptotagmin is a Ca2+ and phospholipid binding protein integrated in synaptic vesicle membranes. It plays a crucial role in neurotransmitter release, probably as a Ca2+ sensor for exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. The extracellular region of synaptotagmin was found antigenic for the induction of a rat model of LEMS. A proportion of human LEMS antibodies reacted with the recombinant synaptotagmin in immunoblot.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B genotype determines risk for sudden death. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 Jan;43(1):77-86. ... Rand CM. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): kindred disorders of autonomic regulation. Respir ...

  19. Calcium channel peptide can cause an autoimmune-mediated model of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Komai, K; Iwasa, K; Takamori, M

    1999-07-01

    The Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a disorder of neuromuscular transmission characterized by the reduced quantal release of acetylcholine from the motor nerve terminal, wherein the P/Q-type of voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) and is attacked by a majority of LEMS antibodies. Using the molecular structure of the alpha1 subunit (consisting of 4 domains) of the P/Q-type VGCC as a reference, we synthesized the extracellular region (S5-S6 linker) of the domain III, known as the segment which plays an important role in channel functions. Six of the ten Lewis rats immunized with this synthetic peptide conjugated with carrier protein showed moderate weakness (grade 1 in a 3-graded scale, for myasthenic weakness in experimental animals) and a reduction in acetylcholine quantum content of end-plate potentials. Antipeptide antibodies raised in test rats reacted with omega-conotoxin MVIIC-sensitive cerebellar extract (P/Q-type VGCC) and the domain III peptide inhibited the binding of rat antibodies to VGCCs. Our findings suggest the identification of one of the potential epitopes of LEMS antibodies.

  20. Conjoint occurrence of GABAB receptor antibodies in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome with antibodies to the voltage gated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Dogan Onugoren, Müjgan; Rauschka, Helmut; Bien, Christian G

    2014-08-15

    Antibodies (abs) to the GABAB receptor have been recently found to be responsible for immune-mediated encephalitis with dominant seizures. They are in approximately 50% of cases associated with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). GABAB receptors are mainly located in the hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum in the presynaptic and postsynaptic regions of synapses. The main function of these receptors is to reduce activity states of neurons. In some instances, GABAB receptor abs in these patients were accompanied by other antibodies, among them VGCC abs (Lancaster et al., 2010, Boronat et al., 2011). VGCC abs cause paraneoplastic Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) by reduction of presynaptic VGCCs (Titulaer et al., 2011). In the domain of CNS disease, VGCC abs have been found in association with paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia (Mason et al., 1997) and rarely and at low titres also in other paraneoplastic encephalopathies together with Hu abs (Lennon et al., 1995). It has been a long-standing debate if abs in paraneoplastic conditions associate rather with the neurological syndrome or the tumour. Here, we describe the conjoint occurrence of abs to the GABAB receptor and to the VGCC in a patient with SCLC presenting only symptoms of the peripheral nervous system giving another example of the latter hypothesis. PMID:24929678

  1. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: the lack of short-term in vitro effects of serum factors on neuromuscular transmission.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y I; Sanders, D B; Johns, T R; Phillips, L H; Smith, R E

    1988-10-01

    Serum was obtained from 7 patients with the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LES), 3 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL), and 9 healthy control subjects. Serum samples were applied in vitro to the rat neuromuscular junction (for 1-3 h for control LES sera; 4 h for SCCL sera), following which the pre- and postjunctional physiological effects of serum factors were studied in the presence of 10 mM [Mg2+]o. All sera produced a marked reduction in the frequency of spontaneous miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs), while causing slight to moderate changes in MEPP amplitude. There were no consistent changes in the quantum content of the impulse-evoked end-plate potentials, though the serum from one LES patient significantly and reversibly inhibited the evoked quantal release. No significant effect was found when a human intercostal muscle was exposed to serum from another LES patient for 2 h. Therefore, when applied in vitro on a short-term basis, the putative LES autoantibodies do not consistently react with voltage-dependent calcium channels in the motor nerve terminal and thus fail to reproduce the physiologic abnormality of the syndrome. We suggest that the pathogenic IgG molecules may require more than 3h of incubation in order to gain access to, and inhibit the function of, the prejunctional Ca2+ channels.

  2. The "harlequin" sign and congenital Horner's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D A; Bibby, K; Woodruff, G

    1997-01-01

    When trying to establish the likely anatomical site (preganglionic or postganglionic) of a lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome, the distribution of facial flushing (the "harlequin" sign), may be seen. In babies and young children, facial flushing is a relatively simple clinical sign to demonstrate, compared with facial sweating. In unilateral facial flushing the areas that do not flush are almost always identical to the anhidrotic areas. However, neither facial flushing nor testing the pupil reactions with pholedrine or hydroxyamphetamine can be relied on to predict the probable site of any lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome. Two patients with congenital Horner's syndrome are presented which demonstrated the "harlequin" sign and in whom clinical examination and pharmacological testing gave conflicting evidence for localisation of the site of the causative lesion. The presentation of congenital Horner's syndrome should be investigated and include MRI or CT to exclude a serious underlying cause. Images PMID:9219751

  3. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  4. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in a 13-year-old girl with Xp11.22-p11.23 duplication.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Sabine; Vanakker, Olivier; Mercelis, Rudy; Lipka, A F; Haerynck, Filomeen; Dullaers, Melissa; Verloo, Patrick; Van Coster, Rudy; Verhelst, Helene

    2014-05-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is an autoimmune disease of the presynaptic neuromuscular junction, typically occurring in adults as a paraneoplastic syndrome. Only rare cases have been reported in childhood. In most childhood cases, malignancies have not been detected but a propensity to autoimmune disease was noticed. Nevertheless, little is known about genetic factors that may contribute to the susceptibility of an individual to develop LEMS. We report on a 13-year-old girl, known with the Xp11.22-p11.23 duplication syndrome, who presented with severe non-paraneoplastic LEMS. The potential role of this microduplication syndrome in the development of LEMS is explored. Previous literature review of twelve Xp11.2 duplication syndrome patients showed that three of them suffered from various autoimmune diseases. The common duplicated region in those three patients and the presented case comprises 12 disease-associated genes including the FOXP3 (Forkhead Box P3) and WAS (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome) gene, both implicated in immune function. However, it is unclear whether increased gene dosage of one or both of these genes can cause susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. In conclusion, the presented case emphasizes that autoimmune disease is a recurrent feature of the Xp11.2 duplication syndrome, which should be considered in the follow-up of these patients. The exact mechanism underlying this autoimmune propensity remains to be elucidated.

  5. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Donders, Jacobus; Mullarkey, Sr Kathryn; Allchin, Joel

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with bilateral congenital perisylvian syndrome as evidenced by polymicrogyria in the left and right frontotemporal regions, pseudobulbar paresis, seizures, and spastic diplegia. This is the first description of comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in a child with this syndrome. The results reflect significant impairments in auditory processing and independent learning and retention, but relatively preserved cognitive performance on interactive tasks involving frequent feedback and redirection. The findings are interpreted in the context of the neuropathology of this syndrome, with an emphasis on pragmatic implications for rehabilitation. PMID:18618376

  6. Handicapping Conditions Associated with the Congenital Rubella Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, McCay; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence of impairments diagnosed among children with congenital rubella syndrome. Approximately 73 percent are hearing impaired, at least 35 percent have congenital heart disorders, and 33 percent have visual defects. (Author)

  7. Congenital camptodactyly associated with the 48,XXYY syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bosch, A M; Hack, W W; Schrander-Stumpel, C T

    1998-01-01

    A male premature infant presented with slow development and congenital camptodactyly of both hands. Chromosome analysis showed a 48,XXYY karyotype. As far as we know, this is the first report describing congenital camptodactyly associated with the 48,XXYY syndrome.

  8. Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome – Finish Type

    PubMed Central

    Spahiu, Lidvana; Merovci, Besart; Jashari, Haki; Këpuska, Arbnore Batalli; Rugova, Blerta Elezi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Identification of the NPHS1 gene, which encodes nephrin, was followed by many studies demonstrating its mutation as a frequent cause of congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS). While this gene is found in 98% of Finnish children with this syndrome, non-Finnish cases have lower level of incidence ranging from 39 to 80%. Case report: This report describes the clinical presentation of a two-week-old neonate who presented with periorbital and lower extremities edema, abdominal distention, heavy proteinuria, serum hypoproteinemia and failure to thrive. Genetic analysis revealed NHPS1 gene mutation leading to CNS-Finnish type diagnosis. Conclusion: Through this case we want to create awareness about diagnosis and treatment challenges in developing countries for rare congenital diseases. PMID:27594755

  9. Congenital Syndromes and Mildly Handicapped Students: Implications for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra M.

    1989-01-01

    Many learning disabilities or cases of mild retardation are due to medically diagnosable, congenital syndromes, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, sex chromosome abnormalities, multiple anomaly syndromes, phenylketonuria, and Tourette Syndrome. These syndromes are discussed, and suggestions are given for special education management. (Author/JDD)

  10. Congenital cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bondy, Carolyn A

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS), or monosomy X, occurs in approximately 1/2000 live born females. Intelligence is normal and short stature is the most obvious and consistent feature of the syndrome. Congenital cardiovascular disease affects approximately 50% of individuals and is the major cause of premature mortality in adults. Unfortunately, this most important aspect of the syndrome has received little attention outside of pediatric medicine, and adult cardiological follow-up is seriously lacking. This review describes the spectrum of cardiovascular defects with particular attention to identifying risk factors for aortic dissection/rupture. X-chromosome genetic pathways implicated in Turner cardiovascular disease, including premature coronary artery disease, are discussed. Recent guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of girls and women with TS are reviewed.

  11. Phoneutria nigriventer omega-Phonetoxin IIA: a new tool for anti-calcium channel autoantibody assays in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin-Moutot, Nicole; Haro, Luc de; Santos, Raquel Gouvea Dos; Mori, Yasuo; Seagar, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a neurological autoimmune disease in which downregulation of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) leads to reduced acetylcholine release from motoneuron terminals. 70% of cases are paraneoplastic and rapid diagnosis of LEMS can result in early detection of the underlying tumor. Serological assays based on the capacity of autoantibodies to precipitate VGCCs labeled with radioligands provide valuable data. We have established a novel assay using the spider venom peptide 125I-omega-Phonetoxin IIA (125I-omegaPtxIIA). 125I-omegaPtxIIA labeled recombinant Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 channels and endogenous VGCCs in rat brain membranes. Autoantibodies that immunoprecipitate a 125I-omegaPtxIIA/channel complex were detected in 26/31 (84%) LEMS patients. The patients that were seropositive in the 125I-omegaPtxIIA assay corresponded precisely to the population that was positive for Cav2.1 and/or Cav2.2 antibodies detected using two different omega-conotoxins. Thus, the 125I-omegaPtxIIA assay detects a broader spectrum of autoantibody specificities than current omega-conotoxin-based assays.

  12. Congenital varicella syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ki Hoon; Park, Yun-Jung; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji-Sung; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-07-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a teratogen that can cross the placenta and cause the congenital varicella syndrome (CVS), which is characterised by multi-system anomalies. There have been 130 reported cases of CVS from 1947 to 2013. The estimated incidence of CVS was 0.59% and 0.84% for women infected with VZV during the entire pregnancy and for those infected the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, respectively. Nine cases were reported at 21-27 weeks of gestation and one case was identified at 36 weeks. Herpes zoster caused CVS in two cases. Regarding treatment, varicella zoster immunoglobulin treatment, irrespective of gestational age, should be considered in addition to antiviral drugs for women who have been exposed to or infected with virus. PMID:26965725

  13. Airway obstruction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, Alexandra K; Mosquera, Ricardo; Colasurdo, Giuseppe N; Jon, Cindy K; Clements, Roya M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is the failure of the autonomic system to control adequate ventilation while asleep with preserved ventilatory response while awake. We report a case of a patient with CCHS who presented with intrathoracic and extrathoracic airway obstruction after tracheostomy tube decannulation and phrenic nerve pacer placement. Nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) revealed hypoxia, hypercapnia and obstructive sleep apnoea, which required bilevel positive airway pressure titration. Airway endoscopy demonstrated tracheomalacia and paretic true vocal cords in the paramedian position during diaphragmatic pacing. Laryngeal electromyography demonstrated muscular electrical impulses that correlated with diaphragmatic pacer settings. Thus, we surmise that the patient's upper and lower airway obstruction was secondary to diaphragmatic pacer activity. Thorough airway evaluation, including NPSG and endoscopy, may help identify the side effects of diaphragmatic pacing, such as airway obstruction, in patients with CCHS.

  14. Congenital rubella syndrome with positive serology and virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Ooi, H L; Cheong, S M; Yogeswery, S; Norizah, I; Zuridah, H; Kumarasamy, V; Chua, K B

    2006-06-01

    An effective live attenuated rubella vaccine was available since 1969 and congenital rubella syndrome can be prevented with appropriate vaccination. We report a baby with congenital rubella syndrome born in Klang valley to indicate that the Universal Rubella Vaccination Programme adopted by the Ministry of Health Malaysia since 2002 has yet to achieve its effect of eliminating transmission of rubella and preventing congenital rubella infection in the community. To our knowledge, the virus isolate represents the first successful isolation of rubella virus in this country and will serve as the reference strain for future comparison in molecular epidemiological tracking of rubella virus activity this country.

  15. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel T; Robson, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:25573243

  16. Peripheral chemoreceptors in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perez, Iris A; Keens, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome is a rare disorder caused by a mutation in the PHOX2B gene resulting in hypoventilation that is worse during sleep. Human physiologic studies show that patients with CCHS have absent or decreased rebreathing ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxemia during sleep as well as during wakefulness. Some ventilatory responses to hypoxia and hyperoxia can be demonstrated using a step change in inspired oxygen. However, these suggest that both central and peripheral chemoreceptor functions are generally defective in all states in children with CCHS. The defect in CCHS may lie in central nervous system pathways regulating ventilation, whose development and function are controlled by PHOX2B. Moreover, the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) may be the major defect in CCHS, where central and peripheral inputs converge. Human physiological studies predicted that the defect in CCHS lies in central integration of the central and peripheral chemoreceptor signals. New evidence suggests the RTN may be the respiratory controller where chemoreceptor inputs are integrated. In this review we present the clinical presentation of CCHS, revisit results of human physiologic studies, and discuss the findings in light of new knowledge about the role of PHOX2B and RTN in CCHS.

  17. A case of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Wagatsuma, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Miho; Kurosawa, Shin; Saito, Koji; Hoshi, Kunihiko

    2012-12-01

    We encountered a 2-year-old female infant with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) who underwent an abdominal operation for strangulated ileus. Prior to the surgery, at home, the infant had been receiving non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) support only during sleep. However, after postoperative extubation, the blood oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) decreased to approximately 90 % with NPPV during sleep alone, necessitating the use of biphasic cuirass ventilation (BCV) along with NPPV for 2 days. The infant was weaned from the BCV on hospital day 9, and was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) on hospital day 13. Although it has been said that CCHS is not under the control of the respiratory center, there are no reports of the true CO(2) response curves in these patients. Therefore, during respiratory management in the ICU post-surgery, we examined (with the consent of the mother) the relationship of the end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2)) to the tidal volume and respiratory rate, for a period of 6 min in the absence of sedation, using a respiratory profile monitor. Electrocardiographic and SpO(2) monitoring was also conducted at the same time, to ensure the patient's safety. In this patient, while the ETCO(2) increased, the tidal volume and respiratory rate remained unchanged. No relationship was found between the tidal volume and the respiratory rate. Various modalities have been used for the treatment of CCHS (tracheotomy, NPPV, and diaphragmatic pacing). Treatment of these patients in the ICU should be tailored to the needs of individual patients and their families. PMID:22790414

  18. Diaphragm pacers as a treatment for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Maida Lynn; Tablizo, Mary Anne; Kun, Sheila; Keens, Thomas G

    2005-09-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome is a rare syndrome present from birth, and is defined as the failure of automatic control of breathing. All patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome require life-long ventilatory support during sleep, although approximately a third of patients require ventilatory support 24 h per day. Diaphragm pacers offer a modality of ventilatory support that affords congenital central hypoventilation syndrome patients with maximal mobility for full-time ventilatory patients, and they may allow for a more normal lifestyle in the appropriate patient. They may permit tracheostomy decannulation in those requiring only support during sleep. Diaphragm pacing entails surgical placement of an electrode onto the phrenic nerve, connected to a subcutaneous receiver. There is an external battery-operated transmitter and antenna placed on the skin over the receiver. The transmitter emits energy, similar to radio transmission, which is converted into an electrical current by the receiver. This stimulates the phrenic nerve resulting in a diaphragmatic contraction. Settings on the transmitter include respiratory rate and electrical voltage, and are adjusted to give enough tidal volume to allow for adequate oxygenation and ventilation. Therefore, diaphragm pacing is an attractive alternative mode of mechanically assisted ventilation for many patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

  19. Congenital rubella syndrome: a matter of concern.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Castillo-Solórzano, Carlos; Torner, Nuria; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-03-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), an important cause of severe birth defects, remains a public health problem in a significant number of countries. Therefore, global health experts encourage use of rubella vaccination, with the primary aim of preventing CRS. While large-scale rubella vaccination during the last decade has drastically reduced or eliminated both the virus and CRS in Europe and the Americas, many countries in Africa, South-East Asia, the Eastern Mediterranean, and the Western Pacific have not yet incorporated any type of rubella-containing vaccine into their immunization schedule. As a result, through travel and migration, rubella has been imported into countries that had successfully eliminated the virus, leading to outbreaks and the reestablishment of endemic transmission. The objective of this study was to identify the key factors required for CRS elimination (prevalence reduction, vaccination strategies, and surveillance methods) by reviewing publications in PubMed on rubella and CRS (systematic reviews, country experiences, and position papers from the World Health Organization (WHO) and other intergovernmental organizations). Based on the results of the review, to eliminate rubella and CRS in endemic areas and reduce re-emergence in previously disease-free areas, all countries should carry out two types of mass rubella vaccination campaigns: 1) one single mass national immunization campaign targeting all men and women 5-39+ years old (with the upper age limit depending on the year in which the rubella-containing vaccine was introduced and the epidemiology of rubella in the country) and 2) incorporation of an rubella-containing vaccine in routine childhood immunization programs, including regular vaccination campaigns for 12-month-olds and measles follow-up campaigns. In addition to mass rubella immunization campaigns and routine childhood vaccination programs, the following measures should be taken to help fight rubella and CRS: 1) surveillance

  20. PHACE syndrome associated with congenital oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Ramesh; Naik, Milind N; Desai, Savari; Honavar, Santosh G

    2009-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a multisystem disorder presenting with facial hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, posterior fossa malformations and eye abnormalities. The eye abnormalities include microphthalmos, cataracts, optic atrophy and iris hypoplasia. Amongst the neurological anomalies, posterior fossa malformations are common. Fourth nerve palsy has been reported with PHACE syndrome. We report a child presenting with a triad of congenital third nerve palsy, cerebellar hypoplasia and facial capillary hemangioma.

  1. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  2. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  3. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and sudden infant death syndrome: disorders of autonomic regulation.

    PubMed

    Rand, Casey M; Patwari, Pallavi P; Carroll, Michael S; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2013-03-01

    Long considered a rare and unique disorder of respiratory control, congenital central hypoventilation syndrome has recently been further distinguished as a disorder of autonomic regulation. Similarly, more recent evidence suggests that sudden infant death syndrome is also a disorder of autonomic regulation. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome typically presents in the newborn period with alveolar hypoventilation, symptoms of autonomic dysregulation and, in a subset of cases, Hirschsprung disease or tumors of neural crest origin or both. Genetic investigation identified PHOX2B, a crucial gene during early autonomic development, as disease defining for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Although sudden infant death syndrome is most likely defined by complex multifactorial genetic and environmental interactions, it is also thought to result from central deficits in the control of breathing and autonomic regulation. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of these autonomic disorders and discuss the influence of this information on clinical practice and future research directions. PMID:23465774

  4. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the individuals diagnosed with LEMS also develop small cell lung cancer. LEMS may appear up to 3 years before cancer is diagnosed. Is there any treatment? There is no cure for LEMS. Treatment is directed at decreasing the ...

  5. Pseudoacromegaly in congenital generalised lipodystrophy (Berardinelli-Seip syndrome).

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Datta, Saumik; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoacromegaly, or acromegaloidism, is characterised by a clinical appearance mimicking acromegaly in the absence of documented hypersomatotropism or past exposure to excess growth hormone. It can develop secondary to a number of congenital and acquired conditions of which severe insulin resistance is an important example. Lipodystrophy syndromes are a group of rare disorders of which autosomal recessive congenital generalised lipodystrophy is the most common type. Patients with this disorder are predisposed to insulin resistance and its associated complications such as diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridaemia, fatty liver, polycystic ovaries and acanthosis nigricans. Elevated circulating insulin levels in these patients rarely can give rise to soft tissue and bony overgrowth, with resultant acromegaloidism. We report an adolescent girl presenting with unusual prominence of her hands and feet; a thorough evaluation ultimately revealed a diagnosis of congenital generalised lipodystrophy. PMID:27068725

  6. Congenital rubella syndrome: ophthalmic manifestations and associated systemic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Givens, K T; Lee, D A; Jones, T; Ilstrup, D M

    1993-01-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome has a wide variety of severe ophthalmic and systemic complications. A worldwide rubella epidemic from 1963 to 1965 affected thousands of infants. This is a 20 year follow up study of patients with congenital rubella syndrome analysing the prevalence of ophthalmic disorders, associated systemic problems, and correlations among these defects. The authors statistically analysed 125 cases of congenital rubella seen in the Mayo clinic ophthalmology department over a 32 year interval. Most patients were young adults. Ocular disease was the most commonly noted disorder (78%), followed by sensorineural hearing deficits (66%), psychomotor retardation (62%), cardiac abnormalities (58%), and mental retardation (42%). Multiorgan disease was typical (88%). Ocular disease and hearing loss were frequently associated (53% had both) but not significantly correlated. A similar association existed between ocular and cardiac disease. Cataracts and microphthalmia were significantly correlated with poor visual acuity (each p < 0.0001). Glaucoma was significantly correlated with cataracts (p = 0.0002) and microphthalmia (p = 0.0024) but not poor visual acuity. Four patients with microphthalmia developed late onset glaucoma. No significant association was found between gestational age at time of maternal infection and the incidence of individual ocular conditions. However, several cardiac disorders were significantly associated with gestational age. Although new cases of congenital rubella are rare, surviving victims continue to challenge the ophthalmic and medical communities with a wide range of ocular and systemic disorders. PMID:8318483

  7. Genetics Home Reference: congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Group. Nephrotic syndrome in the first year of life: two thirds of cases are caused by mutations in 4 genes (NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1, and LAMB2). Pediatrics. 2007 Apr;119(4):e907-19. Epub 2007 Mar 19. Citation on PubMed Machuca E, Benoit G, ...

  8. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  9. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, U. D.; Adhikari, S.

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS). Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them. PMID:26635984

  10. Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome: A rare congenital disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Vinay; Gupta, Mudita; Prashar, Aditi

    2012-01-01

    Keratitis-Icthyosis-Deafness syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by keratitis, ichthyosis, and deafness. We report a 13 year old female child who presented with diffuse alopecia of the scalp and body. There was erythrokeratoderma of face and discrete hyperkeratotic hyperpigmented papulo plaque lesions on the body. Patient also had reticulate hyperkeratosis of palms and soles. There was history of recurrent episodes of folliculitis over the scalp and body. There was no evidence of any malignancy. Eye involvement in the form of bilateral vascularising keratitis was present. There was bilateral mixed hearing loss. PMID:23130264

  11. [Accelerated rubella control and the prevention of congenital rubella syndrome].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Solórzano, Carlos; de Quadros, Ciro A

    2002-04-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and with high costs. Today, as a result of improved vaccination and epidemiological surveillance efforts directed at eradicating measles from the Western Hemisphere, there has been a notable increase in the ability to detect, prevent, and control rubella and CRS. The importance of these measures is undeniable, and this piece examines the components that are essential in moving ahead to reduce these major public health problems in Latin America and the Caribbean. One step in that direction would be to integrate the surveillance of measles with that of rubella and CRS.

  12. Congenital Zika syndrome with arthrogryposis: retrospective case series study

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Epitacio Leite Rolim; Lins, Otavio Gomes; Aragão, Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco; Brainer-Lima, Alessandra Mertens; Cruz, Danielle Di Cavalcanti Sousa; Rocha, Maria Angela Wanderley; Sobral da Silva, Paula Fabiana; Carvalho, Maria Durce Costa Gomes; do Amaral, Fernando José; Gomes, Joelma Arruda; Ribeiro de Medeiros, Igor Colaço; Ventura, Camila V; Ramos, Regina Coeli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical, radiological, and electromyographic features in a series of children with joint contractures (arthrogryposis) associated with congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus. Design Retrospective case series study. Setting Association for Assistance of Disabled Children, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Participants Seven children with arthrogryposis and a diagnosis of congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus during the Brazilian microcephaly epidemic. Main outcome measures Main clinical, radiological, and electromyographic findings, and likely correlation between clinical and primary neurological abnormalities. Results The brain images of all seven children were characteristic of congenital infection and arthrogryposis. Two children tested positive for IgM to Zika virus in the cerebrospinal fluid. Arthrogryposis was present in the arms and legs of six children (86%) and the legs of one child (14%). Hip radiographs showed bilateral dislocation in seven children, subluxation of the knee associated with genu valgus in three children (43%), which was bilateral in two (29%). All the children underwent high definition ultrasonography of the joints, and there was no evidence of abnormalities. Moderate signs of remodeling of the motor units and a reduced recruitment pattern were found on needle electromyography (monopolar). Five of the children underwent brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the remaining two CT only. All presented malformations of cortical development, calcifications predominantly in the cortex and subcortical white matter (especially in the junction between the cortex and white matter), reduction in brain volume, ventriculomegaly, and hypoplasia of the brainstem and cerebellum. MRI of the spine in four children showed apparent thinning of the cord and reduced ventral roots. Conclusions Congenital Zika syndrome should be added to the differential diagnosis of congenital

  13. Severe congenital thrombocytopaenia – first clinical manifestation of Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Aguilar, Sara; Prado, Sara Noéme; Palaré, Maria João; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela

    2012-01-01

    This report focuses on a male infant, the first born of non-consanguineous parents diagnosed with polyhydramnios at 26 weeks of gestation. The newborn was admitted during the neonatal period with bleeding diathesis associated with a low platelet count at birth (5×109/l).The authors registered a persistent low platelet count (9000–129 000/l) during the infants 1st year of life. Physical examination revealed a petechial rash, a dysmorphic face and bilateral cryptorchidism, in the absence of organomegaly. Additionally, cardiologic evaluation revealed an aortic valve dysplasia and an atrial septal defect, while bone marrow biopsy and aspiration were found normal. Throughout the investigation, the authors excluded congenital infection, alloimmune and familiar thrombocytopaenia, Fanconi anaemia and thrombocytopaenia absent radius syndrome. The cytogenetic analysis revealed a mutation in the PTPN11 gene associated with Noonan syndrome. Here the author highlights that severe neonatal thrombocytopaenia is a manifestation that should be considered in the diagnosis and clinical management of Noonan’s syndrome. PMID:22605701

  14. Recurrent Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, I.C.; Ko, S.F.; Shieh, C.S.; Huang, C.F.; Chien, S.J.; Liang, C.D.

    2006-10-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) includes a group of connective tissue disorders with abnormal collagen metabolism and a diverse clinical spectrum. We report two siblings with EDS who both presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The elder sister suffered from recurrent diaphragmatic hernia twice and EDS was overlooked initially. Echocardiography as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed dilatation of the pulmonary artery, and marked elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and its branches. A diagnosis of EDS was eventually established when these findings were coupled with the clinical features of hyperelastic skin. Her younger brother also had similar features. This report emphasizes that EDS may present as CDH in a small child which could easily be overlooked. Without appropriate surgery, diaphragmatic hernia might occur. Echocardiographic screening is recommended in patients with CDH. Contrast-enhanced MRA can be helpful in delineation of abnormally tortuous aortic great vessels that are an important clue to the early diagnosis of EDS.

  15. Mutations in Fibrillin-1 Cause Congenital Scleroderma: Stiff Skin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Loeys, B.L.; Gerber, E.E.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Iqbal, S.; Whiteman, P.; McConnell, V.; Chillakuri, C.R.; Macaya, D.; Coucke, P.J.; De Paepe, A.; Judge, D.P.; Wigley, F.; Davis, E.C.; Mardon, H.J.; Handford, P.; Keene, D.R.; Sakai, L.Y.; Dietz, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    The predisposition for scleroderma, defined as fibrosis and hardening of the skin, is poorly understood. We report that stiff skin syndrome (SSS), an autosomal dominant congenital form of scleroderma, is caused by mutations in the sole Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence-encoding domain of fibrillin-1 that mediates integrin binding. Ordered polymers of fibrillin-1 (termed microfibrils) initiate elastic fiber assembly and bind to and regulate the activation of the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). Altered cell-matrix interactions in SSS accompany excessive microfibrillar deposition, impaired elastogenesis, and increased TGFβ concentration and signaling in the dermis. The observation of similar findings in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a more common acquired form of scleroderma, suggests broad pathogenic relevance. PMID:20375004

  16. Respiratory and autonomic dysfunction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, Jose J

    2016-08-01

    The developmental lineage of the PHOX2B-expressing neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) has been extensively studied. These cells are thought to function as central respiratory chemoreceptors, i.e., the mechanism by which brain Pco2 regulates breathing. The molecular and cellular basis of central respiratory chemoreception is based on the detection of CO2 via intrinsic proton receptors (TASK-2, GPR4) as well as synaptic input from peripheral chemoreceptors and other brain regions. Murine models of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome designed with PHOX2B mutations have suggested RTN neuron agenesis. In this review, we examine, through human and experimental animal models, how a restricted number of neurons that express the transcription factor PHOX2B play a crucial role in the control of breathing and autonomic regulation. PMID:27226447

  17. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome: further delineation and genetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Vuopala, K; Herva, R

    1994-01-01

    In a national morphology based study of lethal arthrogryposis between 1979 and 1992, 40 fetuses and infants with lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS, McKusick 253310) were found in Finland. The incidence of LCCS in Finland was 1:19,000 births. There were 20 affected males and 20 affected females in 26 families. In 16 cases the pregnancy was terminated after the prenatal diagnosis of total akinesia and fetal hydrops on ultrasound. There were 19 stillborn infants and five were born showing signs of life, but died within one hour. The segregation analyses yielded 0.45 affected by the "singles" method and 0.34 by the "sib" method. The birthplaces of the grandparents were located in the sparsely populated north east of Finland. This finding supports the existence of an autosomal recessive LCCS gene in Finland, particularly in the north eastern part. Images PMID:7966188

  18. Diclazuril Protects against Maternal Gastrointestinal Syndrome and Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S.; Tobin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmosis is a common cause of foodborne, gastrointestinal and congenital syndrome with particularly severe or unknown health consequences. There is no safe and effective preventive or therapeutic modality against congenital toxoplasmosis or to eliminate the persistent chronic infection. Hypothesis Diclazuril to be safe in pregnancy and effective against gastrointestinal toxoplasmosis. Methods CD1 programmed pregnant mice were divided into groups and administered a diet containing diclazuril, or sham control. Treatments were initiated on Day 5 of pregnancy and continued until Day 16 when dams were euthanatized. On Day 8 of pregnancy dams were infected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of tachyzoites (0, 100, 300, 600) from Type II strain. Dams were monitored daily for distress, pain, and abortion and samples collected at the end of the experiments. Results Infected dams developed moderate to severe Toxoplasma related complications in tachyzoites dose dependent manner. Animals became anemic and showed hydrothorax, and ascities. Diclazuril effectively protected dams from ascities and anemia (p < 0.05). Infected dams showed splenomegaly, with massive infiltration of epithelioid cells compared with the protective effect of diclazuril in treated animals. Infected dams exhibited severe hepatitis (score 0 to 4 scale = 3.5 ± 0.01) with influx of inflammatory and plasma cells, dysplastic hepatocytes, multinucleated giant cell transformation and hepatic cells necrosis. Diclazuril treatment significantly protected dams from hepatitis, also in tachyzoites dose (100, 300, 600) dependent manner (respectively infected-treated versus infected controls, p < 0.001, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). Colonic tissues were significantly shortened in length, with infiltration of lymphocytes, and macrophages and microabscess formations in the cryptic structures, with significant improvement in diclazuril treated animals. Additionally, the number of fetuses, fetal length and

  19. Congenital Deafness with Cardiac Arrhythmias: The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Richard A.; Macdonald, Dick, II

    1980-01-01

    The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, affecting 0.3 percent of congenitally deaf persons, consists of severe cardiac arrhythmias and sensorineural hearing loss. The authors recommend that every congenitally deaf child with suspicious symptoms receive an electrocardiogram and that professionals who work with deaf children not only inform…

  20. Overview of Usher's Syndrome: Congenital Deafness and Progressive Loss of Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, McCay

    1974-01-01

    Usher's syndrome, a genetic condition causing congenital profound hearing loss and a progressive blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa, affects an estimated three to six percent of children in educational and rehabilitative programs for the hearing impaired. (Author)

  1. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vineet V.; Pritti, Kumari; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP). The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH. PMID:26751945

  2. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vineet V; Pritti, Kumari; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP). The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH.

  3. A Case of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Mimicking Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Kang, Mira; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon; Min, Yong-Ki; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is characterized by decreased adrenal hormone production due to enzymatic defects and subsequent rise of adrenocorticotrophic hormone that stimulates the adrenal cortex to become hyperplastic, and sometimes tumorous. As the pathophysiology is basically a defect in the biosynthesis of cortisol, one may not consider CAH in patients with hypercortisolism. We report a case of a 41-yr-old man with a 4 cm-sized left adrenal tumorous lesion mimicking Cushing's syndrome who was diagnosed with CAH. He had central obesity and acanthosis nigricans involving the axillae together with elevated 24-hr urine cortisol level, supporting the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. However, the 24-hr urine cortisol was suppressed by 95% with the low dose dexamethasone suppression test. CAH was suspected based on the history of precocious puberty, short stature and a profound suppression of cortisol production by dexamethasone. CAH was confirmed by a remarkably increased level of serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone level. Gene mutation analysis revealed a compound heterozygote mutation of CYP21A2 (I173N and R357W). PMID:23166432

  4. Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and congenital cataract: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fayol, Laurence; Garcia, Patricia; Denis, Danièle; Philip, Nicole; Simeoni, Umberto

    2006-04-01

    A female infant presented with Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), intrauterine growth retardation, severe cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, bilateral congenital cataract, and periventricular lesions. The here-reported association of bilateral congenital cataract with AOS is original. Adams-Oliver syndrome is a genetic defect that causes a vasculopathy and leads to a variety of phenotypes. This observation further supports the current understanding of the physiopathology of AOS. PMID:16586236

  5. The spectrum of congenital heart diseases in down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morsy, Mohamed M.; Algrigri, Osama O.; Salem, Sherif S.; Abosedera, Mostafa M.; Abutaleb, Ashraf R.; Al-Harbi, Khaled M.; Al-Mozainy, Ibrahim S.; Alnajjar, Abdulhameed A.; Habeb, Abdelhadi M.; Abo-Haded, Hany M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To to define the frequency and patterns of congenital heart disease (CHD) among children with Down syndrome (DS) in Northwest Saudi Arabia. Methods: We included children with confirmed DS referred to the regional pediatric cardiology unit in Madinah Maternity and Children Hospital between January 2008 and December 2013. Children were identified from the unit’s data-base and the charts were reviewed retrospectively. We excluded term and preterm children with patent ducts arteriosus (PDA) and persistent foramen oval spontaneously resolved during the first 4 weeks of life. Results: A total of 302 children with DS were identified (50.3% male). Of these, 177 (58.6%) had CHD. Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) was the most frequent lesion identified in 72/177 (40.7%) followed by mixed left to right shunt defects (14.7%) and secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) (11.8%). Ventricular septal defect was detected in 10.7% and 8.5% had PDA beyond the neonatal period. There was no gender difference in the frequency of CHD (p=0.9) and the presence of CHD was not related to the genetic cause of DS (p=0.9). Conclusion: The frequency of CHD in our DS cohort is comparable with Europe, Asia, and other KSA regions. However its pattern appears to be different from some areas in KSA. PMID:27381537

  6. Ethical considerations with the management of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Massie, John; Gillam, Lynn

    2015-05-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a well-recognized disorder of the autonomic nervous system caused by mutations in the PHOX2B gene. The most characteristic feature is failure of ventilatory control, resulting in the need for respiratory support while asleep, and in some cases when awake also. Most cases present in infancy or early childhood. Technological advances allow patients with mild to moderate phenotypesto receive adequate support by non-invasive ventilation (NIV), or diaphragm pacing (or combination of the two) avoiding the need for long-term ventilation by tracheostomy. Daytime functioning of patients with CCHS who require sleep-time ventilation only is expected to be good, with some additional surveillance to ensure they don't accidentally fall asleep without respiratory support available. Some children with CCHS have other complications, such as Hirschprung's disease, learning difficulties, and cardiac arrhythmias (leading in some instances to heart block and the requirement for a pacemaker). In a few cases, patients can develop neurogenic malignancies. Parents bear a significant burden for the care of their child with CCHS including provision of NIV at home, close monitoring, and regular surveillance for complications. Information about patients with CCHS comes from databases in the United States and Europe, but these don't include infants or children for whom ventilator support was not offered. In this paper we use a case study to explore the ethical issues of provision of treatment, or non-treatment, of children with CCHS.

  7. Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyun

    2015-12-01

    The proper development and coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are essential for normal reproductive competence. The key factor that regulates the function of the HPG axis is gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Timely release of GnRH is critical for the onset of puberty and subsequent sexual maturation. Misregulation in this system can result in delayed or absent puberty and infertility. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS) are genetic disorders that are rooted in a GnRH deficiency but often accompanied by a variety of non-reproductive phenotypes such as the loss of the sense of smell and defects of the skeleton, eye, ear, kidney, and heart. Recent progress in DNA sequencing technology has produced a wealth of information regarding the genetic makeup of CHH and KS patients and revealed the resilient yet complex nature of the human reproductive neuroendocrine system. Further research on the molecular basis of the disease and the diverse signal pathways involved will aid in improving the diagnosis, treatment, and management of CHH and KS patients as well as in developing more precise genetic screening and counseling regime.

  8. Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The proper development and coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are essential for normal reproductive competence. The key factor that regulates the function of the HPG axis is gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Timely release of GnRH is critical for the onset of puberty and subsequent sexual maturation. Misregulation in this system can result in delayed or absent puberty and infertility. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS) are genetic disorders that are rooted in a GnRH deficiency but often accompanied by a variety of non-reproductive phenotypes such as the loss of the sense of smell and defects of the skeleton, eye, ear, kidney, and heart. Recent progress in DNA sequencing technology has produced a wealth of information regarding the genetic makeup of CHH and KS patients and revealed the resilient yet complex nature of the human reproductive neuroendocrine system. Further research on the molecular basis of the disease and the diverse signal pathways involved will aid in improving the diagnosis, treatment, and management of CHH and KS patients as well as in developing more precise genetic screening and counseling regime. PMID:26790381

  9. Major congenital anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome: a EUROCAT population-based registry study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Budd, Judith; Dias, Carlos Matias; Gatt, Miriam; Klungsoyr, Kari; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Cath; Sipek, Antonin; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tucker, David; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed to determine if the introduction of these screening programs and the subsequent termination of prenatally detected pregnancies were associated with any decline in the prevalence of additional anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome. The study sample consisted of 7,044 live births and fetal deaths with Down syndrome registered in 28 European population-based congenital anomaly registries covering seven million births during 2000-2010. Overall, 43.6% (95% CI: 42.4-44.7%) of births with Down syndrome had a cardiac anomaly and 15.0% (14.2-15.8%) had a non-cardiac anomaly. Female babies with Down syndrome were significantly more likely to have a cardiac anomaly compared to male babies (47.6% compared with 40.4%, P < 0.001) and significantly less likely to have a non-cardiac anomaly (12.9% compared with 16.7%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of cardiac and non-cardiac congenital anomalies in babies with Down syndrome has remained constant, suggesting that population screening for Down syndrome and subsequent terminations has not influenced the prevalence of specific congenital anomalies in these babies.

  10. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a case of patau syndrome: a rare association.

    PubMed

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  11. Congenital stapes malformation: Rare conductive hearing loss in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Eliason, Michael; Conley, George S

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a known autosomal dominant cause of congenital hearing loss. It is characterized by a distinctive phenotypic appearance and often involves sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone abnormalities and inner ear dysmorphisms have been described in association with the disease. However, middle ear abnormalities as causes of conductive hearing loss are not typically seen in Waardenburg syndrome. We discuss a case of an 8-year-old female who meets diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome type 3 and who presented with a bilateral conductive hearing loss associated with congenital stapes fixation. We discuss management strategy in this previously unreported phenotype.

  12. Myasthenic decrement and myasthenic myopathy. A study on the effects of thymectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, P; Arrigo, A; Moglia, A

    1975-01-01

    Motor unit action potentials, M responses to repetitive nerve stimulation, and anticholinesterase tests were investigated in 12 myasthenic patients before and after thymectomy. In six of them the endarterial acetylcholine test was also carried out. Responsiveness to ACTH or to prednisone treatment was evaluated before and after thymectomy. The typical myasthenic presynaptic disorders were improved by thymectomy, while signs of myasthenic myopathy (according to Rowland's definition) were apparently increased. This process of 'functional myopathophanerosis' is discussed and explained in terms of a previous presynaptic disorder blocking the voluntary recruitment threshold of those motor units which are most affected at both presynaptic and postsynaptic level. Images PMID:168321

  13. [Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Kallmann syndrome in males].

    PubMed

    Ghervan, Cristina; Young, Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS) are a group of rare disorders responsible for complete or partial pubertal failure due to lack or insufficient secretion of the pituitary gonadotropins LH and FSH. The underlying neuroendocrine abnormalities are classically divided into two main groups: molecular defects of the gonadotrope cascade leading to isolated normosmic CHH (nCHH), and developmental abnormalities affecting the hypothalamic location of GnRH neurons, but also olfactory bulbs and tracts morphogenesis and responsible for KS. Identification of genetic abnormalities related to CHH/KS has provided major insights into the pathways critical for the development, maturation and function of the gonadotrope axis. In patients affected by nCHH, particularly in familial cases, genetic alterations affecting GnRH secretion (mutations in GNRH1, GPR54/KISS1R and TAC3 and TACR3) or the GnRH sensitivity of gonadotropic cells (GNRHR) have been found. Mutations in KAL1, FGFR1/FGF8/FGF17, PROK2/PROKR2, NELF, CHD7, HS6ST1, WDR11, SEMA3A, SOX10, IL17RD2, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 have been associated with KS but sometimes also with its milder hyposmic/normosmic CHH clinical variant. A number of observations, particularly in sporadic cases, suggest that CHH/KS is not always a monogenic mendelian disease as previously thought but rather a digenic or potentially oligogenic condition. Before the age of 18 years, the main differential diagnosis of isolated nCHH is the relatively frequent constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). However, in male patients with pubertal delay and low gonadotropin levels, the presence of micropenis and/or cryptorchidism argues strongly in favor of CHH and against CDGP. CHH/KS are not always congenital life-long disorders as initially thought, because in nearly 10 % of patients the disease seems not permanent, as evidenced by partial recovery of the pulsatile activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis

  14. Active surveillance for congenital rubella syndrome in Yangon, Myanmar.

    PubMed Central

    Thant, Kyaw-Zin; Oo, Win-Mar; Myint, Thein-Thein; Shwe, Than-Nu; Han, Aye-Maung; Aye, Khin-Mar; Aye, Kay-Thi; Moe, Kyaw; Thein, Soe; Robertson, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Rubella vaccine is not included in the immunization schedule in Myanmar. Although surveillance for outbreaks of measles and rubella is conducted nationwide, there is no routine surveillance for congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Therefore, we organized a study to assess the burden of CRS. METHODS: From 1 December 2000 to 31 December 2002 active surveillance for CRS was conducted among children aged 0-17 months at 13 hospitals and 2 private clinics in Yangon, the capital city. Children with suspected CRS had a standard examination and a blood sample was obtained. All serum samples were tested for rubella-specific IgM; selected samples were tested for rubella-specific IgG and for rubella RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). FINDINGS: A total of 81 children aged 0-17 months were suspected of having CRS. Of these, 18 children had laboratory-confirmed CRS (7 were IgM positive; 7 were RT-PCR positive; and 10 were IgG positive at > 6 months of age). One additional child who tested positive by RT-PCR and whose mother had had rubella during pregnancy but who had a normal clinical examination was classified as having congenital rubella infection. During 2001-02 no rubella outbreaks were detected in Yangon Division. In the 31 urban townships of Yangon Division, the annual incidence was 0.1 laboratory-confirmed cases of CRS per 1000 live births. CONCLUSION: This is the first population-based study of CRS incidence from a developing country during a rubella-endemic period; the incidence of CRS is similar to endemic rates found in industrialized countries during the pre-vaccine era. Rubella-specific IgG tests proved practical for diagnosing CRS in children aged > 6 months. This is one of the first studies to report on the use of rubella-specific RT-PCR directly on serum samples; further studies are warranted to confirm the utility of this method as an additional means of diagnosing CRS. PMID:16501710

  15. Bartter syndrome type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation.

    PubMed

    Westland, Rik; Hack, Wilfried W; van der Horst, Henricus J R; Uittenbogaard, Lukas B; van Hagen, Johanna M; van der Valk, Paul; Kamsteeg, Erik J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Wijk, Joanna A E

    2012-12-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2 years of life, known as classic Bartter syndrome. However, in rare cases Bartter syndrome Type III has an antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios, premature delivery and severe dehydration in the first weeks of life. Associations between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and Bartter syndrome are extremely rare. This case report presents a girl with Bartter syndrome Type III due to a homozygous CLCNKB mutation and bilateral congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. In addition, we describe the antenatal presentation as well as its perinatal management.

  16. Congenital and drug-induced long-QT syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wehrens, X.H.T.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    The congenital long-QT syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition characterised clinically by prolonged QT intervals, syncope and sudden cardiac death. The abnormally prolonged repolarisation is the result of mutations in genes encoding cardiac ion channels. The diagnosis of long-QT syndrome is based on clinical, electrocardiographic, and genetic criteria. Beta-blocking therapy is important in the treatment of long-QT syndrome, although pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) are useful in certain categories of patients. In the near future, mutation-specific treatment will probably become a novel approach to this potentially lethal syndrome. Drug-induced long-QT syndrome has been associated with silent mutations and common polymorphisms in potassium and sodium channel genes associated with congenital long-QT syndrome. Genetic screening for such mutations and polymorphisms may become an important instrument in preventing drug-induced 'torsades de pointes' arrhythmias in otherwise asymptomatic patients. PMID:25696318

  17. Craniorachischisis Totalis with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia-A Rare Presentation of Fryns Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aneet; Pilli, Ganga S; Bannur, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Here we describe the autopsy case findings of a 19-week male fetus, born out of a consanguineous marriage. The dissection revealed left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and shift of heart to the right side. In addition, anencephaly and spina bifida throughout the vertebral column were observed. All six criteria for Fryns syndrome were met. Such a presentation of Fryns syndrome associated with Craniorachischisis Totalis has not been reported so far. We have also tabulated the overlapping features of some multiple congenital anomaly syndromes that need to be distinguished at autopsy for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27064748

  18. Treacher Collins syndrome with multiple congenital heart defects after paroxetine exposure: case report.

    PubMed

    Dinlen, N; Zenciroğlu, A; Dilli, D; Aydin, B; Beken, S; Okumuş, N

    2014-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with an incidence of I in 40,000 to in 70,000 live births. It is characterized by abnormalities of the pinnae which are frequently associated with atresia of the external auditory canals and anomalies of the middle ear ossicles. Rarely congenital heart defects can be present. Prenatal paroxetine exposure may enhance the risks of major malformation, particularly cardiac defects. This article reports a newborn, whose mother used paroxetine during pregnancy, presenting with multiple congenital heart defects associated to typical physical characteristics of Treacher Collins syndrome.

  19. Parenting Styles and the Depressive Syndrome in Congenitally Blind Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Robert; West, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses the effect on congenitally blind children of three types of parents: those who are overprotective, those who push the child toward independence too soon, and those who are "good enough." (Author)

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension in a Patient With Congenital Heart Defects and Heterotaxy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Kramer, Jason; Jones, Brody; Keshmiri, Hesam; Dia, Muhyaldeen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heterotaxy syndrome, also called isomerism, is a condition in which abdominal and thoracic organs are located in abnormal body positions. Pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) is an uncommon clinical feature of heterotaxy syndrome. Case Report: We describe the case of a 26-year-old male who developed PHTN as a rare manifestation of heterotaxy syndrome. To our knowledge, PHTN has never been reported as a prominent clinical feature in a patient with heterotaxy syndome and congenital cardiac abnormalities. Conclusion: It is important for the clinician to be aware of potentially serious consequences of PHTN in the setting of heterotaxy syndrome.

  1. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is part of the new 15q24 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Backx, Liesbeth; Pijkels, Elly; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The recurrent microdeletion 15q24 syndrome is rare with only 5 cases reported thus far. Here we describe an additional patient with this deletion, presenting with many features common to this syndrome, including developmental delay, loose connective tissue, digital and genital anomalies and a distinct facial gestalt. Interestingly, in addition, this patient has a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia, as was described in one other patient with a 15q24 microdeletion, indicating that this feature might be part of the syndrome. Chromosome 15q24 has a highly polymorphic architecture that is prone to genomic rearrangements underlying this novel microdeletion syndrome.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension in a Patient With Congenital Heart Defects and Heterotaxy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Kramer, Jason; Jones, Brody; Keshmiri, Hesam; Dia, Muhyaldeen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heterotaxy syndrome, also called isomerism, is a condition in which abdominal and thoracic organs are located in abnormal body positions. Pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) is an uncommon clinical feature of heterotaxy syndrome. Case Report: We describe the case of a 26-year-old male who developed PHTN as a rare manifestation of heterotaxy syndrome. To our knowledge, PHTN has never been reported as a prominent clinical feature in a patient with heterotaxy syndome and congenital cardiac abnormalities. Conclusion: It is important for the clinician to be aware of potentially serious consequences of PHTN in the setting of heterotaxy syndrome. PMID:27660582

  3. FG syndrome, an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly syndrome: The clinical phenotype and an algorithm for diagnostic testing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robin Dawn; Graham, John M.; Friez, Michael J.; Hoo, Joe J.; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; McKeown, Carole; Moeschler, John B.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.; Battaglia, Agatino; Lyons, Michael J.; Stevenson, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    FG syndrome is a rare X-linked multiple congenital anomaly-cognitive impairment disorder caused by the p.R961W mutation in the MED12 gene. We identified all known patients with this mutation to delineate their clinical phenotype and devise a clinical algorithm to facilitate molecular diagnosis. We ascertained 23 males with the p.R961W mutation in MED12 from 9 previously reported FG syndrome families and 1 new family. Six patients are reviewed in detail. These 23 patients were compared with 48 MED12 mutation-negative patients, who had the clinical diagnosis of FG syndrome. Traits that best discriminated between these two groups were chosen to develop an algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity for the p.R961W MED12 mutation. FG syndrome has a recognizable dysmorphic phenotype with a high incidence of congenital anomalies. A family history of X-linked mental retardation, deceased male infants, and/or multiple fetal losses was documented in all families. The algorithm identifies the p.R961W MED12 mutation-positive group with 100% sensitivity and 90% spec-ificity. The clinical phenotype of FG syndrome defines a recognizable pattern of X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and cognitive impairment. This algorithm can assist the clinician in selecting the patients for testing who are most likely to have the recurrent p.R961W MED12 mutation. PMID:19938245

  4. Congenital scoliosis in Smith-Magenis syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian; Sheng, Lin

    2015-05-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex and rare congenital condition that is characterized by minor craniofacial anomalies, short stature, sleep disturbances, behavioral, and neurocognitive abnormalities, as well as variable multisystemic manifestations. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome.This study is to present a case of scoliosis occurring in the setting of SMS and explore the possible mechanisms between the 2 diseases.The patient is a 13-year-old Chinese female with congenital scoliosis and Tetralogy of Fallot, mental retardation, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertrophy of tonsil, conductive hearing loss, and agenesis of the epiglottis. An interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization at chromosome 17p11.2 revealed a heterozygous deletion, confirming a molecular diagnosis of SMS. She underwent a posterior correction at thoracic 1-lumbar 1 (T1-L1) levels, using the Moss-SI spinal system. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of correction.Congenital cardiac disease, immunodeficiency, and severe behavioral problems can affect the surgical outcome following spine fusion and need to be taken into consideration for the surgeon and anesthesiologist. Scoliosis is not uncommon among patients with SMS, and there is a potential association between congenital scoliosis and SMS. The potential mechanisms in the pathogenesis of congenital scoliosis of SMS included retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) microdeletion and RAI1 gene point mutation.

  5. Profuse congenital familial milia with absent dermatoglyphics (Basan's Syndrome): description of a new family.

    PubMed

    Luna, Paula Carolina; Larralde, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Milia are common, small, keratin-containing cysts frequently seen in all age groups. They may arise spontaneously or develop after a variety of stimuli. They can be found alone or as part of syndromes. We present a female neonate born not only with profuse facial milia, but also with acral bullae and absent dermatoglyphics. Similar features were seen in several members of her family. These findings correspond to the syndrome known as Basan's syndrome, a rare autosomal-dominant inherited dermatosis characterized by profuse congenital milia, transient neonatal acral bullae, and absence of dermatoglyphics.

  6. Evaluation of congenital dysautonomia other than Riley-Day syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, E; Ferrer, T; Pérez-Conde, C; López-Terradas, J M; Pérez-Jiménez, A; Ramos, M J

    1996-02-01

    We report on four children, from different families, who suffer from a congenital autonomic disorder, presumably inherited. Three of them have a sensory neuropathy but do not fit any described hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. All four were examined along with some of their immediate family members. We assessed the cardiovagal, sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic functions with a battery of non-invasive tests. Results demonstrated that sudomotor and cardiovascular orthostatic regulation exhibited the greatest abnormalities, pointing to a predominant impairment of sympathetic components, both cholinergic and adrenergic. The overall examination showed a heterogeneous group of congenital dysautonomia, exclusive of Riley-Day or other recognized hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. We emphasize the importance of studying whole family groups to diagnose subclinical impairment and to provide correct genetic counselling.

  7. Immunoglobulin G avidity in the serodiagnosis of congenital rubella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Herne, V; Hedman, K; Reedik, P

    1997-10-01

    The avidity of specific IgG was investigated in three infants with serologically verified congenital rubella infection. Two sera were taken from each infant: the first soon after birth and the second at the age of 23 to 31 months. Avidity of specific IgG was measured by a protein-denaturing enzyme immunoassay using urea as the elution factor, and avidity then determined by the end-point ratio (derived from antibody titration) and the avidity index methods. Rubella-specific IgM was present in the first sera of all patients, but not in the second sera. However, low avidity of specific IgG persisted in two children until age 23 to 31 months, as determined by the end-point ratio method. These data are in agreement with the findings of previous studies of avidity in congenital rubella, and show the usefulness of the protein-denaturing IgG-avidity assays employing the end-point ratio method for serological diagnosis of congenital rubella even after disappearance of specific IgM.

  8. Hirschsprung disease associated with polydactyly, unilateral renal agenesis, hypertelorism, and congenital deafness: a new autosomal recessive syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, H; Mateus, J; Leal, M J

    1988-01-01

    An association of Hirschsprung disease with polydactyly, unilateral renal agenesis, hypertelorism, and congenital deafness is described in sibs (brother and sister) of consanguineous parents. It is suggested that this might represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. Images PMID:3351909

  9. [A case of Möbius syndrome with congenital facial palsy and supranuclear oculomotor palsy].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Mitsuru; Mihara, Masahito; Kimura, Yasuyoshi; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takahashi, Masanori P; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man with congenital weakness in the facial and mastication muscles was referred to us. His facial senses were intact; however, the bilateral massetter and facial muscles were extremely weak and atrophic. He presented lagophthalmos and had difficulty in closing his mouth. The voluntary movements of his left eye, such as abduction, adduction, and elevation, were partially impaired, without the impairment of the Bell phenomenon. Nerve conduction studies of the facial nerves revealed normal distal latencies for bilateral orbicularis oculi. Blink reflexes were not evoked on both sides. Needle electromyography showed a chronic neurogenic change in the tongue. A biopsy of the biceps brachii and skin did not show abnormality. We diagnosed his condition as Möbius syndrome with congenital facial palsy and supranuclear oculomotor palsy. Möbius syndrome, which manifests itself as congenital and non-progressing facial and abducens palsy, is associated with many clinical symptoms and is probably heterogenous nosological entity. Although several cases of Möbius syndrome with supranuclear binocular elevation palsy were previously known, this is the first case of Möbius syndrome presenting supranuclear monocular elevation palsy. PMID:25904251

  10. Psychiatric manifestations of congenital rubella syndrome: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nidhi; Sen, Mahadev Singh; Jhanda, Soumya; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are known to have varied etiology. Among known etiologic causes, congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is reported to be one of the infections associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. CRS has been reported to be associated with large number of psychiatric manifestation. However, data from developing countries on psychiatric manifestations of CRS are nonexistent. In this report, we present the case of a 7-year-old boy, who presented with mental retardation, atypical autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Since birth, the child was found to have congenital cardiac defects and was found to have bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss since the age of 6 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multifocal symmetrical T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral hemisphere suggestive of sequelae of congenital rubella infection. PMID:27606025

  11. Down syndrome: Molecular mapping of the congenital heart disease and duodenal stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Korenburg, J.R. ); Bradley, C.; Disteche, C.M. )

    1992-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of congenital heart and gut disease and mental retardation. DS individuals also have characteristic facies, hands, and dermatoglyphics, in addition to abnormalities of the immune system, and increased risk of leukemia, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Although their molecular basis is unknown, recent work on patients with DS and partial duplications of chromosome 21 has suggested small chromosomal regions located in band q22 that are likely to contain the genes for some of these features. The authors now extend these analyses to define molecular markers for the congenital heart disease, the duodenal stenosis, and an 'overlap' region for the facial and some of the skeletal features. They report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular analysis of two patients. These studies provide the molecular basis for the construction of a DS phenotypic map and focus the search for genes responsible for the physical features, congenital heart disease, and duodenal stenosis of DS.

  12. Psychiatric manifestations of congenital rubella syndrome: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nidhi; Sen, Mahadev Singh; Jhanda, Soumya; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are known to have varied etiology. Among known etiologic causes, congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is reported to be one of the infections associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. CRS has been reported to be associated with large number of psychiatric manifestation. However, data from developing countries on psychiatric manifestations of CRS are nonexistent. In this report, we present the case of a 7-year-old boy, who presented with mental retardation, atypical autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Since birth, the child was found to have congenital cardiac defects and was found to have bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss since the age of 6 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multifocal symmetrical T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral hemisphere suggestive of sequelae of congenital rubella infection. PMID:27606025

  13. Genotype-phenotype correlation of congenital anomalies in multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizures syndrome (MCAHS1)/PIGN-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Leah; Lemmon, Monica; Beck, Natalie; Johnson, Maria; Mu, Weiyi; Murdock, David; Bodurtha, Joann; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Cohn, Ronald; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Barañano, Kristin; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PIGN, resulting in multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency, have been published in four families to date. We report four patients from three unrelated families with epilepsy and hypotonia in whom whole exome sequencing yielded compound heterozygous variants in PIGN. As with previous reports Patients 1 and 2 (full siblings) have severe global developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and minor dysmorphic features, including high palate, bitemporal narrowing, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia; Patient 3 had early global developmental delay with later progressive spastic quadriparesis, intellectual disability, and intractable generalized epilepsy; Patient 4 had bilateral narrowing as well but differed by the presence of hypertelorism, markedly narrow palpebral fissures, and long philtrum, had small distal phalanges of fingers 2, 3, and 4, absent distal phalanx of finger 5 and similar toe anomalies, underdeveloped nails, unusual brain anomalies, and a more severe early clinical course. These patients expand the known clinical spectrum of the disease. The severity of the presentations in conjunction with the patients' mutations suggest a genotype-phenotype correlation in which congenital anomalies are only seen in patients with biallelic loss-of-function. In addition, PIGN mutations appear to be panethnic and may be an underappreciated cause of epilepsy.

  14. Genotype–Phenotype Correlation of Congenital Anomalies in Multiple Congenital Anomalies Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome (MCAHS1)/ PIGN-Related Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Leah; Lemmon, Monica; Beck, Natalie; Johnson, Maria; Mu, Weiyi; Murdock, David; Bodurtha, Joann; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Cohn, Ronald; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Barañano, Kristin; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PIGN, resulting in multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency, have been published in four families to date. We report four patients from three unrelated families with epilepsy and hypotonia in whom whole exome sequencing yielded compound heterozygous variants in PIGN. As with previous reports Patients 1 and 2 (full siblings) have severe global developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and minor dysmorphic features, including high palate, bitemporal narrowing, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia; Patient 3 had early global developmental delay with later progressive spastic quadriparesis, intellectual disability, and intractable generalized epilepsy; Patient 4 had bilateral narrowing as well but differed by the presence of hypertelorism, markedly narrow palpebral fissures, and long philtrum, had small distal phalanges of fingers 2, 3, and 4, absent distal phalanx of finger 5 and similar toe anomalies, underdeveloped nails, unusual brain anomalies, and a more severe early clinical course. These patients expand the known clinical spectrum of the disease. The severity of the presentations in conjunction with the patients’ mutations suggest a genotype–phenotype correlation in which congenital anomalies are only seen in patients with biallelic loss-of-function. In addition, PIGN mutations appear to be panethnic and may be an underappreciated cause of epilepsy. PMID:26394714

  15. Cerebro-oculo-muscular syndrome: a variant of Fukuyama congenital cerebromuscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dambska, M; Wisniewski, K; Sher, J; Solish, G

    1982-01-01

    Familial occurrence of cerebral malformations with muscular dystrophy was described by Fukuyama as congenital cerebromuscular dystrophy. We have observed a new syndrome belonging to the same group in three siblings. These syndromes differ in the degree of CNS involvement and abnormalities in the eye. The main clinical characteristics of our cohort were dysmorphic face, hypotonia, areflexia, failure to thrive, corneal opacity, cataract, dysgenesis of the anterior chamber of the eye, and death within the 1st year of life. Hydrocephalus and agyria were verified by computed tomography. Neuropathologic examination demonstrated malformations of the CNS. The agyric hemispheres with polymicrogyria in several cortical segments and severe cortical disorganization in other segments represented the principal anomaly. Congenital muscular dystrophy was also found. The CNS anomalies demonstrated a long-lasting pathologic process extending to involve the eye and muscle, which is most likely an inborn error of metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  16. Progressive paranoid psychosis in a 20-year-old with central congenital hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dranovsky, Alex; Needleman, Joshua P; Sylvester, Jessica; VanHeertum, Ronald; Muskin, Philip R

    2014-09-01

    A 20-year-old man with a history of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome presented with recent-onset psychosis, catatonia, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Psychiatric symptoms were resistant to conventional treatment. A fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan of the brain obtained during the hospitalization revealed a hypometabolism distribution more consistent with hypoperfusion than with primary central nervous system disease. Increased mechanical ventilation was successfully used to treat the psychiatric symptoms.

  17. Congenital Absence of Superior Vena Cava with no Manifestation of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Soon; Kim, Jeong Jae

    2016-01-01

    Total absence of superior vena cava (SVC) is a very rare anomaly, and the patient usually suffers from SVC syndrome or conduction disturbances. We report an asymptomatic 27 year-old male, with complete absence of SVC. Transthoracic echocardiography and computed tomography demonstrated the absence of SVC and other congenital cardiac anomalies, but the presence of prominent collateral vessels that allow a sufficient venous return.

  18. A case-control study of the congenital hypothyroidism and dysmaturity syndrome of foals.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A L; Townsend, H G; Doige, C E; Fretz, P B

    1996-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for the congenital hypothyroidism and dysmaturity syndrome of foals. A questionnaire was used during personal interviews of foal owners and farm managers to collect information on animal signalment, farm environment, and mare management. Information on 39 foals with the congenital hypothyroidism and dysmaturity syndrome were compared with 39 control foals. Foals with the syndrome had a significantly (P < 0.0001) longer gestation (357.6 d) than control foals (338.9 d). Pregnant mares that were fed greenfeed, did not receive any supplemental mineral, left their "home farm" during gestation, or grazed irrigated pasture had 13.1 (P = 0.0068), 5.6 (P = 0.0472), 4.3 (P = 0.0076), and approximately 15.3 (P = 0.0245), respectively, greater odds of producing an affected foal than mares not experiencing these events. Greenfeed often contains high levels of nitrate (NO3-), which is known to impair thyroid gland function. In light of this, forage samples from participating farms were analyzed for nitrate levels. The odds of one or more congenitally hypothyroid and dysmature foals being born on a farm feeding forage with at least a trace of nitrate was 8.0 times greater (P = 0.0873) than the odds of the disease occurring on a farm that fed forage free of nitrate. Further, the odds of a mare producing an affected foal when fed forage containing at least a trace of nitrate were 5.9 times greater (P = 0.0007) than those of a mare fed nitrate free forage. This study suggests that congenital hypothyroidism and dysmaturity syndrome in foals may be the result of diets that contain nitrate or that are low in iodine being fed to pregnant mares. PMID:8689594

  19. Congenital rubella syndrome: seeking damages to be born. Ethical, medical and public health considerations.

    PubMed

    Verghini, Emanuele; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa; Virdis, Andrea; De Luca, Daniele

    2011-12-01

    A case of congenital rubella syndrome has been the reason to seek damages but a Civil Court of Rome sentenced against this and in favor of sued doctors. We discussed the high level of social attention and the feeling present in our western culture behind the request for damages. Legal considerations above the Italian abortion Law is provided to understand the framework of the court decision. Ethical, medical, and public health issues are commented and compared with the Perruche's case. PMID:21231850

  20. Unusual Thyroid Constellation in Down Syndrome: Congenital Hypothyroidism, Graves’ Disease, and Hemiagenesis in the Same Child

    PubMed Central

    Nebesio, Todd D.; Eugster, Erica A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a girl with Down syndrome who was diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism in the newborn period due to left thyroid hemiagenesis. Unexpectedly, her hypothyroidism resolved at the age of 3 years. After being off thyroid hormone replacement for 7 years and having normal thyroid function, she developed Graves’ disease. Although Graves’ disease in association with thyroid hemiagenesis has previously been reported, this represents the youngest patient in whom this scenario has been described. Issues pertaining to thyroid hemiagenesis, autoimmune hyperthyroidism, and thyroid disease in children with Down’s syndrome are discussed. PMID:19492583

  1. Congenital isolated Iso–Kikuchi syndrome in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Enrico; Favot, Francesca; Mattei, Ilaria; Cutrone, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Classic CO (also called Iso–Kikuchi syndrome) represents a benign, isolated condition associated with normal patient outcome. Nevertheless, clinical follow-up and/or further clinically-based tests are needed to exclude other nail diseases associated with multisystem pathology; complete family history is also important to determine sporadic or hereditary transmission of such condition. PMID:26509026

  2. Prevalence of primary monofixation syndrome in parents of children with congenital esotropia.

    PubMed

    Scott, M H; Noble, A G; Raymond, W R; Parks, M M

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of primary monofixation syndrome (MFS) in the general population is approximately 1%. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of primary monofixation in biological parents of children with congenital esotropia. Ninety children with congenital esotropia were seen between November 1991 and June 1992 by one ophthalmologist (M.M.P.). One hundred and twenty-nine biological parents of these children were screened for sensorimotor abnormalities. Twelve parents were found to have secondary MFS and were removed from the analysis. This left 78 apparently non-strabismic families consisting of a total of 117 parents. Seven parents were identified as having primary MFS. The prevalence of primary MFS in this population is 9% of families and 6% of parents. Congenital esotropia is believed to be inherited in a multifactorial fashion. We believe that this increase in the prevalence of primary MFS compared to the general population lends support to the hypothesis that primary MFS may be a mild (subthreshold) effect of the "gene(s)" that cause congenital esotropia.

  3. Congenital abnormalities and acute leukemia among children with Down syndrome: a Children's Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Linabery, Amy M; Blair, Cindy K; Gamis, Alan S; Olshan, Andrew F; Heerema, Nyla A; Ross, Julie A

    2008-10-01

    Children with Down syndrome, due to their heightened risk of leukemia and increased prevalence of congenital abnormalities, comprise a valuable population in which to study etiology. A Children's Oncology Group study investigated the causes of childhood leukemia in children with Down syndrome diagnosed at ages 0 to 19 years during the period 1997-2002. Telephone interviews were completed with mothers of 158 cases [n=97 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and n=61 acute myeloid leukemia (AML)] and 173 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were computed via unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between congenital abnormalities and acute leukemia overall, and ALL and AML analyzed separately. The results do not provide evidence for an association among the index children (OR(Combined), 0.74; 95% CI, 0.45-1.23; OR(ALL), 0.67; 95% CI, 0.38-1.20; OR(AML),1.03; 95% CI, 0.49-2.16) or their siblings (OR(Combined), 1.23; 95% CI, 0.71-2.13; OR(ALL), 1.12; 95% CI, 0.60-2.09; OR(AML), 1.60; 95% CI, 0.66-3.86), suggesting congenital malformations do not confer additional risk of leukemia beyond the risk attributable to trisomy 21 in this population.

  4. Congenital spigelian hernia and cryptorchidism: another case of new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Dhiraj; Kadian, Yogender Singh; Raikwar, Preeti; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2013-01-01

    Spigelian hernia (SH) is rarely seen in pediatric age group and is usually associated with cryptorchidism on the same side; termed as a syndromic association of the defect in the Spigelian fascia and absence of gubernaculum and inguinal canal. The absence of the inguinal canal has surgical implication as to placement of the undescended testis into the scrotum. A 3-month-old baby presented with spigelian hernia and ipsilateral impalpable testis. The spigelian hernia was repaired and undescended testis which was present in abdominal wall layers was brought to scrotum with cord structures anterior to external oblique muscle.

  5. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E.

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  6. A genetic study of Gardner syndrome and congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, L A; Lewis, R A; Strong, L C; Zuckerbrod, S; Ferrell, R E

    1988-01-01

    Gardner Syndrome (GS) is an autosomal dominant variant of colorectal polyposis with essentially complete penetrance. It is distinguished from the other polyposis syndromes by its delayed age at onset, the number of polyps, and its extracolonic manifestations. The presence of epidermal cysts, bony osteomata, desmoid tumors, and dental anomalies are distinguishing features of this syndrome. Recently, multiple and bilateral patches of congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE) have been described in three families with classical GS. Tight linkage of the GS and CHRPE phenotypes (Z = 9.752; theta = 0) suggested that CHRPE is a pleiotropic effect of the Gardner mutation within the families in which the ophthalmic trait occurs and is thus a useful marker for the early detection of GS gene carriers. We have analyzed six new families segregating for classic GS and CHRPE. Linkage was tested between GS and CHRPE and between these two phenotypes and a battery of 22 informative biochemical and serological markers. We have extended the linkage analysis on two GS-CHRPE families originally reported elsewhere. Linkage between GS and CHRPE at theta = 0 was observed in all families, a result supporting our original suggestion that CHRPE is a congenital manifestation of the GS mutation. Exclusionary linkage data presented confirm that, for linkage analysis in these families, the CHRPE phenotype is a more powerful marker than other phenotypic features of GS. PMID:3422541

  7. Congenital lower lip pits (Van der Woude syndrome): report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kirzioglu, Zuhal; Ertürk, Münciye Semra Ozay

    2006-02-15

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by a cleft lip and palate with congenital lip pits. This is a report of a case of VWS with sinuses in the lower lip, a cleft in the upper lip, and a supernumerary tooth in the maxilla. The main characteristics of this disorder are discussed. Dental treatment of the patient was performed, but the surgical removal of the sinus was rejected by the parents. This case report brings this condition to the attention of dentists and surgeons and emphasizes lip pits may not always be identical in appearance. PMID:16491156

  8. Osteomalacia complicating a blind loop syndrome from congenital megaesophagus-megaduodenum.

    PubMed

    Manicourt, D H; Orloff, S

    1979-01-01

    A young female with osteomalacia complicating a blind loop syndrome associated with congenital megaduodenum is described. In this case, the correction of vitamin D malabsorption by administration of antibiotics highlights the role of massive intraluminal bacterial overgrowth from destruction of vitamin D, or decreased unicellar solubilization due to deconjugation of biliary acids. The importance of cutaneous vitamin D synthesis in patients with osteomalacia of gastrointestinal origin is emphasized. The detection of megaduodenum and megaesophagus in the patient's father may be the first report of a familial association of these gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  9. Congenital gluteus maximus contracture syndrome - a case report with review of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, Vamshi Krishna; Reddy, Rajasekhar; Reddy, M. Venkateshwar; Moorthy, Rangubatla Sathyanrayana; Kishan, Tatikonda Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Although the clinical features of gluteus maximus contracture syndrome have been frequently described, imaging features have been seldom described. Most commonly reported cases are those following intramuscular injection in the gluteal region although congenital contracture is an uncommon but important occurrence. This condition has most often been reported in children of school going age. These patients often present with difficulty in squatting, limitation of hip motion or specific deformities and often require surgical correction. We describe the plain radiography, ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of this condition in a patient with no previous known history of intramuscular injections. PMID:24967033

  10. A Series of Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome – Classic Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Amit Kumar; Alam, Shah; Mittal, Kartik; Thakkar, Hemangini

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a very rare entity with very poor prognosis in which upper airway is intrinsically obstructed, the most common reason being laryngeal atresia. In summary prenatal early diagnosis of patients with CHAOS is necessary so that perinatal management can be undertaken successfully or elective termination of pregnancy can be undertaken. The fetoscopic approach may be a life saving modality in a subset of CHAOS patients. Involving a multidisciplinary team comprising of paediatricians, radiologists, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists increases the efficiency of management. PMID:27134966

  11. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis: the skin as a clue to complex malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Praticò, Andrea D; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Ruggieri, Martino; Zollino, Marcella; Corsello, Giovanni; Neri, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is defined as an excessive growth in body hair beyond the normal variation compared with individuals of the same age, race and sex and affecting areas not predominantly androgen-dependent. The term hirsutism is usually referred to patients, mainly women, who show excessive hair growth with male pattern distribution.Hypertrichosis is classified according to age of onset (congenital or acquired), extent of distribution (generalized or circumscribed), site involved, and to whether the disorder is isolated or associated with other anomalies. Congenital hypertrichosis is rare and may be an isolated condition of the skin or a component feature of other disorders. Acquired hypertrichosis is more frequent and is secondary to a variety of causes including drug side effects, metabolic and endocrine disorders, cutaneous auto-inflammatory or infectious diseases, malnutrition and anorexia nervosa, and ovarian and adrenal neoplasms. In most cases, hypertrichosis is not an isolated symptom but is associated with other clinical signs including intellective delay, epilepsy or complex body malformations.A review of congenital generalized hypertrichosis is reported with particular attention given to the disorders where excessive diffuse body hair is a sign indicating the presence of complex malformation syndromes. The clinical course of a patient, previously described, with a 20-year follow-up is reported. PMID:26242548

  12. Congenital Insensitivity to Pain and Anhydrosis (CIPA) Syndrome; A Report of 4 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Daneshjou, Khadije; Jafarieh, Hanieh; Raaeskarami, Seyed-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background Background: Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of infections and unexplained fever, anhidrosis (inability to sweat), and absence of reaction to noxious stimuli, self-mutilating behavior, mental retardation and damages to oral structures. Case Presentation In this article, we have demonstrated the signs and symptoms of 4 children that refer to the pediatrics department of the Imam Khomeini hospital and assay about their complications with this disease. They mostly presented by recurrent osteomyelitis in their feet that severely controlled by antibiotic therapy and even surgery. They had no pain sensation in spite of deep sore and infection. Conclusion This syndrome can be diagnosed by clinical and paraclinical tests together but it would be better to confirm by genetic test. The diagnosis of this syndrome helps us to try for the better quality of life for the patients and avoid unnecessary amputations. PMID:23400697

  13. Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type maps to the long arm of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Kestilae, M.; Maennikkoe, M.; Tryggvason, K.; Savolainen, E.R. ); Holmberg, C.; Peltonen, L. ); Gyapay, G.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-05-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish (CNF) is an autosomal recessive disease that is characterized by massive proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome at birth. CNF represents a unique, apparently specific dysfunction of the renal basement membranes, and the estimated incidence of CNF in the isolated population of Finland is 1 in 8,000 newborns. The basic defect is unknown, and no specific biochemical defect or chromosomal aberrations have been described. Here the authors report the assignment of the CNF locus to 19[sub q]12-q13.1 on the basis of linkage analysis in 17 Finnish families. Multipoint analyses and observed recombination events place the CNF locus between multiallelic markers D19S416 and D19S224, and the significant linkage disequilibrium observed suggests that the CNF gene lies in the immediate vicinity of the markers D19S224 and D19S220. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Genetic Modifiers Predisposing to Congenital Heart Disease in the Sensitized Down Syndrome Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiqing; Cherry, Sheila; Klinedinst, Donna; DeLeon, Valerie; Redig, Jennifer; Reshey, Benjamin; Chin, Michael T.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2012-01-01

    Background About half of people with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit some form of congenital heart disease (CHD). However, trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) alone is insufficient to cause CHD as half of all people with DS have a normal heart, suggesting that genetic modifiers interact with dosage sensitive gene(s) on Hsa21 to result in CHD. We hypothesize that a threshold exists in both Down syndrome and euploid populations for the number of genetic perturbations that can be tolerated before CHD results. Methods and Results We ascertained a group of individuals with DS and complete atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and sequenced two candidate genes for CHD, CRELD1, which is associated with AVSD in people with or without DS, and HEY2, whose mouse ortholog produces septal defects when mutated. Several deleterious variants were identified but the frequency of these potential modifiers was low. We crossed mice with mutant forms of these potential modifiers to the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. Crossing loss-of-function alleles of either Creld1 or Hey2 onto the trisomic background caused a significant increase in the frequency of CHD, demonstrating an interaction between the modifiers and trisomic genes. We showed further that although either of these mutant modifiers is benign by itself, they interact to affect heart development when inherited together. Conclusions Using mouse models of Down syndrome and of genes associated with congenital heart disease we demonstrate a biological basis for an interaction that supports a threshold hypothesis for additive effects of genetic modifiers in the sensitized trisomic population. PMID:22523272

  15. Novel de novo mutations in ZBTB20 in Primrose syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Francesca; Piton, Amelie; Gérard, Bénédicte; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Unger, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    The cardinal features of Primrose syndrome (MIM 259050) are dysmorphic facial features, macrocephaly, and intellectual disability, as well as large body size, height and weight, and calcified pinnae. A variety of neurological signs and symptoms have been reported including hearing loss, autism, behavioral abormalities, hypotonia, cerebral calcifications, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Recently, heterozygous de novo missense mutations in ZBTB20, coding for a zing finger protein, have been identified in Primrose syndrome patients. We report a boy with intellectual disability carrying two de novo missense mutations in the last exon of ZBTB20 (Ser616Phe and Gly741Arg; both previously unreported). One of them, Ser616Phe, affects an amino acid located in one of the C2H2 zing-fingers involved in DNA-binding and close to other missense mutations already described. Reverse phenotyping showed that this patient presents with classic features of Primrose syndrome (dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, hearing loss, hypotonia, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum) and, in addition, congenital hypothyroidism. Review of the literature reveals another Primrose syndrome patient with hypothyroidism and thus, this may represent an under recognized component that should be investigated in other patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Long-term perspectives for 46,XY patients affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome or congenital micropenis.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Amy B; Migeon, Claude J

    2002-08-01

    Controversy concerning optimal treatment for individuals affected by syndromes of abnormal sex differentiation can best be resolved with knowledge about long-term medical, surgical, and psychosexual outcomes of patients. Follow-up information has recently been gathered on older cohorts of the following patient groups: (1) those affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) raised female and (2) those affected by congenital micropenis raised male or female. As a group, women with CAIS were satisfied with their female gender and sexual function. However, a need for better patient education was identified for this specific population. Most patients with congenital micropenis, whether raised male or female, were satisfied with their gender. Regardless of sex of rearing, dissatisfaction with the appearance and function of the genitalia as judged by both physicians and subjects was evident. For patients with congenital micropenis, male sex of rearing was concluded to be optimal because genital reconstructive surgery is not required with this choice.

  17. Surgical treatment for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Ogata, Hisao; Yazawa, Masaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kishi, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Currently, only a few reports have recommended surgery as a suitable treatment for blepharoptosis associated with myasthenia gravis. The present study aims to introduce our surgical criteria, surgical options, outcomes, and precautions for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis. Patients and methods Eight patients who failed to respond to at least 2 years of medical treatment and who underwent blepharoptosis surgery, from January 2008 to December 2011, were enrolled in this study. Medical records, photographs, and questionnaire results regarding postoperative status were evaluated. Of the eleven procedures performed, four involved frontal suspension, four involved external levator advancement, one involved nonincisional transconjunctival levator advancement, and two involved subbrow blepharoplasty with orbicularis oculi muscle tucking. The margin reflex distance improved postoperatively in seven patients. Results Seven patients had very minimal scarring, and one had minimal scarring. Five patients showed no eyelid asymmetry, one had subtle asymmetry, and two had obvious asymmetry. Seven patients were very satisfied, and one patient was satisfied with the overall result. Postoperative complications included mild lid lag with incomplete eyelid closure, prolonged scar redness, and worsened heterophoria. No patient experienced postoperative exposure keratitis or recurrent blepharoptosis during the study period. Conclusion Our results indicate that blepharoptosis surgery is effective for patients with myasthenia gravis, especially those with residual blepharoptosis despite multiple sessions of medical treatments. We recommend that neurologists and surgeons collaborate more systematically and discuss comprehensive treatment plans to increase the quality of life for patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:25278744

  18. Predictors of outcome of myasthenic crisis.

    PubMed

    Kalita, J; Kohat, A K; Misra, U K

    2014-07-01

    There is paucity of study on predictors of myasthenic crisis (MC), prolonged ventilation and their outcome, a reason why this study was undertaken. Sixty-four patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were included whose median age was 45 (6-84) years. Their clinical treatment, presence of thymoma, anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (AchRAb), thymectomy, comorbidities, offending drugs and occurrence of MC were noted. Patients needing prolonged ventilation (>15 days) were noted. Hospital mortality, MG quality of life (QOL) at discharge and thereafter annual hospital visit, admission, expenditure and work day loss were enquired. Fourteen (21.9 %) patients had MC within 1-120 (median 8.5) months of disease onset within a median follow-up of 48 (3-264) months. The precipitating factors were infection in six, surgery in five, tapering of drugs in two and reaction to iodinated contrast in one patient. Male gender, bulbar weakness, AchRAb, thymoma, surgery and comorbid illnesses were related to MC. Eight of them (57.1 %) needed prolonged ventilation. Half the patients with MC had recurrent crisis (2-4 attacks). Death was not related to MC although MC patients had worse QOL, higher annual treatment expenditure with frequent hospital visit and hospitalization. In conclusion, association of comorbid illness with MC and prolonged ventilation highlights the need of close follow-up and appropriate management.

  19. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and congenital heart defects: presentation of an additional 32 cases.

    PubMed

    Hills, Christine B; Kochilas, Lazaros; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Moller, James H

    2011-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare genetic abnormality that has been linked to a mutation in the EVC or EVC2 genes. Common atrium (CA) is an uncommon cardiac malformation, and yet it is commonly found in patients with EVC. We performed a retrospective review of the cases submitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) between 1982 and 2007. A review of the English-language literature for previously published cases, as well as current genetic research findings, was also performed. Thirty-two pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and EVC syndrome were identified in the PCCC database. Twenty-eight (88%) had an endocardial cushion defect, with 15 of these having primary failure of atrial septation resulting in CA. Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) and pulmonary venous connection abnormalities were common. The incidence of persistent LSVC and pulmonary venous abnormalities were greater than previously reported for patients with EVC. Our study reviews the reported literature and adds 32 additional cases from the PCCC database. Review of the cardiac phenotype in patients with EVC syndrome reveals a characteristic pattern of atrioventricular canal defects with systemic and pulmonary venous abnormalities. The frequent association of these abnormalities is strongly reminiscent of the cardiac phenotype found in patients with heterotaxy syndromes. Emerging molecular and developmental studies suggest that EVC and EVC2 proteins may be important for cilia function, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of heterotaxy syndromes. It is speculated that coordinate function between the EVC proteins is required for a cilia-dependent cardiac morphogenesis.

  20. Congenital Cardiac, Aortic Arch, and Vascular Bed Anomalies in PHACE Syndrome (From The International PHACE Syndrome Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Michelle L.; Frommelt, Peter C.; Blei, Francine; Breur, Johannes M.P.J.; Cordisco, Maria R.; Frieden, Ilona J.; Goddard, Deborah S.; Holland, Kristen E.; Krol, Alfons L.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Metry, Denise W.; Morel, Kimberly D.; North, Paula E.; Pope, Elena; Shieh, Joseph T.; Southern, James F.; Wargon, Orli; Siegel, Dawn H.; Drolet, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    PHACE syndrome represents the association of large infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck with brain, cerebrovascular, cardiac, ocular, and ventral/midline defects. Cardiac and cerebrovascular anomalies are the most common extracutaneous features of PHACE, and they also constitute the greatest source of potential morbidity. Congenital heart disease in PHACE is incompletely described, and this study was conducted to better characterize its features. This study of the International PHACE Syndrome Registry represents the largest central review of clinical, radiology, and pathology data for cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE patients to date. 62/150 (41%) subjects had intracardiac, aortic arch, or brachiocephalic vessel anomalies. Aberrant origin of a subclavian artery was the most common cardiovascular anomaly (present in 31/150 (21%) of subjects). Coarctation was the second most common anomaly, identified in 28/150 (19%), and can be missed clinically in PHACE patients because of the frequent association of arch obstruction with aberrant subclavian origin. 23/62 (37%) subjects with cardiovascular anomalies required procedural intervention. A higher percentage of hemangiomas were located on the left side of the head/neck in patients with coarctation (46% vs. 39%); however, hemangioma distribution did not predict the presence of cardiovascular anomalies overall. In conclusion, PHACE is associated with a high risk of congenital heart disease. Cardiac and aortic arch imaging with detailed assessment of arch patency and brachiocephalic origins is essential for any patient suspected of having PHACE. Longitudinal investigation is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE. PMID:24079520

  1. Unlikely culprit: congenital middle aortic syndrome diagnosed in the sixth decade of life.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Sajawal; Tchernodrinski, Stefan; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Ali, Ahya Sajawal

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman was admitted with acute heart failure. She had a long history of resistant hypertension, with an unremarkable work up for secondary causes in the past. Her brachial blood pressure was 210/70 mm Hg, with ankle blood pressure of 100/70 mm Hg. CT angiogram revealed marked narrowing of the descending thoracic aorta between the left subclavian artery and the diaphragm, consistent with middle aortic syndrome (MAS). She was initially managed with diuretics and antihypertensives. Subsequently thoracotomy revealed a severely hypoplastic segment of the descending aorta. The diseased segment was resected and aortic reconstruction performed. Histopathology showed fragmentation of the medial elastic fibres and fibrosis of the medial and intimal layers. These findings along with gross aortic hypoplasia and absence of features of Takayasu's arteritis, suggest that our patient had congenital MAS. The patient has done well since her surgery. We believe this is the first case of congenital MAS reported in the sixth decade of life. PMID:27530881

  2. Further efforts in the achievement of congenital rubella syndrome/rubella elimination.

    PubMed

    Cozza, Vanessa; Martinelli, Domenico; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Tafuri, Silvio; Fortunato, Francesca; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The Italian National Plan of Measles and Rubella Elimination 2010-2015 has deferred the objective to reduce congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) to <1 case per 100 000 live births to 2015 and has highlighted the need to reduce to <5% susceptibility to rubella among women in childbearing-age. In Puglia region, MMR vaccine coverage is 93% in newborns (cohort 2010; one dose), 85% in children 5-6 years old and 77% in adolescents (cohort 2005 and 1997, respectively; two doses). Combining available seroepidemiological data and results of a survey on the attitude towards rubella vaccination and rubella testing before pregnancy, we could estimate that 5.7% of Apulian women in childbearing-age are currently susceptible to rubella infection. The regional infectious disease routine notification system reported no cases of CRS and rubella in pregnancy in 2001-2010 period. The inconsistency among the mentioned data triggered the evaluation of the reliability of disease reporting. We performed a retrospective case-finding for the years 2003-2011. We scanned the regional hospital discharge registry to identify hospitalizations for rubella in pregnancy and CRS and retrieve individual records. We also searched for clinical history of CRS mothers in the delivery assistance certificate registry. We identified one CRS, two confirmed and four suspected congenital infections, and seven cases of rubella in pregnancy. Passive surveillance of CRS and rubella in pregnancy appears not to be reliable in the light of strengthening rubella elimination strategies.

  3. Trauma due to Self-aggression in Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome associated with Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sara Nader; Kawakami, Roberto Yoshio; Sgavioli, Claudia Almeida Prado Piccino; Correa, Ana Eliza; D'Árk de Oliveira El Kadre, Guaniara; Carvalho, Ricardo Sandri

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder presenting variable penetrance and expressivity, with an estimated prevalence of 1:42,000. Clinical characteristics of WS include lateral displacement of the internal eye canthus, hyperplasia of the medial portion of the eyebrows, prominent and broad nasal base, congenital deafness, pigmentation of the iris and skin, and white forelock. A 24-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with WS, was referred to the Special Needs Dental Clinic of Sacred Heart University, Bauru, Brazil. Parents reported that the patient was experiencing self-mutilation, particularly in the oral region. He presented multiple congenital anomalies, including anophthalmia, mental retardation, low-set ears, and leg deformities. Clinical oral examination revealed hypodontia, abnormalities in dental morphology, extensive dental caries, periodontal disease, and fistulae. Extensive scars on the tongue, lips, and hands caused by self-mutilation were also observed. In accordance with his family and neurologist, full-mouth extraction under general anesthesia was performed, especially considering his severe self-aggressive behavior and the necessity to be fed with soft-food diet due to his inability to chew. After the surgical procedure, a significant reduction in the patient's irritability and gain of weight were reported in the follow-ups of 30, 60, and 180 days. PMID:27659091

  4. Detection of Connexion 26 GENE (GJB2) Mutations in Cases of Congenital Non Syndromic Deafness.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Hansa; Mungutwar, Varsha; Swarnkar, Neha; Patra, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is most common form of genetic hearing disorder. Non-syndromic sensory neural autosomal recessive deafness (NSRD) is the most common form of genetic hearing loss. Mutations in GJB2 gene, which encodes the connexin 26 protein, are major cause of NSRD. The aim of this study is directed towards the mutations caused along the connexin 26 gene using blood samples from nonsyndromic deaf children. The study was conducted on 36 congenitally hearing impaired children who visited to our department with complains of hearing loss and reduced speech and whose age was <10 years with no other congenital anomaly. After a thorough history, clinical examination and all audiological and radiological assessment, blood samples are collected and DNA extraction, PCR and sequencing were done for further genetic analysis. Annotated and documented autosomal recessive (pathogenic) mutations were observed in 57 % of NSRD cases. The frequency of pathogenic mutation was commonest for Ins G between nucleotide 30-35 (40 % of cases) followed by Del T at nucleotide 59(20 % of cases).These two common mutations (singly or doubly) were present in 51.4 % of cases. Present study helps to screen the families with hearing impaired children, which will facilitate the development of strategies for diagnosis and treatment of these common genetic disorders. PMID:27340645

  5. Identification of Ocular and Auditory Manifestations of Congenital Rubella Syndrome in Mbingo

    PubMed Central

    Rudnisky, Chris J.; Tambe, Emmanuel; Tipple, Graham; Tennant, Matthew T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is a global cause of preventable hearing impairment, blindness, and intellectual impairment. The present study sought to identify ocular and auditory manifestations of CRS in school-aged children in Mbingo, Cameroon. Design. Cross sectional study. Subjects. Students at two schools, one for children with hearing impairment, were screened for cataract, congenital glaucoma, and pigmentary retinopathy. Methods. Students underwent seven-field digital fundus photography through a dilated pupil using a Topcon NW200 nonmydriatic camera. Images were assessed by retina specialists in Canada via teleophthalmology. Clinical evidence was integrated to form case definitions for CRS based on Center for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Serological evidence of rubella infection was obtained using standardized IgG antibody titers. Main Outcome Measure. Number of probable and suspicious cases of CRS. Results. Between September 2009 and May 2010, 320 students participated. There were 28 (10.2%) probable cases, 104 (37.8%) suspects, and 143 (52.0%) unaffected. Rubella IgG serology was positive in 79 (48.7%) of children with hearing impairment and 11 (7.4%) of children with normal hearing. Conclusions. The present study identified 28 probable cases of CRS. Furthermore, 92.6% of students with normal hearing did not possess rubella IgG antibodies making future cases of CRS likely without intervention. PMID:25525427

  6. Trauma due to Self-aggression in Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome associated with Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sara Nader; Kawakami, Roberto Yoshio; Sgavioli, Claudia Almeida Prado Piccino; Correa, Ana Eliza; D'Árk de Oliveira El Kadre, Guaniara; Carvalho, Ricardo Sandri

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder presenting variable penetrance and expressivity, with an estimated prevalence of 1:42,000. Clinical characteristics of WS include lateral displacement of the internal eye canthus, hyperplasia of the medial portion of the eyebrows, prominent and broad nasal base, congenital deafness, pigmentation of the iris and skin, and white forelock. A 24-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with WS, was referred to the Special Needs Dental Clinic of Sacred Heart University, Bauru, Brazil. Parents reported that the patient was experiencing self-mutilation, particularly in the oral region. He presented multiple congenital anomalies, including anophthalmia, mental retardation, low-set ears, and leg deformities. Clinical oral examination revealed hypodontia, abnormalities in dental morphology, extensive dental caries, periodontal disease, and fistulae. Extensive scars on the tongue, lips, and hands caused by self-mutilation were also observed. In accordance with his family and neurologist, full-mouth extraction under general anesthesia was performed, especially considering his severe self-aggressive behavior and the necessity to be fed with soft-food diet due to his inability to chew. After the surgical procedure, a significant reduction in the patient's irritability and gain of weight were reported in the follow-ups of 30, 60, and 180 days.

  7. Further efforts in the achievement of congenital rubella syndrome/rubella elimination.

    PubMed

    Cozza, Vanessa; Martinelli, Domenico; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Tafuri, Silvio; Fortunato, Francesca; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The Italian National Plan of Measles and Rubella Elimination 2010-2015 has deferred the objective to reduce congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) to <1 case per 100 000 live births to 2015 and has highlighted the need to reduce to <5% susceptibility to rubella among women in childbearing-age. In Puglia region, MMR vaccine coverage is 93% in newborns (cohort 2010; one dose), 85% in children 5-6 years old and 77% in adolescents (cohort 2005 and 1997, respectively; two doses). Combining available seroepidemiological data and results of a survey on the attitude towards rubella vaccination and rubella testing before pregnancy, we could estimate that 5.7% of Apulian women in childbearing-age are currently susceptible to rubella infection. The regional infectious disease routine notification system reported no cases of CRS and rubella in pregnancy in 2001-2010 period. The inconsistency among the mentioned data triggered the evaluation of the reliability of disease reporting. We performed a retrospective case-finding for the years 2003-2011. We scanned the regional hospital discharge registry to identify hospitalizations for rubella in pregnancy and CRS and retrieve individual records. We also searched for clinical history of CRS mothers in the delivery assistance certificate registry. We identified one CRS, two confirmed and four suspected congenital infections, and seven cases of rubella in pregnancy. Passive surveillance of CRS and rubella in pregnancy appears not to be reliable in the light of strengthening rubella elimination strategies. PMID:25483539

  8. Immunolocalization and Distribution of Rubella Antigen in Fatal Congenital Rubella Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Mihaela; Perelygina, Ludmila; Martines, Roosecelis; Greer, Patricia; Paddock, Christopher D.; Peltecu, Gheorghe; Lupulescu, Emilia; Icenogle, Joseph; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 100,000 cases of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) occur worldwide each year. The reported mortality rate for infants with CRS is up to 33%. The cellular mechanisms responsible for the multiple congenital defects in CRS are presently unknown. Here we identify cell types positive for rubella virus (RV) in CRS infants. Methods Cells and organs involved in RV replication were identified in paraffin-embedded autopsy tissues from three fatal case-patients by histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using a rabbit polyclonal RV antibody. Normal rabbit antisera and RV antisera preabsorbed with highly purified RV served as negative controls. Results RV antigen was found in interstitial fibroblasts in the heart, adventitial fibroblasts of large blood vessels, alveolar macrophages, progenitor cells of the outer granular layer of the brain, and in capillary endothelium and basal plate in the placenta. The antibody specificity was verified by IHC staining of multiple tissue sections from other infectious disease cases. RV infection of each cell type is consistent with abnormalities which have been identified in patients with CRS, in the heart, large blood vessels, and brain. Antigen distribution was consistent with inflammatory response to vascular injury and systemic spread of RV. Conclusions The identification of RV positive cell types in CRS is important to better understand the pathology and pathogenesis of CRS. PMID:26870820

  9. A new case of holoprosencephaly-polydactyly syndrome with alobar holoprosencephaly, preaxial polydactyly and congenital glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Sandal, G; Tok, L; Ormeci, A R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a female baby born at 34 weeks of gestation. Birth weight was 1760 g (10th-25th centile), length 41cm (10th-25th centile) and head circumference 27cm (< 10th centile). Clinical examination revealed microcephaly, hypotelorism, micrognathia, a flat rudimentary nose, high palate, thick dysplastic low-set ears, a short neck, preaxial polydactyly of the right hand, and overriding toes. Investigations showed bilateral congenital glaucoma, alobar holoprosencephaly, severe ventriculomegaly and absence midline structures of the brain, a large atrial septal defect. The karyotype was 46,XX. The case was also diagnosed as having holoprosencephaly-polydactyly syndrome (pseudotrisomy 13) because she had alobar holoprosencephaly, preaxial polydactyly, facial dysmorfism (hypotelorism, micrognathia, a flat rudimentary nose, high palate, thick dysplastic low-set ears) and normal karyotype.

  10. Macroscopic hematuria caused by congenital portosystemic shunt and concomitant nutcracker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyub; Lee, Dong-Gi

    2015-06-01

    Nutcracker syndrome (NCS) is an uncommon vascular abnormality that causes a variety of symptoms that range from asymptomatic microscopic hematuria to severe pelvic congestion. Congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS) is an extremely rare anomaly that causes serious complications. Many cases of NCS and CPSS that have presented separately have been reported, but no cases of concomitant NCS and CPSS have been reported. We present a case of intermittent macroscopic hematuria in a patient with both NCS and CPSS. We diagnosed NCS on pressure gradient between the left renal vein (LRV) and the inferior vena cava. The presence of CPSS, which emerged from the LRV and connected to the extrahepatic portal vein, was confirmed on computed tomography. The interaction between NCS and CPSS resulted in mild intermittent macroscopic hematuria only, rather than the more common symptoms that occur when NCS or CPSS present separately. PMID:26113323

  11. Genotype- and Phenotype-Guided Management of Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Giudicessi, John R.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetically heterogeneous collection of heritable disorders of myocardial repolarization linked by their shared clinical phenotype of QT prolongation on electrocardiogram and an increased risk of potentially life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. At the molecular level, mutations in 15 distinct LQTS-susceptibility genes that encode ion channel pore-forming α-subunits and accessory/auxiliary subunits central to the electromechanical function of the heart have been implicated in its pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, our evolving understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms by which specific genetic substrates perturb the cardiac action potential has translated into vastly improved approaches to the diagnosis, risk stratification, and treatment of patients with LQTS. In this Review, we detail how our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of LQTS has yielded numerous clinically meaningful genotype-phenotype correlations and how these insights have translated into genotype- and phenotype-guided approaches to the clinical management of LQTS. PMID:24093767

  12. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  13. Mapping of the locus for congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) on chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Kestilae, M.; Maennikkoe, M.; Tryggvason, K.

    1994-09-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) is an autosomal recessive disease which forms a distinct entity among congenital nephrotic syndromes. It is characterized by massive proteinuria starting already in utero, large placenta and manifestation of nephrosis soon after birth. The incidence in Finland is about 1 in 8000 newborns, and the disease has been reported occasionally in other countries, particularly in Minnesota, USA. The gene defect in CNF is unknown, but the gene product is likely to be important for kidney development of glomerular filtration. We have used a random mapping approach in 17 Finnish CNF families resulting in the localization of the gene to chromosome 19q12-q13.1. Based on observed recombination events, the CNF locus is flanked by markers D19S191 and D19S224 corresponding to a region under 1 Mb in physical length. Cosmid contigs have been isolated from this region and at least two new polymorphic CA-repeat markers (MKMM1, MKMM2) have been identified from those clones. Statistically highly significant linkage disequilibrium can be observed with markers MKMM1, D19S224 and D19S220, the allelic association being about 65%. The most common haplotype, which was combined from these markers, is found in 60% of chromosomes carrying the CNF mutation. This work has enabled DNA-based diagnosis of CNF, and recently linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses were used in prenatal diagnostics in a family with one affected child and two healthy siblings. DNA isolated from chorion villus biopsy was analyzed using markers D19S191, MKMM1, D19S224 and D19S220, and the fetus was shown to have the same genotype as the affected child.

  14. Ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure for management of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome in a vertex/breech twin gestation.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Richard; Vallera, Cristianna; Heitmiller, Eugenie S; Isaac, Gillian; Lee, Michael; Crino, Jude; Boss, Emily F; Ishman, Stacey L

    2013-03-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is one indication for the ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT), which is used to secure the fetal airway, while fetal oxygenation is maintained by uteroplacental circulation. We report a successful EXIT procedure in a twin gestation in which one child had CHAOS while the other was a healthy child without any congenital abnormalities. After version of Twin B to allow for delivery of Twin A, Twin B underwent airway evaluation and tracheostomy for laryngeal atresia prior to delivery.

  15. Phakomatosis Pigmentovascularis Associated With Sturge-Weber Syndrome, Ota Nevus, and Congenital Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yangfan; Guo, Xiujuan; Xu, Jiangang; Ye, Yiming; Liu, Xiaoan; Yu, Minbin

    2015-07-01

    Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis (PPV) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome that is characterized by a combination of capillary abnormalities and dermal melanocytosis.We describe 3 cases of PPV combined with bilateral Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), Ota nevus, and congenital glaucoma.Case 1 was a 2-year-old boy. Facial port-wine stains distributed along the 3 branches of his trigeminal nerves, which suggested the existence of SWS. Gray-blue patches were spread over the frontal and temporal areas of bilateral face, waist, buttocks, and thigh. Bilateral triangular alopecia was found on the temporal scalp. The diagnosis of Ota nevus was made by the bilateral scleral malanocystosis. Increased intraocular pressure, enlarged cornea, and pathologic optic disc cupping supported the diagnoses of infantile bilateral glaucoma. Case 2 was a 4-year-old boy. Port-wine stains were found on the face along the 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve and distributed along the trunk, arms, and legs. Mongolian spots spread over his frontal and temporal areas of the bilateral face, waist, buttocks, thigh, abdomen, and back. Infantile glaucoma was found in both eyes. Ota nevus were found in the both eyes. Optic coherent tomography (OCT) scans revealed increased thickness of choroid. Case 3 was a 5-year-old boy. Besides Ota nevus and infantile glaucoma in both eyes, color Doppler ultrasonography showed choroidal hemagioma. OCT scan showed increased choroidal thickness. The bilateral triangular alopecia on the child's temporal scalp was similar to that of Case 1. Cases 1 and 2 presented with port-wine stain patches that were consistent with the characteristic manifestation of PPV type IIb. However, the CMTC of Case 3 met the diagnostic criteria for PPV type Vb.Case 1 was treated with trabeculotomies in both eyes. For Cases 2 and 3, surgical interventions were not considered due to the high risks of antiglaucomatous operation complications. We prescribed them antiglaucoma indications

  16. Prevalence and profile of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension in Down syndrome in a pediatric cardiology service

    PubMed Central

    Mourato, Felipe Alves; Villachan, Lúcia Roberta R.; Mattos, Sandra da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequence and profile of congenital heart defects in Down syndrome patients referred to a pediatric cardiologic center, considering the age of referral, gender, type of heart disease diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and its association with pulmonary hypertension at the initial diagnosis. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection of 138 patients with Down syndrome from a total of 17,873 records. Descriptive analysis of the data was performed, using Epi-Info version 7. RESULTS: Among the 138 patients with Down syndrome, females prevailed (56.1%) and 112 (81.2%) were diagnosed with congenital heart disease. The most common lesion was ostium secundum atrial septal defect, present in 51.8%, followed by atrioventricular septal defect, in 46.4%. Ventricular septal defects were present in 27.7%, while tetralogy of Fallot represented 6.3% of the cases. Other cardiac malformations corresponded to 12.5%. Pulmonary hypertension was associated with 37.5% of the heart diseases. Only 35.5% of the patients were referred before six months of age. CONCLUSIONS: The low percentage of referral until six months of age highlights the need for a better tracking of patients with Down syndrome in the context of congenital heart disease, due to the high frequency and progression of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25119745

  17. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD.

  18. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD. PMID:27479907

  19. Intestinal blind pouch- and blind loop- syndrome in children operated previously for congenital duodenal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Salonen, I S; Mäkinen, E

    1976-01-01

    A follow-up study of 27 children operated for congenital duodenal obstruction (CDO) in the years 1953--71 is presented. Nine children belonged to the intrinsic and 18 children to the extrinsic group of CDO. A total of 7 retrocolic, isoperistaltic, side-to-side duodeno-jejunostomy, 7 Ladd's operation, 8 duodenolysis, 2 reduction of midgut volvulus, 2 duodenostomy a.m. Morton and one gastro-jejunostomy were performed at the age of 1 day--15 years. The clinical and radiological examinations were performed 3--21 years (mean 10 years 2 months) after these operations. In 3 cases there was a moderate duodenal dilatation, but reoperation was not necessary. During the follow-up period, one boy, now aged 8 years, developed a blind pouch-syndrome in the I portion of the duodenum containing a 5 x 5 cm phytobezoar 4 1/2 years after duodeno-jejunostomy. The frequency of blind pouch-syndrome after duodeno-jejunostomy was thus 1:7 or 14%. One girl, now aged 9 years, developed a blind loop-syndrome in the ileocaecal segment 3 months after side-to-side ileotransversostomy, which was performed from adhesion-obstruction after duodenolysis for malrotation I and CDO. Both the blind pouch- and the blind loop-deformation were resected and the children recovered well. To avoid blind-pouch- and blind loop-deformations in the intestines, the anastomosis must be made wide enough, and especially in the surgery of the jejuno-ileo-colic region an end-to-end anastomosis is preferable.

  20. Intestinal blind pouch- and blind loop-syndrome in children operated previously for congenital duodenal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Salonen, I S; Mäkinen, E

    1976-01-01

    A follow-up study of 27 children operated for congenital duodenal obstruction (CDO) in years 1953-71 is presented. Nine children belonged to the intrinsic and 18 children to the extrinsic group of CDO. A total of 7 retrocolic, isoperistaltic, side-to-side duodeno-jejunostomy, 7 Ladd's operation, 8 duodenolysis, 2 reduction of midgut volvulus, 2 duodenostomy a.m. Morton and one gastro-jejunostomy were performed at the age of 1 day-15 years. The clinical and radiological examinations were performed 3-21 years (mean 10 years 2 months) after these operations. In 3 cases there was a moderate duodenal dilation, but reoperation was not necessary. During the follow-up period, one boy, now aged 8 years, developed a blind pouch-syndrome in the I portion of the duodenum containing a 5 X 5 cm phytobezoar 4 1/2 years after duodeno-jejunostomy. The frequency of blind pouch-syndrome after duodeno-jejunostomy was thus 1:7 or 14%. One girl, now aged 9 years, developed a blind loop-syndrome in the ileocaecal segment 3 months after side-to-side ileotransversostomy, which was performed from adhesion-obstruction after duodenolysis for malrotation I and CDO. Both the blind pouch- and the blind loop-deformation were resected and the children recovered well. To avoid blind pouch- and blind loop-deformations in the intestines, the anastomosis must be made wide enough, and especially in the surgery of the jejuno-ileo-colic region an end-to-end anastomosis is preferable.

  1. Global Progress Toward Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome Control and Elimination - 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Grant, Gavin B; Reef, Susan E; Dabbagh, Alya; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Strebel, Peter M

    2015-09-25

    Rubella virus usually causes a mild fever and rash in children and adults. However, infection during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, can result in miscarriage, fetal death, stillbirth, or a constellation of congenital malformations known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated guidance on the preferred strategy for introduction of rubella-containing vaccine (RCV) into national routine immunization schedules, including an initial vaccination campaign usually targeting children aged 9 months-15 years . The Global Vaccine Action Plan endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2012 and the Global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan (2012-2020) published by Measles and Rubella Initiative partners in 2012 both include goals to eliminate rubella and CRS in at least two WHO regions by 2015, and at least five WHO regions by 2020 (2,3). This report updates a previous report and summarizes global progress toward rubella and CRS control and elimination during 2000-2014. As of December 2014, RCV had been introduced in 140 (72%) countries, an increase from 99 (51%) countries in 2000 (for this report, WHO member states are referred to as countries). Reported rubella cases declined 95%, from 670,894 cases in 102 countries in 2000 to 33,068 cases in 162 countries in 2014, although reporting is inconsistent. To achieve the 2020 Global Vaccine Action Plan rubella and CRS elimination goals, RCV introduction needs to continue as country criteria indicating readiness are met, and rubella and CRS surveillance need to be strengthened to ensure that progress toward elimination can be measured.

  2. Rubella and congenital rubella syndrome control and elimination - global progress, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Rubella virus usually causes a mild fever and rash in children and adults. However, infection during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, can result in miscarriage, stillbirth, or infants with congenital malformations, known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated guidance on the preferred strategy for introduction of rubella-containing vaccine (RCV) into national routine immunization schedules with an initial wide-age-range vaccination campaign that includes children aged 9 months-15 years. WHO also urged all member states to take the opportunity offered by accelerated measles control and elimination activities as a platform to introduce RCVs. The Global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan (2012-2020) published by the Measles Rubella Initiative partners in 2012 and the Global Vaccine Action Plan endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2012 include milestones to eliminate rubella and CRS in two WHO regions by 2015, and eliminate rubella in five WHO regions by 2020. This report summarizes the global progress of rubella and CRS control and elimination during 2000-2012. As of December 2012, a total of 132 (68%) WHO member states had introduced RCV, a 33% increase from 99 member states in 2000. A total of 94,030 rubella cases were reported to WHO in 2012 from 174 member states, an 86% decrease from the 670,894 cases reported in 2000 from 102 member states. The WHO Region of the Americas (AMR) and European Region (EUR) have established rubella elimination goals of 2010 and 2015, respectively. AMR has started to document the elimination of measles, rubella, and CRS; in EUR, rubella incidence has decreased significantly, although outbreaks continue to occur. PMID:24304830

  3. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in FOXC1 Causes Axenfeld Rieger Syndrome with Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Micheal, Shazia; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina; Cortés-González, Vianney; Khan, Muhammad Imran; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes in which frequently cornea, iris, and lens are affected. This study aimed to identify novel mutations in PAX6, PITX2 and FOXC1 in families with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. Methods We studied 14 Pakistani and one Mexican family with Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS; n = 10) or aniridia (n = 5). All affected and unaffected family members underwent full ophthalmologic and general examinations. Total genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed for the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FOXC1, PAX6, and PITX2 genes. Results Mutations were identified in five of the 15 probands; four variants were novel and one variant was described previously. A novel de novo variant (c.225C>A; p.Tyr75*) was identified in the PAX6 gene in two unrelated probands with aniridia. In addition, a known variant (c.649C>T; p.Arg217*) in PAX6 segregated in a family with aniridia. In the FOXC1 gene, a novel heterozygous variant (c.454T>C; p.Trp152Arg) segregated with the disease in a Mexican family with ARS. A novel homozygous variant (c.92_100del; p.Ala31_Ala33del) in the FOXC1 gene segregated in a Pakistani family with ARS and congenital glaucoma. Conclusions Our study expands the mutation spectrum of the PAX6 and FOXC1 genes in individuals with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. In addition, our study suggests that FOXC1 mutations, besides typical autosomal dominant ARS, can also cause ARS with congenital glaucoma through an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Our results thus expand the disease spectrum of FOXC1, and may lead to a better understanding of the role of FOXC1 in development. PMID:27463523

  4. Homozygous SALL1 Mutation Causes a Novel Multiple Congenital Anomaly—Mental Retardation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vodopiutz, Julia; Zoller, Heinz; Fenwick, Aimée L.; Arnhold, Richard; Schmid, Max; Prayer, Daniela; Müller, Thomas; Repa, Andreas; Pollak, Arnold; Aufricht, Christoph; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Janecke, Andreas R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To delineate a novel autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly-mental retardation (MCA-MR) syndrome in 2 female siblings of a consanguineous pedigree and to identify the disease-causing mutation. Study design Both siblings were clinically characterized and homozygosity mapping and sequencing of candidate genes were applied. The contribution of nonsense-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) decay to the expression of mutant mRNA in fibroblasts of a healthy carrier and a control was studied by pyrosequencing. Results We identified the first homozygous SALL1 mutation, c.3160C > T (p.R1054*), in 2 female siblings presenting with multiple congenital anomalies, central nervous system defects, cortical blindness, and absence of psychomotor development (ie, a novel recognizable, autosomal recessive MCA-MR). The mutant SALL1 transcript partially undergoes nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and is present at 43% of the normal transcript level in the fibroblasts of a healthy carrier. Conclusion Previously heterozygous SALL1 mutations and deletions have been associated with dominantly inherited anal-renal-radial-ear developmental anomalies. We identified an allelic recessive SALL1-related MCA-MR. Our findings imply that quantity and quality of SALL1 transcript are important for SALL1 function and determine phenotype, and mode of inheritance, of allelic SALL1-related disorders. This novel MCA-MR emphasizes SALL1 function as critical for normal central nervous system development and warrants a detailed neurologic investigation in all individuals with SALL1 mutations. PMID:23069192

  5. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome: Report of Two Cases and Brief Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Halil Gursoy; Nese, Nalan; Tarhan, Serdar; Baytur, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is the obstruction of the fetal upper airways, which may be partial or complete. It is usually incompatible with life. Prenatal recognition of the disease is quite important due to the recently described management options. We report here two cases of CHAOS due to tracheal atresia diagnosed by antenatal ultrasonography and fetal MRI. We also briefly review the relevant literature with the associated management options. PMID:24251054

  6. Spectrum of Steroid-Resistant and Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome in Children: The PodoNet Registry Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Trautmann, Agnes; Bodria, Monica; Ozaltin, Fatih; Gheisari, Alaleh; Melk, Anette; Azocar, Marta; Anarat, Ali; Caliskan, Salim; Emma, Francesco; Gellermann, Jutta; Oh, Jun; Baskin, Esra; Ksiazek, Joanna; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Erdogan, Ozlem; Akman, Sema; Dusek, Jiri; Davitaia, Tinatin; Özkaya, Ozan; Papachristou, Fotios; Firszt-Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Urasinski, Tomasz; Testa, Sara; Krmar, Rafael T.; Hyla-Klekot, Lidia; Pasini, Andrea; Özcakar, Z. Birsin; Sallay, Peter; Cakar, Nilgun; Galanti, Monica; Terzic, Joelle; Aoun, Bilal; Caldas Afonso, Alberto; Szymanik-Grzelak, Hanna; Lipska, Beata S.; Schnaidt, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome is a rare kidney disease involving either immune-mediated or genetic alterations of podocyte structure and function. The rare nature, heterogeneity, and slow evolution of the disorder are major obstacles to systematic genotype-phenotype, intervention, and outcome studies, hampering the development of evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic concepts. To overcome these limitations, the PodoNet Consortium has created an international registry for congenital nephrotic syndrome and childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Since August of 2009, clinical, biochemical, genetic, and histopathologic information was collected both retrospectively and prospectively from 1655 patients with childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, congenital nephrotic syndrome, or persistent subnephrotic proteinuria of likely genetic origin at 67 centers in 21 countries through an online portal. Results Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome manifested in the first 5 years of life in 64% of the patients. Congenital nephrotic syndrome accounted for 6% of all patients. Extrarenal abnormalities were reported in 17% of patients. The most common histopathologic diagnoses were FSGS (56%), minimal change nephropathy (21%), and mesangioproliferative GN (12%). Mutation screening was performed in 1174 patients, and a genetic disease cause was identified in 23.6% of the screened patients. Among 14 genes with reported mutations, abnormalities in NPHS2 (n=138), WT1 (n=48), and NPHS1 (n=41) were most commonly identified. The proportion of patients with a genetic disease cause decreased with increasing manifestation age: from 66% in congenital nephrotic syndrome to 15%–16% in schoolchildren and adolescents. Among various intensified immunosuppressive therapy protocols, calcineurin inhibitors and rituximab yielded consistently high response rates, with 40%–45% of patients

  7. Neonatal progeroid variant of Marfan syndrome with congenital lipodystrophy results from mutations at the 3' end of FBN1 gene.

    PubMed

    Jacquinet, Adeline; Verloes, Alain; Callewaert, Bert; Coremans, Christine; Coucke, Paul; de Paepe, Anne; Kornak, Uwe; Lebrun, Frederic; Lombet, Jacques; Piérard, Gérald E; Robinson, Peter N; Symoens, Sofie; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Debray, François-Guillaume

    2014-04-01

    We report a 16-year-old girl with neonatal progeroid features and congenital lipodystrophy who was considered at birth as a possible variant of Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome. The emergence of additional clinical signs (marfanoid habitus, severe myopia and dilatation of the aortic bulb) lead to consider the diagnosis of the progeroid variant of Marfan syndrome. A de novo donor splice-site mutation (c.8226+1G>A) was identified in FBN1. We show that this mutation leads to exon 64 skipping and to the production of a stable mRNA that should allow synthesis of a truncated profibrillin-1, in which the C-terminal furin cleavage site is altered. FBN1 mutations associated with a similar phenotype have only been reported in four other patients. We confirm the correlation between marfanoid phenotype with congenital lipodystrophy and neonatal progeroid features (marfanoid-progeroid-lipodystrophy syndrome) and frameshift mutations at the 3' end of FBN1. This syndrome should be considered in differential diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndromes.

  8. Acute Inhibition of MEK Suppresses Congenital Melanocytic Nevus Syndrome in a Murine Model Driven by Activated NRAS and Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Jeffrey S; Brock, Claire; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Al-Olabi, Lara; Nixon, Colin; McGregor, Fiona; Paine, Simon; Chanudet, Estelle; Lambie, Wendy; Holmes, William M; Mullin, James M; Richmond, Ann; Wu, Hong; Blyth, Karen; King, Ayala; Kinsler, Veronica A; Adams, Peter D

    2015-08-01

    Congenital melanocytic nevus (CMN) syndrome is the association of pigmented melanocytic nevi with extra-cutaneous features, classically melanotic cells within the central nervous system, most frequently caused by a mutation of NRAS codon 61. This condition is currently untreatable and carries a significant risk of melanoma within the skin, brain, or leptomeninges. We have previously proposed a key role for Wnt signaling in the formation of melanocytic nevi, suggesting that activated Wnt signaling may be synergistic with activated NRAS in the pathogenesis of CMN syndrome. Some familial pre-disposition suggests a germ-line contribution to CMN syndrome, as does variability of neurological phenotypes in individuals with similar cutaneous phenotypes. Accordingly, we performed exome sequencing of germ-line DNA from patients with CMN to reveal rare or undescribed Wnt-signaling alterations. A murine model harboring activated NRAS(Q61K) and Wnt signaling in melanocytes exhibited striking features of CMN syndrome, in particular neurological involvement. In the first model of treatment for this condition, these congenital, and previously assumed permanent, features were profoundly suppressed by acute post-natal treatment with a MEK inhibitor. These data suggest that activated NRAS and aberrant Wnt signaling conspire to drive CMN syndrome. Post-natal MEK inhibition is a potential candidate therapy for patients with this debilitating condition.

  9. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis: a proposed classification and a plea to avoid the ambiguous term "Ambras syndrome".

    PubMed

    Chen, WenChieh; Ring, Johannes; Happle, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis (CGHT) is a heterogenous group of diseases with continuing excessive growth of terminal hair. "Ambras syndrome" was first coined by Baumeister in 1993 to describe a case of nonsyndromic CGHT which was erroneously analogized to the portrait paintings of Petrus Gonzales and his children, exhibited in Ambras Castle near Innsbruck, Austria. This family probably, a syndromic type with abnormal dentition, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. CGHT associated with gingival hyperplasia is probably a particular entity typified by the historical cases of Julia Pastrana and her son. An X-linked type of CGHT has likewise been categorized as "Ambras syndrome". Moreover, some reports have mistakenly classified "Ambras syndrome" as an example of hypertrichosis lanuginosa. Potential gene loci identified so far may include 8q22, 17q24.2-q24.3 and Xq24-q27.1. The designation "Ambras syndrome" has thus been applied to various types of congenital hypertrichosis that differ to such degree that the name "Ambras" has no specific meaning, neither in the past nor in the future. Hence, this misleading term should now be jettisoned.

  10. Electrocardiographic changes following exercise in the congenitally deaf school children: relationship with Jervell Lange Neilsen syndrome (the Long QT syndrome).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R D; Pramod, J; Deep, J; Jaison, T M; Singh, S; Soni, K

    1998-10-01

    The present study was conducted to test the effects of exercise stress on the ECG of the congenitally deaf children from school for deaf, in view of the occurrence of the Jervell-Lange Neilsen (Surdo Cardiac) variant of the Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) in them. An ECG Lead II was recorded at rest and after two minutes of static jogging. For comparison, the same protocol was repeated in normal healthy children from another school. ECG were analysed for the calculation of corrected QT interval (QTc) by Bazett's equation QTc = QT/square root of R-R and also for the evidence for other abnormalities. Both in the normal and deaf children, exercise did not produce significant (P > 0.05) change in QTc from their resting values. However, when pre and post exercise QTc values of deaf children were compared with normal children, the female deaf had significantly longer QTc (P < 0.01) both at rest and after exercise than normal female children. Normal children did not show significant ECG abnormality either at rest or on exercise. On the contrary many of their counter part (deaf) exhibited occasional ECG abnormality at rest but plethora of abnormalities after exercise viz., sinus arrhythmias, sinus pauses, ST depression, T-inversion, biphasic-T, notched-T, T-alternans, nodal ectopics and junctional rhythm. These results lend credence to the hypothesis of sympathetic imbalance and repolarisation defects in deaf children's heart, which in more severe form could pass into frank Jervell-Lange Neilsen variant of the Long: QT Syndrome. PMID:10874353

  11. Broadening the Spectrum of Ehlers Danlos Syndrome in Patients With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F.; Dreiling, Jennifer L.; Arai, Andrew E.; Sachdev, Vandana; Hannoush, Hwaida; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; McDonnell, Nazli B.; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The contiguous gene deletion syndrome (CAH-X) was described in a subset (7%) of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients with a TNXA/TNXB chimera, resulting in deletions of CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase necessary for cortisol biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-X (TNX). This TNXA/TNXB chimera is characterized by a 120-bp deletion in exon 35 and results in TNXB haploinsufficiency, disrupted TGF-β signaling, and an Ehlers Danlos syndrome phenotype. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the genetic status of TNXB and resulting protein defects in CAH patients with a CAH-X phenotype but not the previously described TNXA/TNXB chimera. Design, Settings, Participants, and Intervention: A total of 246 unrelated CAH patients were screened for TNXB defects. Genetic defects were investigated by Southern blotting, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, Sanger, and next-generation sequencing. Dermal fibroblasts and tissue were used for immunoblotting, immunohistochemical, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Main Outcome Measures: The genetic and protein status of tenascin-X in phenotypic CAH-X patients was measured. Results: Seven families harbor a novel TNXB missense variant c.12174C>G (p.C4058W) and a clinical phenotype consistent with hypermobility-type Ehlers Danlos syndrome. Fourteen CAH probands carry previously described TNXA/TNXB chimeras, and seven unrelated patients carry the novel TNXB variant, resulting in a CAH-X prevalence of 8.5%. This highly conserved pseudogene-derived variant in the TNX fibrinogen-like domain is predicted to be deleterious and disulfide bonded, results in reduced dermal elastin and fibrillin-1 staining and altered TGF-β1 binding, and represents a novel TNXA/TNXB chimera. Tenascin-X protein expression was normal in dermal fibroblasts, suggesting a dominant-negative effect. Conclusions: CAH-X syndrome is commonly found in CAH due to 21-hydroxylase

  12. Novel NPHS1 splice site mutations in a Chinese child with congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fu, R; Gou, M F; Ma, W H; He, J J; Luan, Y; Liu, J

    2015-01-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) is defined as heavy proteinuria or nephrotic syndrome occurring before 3 months of age. It is characterized by early onset and progresses to end-stage renal disease. Recently, several genes associated with CNS have been identified, including NPHS1 and NPHS2. Mutations in the NPHS1 gene have been identified in patients with CNS in Finland with relatively high frequency. Thus far, only a few case reports about CNS have described an NPHS1 mutation in China. In this study, mutational analyses of NPHS1 and NPHS2 were performed in a Chinese child with CNS. Mutations were analyzed in all exons and exon/intron boundaries of NPHS1 and NPHS2 in the patient and his parents as well as in 50 unrelated controls using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing techniques. No mutations were detected in NPHS2. A novel splice site mutation (IVS11+1G>A) within intron 11 and a missense mutation within exon 8 (c.928G>A) in the NPHS1 gene were detected in the child. The child's mother had normal urinalysis and a c.928G>A (D310N) heterozygous mutation, and his father had normal urinalysis and IVS11+1G>A. These were not identified in the 50 unrelated controls. The novel splice site mutation of IVS11+1G>A and a missense mutation at c.928G>A in NPHS1 were found to cause CNS in this Chinese child.

  13. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by Biallelic TNXB Variants in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F; Morissette, Rachel; Dreiling, Jennifer L; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P

    2016-09-01

    Some variants that cause autosomal-recessive congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) also cause hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) due to the monoallelic presence of a chimera disrupting two flanking genes: CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase, necessary for cortisol and aldosterone biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding tenascin-X, an extracellular matrix protein. Two types of CAH tenascin-X (CAH-X) chimeras have been described with a total deletion of CYP21A2 and characteristic TNXB variants. CAH-X CH-1 has a TNXB exon 35 120-bp deletion resulting in haploinsufficiency, and CAH-X CH-2 has a TNXB exon 40 c.12174C>G (p.Cys4058Trp) variant resulting in a dominant-negative effect. We present here three patients with biallelic CAH-X and identify a novel dominant-negative chimera termed CAH-X CH-3. Compared with monoallelic CAH-X, biallelic CAH-X results in a more severe phenotype with skin features characteristic of classical EDS. We present evidence for disrupted tenascin-X function and computational data linking the type of TNXB variant to disease severity.

  14. Current epidemiology of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in Australia: progress towards elimination.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning; Gao, Zhanhai; Wood, James G; Hueston, Linda; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; MacIntyre, C Raina; Quinn, Helen E; Menzies, Robert; McIntyre, Peter

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluates the evidence for elimination of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in Australia, drawing on three national serosurveys conducted between 1996 and 2007 and supported by statutory notification and vaccine coverage data. Anti-rubella IgG seropositivity was defined as ≥ 10 IU/ml by EIA. Between 1998 and 2007, rubella notifications fell >100-fold, to an average of 2 cases per million and there were five confirmed cases of CRS, two of which were locally acquired in 2003. Weighted overall seropositivity remained constant among 1-49 year-olds (89.6% in 1999; 88.1% in 2007). Between 2002 and 2009, 95% of children received at least one dose of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. All three serosurveys provided estimates for R less than 0.5, well below the epidemic threshold of 1. All available data are supportive of Australia being considered for elimination status. Further reductions in incidence of CRS will require continued attention to vaccine coverage in overseas-born women, as well as the maintenance of current high coverage level of two-dose MMR vaccination.

  15. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Zlatareva, Dora; Raycheva, Margarita; Bichev, Stoyan; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients' age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes.

  16. Rubella in the Russian Federation: epidemiological features and control measures to prevent the congenital rubella syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Semerikov, V. V.; Lavrentyeva, I. N.; Popov, V. F.; Fletcher, M. A.; Kolotov, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the epidemiology of clinical rubella in the Perm region of the Russian Federation from 1979-97 showed that the incidence was about 220 cases per 100,000 population. Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) accounted for 15% of birth defects and for about 3.5 cases of CRS per 1000 live births per year. Surveys of the seroepidemiology of rubella infection revealed that the susceptibility rate among pregnant women (i.e. rubella virus antibody haemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) assay titres < 10) was 16.5%. As serum rubella antibody HAI titres > or = 10 both prevented infection in pregnant women and protected their foetuses, serological testing has been introduced into the routine antenatal services. Pre-existing rubella antibodies were found not to interfere with the immune response to vaccination, so selective immunization was provided to girls approaching puberty and to women of childbearing age. A programme of epidemiological surveillance is being developed to define tactics for the widescale introduction of rubella vaccination. PMID:11117959

  17. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Eisenmenger Syndrome: Current Practice in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David B.; Hanna, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon but serious disease characterized by severe pulmonary vascular disease and significant morbidity and mortality. PAH associated with congenital heart disease (APAH-CHD) is one etiology of PAH that has innate characteristics delineating it from other forms of PAH. The patient with APAH-CHD presents with unique challenges consisting of not only pulmonary vascular disease but also the complexity of the cardiac lesion. Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) represents the severe end of the spectrum for disease in APAH-CHD. Over time, systemic-to-pulmonary shunting through cardiac defects increases pulmonary vascular resistance to levels significant enough to reverse shunting across the defect. Historically, ES patients have been reported to have better outcomes than IPAH despite similarities in pulmonary vascular disease. However, recent studies are challenging this notion. Nonetheless, APAH-CHD survival has improved with the advent of modern PAH targeted therapies. New therapeutic options have allowed us to reconsider the dogma of inoperability in APAH-CHD patients with unrepaired defects. Certainly advances have been made, however, investigators must continue to advance the field through controlled clinical trials in both adult and pediatric APAH-CHD patients. PMID:25604592

  18. Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects Associated with Down Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Yun

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is common in infants with Down syndrome (DS), which is the principle cause of mortality. However, there is no data available for the frequency and types of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. We investigated the frequency of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. After the survey on birth defects was conducted throughout the country, the prevalence of CHD in DS in 2005-2006 was calculated. This study was conducted based on the medical insurance claims database of the National Health Insurance Corporation. The number of total births in Korea was 888,263 in 2005-2006; of them, 25,975 cases of birth defects were identified. The prevalence of DS was 4.4 per 10,000 total births, accounting for 1.5% of all birth defects. Of the 394 infants with DS, 224 (56.9%) had a CHD. Atrial septal defect was the most common defect accounting for 30.5% of DS followed by ventricular septal defect (19.3%), patent duct arteriosus (17.5%), and atrioventricular septal defect (9.4%). Our study will be helpful to demonstrate the current status of DS and to identify the distribution of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. PMID:25408587

  19. A novel syndrome of abnormal striatum and congenital cataract: evidence for linkage to chromosomes 11.

    PubMed

    Al-Owain, M; Al-Zahrani, J; Al-Bakheet, A; Abudheim, N; Al-Younes, B; Aldhalaan, H; Al-Zaidan, H; Colak, D; Almohaileb, F; Abouzied, M E; Al-Fadhli, F; Meyer, B; Kaya, N

    2013-09-01

    We report a consanguineous family of three girls and one boy affected with a novel syndrome involving the lens and the basal ganglia. The phenotype is strikingly similar between affected siblings with cognitive impairment, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), microcephaly, growth retardation, congenital cataract, and dystonia. The magnetic resonance imaging showed unusual pattern of swelling of the caudate heads and thinning of the putamina with severe degree of hypometabolism on the [18F] deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Furthermore, the clinical assessment provides the evidence that the neurological phenotype is very slowly progressive. We utilized the 10K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping for linkage analysis. Genome-wide scan indicated a 45.9-Mb region with a 4.2353 logarithm of the odds score on chromosome 11. Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 assay did not show any gross chromosomal abnormality. Targeted sequencing of two candidate genes within the linkage interval (PAX6 and B3GALTL) as well as mtDNA genome sequencing did not reveal any putative mutations.

  20. Control of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in developing countries, Part 2: Vaccination against rubella.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, S. E.; Cutts, F. T.; Samuel, R.; Diaz-Ortega, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    In 1995-96 we conducted a review of rubella immunization strategies. Worldwide, 78 countries (more than one-third) reported a national policy of using rubella vaccine. This was closely related to country economic status. Based on the United Nations country classification, rubella vaccine is used in 92% of industrialized countries, 36% of those with economies-in-transition, and 28% of developing countries. Cases of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) may be prevented as follows: by providing direct protection to women and/or schoolgirls (a selective vaccination strategy); by vaccinating boys and girls to provide indirect protection by reducing the transmission of rubella virus (a childhood vaccination strategy); or by a combination of these approaches (a combined strategy). A combined strategy was most commonly reported (60% of countries); seven countries (9%) reported a selective strategy; and 24 countries (31%) reported only childhood immunization. Experience has shown that it is essential to include vaccination of women of childbearing age in any rubella control strategy. Childhood vaccination alone may pose a risk of an increase in CRS cases. Although many countries have introduced rubella vaccine, few report any data on the impact of vaccination. Countries using rubella vaccine need to establish surveillance for rubella and CRS and monitor coverage in each of the target groups. PMID:9141752

  1. Genetic mutation analysis in Japanese patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroko; Nakaji, Mai; Kitano, Masataka; Kim, Ki-Sung; Sagawa, Koichi; Ishikawa, Shiro; Satokata, Ichiro; Mitani, Yoshihide; Kato, Hitoshi; Hamaoka, Kenji; Echigo, Shigeyuki; Shiraishi, Isao; Morisaki, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect occurring in humans and some transcriptional factors have been identified as causative. However, additional mutation analysis of these genes is necessary to develop effective diagnostic and medical treatment methods. We conducted sequence analysis of the coding regions of NKX2.5, GATA4, TBX1, TBX5, TBX20, CFC1 and ZIC3 in 111 Japanese patients with non-syndromic CHD and 9 of their relatives. All patient samples were also analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification using probes involved in chromosome deletion related to CHD. Five novel variations of TBX5, GATA4 and TBX20 were detected in 6 of the patients, whereas none were found in 200 controls. The TBX5 variation p.Pro108Thr, located in the T-box domain, was identified in a patient with tricuspid atresia, an exon-intron boundary variation of GATA4 (IVS4+5G>A) was detected in a Tetralogy of Fallot patient and an 8p23 microdeletion was detected in one patient with atrioventricular septal defect and psychomotor delay. A total of seven non-synonymous polymorphisms were found in the patients and controls. Accumulation of novel variations of genes involving the cardiac development may be required for better understanding of CHD. PMID:26490186

  2. Congenital Rubella Syndrome: A Case Report on Changes in Viral Load and Rubella Antibody Titers.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Koo; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ogura, Atsushi; Ogawa, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Noriko; Hishiki, Haruka; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess changes in viral load in a patient with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Rubella-specific antibody titers were also determined. The patient was a male neonate born to a primipara with rubella infection at 10 weeks of gestation. He had no symptoms at birth, but rubella virus was detected in his pharynx, blood, and urine. His mental and physical development was normal for 1 year; however, he was diagnosed with deafness at 13 months of age. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with CRS. Rubella infection in the pharynx was almost constant until 5 months of age; however, it increased dramatically at 6 months of age. No infection was detected at 13 months. Rubella-specific immunoglobulin M titer was consistently low until 9 months of age and then decreased gradually until it became negative at 20 months of age. Rubella-specific immunoglobulin G titer was high at birth. However, it decreased at 3 months and increased again at 4 months. This titer peaked at ∼9 months and then decreased again at 13 months. This case shows that the period after the decline in maternal antibody titers, not the neonatal period, may be the most contagious period in patients with CRS. PMID:27244797

  3. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: Mutation analysis of the receptor tyrosine kinase RET

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Angrist, M.; Schwartz, S.; Chakravarti, A. |

    1996-06-28

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) usually occurs as an isolated phenotype. However, 16% of the index cases are also affected with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Complex segregation analysis suggests that CCHS is familial and has the same inheritance pattern with or without HSCR. We postulate that alteration of normal function of the receptor tyrosine kinase, RET, may contribute to CCHS based on RET`s expression pattern and the identification of RET mutations in HSCR patients. To further explore the nature of the inheritance of CCHS, we have undertaken two main routes of investigation: cytogenetic analysis and mutation detection. Cytogenetic analysis of metaphase chromosomes showed normal karyotypes in 13 of the 14 evaluated index cases; one index case carried a familial pericentric inversion on chromosome 2. Mutation analysis showed no sequence changes unique to index cases, as compared to control individuals, and as studied by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding region of RET. We conclude that point mutations in the RET coding region cannot account for a substantial fraction of CCHS in this patient population, and that other candidate genes involved in neural crest cell differentiation and development must be considered. 54 refs.

  4. Zika fever and congenital Zika syndrome: An unexpected emerging arboviral disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper F W; Choi, Garnet K Y; Yip, Cyril C Y; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-05-01

    Unlike its mosquito-borne relatives, such as dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, which can cause severe human diseases, Zika virus (ZIKV) has emerged from obscurity by its association with a suspected "congenital Zika syndrome", while causing asymptomatic or mild exanthematous febrile infections which are dengue- or rubella-like in infected individuals. Despite having been discovered in Uganda for almost 60 years, <20 human cases were reported before 2007. The massive epidemics in the Pacific islands associated with the ZIKV Asian lineage in 2007 and 2013 were followed by explosive outbreaks in Latin America in 2015. Although increased mosquito breeding associated with the El Niño effect superimposed on global warming is suspected, genetic changes in its RNA virus genome may have led to better adaptation to mosquitoes, other animal reservoirs, and human. We reviewed the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, virology, pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, management, and prevention of this emerging infection. Laboratory diagnosis can be confounded by cross-reactivity with other circulating flaviviruses. Besides mosquito bite and transplacental transmission, the risk of other potential routes of transmission by transfusion, transplantation, sexual activity, breastfeeding, respiratory droplet, and animal bite is discussed. Epidemic control requires adequate clearance of mosquito breeding grounds, personal protection against mosquito bite, and hopefully a safe and effective vaccine.

  5. Implications of spatially heterogeneous vaccination coverage for the risk of congenital rubella syndrome in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, C. J. E.; Cohen, C.; Lessler, J.; McAnerney, J. M.; Ntshoe, G. M.; Puren, A.; Klepac, P.; Tatem, A.; Grenfell, B. T.; Bjørnstad, O. N.

    2013-01-01

    Rubella is generally a mild childhood disease, but infection during early pregnancy may cause spontaneous abortion or congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), which may entail a variety of birth defects. Since vaccination at levels short of those necessary to achieve eradication may increase the average age of infection, and thus potentially the CRS burden, introduction of the vaccine has been limited to contexts where coverage is high. Recent work suggests that spatial heterogeneity in coverage should also be a focus of concern. Here, we use a detailed dataset from South Africa to explore the implications of heterogeneous vaccination for the burden of CRS, introducing realistic vaccination scenarios based on reported levels of measles vaccine coverage. Our results highlight the potential impact of country-wide reductions of incidence of rubella on the local CRS burdens in districts with small population sizes. However, simulations indicate that if rubella vaccination is introduced with coverage reflecting current estimates for measles coverage in South Africa, the burden of CRS is likely to be reduced overall over a 30 year time horizon by a factor of 3, despite the fact that this coverage is lower than the traditional 80 per cent rule of thumb for vaccine introduction, probably owing to a combination of relatively low birth and transmission rates. We conclude by discussing the likely impact of private-sector vaccination. PMID:23152104

  6. An outbreak investigation of congenital rubella syndrome in Solomon Islands, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Durski, Kara N; Tituli, Carol; Ogaoga, Divi; Joshua, Cynthia; Dofai, Alfred; Leydon, Jennie; Nilles, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Introduction During May 2012, a rubella outbreak was declared in Solomon Islands. A suspected case of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) was reported from one hospital 11 months later in 2013. This report describes the subsequent CRS investigation, findings and measures implemented. Methods Prospective CRS surveillance was conducted at the newborn nursery, paediatric and post-natal wards, and the paediatric cardiology and ophthalmology clinics of the study hospital from April to July 2013. Retrospective case finding by reviewing medical records was also undertaken to identify additional cases born between January and March 2013 for the same wards and clinics. Cases were identified using established World Health Organization case definitions for CRS. Results A total of 13 CRS cases were identified, including two laboratory-confirmed, four clinically confirmed and seven suspected cases. Five CRS cases were retrospectively identified, including four suspected and one clinically confirmed case. There was no geospatial clustering of residences. The mothers of the cases were aged between 20 and 36 years. Three of the six mothers available for interview recalled an acute illness with rash during the first trimester of pregnancy. Discussion Additional CRS cases not captured in this investigation are likely. Caring for CRS cases is a challenge in resource-poor settings. Rubella vaccination is safe and effective and can prevent the serious consequences of CRS. Well planned and funded vaccination activities can prevent future CRS cases.

  7. Prevalence of congenital heart defects associated with Down syndrome in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-A; Lee, You Sun; Yee, Nan Hee; Choi, Jeong Soo; Choi, Jung Yun; Seo, Kyung

    2014-11-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is common in infants with Down syndrome (DS), which is the principle cause of mortality. However, there is no data available for the frequency and types of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. We investigated the frequency of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. After the survey on birth defects was conducted throughout the country, the prevalence of CHD in DS in 2005-2006 was calculated. This study was conducted based on the medical insurance claims database of the National Health Insurance Corporation. The number of total births in Korea was 888,263 in 2005-2006; of them, 25,975 cases of birth defects were identified. The prevalence of DS was 4.4 per 10,000 total births, accounting for 1.5% of all birth defects. Of the 394 infants with DS, 224 (56.9%) had a CHD. Atrial septal defect was the most common defect accounting for 30.5% of DS followed by ventricular septal defect (19.3%), patent duct arteriosus (17.5%), and atrioventricular septal defect (9.4%). Our study will be helpful to demonstrate the current status of DS and to identify the distribution of CHD in infants with DS in Korea.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension in adults with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome: current advanced management strategies.

    PubMed

    D'Alto, Michele; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2014-09-01

    The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) increases morbidity and reduces survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition, depending on the type of the underlying defect and previous repair strategies. There is growing evidence of the benefits of PAH-specific therapy in the PAH-CHD population, but despite recent advances mortality rates remain relatively high. In the last years, an increasing focus has been placed on patients with PAH-CHD and net left-to-right shunt. Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of these patients and uncertainty on the cut-off values for eventual defect closure. Pregnancy conveys significant risks in PAH-CHD patients: appropriate counselling and care, including psychological support and a multidisciplinary team, should be part of the routine management of women with PAH-CHD of reproductive age. Some subgroups, such as patients with Down's syndrome, Fontan circulation and 'segmental' pulmonary hypertension, present particular challenges in terms of management and therapy. The current review focuses on contemporary treatment strategies in PAH-CHD patients with particular emphasis on challenging patient groups and conditions.

  9. The value of the study of natural history in genetic disorders and congenital anomaly syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J G

    1988-01-01

    The study of the natural history of genetic disorders and syndromes with congenital anomalies and dysmorphic features is a challenging and often neglected area. There are many reasons to pursue this type of research but it requires special clinical skills and a considerable amount of hard work. Setting up protocols and collecting data is complex and time consuming. Frequently, helpful clues for a particular disorder come from the study of the natural history of other disorders. Older affected subjects and unique cases with unusual features are often most important in unravelling the 'normal' course of a disease or recognising the basic defect. The study of natural history from individual patients and their records is complementary to population or registry based studies because it identifies individual variations and clinical heterogeneity. The understanding of the natural history of a particular disorder is of importance both to the affected person and their family and to the physicians caring for them. It is also useful to the basic researcher trying to determine the pathogenetic mechanism causing the disorder. In many ways, clinical geneticists have learned the art of caring for patients, as well as the challenges of clinical genetics, by becoming apprentices to and studying in depth specific disease entities. PMID:3050091

  10. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by Biallelic TNXB Variants in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F; Morissette, Rachel; Dreiling, Jennifer L; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P

    2016-09-01

    Some variants that cause autosomal-recessive congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) also cause hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) due to the monoallelic presence of a chimera disrupting two flanking genes: CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase, necessary for cortisol and aldosterone biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding tenascin-X, an extracellular matrix protein. Two types of CAH tenascin-X (CAH-X) chimeras have been described with a total deletion of CYP21A2 and characteristic TNXB variants. CAH-X CH-1 has a TNXB exon 35 120-bp deletion resulting in haploinsufficiency, and CAH-X CH-2 has a TNXB exon 40 c.12174C>G (p.Cys4058Trp) variant resulting in a dominant-negative effect. We present here three patients with biallelic CAH-X and identify a novel dominant-negative chimera termed CAH-X CH-3. Compared with monoallelic CAH-X, biallelic CAH-X results in a more severe phenotype with skin features characteristic of classical EDS. We present evidence for disrupted tenascin-X function and computational data linking the type of TNXB variant to disease severity. PMID:27297501

  11. Genetic dissection of Down syndrome-associated congenital heart defects using a new mouse mapping panel

    PubMed Central

    Lana-Elola, Eva; Watson-Scales, Sheona; Slender, Amy; Gibbins, Dorota; Martineau, Alexandrine; Douglas, Charlotte; Mohun, Timothy; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Tybulewicz, Victor LJ

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), is the most common cause of congenital heart defects (CHD), yet the genetic and mechanistic causes of these defects remain unknown. To identify dosage-sensitive genes that cause DS phenotypes, including CHD, we used chromosome engineering to generate a mapping panel of 7 mouse strains with partial trisomies of regions of mouse chromosome 16 orthologous to Hsa21. Using high-resolution episcopic microscopy and three-dimensional modeling we show that these strains accurately model DS CHD. Systematic analysis of the 7 strains identified a minimal critical region sufficient to cause CHD when present in 3 copies, and showed that it contained at least two dosage-sensitive loci. Furthermore, two of these new strains model a specific subtype of atrio-ventricular septal defects with exclusive ventricular shunting and demonstrate that, contrary to current hypotheses, these CHD are not due to failure in formation of the dorsal mesenchymal protrusion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11614.001 PMID:26765563

  12. Sevoflurane-associated torsade de pointes in a patient with congenital long QT syndrome genotype 2.

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Mika; Hara, Koji; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Although patients with congenital long QT syndrome (c-LQTS) are considered to be at high risk for anesthesia, few reports describe c-LQTS genotype-specific considerations for anesthesia. We describe a case of torsade de pointes (TdP) caused by sevoflurane in a patient with c-LQTS genotype 2 (LQT2). A 39-year-old woman diagnosed with c-LQTS was scheduled for an elective therapeutic abortion. Immediately after starting the operation, the patient developed TdP. Since pulseless ventricular tachycardia was sustained despite intravenous injection of lidocaine, defibrillation was performed. Analysis of the electrocardiogram revealed that the corrected QT interval before anesthesia was 530 ms and 2.0% sevoflurane markedly prolonged the corrected QT interval to 693 ms. Postoperative studies revealed a mutation in the KCNH2 gene. Anesthesiologists should note that patients with LQT2 could be more susceptible to volatile anesthetics than are those with other major genotypes. Genotype-specific management of anesthesia may reduce the risk of developing TdP during the perioperative period. PMID:27555138

  13. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Zlatareva, Dora; Raycheva, Margarita; Bichev, Stoyan; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients' age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes. PMID:26060356

  14. Occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Moon, Seok-Whan; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Ki, Chang Seok

    2013-12-01

    An 8-year-old male presented with a cystic lung lesion in the left lower lobe, which was initially detected during surgery for a spontaneous rupture of the sigmoid colon at the age of 6 years. Tissue fragility and a tendency to bleed easily were noted during the surgery, which strongly suggested vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Although there was no abnormality in the hemostasis screening test, or any suspicious hereditary problem in his pedigree, genetic gene testing for vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was recommended, and showed a de novo mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This report presents the case of patient with occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung, in addition to a duplicated infrarenal vena cava.

  15. The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (congenital absence of uterus and vagina) – phenotypic manifestations and genetic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Guerrier, Daniel; Mouchel, Thomas; Pasquier, Laurent; Pellerin, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome affects at least 1 out of 4500 women and has for a long time been considered as a sporadic anomaly. Congenital absence of upper vagina and uterus is the prime feature of the disease which, in addition, is often found associated with unilateral renal agenesis or adysplasia as well as skeletal malformations (MURCS association). The phenotypic manifestations of MRKH overlap various other syndromes or associations and thus require accurate delineation. Since MRKH manifests itself in males, the term GRES syndrome (Genital, Renal, Ear, Skeletal) might be more appropriate when applied to both sexes. The MRKH syndrome, when described in familial aggregates, seems to be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with an incomplete degree of penetrance and variable expressivity. This suggests the involvement of either mutations in a major developmental gene or a limited chromosomal deletion. Until recently progress in understanding the genetics of MRKH syndrome has been slow, however, now HOX genes have been shown to play key roles in body patterning and organogenesis, and in particular during genital tract development. Expression and/or function defects of one or several HOX genes may account for this syndrome. PMID:16441882

  16. Electrophysiologic Substrate in Congenital Long QT Syndrome: Noninvasive Mapping with Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI)

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Kavit A.; Abraham, Robert L.; Strom, Maria; Sacher, Frederic; Van Hare, George F.; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Roden, Dan M.; Rudy, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an arrhythmogenic disorder that causes syncope and sudden death. While its genetic basis has become well-understood, the mechanisms whereby mutations translate to arrhythmia susceptibility in the in situ human heart have not been fully defined. We used noninvasive ECG imaging (ECGI) to map the cardiac electrophysiologic substrate and examine whether LQTS patients display regional heterogeneities in repolarization, a substrate which promotes arrhythmogenesis. Methods and Results 25 subjects (9 LQT1, 9 LQT2, 5 LQT3 and 2 LQT5) with genotype and phenotype positive LQTS underwent ECGI. Seven normal subjects provided control. Epicardial maps of activation, recovery times (RT), Activation-recovery intervals (ARI) and repolarization dispersion were constructed. Activation was normal in all patients. However, RT and ARI were prolonged relative to control, indicating delayed repolarization and abnormally long APD (312 ± 30 ms vs. 235 ± 21 ms in control). ARI prolongation was spatially heterogeneous, with repolarization gradients much steeper than control (119 ± 19 ms/cm vs. 2.0 ± 2.0 ms/cm). There was variability in steepness and distribution of repolarization gradients between and within LQTS types. Repolarization gradients were steeper in symptomatic patients (130 ± 27 ms/cm in 12 symptomatic patients vs. 98 ± 19 ms/cm in 13 asymptomatic patients; P < 0.05). Conclusions LQTS patients display regions with steep repolarization dispersion caused by localized APD prolongation. This defines a substrate for reentrant arrhythmias, not detectable by surface ECG. Steeper dispersion in symptomatic patients suggests a possible role for ECGI in risk stratification. PMID:25294783

  17. Impaired neural structure and function contributing to autonomic symptoms in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Harper, Rebecca K.; Ogren, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover, or hypoxic exposure

  18. Screening for Congenital Heart Disease in Infants with Down Syndrome: Is Universal Echocardiography Necessary?

    PubMed

    Bogarapu, Soujanya; Pinto, Nelangi M; Etheridge, Susan P; Sheng, Xiaoming; Liesemer, Kirk N; Young, Paul C; Saarel, Elizabeth V

    2016-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend that all neonates with Down syndrome (DS) be screened for congenital heart disease (CHD) with an echocardiogram. We sought to determine the effectiveness of a more accessible and less expensive screening strategy consisting of physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG), and chest X-ray. The Intermountain Healthcare Enterprise Data Warehouse was used to identify infants with a positive karyotype for DS who were born between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2012. Infants with the results of an echocardiogram, physical examination, ECG, and chest X-ray documented at age ≤6 months were included. Infants with an abnormality on physical examination, ECG, or chest X-ray were considered to have a positive screen. Echocardiography was the gold standard for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for major CHD, defined as any heart defect that would typically require intervention during early childhood. Of 408 eligible infants, 240 (59 %) had major CHD, of whom 228 (95 %) had a positive screen. Screening missed eight infants with moderate/large patent ductus arteriosus and four infants with a moderate/large atrial septal defect. In 11 of these infants, the defect resolved spontaneously by age ≤4 months. One infant had a moderate atrial septal defect persisting at 2-year follow-up. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening for detecting CHD were 95 % (CI 92-98 %) and 41 % (CI 32-47 %); positive and negative predictive values were 69 % (CI 63-73 %) and 85 % (CI 75-92 %). Screening with physical examination, ECG, and chest X-ray is an effective method of identifying which infants with DS should have an echocardiogram. This method would have resulted in 69 (17 %) fewer echocardiograms without missing infants with major CHD. PMID:27278630

  19. Epidemiology of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in Japan before 1989.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kohji

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in Japan have been conducted since the first nationwide rubella epidemic of 1965-1969 and subsequent epidemics of 1975-1977, 1982, 1987-1988, and 1992-1993. Rubella was non-endemic in Japan before the 1975-1977 epidemic, and endemic thereafter. Japan started a selective rubella vaccination program for junior high school girls in 1977, and universal rubella vaccination of children of both sexes in 1989. No nationwide rubella epidemics have occurred since 1994. Only three children with CRS were reported in Japan before 1964; however, many children with CRS were identified in 1965 when a rubella epidemic struck Okinawa, which has many the United States military bases. After the 1965-1969 and 1975-1977 rubella epidemics on the Japanese mainland, small numbers of children with CRS were identified (hospital survey). These findings led to the hypothesis that, compared to U.S. rubella virus strains, Japanese strains of rubella virus are less teratogenic. This hypothesis strongly affected the development of rubella vaccines in Japan. However, retrospective seroepidemiological studies attributed the CRS in many children in Okinawa to the high rate of rubella infection in pregnant women. According to the survey conducted at special schools for the deaf, 83, 232, 77, and 167 children were born with CRS on the Japanese mainland respectively after the 1965-1969, 1975-1977, 1982, and 1987-1988 nationwide rubella epidemics, suggesting that the incidence of CRS in Japan is in fact comparable to that in the U.S. and Europe. Rubella epidemics in children have been effectively prevented since 1994. However, a rubella outbreak among adult males and CRS occurred between 2012 and 2014.

  20. The cerebral cost of breathing: an FMRI case-study in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Mike; Gallea, Cécile; Lehongre, Katia; Galanaud, Damien; Nicolas, Nathalie; Similowski, Thomas; Cohen, Laurent; Straus, Christian; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Certain motor activities--like walking or breathing--present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks--including various frontal lobe areas--subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the "resting state" pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB), mechanical ventilation (MV) restored the default mode network (DMN) associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the active

  1. A Rare Combination: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due To 21 Hydroxylase Deficiency and Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Aycan, Zehra; Çetinkaya, Semra; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat Yılmaz; Önder, Aşan

    2012-01-01

    A combination of Turner syndrome (TS) and classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is rare. A one-day-old newborn was referred to our hospital with ambiguous genitalia. The parents were third-degree relatives. The infant’s weight was 3350g (50-75p), and the head circumference was 34.5cm (50p). The gonads were nonpalpable. Presence of a 3 cm phallus, one urogenital opening into the perineum, and incomplete labial fusion were identified. Laboratory tests revealed a classical type of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Karyotyping revealed a 45X0(35)/46XX(22) pattern with negative sex-determining region Y (SRY) on gene analysis. At the most recent follow-up visit, the patient appeared to be in good health - her height was 70.4 cm [-1.5 standard deviation (SD)] and her weight was 9.8 kg (0.3 SD). She was receiving hydrocortisone in a dose of 10 mg/m2/day, fludrocortisone acetate in a dose of 0.075 mg/day, and oral salt of 1 g/day. System examinations were normal. The patient’s electrolyte levels were found to be normal and she was in good metabolic control. The findings of this patient demonstrate that routine karyotyping during investigation of patients with sexual differentiation disorders can reveal TS. Additionally, signs of virilism should always be investigated at diagnosis or during physical examinations for follow-up of TS cases. [i][/i]SRY analysis should be performed primarily when signs of virilism are observed. CAH should also be considered in patients with negative [i]SRY[/i]. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23261864

  2. Cleft Palate, Retrognathia and Congenital Heart Disease in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome: A Phenotype Correlation Study

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marcia A.; Miletta, Nathanial; Roe, Cheryl; Wang, Dongliang; Morrow, Bernice E.; Kates, Wendy R.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a microdeletion of approximately 40 genes from one copy of chromosome 22. Expression of the syndrome is a variable combination of over 190 phenotypic characteristics. As of yet, little is known about how these phenotypes correlate with one another or whether there are predictable patterns of expression. Two of the most common phenotypic categories, congenital heart disease and cleft palate, have been proposed to have a common genetic relationship to the deleted T-box 1 gene (TBX1). The purpose of this study is to determine if congenital heart disease and cleft palate are correlated in a large cohort of human subjects with VCFS. Methods This study is a retrospective chart review including 316 Caucasian non-Hispanic subjects with FISH or CGH microarray confirmed chromosome 22q11.2 deletions. All subjects were evaluated by the interdisciplinary team at the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome International Center at Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY. Each combination of congenital heart disease, cleft palates, and retrognathia was analyzed by chi square or Fisher exact test. Results For all categories of congenital heart disease and cleft palate or retrognathia no significant associations were found, with the exception of submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.0325) and occult submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.000013). Conclusions Congenital heart disease and cleft palate do not appear to be correlated in human subjects with VCFS despite earlier suggestions from animal models. Possible explanations include modification of the effect of TBX1 by genes outside of the 22q11.2 region that may further influence the formation of the palate or heart, or the presence of epigenetic factors that may effect genes within the deleted region, modifying genes elsewhere, or polymorphisms on the normal copy of chromosome 22. Lastly, it is possible that TBX1 plays a role in palate formation in some

  3. A premature termination mutation in a patient with Lowe syndrome without congenital cataracts: dropping the "O" in OCRL.

    PubMed

    Pasternack, S M; Böckenhauer, D; Refke, M; Tasic, V; Draaken, M; Conrad, C; Born, M; Betz, R C; Reutter, H; Ludwig, M

    2013-01-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the triad of congenital cataracts, mental retardation and a renal proximal tubulopathy. Although severity of phenotype might vary, congenital cataracts are part of the definition of this rare disorder.We report a 13-year-old patient with the typical cerebrorenal phenotype of Lowe syndrome, that had remained undiagnosed due to absence of any ocular involvement. OCRL gene analysis was carried.DNA analysis revealed a c.C760T (p.Gln199X) nonsense mutation in exon 8 expected to cause complete disruption of OCRL function. After sequencing the parents of the index patient and his maternal grandparents, this mutation turned out to be de novo in the mother. Furthermore, a silent variant (p.Arg35=) was identified in exon 2, that could also be identified in the mother and her 3 sisters, but not in the grandparents assuming germ cell mosaicism in either of the grandparents. RNA analysis from the patient's lymphocytes revealed presence of full-length OCRL transcripts. Western blotting from lymphocyte samples failed to detect OCRL protein even in controls.Our findings extend the phenotypic spectrum caused by OCRL mutations and illustrate that there may be selective organ involvement in Lowe syndrome.

  4. Management of ventricular fibrillation or unstable ventricular tachycardia in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome: a suggested modification to ACLS guidelines.

    PubMed

    Homme, Jason H; White, Roger D; Ackerman, Michael J

    2003-10-01

    Prolongation of the QT interval is a known risk factor for syncope, seizures and sudden cardiac death. Most patients with QT prolongation have an acquired cause, but congenital forms of QT prolongation are being increasingly recognized. However, existing advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) treatment algorithms for prolonged QT mediated ventricular fibrillation pertains to acquired long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Here, a young patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to congenital LQTS illustrates critical exceptions to the current ACLS treatment algorithms for ventricular fibrillation and unstable ventricular tachycardia when QT prolongation is congenital in origin. A clarified ACLS algorithm is proposed.

  5. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Lalita; Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Mishra, Ramesh C; Rao, Amaresh M; Kapur, Pragati

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD), subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right ventricular infundibular resection, subaortic membrane resection, closure of atrial and ventricular septal defect, rerouting left superior vena cava to left pulmonary artery and aortic valve replacement.

  6. Tannic acid facilitates expression of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein and alleviates deleterious inclusion of CHRNA1 exon P3A due to an hnRNP H-disrupting mutation in congenital myasthenic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yang; Masuda, Akio; Matsuura, Tohru; Ito, Mikako; Okushin, Kazuya; Engel, Andrew G.; Ohno, Kinji

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the intronic splice-site mutation IVS3-8G>A of CHRNA1 that encodes the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α subunit disrupts binding of a splicing repressor, hnRNP H. This, in turn, results in exclusive inclusion of the downstream exon P3A. The P3A(+) transcript encodes a non-functional α subunit that comprises 50% of the transcripts in normal human skeletal muscle, but its functional significance remains undetermined. In an effort to search for a potential therapy, we screened off-label effects of 960 bioactive chemical compounds and found that tannic acid ameliorates the aberrant splicing due to IVS3-8G>A but without altering the expression of hnRNP H. Therefore, we searched for another splicing trans-factor. We found that the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) binds close to the 3′ end of CHRNA1 intron 3, that PTB induces skipping of exon P3A and that tannic acid increases the expression of PTB in a dose-dependent manner. Deletion assays of the PTB promoter region revealed that the tannic acid-responsive element is between positions −232 and −74 from the translation initiation site. These observations open the door to the discovery of novel therapies based on PTB overexpression and to detecting possible untoward effects of the overexpression. PMID:19147685

  7. Surgical management of a large peritoneal pseudocyst causing acute kidney injury secondary to abdominal compartment syndrome in a rare case of congenital absence of omentum during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benjamin P; Hunjan, Tia; Terry, Jayne

    2016-09-01

    Complete congenital absence of the omentum is very rare with only one previously reported case. We present a unique case of the management of a pregnant woman with a large pelvic pseudocyst caused by complications related to congenital absence of omentum, resulting in acute kidney injury, likely secondary to acute compartment syndrome. This case highlights the importance of considering acute compartment syndrome in critically unwell pregnant women and reiterates the need to measure intra-abdominal pressure when clinically indicated. Given that pregnancy is in itself a state of intra-abdominal hypertension, obstetricians should maintain a high index of suspicion in the context of additional risk factors. PMID:27630753

  8. Role of alpha1-blockade in congenital long QT syndrome: investigation by exercise stress test.

    PubMed

    Furushima, H; Chinushi, M; Washizuka, T; Aizawa, Y

    2001-07-01

    Beta-blockade is widely reported to reduce the incidence of syncope in 75-80% of patients with congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). However, despite full-dose beta-blockade, 20-25% of patients continue to have syncopal episodes and remain at high risk for sudden cardiac death. In some patients refractory to beta-blockade, the recurrence of arrhythmias is successfully prevented by left stellate ganglionectomy, and also by labetalol, a nonselective beta-blockade with alpha1-blocking action. These observations suggest that not only beta-adrenoceptors, but also alpha1-adrenoceptors, play an important pathogenic role, especially under sympathetic stimulation, in LQTS. The clinical effects of alpha1-blockade in congenital LQTS were investigated in 8 patients with familial or sporadic LQTS. Two measurements of the QT interval were taken, from the QRS onset to the T wave offset (QT) and from the QRS onset to the peak of the T wave (QTp). Using the Bruce protocol, an exercise test was performed after administration of beta-blockade alone and again after administration of alpha1-blockade. The following were compared: (1) Bazzet-corrected QT (QTc) and QTp (QTpc) intervals in the supine and standing position before exercise and in the early recovery phase after exercise; and (2) the slopes (reflecting the dynamic change in the QT interval during exercise) of the QT interval to heart rate were obtained from the linear regression during the exercise test. In the supine position before exercise, there was no change in the QTc before or after the addition of alpha1-blockade (498+/-23 vs 486+/-23 ms [NS]). However, in the upright position before exercise and in the early recovery phase after exercise, QTc was significantly shortened from 523+/-21 to 483+/-22ms (p<0.01), and from 521+/-30 to 490+/-39ms (p<0.01), respectively, by alpha1-blockade. The QTpc was unchanged in any situation. Consequently, QTc-QTpc was significantly shortened by alpha1-blockade in the upright position

  9. Misdiagnosis of omphalocele associated with Edwards syndrome and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Colley, N; Knott, P D; Gould, S J

    1987-06-01

    We present a case in which an apparent omphalocele, diagnosed at 30 weeks gestation by ultrasound, led to identification of fetal trisomy 18 and congenital heart disease. At delivery, the fetus had the features of trisomy 18 and congenital heart disease but the omphalocele was absent. We suggest that the appearances seen are easily confused with a small omphalocele and could potentially result in unnecessary further investigations being performed.

  10. Nutritional intakes in children with Prader–Willi syndrome and non-congenital obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Daniela A.; Nowak, Jill; McLaren, Erin; Patiño, Monzeratt; Castner, Diobel M.; Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) have extremely regulated diets to prevent the development of morbid obesity. Objective This study evaluated potential deficiencies in macro and micronutrients in a cohort of youth with PWS and compared them to a group of children with non-congenital obesity and to US national recommendations. Design Participants were 32 youth with PWS (age=10.8±2.6 years, body fat=46.7±10.1%) and 48 children without PWS but classified as obese (age=9.7±1.2 years, body fat=43.4±5.7%). Participants’ parents completed a training session on food recording before completing a 3-day food record during a typical week including a weekend day and two weekdays, as well as a screening form indicating nutritional supplements use. Results Youth with PWS reported less calories (1,312±75 vs. 1,531±61 kcal, p=0.03), carbohydrate (175±10 vs. 203±8 g), and sugars (67±5 vs. 81±4 g; p=0.04 for both) than obese. Youth with PWS consumed more vegetables (1.1±0.1 vs. 0.6±0.1 cups) and more of them met the daily recommendation (p<0.01 for both). Likewise, youth with PWS consumed more calcium than obese (899±53 vs. 752±43 mg) and more of them met the recommended daily dose (p=0.04 for both). The majority of participants in this study did not meet the vitamin D recommendation. Conclusion Despite consuming less calories, youth with PWS had a similar proportion of macronutrients in their diet as children with obesity. Micronutrient deficiencies in calcium and vitamin D in youth with PWS were noted despite a third of youth with PWS consuming multivitamin supplements. Special attention must be paid to the diets of youth with PWS and with obesity to ensure they are meeting micronutrient needs during this period of growth and development. PMID:26652260

  11. Average Volume-Assured Pressure Support in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vagiakis, Emmanouil; Koutsourelakis, Ioannis; Perraki, Eleni; Roussos, Charis; Mastora, Zafeiria; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Kotanidou, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by the absence of adequate autonomic control of respiration, which results in alveolar hypoventilation and decreased sensitivity to hypercarbia and hypoxemia, especially during sleep.1 Patients with CCHS need lifelong ventilatory support. The treatment options for CCHS include intermittent positive pressure ventilation administered via tracheostomy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, negative-pressure ventilation by body chamber or cuirass, and phrenic nerve pacing.2 However, it may be necessary to alter the mode of ventilation according to age, psychosocial reasons, complications of therapy, and emergence of new modes of ventilation.3 We present a case of a 16-year-old girl with CCHS who was mechanically ventilated via tracheostomy for 16 years and was successfully transitioned to a new modality of noninvasive ventilation (average volume-assured pressure support [AVAPS]) that automatically adjusts the pressure support level in order to provide a consistent tidal volume. Citation: Vagiakis E; Koutsourelakis I; Perraki E; Roussos C; Mastora Z; Zakynthinos S; Kotanidou A. Average volume-assured pressure support in a 16-year-old girl with central congenital hypoventilation syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(6):609-612. PMID:21206552

  12. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients. PMID:25117323

  13. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  14. A mutation causes MuSK reduced sensitivity to agrin and congenital myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Ben Ammar, Asma; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Bauché, Stéphanie; Richard, Pascale; Goillot, Evelyne; Herbst, Ruth; Gaudon, Karen; Huzé, Caroline; Schaeffer, Laurent; Yamanashi, Yuji; Higuchi, Osamu; Taly, Antoine; Koenig, Jeanine; Leroy, Jean-Paul; Hentati, Fayçal; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ilkhani, Manouchehr; Fardeau, Michel; Eymard, Bruno; Hantaï, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. The agrin/muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) pathway is critical for proper development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We report here an Iranian patient in whom CMS was diagnosed since he presented with congenital and fluctuating bilateral symmetric ptosis, upward gaze palsy and slowly progressive muscle weakness leading to loss of ambulation. Genetic analysis of the patient revealed a homozygous missense mutation c.2503A>G in the coding sequence of MUSK leading to the p.Met835Val substitution. The mutation was inherited from the two parents who were heterozygous according to the notion of consanguinity. Immunocytochemical and electron microscopy studies of biopsied deltoid muscle showed dramatic changes in pre- and post-synaptic elements of the NMJs. These changes induced a process of denervation/reinnervation in native NMJs and the formation, by an adaptive mechanism, of newly formed and ectopic NMJs. Aberrant axonal outgrowth, decreased nerve terminal ramification and nodal axonal sprouting were also noted. In vivo electroporation of the mutated MuSK in a mouse model showed disorganized NMJs and aberrant axonal growth reproducing a phenotype similar to that observed in the patient's biopsy specimen. In vitro experiments showed that the mutation alters agrin-dependent acetylcholine receptor aggregation, causes a constitutive activation of MuSK and a decrease in its agrin- and Dok-7-dependent phosphorylation.

  15. A Mutation Causes MuSK Reduced Sensitivity to Agrin and Congenital Myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ammar, Asma; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Bauché, Stéphanie; Richard, Pascale; Goillot, Evelyne; Herbst, Ruth; Gaudon, Karen; Huzé, Caroline; Schaeffer, Laurent; Yamanashi, Yuji; Higuchi, Osamu; Taly, Antoine; Koenig, Jeanine; Leroy, Jean-Paul; Hentati, Fayçal; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ilkhani, Manouchehr; Fardeau, Michel; Eymard, Bruno; Hantaï, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. The agrin/muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) pathway is critical for proper development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We report here an Iranian patient in whom CMS was diagnosed since he presented with congenital and fluctuating bilateral symmetric ptosis, upward gaze palsy and slowly progressive muscle weakness leading to loss of ambulation. Genetic analysis of the patient revealed a homozygous missense mutation c.2503A>G in the coding sequence of MUSK leading to the p.Met835Val substitution. The mutation was inherited from the two parents who were heterozygous according to the notion of consanguinity. Immunocytochemical and electron microscopy studies of biopsied deltoid muscle showed dramatic changes in pre- and post-synaptic elements of the NMJs. These changes induced a process of denervation/reinnervation in native NMJs and the formation, by an adaptive mechanism, of newly formed and ectopic NMJs. Aberrant axonal outgrowth, decreased nerve terminal ramification and nodal axonal sprouting were also noted. In vivo electroporation of the mutated MuSK in a mouse model showed disorganized NMJs and aberrant axonal growth reproducing a phenotype similar to that observed in the patient’s biopsy specimen. In vitro experiments showed that the mutation alters agrin-dependent acetylcholine receptor aggregation, causes a constitutive activation of MuSK and a decrease in its agrin- and Dok-7-dependent phosphorylation. PMID:23326516

  16. [Mosaic isochromosome Xq and microduplication 17p13.3p13.2 in a patient with Turner syndrome and congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Rojas Martínez, Jorge A; Acosta Guio, Johanna C

    2015-01-01

    The combination of Turner syndrome with other genetic disorders such as congenital cataract has been reported, but its association with a congenital form with autosomal dominant inheritance and incomplete penetrance has not been previously reported in the literature. There are no reports on its presentations with rearrangements on chromosome 17. We report the exceptional case of a 20 months old girl with a constellation of major and minor anomalies, diagnosed with mosaic Turner syndrome by isochromosome Xq associated with a microduplication 17p13.3p13.2, who also had bilateral congenital nuclear cataract autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance. We reviewed in the literature the origin and cause of these genetic alterations and we provided an approach to the hypothesis of the pathogenesis of the association of two of these genetic disorders in the same patient.

  17. Myasthenic crisis and polymyositis induced by one dose of nivolumab.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshihiro; Fukushima, Satoshi; Miyashita, Azusa; Aoi, Jun; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Kosaka, Takayuki; Ando, Yukio; Matsukawa, Masakazu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Park, Jae-Hyun; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    An 80-year-old man, who developed multiple lymph node and skin metastasis of malignant melanoma, received nivolumab monotherapy. Two weeks after the first dose, he experienced anorexia and fatigue, and suffered from progressive, severe dyspnea and muscle weakness. We diagnosed him with myocarditis, myositis, and myasthenic crisis induced by nivolumab. We commenced steroid therapy, immune absorption therapy, plasma exchange therapy, and i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, and succeeded in saving his life. Because his serum level of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in a sample collected before nivolumab treatment were positive and were elevated significantly after nivolumab, we suspected that nivolumab triggered a severe autoimmune response, which progressed subclinical myasthenia gravis to myasthenic crisis. We carried out T cell receptor repertoire analysis using next-generation sequencing technologies and identified infiltration of clonally expanded T cell populations in the skeletal muscle after nivolumab treatment, implying a very strong T cell immune response against muscular cells. To avoid severe immune-related adverse events, the exclusion of patients with subclinical autoimmune disease is very important for treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27420474

  18. Hereditary pancreatic hypoplasia, diabetes mellitus, and congenital heart disease: a new syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Yorifuji, T; Matsumura, M; Okuno, T; Shimizu, K; Sonomura, T; Muroi, J; Kuno, C; Takahashi, Y; Okuno, T

    1994-01-01

    We report on a Japanese family with hereditary pancreatic hypoplasia, diabetes mellitus, and congenital heart disease. The disease was apparently inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The patients in this family had no major anomalies other than those of the heart and pancreas. To our knowledge, this combination has not previously been reported. Images PMID:8071961

  19. [Vasopressin V2 receptor-related pathologies: congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and nephrogenic syndrome of inappropiate antidiuresis].

    PubMed

    Morin, Denis

    2014-12-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a rare hereditary disease with mainly an X-linked inheritance (90% of the cases) but there are also autosomal recessive and dominant forms. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is characterized by a resistance of the renal collecting duct to the action of the arginine vasopressin hormone responsible for the inability of the kidney to concentrate urine. The X-linked form is due to inactivating mutations of the vasopressin 2 receptor gene leading to a loss of function of the mutated receptors. Affected males are often symptomatic in the neonatal period with a lack of weight gain, dehydration and hypernatremia but mild phenotypes may also occur. Females carrying the mutation may be asymptomatic but, sometimes, severe polyuria is found due to the random X chromosome inactivation. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms, occurring in both genders, are linked to mutations in the aquaporin-2 gene. The treatment remains difficult, especially in infants, and is based on a low osmotic diet with increased water intake and the use of thiazides and indomethacin. The main goal is to avoid hypernatremic episodes and maintain a good hydration state. Potentially, specific treatment, in some cases of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with pharmacological chaperones such as non-peptide vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists will be available in the future. Conversely, the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is linked to a constitutive activation of the V(2)-receptor due to activating mutations with clinical and biological features of inappropriate antidiuresis but with low or undetectable plasma arginine vasopressin hormone levels.

  20. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B.; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J.; Roberts, Amy E.; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E.; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R.; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60–75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients. PMID:26742502

  1. Models of strategies for control of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome-a 40 year experience from Australia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhanhai; Wood, James G; Burgess, Margaret A; Menzies, Robert I; McIntyre, Peter B; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2013-01-11

    We investigated the impact of vaccination on rubella epidemiology in Australia, using a mathematical model fitted to Australian serosurvey data and incorporating pre-vaccination European estimates of rubella transmissibility. Mass infant measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination produced a 99% reduction in both rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) incidence by 2010 compared to the pre-vaccination era (1960-70). The model is consistent with reductions in CRS based on surveillance of congenital hearing impairment. Model simulations suggest that selective schoolgirl vaccination (1971-88) was associated with a 90% reduction in CRS incidence, but only a 1-4% reduction in rubella incidence. Our model predicted that these reductions in rubella were much less vulnerable to reductions in MMR vaccine coverage than for measles. In the future, a less than 15% decrease in MMR vaccine coverage is estimated to have minimal impact before 2060, but a 20% reduction may result in a 7-fold increase in rubella incidence, with the effective reproductive number R rising from 0.28 to 0.78 by 2060. The 99% reduction in both rubella and CRS incidence and low effective reproductive number (R≤0.28) we documented after 2010 are consistent with Australia having achieved rubella elimination.

  2. A novel FGD1 mutation in a family with Aarskog–Scott syndrome and predominant features of congenital joint contractures

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Laurie Beth; Farley, Frances A.; Antonellis, Anthony; Keegan, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in FGD1 cause Aarskog–Scott syndrome (AAS), an X-linked condition characterized by abnormal facial, skeletal, and genital development due to abnormal embryonic morphogenesis and skeletal formation. Here we report a novel FGD1 mutation in a family with atypical features of AAS, specifically bilateral upper and lower limb congenital joint contractures and cardiac abnormalities. The male proband and his affected maternal uncle are hemizygous for the novel FGD1 mutation p.Arg921X. This variant is the most carboxy-terminal FGD1 mutation identified in a family with AAS and is predicted to truncate the FGD1 protein at the second to last amino acid of the carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Our study emphasizes the importance of the 3′ peptide sequence in the structure and/or function of the FGD1 protein and further demonstrates the need to screen patients with X-linked congenital joint contractures for FGD1 mutations. PMID:27551683

  3. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome). PMID:27625455

  4. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome).

  5. Creatinine clearance, urinary excretion of glomerular basement membrane antigens and renal histology in congenital nephrotic syndrome of Finnish type.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, N P

    1977-04-01

    The endogenous creatinine clearance and urinary excretion rate of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antigens were followed from 2 to 19 months in fifteen patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNF). The quantitative examination of renal morphology was made on fourteen of these patients. Creatinine clearance increased during the first few months of life and thereafter gradually decreased. The urinary excretion rate of GBM antigens rose during the course of the disease. The creatinine clearance did not correlate significantly with glomerular fibrosis but it did correlate with tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The urinary excretion of GBM antigens correlated significantly with glomerular and interstitial fibrosis and with tubular atrophy. It is concluded that there is a clear progress in the disease and the renal histological changes probably are caused by accumulation of GBM material in glomeruli.

  6. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome). PMID:27625455

  7. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Platelet storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... disorder may also cause severe bleeding. Platelet storage pool disorder (also called platelet secretion disorder) occurs when ...

  8. Novel compound heterozygous PIGT mutations caused multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Mitsuko; Kashii, Hirofumi; Murakami, Yoshiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Kubota, Masaya; Kinoshita, Taroh; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-08-01

    Recessive mutations in genes of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor synthesis pathway have been demonstrated as causative of GPI deficiency disorders associated with intellectual disability, seizures, and diverse congenital anomalies. We performed whole exome sequencing in a patient with progressive encephalopathies and multiple dysmorphism with hypophosphatasia and identified novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.250G>T (p. Glu84*) and c.1342C>T (p. Arg488Trp), in PIGT encoding a subunit of the GPI transamidase complex. The surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on patient granulocytes was lower than that of healthy controls. Transfection of the Arg488Trp mutant PIGT construct, but not the Glu84* mutant, into PIGT-deficient cells partially restored the expression of GPI-APs DAF and CD59. These results indicate that PIGT mutations caused neurological impairment and multiple congenital anomalies in this patient.

  9. [Congenital cardiopathy in a patient with Sotos syndrome. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Di Marco, G; Levantesi, G; Parisi, G; Chiarelli, A

    1989-05-01

    The number of cases of Sotos syndrome or cerebral gigantism described in the literature total more than 200. For 6 of these, cardiac malformations were described. The authors report a case of Sotos syndrome in which malformative alterations of the aortic and mitral valves were simultaneously present. PMID:2670658

  10. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  11. 8p23.1 Interstitial Deletion in a Patient with Congenital Cardiopathy, Neurobehavioral Disorders, and Minor Signs Suggesting 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Molck, Miriam C; Monteiro, Fabíola P; Simioni, Milena; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L

    2015-09-01

    Copy number variation studies of known disorders have the potential to improve the characterization of clinical phenotypes and may help identifying candidate genes and their pathways. The authors described a child with congenital heart disease, microcephaly, facial dysmorphisms, developmental delay, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. There was initially a clinical suspicion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS), but molecular cytogenetic analysis (array genomic hybridization [aGH]) showed the presence of a de novo 3.6-Mb interstitial microdeletion in 8p23.1. The main features of 8p23.1 DS include congenital heart disease and behavioral problems, in addition to minor dysmorphisms and mental delay. Therefore, this article highlights the application of aGH to investigate 8p23.1 deletion in nonconfirmed 22q11.2 DS patients presenting neurobehavioral disorders, congenital cardiopathy, and minor dysmorphisms.

  12. Multiple congenital malformations in two sibs reminiscent of hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Dincsoy, M.Y.; Salih, M.A.M.; Al-Jurayyan, N.

    1995-04-10

    We report on two sibs, born to consanguineous parents, with defects of the midline including cleft lip and palate, flat nose, hypotelorism, and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, in addition to short limbs, radiolucent tibial notch, digital anomalies, ambiguous genitalia, and hypopituitarism. In spite of the similarities between this condition and the hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes, our patients had neither preaxial nor postaxial polydactyly, but had previously undescribed bilateral radiolucent tibial notch, which is not known to be part of those two syndromes. The cases presented here may very well represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A Case of Lacrimo-Auriculo-Dento-Digital Syndrome with Multiple Congenitally Missing Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Munagala Karthik; Rallan, Mandeep

    2016-01-01

    Lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital (LADD) syndrome is an extremely rare disorder which may occur sporadically or inheritably as an autosomal dominant condition. It is characterized by defects in the lacrimal apparatus, ear problems, and dental and digital abnormalities. However, specific symptoms vary greatly among the cases with a high degree of overlap with other similar genetic disorders. Here, we describe a 7-year-old boy with LADD syndrome, clinical and radiological findings, dental treatment undertaken, and its differential diagnosis. PMID:27803819

  14. Microdeletion on 17p11.2 in a Smith-Magenis syndrome patient with mental retardation and congenital heart defect: first report from China.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Yang, Y-F; Zhang, H; Xie, L; Chen, J-L; Wang, J; Tan, Z-P; Luo, H

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a rare syndrome with multiple congenital malformations, including development and mental retardation, behavioral problems and a distinct facial appearance. SMS is caused by haploinsufficiency of RAI1 (deletion or mutation of RAI1). We describe an eight-year-old female Chinese patient with multiple malformations, congenital heart defect, mental retardation, and behavioral problems (self hugging, sleeping disturbance). High-resolution genome wide single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed a 3.7-Mb deletion in chromosome region 17p11.2. This chromosome region contains RAI1, a critical gene involved in SMS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an SMS patient in mainland China. PMID:22911601

  15. Hyperammonemia and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Predicts Presence of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Dogs with Congenital Portosystemic Shunts

    PubMed Central

    Tivers, Mickey S.; Handel, Ian; Gow, Adam G.; Lipscomb, Vicky J.; Jalan, Rajiv; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver disease. The pathogenesis of he is incompletely understood although ammonia and inflammatory cytokines have been implicated as key mediators. To facilitate further mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of HE, a large number of animal models have been developed which often involve the surgical creation of an anastomosis between the hepatic portal vein and the caudal vena cava. One of the most common congenital abnormalities in dogs is a congenital portosystemic shunt (cpss), which closely mimics these surgical experimental models of HE. Dogs with a cPSS often have clinical signs which mimic clinical signs observed in humans with HE. Our hypothesis is that the pathogenesis of HE in dogs with a cPSS is similar to humans with HE. The aim of the study was to measure a range of clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters, which have been linked to the development of HE in humans, in dogs with a cPSS and a known HE grade. One hundred and twenty dogs with a cPSS were included in the study and multiple regression analysis of clinical, haematological and biochemical variables revealed that plasma ammonia concentrations and systemic inflammatory response syndrome scores predicted the presence of HE. Our findings further support the notion that the pathogenesis of canine and human HE share many similarities and indicate that dogs with cPSS may be an informative spontaneous model of human HE. Further investigations on dogs with cPSS may allow studies on HE to be undertaken without creating surgical models of HE thereby allowing the number of large animals used in animal experimentation to be reduced. PMID:24392080

  16. Mutations in contactin-1, a neural adhesion and neuromuscular junction protein, cause a familial form of lethal congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Compton, Alison G; Albrecht, Douglas E; Seto, Jane T; Cooper, Sandra T; Ilkovski, Biljana; Jones, Kristi J; Challis, Daniel; Mowat, David; Ranscht, Barbara; Bahlo, Melanie; Froehner, Stanley C; North, Kathryn N

    2008-12-01

    We have previously reported a group of patients with congenital onset weakness associated with a deficiency of members of the syntrophin-alpha-dystrobrevin subcomplex and have demonstrated that loss of syntrophin and dystrobrevin from the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle can also be associated with denervation. Here, we have further studied four individuals from a consanguineous Egyptian family with a lethal congenital myopathy inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion and characterized by a secondary loss of beta2-syntrophin and alpha-dystrobrevin from the muscle sarcolemma, central nervous system involvement, and fetal akinesia. We performed homozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis and identified a mutation that segregates with disease within CNTN1, the gene encoding for the neural immunoglobulin family adhesion molecule, contactin-1. Contactin-1 transcripts were markedly decreased on gene-expression arrays of muscle from affected family members compared to controls. We demonstrate that contactin-1 is expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in mice and man in addition to the previously documented expression in the central and peripheral nervous system. In patients with secondary dystroglycanopathies, we show that contactin-1 is abnormally localized to the sarcolemma instead of exclusively at the NMJ. The cntn1 null mouse presents with ataxia, progressive muscle weakness, and postnatal lethality, similar to the affected members in this family. We propose that loss of contactin-1 from the NMJ impairs communication or adhesion between nerve and muscle resulting in the severe myopathic phenotype. This disorder is part of the continuum in the clinical spectrum of congenital myopathies and congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  17. Two female siblings with congenital heart disease, postaxial polydactyly, ectopic neuropituitary gland, hair anomalies and characteristic facial features: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Goossens, Linde; Janssens, Sandra; Meersschaut, Valerie; Peeters, Hilde; Devlieger, Hugo; Devriendt, Koen

    2006-04-01

    We present two siblings from unrelated parents presenting with intrauterine growth retardation, a congenital heart defect, postaxial polydactyly, a brain malformation (ectopic neuropituitary gland associated with a hypoplastic adenopituitary in one of them, and a hypoplastic cerebellum and vermis in the other), abnormal hair with temporal balding, a striking facial dysmorphism and, at least in the child who survived, postnatal growth retardation and severe developmental delay. This probably represents a novel syndrome.

  18. Beals-Hecht syndrome (congenital contractural arachnodactyly) with additional craniospinal abnormality: a case report.

    PubMed

    Meena, Jagdish P; Gupta, Ajay; Mishra, Devendra; Juneja, Monica

    2015-05-01

    Beals syndrome is an autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder, characterized by multiple flexion contractures, arachnodactyly, severe kyphoscoliosis, crumpled ear, and muscular hypoplasia. It has similarities to Marfan syndrome (MFS) in many respects. It has much fewer incidences of eye and heart anomalies compared with MFS. Beals syndrome is caused by a mutation in the fibrillin-2 gene (FBN2) in 5q23; MFS is caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. With time, there is spontaneous improvement in joint contractures, but kyphosis tends to be progressive. The neonatal form results from new mutations and tends to be severe. Prenatal molecular diagnosis is possible. Ultrasound could be used to demonstrate hypokinesia and joint contractures in presumptive cases. We present a case of a patient with Beals syndrome who presented to the emergency department with pneumonia and was found to have narrowing of the foramen magnum, with partial fusion of C2-C3 vertebral bodies. To our knowledge, this has not been documented in the literature and could be characteristic in relation to Beals syndrome. PMID:25493702

  19. Cesarean section plus delayed cord clamping approach in the perinatal management of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS): a case report.

    PubMed

    Pivetti, V; Cavigioli, F; Lista, G; Napolitano, M; Rustico, M; Paganelli, A; Ferrazzi, E

    2014-01-01

    In this case, we describe a newborn with prenatal diagnosis of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS), successfully managed with a cesarean section with delayed cord clamping 180 seconds. In case of prenatal diagnosis of CHAOS, prompt airway intervention at delivery allows survival of this otherwise fatal condition. Ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) is considered the elective procedure to secure the fetal airway before the baby is completely separated from the maternal circulation. In cases where the EXIT procedure is not possible for maternal reasons (Ballantyne's syndrome), delayed cord clamping may serve as an alternative method to manage CHAOS.

  20. Delayed diagnosis of congenital factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease) in a girl with Turner's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, G; Monagle, P; Barnes, C

    2006-10-01

    Patients with Turner's syndrome are at risk of X-linked recessive disorders. We report a case of a young girl with Turner's syndrome with persistent mildly abnormal coagulation studies associated with a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis. The abnormalities were initially attributed to intrahepatic cholestasis and were partially responsive to vitamin K. After an interval of several years an episode of unexplained iron deficiency anaemia prompted re-investigation of the mild coagulopathy. Disproportionate reduction in the factor IX concentration and restoration of haemostasis with factor IX concentrate lead to a revised provisional diagnosis of mild haemophilia B which was subsequently confirmed by sequencing the factor IX gene.

  1. A rare type of congenital Sturge-Weber Syndrome: presenting with history of perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Obuoha; Odume, Calistus; Ekwochi, Uchenna; Ndu, Ikenna; Imanyikwa, Ugochukwu

    2016-08-01

    The presentation of a newborn with perinatal asphyxia and poor developmental milestones in a resource-poor setting. Many a times, obscured, unsuspected, and uncommon etiologies compound well-known causes of failure to thrive; in this case a rare finding of Type III Sturge-Weber Syndrome was revealed by Brain CT scanning. PMID:27525070

  2. A rare type of congenital Sturge-Weber Syndrome: presenting with history of perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Obuoha; Odume, Calistus; Ekwochi, Uchenna; Ndu, Ikenna; Imanyikwa, Ugochukwu

    2016-08-01

    The presentation of a newborn with perinatal asphyxia and poor developmental milestones in a resource-poor setting. Many a times, obscured, unsuspected, and uncommon etiologies compound well-known causes of failure to thrive; in this case a rare finding of Type III Sturge-Weber Syndrome was revealed by Brain CT scanning.

  3. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, S; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causing dyshormonogenesis. Genes associated with thyroid gland dysgenesis include the TSH receptor in non-syndromic congenital hypothyroidism, and Gsα and the thyroid transcription factors (TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax-8), associated with different complex syndromes that include congenital hypothyroidism. Among those causing dyshormonogenesis, the thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin genes were initially described, and more recently PDS (Pendred syndrome), NIS (sodium iodide symporter), and THOX2 (thyroid oxidase 2) gene defects. There is also early evidence for a third group of congenital hypothyroid conditions associated with iodothyronine transporter defects associated with severe neurological sequelae. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of primary congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:15863666

  4. Thyroid hypoplasia as a cause of congenital hypothyroidism in monozygotic twins concordant for Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akın, Mustafa Ali; Güneş, Tamer; Akın, Leyla; Çoban, Dilek; Oncu, Sena Kara; Kiraz, Aslıhan; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2011-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS), a genetic disorder characterized by growth retardation, mental deficiency, dysmorphic face, broad thumbs and large toes, generally affects monozygotic twins concordantly. Thyroid hypoplasia (TH) is a common cause of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and often accompanies dysmorphic syndromes. A pair of female twins were admitted to our neonatology unit 16 hours after delivery. They were born at 35 weeks of gestation. Both twins had an unusual dysmorphic facial appearance with microcephaly, as well as broad short thumbs and large toes. Based on the presence of characteristic dysmorphic features, the twins were diagnosed as RSTS. Thyroid function tests in the first twin revealed the following results: free thyroxine (T4) 8.4 pg/mL, thyrotropin (TSH) 4.62 mIU/L, thyroglobulin (TG) 213.24 ng/mL and a normal level of urinary iodine excretion (UIE). Thyroid function test results in the second twin in the second week were: free T4 5.9 pg/mL, TSH 9.02 mIU/L, TG 204.87 ng/mL, and normal UIE levels. Thyroid volumes were 0.36 mL and 0.31 mL in the first and second twin, respectively. TH was confirmed by technetium 99 m pertechnetate thyroid scans in both infants. Thyroid function tests normalized with L-thyroxine replacement therapy (10 μg/kg/day) around the end of the 3(rd) week of life. The infants were discharged planning their follow-up by both endocrinology and cardiology units. The rarity of cases of twins with RSTS (concordant) co-existing with CH led us to present this report. PMID:21448332

  5. Heterozygous Pitx2 Null Mice Accurately Recapitulate the Ocular Features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lisheng; Gage, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to assess the utility of Pitx2+/− mice as a model for the ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and for congenital glaucoma. Methods Eyes of Pitx2+/− and wild-type littermates were examined clinically using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus photography. Intraocular pressures were measured using a TonoLab rebound tonometer. Eyes were examined histologically to assess PITX2 expression, structural integrity, and optic nerve and ganglion cell content. Results PITX2 is present postnatally in the corneal endothelium and stroma, iris stroma, trabecular meshwork, and Schlemm's canal. Reduced central corneal thickness, iris defects, and iridicorneal adhesions are all prevalent in Pitx2+/− eyes. Although optic nerve heads appear normal at postnatal day 7, IOP is elevated and optic nerve head cupping is fully penetrant in Pitx2+/− eyes by 3 weeks of age. Neurodegeneration is present in a significant percentage of optic nerves from Pitx2+/− mice by 3 weeks of age, and is fully penetrant by 2 months of age. Pitx2+/− eyes show significant reductions in specifically ganglion cell density in all four quadrants by 2 months of age. Conclusions Pitx2+/− mice model the major ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and will be an important resource for understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to anterior segment dysgenesis and a high prevalence of glaucoma in this disease. In addition, these mice may provide an efficient new model for assessing the molecular events in glaucoma more generally, and for developing and testing new treatment paradigms for this disease. PMID:27654429

  6. Sonographic Diagnosis in a Rare Aetiology of Neonatal Scrotal Swellings: A Case Report of Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Shabnam Bhandari; Kumar, Nishith; Grover, Hemal; Taneja, Dinesh Kumar; Katyan, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Common etiologies of scrotal swelling in neonates include hydrocoele, inguinal hernia and testicular torsion; less common is epididymo-orchitis. Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS), a rare entity, is known to present as progressive renal failure and its leading presentation with scrotal involvement has not been reported. Material/Methods We report a rare case of CNS with primary clinical presentation as scrotal cellulitis and epididymo-orchitis. In this neonate, scrotal and abdominal ultrasound examination was performed and the laboratory data were obtained. Results Sonography revealed bilaterally enlarged echogenic kidneys, testis and epididymis with echogenic peritoneal fluid tracking into both scrotal sacs. Laboratory data revealed proteinuria and severe depletion of serum IgG. Culture of the peritoneal fluid showed gram-negative organisms. A final diagnosis of CNS, complicated with peritonitis tracking into the scrotal sacs was arrived at. Conclusions CNS may have a rare presentation with distracting symptoms of scrotal cellulitis and epididymo-orchitis, as seen in our patient. However, diligent use of abdomino-scrotal sonography, supported by relevant laboratory data can clinch the accurate diagnosis. PMID:27757175

  7. Epidemiological characteristics of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in the 2012-2013 epidemics in Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugishita, Yoshiyuki; Shimatani, Naotaka; Katow, Shigetaka; Takahashi, Takuri; Hori, Narumi

    2015-01-01

    A large rubella outbreak has been observed since June 2012 in Tokyo, Japan, and a rapid increase in the number of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) cases have also been reported in Japan since October 2012. All the clinically diagnosed and laboratory-confirmed rubella cases reported in Tokyo from January 2012 to December 2013 and all the laboratory-confirmed CRS cases from January 2012 to March 2014 were analyzed. In total, 4,116 rubella cases were reported in Tokyo. Of these, 77.2% (n=3,176) were male; the highest number of cases occurred in males aged 35-39 years and in females aged 20-24 years. Complications included arthralgia/arthritis (19.4%), thrombocytopenic purpura (0.5%), hepatic dysfunction (0.3%), and encephalitis (0.1%). The circulating rubella virus in Tokyo was genotype 2B. The most possible site of transmission was the workplace. Because of the rubella epidemic, 16 CRS cases were reported in Tokyo from March 2013 to February 2014. Domestic infection with rubella was proven for all mothers of 16 cases. This situation suggests that Japan is still working to achieve rubella elimination.

  8. A model-based evaluation of the national immunization programme against rubella infection and congenital rubella syndrome in The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, O. G.; Conyn-van Spaendonck, M. A.; Plantinga, A. D.; Kretzschmar, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve the prevention of cases of congenital rubella syndrome in The Netherlands, in 1987 the selective vaccination strategy against rubella infection in girls was replaced by mass vaccination. This decision was supported by mathematical model analyses carried out by Van Druten and De Boo. In order to compare the predicted impact of the rubella vaccination programme with the current available data in more detail, a similar model was built. Although the model predicts elimination of the rubella virus, data show that virus circulation is still present at a higher level than expected by the model. Simulation studies indicate that import of infection and a lower vaccine effectiveness, related to possible asymptomatic reinfection of vaccinated people, could be sources contributing to the present virus circulation. Even though the number of infections is much higher than the number of reported cases of disease, limited serosurveillance data and case notification data show that females of childbearing age are well protected by immunization. PMID:10030716

  9. Rubella metapopulation dynamics and importance of spatial coupling to the risk of congenital rubella syndrome in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, C. J. E.; Munayco, C. V.; Chowell, G.; Grenfell, B. T.; Bjørnstad, O. N.

    2011-01-01

    Rubella is generally a mild childhood disease, but infection during early pregnancy may cause spontaneous abortion or congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), which may entail a variety of birth defects. Consequently, understanding the age-structured dynamics of this infection has considerable public health value. Vaccination short of the threshold for local elimination of transmission will increase the average age of infection. Accordingly, the classic concern for this infection is the potential for vaccination to increase incidence in individuals of childbearing age. A neglected aspect of rubella dynamics is how age incidence patterns may be moulded by the spatial dynamics inherent to epidemic metapopulations. Here, we use a uniquely detailed dataset from Peru to explore the implications of this for the burden of CRS. Our results show that the risk of CRS may be particularly severe in small remote regions, a prediction at odds with expectations in the endemic situation, and with implications for the outcome of vaccination. This outcome results directly from the metapopulation context: specifically, extinction–re-colonization dynamics are crucial because they allow for significant leakage of susceptible individuals into the older age classes during inter-epidemic periods with the potential to increase CRS risk by as much as fivefold. PMID:20659931

  10. Is congenital melanocytic naevus a link between Hirayama disease and moyamoya pattern: a new syndrome or a co-incidence?

    PubMed

    Puri, Inder; Vibha, Deepti; Prasad, Kameshwar; Bhatia, Rohit

    2016-01-08

    A 22-year-old man presented with a history of progressive weakness and wasting of the right hand and forearm for 12 months followed by similar symptoms in the left upper limb for the past 5 months. He also gave a history of episodes of loss of consciousness for the past 5 years with a frequency of one per 3 months. On examination, there were melanocytic naevi-one large lesion in the nape of the neck and multiple satellite lesions. On investigation, the cervical cord MRI was normal. The brain MRI and angiography showed a moyamoya pattern. Thus, this patient had congenital melanocytic naevi with Hirayama disease and moyamoya pattern. He was treated with extracranial-intracranial bypass for moyamoya disease. During 6-month follow-up, he has been stable. Although moyamoya syndrome has been associated with several systemic diseases and conditions, the coexistence of a moyamoya pattern with Hirayama disease and melanocytic naevi has not been described so far.

  11. Application of iPS cells derived from congenital myelodysplastic syndrome for research of nomal hematopoesis and hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are not only a valuable resource for regenerative medicine, but also a promising tool for disease modeling and drug discovery. Patient-specific iPSCs harboring disease-specific mutations are extremely useful for investigating disease mechanisms and novel treatment approaches. In the field of hematology, attempts to establish iPSCs from tumor cells such as those of leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were largely unsuccessful because proper reprogramming processes were hampered by their extensive genetic alterations. In contrast, congenital disorders caused by a single genetic mutation are ideal candidates for deriving iPSCs. We have been investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying leukemia and MDS by implementing iPSC technology. Familial platelet disorder (FPD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia and a high propensity for developing acute leukemia, which is caused by heterozygous mutation of RUNX1. We have successfully established iPSCs from three distinct FPD pedigrees and examined the responsible defect during hematopoietic development. This system will serve as a novel unprecedented platform for prospectively studying hematologic disorders using human cells. PMID:27599428

  12. Fine mapping and haplotype analysis of the locus for congenital nephrotic syndrome on chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Maennikkoe, M.; Kestilae, M.; Tryggvason, K.

    1995-12-01

    We have recently localized the gene for congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) to chromosome 19q12-13.1. On the basis of observed recombination events, the gene was localized between markers D19S416/D19S425/D19S213/D19S208/D19S191 and D19S224. Here we have extended the mapping efforts, on the basis of a detailed physical map of the region. By means of three new polymorphic markers - D19S608, D19S609, and D19S610 - developed in this study, the critical candidate region could be further restricted. Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed with marker D19S610, D19S608, D19S224, and D19S220, the strongest allelic association being 84% with marker D19S610 at 19q13.1. This suggests that the CNF gene locus lies in close proximity to marker D19S610. Combination of the informative markers revealed four main haplotype categories. Different geographic distribution was observed between these haplotype groups when they were placed on the map of Finland according to the birthplaces of grandparents. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Induction of Podocyte VEGF164 Overexpression at Different Stages of Development Causes Congenital Nephrosis or Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Veron, Delma; Reidy, Kimberly; Marlier, Arnaud; Bertuccio, Claudia; Villegas, Guillermo; Jimenez, Juan; Kashgarian, Michael; Tufro, Alda

    2010-01-01

    The tight regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) signaling is required for both the development and maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier, but the pathogenic role of excessive amounts of VEGF-A detected in multiple renal diseases remains poorly defined. We generated inducible transgenic mice that overexpress podocyte VEGF164 at any chosen stage of development. In this study, we report the phenotypes that result from podocyte VEGF164 excess during organogenesis and after birth. On doxycycline induction, podocin-rtTA:tet-O-VEGF164 mice express twofold higher kidney VEGF164 levels than single transgenic mice, localized to podocytes. Podocyte VEGF164 overexpression during organogenesis resulted in albuminuria at birth and was associated with glomerulomegaly, uniform podocyte effacement, very few and wide foot processes joined by occluding junctions, almost complete absence of slit diaphragms, and swollen endothelial cells with few fenestrae as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Podocyte VEGF164 overexpression after birth caused massive albuminuria in 70% of 2-week-old mice, glomerulomegaly, and minimal changes on light microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy showed podocyte effacement and fusion and morphologically normal endothelial cells. Podocyte VEGF164 overexpression induced nephrin down-regulation without podocyte loss. VEGF164-induced abnormalities were reversible on removal of doxycycline and were unresponsive to methylprednisolone. Collectively, the data suggest that moderate podocyte VEGF164 overexpression during organogenesis results in congenital nephrotic syndrome, whereas VEGF164 overexpression after birth induces a steroid-resistant minimal change like-disease in mice. PMID:20829436

  14. Two novel RUNX1 mutations in a patient with congenital thrombocytopenia that evolved into a high grade myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Jessica M.; Turner, Daniel J.; Hromas, Robert A.; Wingard, John R.; Brown, Randy A.; Li, Ying; Li, Marilyn M.; Slayton, William B.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report two new RUNX1 mutations in one patient with congenital thrombocytopenia that transformed into a high grade myelodysplastic syndrome with myelomonocytic features. The first mutation was a nucleotide base substitution from guanine to adenine within exon 8, resulting in a nonsense mutation in the DNA-binding inhibitory domain of the Runx1 protein. This nonsense mutation is suspected a de novo germline mutation since both parents are negative for the mutation. The second mutation identified was an in-frame six nucleotide base pair insertion in exon 5 of the RUNX1 gene, which is predicted to result in an insertion in the DNA-binding runt homology domain (RHD). This mutation is believed to be a somatic mutation as it was mosaic before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and disappeared after transplant. As no other genetic mutation was found using genetic screening, it is speculated that the combined effect of these two RUNX1 mutations may have exerted a stronger dominant negative effect than either RUNX1 mutation alone, thus leading to a myeloid malignancy. PMID:25893166

  15. Enhanced A-V nodal conduction (Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome) by congenitally hypoplastic A-V node.

    PubMed

    Ometto, R; Thiene, G; Corrado, D; Vincenzi, M; Rossi, L

    1992-11-01

    The basic anatomical substrate of enhanced A-V nodal conduction, manifesting or not as Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome, is still a controversial issue. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man who presented episodes of ventricular fibrillation. Electrophysiological studies showed that the AH interval was 55 ms, and increased by only 20 ms at paced cycle lengths of 300 ms; atrial pacing induced atrial fibrillation, with a shortest RR interval of 240 ms. Despite verapamil therapy, this patient died suddenly at home. Histological study disclosed a severe A-V node hypoplasia that was evidently congenital in nature; the rest of the conduction system was normal, and no accessory A-V pathways were present. We suggest that enhanced A-V nodal conduction in this patient was due to the developmental defect in the A-V node; this abnormality caused a loss of specific impulse-delaying function, and thus allowed rapid, unfiltered atrial impulses to reach the lower A-V junction and ventricles.

  16. Control of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in developing countries, Part 1: Burden of disease from CRS.

    PubMed Central

    Cutts, F. T.; Robertson, S. E.; Diaz-Ortega, J. L.; Samuel, R.

    1997-01-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) can lead to deafness, heart disease, and cataracts, and a variety of other permanent manifestations. In developing countries, the burden of CRS has been assessed as follows: by surveillance of CRS; by surveillance of acquired rubella; by age-stratified serosurveys; and by serosurveys documenting the rubella susceptibility of women of childbearing age. During rubella outbreaks, rates of CRS per 1000 live births were at least 1.7 in Israel, 1.7 in Jamaica, 0.7 in Oman, 2.2 in Panama, 1.5 in Singapore, 0.9 in Sri Lanka, and 0.6 in Trinidad and Tobago. These rates are similar to those reported from industrialized countries during the pre-vaccine era. Special studies of CRS have been reported from all WHO regions. Rubella surveillance data show that epidemics occur every 4-7 years, similar to the situation in Europe during the pre-vaccination era. In developing countries, the estimated average age at infection varies from 2-3 years to 8 years. For 45 developing countries we identified serosurveys of women of childbearing age that had enrolled > or = 100 individuals. The proportion of women who remained susceptible to rubella (e.g. seronegative) was < 10% in 13 countries. 10-24% in 20 countries, and > or = 25% in 12 countries. Discussed are methods to improve the surveillance of rubella and CRS in developing countries. PMID:9141751

  17. Neonatal Marfan syndrome with congenital arachnodactyly, flexion contractures, and severe cardiac valve insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Buntinx, I M; Willems, P J; Spitaels, S E; Van Reempst, P J; De Paepe, A M; Dumon, J E

    1991-01-01

    We describe a male neonate with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, micrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and ocular abnormalities. Severe cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure and death 20 hours after birth. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome. As similar patients have been reported, they may represent a separate mutation. Images PMID:1856834

  18. Cardiovascular malformations in DiGeorge syndrome (congenital absence of hypoplasia of the thymus).

    PubMed Central

    Moerman, P; Goddeeris, P; Lauwerijns, J; Van der Hauwaert, L G

    1980-01-01

    Partial or complete absence of the thymus (DiGeorge syndrome, III-IV pharyngeal pouch syndrome) is often associated with agenesis or hypoplasia of the parathyroid glands and, almost invariably, with cardiovascular malformations. The clinical and pathologcial findings in 10 cases proven at necropsy are presented. All patients presented with cardiac symptoms and signs in the first weeks of life and, with one exception, all died of a cardiac cause. Major cardiovascular malformations were found in all 10 cases. Four had, in association with a ventricular septal defect of the infundibular type, an interrupted aortic arch, which was left-sided in two and right-sided in two other cases. Four patients had truncus arteriosus type I, in two of them associated with a right-sided aortic arch. Two patients with tetralogy of Fallot had a right-sided aortic arch. Only two of the 10 had a normally developed left aortic arch. Aberrant subclavian arteries were found in five cases. From our observations and a survey of the previously published patients it appears that 90 per cent of the necropsy-proven cases of DiGeorge syndrome have cardiovascular malformations and that 95 per cent of these malformations can be classified as aortic arch anomalies, truncus ateriosus, or tetralogy of Fallot. Images PMID:7426208

  19. Congenital contractures, edema, hyperkeratosis, and intrauterine growth retardation: a fatal syndrome in Hutterite and Mennonite kindreds.

    PubMed

    Lowry, R B; Machin, G A; Morgan, K; Mayock, D; Marx, L

    1985-11-01

    We present clinical findings in infants from three kindreds (two Hutterite and one Mennonite) with an apparently unique, fatal disorder. The major manifestations consist of severe intrauterine growth retardation, congenital contractures, and tense skin which is easily eroded. The skin is tightly drawn over the face, giving an abnormal appearance consisting of a narrow, pinched nose, small mouth, limited jaw mobility, and ectropion (in one). One infant had first-degree hypospadias. Apart from this, there were no organ malformations and the infants did not have hydrops. Histologically, the skin showed hyperkeratosis. It is postulated that this is a tissue dysplasia and that all of the clinical effects are secondary. The disorder appears to be an autosomal recessive trait. The two Hutterite families are from different endogamous subdivisions. They are related as fourth cousins once-removed and fifth cousins in multiple ways through the six nearest common ancestors of all four parents. There are 25 founders (11 couples and three individuals) who are common ancestors. We computed the probability of joint descent of the four alleles in each pair of parents and in a sample of Alberta Hutterite couples, assuming that each of the common founders in turn was the original carrier. For an allele from one particular founder couple, there is a relatively greater probability of identity by descent for each pair of parents than on the average for other couples of the same endogamous subdivision.

  20. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  1. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  2. Role of HOXA7 to HOXA13 and PBX1 genes in various forms of MRKH syndrome (congenital absence of uterus and vagina)

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Agnès; Mouchel, Thomas; Odent, Sylvie; Tiker, Filiz; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Pellerin, Isabelle; Guerrier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome refers to the congenital absence or severe hypoplasia of the female genital tract, often described as uterovaginal aplasia which is the prime feature of the syndrome. It is the second cause of primary amenorrhea after gonadal dysgenesis and occurs in ~1 in 4500 women. Aetiology of this syndrome remains poorly understood. Frequent association of other malformations with the MRKH syndrome, involving kidneys, skeleton and ears, suggests the involvement of major developmental genes such as those of the HOX family. Indeed mammalian HOX genes are well known for their crucial role during embryogenesis, particularly in axial skeleton, hindbrain and limb development. More recently, their involvement in organogenesis has been demonstrated notably during urogenital differentiation. Although null mutations of HOX genes in animal models do not lead to MRKH-like phenotypes, dominant mutations in their coding sequences or aberrant expression due to mutated regulatory regions could well account for it. Sequence analysis of coding regions of HOX candidate genes and of PBX1, a likely HOX cofactor during Müllerian duct differentiation and kidney morphogenesis, did not reveal any mutation in patients showing various forms of MRKH syndrome. This tends to show that HOX genes are not involved in MRKH syndrome. However it does not exclude that other mechanisms leading to HOX dysfunction may account for the syndrome. PMID:16556301

  3. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome plus; a contiguous gene constellation of congenital anomalies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    A term female infant was referred to the University Hospital because of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral choanal stenosis. Her examination revealed bilateral pre-auricular pits, branchial fistulae, cupped shaped ears, and bilateral athelia. She failed ABR screening; her creatinine was elevated to 1.5 mgs% and renal ultra-sonography showed reduced kidney size bilaterally. She was the product of her mother`s third pregnancy. The first produced a now normal 5 year old son. The second pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios and resulted in a premature delivery at 27 weeks gestation. The infant expired secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia. The mother had bilateral neurosensory deafness, pre-auricular pits, cupped shaped ears, lacrimal stenois and bilateral athelia. She wore dentures having earlier been diagnosed with dentogeneis imperfecta. She was shorter than her three normal sisters and had experienced academic problems throughout her school years. The maternal grandfather had an adult onset neurosensory hearing loss, but he and the maternal grandmother exhibited no other features of the BOR syndrome. Althelia was present only in the mother and daughter. The mother clearly has BOR syndrome transmitted to one, and possibly two, of her three offspring. The additional features of athelia, choanal stenosis and dentogenesis imperfecta are thought to represent additional autosomal dominant traits. Greenberg described an infant with athelia and choanal atresia. By family linkage studies, the BOR syndrome has been mapped to 8q13-21 with no recombination observed with loci D8S530 and D8S279. Given a normal prophase karyotype in the proband, it is speculated that a sub-microscopic deletion at 8q13-21 is the likely basis for the constellation of birth defects seen in this mother and daughter. Analysis of D8S530 and D8S279 is currently underway in this family.

  4. Lymphoma Secondary to Congenital and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes at a Turkish Pediatric Oncology Center.

    PubMed

    Tanyildiz, Hikmet G; Dincaslan, Handan; Yavuz, Gulsan; Unal, Emel; Ikinciogulları, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Tacyildiz, Nurdan

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of lymphoma in primary immunodeficiency cases and autoimmune diseases, as well as on a background of immunodeficiency following organ transplants, is increasing. The lymphoma treatment success rate is known to be a low prognosis. Our study aimed to emphasize the low survival rates in immunodeficient vs. immunocompetent lymphoma patients and also to investigate the effect of rituximab in patients with ataxia telangiectasia and other immunodeficiencies. We summarized the clinical characteristics and treatment results of 17 cases with primary immunodeficiency that developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) retrospectively. Seven patients were diagnosed with ataxia-telangiectasia, two with common variable immunodeficiency, two with selective IgA deficiency, one with X-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, one with Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (ITK) deficiency, and one with lymphoma developing after autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). One patient underwent a renal transplant. Of the nine males and eight females (aged 3-12 years, median = 7) that developed lymphoma, seven were diagnosed with HL and ten with NHL (seven B-cell, three T-cell). The NHL patients were started on the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster, POG9317, LMB-96, or R-CHOP treatment protocols with reduced chemotherapy dosages. HL cases were started on the doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and/or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) protocol, also with modified dosages. Importantly, all seven cases of HL are alive and in remission, while six of the ten NHL patients have died. Primary immunodeficiency is a strong predisposing factor for developing lymphoma. Low treatment success rates relative to other lymphomas and difficulties encountered during treatment indicate that new treatment agents are needed

  5. Natural history of Brugada syndrome in a patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, Doroteia; Martins, Fernando Maymone; Cavaco, Diogo; Adragão, Pedro; Silva, Margarida Matos; Anjos, Rui; Ferreira, Álvaro; Gaspar, Isabel Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Risk stratification of sudden death in patients with Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a controversial issue, and there is currently no consensus on the best method. Examination of data from the natural history of the disease is of fundamental importance and may help to identify relatives at risk. At the same time, study of the genetic mutations responsible for the disease may also contribute to risk stratification of the syndrome, enabling identification of asymptomatic relatives carrying mutations. This paper presents the case of a young man, aged 26, monitored as a pediatric cardiology outpatient from birth for a simple structural heart defect not requiring surgery. Analysis of the evolution of the patient's electrocardiogram revealed the appearance, at the age of 20, of a pattern compatible with type I BrS. Following an episode of syncope and induction of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in the electrophysiological study, a cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted. One year later, a single shock terminated an episode of ventricular fibrillation. A molecular study of the SCN5A gene identified a rare mutation, c.3622G>T (p.Glu1208X), recently described and associated with more severe phenotypes in patients with BrS, as in the case presented. PMID:26148667

  6. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  7. Associations Between TGFA/TGFB3/MSX1 Gene Polymorphisms and Congenital Non-Syndromic Hearing Impairment in a Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Du, Jihong; Deng, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate whether the TGFA/TGFB3/MSX1 gene polymorphisms and haplotypes lead to individual differences between congenital non-syndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) patients and normal people in a Chinese population and to analyze the risk factors for NSHI. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between December 2010 and September 2014, 343 congenital NSHI patients were recruited as cases, and 272 healthy subjects were recruited as controls. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) was used to identify genotypes, SHEsis software was used to conduct gene linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses, and regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for congenital NSHI. RESULTS The distribution of genotype frequencies and allele frequencies of TGFA rs3771494, TGFB3 rs3917201 and rs2268626, and MSX1 rs3821949 and rs62636562 were significantly different between the case and the control groups (all P<0.05). TGFA/TGFB3/MSX1 gene rs3771494, rs1058213, rs3917201, rs2268626, rs3821949, and rs62636562 haplotype analysis showed that haplotype CCGTAC and TTACGT might be protective factors (both P<0.001), while TTGCGC might be a risk factor for the normal population (P<0.001). The other risk factors include paternal smoking, advanced maternal age, maternal sickness history, maternal contact with pesticides or similar drugs, maternal abortion history, maternal medication history, maternal passive smoking history during pregnancy, rs3771494 CT, rs2268626 CC and TC, and rs3821949 GG and AG genotypes were risk factors (all P<0.05), while maternal vitamin supplements during pregnancy, rs3917201 GA, rs62636562 TT and CT genotypes were protective factors for congenital NSHI (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS rs3771494, rs3917201, rs2268626, rs3821949 and rs62636562 might be associated with congenital NSHI. PMID:27356075

  8. Associations Between TGFA/TGFB3/MSX1 Gene Polymorphisms and Congenital Non-Syndromic Hearing Impairment in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jihong; Deng, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether the TGFA/TGFB3/MSX1 gene polymorphisms and haplotypes lead to individual differences between congenital non-syndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) patients and normal people in a Chinese population and to analyze the risk factors for NSHI. Material/Methods Between December 2010 and September 2014, 343 congenital NSHI patients were recruited as cases, and 272 healthy subjects were recruited as controls. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) was used to identify genotypes, SHEsis software was used to conduct gene linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses, and regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for congenital NSHI. Results The distribution of genotype frequencies and allele frequencies of TGFA rs3771494, TGFB3 rs3917201 and rs2268626, and MSX1 rs3821949 and rs62636562 were significantly different between the case and the control groups (all P<0.05). TGFA/TGFB3/MSX1 gene rs3771494, rs1058213, rs3917201, rs2268626, rs3821949, and rs62636562 haplotype analysis showed that haplotype CCGTAC and TTACGT might be protective factors (both P<0.001), while TTGCGC might be a risk factor for the normal population (P<0.001). The other risk factors include paternal smoking, advanced maternal age, maternal sickness history, maternal contact with pesticides or similar drugs, maternal abortion history, maternal medication history, maternal passive smoking history during pregnancy, rs3771494 CT, rs2268626 CC and TC, and rs3821949 GG and AG genotypes were risk factors (all P<0.05), while maternal vitamin supplements during pregnancy, rs3917201 GA, rs62636562 TT and CT genotypes were protective factors for congenital NSHI (all P<0.05). Conclusions rs3771494, rs3917201, rs2268626, rs3821949 and rs62636562 might be associated with congenital NSHI. PMID:27356075

  9. Quantitative investigations of different vaccination policies for the control of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R M; Grenfell, B T

    1986-04-01

    The paper examines predictions of the impact of various one-, two- and three-stage vaccination policies on the incidence of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the United Kingdom with the aid of a mathematical model of the transmission dynamics of rubella virus. Parameter estimates for the model are derived from either serological data or case notifications, and special attention is given to the significance of age-related changes in the rate of exposure to rubella infection and heterogeneous mixing between age groups. Where possible, model predictions are compared with observed epidemiological trends. The principal conclusion of the analyses is that benefit is to be gained in the UK, both in the short and long term, by the introduction of a multiple-stage vaccination policy involving high levels of vaccination coverage of young male and female children (at around two years of age) and teenage girls (between the ages of 10-15 years), plus continued surveillance and vaccination of adult women in the child-bearing age classes. Model predictions suggest that to reduce the incidence of CRS in future years, below the level generated by a continuation of the current UK policy (the vaccination of teenage girls), would require high rates of vaccination (greater than 60%) of both boys and girls at around two years of age. Numerical studies also suggest that uniform vaccination coverage levels of greater than 80-85% of young male and female children could, in the long term (40 years or more), eradicate rubella virus from the population. The robustness of these conclusions with respect to the accuracy of parameter estimates and various assumptions concerning the pattern of age-related change in exposure to infections and 'who acquires infection from whom' is discussed.

  10. PITX2 Loss-of-Function Mutation Contributes to Congenital Endocardial Cushion Defect and Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cui-Mei; Peng, Lu-Ying; Li, Li; Liu, Xing-Yuan; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Xian-Ling; Yuan, Fang; Li, Ruo-Gu; Qiu, Xing-Biao; Yang, Yi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), the most common type of birth defect, is still the leading non-infectious cause of infant morbidity and mortality in humans. Aggregating evidence demonstrates that genetic defects are involved in the pathogenesis of CHD. However, CHD is genetically heterogeneous and the genetic components underpinning CHD in an overwhelming majority of patients remain unclear. In the present study, the coding exons and flanking introns of the PITX2 gene, which encodes a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2essential for cardiovascular morphogenesis as well as maxillary facial development, was sequenced in 196 unrelated patients with CHD and subsequently in the mutation carrier’s family members available. As a result, a novel heterozygous PITX2 mutation, p.Q102X for PITX2a, or p.Q148X for PITX2b, or p.Q155X for PITX2c, was identified in a family with endocardial cushion defect (ECD) and Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS). Genetic analysis of the pedigree showed that the nonsense mutation co-segregated with ECD and ARS transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern with complete penetrance. The mutation was absent in 800 control chromosomes from an ethnically matched population. Functional analysis by using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system revealed that the mutant PITX2 had no transcriptional activity and that the mutation eliminated synergistic transcriptional activation between PITX2 and NKX2.5, another transcription factor pivotal for cardiogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of PITX2 loss-of-function mutation with increased susceptibility to ECD and ARS. The findings provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underpinning ECD and ARS, suggesting the potential implications for the antenatal prophylaxis and personalized treatment of CHD and ARS. PMID:25893250

  11. The Cerebral Cost of Breathing: An fMRI Case-Study in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Mike; Gallea, Cécile; Lehongre, Katia; Galanaud, Damien; Nicolas, Nathalie; Similowski, Thomas; Cohen, Laurent; Straus, Christian; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Certain motor activities - like walking or breathing - present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks - including various frontal lobe areas - subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the “resting state” pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB), mechanical ventilation (MV) restored the default mode network (DMN) associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the active

  12. Alanine Expansions Associated with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome Impair PHOX2B Homeodomain-mediated Dimerization and Nuclear Import*

    PubMed Central

    Di Lascio, Simona; Belperio, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the human PHOX2B gene, a key regulator of autonomic nervous system development, lead to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a failure in the autonomic control of breathing. Polyalanine expansions in the 20-residues region of the C terminus of PHOX2B are the major mutations responsible for CCHS. Elongation of the alanine stretch in PHOX2B leads to a protein with altered DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and nuclear localization and the possible formation of cytoplasmic aggregates; furthermore, the findings of various studies support the idea that CCHS is not due to a pure loss of function mechanism but also involves a dominant negative effect and/or toxic gain of function for PHOX2B mutations. Because PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimers with its paralogue PHOX2A in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that the dominant negative effects of the mutated proteins are due to non-functional interactions with the wild-type protein or PHOX2A using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and the mammalian two-hybrid system. Our findings show that PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimerizes weakly with mutated proteins, exclude the direct involvement of the polyalanine tract in dimer formation, and indicate that mutated proteins retain partial ability to form heterodimers with PHOX2A. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the effects of the longest polyalanine expansions on the homeodomain-mediated nuclear import, and our data clearly show that the expanded C terminus interferes with this process. These results provide novel insights into the effects of the alanine tract expansion on PHOX2B folding and activity. PMID:27129232

  13. Congenital Bilateral Retinal Detachment in Two Siblings with Osteoporosis-Pseudoglioma Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Lotte G; Robitaille, Johane M; Rupps, Rosemarie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Lyons, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The birth of a bilaterally blind child is catastrophic for families and a challenging diagnostic and management problem for ophthalmologists. Early identification of the underlying cause and its genetic basis helps initiate possible treatment, delineate prognosis, and identify risks for future pregnancies. In some cases, an early diagnosis can also influence the treatment of other family members. We report two sisters with bilateral retinal detachment and retro-lental masses from birth with no detectable NDP or FZD4 mutations. They were born to parents without detectable retinal anomalies. At 1 year of age, the elder sister had low impact bone fractures, and further evaluation identified severe osteopenia and multiple spinal compression fractures. Molecular testing identified biallelic lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutations (NM_002335.3:c. [889dupA]; [2827 + 1G > A]) confirming a diagnosis of osteoporosis-pseudoglioma (OPPG) syndrome. After this diagnosis, the father and mother were found to have low bone mass and the father started on therapy. We conclude that early detection of LRP5 mutations is important for initiation of treatment of reduced bone density in the patients and their carrier relatives. PMID:25945592

  14. Postnatal cytomegalovirus infection in an infant with congenital thrombocytopenia: how it can support or mislead the diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Virginia, Elena; Nedbal, Marco; Soresina, Annarosa; Bruni, Paola

    2016-09-01

    A male newborn developed a post-natal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, arising in the clinical setting of congenital thrombocytopenia, which was diagnosed as being alloimmune. The evidence of active CMV infection in an infant showing slow-resolution lower airways infection, persistent neonatal and low platelet volume thrombocytopenia, and diffuse eczema (associated to very high levels of serum immunoglobulin E) led to the diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) before the third month of life, despite the presence of several confounding clinical factors. The correct interpretation of all clinical features supported the precocious diagnosis of WAS. PMID:27668906

  15. Congenital subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarctions caused by an atypical circumflex retroesophageal right aortic arch with atretic aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Mamopoulos, Apostolos T; Luther, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    A right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly with an incidence of 0.1% worldwide and is usually associated with a mirror image of all supra-aortic branches or an aberrant left subclavian artery. The latter is often associated with a Kommerell diverticulum, although it can rarely be hypoplastic or atretic and lead to congenital subclavian steal. In most patients, the situation is well-tolerated. In this report, we present a case of subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarcts in a patient with an atypical right-sided aortic arch and an atretic aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a left-sided descending thoracic aorta.

  16. Congenital and acquired neutropenia consensus guidelines on diagnosis from the Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group of the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica).

    PubMed

    Fioredda, Francesca; Calvillo, Michaela; Bonanomi, Sonia; Coliva, Tiziana; Tucci, Fabio; Farruggia, Piero; Pillon, Marta; Martire, Baldassarre; Ghilardi, Roberta; Ramenghi, Ugo; Renga, Daniela; Menna, Giuseppe; Barone, Angelica; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo

    2011-07-15

    Congenital and acquired neutropenia are rare disorders whose frequency in pediatric age may be underestimated due to remarkable differences in definition or misdiagnosed because of the lack of common practice guidelines. Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group (MFSG) of the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica) elaborated this document following design and methodology formerly approved by the AIEOP board. The panel of experts reviewed the literature on the topic and participated in a conference producing a document which includes a classification of neutropenia and a comprehensive guideline on diagnosis of neutropenia.

  17. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  18. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome: congenital diaphragmatic hernia and radiologic findings in two patients and follow-up of a previously reported case.

    PubMed

    Chen, E; Johnson, J P; Cox, V A; Golabi, M

    1993-06-15

    This report suggests the association of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome by describing two unrelated males with this malformation. One male was the maternal half-nephew of our previously reported 8-year-old boy with this syndrome. Review of the skeletal roentgenograms of these 2 affected males, and those of the previously reported 8-year-old, documents flare of the iliac wings, narrow sacroiliac notches, and the presence of two carpal ossification centers as a newborn ("advanced bone age"). We also report the follow-up of the 8-year-old boy, now 16 years old, who continues to have significant overgrowth and speech, dental, developmental, and adjustment problems. PMID:8322824

  19. De novo mutations in NALCN cause a syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; Armenteros, Jose R; Buckingham, Kati J; Nkinsi, Naomi T; Boyle, Evan A; Berry, Margaret N; Bocian, Maureen; Foulds, Nicola; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kaplan, Paige; Kline, Antonie D; Mercer, Catherine L; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Klein Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Moreno, Regina A; Scheuerle, Angela E; Shashi, Vandana; Stevens, Cathy A; Carey, John C; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Tabor, Holly K; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by mutations in MYH3 and characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the face and limbs and normal cognitive development. We identified a subset of five individuals who had been putatively diagnosed with "DA2A with severe neurological abnormalities" and for whom congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and global developmental delay had resulted in early death in three cases; this is a unique condition that we now refer to as CLIFAHDD syndrome. Exome sequencing identified missense mutations in the sodium leak channel, non-selective (NALCN) in four families affected by CLIFAHDD syndrome. We used molecular-inversion probes to screen for NALCN in a cohort of 202 distal arthrogryposis (DA)-affected individuals as well as concurrent exome sequencing of six other DA-affected individuals, thus revealing NALCN mutations in ten additional families with "atypical" forms of DA. All 14 mutations were missense variants predicted to alter amino acid residues in or near the S5 and S6 pore-forming segments of NALCN, highlighting the functional importance of these segments. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that NALCN alterations nearly abolished the expression of wild-type NALCN, suggesting that alterations that cause CLIFAHDD syndrome have a dominant-negative effect. In contrast, homozygosity for mutations in other regions of NALCN has been reported in three families affected by an autosomal-recessive condition characterized mainly by hypotonia and severe intellectual disability. Accordingly, mutations in NALCN can cause either a recessive or dominant condition characterized by varied though overlapping phenotypic features, perhaps based on the type of mutation and affected protein domain(s). PMID:25683120

  20. De Novo Mutations in NALCN Cause a Syndrome Characterized by Congenital Contractures of the Limbs and Face, Hypotonia, and Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; Armenteros, Jose R.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Nkinsi, Naomi T.; Boyle, Evan A.; Berry, Margaret N.; Bocian, Maureen; Foulds, Nicola; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Kaplan, Paige; Kline, Antonie D.; Mercer, Catherine L.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Klein Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S.; McPherson, Elizabeth W.; Moreno, Regina A.; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Shashi, Vandana; Stevens, Cathy A.; Carey, John C.; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Tabor, Holly K.; Smith, Joshua D.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by mutations in MYH3 and characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the face and limbs and normal cognitive development. We identified a subset of five individuals who had been putatively diagnosed with “DA2A with severe neurological abnormalities” and for whom congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and global developmental delay had resulted in early death in three cases; this is a unique condition that we now refer to as CLIFAHDD syndrome. Exome sequencing identified missense mutations in the sodium leak channel, non-selective (NALCN) in four families affected by CLIFAHDD syndrome. We used molecular-inversion probes to screen for NALCN in a cohort of 202 distal arthrogryposis (DA)-affected individuals as well as concurrent exome sequencing of six other DA-affected individuals, thus revealing NALCN mutations in ten additional families with “atypical” forms of DA. All 14 mutations were missense variants predicted to alter amino acid residues in or near the S5 and S6 pore-forming segments of NALCN, highlighting the functional importance of these segments. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that NALCN alterations nearly abolished the expression of wild-type NALCN, suggesting that alterations that cause CLIFAHDD syndrome have a dominant-negative effect. In contrast, homozygosity for mutations in other regions of NALCN has been reported in three families affected by an autosomal-recessive condition characterized mainly by hypotonia and severe intellectual disability. Accordingly, mutations in NALCN can cause either a recessive or dominant condition characterized by varied though overlapping phenotypic features, perhaps based on the type of mutation and affected protein domain(s). PMID:25683120

  1. De novo mutations in NALCN cause a syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; Armenteros, Jose R; Buckingham, Kati J; Nkinsi, Naomi T; Boyle, Evan A; Berry, Margaret N; Bocian, Maureen; Foulds, Nicola; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kaplan, Paige; Kline, Antonie D; Mercer, Catherine L; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Klein Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Moreno, Regina A; Scheuerle, Angela E; Shashi, Vandana; Stevens, Cathy A; Carey, John C; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Tabor, Holly K; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by mutations in MYH3 and characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the face and limbs and normal cognitive development. We identified a subset of five individuals who had been putatively diagnosed with "DA2A with severe neurological abnormalities" and for whom congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and global developmental delay had resulted in early death in three cases; this is a unique condition that we now refer to as CLIFAHDD syndrome. Exome sequencing identified missense mutations in the sodium leak channel, non-selective (NALCN) in four families affected by CLIFAHDD syndrome. We used molecular-inversion probes to screen for NALCN in a cohort of 202 distal arthrogryposis (DA)-affected individuals as well as concurrent exome sequencing of six other DA-affected individuals, thus revealing NALCN mutations in ten additional families with "atypical" forms of DA. All 14 mutations were missense variants predicted to alter amino acid residues in or near the S5 and S6 pore-forming segments of NALCN, highlighting the functional importance of these segments. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that NALCN alterations nearly abolished the expression of wild-type NALCN, suggesting that alterations that cause CLIFAHDD syndrome have a dominant-negative effect. In contrast, homozygosity for mutations in other regions of NALCN has been reported in three families affected by an autosomal-recessive condition characterized mainly by hypotonia and severe intellectual disability. Accordingly, mutations in NALCN can cause either a recessive or dominant condition characterized by varied though overlapping phenotypic features, perhaps based on the type of mutation and affected protein domain(s).

  2. Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

  3. Autism and Congenital Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Lee, Anthony; Brown, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    This study compared a group of nine children (ages 3 to 8) with congenital blindness and an autism-like syndrome with nine sighted children. Children with autism had more severe abnormalities in terms of their relationships with people and emotional expressions, and were more impaired in the area of pretend play. (CR)

  4. Congenital Neutropenia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients Procedure for Accessing Lab Services Data Package Requirements AIDS Therapies Resource Guide In Vitro Efficacy Evaluations ... Assurances to Users Application and Approval Process User Requirements Malaria Vaccine Production Services Data Sharing and Release ...

  5. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Orphanet is a European reference ... Support for Patients and Families Help with Travel Costs How to Get Involved in Research FAQs About ...

  6. A Deletion in FOXN1 Is Associated with a Syndrome Characterized by Congenital Hypotrichosis and Short Life Expectancy in Birman Cats

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Marie; Bossé, Philippe; Thomas, Anne; Tiret, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by congenital hypotrichosis and short life expectancy has been described in the Birman cat breed (Felis silvestris catus). We hypothesized that a FOXN1 (forkhead box N1) loss-of-function allele, associated with the nude phenotype in humans, mice and rats, may account for the syndrome observed in Birman cats. To the best of our knowledge, spontaneous mutations in FOXN1 have never been described in non-human, non-rodent mammalian species. We identified a recessive c.1030_1033delCTGT deletion in FOXN1 in Birman cats. This 4-bp deletion was associated with the syndrome when present in two copies. Percentage of healthy carriers in our French panel of genotyped Birman cats was estimated to be 3.2%. The deletion led to a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 547 in the protein. In silico, the truncated FOXN1 protein was predicted to lack the activation domain and critical parts of the forkhead DNA binding domain, both involved in the interaction between FOXN1 and its targets, a mandatory step to promote normal hair and thymic epithelial development. Our results enlarge the panel of recessive FOXN1 loss-of-function alleles described in mammals. A DNA test is available; it will help owners avoid matings at risk and should prevent the dissemination of this morbid mutation in domestic felines. PMID:25781316

  7. Congenital megaurethra in a fetus with Meckel syndrome and in a fetus with female pseudoermanphroditism. The first report of these occurrences

    PubMed Central

    Di Meglio, Letizia; Mazzarelli, Laura Letizia; Boscaino, Amedeo; Cancemi, Dino; Morelli, Franco; Lonardo, Maria Concetta; Lonardo, Valeria; Friso, Patrizia; Spampanato, Carmine; Urciuoli, Maria; Ventruto, Marialuisa; Ventruto, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Objective the purpose of this paper is to report the first case of megaurethra in a fetus with Meckel syndrome and in a fetus with femal pseudoermaphroditism. Results the former case refers to a fetus of 13 weeks gestation with the three following prominent anomalies, observed by transonic scan and confirmed by autopsy: congenital megaurethra, anal atresia, single umbelical artery. The latter case refers to a fetus of 18 weeks gestation. Autopsy confirmed penile malformation and revealed ovaries in the abdomen. The karyotype was 46,XX with normal molecular karytype. The megaurethra was discovered by sonography at 18 weeks gestation. Autopsy confirmed penile malformation and revealed ovaries in the abdomen. The karyotype was 46,XX with normal molecular karyotype (Array-CGH, 1 Mb of resolution). Methods transonic scan, autopsy, karyotype, array-CGH. Conclusions the first prenatal cases of two genetic syndromes with megaurethra have been reported, concening respectively a fetus with Meckel syndrome and a fetus with femal pseudoermaphroditism. The latter was confirmed by both autopsy and the normal female 46,XX karyotype. PMID:26266000

  8. A deletion in FOXN1 is associated with a syndrome characterized by congenital hypotrichosis and short life expectancy in Birman cats.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Marie; Bossé, Philippe; Thomas, Anne; Tiret, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by congenital hypotrichosis and short life expectancy has been described in the Birman cat breed (Felis silvestris catus). We hypothesized that a FOXN1 (forkhead box N1) loss-of-function allele, associated with the nude phenotype in humans, mice and rats, may account for the syndrome observed in Birman cats. To the best of our knowledge, spontaneous mutations in FOXN1 have never been described in non-human, non-rodent mammalian species. We identified a recessive c.1030_1033delCTGT deletion in FOXN1 in Birman cats. This 4-bp deletion was associated with the syndrome when present in two copies. Percentage of healthy carriers in our French panel of genotyped Birman cats was estimated to be 3.2%. The deletion led to a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 547 in the protein. In silico, the truncated FOXN1 protein was predicted to lack the activation domain and critical parts of the forkhead DNA binding domain, both involved in the interaction between FOXN1 and its targets, a mandatory step to promote normal hair and thymic epithelial development. Our results enlarge the panel of recessive FOXN1 loss-of-function alleles described in mammals. A DNA test is available; it will help owners avoid matings at risk and should prevent the dissemination of this morbid mutation in domestic felines. PMID:25781316

  9. Mutations in SMG9, Encoding an Essential Component of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Machinery, Cause a Multiple Congenital Anomaly Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Anazi, Shams; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Caddle, L. Brianna; Palmer, Kristina; Ali, Rehab; Alshidi, Tarfa; Hagos, Samya; Goodwin, Leslie; Hashem, Mais; Wakil, Salma M.; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Colak, Dilek; Murray, Stephen A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an important process that is best known for degrading transcripts that contain premature stop codons (PTCs) to mitigate their potentially harmful consequences, although its regulatory role encompasses other classes of transcripts as well. Despite the critical role of NMD at the cellular level, our knowledge about the consequences of deficiency of its components at the organismal level is largely limited to model organisms. In this study, we report two consanguineous families in which a similar pattern of congenital anomalies was found to be most likely caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMG9, encoding an essential component of the SURF complex that generates phospho-UPF1, the single most important step in NMD. By knocking out Smg9 in mice via CRISPR/Cas9, we were able to recapitulate the major features of the SMG9-related multiple congenital anomaly syndrome we observed in humans. Surprisingly, human cells devoid of SMG9 do not appear to have reduction of PTC-containing transcripts but do display global transcriptional dysregulation. We conclude that SMG9 is required for normal human and murine development, most likely through a transcriptional regulatory role, the precise nature of which remains to be determined. PMID:27018474

  10. Eisenmenger syndrome: a case of survival after ventricular tachycardia due to inferior myocardial infarction in a 48-year-old patient with congenital large ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Passarani, Simonetta; Vignati, Gabriele; Einaudi, Arturo

    2004-06-01

    Eisenmenger syndrome is the most common consequence of congenital cyanotic heart disease seen in adults; survival to the fifth decade of life is rare. Death is very difficult to predict: it is related to sudden cardiac ventricular arrhythmia, massive hemoptysis and right heart failure. In this paper, a patient with ventricular septal defect and Eisenmenger reaction is described. The patient was relatively well until 48 years of age, when she underwent surgery because of a cerebral abscess without cerebral complications but with some deterioration of her cardiac function. After discharge, the patient was readmitted to the hospital because the electrocardiogram showed persistent ST inferior elevation. Echocardiography demonstrated poor contractility and inferior akinesia. Sudden ventricular tachycardia occurred and the patient became unconscious. She was successfully resuscitated and, following a period of ventilation, the hemodynamics stabilized and she was discharged 17 days later. She remained well two years later. PMID:15229766

  11. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. PMID:27301600

  12. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-09-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed.

  13. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed. PMID:27607320

  14. Congenital Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gravereaux, Edwin C.; Nguyen, Louis L.; Cunningham, Leslie D.

    2004-04-01

    Congenital vascular anomalies are rare. The cardiovascular specialist should nevertheless be aware of the more common types of vascular anomalies and understand the implications for patient treatment and the likelihood of associated morbidity. The presentation of congenital arteriovenous malformations can range from asymptomatic or cosmetic lesions, to those causing ischemia, ulceration, hemorrhage, or high-output congestive heart failure. Treatment of large, symptomatic arteriovenous malformations often requires catheter-directed embolization prior to the attempt at complete surgical excision. Later recurrence, due to collateral recruitment, is frequent. Graded compression stockings and leg elevation are the mainstays of treatment for the predominantly venous congenital vascular anomalies. Most congenital central venous disorders are clinically silent. An exception is the retrocaval ureter. Retroaortic left renal vein, circumaortic venous ring, and absent, left-sided or duplicated inferior vena cava are relevant when aortic or inferior vena cava procedures are planned. The treatment of the venous disorders is directed at prevention or management of symptoms. Persistent sciatic artery, popliteal entrapment syndrome, and aberrant right subclavian artery origin are congenital anomalies that are typically symptomatic at presentation. Because they mimic more common diseases, diagnosis is frequently delayed. Delay can result in significant morbidity for the patient. Failure to make the diagnosis of persistent sciatic artery and popliteal entrapment can result in critical limb ischemia and subsequent amputation. Unrecognized aberrant right subclavian artery origin associated with aneurysmal degeneration can rupture and result in death. The treatment options for large-vessel arterial anomalies are surgical, sometimes in combination with endovascular techniques.

  15. A 1.1Mb deletion in distal 13q deletion syndrome region with congenital heart defect and postaxial polydactyly: additional support for a CHD locus at distal 13q34 region.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng; Ai, Qi; Huang, Can; Chen, Jin-Lan; Wang, Jian; Xie, Li; Zhang, Wei-Zhi; Yang, Jin-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-01

    13q deletion syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, especially for group 3 deletion (13q33-q34 deletion). Previously we described a patient with congenital heart defect and mental retardation and proposed that a distal 6Mb region might contain the causative gene of congenital heart defect. Here we present a new patient with congenital heart defects (CHD), hand and foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. We identified a 1.1Mb deletion at chromosome 13q34 with high resolution SNP-array BeadChips (HumanOmni1-Quad, Illumina, USA). This chromosome region contains ten annotated genes, including GRK1, TFDP1, RASA3 and GAS6. To our knowledge, this represents the smallest 13q34 deletion identified to date. Our study provides additional support that distal 13q34 deletion region might contain key gene(s) responsible for cardiac development.

  16. Copy-Number Variation of the Glucose Transporter Gene SLC2A3 and Congenital Heart Defects in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Sheridan, Molly B.; Xie, Michael; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Gai, Xiaowu; Chow, Eva W.C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J.; Roberts, Amy E.; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E.; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R.; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Shaikh, Tamim H.; Bassett, Anne S.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Morrow, Bernice E.; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome and the phenotypic presentation is highly variable. Approximately 65% of individuals with 22q11DS have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or an aortic arch defect. The etiology of this phenotypic variability is not currently known. We hypothesized that copy-number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region might increase the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Genotyping with Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 was performed on two groups of subjects with 22q11DS separated by time of ascertainment and processing. CNV analysis was completed on a total of 949 subjects (cohort 1, n = 562; cohort 2, n = 387), 603 with CHDs (cohort 1, n = 363; cohort 2, n = 240) and 346 with normal cardiac anatomy (cohort 1, n = 199; cohort 2, n = 147). Our analysis revealed that a duplication of SLC2A3 was the most frequent CNV identified in the first cohort. It was present in 18 subjects with CHDs and 1 subject without (p = 3.12 × 10−3, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test). In the second cohort, the SLC2A3 duplication was also significantly enriched in subjects with CHDs (p = 3.30 × 10−2, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test). The SLC2A3 duplication was the most frequent CNV detected and the only significant finding in our combined analysis (p = 2.68 × 10−4, two-tailed Fisher’s exact test), indicating that the SLC2A3 duplication might serve as a genetic modifier of CHDs and/or aortic arch anomalies in individuals with 22q11DS. PMID:25892112

  17. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    PubMed

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.

  18. Metachronous Bilateral Testicular Leydig-Like Tumors Leading to the Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (Adrenogenital Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Vukina, Josip; Chism, David D.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with a history of left testis Leydig cell tumor (LCT), 3-month status after left radical orchiectomy, presented with a rapidly enlarging (0.6 cm to 3.7 cm) right testicular mass. He underwent a right radical orchiectomy, sections interpreted as showing a similar Leydig cell-like oncocytic proliferation, with a differential diagnosis including metachronous bilateral LCT and metachronous bilateral testicular tumors associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (a.k.a. “testicular adrenal rest tumors” (TARTs) and “testicular tumors of the adrenogenital syndrome” (TTAGS)). Additional workup demonstrated a markedly elevated serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and elevated adrenal precursor steroid levels. He was diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3BHSD) type, and started on treatment. Metachronous bilateral testicular masses in adults should prompt consideration of adult presentation of CAH. Since all untreated CAH patients are expected to have elevated serum ACTH, formal exclusion of CAH prior to surgical resection of a testicular Leydig-like proliferation could be accomplished by screening for elevated serum ACTH. PMID:26351608

  19. Congenital generalized terminal hypertrichosis with gingival hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Sanginés, Esther; Villalobos, Alejandra; Vega-Memije, Ma Elisa; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Canún-Serrano, Sonia; Lacy-Niebla, Rosa Ma

    2002-01-01

    Congenital generalized terminal hypertrichosis is a rare disease, especially when associated with gingival hyperplasia. Congenital hypertrichosis can be a clinical feature of several syndromes, so these patients must be studied by a multidisciplinary team that should include a dermatologist, geneticist, psychologist, odontologist, and an endocrinologist. We report a 7-year-old girl with congenital generalized hypertrichosis and gingival hyperplasia, and analyze the clinical approach, differential diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:11994171

  20. A case of split notochord syndrome with congenital ileal atresia, the total absence of a colon, and a dorsal enteric cyst communicating to the retroperitoneal isolated ceca with a vesical fistula.

    PubMed

    Asagiri, Kimio; Yagi, Minoru; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Akaiwa, Masao; Asakawa, Takahiro; Kaida, Akiko; Kobayashi, Hidefumi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2008-09-01

    Split notochord syndrome (SNS) is an extremely rare anomaly. This report presents the case of a male infant with SNS associated with congenital ileal atresia and a dorsal enteric cyst communicating to the retroperitoneal isolated ceca with a vesical fistula. Dorsal fistulography and vesicography were useful and essential for the detailed study of the topology in this patient. The embryological mechanism and etiologic theories are discussed with a review of 19 cases reported in the literature.

  1. Antley-Bixler syndrome: a disorder characterized by congenital synostosis of the elbow joint and the cranial suture.

    PubMed

    Kitoh, H; Nogami, H; Oki, T; Arao, K; Nagasaka, M; Tanaka, Y

    1996-01-01

    The Antley-Bixler syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia, radiohumeral synostosis, joint contractures, arachnodactyly, and femoral bowing and fractures. We report four cases with this disorder, all of which had craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia with characteristic facial appearance, and contractures of bilateral elbow joints. However, femoral bowing, fractures, and arachnodactyly were not seen in our patients. In addition, proximal phalanges of the thumb and the great toe showed deformity of the delta phalanx in two cases. Characteristic features in these cases were the synostotic deformity of the elbow joint; three had radioulnahumeral synostosis, and one had radioulnar synostosis. Therefore, our cases indicated that various synostotic patterns of the elbow joints may exist in this syndrome. It is reasonable to propose that characteristic craniofacial appearance associated with the synostosis of the elbow joints of various forms should be considered minimal diagnostic criteria of the Antley-Bixler syndrome. PMID:8742293

  2. Congenital insensitivity to pain with neuroparalytic keratitis.

    PubMed

    Biedner, B; Dagan, M; Gedalia, A; David, R

    1990-08-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain is a well-defined entity in the group of sensory deficiency syndromes. To the best of our knowledge, unilateral neuroparalytic keratitis associated with congenital insensitivity to pain has not been reported. We report such a case to alert clinicians to this potentially blinding problem.

  3. Congenital defects of C1 arches and odontoid process in a child with Down's syndrome: A case presentation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzantonis, Catherine; Muquit, Samiul; Nasto, Luigi Aurelio; Mehdian, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 2-year-old child with Down's syndrome who presented to our unit with torticollis. Imaging studies revealed the rare occurrence of anterior and posterior C1 arch defects, absent odontoid process, and atlantoaxial subluxation. We managed her conservatively for 3 years without neurological deficits or worsening of atlantoaxial subluxation. We discuss the rare occurrences of anterior and posterior arch defects of the atlas, the radiological presentations of axis defects in patients, and the occurrence of atlantoaxial instability in patients with Down's syndrome. Management options with consideration to surgery in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients are also discussed. PMID:27217660

  4. [Congenital ectropion of the upper eyelids due to an anomaly of the eyelids in down's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hennighausen, U; Schmidt-Martens, F W; Reim, M

    1978-05-01

    A 5-months-old female baby with Down's Syndrome developed an intermittent spastic ectropion of the upper eyelids. The reasons for this are thought to be the flaccidity of the connective tissue, which is typical in Down's Syndrome, and a little anomaly of the eyelids, the tarsus was too short horizontally and very weak and the upper eyelids were somewhat larger than normal and elongated. Suturing Bangerter's lid-sheets on the upper eyelids for 15 days resulted in a scarring of the tarsus with the lax connective tissue of the upper eyelids. The ectropion disappeared and did not recur.

  5. A mimic's imitator: a cavitary pneumonia in a myasthenic patient with history of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Raquel Ramos; Bhanot, Nitin; Min, Zaw

    2015-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with myasthenia gravis receiving prednisone and plasmapheresis was found to have right upper lobe cavitary pneumonia on radiological imaging studies after thymectomy. He had a remote history of treated pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) at the age of 19. On the basis of history of TB and current prednisone therapy, reactivation of pulmonary TB was highly suspected. Branching Gram-positive bacilli were identified on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). BAL Ziehl-Neelsen Acid-fast bacilli stain was negative, but a modified Kinyoun stain revealed branching, beaded, filamentous bacilli, suggestive of Nocardia spp. Nocardia cyriacigeorgica grew from the BAL culture. Cerebral MRI demonstrated a right frontal lobe lesion, clinically correlated to be nocardial brain abscess. The patient was treated with three-drug antimicrobial therapy (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, meropenem, linezolid) for 2 months, followed by an additional 10 months of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Amikacin would have been included in the initial three-drug regimen, but its use was contraindicated in our myasthenic patient because aminoglycoside would trigger fatal myasthenic crisis by neuromuscular blockage. Follow-up imaging studies revealed resolution of the lung and brain lesions. PMID:26150643

  6. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  7. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital lues; Fetal syphilis ... which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all ... Saunders; 2014:chap 143. Duff P. Maternal and fetal infections. In: Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, ...

  8. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  9. Congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Romero, Norma Beatriz; Clarke, Nigel F

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders, characterized by the predominance of particular histopathological features on muscle biopsy, such as cores (central core disease) or rods (nemaline myopathy). Clinically, early onset of the disease, stable or slowly progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia and delayed motor development are common in most forms. As a result, the diagnosis of a subtype of congenital myopathy is largely based on the presence of specific structural abnormalities in the skeletal muscle detected by enzyme-histochemistry and electron microscopy studies. During the last decades there have been significant advances in the identification of the genetic basis of most congenital myopathies. However, there is significant genetic heterogeneity within the main groups of congenital myopathies, and mutations in one particular gene may also cause diverse clinical and morphological phenotypes. Thus, the nosography and nosology in this field is still evolving. PMID:23622357

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Walker-Warburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a group of genetic conditions known as congenital muscular dystrophies, which cause muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) beginning ... or management of Walker-Warburg syndrome: GeneReview: Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Overview Genetic Testing Registry: Walker-Warburg syndrome These ...

  11. [Congenital analgesia].

    PubMed

    Accornero, N; Bini, G; Cruccu, G

    1980-01-01

    The case of a 12 years old boy with a congenital anaesthesia covering all cutaneous and visceral districts is reported. There were no other neurological abnormalities apart a light mental retardation and loss of axon reflex after intradermal injection of hystamine. Notwithstanding this last finding a diagnosis of congenital indifference to pain was made. The differential diagnosis between indifference and insensitivity to pain is discussed. PMID:6162189

  12. Immunity to polio, measles and rubella in women of child-bearing age and estimated congenital rubella syndrome incidence, Cambodia, 2012.

    PubMed

    Mao, B; Chheng, K; Wannemuehler, K; Vynnycky, E; Buth, S; Soeung, S C; Reef, S; Weldon, W; Quick, L; Gregory, C J

    2015-07-01

    Significant gaps in immunity to polio, measles, and rubella may exist in adults in Cambodia and threaten vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) elimination and control goals, despite high childhood vaccination coverage. We conducted a nationwide serological survey during November-December 2012 of 2154 women aged 15-39 years to assess immunity to polio, measles, and rubella and to estimate congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) incidence. Measles and rubella antibodies were detected by IgG ELISA and polio antibodies by microneutralization testing. Age-structured catalytic models were fitted to rubella serological data to predict CRS cases. Overall, 29.8% of women lacked immunity to at least one poliovirus (PV); seroprevalence to PV1, PV2 and PV3 was 85.9%, 93.4% and 83.3%, respectively. Rubella and measles antibody seroprevalence was 73.3% and 95.9%, respectively. In the 15-19 years age group, 48.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 42.4-54.1] were susceptible to either PV1 or PV3, and 40.3% (95% CI 33.0-47.5) to rubella virus. Based on rubella antibody seroprevalence, we estimate that >600 infants are born with CRS in Cambodia annually. Significant numbers of Cambodian women are still susceptible to polio and rubella, especially those aged 15-19 years, emphasizing the need to include adults in VPD surveillance and a potential role for vaccination strategies targeted at adults.

  13. Immunity to polio, measles and rubella in women of child-bearing age and estimated congenital rubella syndrome incidence, Cambodia, 2012.

    PubMed

    Mao, B; Chheng, K; Wannemuehler, K; Vynnycky, E; Buth, S; Soeung, S C; Reef, S; Weldon, W; Quick, L; Gregory, C J

    2015-07-01

    Significant gaps in immunity to polio, measles, and rubella may exist in adults in Cambodia and threaten vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) elimination and control goals, despite high childhood vaccination coverage. We conducted a nationwide serological survey during November-December 2012 of 2154 women aged 15-39 years to assess immunity to polio, measles, and rubella and to estimate congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) incidence. Measles and rubella antibodies were detected by IgG ELISA and polio antibodies by microneutralization testing. Age-structured catalytic models were fitted to rubella serological data to predict CRS cases. Overall, 29.8% of women lacked immunity to at least one poliovirus (PV); seroprevalence to PV1, PV2 and PV3 was 85.9%, 93.4% and 83.3%, respectively. Rubella and measles antibody seroprevalence was 73.3% and 95.9%, respectively. In the 15-19 years age group, 48.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 42.4-54.1] were susceptible to either PV1 or PV3, and 40.3% (95% CI 33.0-47.5) to rubella virus. Based on rubella antibody seroprevalence, we estimate that >600 infants are born with CRS in Cambodia annually. Significant numbers of Cambodian women are still susceptible to polio and rubella, especially those aged 15-19 years, emphasizing the need to include adults in VPD surveillance and a potential role for vaccination strategies targeted at adults. PMID:25373419

  14. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Catherine Y; Yonkers, Marc A; Liu, Tiffany S; Minckler, Don S; Tao, Jeremiah P

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery.

  15. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Catherine Y; Yonkers, Marc A; Liu, Tiffany S; Minckler, Don S; Tao, Jeremiah P

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  16. Gene of a new X-linked syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies and severe mental retardation maps in Xp22-pter

    SciTech Connect

    Wittwer, B.; Kircheisen, R.; Leutelt, J.

    1994-09-01

    We report on a family with 3 males presenting with a not yet described new X-chromosomal syndrome of multiple congenital anomalies and severe mental retardation. Two sisters have (with 3 different partners) 3 severely handicapped sons. In each case, oligohydramnios and intrauterine growth retardation were observed. Delivery was in the 34th, 31st, and 38th gestational week, respectively. Two of the patients had microcephaly (head circumference of the third case at birth is unknown). On physical examination, high and broad forehead, frontal bossing, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, thin upper lip, high arched palate, and deeply set anteverted ears were seen. One of the boys has microphthalmos and sclerocornea, while his cousin shows atrophy of the optic nerve. All three patients show a severe statomotor and mental retardation, they are most likely deaf and blind, have pathologic EEG, and seizures. Important additional findings are hydronephrosis, renal duplication, vesicorenal reflux, and agenesis of corpus callosum. The karyotype is normal (46,XY). We performed a segregation analysis in the family using more than 20 DNA polymorphisms distributed over the X chromosome. Linkage without recombination was found to KAL, DXS278, and DXS16 in Xp22. Analysis of multiple informative meioses suggested a location of the disease locus distal to DXS207. Recombinants were identified with all other marker loci from Xp22-Xpter.

  17. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Catherine Y.; Yonkers, Marc A.; Liu, Tiffany S.; Minckler, Don S.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-) in association with congenital hypospadias and foot deformity

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Halil; Karaca, Nilay; Basaran, Seher; Ermis, Hayri; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2003-01-01

    Background Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is caused by distal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p-). We report a case in which intrauterine growth restriction, hypospadias and foot deformity were detected by prenatal ultrasound examination at 29 weeks of gestation. Case Presentation A 31-year-old gravida 2 partus 1 woman was referred at 29 weeks' gestation with suspicion of intrauterine growth restriction. Sonographic examination revealed deformity of the right lower limb and undescended testes with an irregular distal penis. A cordocentesis was performed and chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY,del(4)(p14) karyotype. Conclusion The prenatal detection of intrauterine growth restriction, hypospadias and foot deformity should lead doctors to suspect the presence of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. PMID:12546710

  19. van den Ende-Gupta syndrome of blepharophimosis, arachnodactyly, and congenital contractures: clinical delineation and recurrence in brothers.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Daniela N; Lachman, Ralph S; Pressman, Barry D; Graham, John M

    2003-04-30

    We describe two Hispanic brothers born to unrelated parents with van den Ende-Gupta syndrome (VDEGS), a distinctive combination of characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal abnormalities, and cerebellar hyperplasia. This syndrome was previously delineated by van den Ende et al. [1992: Am J Med Genet 42:467-469] and Gupta et al. [1995: J Med Genet 32:809-812], with additional reports by Phadke et al. [1998: Am J Med Genet 77:16-18] and Bistritzer et al. [1993: Clin Genet 44:15-19]. This is the fifth report of VDEGS, which is characterized by blepharophimosis, narrow nose with hypoplastic alae nasi, hypoplastic maxilla, everted lower lip, slender and elongated hands and feet, arachnodactyly, self-limiting joint contractures, and distinctive skeletal findings. This report of affected siblings, and a previous report of double second cousins born to consanguineous parents [Bistritzer et al. [1993: Clin Genet 44:15-19

  20. Constellation of congenital abnormalities in an infant: A new syndrome or tissue-specific mosaicism for trisomy 18?

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; von Kap-Herr, C.; Wilson, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    A newborn infant born to consanguineous (first cousin) parents was noted to have complex cogenital heart defect and minor anomalies suggestive of trisomy 18. Blood lymphocyte and skin fibroblast karyotypes were normal. He died in the neonatal period of postoperative complications. On interphase fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) using autopsy specimens, a significant number of cells in the liver (17%) were trisomic for chromosome 18, compared to normal control liver tissue. However, interphase FISH analyses of blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and kidney tissue were normal. It is our opinion that this apparent mosaicism for trisomy 18 in the patient`s liver may be spurious, though it brings into focus the issue of possible tissue/organ-specific mosaicism. The anomalies in this infant do not resemble a previously described malformation syndrome. Parental consanguinity raises the possibility that this represents a new autosomal recessive malformation syndrome. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Congenital lipodystrophies and dyslipidemias.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Xavier; Le May, Cedric; Magré, Jocelyne; Cariou, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    Lipodystrophies are rare acquired and genetic disorders characterized by the selective loss of adipose tissue. One key metabolic feature of patients with congenital inherited lipodystrophy is hypertriglyceridemia. The precise mechanisms by which the lack of adipose tissue causes dyslipidemia remain largely unknown. In recent years, new insights have arisen from data obtained in vitro in adipocytes, yeast, drosophila, and very recently in several genetically modified mouse models of generalized lipodystrophy. A common metabolic pathway involving accelerated lipolysis and defective energy storage seems to contribute to the dyslipidemia associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy syndromes, although the pathophysiological changes may vary with the nature of the mutation involved. Therapeutic management of dyslipidemia in patients with lipodystrophy is primarily based on specific approaches using recombinant leptin therapy. Preclinical studies suggest a potential efficacy of thiazolidinediones that remains to be assessed in dedicated clinical trials.

  2. Total hip arthroplasty to treat congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities in the juvenile Down Syndrome hip: review of literature with case.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Drew W; MacDonald, Matthew P; Kosashvili, Yona; Gross, Allan E

    2012-05-01

    Down Syndrome can result in musculoskeletal abnormalities of the hip at an early age. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head can occur as a result of slipped capital femoral epiphysis causing the patient a great deal of pain, limiting the ability to ambulate. Despite the benefits that this patient group can receive from the surgery, surgeons may be apprehensive to operate. It is our experience that these patients benefit greatly from arthroplasty without complication. In this report, we present a total hip replacement to treat avascular necrosis in an adolescent and address the concerns that surgeons may have in treating this patient population.

  3. LRP4 third β-propeller domain mutations cause novel congenital myasthenia by compromising agrin-mediated MuSK signaling in a position-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Bisei; Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Nakata, Tomohiko; Milone, Margherita; Asai, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kenyu; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ito, Yasutomo; Engel, Andrew G; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-04-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders in which the safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. Using Sanger and exome sequencing in a CMS patient, we identified two heteroallelic mutations, p.Glu1233Lys and p.Arg1277His, in LRP4 coding for the postsynaptic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4. LRP4, expressed on the surface of the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, is a receptor for neurally secreted agrin, and LRP4 bound by agrin activates MuSK. Activated MuSK in concert with Dok-7 stimulates rapsyn to concentrate and anchor AChR on the postsynaptic membrane and interacts with other proteins implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. LRP4 also functions as an inhibitor of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The identified mutations in LRP4 are located at the edge of its 3rd beta-propeller domain and decrease binding affinity of LRP4 for both MuSK and agrin. Mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain were previously reported to impair Wnt signaling and cause bone diseases including Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome and sclerosteosis-2. By analyzing naturally occurring and artificially introduced mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain, we show that the edge of the domain regulates the MuSK signaling whereas its central cavity governs Wnt signaling. We conclude that LRP4 is a new CMS disease gene and that the 3rd beta propeller domain of LRP4 mediates the two signaling pathways in a position-specific manner.

  4. LRP4 third β-propeller domain mutations cause novel congenital myasthenia by compromising agrin-mediated MuSK signaling in a position-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawara, Bisei; Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Nakata, Tomohiko; Milone, Margherita; Asai, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kenyu; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ito, Yasutomo; Engel, Andrew G.; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders in which the safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. Using Sanger and exome sequencing in a CMS patient, we identified two heteroallelic mutations, p.Glu1233Lys and p.Arg1277His, in LRP4 coding for the postsynaptic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4. LRP4, expressed on the surface of the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, is a receptor for neurally secreted agrin, and LRP4 bound by agrin activates MuSK. Activated MuSK in concert with Dok-7 stimulates rapsyn to concentrate and anchor AChR on the postsynaptic membrane and interacts with other proteins implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. LRP4 also functions as an inhibitor of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The identified mutations in LRP4 are located at the edge of its 3rd beta-propeller domain and decrease binding affinity of LRP4 for both MuSK and agrin. Mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain were previously reported to impair Wnt signaling and cause bone diseases including Cenani–Lenz syndactyly syndrome and sclerosteosis-2. By analyzing naturally occurring and artificially introduced mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain, we show that the edge of the domain regulates the MuSK signaling whereas its central cavity governs Wnt signaling. We conclude that LRP4 is a new CMS disease gene and that the 3rd beta propeller domain of LRP4 mediates the two signaling pathways in a position-specific manner. PMID:24234652

  5. BDNF and its receptors in human myasthenic thymus: implications for cell fate in thymic pathology.

    PubMed

    Berzi, Angela; Ayata, C Korcan; Cavalcante, Paola; Falcone, Chiara; Candiago, Elisabetta; Motta, Teresio; Bernasconi, Pia; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Mantegazza, Renato; Meinl, Edgar; Farina, Cinthia

    2008-07-15

    Here we show that in myasthenic thymus several cell types, including thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and immune cells, were the source and the target of the neurotrophic factor brain-derived growth factor (BDNF). Interestingly, many actively proliferating medullary thymocytes expressed the receptor TrkB in vivo in involuted thymus, while this population was lost in hyperplastic or neoplastic thymuses. Furthermore, in hyperplastic thymuses the robust coordinated expression of BDNF in the germinal centers together with the receptor p75NTR on all proliferating B cells strongly suggests that this factor regulates germinal center reaction. Finally, all TEC dying of apoptosis expressed BDNF receptors, indicating that this neurotrophin is involved in TEC turnover. In thymomas both BDNF production and receptor expression in TEC were strongly hindered. This may represent an attempt of tumour escape from cell death.

  6. [Congenital torticollis].

    PubMed

    Wicart, P

    2012-03-01

    Congenital torticollis is a very common postural deformity, characterized by a more or less severe retraction of sternocleidomastoid muscle. Any treatment, else that "good sense" counsels given to the parents, is indicated. The evolution is spontaneously favorable in the majority of cases before the age of one year old. The elimination of differential diagnosis (vertebral and/or neurological malformations, ocular, tumor) is the key-point. Screening of congenital hip dislocation is mandatory because the physiopathology is the same in both diseases. A remaining torticolis after 18 months of age may be an indication to sternocleidomastoid muscle lengthening.

  7. De Novo Loss-of-Function Mutations in USP9X Cause a Female-Specific Recognizable Syndrome with Developmental Delay and Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Latour, Brooke; Jolly, Lachlan; Mancini, Grazia M.; Pfundt, Rolph; Wu, Ka Man; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M.A.; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; Anderlid, Britt-Marie M.; Wood, Stephen A.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Barnicoat, Angela; Probst, Frank; Magoulas, Pilar; Brooks, Alice S.; Malmgren, Helena; Harila-Saari, Arja; Marcelis, Carlo M.; Vreeburg, Maaike; Hobson, Emma; Sutton, V. Reid; Stark, Zornitza; Vogt, Julie; Cooper, Nicola; Lim, Jiin Ying; Price, Sue; Lai, Angeline Hwei Meeng; Domingo, Deepti; Reversade, Bruno; Gecz, Jozef; Gilissen, Christian; Brunner, Han G.; Kini, Usha; Roepman, Ronald; Nordgren, Ann; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in more than a hundred genes have been reported to cause X-linked recessive intellectual disability (ID) mainly in males. In contrast, the number of identified X-linked genes in which de novo mutations specifically cause ID in females is limited. Here, we report 17 females with de novo loss-of-function mutations in USP9X, encoding a highly conserved deubiquitinating enzyme. The females in our study have a specific phenotype that includes ID/developmental delay (DD), characteristic facial features, short stature, and distinct congenital malformations comprising choanal atresia, anal abnormalities, post-axial polydactyly, heart defects, hypomastia, cleft palate/bifid uvula, progressive scoliosis, and structural brain abnormalities. Four females from our cohort were identified by targeted genetic testing because their phenotype was suggestive for USP9X mutations. In several females, pigment changes along Blaschko lines and body asymmetry were observed, which is probably related to differential (escape from) X-inactivation between tissues. Expression studies on both mRNA and protein level in affected-female-derived fibroblasts showed significant reduction of USP9X level, confirming the loss-of-function effect of the identified mutations. Given that some features of affected females are also reported in known ciliopathy syndromes, we examined the role of USP9X in the primary cilium and found that endogenous USP9X localizes along the length of the ciliary axoneme, indicating that its loss of function could indeed disrupt cilium-regulated processes. Absence of dysregulated ciliary parameters in affected female-derived fibroblasts, however, points toward spatiotemporal specificity of ciliary USP9X (dys-)function. PMID:26833328

  8. The genetics of folate metabolism and maternal risk of birth of a child with Down syndrome and associated congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Almost 15 years ago it was hypothesized that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in folate metabolism could lead to aberrant methylation of peri-centromeric regions of chromosome 21, favoring its abnormal segregation during maternal meiosis. Subsequently, more than 50 small case-control studies investigated whether or not maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes could be risk factors for the birth of a child with Down syndrome (DS), yielding conflicting and inconclusive results. However, recent meta-analyses of those studies suggest that at least three of those polymorphisms, namely MTHFR 677C>T, MTRR 66A>G, and RFC1 80G>A, are likely to act as maternal risk factors for the birth of a child with trisomy 21, revealing also complex gene-nutrient interactions. A large-cohort study also revealed that lack of maternal folic acid supplementation at peri-conception resulted in increased risk for a DS birth due to errors occurred at maternal meiosis II in the aging oocyte, and it was shown that the methylation status of chromosome 21 peri-centromeric regions could favor recombination errors during meiosis leading to its malsegregation. In this regard, two recent case-control studies revealed association of maternal polymorphisms or haplotypes of the DNMT3B gene, coding for an enzyme required for the regulation of DNA methylation at centromeric and peri-centromeric regions of human chromosomes, with risk of having a birth with DS. Furthermore, congenital heart defects (CHD) are found in almost a half of DS births, and increasing evidence points to a possible contribution of lack of folic acid supplementation at peri-conception, maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes, and resulting epigenetic modifications of several genes, at the basis of their occurrence. This review summarizes available case-control studies and literature meta-analyses in order to provide a critical and up to date overview of what we currently know in this field. PMID:26161087

  9. Lateral diffusion, function, and expression of the slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome αC418W nicotinic receptor mutation with changes in lipid raft components.

    PubMed

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A; Martínez, Hernán L; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-10-30

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR.

  10. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4) due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Anna; Straub, Volker; McCann, Liza J; Seelow, Dominik; Varon, Raymonda; Barresi, Rita; Schulze, Anne; Lucke, Barbara; Lützkendorf, Susanne; Karbasiyan, Mohsen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Spuler, Simone; Schuelke, Markus

    2010-03-01

    We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4) of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin) as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT). PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  11. Haploinsufficiency for Phox2b in mice causes dilated pupils and atrophy of the ciliary ganglion: mechanistic insights into human congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cross, Sally H; Morgan, Joanne E; Pattyn, Alexandre; West, Katrine; McKie, Lisa; Hart, Alan; Thaung, Caroline; Brunet, Jean-François; Jackson, Ian J

    2004-07-15

    Dilp1 is a semi-dominant mouse mutation that causes dilated pupils when heterozygous and is lethal when homozygous. We report here that it is caused by a point mutation that introduces a stop codon close to the start of the coding sequence of the paired-like homeobox transcription factor Phox2b. Mice carrying a targeted allele of Phox2b also have dilated pupils and the two alleles do not complement. Phox2b is necessary for the development of the autonomic nervous system and when absent one of the consequences is that all parasympathetic ganglia fail to form. Constriction of the pupil is a parasympathetic response mediated by the ciliary ganglion and we find that in Phox2b heterozygous mutants it is highly atrophic. The development of other parasympathetic and sympathetic ganglia appears to be largely unaffected indicating that the ciliary ganglion is exquisitely sensitive to a reduction in dose of this transcription factor. PHOX2B has been implicated in human disease. Mutations, principally leading to polyalanine expansions within the protein, have been found in patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), the cardinal feature of which is an inability to breathe unassisted when asleep. Additionally, some CCHS patients have ocular abnormalities, including pupillary defects, although they principally have constricted rather than dilated pupils. The apparent phenotypic differences observed between mice carrying a loss-of-function mutation of Phox2b and CCHS patients indicate that PHOX2B mutations found in CCHS patients, all of which can produce proteins with intact DNA-binding domains, are gain-of-function mutations that alter rather than abolish protein function.

  12. Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vynnycky, Emilia; Adams, Elisabeth J.; Cutts, Felicity T.; Reef, Susan E.; Navar, Ann Marie; Simons, Emily; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Brown, David W. J.; Jackson, Charlotte; Strebel, Peter M.; Dabbagh, Alya J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) is typically underestimated in routine surveillance. Updated estimates are needed following the recent WHO position paper on rubella and recent GAVI initiatives, funding rubella vaccination in eligible countries. Previous estimates considered the year 1996 and only 78 (developing) countries. Methods We reviewed the literature to identify rubella seroprevalence studies conducted before countries introduced rubella-containing vaccination (RCV). These data and the estimated vaccination coverage in the routine schedule and mass campaigns were incorporated in mathematical models to estimate the CRS incidence in 1996 and 2000–2010 for each country, region and globally. Results The estimated CRS decreased in the three regions (Americas, Europe and Eastern Mediterranean) which had introduced widespread RCV by 2010, reaching <2 per 100,000 live births (the Americas and Europe) and 25 (95% CI 4–61) per 100,000 live births (the Eastern Mediterranean). The estimated incidence in 2010 ranged from 90 (95% CI: 46–195) in the Western Pacific, excluding China, to 116 (95% CI: 56–235) and 121 (95% CI: 31–238) per 100,000 live births in Africa and SE Asia respectively. Highest numbers of cases were predicted in Africa (39,000, 95% CI: 18,000–80,000) and SE Asia (49,000, 95% CI: 11,000–97,000). In 2010, 105,000 (95% CI: 54,000–158,000) CRS cases were estimated globally, compared to 119,000 (95% CI: 72,000–169,000) in 1996. Conclusions Whilst falling dramatically in the Americas, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean after vaccination, the estimated CRS incidence remains high elsewhere. Well-conducted seroprevalence studies can help to improve the reliability of these estimates and monitor the impact of rubella vaccination. PMID:26962867

  13. [Congenital heart diseases in women].

    PubMed

    Putotto, Carolina; Unolt, Marta; Caiaro, Angela; Marino, Dario; Massaccesi, Valerio; Marino, Bruno; Digilio, Maria Cristina

    2013-02-01

    Are there gender differences in prevalence, surgical results and long-term survival of patients with congenital heart disease? Available literature data allow us to state what follows. At birth there is a mild but significant prevalence of congenital heart disease in females. The most severe congenital heart diseases are less frequent in girls, but when they are present in females, they are linked to a higher surgical mortality rate, due perhaps to lower weight at birth and to the prevalence of extracardiac malformations and/or of associated genetic syndromes. On the other hand, in adults, surgery for congenital heart disease is at higher risk in males, and so the long-term survival rate is higher in females. Particular psychological attitudes, a higher incidence of pulmonary hypertension, as well as specific problems linked to the reproductive function characterize congenital heart disease in adult women. The knowledge and analysis of these data are essential for a correct management of congenital heart disease in neonates, children and adults.

  14. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  15. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." PMID:25726292

  16. Autre cause de mort subite du nourrisson: à propos d'un cas clinique de syndrome du QT long congenital

    PubMed Central

    Seka, Zena; Mols, Pierre; Gobin, Eric; Ngatchou, William

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome du QT long congénital est une maladie rythmique liée à une mutation génétique et caractérisée par un espace QT allongé sur l’électrocardiogramme, des arythmies malignes type torsade de pointe et fibrillation ventriculaire entraînant une mort subite. Les gènes impliqués dans ces mutations codent pour des sous unités des canaux ioniques responsables de l'activité électrique cardiaque. Le diagnostic est basé sur l’électrocardiogramme, une enquête familiale et l’étude génétique. Le traitement repose sur les bêtabloquants, la sympathectomie et le stimulateur cardiaque. Nous rapportons le cas d'un nourrisson de 2 ans retrouvé en état de mort apparente. Nous discutons de sa prise en charge initiale, de l'enquête familiale et de son suivi ultérieur. PMID:25667708

  17. Surgery for congenital diseases of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Duke

    2015-02-01

    Congenital diseases of the aorta tend to be obstructive when they present early in life, and aneurysmal when they present later in life. The latter group also tends to be associated with connective tissue disorders and with repaired conotruncal lesions. The indications for intervention in the aneurysm group are still in evolution but are clearly age- and lesion-dependant. Disorders such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome may deserve aggressive prophylactic surgery, as well as Marfan syndrome to a lesser extent. The natural history of the dilated aorta after repair of congenital heart lesions is probably more benign than de novo aneurysms and therefore should be treated conservatively.

  18. Surgery for congenital diseases of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Duke

    2015-02-01

    Congenital diseases of the aorta tend to be obstructive when they present early in life, and aneurysmal when they present later in life. The latter group also tends to be associated with connective tissue disorders and with repaired conotruncal lesions. The indications for intervention in the aneurysm group are still in evolution but are clearly age- and lesion-dependant. Disorders such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome may deserve aggressive prophylactic surgery, as well as Marfan syndrome to a lesser extent. The natural history of the dilated aorta after repair of congenital heart lesions is probably more benign than de novo aneurysms and therefore should be treated conservatively. PMID:25726075

  19. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  20. Gingival fibromatosis with hemi-osseous hyperplasia of jaws, focal maxillary viral papillomatosis of gingiva, fissured tongue and congenitally missing anterior teeth: a case report and surgical management of a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Sesha; Manyam, Ravikanth; Babu, M Narendera; Saraswathi, T R

    2011-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is characterized by fibrotic enlargement of the gingiva that can occur as inherited or sporadic form. Inherited form can be an isolated trait or as a component of a syndrome. This article reports a 35 year old male patient affected by gingival fibromatosis associated with hemiosseous hyperplasia of mandible, maxilla, and zygoma on the right side, viral papillomatosis of maxillary anterior gingiva, fissured tongue and congenitally missing anterior teeth. The patient was subjected to phase I and phase II periodontal therapy. There was no evidence of recurrence of the enlargement after one year but the papillomatosis recurred. Gingival fibromatosis has been reported to be associated with various other abnormalities but not with those described in our case. This observation raises the possibility that the coexistence of these entities in our case may represent a new syndrome.

  1. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure.

  2. [Congenital aniridia].

    PubMed

    Chiruţa, Daria; Stan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Aniridia is a rare congenital, hereditary, bilateral disease which is associated with various systemic and ocular defects. We present the case of a 61 year old patient who was admitted in the hospital of ophthalmology Cluj Napoca, for the symptoms caused by the ocular defects associated with aniridia. In this case, aniridia is autosomal dominant transmitted with incomplete penetrance and it is not accompanied by any systemic defects. The disease also affects three of her sons and two nephews of the patient.

  3. Renal complications in 6p duplication syndrome: microarray-based investigation of the candidate gene(s) for the development of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura-Furuhata, Megumi; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Amano, Yoshiro; Ehara, Takashi; Hamasaki, Yuko; Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Aikawa, Atsushi; Hamada, Riku; Ishikura, Kenji; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Noda, Shunsuke; Koike, Kenichi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Awazu, Midori; Miyake, Noriko; Kosho, Tomoki

    2015-03-01

    6p duplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder that frequently manifests renal complications, including proteinuria, hypoplastic kidney, and hydronephrosis. We report a girl with the syndrome, manifesting left hydronephrosis, proteinuria/hematuria, and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS) resulting in chronic end-stage renal failure, successfully treated with renal transplantation. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization showed the derivative chromosome 6 to have a 6.4-Mb duplication at 6p25.3-p25.1 with 32 protein-coding genes and a 220-Kb deletion at 6p25.3 with two genes of no possible relation to the renal pathology. Review of the literature shows that variation of renal complications in the syndrome is compatible with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). FSGS, observed in another patient with 6p duplication syndrome, could be a non-coincidental complication. FOXC1, located within the 6.4-Mb duplicated region at 6p25.3-p25.2, could be a candidate gene for CAKUT, but its single gene duplication effect would not be sufficient. FSGS would be a primary defect associated with duplicated gene(s) albeit no candidate could be proposed, or might occur in association with CAKUT.

  4. Long-term effects of a multimodal approach including immunoadsorption for the treatment of myasthenic crisis.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Heike; Ulrich-Merzenich, Gudrun; Hoffmann, Lars; Kornblum, Cornelia; Schmidt, Stephan; Vetter, Hans; Walger, Peter

    2006-08-01

    A multimodal treatment protocol with immunoadsorption (IA) as the central element was used in the treatment of myasthenic crisis (MC). Fifteen patients with MC were treated in repeated, uninterrupted 7-day cycles until mobilization with: (i) large-volume IA using an antihuman-IgG adsorber, days 1-5; (ii) intravenous immunoglobulin substitution (0.3-0.5 g/kg body weight [BW]/day), days 5-7; and (iii) immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide (1-2 mg/kg BW/day) and prednisolone (0.5-1 mg/kg BW/day), until remission. Patients required a median of 8 days of mechanical ventilation, 12 days in the intensive care unit, and 35 days of hospitalization. Functional improvement compared to their precrisis condition was attained by 14 of 15 patients. MG severity score improved by a mean of 10 points, quality of life score by 9.8 points, and Karnofsky index by 29 points in 14 of 15 patients. Improvements remained stable and no further crises occurred during long-term follow-up, which averaged 4.4 years. No fatalities due to MC occurred. The results demonstrate that our protocol is a potent therapeutic approach in the treatment of MC.

  5. Congenital hypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Vanathi; Vijayakumar, M; Janakiraman, Lalitha; Nammalwar, B R

    2008-08-01

    Congenital hypoaldosteronism due to an isolated aldosterone biosynthesis defect is rare. We report a 4 month old female infant who presented with failure to thrive, persistent hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. Investigations revealed normal serum 17 hydroxy progesterone and cortisol. A decreased serum aldosterone and serum 18 hydroxy corticosterone levels with a low 18 hydroxy corticosterone: aldosterone ratio was suggestive of corticosterone methyl oxidase type I deficiency. She was started on fludrocortisone replacement therapy with a subsequent normalization of electrolytes. Further molecular analysis is needed to ascertain the precise nature of the mutation.

  6. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  7. [Congenital anophthalmias: a case of trisomy 13].

    PubMed

    Kouassi, F X; Koffi, K V; Safede, K; Cochard, C; Cochener, B

    2006-04-01

    Congenital anophthalmia is the result of a lack of development or regression of the primary optic vesicle in utero. It can be isolated or associated with other malformations and can be unilateral or, rarely, bilateral. Different etiologies are usually found such as chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations, toxic agents, and infections. We report a case of bilateral congenital anophthalmia in a setting of a polymalformative syndrome with microcephalia and bilateral lip cleft. Karyotype studies confirmed trisomy 13 known as Patau's syndrome. Trisomy 13 is a rare lethal chromosomal aberration frequently responsible for uni- or bilateral microphthalmia and occasionally for anophthalmia.

  8. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  9. Marrow hypoplasia associated with congenital neurologic anomalies in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Drachtman, R; Weinblatt, M; Sitarz, A; Gold, A; Kochen, J

    1990-10-01

    Two siblings with congenital neurologic structural anomalies and delayed-onset selective bone marrow hypoplasia in a previously undescribed constellation of symptoms are presented. Differences between these cases and other well known syndromes are discussed. The importance of this association is the implication that children with congenital neurologic abnormalities may be at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic hematopoietic conditions. PMID:2264478

  10. Mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft palate, short stature, and facial anomalies: A new X-linked multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome: Clinical description and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Ropers, H.H.; Schoonbrood-Lenssen, A.M.J.

    1994-07-15

    We report on two brothers and their two maternal uncles with severe mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft or highly arched palate, short stature and craniofacial anomalies consisting of microcephaly, abnormal ears, bulbous nose, broad nasal bridge, malar hypoplasia, and micro-gnathia. Three of the four patients died at an early age. The mother of the two brothers had an atrial septal defect. She is assumed to be manifesting carrier of a mutant gene, which is expressed in her two sons and two brothers. By multipoint linkage analysis it is found that the most likely location of the responsible gene is the pericentromeric region Xp21.3-q21.3 with DMD and DXS3 as flanking markers. Maximum information is obtained with marker DXS453 (Z = 1.20 at {theta} = 0.0). 24 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD. PMID:25497206

  12. Two case reports of anophthalmia and congenital heart disease: Adding a new dimension to this association.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jenny; Steelman, Charlotte K; Vincent, Robert; Richburg, Delene; Chang, Tiffany S; Shehata, Bahig M

    2010-01-01

    Anophthalmia is the congenital absence of ocular tissue from the orbit. Many syndromes and malformations (e.g., anophthalmia-esophageal-genital syndrome, Matthew-Wood syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, oculo-facial-cardio-dental-syndome, heterotaxy, and Fraser syndrome) have been associated with anophthalmia. However, its relation with congenital heart disease has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we discuss two cases of patients with anophthalmia and congenital heart defects, and we compare these findings with other syndromes with which anophthalmia has been associated. One of our two patients showed complex congenital heart disease with heterotaxia, polysplenia, and normal lung lobation. These findings may reflect a new dimension of anophthalmia, heterotaxia, and congenital heart disease associations.

  13. Congenital and acquired neutropenias consensus guidelines on therapy and follow-up in childhood from the Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group of the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica).

    PubMed

    Fioredda, Francesca; Calvillo, Michaela; Bonanomi, Sonia; Coliva, Tiziana; Tucci, Fabio; Farruggia, Piero; Pillon, Marta; Martire, Baldassarre; Ghilardi, Roberta; Ramenghi, Ugo; Renga, Daniela; Menna, Giuseppe; Pusiol, Anna; Barone, Angelica; Gambineri, Eleonora; Palazzi, Giovanni; Casazza, Gabriella; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo

    2012-02-01

    The management of congenital and acquired neutropenias presents some differences according to the type of the disease. Treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is not standardized and scanty data are available on the best schedule to apply. The frequency and the type of longitudinal controls in patients affected with neutropenias are not usually discussed in the literature. The Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group (MFSG) of the Associazione Italiana di Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) elaborated this document following design and methodology formerly approved by the AIEOP board. The panel of experts reviewed the literature on the topic and participated in a conference producing a document that includes recommendations on neutropenia treatment and timing of follow-up.

  14. Sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Wei; Wu, Yu-Hung; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Peng, Chun-Chih; Ho, Che-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    SCALP syndrome is an acronym describing the coincidence of sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus (giant congenital melanocytic nevus). We present a fourth case of this syndrome.

  15. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Maynika V; LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs in approximately 1:2,000 to 1:4,000 newborns. The clinical manifestations are often subtle or not present at birth. This likely is due to trans-placental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone, while many infants have some thyroid production of their own. Common symptoms include decreased activity and increased sleep, feeding difficulty, constipation, and prolonged jaundice. On examination, common signs include myxedematous facies, large fontanels, macroglossia, a distended abdomen with umbilical hernia, and hypotonia. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Thyroid dysgenesis accounts for 85% of permanent, primary CH, while inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis (dyshormonogeneses) account for 10-15% of cases. Secondary or central CH may occur with isolated TSH deficiency, but more commonly it is associated with congenital hypopitiutarism. Transient CH most commonly occurs in preterm infants born in areas of endemic iodine deficiency. In countries with newborn screening programs in place, infants with CH are diagnosed after detection by screening tests. The diagnosis should be confirmed by finding an elevated serum TSH and low T4 or free T4 level. Other diagnostic tests, such as thyroid radionuclide uptake and scan, thyroid sonography, or serum thyroglobulin determination may help pinpoint the underlying etiology, although treatment may be started without these tests. Levothyroxine is the treatment of choice; the recommended starting dose is 10 to 15 mcg/kg/day. The immediate goals of treatment are to rapidly raise the serum T4 above 130 nmol/L (10 ug/dL) and normalize serum TSH levels. Frequent laboratory monitoring in infancy is essential to ensure optimal neurocognitive outcome. Serum TSH and free T4 should be measured every 1-2 months in the first 6 months of life and every 3-4 months thereafter. In general, the prognosis

  16. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  17. [The "lethal white foal" syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blendinger, C; Müller, G; Bostedt, H

    1994-06-01

    The lethal white foal syndrome (congenital intestinal aganglionosis) was diagnosed by history, clinical signs and pathological findings in a female foal, born in March 1992, that was an offspring of two overo-spotted paint horses. The syndrome is a congenital innervation defect of the gastrointestinal tract. A literature review of this condition, relatively unknown in Germany, is given.

  18. Congenital errors of folate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zittoun, J

    1995-09-01

    Congenital errors of folate metabolism can be related either to defective transport of folate through various cells or to defective intracellular utilization of folate due to some enzyme deficiencies. Defective transport of folate across the intestine and the blood-brain barrier was reported in the condition 'Congenital Malabsorption of Folate'. This disease is characterized by a severe megaloblastic anaemia of early appearance associated with mental retardation. Anaemia is folate-responsive, but neurological symptoms are only poorly improved because of the inability to maintain adequate levels of folate in the CSF. A familial defect of cellular uptake was described in a family with a high frequency of aplastic anaemia or leukaemia. An isolated defect in folate transport into CSF was identified in a patient suffering from a cerebellar syndrome and pyramidal tract dysfunction. Among enzyme deficiencies, some are well documented, others still putative. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency is the most common. The main clinical findings are neurological signs (mental retardation, seizures, rarely schizophrenic syndromes) or vascular disease, without any haematological abnormality. Low levels of folate in serum, red blood cells and CSF associated with homocystinuria are constant. Methionine synthase deficiency is characterized by a megaloblastic anaemia occurring early in life that is more or less folate-responsive and associated with mental retardation. Glutamate formiminotransferase-cyclodeaminase deficiency is responsible for massive excretion of formiminoglutamic acid but megaloblastic anaemia is not constant. The clinical findings are a more or less severe mental or physical retardation. Dihydrofolate reductase deficiency was reported in three children presenting with a megaloblastic anaemia a few days or weeks after birth, which responded to folinic acid. The possible relationship between congenital disorders such as neural tube defects or

  19. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad A; Afifi, Ashraf M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency present at birth. Babies with CH who are not identified and treated promptly develop severe mental retardation. Most of the babies with CH do not manifest the typical known signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, and this is most likely due to transplacental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone in addition to some residual neonatal thyroid function, as might be seen with thyroid hypoplasia, an ectopic gland, or mild dyshormonogenesis. Screening for CH has enabled the virtual eradication of the devastating effects of mental retardation due to sporadic CH in most developed countries of the world. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Permanent CH refers to a persistent deficiency of thyroid hormone that requires life-long treatment. Transient CH refers to a temporary deficiency of thyroid hormone that is discovered at birth but recovers to normal in the first few months or years of life. In the last several decades, there have been exciting advances in our understanding of fetal and neonatal thyroid physiology. In addition, advances in molecular biology have helped in understanding the early events in thyroid gland embryogenesis, mechanisms of thyroid action in the brain, the molecular basis for many of the inborn errors of thyroid hormonogenesis, and thyroid hormone action. However, many questions and challenges are still not answered. For example, the increasing numbers of surviving small and premature neonates with abnormalities in thyroid function need definite diagnostic criteria and whether they require medical therapy. Another challenge is the dilemma of finding the best screening methodology that is sensitive and cost effective. PMID:22570946

  20. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  1. Homozygosity and linkage-disequilibrium mapping of the syndrome of congenital hypoparathyroidism, growth and mental retardation, and dysmorphism to a 1-cM interval on chromosome 1q42-43.

    PubMed Central

    Parvari, R; Hershkovitz, E; Kanis, A; Gorodischer, R; Shalitin, S; Sheffield, V C; Carmi, R

    1998-01-01

    The syndrome of hypoparathyroidism associated with growth retardation, developmental delay, and dysmorphism (HRD) is a newly described, autosomal recessive, congenital disorder with severe, often fatal consequences. Since the syndrome is very rare, with all parents of affected individuals being consanguineous, it is presumed to be caused by homozygous inheritance of a single recessive mutation from a common ancestor. To localize the HRD gene, we performed a genomewide screen using DNA pooling and homozygosity mapping for apparently unlinked kindreds. Analysis of a panel of 359 highly polymorphic markers revealed linkage to D1S235. The maximum LOD score obtained was 4.11 at a recombination fraction of 0. Analysis of three additional markers-GGAA6F06, D1S2678, and D1S179-in a 2-cM interval around D1S235 resulted in LOD scores >3. Analysis of additional chromosome 1 markers revealed evidence of genetic linkage disequilibrium and place the HRD locus within an approximately 1-cM interval defined by D1S1540 and D1S2678 on chromosome 1q42-43. PMID:9634513

  2. X-linked congenital ptosis and associated intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, cleft palate, digital and genital abnormalities define novel Xq25q26 duplication syndrome.

    PubMed

    Møller, R S; Jensen, L R; Maas, S M; Filmus, J; Capurro, M; Hansen, C; Marcelis, C L M; Ravn, K; Andrieux, J; Mathieu, M; Kirchhoff, M; Rødningen, O K; de Leeuw, N; Yntema, H G; Froyen, G; Vandewalle, J; Ballon, K; Klopocki, E; Joss, S; Tolmie, J; Knegt, A C; Lund, A M; Hjalgrim, H; Kuss, A W; Tommerup, N; Ullmann, R; de Brouwer, A P M; Strømme, P; Kjaergaard, S; Tümer, Z; Kleefstra, T

    2014-05-01

    Submicroscopic duplications along the long arm of the X-chromosome with known phenotypic consequences are relatively rare events. The clinical features resulting from such duplications are various, though they often include intellectual disability, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, hypogonadism and feeding difficulties. Female carriers are often phenotypically normal or show a similar but milder phenotype, as in most cases the X-chromosome harbouring the duplication is subject to inactivation. Xq28, which includes MECP2 is the major locus for submicroscopic X-chromosome duplications, whereas duplications in Xq25 and Xq26 have been reported in only a few cases. Using genome-wide array platforms we identified overlapping interstitial Xq25q26 duplications ranging from 0.2 to 4.76 Mb in eight unrelated families with in total five affected males and seven affected females. All affected males shared a common phenotype with intrauterine- and postnatal growth retardation and feeding difficulties in childhood. Three had microcephaly and two out of five suffered from epilepsy. In addition, three males had a distinct facial appearance with congenital bilateral ptosis and large protruding ears and two of them showed a cleft palate. The affected females had various clinical symptoms similar to that of the males with congenital bilateral ptosis in three families as most remarkable feature. Comparison of the gene content of the individual duplications with the respective phenotypes suggested three critical regions with candidate genes (AIFM1, RAB33A, GPC3 and IGSF1) for the common phenotypes, including candidate loci for congenital bilateral ptosis, small head circumference, short stature, genital and digital defects.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Novel Non-Synonymous Mutation in Ectodysplasin A (EDA) Associated with Non-Syndromic X-Linked Dominant Congenital Tooth Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Tanmoy; Bansal, Rajesh; Das, Parimal

    2014-01-01

    Congenital tooth agenesis in human is characterized by failure of tooth development during tooth organogenesis. 300 genes in mouse and 30 genes in human so far have been known to regulate tooth development. However, candidature of only 5 genes viz. PAX9, MSX1, AXIN2, WNT10A and EDA have been experimentally established for congenitally missing teeth like hypodontia and oligodontia. In this study an Indian family with multiple congenital tooth agenesis was identified. Pattern of inheritance was apparently autosomal dominant type with a rare possibility to be X-linked. Whole genome sequencing of two affected individuals was carried out which revealed 119 novel non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (SNVs) distributed among 117 genes. Out of these only one variation (c.956G>T) located at exon 9 of X-linked EDA gene was considered as pathogenic and validated among all the affected and unaffected family members and unrelated controls. This variation leads to p.Ser319Ile change in the TNF homology domain of EDA (transcript variant 1) protein. In silico analysis predicts that this Ser319 is well conserved across different vertebrate species and a part of putative receptor binding site. Structure based homology modeling predicts that this amino acid residue along with four other amino acid residues nearby, those when mutated known to cause selective tooth agenesis, form a cluster that may have functional significance. Taken together these results suggest that c.956G>T (p.Ser319Ile) mutation plausibly reduces the receptor binding activity of EDA leading to distinct tooth agenesis in this family. PMID:25203534

  4. [Congenital heart disease, heterotaxia and laterality].

    PubMed

    Icardo, José Manuel; García Rincón, Juan Manuel; Ros, María Angeles

    2002-09-01

    Congenital heart disease occurs in about 0,8% of all newborns. Many cardiac malformations occur among relatives and have a polymorphic presentation. The origin of most congenital heart disease is thought to be multifactorial, implying both anomalous expression of genes and the influence of epigenetic factors. However, in a small number of cases, the origin of congenital heart disease has been directly related to chromosomal anomalies or to defects in a single gene. Curiously, defects in a single gene can explain a polymorphic presentation if the anomalous gene controls a basic embryonic process that affects different organs in time and space. Some of these genes appear to control the establishment of laterality. The establishment of the left-right asymmetry starts at the Hensen node. Here, the initial embryonic symmetry is broken by cascades of gene activation that confer specific properties on the left and right sides of the embryo. Although there are variations between species, some basic patterns of gene expression (Nodal, Pitx2) appear to be maintained along the phylogenetic scale. Anomalous expression of these genes induces the heterotaxia syndrome, which usually courses with congenital heart disease. The development of heart malformations is illustrated with the mouse mutant iv/iv, which is a model for the heterotaxia syndrome and the associated congenital heart disease.

  5. Congenital Intralabyrinthine Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sanjay; Prasad, Kiran; Azadarmaki, Roya

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma is presented. High-resolution computerized tomographic scans and intraoperative photomicrographs display features of intralabyrinthine extension. We discuss pathogenetic theories for the development of congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma. The distinction of this condition from congenital cholesteatoma with labyrinthine erosion is discussed. PMID:25057421

  6. JS-X syndrome: A multiple congenital malformation with vocal cord paralysis, ear deformity, hearing loss, shoulder musculature underdevelopment, and X-linked recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hoeve, Hans L J; Brooks, Alice S; Smit, Liesbeth S

    2015-07-01

    We report on a family with a not earlier described multiple congenital malformation. Several male family members suffer from laryngeal obstruction caused by bilateral vocal cord paralysis, outer and middle ear deformity with conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, facial dysmorphisms, and underdeveloped shoulder musculature. The affected female members only have middle ear deformity and hearing loss. The pedigree is suggestive of an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. SNP-array revealed a deletion and duplication on Xq28 in the affected family members. A possible aetiology is a neurocristopathy with most symptoms expressed in structures derived from branchial arches.

  7. X-linked neurodegenerative syndrome with congenital ataxia, late-onset progressive myoclonic encephalopathy and selective macular degeneration, linked to Xp22.33-pter

    SciTech Connect

    Portes, V. des; Beldjord, C.; Bruels, T.

    1996-07-12

    Linkage analysis was performed in a previously described family segregating for an X-linked progressive neurological disorder. In three generations, the disease was inherited from the mothers in seven affected males. Five had severe congenital hypotonia and died during the first year of life. Two other boys (maternal cousins) were found to have severe congenital ataxia, late-onset progressive myoclonic encephalopathy, and selective macular degeneration; brain CT-scan showed moderate cerebellar vermis hypoplasia. Linkage analysis was carried out in 12 informative relatives using 35 microsatellite markers (Genethon) evenly distributed on the X chromosome. A multipoint analysis showed a significant linkage (Z > 2) between the disease and three markers in the Xp22.33 region: DYS403 (Z = 2.37, {theta} = 0) which maps in the pseudoautosomal region, DXS7099 (Z = 2.45, {theta} = 0), and DXS7100 (Z = 2.48, {theta} = 0). Further linkage analysis with more telomeric markers will refine the location of this severe X-linked encephalopathy. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Asplenia Syndrome in a Neonate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Kapil; Yadav, Jaivinder; Mehra, Suchi

    2016-01-01

    Asplenia syndrome is a syndrome of right isomerism or attempted bilateral right sidedness. It includes congenital asplenia in association with complex congenital cyanotic heart disease and situs anomalies of the other thoracoabdominal organs. Herein we report a case of asplenia syndrome so as to highlight and refocus attention on the possibility of this rare syndrome that must be considered in a neonate presenting with congenital cyanotic heart disease. PMID:27504371

  9. Asplenia Syndrome in a Neonate: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Kapil; Singh, Jasbir; Yadav, Jaivinder; Mehra, Suchi

    2016-06-01

    Asplenia syndrome is a syndrome of right isomerism or attempted bilateral right sidedness. It includes congenital asplenia in association with complex congenital cyanotic heart disease and situs anomalies of the other thoracoabdominal organs. Herein we report a case of asplenia syndrome so as to highlight and refocus attention on the possibility of this rare syndrome that must be considered in a neonate presenting with congenital cyanotic heart disease. PMID:27504371

  10. Genetics Home Reference: PMM2-congenital disorder of glycosylation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDG (CDG-Ia) Genetic Testing Registry: Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I These resources from MedlinePlus offer ... area? Other Names for This Condition carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type Ia CDG Ia CDG1a CDGS1a congenital ...

  11. Congenital Portosystemic Shunt: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Timpanaro, Tiziana; Passanisi, Stefano; Sauna, Alessandra; Trombatore, Claudia; Pennisi, Monica; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Smilari, Pierluigi; Greco, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital portosystemic venous malformations are rare abnormalities in which the portal blood drains into a systemic vein and which are characterized by extreme clinical variability. Case Presentations. The authors present two case reports of a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (Type II). In the first patient, apparently nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, proved to be secondary to hypoglycemic episodes related to the presence of a portosystemic shunt, later confirmed on imaging. During portal vein angiography, endovascular embolization of the portocaval fistula achieved occlusion of the anomalous venous tract. In the second patient, affected by Down's syndrome, the diagnosis of a portosystemic malformation was made by routine ultrasonography, performed to rule out concurrent congenital anomalies. Because of the absence of symptoms, we chose to observe this patient. Conclusions. These two case reports demonstrate the clinical heterogeneity of this malformation and the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As part of a proper workup, clinical evaluation must always be followed by radiographic diagnosis. PMID:25709849

  12. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively.

  13. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  14. A resurgence of congenital rubella in Australia?

    PubMed

    Forrest, Jill M; Burgess, Margaret; Donovan, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Two infants with congenital rubella defects (congenital rubella syndrome) have been reported from Queensland in 2003, after an increase in rubella in that State in 2001-2002. The national Measles Control Campaign in 1998 aimed to give measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to all unvaccinated preschoolers and a second dose to primary schoolchildren. Following the Campaign no children with congenital rubella defects were born to Australian-born mothers during the five years 1998 to 2002, according to reports to the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit. However, three imported cases occurred. Broad immunisation coverage and detection and vaccination of susceptible women of child-bearing age before they become pregnant are necessary to prevent further cases.

  15. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  16. Ethical Dilemmas Relating to the Management of a Newborn with Down Syndrome and Severe Congenital Heart Disease in a Resource-Poor Setting.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Ama K; Edwin, Frank; McGee, Summer J

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making regarding treatment for newborns with disabilities in resource-poor settings is a difficult process that can put parents and caregivers in conflict. Despite several guidelines that have helped to clarify some of the medical decision-making in Ghana, there is still no clear consensus on the specific moral criteria to be used. This article presents the case of a mother who expressed her wish that her child with Down syndrome should not have been resuscitated at birth. It explores the ethical issues at stake in both her misgivings about the resuscitation and her unwillingness to consider surgical repair of an atrioventricular (AV) canal defect. Knowing that children born with Down syndrome are able to pursue life's goals, should our treatment of complete AV canal defect in such children be considered morally obligatory, even in resource-poor settings like Ghana? PMID:26752583

  17. Congenital myopathies: an update.

    PubMed

    Nance, Jessica R; Dowling, James J; Gibbs, Elizabeth M; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2012-04-01

    Congenital myopathy is a clinicopathological concept of characteristic histopathological findings on muscle biopsy in a patient with early-onset weakness. Three main categories are recognized within the classical congenital myopathies: nemaline myopathy, core myopathy, and centronuclear myopathy. Recent evidence of overlapping clinical and histological features between the classical forms and their different genetic entities suggests that there may be shared pathomechanisms between the congenital myopathies. Animal models, especially mouse and zebrafish, have been especially helpful in elucidating such pathomechanisms associated with the congenital myopathies and provide models in which future therapies can be investigated. PMID:22392505

  18. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  19. Diencephalic neuronal hamartoma associated with congenital obstructive hydrocephalus, anophthalmia, cleft lip and palate and severe mental retardation: a possible new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, J P; Khalifa, M M; Nag, S

    2000-06-01

    A male infant was born with severe hydrocephalus, bilateral cleft lip/palate, left anophthalmos and right microphthalmos, and an equino-varus foot deformity. Imaging studies showed enlarged lateral ventricles, apparent absence of the corpus callosum and a midline density in the third ventricular region. He had a normal male karyotype. He was severely mentally retarded and died suddenly at 7 years of age. Neuropathological examination of the brain revealed enlarged and polygyric cerebral hemispheres, due to congenital obstructive hydrocephalus, and secondary thinning of the corpus callosum. An unusually large neuronal hamartoma filled the interpeduncular fossa and third ventricle. It was continuous posteriorly with the left thalamus and so was classified as diencephalic rather than as hypothalamic. The right optic nerve merged with the hamartoma, whereas the left nerve was absent. Microscopically the hamartoma consisted of mature grey matter interspersed with narrow bands of white matter. No immature or non-neural elements were identified. This combination of diencephalic neuronal hamartoma, hydrocephalus, ocular and craniofacial abnormalities has not, to our knowledge, previously been described.

  20. Severe congenital neutropenia or hyper-IgM syndrome? A novel mutation of CD40 ligand in a patient with severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Ramyar, Asghar; Pan-Hammarstrom, Qiang; Hammarstrom, Lennart

    2008-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) and CD40 ligand deficiency (CD40LD) are two primary immunodeficiency diseases caused by different underlying genetic defects. In this report, we present a case who clinically presented as a SCN patient, but subsequent mutation analysis of this patient was compatible with CD40LD. The patient is a 3-year-old boy, who was referred to our center because of pneumonia, oral and anal ulcers, and periodontitis. As severe consistent neutropenia and maturation arrest in the myeloid series were observed in the bone marrow, a diagnosis of SCN was made. However, no mutations were found in the ELA2 and HAX1 genes. As functional T cell defects were observed, we suspected CD40LD. DNA sequencing showed a 17-base pair deletion in the CD40L gene. Although the patient did not have a decreased serum level of IgA, and his serum IgM level was within the normal range, the diagnosis of CD40LD was confirmed, suggesting that CD40LD should be suspected in any male patient with recurrent infections and neutropenia. PMID:18594157

  1. Respiratory distress of the newborn: congenital laryngeal atresia.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Art; Magit, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Congenital laryngeal atresia is a rare cause of respiratory distress of the newborn. The defect may be isolated or occur in association with other congenital abnormalities, notably the presence of a tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, encephalocele, or Congenital High Airway Obstructive Syndrome (CHAOS). We present the case of a newborn with no identified intrapartum abnormalities with respiratory distress at birth secondary to near-complete laryngeal atresia. Management included tracheostomy, repeated endoscopic incisions, and serial balloon dilatations employing the topical use of Mitomycin C. Seven year follow-up was significant for mobilization of the true vocal cords bilaterally, as well as successful decannulation.

  2. Review Recent progress in identification and characterization of loci associated with sex-linked congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D D; Du, J Z; Topolewski, J; Wang, X M

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a common cause of blindness in children; however, its pathogenesis remains unclear. Genetic factors have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of congenital cataract. The current genetic models of congenital cataract include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and sex-linked inheritance. Sex-linked congenital cataract could be inherited through the X or Y chromosome. Congenital cataract is a symptom associated with several X-linked disorders, including Nance-Horan syndrome, Lowe syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome, and Alport syndrome. On the other hand, the mechanism and characteristics of Y-linked congenital cataract remains to be identified. Despite its rarity, sex-linked congenital cataract has been known to seriously affect the quality of life of patients. In this review, we present our current understanding of the genes and loci associated with sex-linked congenital cataract. This could help identify novel approaches for the prevention, early diagnosis, and comprehensive disease treatment. PMID:27525896

  3. Pregnancy and Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen

    2015-11-01

    Most women with known congenital heart disease can have successful pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Preconception assessment is essential in understanding anatomy, repairs, and current physiology, all of which can influence risk in pregnancy. With that foundation, a multidisciplinary cardio-obstetric team can predict and prepare for complications that may occur with superimposed hemodynamic changes of pregnancy. Individuals with Eisenmenger syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, significant left heart obstruction, ventricular dysfunction, or prior major cardiac event are among the highest risk for complications.

  4. Recurrent congenital heart block in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Maria C; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Albert, Dimpna; Ferrer, Queralt; Girona, Josep

    2007-07-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is the main complication of neonatal lupus (NL) and is strongly associated with the presence of anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. The recurrence of CHB in subsequent pregnancies in mothers with these antibodies is uncommon, occurring in approximately 15% of cases. We describe here a case of recurrent CHB in a previously asymptomatic mother with Sjögren syndrome and discuss the current strategies for the prevention and treatment of CHB in NL.

  5. Severe congenital malaria acquired in utero.

    PubMed

    Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R; Hasanuddin, Afdal; Fobia, Wendelina; Sugiarto, Paulus; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2010-04-01

    Vertical transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is under-recognized and usually associated with asymptomatic low-level parasitemia at birth. We report symptomatic congenital malaria presenting as a neonatal sepsis syndrome. The presence at birth of a high asexual parasitemia, gametocytemia, and splenomegaly indicated in utero rather than intrapartum transmission. The neonate was successfully treated with intravenous artesunate followed by oral dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, without apparent adverse effects. PMID:20348499

  6. Severe Congenital Malaria Acquired in utero

    PubMed Central

    Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R.; Hasanuddin, Afdal; Fobia, Wendelina; Sugiarto, Paulus; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A.; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is under-recognized and usually associated with asymptomatic low-level parasitemia at birth. We report symptomatic congenital malaria presenting as a neonatal sepsis syndrome. The presence at birth of a high asexual parasitemia, gametocytemia, and splenomegaly indicated in utero rather than intrapartum transmission. The neonate was successfully treated with intravenous artesunate followed by oral dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, without apparent adverse effects. PMID:20348499

  7. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Babies Born with CMV (Congenital CMV Infection) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Detection and Intervention Helping Children With Congenital CMV Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  8. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  9. Brown's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Eustis, H S; Parks, M M

    1989-01-01

    Brown's syndrome is a well-recognized clinical disorder of ocular motility manifesting most notably a restriction of active and passive elevation in adduction. The original name, "superior oblique tendon sheath syndrome," is no longer appropriate, since it has been shown that the tissue surrounding the anterior superior oblique tendon is blameless as a restrictive force. "True" and "simulated" as descriptive modifiers should also be discarded, as they relate to the disproven sheath concept. Brown's syndrome occurs as a congenital or acquired, constant or intermittent condition; the common link is restriction of free movement through the trochlea pulley mechanism. The various etiologic theories are reviewed and the spectrum of medical and surgical treatments are described and evaluated. Evidence suggests that subtypes of Brown's syndrome lie on a single continuum and that spontaneous resolution occurs in each group, probably more often than previously recognized. A simplified classification scheme is encouraged and possible future directions in Brown's syndrome research are introduced.

  10. Synaptogenesis and Myelination in the Nucleus/Tractus Solitarius: Potential Role in Apnea of Prematurity, Congenital Central Hypoventilation, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Fetuses as early as 15 weeks' gestation exhibit rhythmical respiratory movements shown by real-time ultrasonography. The nucleus/tractus solitarius is the principal brainstem respiratory center; other medullary nuclei also participate. The purpose was to determine temporal maturation of synaptogenesis. Delayed synaptic maturation may explain neurogenic apnea or hypoventilation of prematurity and some cases of sudden infant death syndrome. Sections of medulla oblongata were studied from 30 human fetal and neonatal brains 9 to 41 weeks' gestation. Synaptophysin demonstrated the immunocytochemical sequence of synaptogenesis. Other neuronal markers and myelin stain also were applied. The nucleus/tractus solitarius was similarly studied in fetuses with chromosomopathies, metabolic encephalopathies, and brain malformations. Synapse formation in the nucleus solitarius begins at about 12 weeks' gestation and matures by 15 weeks; myelination initiated at 33 weeks. Synaptogenesis was delayed in 3 fetuses with different conditions, but was not specific for only nucleus solitarius. Delayed synaptogenesis or myelination in the nucleus solitarius may play a role in neonatal hypoventilation, especially in preterm infants and in some sudden infant death syndrome cases.

  11. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of “mitochondrial chaperonopathies” and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  12. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and…

  13. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  14. Suprasellar choristoma associated with congenital hydrocephalus, anophthalmia, cleft lip and palate, and clinodactly: a proposed variant of a unique new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sever, Alysse J; Koets, Michael D; Sabharwal, Gauravi K

    2015-12-01

    A male infant was born with a bilateral cleft lip and/or palate, absent nasal structures, left anophthalmos, right coloboma, and bilateral fifth digit clinodactly. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe asymmetric hydrocephalus, absent corpus callosum, a suprasellar mass with a high riding third ventricle, and no pituitary gland. He had a normal male karyotype and normal prenatal laboratory testing. He had no significant family history and no renal, vertebral, gastrointestinal, or cardiac malformations. This combination of central nervous system findings, ocular and craniofacial abnormalities, a normal karyotype, and limited skeletal abnormalities to our knowledge has only been previously described once in the literature in association with a disruption in Pax and Sonic Hedgehog protein pathways, and we conclude this patient represents a variant of this described syndrome.

  15. Suprasellar choristoma associated with congenital hydrocephalus, anophthalmia, cleft lip and palate, and clinodactly: a proposed variant of a unique new syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Alysse J.; Koets, Michael D.; Sabharwal, Gauravi K.

    2015-01-01

    A male infant was born with a bilateral cleft lip and/or palate, absent nasal structures, left anophthalmos, right coloboma, and bilateral fifth digit clinodactly. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe asymmetric hydrocephalus, absent corpus callosum, a suprasellar mass with a high riding third ventricle, and no pituitary gland. He had a normal male karyotype and normal prenatal laboratory testing. He had no significant family history and no renal, vertebral, gastrointestinal, or cardiac malformations. This combination of central nervous system findings, ocular and craniofacial abnormalities, a normal karyotype, and limited skeletal abnormalities to our knowledge has only been previously described once in the literature in association with a disruption in Pax and Sonic Hedgehog protein pathways, and we conclude this patient represents a variant of this described syndrome. PMID:26649128

  16. Nonketotic hyperosmolar syndrome as an acute complication of type 1 diabetes onset in a 20-month-old boy with congenital central nervous system defect.

    PubMed

    Chumiecki, Miron; Minkina-Pedras, Mariola; Chobot, Agata; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is one of the most severe acute complications of type 2 diabetes, but may also be developed in type 1 diabetes. Similar to ketoacidosis,HHS still remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes,despite a significant progress in understanding its pathogenesis and greater consensus on HHS diagnosis and treatment. It is mainly observed in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. However,it may also occur in children,especially in infants and those with concomitant central nervous system (CNS) defects or suffering from severe infections associated with dehydration. The authors report a case of HHS in a 20-month-old child with central nervous system abnormality. Symptoms observed in our patient are characteristic for HHS. It must be emphasized that HHS may accompany diabetes onset also in children.

  17. Congenital dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ko, J Y; Shih, C H; Wenger, D R

    1999-01-01

    Between February 1988 and June 1995, 24 congenital dislocations of the knee joints (17 patients) were reduced with closed methods including immediate reduction, serial casting, or traction in patients from 10 min to 26 days old. At an average follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, an excellent or good result was achieved if there were no associated anomalies. Fair or poor results were the result of delayed treatment or associated musculoskeletal anomalies including arthrogryposis multiplex congenita or Larsen's syndrome. Routine check of the hip dislocation is suggested. Diagnosis with manual testing was difficult, and other methods such as radiography or sonography were suggested in combination to detect hip dysplasia. The dislocated knee should be reduced before treating the hip dislocation. Concomitant treatment of the congenital dislocation of the knee and the hip with Pavlik harness provided satisfactory results. When late, progressive, genu valgus deformity occurred because of global instability of the knee and asymmetric physeal growth, reconstruction of the medial structures of the knee and prolonged bracing provided good results. PMID:10088699

  18. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  19. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  20. Novel mutation-deletion in the PHOX2B gene of the patient diagnosed with Neuroblastoma, Hirschsprung’s Disease, and Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome (NB-HSCR-CCHS) Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Szymońska, Izabela; Borgenvik, Thore Langfeldt; Karlsvik, Tina Margrethe; Halsen, Anders; Malecki, Bianka Kathryn; Saetre, Sindre Ervik; Jagła, Mateusz; Kruczek, Piotr; Talowska, Anna Madetko; Drabik, Grażyna; Zasada, Magdalena; Malecki, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroblastoma (NB), Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome (CCHS), clinically referred as the NB-HSCR-CCHS cluster, are genetic disorders linked to mutations in the PHOX2B gene on chromosome 4p12. Specific Aim The specific aim of this project is to define the PHOX2B gene mutations as the genomic basis for the clinical manifestations of the NB-HSCR-CCHS cluster. Patient A one day old male patient presented to the Jagiellonian University Medical College (JUMC), American Children Hospital, neonatal Intensive Care Unit (ICU) due to abdominal distention, vomiting, and severe apneic episodes. With the preliminary diagnosis of the NB-HSCR-CCHS, the blood and tissue samples were acquired from the child, as well as from the child’s parents. All procedures were pursued in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki, with the patient’s Guardian Informed Consent and the approval from the Institutional Review Board. Genetic/Genomic Methods Karyotyping was analyzed based upon Giemsa banding. The patient’s genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Direct microfluidic Sanger sequencing was performed on the genomic DNA amplicons. These procedures were pursued in addition to the routine clinical examinations and tests. Results G-banding showed the normal 46 XY karyotype. However, genomic sequencing revealed a novel, heterozygous deletion (8 nucleotides: c.699–706, del8) in exon 3 of the PHOX2B gene on chromosome 4. This led to the frame-shift mutation and malfunctioning gene expression product. Conclusion Herein, we report a novel PHOX2B gene mutation in the patient diagnosed with the NB-HSCR-CCHS cluster. The resulting gene expression product may be a contributor to the clinical manifestations of these genetic disorders. It adds to the library of the mutations linked to this syndrome. Consequently, we suggest that screening for the PHOX2B mutations becomes an integral part of

  1. Congenital craniofacial asymmetry: early treatment.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L A; Schut, L; Rosen, H M

    1981-01-01

    Congenital craniofacial asymmetry has two dominant causes: isolated synostosis and craniofacial clefts. Treatment considerations in these problems differ from those with isolated cranial or isolated facial defects. Isolated cranial defects are most frequently treated by the neurosurgeon with craniectomy alone. Isolated facial asymmetry when congenital in origin usually manifests as hemifacial microsomia and based on our experience with 40 such patients, is best treated in later childhood. Treatment timing of craniofacial asymmetry varies with the cause, but is best done in the first two years of life. Nasofrontal encephaloceles are usually best treated in the first few weeks of life; synostosis syndromes are treated at six months of age after the facial sutures have had time to stabilize sufficiently for adequate dissection and mobilization; and other craniofacial clefts at approximately two years of age following descent of the teeth and better homeostatic capability of the patient. Based on our series of 58 patients, 40 treated with isolated synostosis at less than one year of age, eight at more than one year of age, and ten patients with craniofacial clefts, the guidelines for timing and methods of treatment have evolved. Liberal use of craniectomy bone with expected regrowth is possible in the first year of life, and more limited use in the second year of life. This bone is used to hold the repositioned orbit, augment hypoplastic zygomas, and reconstruct noses, or for other uses. In isolated synostosis, repositioning provides a form of immediate catch-up growth then proceeds normally. In craniofacial clefts, repositioning puts structures into normal relations and growth likewise proceeds normally. The isolated synostosis syndromes treated at a later age are done with more difficulty, though may be effectively cared for. Complications other than incomplete structural correction have been nonexistent in the group two years of age and less.

  2. Inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptors mediate activity-induced synaptic Ca2+ signals in muscle fibers and Ca2+ overload in slow-channel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Roberto; Groshong, Jason S; Gomez, Christopher M

    2007-04-01

    Strict control of calcium entry through excitatory synaptic receptors is important for shaping synaptic responses, gene expression, and cell survival. Disruption of this control may lead to pathological accumulation of Ca2+. The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS), due to mutations in muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR), perturbs the kinetics of synaptic currents, leading to post-synaptic Ca2+ accumulation. To understand the regulation of calcium signaling at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and the etiology of Ca2+ overload in SCS we studied the role of sarcoplasmic Ca2+ stores in SCS. Using fura-2 loaded dissociated fibers activated with acetylcholine puffs, we confirmed that Ca2+ accumulates around wild type NMJ and discovered that Ca2+ accumulates significantly faster around the NMJ of SCS transgenic dissociated muscle fibers. Additionally, we determined that this process is dependant on the activation, altered kinetics, and movement of Ca2+ ions through the AChR, although, surprisingly, depletion of intracellular stores also prevents the accumulation of this cation around the NMJ. Finally, we concluded that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is the main source of Ca2+ and that inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R), and to a lesser degree L-type voltage gated Ca2+ channels, are responsible for the efflux of this cation from intracellular stores. These results suggest that a signaling system mediated by the activation of AChR, Ca2+, and IP3R is responsible for localized Ca2+ signals observed in muscle fibers and the Ca2+ overload observed in SCS.

  3. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  4. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  5. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-09-24

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered.

  6. Congenital lobar emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Tural-Kara, Tuğçe; Özdemir, Halil; Çiftçi, Ergin; İnce, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema is a rare disease, which is characterized by pulmoner hyperinflation. Depending on the degree of bronchial obstruction, the clinical presentation may be variable. We report a rare case with congenital lobar emphysema in a 38-days-old male infant who presented with severe respiratory distress and hypertension. Air trapping in the left upper lung and significant mediastinal shift to the right were observed on the chest x-ray. Emphysematous changes were detected on the thorax computed tomography and considered as congenital lobar emphysema. The upper left lobectomy was successfully performed by pediatric surgeons. On postoperative follow up, no sign of respiratory distress occurred and the patient was normotensive. In this report, a case with congenital lobar emphysema, which is a rare cause of respiratory distress and hypertension is discussed. PMID:27381542

  7. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... pigmented nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... baby grows in the womb. In some families bathing trunk nevi may be inherited. The condition may ...

  8. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  9. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Neurologic course of congenital disorders of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Pearl, P L; Krasnewich, D

    2001-06-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation, formerly called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome, may present in infancy with slowly progressive neurologic deficits including cognitive impairment, ataxia, pigmentary retinal degeneration, and neuropathy. The metabolic defect is in N-linked oligosaccharide synthesis, and diagnosis is made by a serum transferrin isoelectric focusing. We reviewed the neurologic course of 10 children with congenital disorders of glycosylation (ages 13 months to 7 years). All had severe developmental delay and ataxia; none walked unassisted, and the highest level of communication was simple sign language in one patient. Five of 10 children had seizures (absence, complex partial, tonic clonic). Only one patient has had strokelike episodes, despite reports that they are common in this population. The underlying basis of these episodes has been hypothesized to be coagulopathy due to dysfunctional, incorrectly glycosylated coagulation factors. This 5-year-old patient with congenital disorders of glycosylation type Ia had two strokelike episodes, with evolving hemiparesis over 5 to 6 days' duration, followed by focal tonic-clonic seizures. Coagulation studies were normal. Electroencephalography showed transient hemispheric polymorphous delta-range slowing and suppression. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed corresponding cortical swelling. Magnetic resonance angiography was normal. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a decrease in the N-acetylaspartate peak, suggesting neuronal loss, with normal lactate peak. The neuroradiologic data do not support a thrombotic, embolic, or hemorrhagic basis for strokelike episodes in carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome; other mechanisms must be considered.

  11. Sequential presentation of bilateral Brown syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sekeroğlu, Hande Taylan; Türkçüoğlu, Peykan; Sanaç, Ali Şefik; Sener, Emin Cumhur

    2012-04-01

    Brown syndrome, characterized by a limitation of elevation in adduction and positive forced duction testing, is usually unilateral but occurs bilaterally in 10% of all cases. It may present as a congenital condition in one eye and develop in the other eye with no apparent cause. We present a case of bilateral Brown syndrome in which the right eye became involved within 1 year of surgery on the left eye for congenital Brown syndrome.

  12. The use of octreotide to treat congenital chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Paget-Brown, Alix; Kattwinkel, John; Rodgers, Bradley M; Michalsky, Marc P

    2006-04-01

    We report the use of the octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) in the treatment of idiopathic congenital chylothorax in a patient with Turner's syndrome who had previously failed conservative medical therapy. The patient improved rapidly after initiation of octreotide with complete resolution after 5 days of continuous therapy (10 microg/kg per hour).

  13. Acroangiodermatitis of Mali in a patient with congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Rashmi; De, Dipankar; Dogra, Sunil; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Kanwar, Amrinder J

    2010-01-01

    Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma is a disease entity that encompasses acroangiodermatitis as well as Steward-Bluefarb syndrome. It has varied etiologies and clinical presentations. Most important distinction is from Kaposi sarcoma and this is mainly histopathological. Here we report a case of acroangiodermatitis in a patient with congenital myopathy and have also discussed its pathogenesis. PMID:20673532

  14. Limb-threatening ischemia secondary to a congenital acromioclavicular remnant.

    PubMed

    Enlow, Jonathan M; McGregor, Walter E

    2009-07-01

    Upper extremity vascular compromise from thoracic outlet syndrome is rare and is usually the result of a "cervical rib," anterior scalene muscle abnormality, or clavicular trauma. We report a case of acute axillary artery thrombosis secondary to a congenital acromioclavicular remnant in a 40-year-old woman.

  15. Venous ulcers of the lower limbs due to congenital thalidomide-related valve defect.

    PubMed

    Rubegni, Pietro; Poggiali, Sara; Bilenchi, Roberta; Diana, Agnese; Risulo, Massimiliano; Civeli, Letizia; Fimiani, Michele

    2007-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with fetal thalidomide syndrome and congenital pseudoainhum of the left big toe had a 5-year history of painful nonhealing ulcers in the left malleolar region. Venous Doppler ultrasonography showed hypoagenesis of the valve flaps of the deep and superficial venous circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first description of congenital pseudoainhum associated with fetal thalidomide syndrome. The coexistence of cutaneous ulcers in our case might be coincidental but may be related to a congenital valve defect (hypoagenesis) caused by thalidomide.

  16. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  17. West syndrome in a patient with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Fuyu; Kuroda, Yukiko; Naruto, Takuya; Ohashi, Ikuko; Takano, Kyoko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare recognizable malformation syndrome defined by characteristic facial features, profound developmental delay, severe growth failure, and multiple congenital anomalies. The causative gene of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, SETBP1, has been identified, but limited cases have been confirmed by molecular analysis. We present a 9-month-old girl affected by West syndrome with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Congenital severe hydronephrosis, typical facial features, and multiple anomalies suggested a clinical diagnosis of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Hypsarrhythmia occurred at 7 months of age and was temporarily controlled by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy during 5 weeks. SETBP1 mutational analysis showed the presence of a recurrent mutation, p.Ile871Thr. The implications in management of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome are discussed.

  18. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  19. Neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Klar, Nitasha; Cohen, Bernard; Lin, Doris D M

    2016-01-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes (or phakomatoses) are a diverse group of congenital disorders that encompass abnormalities of neuroectodermal and, sometimes, mesodermal development, hence commonly involving the skin, eye, and central nervous system. These are often inherited conditions and typically present in early childhood or adolescence. Some of the abnormalities and clinical symptoms may, however, be progressive, and there is an increased risk of neoplastic formation in many of the syndromes. As a group, neurocutaneous syndromes are characterized by distinctive cutaneous stigmata and neurologic symptomology, the latter often representing the most devastating and debilitating features of these diseases. Many of these syndromes are markedly heterogeneous in nature as they affect many organ systems. Given the incurable nature of these conditions and the broad spectrum of pathologies they comprise, treatments vary on a case-by-case basis and tend to be palliative rather than curative. With the advances in molecular genetics, however, greater understanding of biologic functions of the gene products and the correlative phenotypic expression is being attained, and this knowledge may guide future therapeutic developments. This chapter focuses on the cutaneous and neurologic pathology with emphasis on neuroimaging of selective neurocutaneous syndromes, including tuberous sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and incontinentia pigmenti. PMID:27432683

  20. Congenital Muscle Disease Study of Patient and Family Reported Medical Information

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Muscular Dystrophy; Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Fukutin-related Protein Gene; Limb Girdle; FKRP Gene; Childhood Onset LGMD; Adult Onset LGMD; POMT1; POMT2; POMGnT1; LARGE; Alpha Dystroglycan; Dystroglycanopathy; Centronuclear; Multiminicore; Multicore; Minicore; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Myotubular; Nemaline; Congenital Myopathy; Neuromuscular; Rigid Spine; Phenotype-Genotype Correlation; Cough Assisted Device; Neuromuscular Disease; Respiratory Exacerbation; Invasive Ventilation; Chest Physiotherapy; Congenital Myopathies; Genetic Mutations; Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy; Wheelchair Use; Cataract; Opthalmoplegia; Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Intermediate Collagen VI Myopathy; Laminin Alpha 2 Related Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; MDC1A; Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Undiagnosed; Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Merosin Positive; Walker Warburg Syndrome; Muscle Eye Brain Disease; Fukuyama; Integrin Alpha 7 Deficiency; Integrin Alpha 9 Deficiency; Laminopathy; Lamin AC; SEPN 1 Related Myopathies; Bethlem Myopathy; Dystroglycanopathies; LGMD2K; LGMD2I; LGMD2L; LGMD2N; Actin Aggregation Myopathy; Cap Disease; Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Core Rod Myopathy; Hyaline Body Myopathy; Multiminicore Myopathy; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Tubular Aggregate Myopathy; Zebra Body Disease Myopathy; Congenital Myopathy Other; Reducing Body Myopathy; Sarcotubular Myopathy; Spheroid Body Myopathy

  1. A novel Fryns "Anophthalmia-plus" syndrome associated with primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Akalin, I; Senses, D A; Ilgin-Ruhi, H; Misirlioğlu, E; Yalçiner, M; Cetinkaya, E; Fryns, J P; Tükün, A

    2005-01-01

    A novel Fryns "anophthalmla-plus" syndrome associated with primary hypothyroidism: Here, we report a newborn male with "anophthalmia-plus" syndrome and primary congenital hypothyroidism. To our knowledge this is the first case of 'anophthalmia-plus' syndrome associated with congenital hypothyroidism in the literature up to date.

  2. Clinical, Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Congenital Vertebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, P.F.; Raggio, C.L.; Blank, R.D.; McCarty, C.; Broeckel, U.; Pickart, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) pose a significant health problem because they can be associated with spinal deformities, such as congenital scoliosis and kyphosis, in addition to various syndromes and other congenital malformations. Additional information remains to be learned regarding the natural history of congenital scoliosis and related health problems. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the process of somite formation, which gives rise to vertebral bodies, there is a wide gap in our understanding of how genetic factors contribute to CVM development. Maternal diabetes during pregnancy most commonly contributes to the occurrence of CVM, followed by other factors such as hypoxia and anticonvulsant medications. This review highlights several emerging clinical issues related to CVM, including pulmonary and orthopedic outcome in congenital scoliosis. Recent breakthroughs in genetics related to gene and environment interactions associated with CVM development are discussed. The Klippel-Feil syndrome which is associated with cervical segmentation abnormalities is illustrated as an example in which animal models, such as the zebrafish, can be utilized to provide functional evidence of pathogenicity of identified mutations. PMID:23653580

  3. Incidence of legal abortions and congenital abnormalities in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, A E

    1991-01-01

    The annual and monthly distributions of congenital abnormalities and pregnancy outcomes as confounding factors were evaluated in Hungary in reflection of the accident at the Chernobyl reactor. The different congenital abnormality entities and the components of fetal radiation syndrome did not show a higher rate after the Chernobyl accident in the data-set of the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry. Among confounding factors, the rate of induced abortions did not increase after the Chernobyl accident in Hungary. In the 9th month after the peak of public concern (May and June, 1986) the rate of livebirths decreased. Three indicator conditions: 15 sentinel anomalies as indicators of germinal dominant gene mutations, Down syndrome as an indicator of germinal numerical and structural chromosomal mutations, and unidentified multiple congenital abnormalities as indicators of germinal dominant gene and chromosomal mutations were selected from the material of the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry. Diagnoses were checked, familial and sporadic cases were separated and only the sporadic cases were evaluated. The analysis of indicator conditions did not reveal any measurable germinal mutagenic effect of the Chernobyl accident in Hungary.

  4. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy.

  5. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  6. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  7. Duane's retraction syndrome associated with morning glory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawano, K; Fujita, S

    1981-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy with Duane's retraction syndrome and morning glory syndrome is presented. The right eye showed a grayish-pink optic disc, which had a deep excavation containing a white mass in its center and was surrounded by an annulus of pigment disturbance, i.e., consistent with the features of morning glory syndrome. The left eye had a congenital disturbance of ocular motility, which was typical of Duane's retraction syndrome. This is probably the first report of the association of Duane's retraction syndrome and morning glory syndrome. It is hypothesized that a noxious stimulus given at around two months of gestation was responsible for this rare association.

  8. Reconstruction of Congenital Defects of the Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Eldor, Liron; Friedman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital absence of the vagina is a relatively rare condition most commonly associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. Historically, several reconstructive techniques have been described to provide for functional vaginal reconstruction on these patients, both operative and nonoperative. Although there are many advantages and disadvantages of the various procedures, one experience with the use of split thickness skin grafts to reconstruct the vagina has produced acceptable functional results with limited donor site morbidity. Careful planning and timing of this form of reconstruction can produce predictable results in patients who are nearing sexual maturity. PMID:22547971

  9. Microcephaly syndromes.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review microcephaly from a genetics point of view, especially with regard to the process of identification of syndromes in which small head circumference occurs. Microcephaly can be due to either genetic or environmental causes. It can be the only positive finding or may be part of a syndrome of congenital anomalies. The genetic etiology can be caused by autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked genes or various types of chromosome anomalies. Some of the gene mutations have been identified recently. Syndromic microcephaly is associated with a large number of conditions. Some can be diagnosed, or at least suspected, based on their characteristic facial dysmorphism, and others can be searched for using databases of genetic disorders.

  10. [Unilateral nasal obstruction in children: Pai syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zanetta, Adrián; Cuestas, Giselle; Oviedo, Maricruz; Tiscorni, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Unilateral obstruction of the nasal cavity in children is mainly caused by the introduction of foreign bodies further stated with rhinorrhea and fetid odor. Less commonly, it can be traumatic, neoplastic, due to congenital malformation or iatrogenic. Symptoms of congenital intranasal mass may present at birth, or go unnoticed and be a finding in a routine pediatric examination. Patient evaluation should include imaging studies to guide the diagnosis and rule out intracranial extension. A syndrome associated with congenital nasal tumor should be suspected when other abnormalities are present. Pai syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. Its manifestations are craniofacial being congenital nasal polyp his main marker. We present a patient with unilateral nasal respiratory failure secondary to congenital nasal lipoma, with craniofacial anomalies belonging to Pai syndrome. Nasal obstruction was successfully surgically resolved. PMID:22042063

  11. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  12. Seminar on Usher's Syndrome: Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester School for the Deaf, NY.

    Summarized are the presentation of M. Vernon and the Comments of primary panelists from a seminar on Usher's Syndrome, a genetic disease involving congenital deafness and progressive loss of vision due to retinitis pigmentosa. The following topics are addressed: genetics today, nature of Usher's Syndrome, symptoms, prevalence, lay diagnosis for…

  13. Difficult airway in Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Packiasabapathy, Senthil; Chandiran, Ravindran; Batra, Ravinder K; Agarwala, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome involving multiple system abnormalities. The most consistently present components include facial deformity, mental retardation, and Hirschsprung disease. We report the anesthetic management of a case of Mowat-Wilson syndrome, with a difficult airway, who underwent Duhamel's procedure and colostomy closure. PMID:27687363

  14. Transition in Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Management of the chromosomal condition Turner's syndrome requires consistent medical care, especially during the time when affected girls transition from childhood into adulthood. The medical problems that first develop during childhood of a patient with Turner's syndrome such as congenital heart disease, hearing loss, skeletal problems and dental and ophthalmological abnormalities, should be followed into adulthood. Providing the necessary continuum of care will require that medical centers develop teams with the appropriate expertise in treatment of Turner's syndrome. Now more than ever patients with Turner's syndrome have the capability of achieving their full potential, but it requires a multidisciplinary approach toward care throughout their lifetime.

  15. [Diagnosis of congenital infection].

    PubMed

    Sampedro Martínez, Antonio; Martínez, Luis Aliaga; Teatino, Pablo Mazuelas; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier

    2011-12-01

    In general, congenital diagnosis is based on: a) maternal serologic assays; b) microbiologic study of amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling; and c) serology in children and microorganism detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or culture. Congenital infections due to cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, varicella, B19 erythrovirus and toxoplasmosis are usually the result of primary infection in the mother. Therefore, when IgG antibodies are detected before pregnancy, these infections are ruled out. Definitive serologic diagnosis of acute infection in pregnant women requires the demonstration of seroconversion (i.e., from seronegative to seropositive). In these cases, amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling should be performed to determine the presence of intrauterine congenital infection. Cytomegalovirus, rubella and toxoplasmosis can be diagnosed by detection of specific IgM antibodies in fetal blood. However, PCR in amniotic fluid has replaced conventional prenatal diagnostic techniques, including fetal blood sampling, in the diagnosis of these infections. In the newborn, these infections may be confirmed by measuring IgM specific antibodies. B19 erythrovirus can be detected by PCR in amniotic fluid or fetal blood. Congenital varicella-zoster infection may be diagnosed on the basis of persistence of IgG antibodies after birth. Definitive diagnosis of herpes simplex virus infection requires viral isolation. Swabs or scraping from clinical specimens can be inoculated into susceptible cell lines for isolation. PMID:22305665

  16. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  17. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  18. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  19. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barmash and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  20. Multiple congenital coagulation deficiencies.

    PubMed

    BONNIN, J A; HICKS, N D; INNIS, M D; SIMPSON, D A

    1960-07-01

    A 6-week-old infant is presented who suffered from a congenital haemorrhagic disorder which caused death from subdural haemorrhage following mild trauma. Haematological investigation revealed deficiencies of factor VII and Christmas factor. Prower-Stuart factor was probably also deficient although investigation of this clotting factor was carried out only on serum obtained at necropsy.

  1. Congenital cataracts and other abnormalities in a female with 46.X, del(X)(q26q28)mat: A new locus for X-linked congenital cataract?

    SciTech Connect

    Babul, R.; Chitayat, D.; Teshima, I.

    1994-09-01

    Three forms of X-linked congenital cataracts have been delineated: congenital cataract with posterior Y-sutural opacities in heterozygotes, congenital cataract and microcornea or microphthalmia and congenital cataract-dental syndrome (Nance-Horan syndrome). Of these, only the Nance-Horan syndrome has been mapped to Xp22.3-p21.1. However, Warburg has suggested that these different forms of X-linked congenital cataracts are due to deletions of varying sizes, placing them in the vicinity of the Nance-Horan syndrome region. We report on a female patient born to a 29-year-old primigravida woman who at birth was found to have hypotonia, dysmorphic facial features, hydrocephalus and dense white congenital bilateral cataracts. Other ophthalmological findings included bilateral nystagmus and shallow orbits. Chromosome analysis revealed 46,X,del(X)(q26q28)mat. The mother, however, is phenotypically normal. Brain CT scan on the female infant revealed communicating hydrocephalus and a muscle biopsy showed congenital muscle fiber disproportion. An EMG and NCV were normal. At 4 years of age, her height and weight were below -3SD and her OFC was +2SD. Molecular studies using DNA markers located in Xq26-qter have revealed that the proximal breakpoint in the patient and her mother is defined by the HPRT locus while the distal breakpoint is defined by the locus DXS1108. This indicates that the deletion is not terminal but rather interstitial, retaining sequences proximal to the telomeric region. Other molecular studies are in progress to determine the X-inactivation status of the deleted chromosome in our patient and her mother as a possible explanation for the variation in the phenotype. These clinical and molecular findings suggest that another locus for X-linked congenital cataract exists at Xq26-28.

  2. The Usher's Syndrome Adolescent: Programming Implications for School Administrators, Teachers, and Residential Advisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Wanda M.; Hicks, Doin E.

    1981-01-01

    The article examines educational programing implications for adolescents with Usher's syndrome, a condition of congenital deafness accompanied by progressive loss of vision through retinitis pigmentosa. (DB)

  3. Congenital Upper Eyelid Coloboma: Embryologic, Nomenclatorial, Nosologic, Etiologic, Pathogenetic, Epidemiologic, Clinical, and Management Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abdulhafez, Mohamed H.; Fouad, Yousef A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the recent literature and describe the authors’ experience with congenital upper eyelid coloboma. Methods: In this review, we will summarize the embryologic and etiopathogenetic bases of congenital upper eyelid coloboma, and study the published clinical reports. We will also attempt to briefly shed some light on the rarer syndromic curiosities associated with upper eyelid coloboma. Results: Congenital upper eyelid colobomas are one of the few nontraumatic oculoplastic emergencies that may occasionally present in the first few days of life with a corneal ulcer and may even present with impending perforation. They can present with or without corneopalpebral adhesions, may be isolated findings or a part of a larger spectrum of congenital anomalies as in the case of Fraser syndrome or Goldenhar syndrome, or could be associated with other rare curiosities that could challenge the clinician with a huge diagnostic dilemma. Conclusions: Existing literature dealing with congenital colobomas of the upper eyelid is fraught with nosologic problems, confusing etiologies, and overlapping clinical features. We attempted to clarify the salient clinical features, outline the management principles, and until a time in the not-so-distant future where advances in molecular genetic testing would help redefine the etiology and the diverse clinical spectrum of genetic diseases associated with upper eyelid colobomas, we propose a simplified classification scheme based on the relation of the coloboma to the cornea, the presence or absence of systemic features, and all the syndromic and nonsyndromic associations of congenital coloboma of the upper eyelid known today. PMID:25419956

  4. Chanarin-Dorfman Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Nadia; Cheema, Huma Arshad; Suleman, Hassan; Mushtaq, Iqra; Fayyaz, Zafar

    2016-09-01

    Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome is a rare, genetically determined autosomal recessive disorder, characterised by the presence of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of multiple tissues of the body, particularly in the blood leukocytes and congenital non-bullous icthyosiform erythroderma. In this paper, we report one-year child who presented with skin lesions since birth and hepatomegaly. Liver biopsy showed steatohepatitis; and peripheral blood smear confirmed Jordan`s anomaly, which is a permanent feature of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome. PMID:27671187

  5. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Güngor Gündoğan, Tuğba; Jacquemyn, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital vascular disorder, and only few cases have been described in pregnancy. We describe two cases, in one patient without complications, the other patient developed postpartum deep venous thrombosis. PMID:21209709

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious abnormalities, such as heart defects or a cleft lip with or without an opening in the roof ... MedlinePlus (4 links) Encyclopedia: Aarskog syndrome Health Topic: Cleft Lip and Palate Health Topic: Congenital Heart Defects Health ...

  7. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered. PMID:26399846

  8. New patterns in genetic and congenital otonephropathies.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, L; Thompson, P; Wood, R P

    1979-02-01

    In a series of chronic renal and congenitally deaf patients 24 were identified as having inborn renal and otologic disease. Sixteen patients, representing 14 families, had genetic disorders. Only two had the features of Alport's syndrome. The patients were classified as follows: 1) Probable Alport's--2 patients (1 family); 2) Atypical hereditary nephritis and sensorineural hearing loss--7 patients; 3) Renal and inner ear anomalies--1 patient; 4) Renal, inner ear and multiple anomalies--4 patients. The temporal bone pathology in one case showed primary neural atrophy and a mild Mondini malformation. In another a Scheibe defect and unusual calcific structures were found in the cochlear duct. 5) Renal, external or middle ear and multiple anomalies--6 patients (5 families); 6 Renal, middle and inner ear anomalies and multiple anomalies--2 patients. A temporal bone obtained from one case showed combined middle and inner ear defects. In the other, who had a chromosome defect, predominantly middle ear anomalies were found. 7) Nephrotic syndrome and congenital hearing loss--1 patient; 8) Unclassified--1 patient. Some cases represent entities apparently not previously described. Probably most interesting is the delineation of hereditary nephritis and deafness distinct from Alport's disease. PMID:423658

  9. ASSOCIATED NON DIAPHRAGMATIC ANOMALIES AMONG CASES WITH CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Alembik, Y; Dott, B; Roth, M P

    2015-01-01

    Cases with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CDH in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CDH were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 29 years in 386,088 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 139 cases with CDH born during this period (total prevalence of 3.60 per 10,000), 85 (61.2%) had associated major anomalies. There were 25 (18.0%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 12 trisomies 18, and 24 (17.3%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but Fryns syndrome. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including fetal alcohol syndrome, de Lange syndrome, sequences (laterality sequence and ectopia cordis), and complexes (limb body wall complex). Thirty six (25.9%) of the cases had non syndromic multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies of the cardiovascular system (n = 53, 27.5%), the urogenital system (n = 34, 17.6%), the musculoskeletal system (n = 29, 15.0%), and the central nervous system (n = 19, 9.8%) were the most common other congenital anomalies. We observed specific patterns of anomalies associated with CDH which emphasizes the need to evaluate all patients with CDH for possible associated malformations. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was close to two in three infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CDH. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CDH. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CDH can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in more than one out of two cases with CDH.

  10. ASSOCIATED NON DIAPHRAGMATIC ANOMALIES AMONG CASES WITH CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Alembik, Y; Dott, B; Roth, M P

    2015-01-01

    Cases with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CDH in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CDH were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 29 years in 386,088 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 139 cases with CDH born during this period (total prevalence of 3.60 per 10,000), 85 (61.2%) had associated major anomalies. There were 25 (18.0%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 12 trisomies 18, and 24 (17.3%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but Fryns syndrome. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including fetal alcohol syndrome, de Lange syndrome, sequences (laterality sequence and ectopia cordis), and complexes (limb body wall complex). Thirty six (25.9%) of the cases had non syndromic multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies of the cardiovascular system (n = 53, 27.5%), the urogenital system (n = 34, 17.6%), the musculoskeletal system (n = 29, 15.0%), and the central nervous system (n = 19, 9.8%) were the most common other congenital anomalies. We observed specific patterns of anomalies associated with CDH which emphasizes the need to evaluate all patients with CDH for possible associated malformations. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was close to two in three infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CDH. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CDH. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CDH can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in more than one out of two cases with CDH. PMID:26625659

  11. Neurophysiological Strategies for the Diagnosis of Disorders of the Neuromuscular Junction in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The disorders of the neuromuscular junction seen in children, the congenital myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune myasthenia gravis, are very rare. Their clinical symptoms and signs may be variable, most notably in the neonate and infant. They should enter the differential diagnosis of many different clinical presentations, such as "floppy infant"…

  12. A new case of a LUMBAR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Golabi, Mahin; An, Andrew C; Lopez, Christina; Lee, Lauren; Kwong, Michael; Hall, Bryan D

    2014-01-01

    LUMBAR syndrome (lower body congenital infantile hemangiomas and other skin defects; urogenital anomalies and ulceration; myelopathy; bony deformities; anorectal malformations and arterial anomalies; and rectal anomalies) is a rare association between infantile hemangiomas of the lower half of the body and regional congenital anomalies. Since 1986, 53 cases have been reported and no etiology has been identified. We report on the 54th case in a male infant and review the literature concerning the manifestations of the LUMBAR syndrome.

  13. Update on congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Anil K; Chakrabarti, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma is a global problem and poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. A detailed evaluation under general anesthesia is advisable to establish the diagnosis and plan for management. Medical therapy has a limited role and surgery remains the primary therapeutic modality. While goniotomy or trabeculotomy ab externo is valuable in the management of congenital glaucoma, primary combined trabeculotomy–trabeculectomy offers the best hope of success in advanced cases. Trabeculectomy with antifibrotic agent and glaucoma drainage devices has a role in the management of refractory cases, and cyclodestructive procedures should be reserved for patients where these procedures have failed. Early diagnosis, prompt therapeutic intervention and proper refractive correction are keys to success. Management of residual vision and visual rehabilitation should be an integral part of the management of children with low vision and lifelong follow-up is a must. PMID:21150027

  14. Congenital idiopathic clubfoot deformities.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S P; Stark, S L

    1995-03-01

    Clubfoot is a birth defect that is marked primarily by a deformed talus (ie, ankle) and calcaneous (ie, heel) that give the foot a characteristic "club-like" appearance. In congenital idiopathic clubfoot (ie, talipes equinovarus), the infant's foot points downward (ie, equinus) and turns inward (ie, varus), while the forefoot curls toward the heel (ie, adduction). This congenital disorder has an incidence of 1 in 400 live births, with boys affected twice as often as girls. Unilateral clubfoot is somewhat more common than bilateral clubfoot and may occur as an isolated defect or in association with other disorders (eg, chromosomal aberrations, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, arthrogryposis). Infantile clubfoot deformity is painless and is correctable with early diagnosis and prompt treatment. PMID:7778903

  15. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshingkar, S A; Barpande, S R; Bhavthankar, J D

    2011-07-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  16. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Deshingkar, S. A.; Barpande, S. R.; Bhavthankar, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  17. Congenital brachymetatarsia: three cases.

    PubMed

    Ferrández, L; Yubero, J; Usabiaga, J; Ramos, L

    1993-01-01

    We report on three cases with congenital brachymetatarsia, one with bilateral affectation, together with the results of a lengthening of the short metatarsal bones by progressive axial distraction using an external minifixator. The method proved to be easy to implement, permitting immediate functionality of the ankle and early load bearing. The immediate results (cosmetic) and later findings (functional) were excellent in all three cases. PMID:8314189

  18. Congenital scoliosis - Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ujjwal K; Goel, Vivek; Harshavardhana, Nanjanduppa; Webb, John K

    2010-04-01

    Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV) which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions) and patient's age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only) surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the armamentarium of the

  19. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  20. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  1. Congenital Cataract Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  2. [Worster-Drought syndrome--a specific cerebral palsy syndrome--why is the diagnosis frequently overlooked?].

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Dorit; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    2007-10-01

    Worster-Drought syndrome (WDS) is a developmental disorder presenting as mild tetraplegic cerebral palsy (CP) with severe pseudobulbar palsy, manifested as articulation problems or anarthria, chewing, and swallowing difficulties and severe drooling. Epilepsy, learning disabilities, behavioral disturbances, and other congenital anomalies are common. WDS accounts for about 1% of CP cases. On brain imaging, migrational abnormalities are frequently found, mainly in the opercular area, however normal brain imaging does not exclude the diagnosis. Although children with WDS have serious, early-onset developmental disabilities, the specific diagnosis is frequently delayed or overlooked. There is a lack of awareness of the syndrome and an overlap with similar congenital syndromes, such as the Opercular Syndrome and Congenital Bilateral Perisylvian Syndrome. Two children with WDS are presented, emphasizing the clinical symptoms, natural history of the disorder, etiology and imaging. The similarity between WDS and other specific congenital syndromes will be discussed with the suggestion to unite them all under the name WDS. PMID:17990388

  3. [Clinical and MRI Findings in Patients with Congenital Anosmia].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takao; Kato, Tomohisa; Ono, Mayu; Shimizu, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of 16 patients with congenital anosmia were examined retrospectively. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) was used to assess the morphological changes in the olfactory bulbs and olfactory sulci according to the method of P. Rombaux (2009). Congenital anosmia was divided into two forms: syndromic forms in association with a syndrome, and isolated forms without evidence of other defects. Only three patients (19%) in our series had syndromic forms of congenital anosmia, such as the Kallmann syndrome. Most cases (13 patients, 81%) had isolated congenital anosmia. Psychophysical testing of the olfactory function included T&T olfactometry and the intravenous Alinamin test, which are widely used in Japan. In T&T olfactometry, detection and recognition thresholds for the five odorants are used to assign a diagnostic category representing the level of olfactory function. Most cases (14 patients, 88%) showed off-scale results on T&T olfactometry, and the Alinamin test resulted in no response in all 11 patients who underwent the test. Abnormal MRI findings of the olfactory bulbs and sulci were detected in 15 of 16 patients (94%). Olfactory bulbs were bilaterally absent in nine patients (56%), and two patients (13%) had unilateral olfactory bulbs. Four patients (25%) had bilateral hypoplastic olfactory bulbs, and only one patient had normal olfactory bulbs (6%). The olfactory sulcus was unilaterally absent in one patient (6%), and nine patients (56%) had bilaterally hypoplastic olfactory sulci. Two patients (13%) had a unilateral normal olfactory sulcus and hypoplastic olfactory sulcus. Three patients (19%) had normal olfactory sulci. Quantitative analysis showed that the volume of olfactory bulbs varied from 0 mm3 to 63.5 mm3, with a mean volume of 10.20 ± 18 mm3, and the mean depth of the olfactory sulcus varied from 0 mm to 12.22 mm, with a mean length of 4.85 ± 4.1 mm. Currently, there is no effective treatment for congenital anosmia. However

  4. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-01-01

    ‘Acro-renal syndrome’ refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  5. [Transposition of great vessels in Cantrell syndrome].

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, L; Mikołajczak-Mejer, U; Zinka, E

    1993-04-01

    A case is presented of complete transposition of great vessels with atrial and ventricular septum defect and coarctation of the pulmonary artery in Cantrell syndrome. The Cantrell syndrome consists of: congenital heart disease, defect of pericardium, diaphragm, sternum, and anterior abdomen wall. In all cases of Cantrell syndrome described as yet ventricular septum defect was present alone or in combination with other intracardiac defects. The presented case is the first report of congenital abnormality in the from of d-TGA in Cantrell syndrome. PMID:8249420

  6. MOEBIUS SYNDROME: CHALLENGES OF AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Budić, Ivana; Šurdilović, Dušan; Slavković, Anđelka; Marjanović, Vesna; Stević, Marija; Simić, Dušica

    2016-03-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare nonprogressive congenital neurological disorder with a wide range of severity and variability of symptoms. This diversity is a consequence of dysfunction of different cranial nerves (most often facial and abducens nerves), accompanying orofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal malformations, congenital cardiac diseases, as well as specific associations of Moebius and other syndromes. The authors present anesthesia and airway management during the multiple tooth extraction surgery in a 10-year-old girl with Moebius syndrome associated with Poland and trigeminal trophic syndromes. PMID:27276780

  7. Congenital hemangiopericytoma: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bosch, A M; Hack, W W; Ekkelkamp, S

    1998-03-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumor consisting of capillaries surrounded by pericytes. Only histologically can the tumor be distinguished from other vascular hamartomas. For a long time the congenital type was considered benign; however, metastases have recently been described. A histologic diagnosis of all soft-tissue sarcomas should be made. We describe two patients with congenital hemangiopericytomas in whom the diagnosis was not suspected until after histologic examination. Long-term follow-up is indicated.

  8. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  9. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  10. Congenital deficiency of the fibula with ipsilateral iliac horn and absence of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Haga, N; Lee, K; Nakamura, K; Okazaki, Y; Mamada, K; Kurokawa, T

    1997-04-01

    Congenital deficiency of the fibula is sometimes accompanied by femoral hypoplasia, genu valgum, patellar a/hypoplasia or dislocation, tibial bowing, foot deformity, and toe deficiency in the affected limb. 'Iliac horns' are bony projections extending posterolaterally from the ilium and considered to be pathognomonic of nail-patella syndrome. We report a 5-year-old Japanese girl with congenital complete deficiency of the left fibula, ipsilateral iliac horn and absence of the left kidney. PMID:9134300

  11. Micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, M J; Jones, B; Waagner, D C; Dunn, D

    1989-01-01

    Micropenis is often an early sign of congenital hypopituitarism. It has also been associated with congenital adrenal hypoplasia in infants with anencephaly and pituitary agenesis. This report is on two infants with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia. One presented with a similar clinical course and postmortem findings to previously reported cases of adrenal hypoplasia and pituitary agenesis. The other patient represents the first reported case of an infant with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia in the absence of pituitary agenesis. The histologic patterns of adrenal hypoplasia, as well as the etiologic and clinical implications of its association with micropenis, are discussed.

  12. Possible new autosomal recessive syndrome of lymphedema, hydroceles, atrial septal defect, and characteristic facial changes.

    PubMed

    Irons, M B; Bianchi, D W; Geggel, R L; Marx, G R; Bhan, I

    1996-12-01

    We describe two brothers with congenital lymphedema of lower limbs, atrial septal defect (ASD), and similar facial appearance. A sister had severe hydrops fetalis, ASD, omphalocele, and other anomalies. This combination of congenital lymphedema and ASD differs from other reported cases of congenital lymphedema and most likely constitutes a previously unrecognized autosomal recessive syndrome.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry: Leber congenital amaurosis 9 National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis These resources from MedlinePlus ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  15. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mantelli, Flavio; Nardella, Chiara; Tiberi, Eloisa; Sacchetti, Marta; Bruscolini, Alice; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis (NK) is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK. PMID:26451380

  16. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyomatous lingual hamartoma. Differential diagnosis, especially for midline tongue mass and other paediatric tongue lesions are discussed. We also discuss the epidemiology, histopathologic features, treatment and prognosis of lingual hamartoma based on the literature review. PMID:27790477

  17. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel–Joubert, short rib, Bardet–Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  18. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Portosystemic Shunts Treated with Transcatheter Embolization and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Sato, Haruka; Miura, Masanobu; Yaoita, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Saori; Tatebe, Shunsuke; Aoki, Tatsuo; Satoh, Kimio; Ota, Hideki; Takase, Kei; Sugimura, Koichiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary abnormalities are often present in patients with liver diseases. We herein report a case of congenital portosystemic shunts complicated by hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH). A 57-year-old woman complained of dyspnea and was subsequently diagnosed with HPS and PoPH caused by congenital portosystemic shunts. Although shunt closure by transcatheter embolization was successfully performed, her dyspnea worsened and pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance elevated. Conventional vasodilator therapy was started, resulting in an improvement of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In some patients with congenital portosystemic shunts, shunt closure could exacerbate PH, and vasodilator therapy may be effective. PMID:27580545

  19. Congenital Hypertonia of the Temporalis Leading to Trismus Since Birth.

    PubMed

    Dharmesh Kumar Raja, A V; Jones, T; Venkadasalapathi, N; Srinivasan, K G

    2016-07-01

    Congenital trismus is quite rare especially when its etiology is not the usual. In our case report an 8 year old female patient with no history of forcep delivery, no history of trauma or infection and a non syndromic presents with trismus since birth. After thorough examination we could conclude that the cause is due to hypertonia of the temporalis muscle and its etiology is discussed. PMID:27408475

  20. Congenital isolation of the subclavian artery in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, G A; Weathers, S

    1997-01-01

    The congenital anomaly of isolation of the subclavian artery, on the left side, is associated with a right aortic arch. The subclavian artery loses its connection with the aorta and is connected to the left pulmonary artery via the ligamentum arteriosum. Subclavian steal syndrome accompanies this anomaly in a minority of patients. We report 2 cases of adults with subclavian artery isolation, one of whom was symptomatic, and we discuss the importance of recognizing its presence. Images PMID:9068141

  1. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  2. Congenital granular cell epulis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Rachel; Perez, Mia C N

    2014-01-01

    Congenital granular cell epulis is a rarely reported lesion of unknown histogenesis with a strong predilection for the maxillary alveolar ridge of newborn girls. Microscopically, it demonstrates nests of polygonal cells with granular cytoplasm, a prominent capillary network, and attenuated overlying squamous epithelium. The lesion lacks immunoreactivity for S-100, laminin, chromogranin, and most other markers except neuron-specific enolase and vimentin. Through careful observation of its unique clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical features, this lesion can be distinguished from the more common adult granular cell tumor as well as other differential diagnoses.

  3. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  4. [Congenital linear nevus sebaceus].

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Anders; Bygum, Anette; Fenger-Grøn, Jesper

    2011-09-01

    An unusual case of nevus sebaceous is described. Nevus sebaceous is a congenital epidermal hamartoma of the skin and the predilection site is the head or neck. In this case the nevus followed the lines of Blaschko along the back of the left lower extremity. The linear lesion seemed papulovesicular which caused suspicion of incontinentia pigmenti or infection, and the boy received antimicrobial treatment until a biopsy revealed the correct diagnosis. We wish to emphasize this clinical picture to spare the patient and relatives from unnecessary tests, treatment and concern. PMID:21893006

  5. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  6. [Enzymopathic congenital hyperlactacidemia].

    PubMed

    Leroux, J P; Marsac, C; Saudubray, J M

    1976-01-01

    Congenital enzymopathic hyperlactacidemia results from a defect of utilisation of pyruvate either at the level of the pyruvate junction (pyruvate-carboxylase, pyruvate-dehydrogenase and Kreb's cycle), or at the level of the unidirectional enzymes on neo-glucogenesis and of neo-glycogenogenesis, e.g. glucose-6-phosphatase, phosphoenol-pyruvate-carboxykinase and glycogen synthetase. The enzymopathies which affect neoglucogenesis associate hyper-lactacidemia and fasting hypoglycemia and more or less marked hepatomegaly. Type I glycogenesis (von Gierke's disease) is the best known example. Enzymopathies which affect the pyruvate junction and the Krebs cycle, may be manifested in addition by: --either chronic neuropathies, e.g. Leigh's disease, recurrent ataxia, and moderate hyperalactacidemia,--or, as in congenital lactic acidoses, which have a rapid and severe prognosis with major hyperlactacidemia. Functional investigation, in particular, loading tests are of great value in orientation and justify the practice of tissue biopsy which permits the enzyme diagnosis. Recent, still unconfirmed knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases emphasizes the considerable importance of estimation of blood lactic acid in the investigation of metabolic acidoses of hereditary origin. PMID:184725

  7. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F.; Miner, Lonnie; Petheram, Susan J.

    2002-05-01

    Intrauterine infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a betaherpesvirus, remains the most frequent congenital virus infection in many regions of the world. Although most CMV-infected newborns lack signs of CMV infection, approximately 10% have signs that can consist of low birth weight, jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, skin rash, microcephaly, and chorioretinitis. Neonates with signs of CMV infection at birth have high rates of audiologic and neurodevelopmental sequelae. Although postnatal therapy with ganciclovir transiently reduces virus shedding and may lessen the audiologic consequences of CMV in some infected infants, additional strategies are needed to prevent congenital CMV disease and to improve the neurodevelopmental prognosis of infants infected with CMV in utero. Some cases of intrauterine infections can be prevented in susceptible women by avoiding contact with the urine or saliva of young children who may be shedding CMV. Vaccines against CMV remain in the experimental stages of development. Termination of pregnancy can be offered to women whose infants have evidence of intrauterine CMV infection and sonographic signs of central nervous system damage. Infants who survive symptomatic intrauterine infections have high rates of neurodevelopmental sequelae and require comprehensive evaluation and therapy through center and home-based early intervention programs. PMID:11931729

  8. [Genetics of congenital lipodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Buffet, A; Lombes, M; Caron, P

    2015-10-01

    Congenital lipodystrophies are heterogeneous genetic diseases, leading to the loss of adipose tissue. This loss of adipose tissue can be generalized or partial, thus defining different phenotypes. These lipodystrophies have a major metabolic impact, secondary to lipotoxicity. This lipotoxicity is responsible for insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis. The severity of the metabolic impact correlates with the severity of the loss of adipose tissue. Mutations in 15 predisposition genes are currently described; BSCL2 and AGPT2 genes are the major genes in the generalized forms. On the contrary, LMNA and PPARG gene mutations are recovered in partial lipodystrophies forms. These different genes encode for proteins involved in adipocyte physiology, altering adipocyte differentiation, triglycerides synthesis and lysis or playing a major role in the lipid droplet formation. Congenital lipodystrophies treatment is based on the management of metabolic comorbidities but recombinant leptin therapy appears to have promising results. These different points have been recently discussed during the 2015 Endocrine Society Congress, notably by S. O'Rahilly and are highlighted in this review.

  9. Ankyloglossia superior syndrome: Case report and updated literature review.

    PubMed

    Shay, Sophie; West, Alisha N

    2016-07-01

    Ankyloglossia superior (palatoglossal adhesion) is an extremely rare congenital condition with only 14 previously reported cases. When found in conjunction with other congenital abnormalities, such as cleft palate, gastrointestinal malformations, and limb malformations, this anomaly is considered part of ankyloglossia superior syndrome. We present a case of a newborn female found to have ankyloglossia superior syndrome. Surgical repair is also described. We review the available literature and discuss theories regarding the etiology of ankyloglossia superior syndrome. Clinicians should have a high degree of suspicion for other congenital anomalies when a neonate is found to have ankyloglossia superior.

  10. Jarcho-Levin syndrome presenting with diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Onay, O S; Kinik, S T; Otgün, Y; Arda, I S; Varan, B

    2008-08-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (spondylothoracic or spondylocostal dysostosis) is an eponym that is used to define individuals with a short neck, short trunk, and short stature and multiple vertebral anomalies. The prognosis is directly related to respiratory complications. Reported findings associated with Jarcho-Levin syndrome include congenital heart defects, abdominal wall malformations, genitourinary malformations, upper limb anomalies, and neural tube defects. We report on a 6-day-old girl who presented with an incomplete form of Jarcho-Levin syndrome with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia and congenital heart disease. PMID:18629769

  11. Double Aneuploidy 48,XXY,+21 Associated with a Congenital Heart Defect in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    Shu, X; Zou, C; Shen, Z

    2013-12-01

    A neonate with a double aneuploidy associated with congenital heart defect (CHD) suffered from cyanosis after birth. He had typical features of Down syndrome (DS) including hypertelorism, slightly lowset ears with protruding pinna. Doppler echocardiography indicated complex congenital heart disease with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect, enlarged right ventricle, and mild tricuspid valve regurgitation. Further chromosomal analysis showed a karyotype of 48,XXY,+21: a double aneuploidy of DS and Klinefelter syndrome (KS). Until now, only seven cases of double aneuploidy associated with CHD defect have been reported. PMID:24778570

  12. Clues in diagnosing congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of practical office and bedside clues to cardiac disease in infants and children have been passed on through the years. They relate to the history, to the inspection and palpation components of the physical examination, and to knowledge of the specific cardiac defects that are likely to be associated with certain clinical syndromes. With the possible exception of coarctation of the aorta, the clues are not diagnostically specific. In many instances, however, they serve to narrow a broad array of diagnostic possibilities to 2 or 3 and, with the aid of other clues and auscultation, they can often be distinguished from one another. When a primary care physician is confronted with a child who has an incidental murmur that is "probably" innocent but could be organic, useful clues favoring an organic murmur are a history of congenital heart disease in a first-degree relative; a history of maternal rubella syndrome, alcohol use, or teratogenic drug use during pregnancy; a history of inappropriate sweating; a history of syncope, chest pain, or squatting; maternal diabetes mellitus; premature birth; birth at a high altitude; cyanosis; abnormal pulsations; recurrent bronchiolitis or pneumonia; chronic unexplained hoarseness; asymmetric facies with crying; and a physical appearance suggestive of a clinical syndrome. PMID:1574882

  13. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. PMID:27777480

  14. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  15. Congenital anerythremic erythroleukemia presenting as hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Lazure, Thierry; Beauchamp, Anne; Croisille, Laure; Ferlicot, Sophie; Feneux, Danielle; Fabre, Monique

    2003-10-01

    We report an atypical case of congenital erythroleukemia in a child born with hepatosplenomegaly and abnormal liver tests. The initial peripheral blood cell count showed anemia and hyperleukocytosis with erythroblastosis that disappeared 1 week later. During the next 5 weeks, no blasts were found in the blood, and less than 5% were found on 2 successive bone marrow aspirates. The infant died of hepatic failure. The suspected diagnosis on a premortem liver biopsy was confirmed by an autopsy that showed a blastic infiltration in many organs. These cells expressed only erythroid markers glycophorin A and C. Rearrangement of the myeloid lymphoid leukemia gene was not found by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The main differential diagnoses include metabolic diseases, Langerhans histiocytosis, Pepper syndrome, transient myeloproliferative disorder, and leukemoid reactions. Although some of these can be excluded by the pathologist, others require a multidisciplinary confrontation: clinical, biologic, genetic, and pathologic examinations. PMID:14521454

  16. Genetic Factors in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, A. M.; Klaassens, M.; Tibboel, D.; de Klein, A.; Lee, B.; Scott, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a relatively common birth defect associated with high mortality and morbidity. Although the exact etiology of most cases of CDH remains unknown, there is a growing body of evidence that genetic factors play an important role in the development of CDH. In this review, we examine key findings that are likely to form the basis for future research in this field. Specific topics include a short overview of normal and abnormal diaphragm development, a discussion of syndromic forms of CDH, a detailed review of chromosomal regions recurrently altered in CDH, a description of the retinoid hypothesis of CDH, and evidence of the roles of specific genes in the development of CDH. PMID:17436238

  17. The Return of Congenital Rickets, Are We Missing Occult Cases?

    PubMed

    Elidrissy, Abdelwahab T H

    2016-09-01

    Congenital rickets is the term given to fetus born with clinical features of rickets, but those born with biochemical evidence of rickets without obvious clinical features still can be considered occult congenital rickets. Some of the affected babies with this disease have the intrauterine rachitic environment, but a calcium trans-placental pump prevents the fetus from having clinical features of rickets. They may present with hypocalcemia few days after birth or later with more florid features of rickets. Congenital rickets cases born with florid features reported over the last 40 years are few and can be divided into two groups. The first due to severe maternal osteomalacia in which their bones were so decalcified to have enough calcium to be pumped to their fetus. Another group in which newborn babies were hypocalcemic due to other maternal diseases as malabsorption, celiac disease, pre-eclampsia, and prematurity. All inherited rickets cases per se, or as part of other syndromes can be considered congenital rickets. Most cases seen in our region are due to maternal vitamin D deficiency with symptoms becoming obvious when the infants are breastfed, or may present with hypocalcemic convulsions or craniotabes. This is a review of congenital rickets with the aim of shedding light on this potentially acute disease that needs more attention and awareness in the neonatal period to avoid rare serious complications as cardiomyopathy or myelofibrosis and the complications of hypocalcemic convulsions. Congenital rickets cases seen simulate a tip of an ice-burg and its prevention is an important issue, especially with the tremendous urbanization with tall buildings living in sun-deprived flats as the commonest type of residence leading to the increasing incidence of maternal osteomalacia and rickets. PMID:27245342

  18. The Return of Congenital Rickets, Are We Missing Occult Cases?

    PubMed

    Elidrissy, Abdelwahab T H

    2016-09-01

    Congenital rickets is the term given to fetus born with clinical features of rickets, but those born with biochemical evidence of rickets without obvious clinical features still can be considered occult congenital rickets. Some of the affected babies with this disease have the intrauterine rachitic environment, but a calcium trans-placental pump prevents the fetus from having clinical features of rickets. They may present with hypocalcemia few days after birth or later with more florid features of rickets. Congenital rickets cases born with florid features reported over the last 40 years are few and can be divided into two groups. The first due to severe maternal osteomalacia in which their bones were so decalcified to have enough calcium to be pumped to their fetus. Another group in which newborn babies were hypocalcemic due to other maternal diseases as malabsorption, celiac disease, pre-eclampsia, and prematurity. All inherited rickets cases per se, or as part of other syndromes can be considered congenital rickets. Most cases seen in our region are due to maternal vitamin D deficiency with symptoms becoming obvious when the infants are breastfed, or may present with hypocalcemic convulsions or craniotabes. This is a review of congenital rickets with the aim of shedding light on this potentially acute disease that needs more attention and awareness in the neonatal period to avoid rare serious complications as cardiomyopathy or myelofibrosis and the complications of hypocalcemic convulsions. Congenital rickets cases seen simulate a tip of an ice-burg and its prevention is an important issue, especially with the tremendous urbanization with tall buildings living in sun-deprived flats as the commonest type of residence leading to the increasing incidence of maternal osteomalacia and rickets.

  19. Stickler's syndrome: a study of 12 families.

    PubMed Central

    Spallone, A

    1987-01-01

    Stickler's syndrome is a congenital disease of connective tissue with considerable ocular and non-ocular lesions. This study reports 12 pedigrees (10 families and two isolated cases) and evaluates some peculiar ocular aspects not previously reported in the syndrome. Images PMID:3651362

  20. Congenital Aberrant Tearing: A Re-Look

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T.; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Congenital aberrant tearing is characterized by tearing when eating (“crocodile tears”), lack of emotional tearing, or both. Most reported cases are associated with Duane syndrome. In our previous studies we observed aberrant tearing in individuals with thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence. This report summarizes the literature on the subject and adds 3 new studies that give information on this unusual condition. Methods Twenty-eight individuals with Möbius sequence were interviewed about tearing symptoms at a support group meeting in Italy. In Sweden 30 adults primarily from the original thalidomide series were reexamined. In this latter study, a Schirmer test was done at baseline and repeated 5 minutes after eating. Twenty families in Brazil who have children with Möbius sequence were questioned about tearing symptoms and exposure to misoprostol during pregnancy. Results In the 28 Italian individuals, either “crocodile tears” or lack of emotional tearing was noted in 7 cases. In the thalidomide study, 10 of 30 patients had tearing when eating and 7 had no emotional tearing. Low Schirmer scores or increased tearing after eating was noted in a few asymptomatic individuals. Among the 20 Brazilian children with Möbius sequence, 10 had some tearing abnormality. Conclusion Congenital anomalous lacrimation is rare but usually associated with Duane syndrome or abduction deficits, as in Möbius sequence and, less frequently, facial nerve palsy. Studies implicate an early insult in development at 4 to 6 weeks. At that time the facial nerve, sixth nerve, and lacrimal nucleus are in close proximity in the embryo. PMID:19277226