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Sample records for congenital renal dysplasia

  1. Congenital renal tubular dysplasia and skull ossification defects similar to teratogenic effects of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, D; Moss, G; Primhak, R; Coombs, R

    1997-01-01

    An apparently autosomal recessive syndrome of congenital renal tubular dysplasia and skull ossification defects is described in five infants from two separate, consanguineous, Pakistani Muslim kindreds. The clinical, pathological, and radiological features are similar to the phenotype associated with fetal exposure to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors: intrauterine growth retardation, skull ossification defects, and fetal/ neonatal anuric renal failure associated with renal tubular dysplasia. There was no fetal exposure to ACE inhibitors in the affected infants. Phenotypic similarities between these familial cases and those associated with ACE inhibition suggest an abnormality of the "renin-angiotensin-aldosterone" system (RAS). It is postulated that the molecular pathology in this uncommon autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular dysgenesis could be related to mutations of the gene systems governing the RAS. Images PMID:9222960

  2. [Fibromuscular dysplasia of renal arteries].

    PubMed

    Plouin, Pierre-François; Fiquet, Béatrice; Bobrie, Guillaume; Jeunemaître, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of the medium caliber arteries causing segmental stenosis, and sometimes aneurysm and/or dissection. Renal involvement is either asymptomatic or revealed by hypertension, rarely acute complications (renal infarction/hemorrhage). Cross-sectional imaging or angiography differentiates multifocal fibromuscular dysplasia (pearl necklace appearance) and focal fibromuscular dysplasia (tubular stenosis). Several differential diagnoses are to be mentioned. Carotid and vertebral involvement are possible. Smoking cessation must be encouraged. Selected patients benefit from renal revascularization. The best indications are recent or resistant hypertension, and progressive renal atrophy. Angioplasty without stent revascularization is the technique of choice in purely stenotic forms. PMID:26968476

  3. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  4. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  5. The Good and Bad of β-Catenin in Kidney Development and Renal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Felix J.; Sarin, Sanjay; Evans, J. Colin; Bridgewater, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Congenital renal malformations are a major cause of childhood and adult onset chronic kidney disease. Identifying the etiology of these renal defects is often challenging since disruptions in the processes that drive kidney development can result from disruptions in environmental, genetic, or epigenetic cues. β-catenin is an intracellular molecule involved in cell adhesion, cell signaling, and regulation of gene transcription. It plays essential roles in kidney development and in the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. Here, we review the function of β-catenin during kidney development and in the genesis of renal dysplasia. PMID:26734608

  6. Fibromuscular Dysplasia Presenting with Bilateral Renal Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Doody, O.; Adam, W. R.; Foley, P. T.; Lyon, S. M.

    2009-03-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) describes a group of conditions which cause nonatheromatous arterial stenoses, most commonly of the renal and carotid arteries, typically in young women. We report a rare case of bilateral segmental renal infarction secondary to FMD in a young male patient. His initial presentation with loin pain and pyrexia resulted in a delay in the definitive diagnosis of FMD. He was successfully treated with bilateral balloon angioplasty. The delayed diagnosis in this patient until the condition had progressed to bilateral renal infarcts highlights the need for prompt investigation and diagnosis of suspected cases of FMD.

  7. Bilateral renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter in a septic neonatal foal

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca A.; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Tryon, Kimberly A.; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    A Canadian warmblood foal treated for septic polyarthritis was diagnosed with bilateral congenital renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter at 2 weeks of age based on abdominal ultrasound and postmortem examination. Intermittent abdominal pain throughout the course of treatment was attributed to hydronephrosis and hydroureter. PMID:25750445

  8. Bilateral renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter in a septic neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Gilday, Rebecca A; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Tryon, Kimberly A; Lohmann, Katharina L

    2015-03-01

    A Canadian warmblood foal treated for septic polyarthritis was diagnosed with bilateral congenital renal dysplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter at 2 weeks of age based on abdominal ultrasound and postmortem examination. Intermittent abdominal pain throughout the course of treatment was attributed to hydronephrosis and hydroureter.

  9. Two sibs with microcephaly, hygroma colli, renal dysplasia, and cutaneous syndactyly: a new lethal MCA syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, H; Schaap, C; Vandevijver, N; Moerman, P; de Die-Smulders, C E M; Fryns, J

    1999-01-01

    We report two sibs of Turkish descent with multiple congenital anomalies including severe microcephaly, hygroma colli, cystic renal dysplasia, and bilateral cutaneous syndactyly of toes IV-V. In addition, the second sib presented with bilateral fusion of the eyelids, a bicornuate uterus, and clitoromegaly. The parents are first cousins, which suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. In reviewing previously published reports, several cases were found with cerebral, renal, and digital anomalies as the main features. Several of the additional symptoms present in the second sib were suggestive of Fraser syndrome, but the severe microcephaly in both sibs is unusual. The differential diagnosis is discussed, including the possibility of an entirely new entity in the broad spectrum of syndromes with cerebral, renal, and digital anomalies.


Keywords: lethal MCA syndrome; microcephaly; cystic renal dysplasia; cutaneous syndactyly PMID:10874639

  10. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN CAIRN TERRIERS WITH PRECLINICAL RENAL DYSPLASIA

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Gabriela S.; Rhodes, James; Cianciolo, Rachel; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia is a hereditary disease characterized by abnormal differentiation of renal tissue. The ultrasonographic appearance of dysplastic canine kidneys has been reported in the late stage of the disease where inflammatory and degenerative changes are already present and the dogs are in chronic renal failure. In this study, we describe the ultrasonographic appearance of the kidneys of five related Cairn Terriers affected with renal dysplasia before the onset of clinical or laboratory evidence of renal failure. Common findings included poor corticomedullary definition and multifocal hyperechoic speckles in the renal medulla, or a diffusely hyperechoic medulla. Severity of ultrasonographic changes was related to the severity of histopathologic findings. The ability to detect dysplastic changes before clinical signs develop makes ultrasound a potentially useful screening method for canine renal dysplasia. PMID:20806879

  11. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  12. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia.

  13. The Syndrome of Familial Hypoparathyroidism, Sensorineural Deafness and Renal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ratti Lal; Maloo, Sudheer Kumar; Samar, Neera; Ruhela, Asim; Saini, Subhash

    2015-06-01

    The syndrome of familial hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR syndrome) is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, caused by haploinsufficiency of the GATA3 gene in chromosome 10p. Although first described years ago, but the disease is considered to be very rare. Patients usually present with hypocalcemia, tetany, or afebrile convulsions at any age. Hearing loss is usually bilateral, range from mild to profound impairment. Renal disease includes dysplasia, hypoplasia or aplasia.

  14. Bilateral juvenile renal dysplasia in a Norwegian Forest Cat.

    PubMed

    Aresu, Luca; Zanatta, Renato; Pregel, Paola; Caliari, Diego; Tursi, Massimiliano; Valenza, Federico; Tarducci, Alberto

    2009-04-01

    Renal dysplasia is defined as a condition of disorganised development of renal parenchyma due to abnormal differentiation. The case of a 5-month-old intact male Norwegian Forest Cat with a history of polyuria and polydipsia is reported. Ultrasonographic examination showed a slight enlargement of kidneys. Biochemical parameters, haematological examinations and clinical signs were compatible with chronic renal failure (CRF). Histological examination was correlated with a primary tubular disorganisation and modification of glomerular compartment. The clinical history together with the histological lesions is consistent with bilateral juvenile renal dysplasia in this cat. To our knowledge, feline renal dysplasia has been reported in fetal infections with panleukopenia virus; no reports indicate the idiopathic origin in feline dysplastic lesions.

  15. Bilateral renal infarction: an uncommon presentation of fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Kazory, Amir

    2013-12-01

    While fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an established cause of secondary hypertension, its association with renal infarction is less well recognized. We report a middle-aged man who presented with complaints of loin pain and severe hypertension. Computed tomography angiography of the abdomen revealed bilateral renal infarction with multiple short-segment arterial dissection compatible with FMD in the absence of systemic vasculitis and other risk factors for thromboembolic events. Bilateral renal infarction complicating FMD is extremely rare and has so far been reported only in a handful of cases. Physicians encountering cases of otherwise unexplained renal infarction/ischemia need to be aware of this complication.

  16. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M; Kim, Helen J; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W; Stevenson, David A; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  17. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kim, Helen J.; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W.; Stevenson, David A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  18. Surgically intractable epilepsy associated with focal cortical dysplasia and congenital cutaneous hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Brzezinski, Anna; Cruz, Vincent B; Prayson, Richard A

    2014-11-01

    We describe a 6-month-old girl with medically intractable seizures, multiple congenital hemangiomas, and developmental delay. The patient underwent two surgical resections. Pathological findings at both the first and second resections were consistent with focal cortical dysplasia. The literature was reviewed on focal cortical dysplasia associated with cutaneous hemangiomas.

  19. Bilateral renal dysplasia, nephroblastomatosis, and bronchial stenosis. A new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria Matilde; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Whittington, Elizabeth E

    2015-06-01

    Bilateral nephroblastomatosis (NB) is an uncommon renal anomaly characterized by multiple confluent nephrogenic rests scattered through both kidneys, with only a limited number of cases reported in the medical literature. Some of these children may have associated either Perlman or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and others do not demonstrate syndromic features. We report a full-term boy with anteverted nose, bilateral bronchial stenosis due to lack of cartilage, bilateral obstructive renal dysplasia and NB with glomeruloid features. The infant had visceromegaly, but neither gigantism nor hemihypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry for PAX2 (Paired box gene-2) and WT-1 (Wilms Tumor 1) were strongly positive in the areas of NB. GLEPP-1 (Glomerular Epithelial Protein) did not stain the areas of NB with a glomeruloid appearance, but was positive in the renal glomeruli as expected. We found neither associated bronchial stenosis nor the histology of NB resembling giant glomeruli in any of the reported cases of NB. PMID:25871299

  20. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia-renal agenesis-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia): a rare cause of primary amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-04-01

    The agenesis of the Müllerian duct is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhoea after Turner syndrome. The abnormal development of Müllerian duct often associates with the urinary tract and skeletal abnormalities. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia-renal agenesis-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association is a unique and rare developmental disorder with four common features of uterine hypoplasia or aplasia, renal agenesis or ectopy, vertebral anomalies and short stature. We report a case of young female with primary amenorrhoea. She had well-developed secondary sexual characteristics along with multiple congenital developmental abnormalities such as the absence of uterus, ectopic kidney, cervical vertebral fusion, hemivertebrae, scoliosis, cervical rib, facial asymmetry and growth retardation. Our case highlights the rarity and clinical importance of this syndrome. For the evaluation of primary amenorrhoea in a female with well-developed secondary sexual characteristics, congenital anomalies should be ruled out before hormone and karyotype analyses. PMID:27099773

  1. Renal Function and Hematology in Rats with Congenital Renal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hidenori; Amakasu, Kohei; Tochigi, Yuki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2016-01-01

    Renal hypoplasia due to a congenitally reduced number of nephrons progresses to chronic kidney disease and may cause renal anemia, given that the kidneys are a major source of erythropoietin in adults. Hypoplastic kidney (HPK) rats have only about 20% of the normal number of nephrons and develop CKD. This study assessed the renal function and hematologic changes in HPK rats from 70 to 210 d of age. HPK rats demonstrated deterioration of renal excretory function, slightly macrocytic erythropenia at all days examined, age-related increases in splenic hemosiderosis accompanied by a tendency toward increased hemolysis, normal plasma erythropoietin levels associated with increased hepatic and decreased renal erythropoietin production, and maintenance of the response for erythropoietin production to hypoxic conditions, with increased interstitial fibrosis at 140 d of age. These results indicate that increases in splenic hemosiderosis and the membrane fragility of RBC might be associated with erythropenia and that hepatic production of erythropoietin might contribute to maintaining the blood Hgb concentration in HPK rats. PMID:26884405

  2. Congenital generalised bone dysplasias: a clinical, radiological, and epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P E; Hauge, M

    1989-01-01

    The point prevalence at birth of generalised bone dysplasias was estimated by a study of all children born between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1983 in the county of Fyn (Denmark). Additionally the population prevalence on 31 December 1983 of all patients with generalised bone dysplasias in this county was determined. The county is a well defined, representative subregion of Denmark which demographically comprises a cross section of about 9% of the Danish population. In total, bone dysplasias were found to be more frequent than generally assumed. Achondroplasia was, however, less common with a point prevalence at birth of 1.3 per 100,000, while osteogenesis imperfecta (21.8), multiple epiphyseal dysplasia tarda (9.0), achondrogenesis (6.4), osteopetrosis (5.1), and thanatophoric dysplasia (3.8) were found more frequently. It is striking how many bone dysplasias are still erroneously classified as achondroplasia. Correct diagnosis is important for a valid prognosis, for treatment, and for genetic counselling. The diagnosis relies almost exclusively on the radiographical findings. PMID:2783977

  3. Fibromuscular Dysplasia-Related Renal Artery Stenosis Associated with Aneurysm: Successive Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serter, Selim Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memis, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease. FMD of the renal arteries is one of the leading causes of curable hypertension. The simultaneous occurrence of FMD and renal artery aneurysm has been described previously. In this case, we present a fibrodysplastic lesion and an aneurysm in a renal artery treated with a percutanous transluminal angioplasty and coil embolization.

  4. Stromal β-catenin overexpression contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Felix J; Sarin, Sanjay; Dabas, Pari; Karolak, Michele; Oxburgh, Leif; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysplasia, the leading cause of renal failure in children, is characterized by disrupted branching of the collecting ducts and primitive tubules, with an expansion of the stroma, yet a role for the renal stroma in the genesis of renal dysplasia is not known. Here, we demonstrate that expression of β-catenin, a key transcriptional co-activator in renal development, is markedly increased in the expanded stroma in human dysplastic tissue. To understand its contribution to the genesis of renal dysplasia, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses β-catenin specifically in stromal progenitors, termed β-cat(GOF-S) . Histopathological analysis of β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed a marked expansion of fibroblast cells surrounding primitive ducts and tubules, similar to defects observed in human dysplastic kidneys. Characterization of the renal stroma in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed altered stromal cell differentiation in the expanded renal stroma demonstrating that this is not renal stroma but instead a population of stroma-like cells. These cells overexpress ectopic Wnt4 and Bmp4, factors necessary for endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Characterization of the renal vasculature demonstrated disrupted endothelial cell migration, organization, and vascular morphogenesis in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice. Analysis of human dysplastic tissue demonstrated a remarkably similar phenotype to that observed in our mouse model, including altered stromal cell differentiation, ectopic Wnt4 expression in the stroma-like cells, and disrupted endothelial cell migration and vessel formation. Our findings demonstrate that the overexpression of β-catenin in stromal cells is sufficient to cause renal dysplasia. Further, the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is one of disrupted stromal differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time the contribution of stromal β-catenin overexpression to the genesis of renal

  5. Congenital anomalies in the teratological collection of Museum Vrolik in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. II: Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Oostra, R J; Baljet, B; Dijkstra, P F; Hennekam, R C

    1998-05-01

    The Museum Vrolik collection of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology of the University of Amsterdam, founded by Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859) and his son Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), consists of more than five thousand specimens of human and animal anatomy, embryology, pathology, and congenital anomalies. Recently, the collection of congenital anomalies was recatalogued and redescribed according to contempory syndromological views. The original descriptions, as far as preserved, were compared with the clinical and radiographical findings. In 18 specimens the following skeletal dysplasias were diagnosed: achondrogenesis, achondroplasia, Blomstrand chondrodysplasia, Majewski syndrome, osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, osteogenesis imperfecta type I, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, and thanatophoric dysplasia with and without cloverleaf skull. Radiography did not yield a diagnosis in 4 specimens. The use of additional diagnostical techniques, such as MRI and CT scanning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in these specimens, is currently being investigated. PMID:9605285

  6. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III). PMID:27512242

  7. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  8. Fibromuscular dysplasia of renal arteries presenting with bilateral renal infarction in a young man.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo; Lisi, Piero; Chimienti, Domenico; Antonelli, Maurizio; Bruno, Andrea; Giambersio, Silvia; Zurlo, Maria Teresa; Petronelli, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) describes a group of conditions which cause nonatheromatous arterial stenoses, most commonly of the renal and carotid arteries, typically in young women. We report the case of a previously healthy 43-year-old white man presenting with acute bilateral flank pain. The pain was more severe on the left side. Initially treated for ureteral colic, he was transferred to the nephrology unit upon recognition of a rising serum creatinine. He was found to have FMD of bilateral renal arteries with resultant infarctions in both kidneys. He was treated with intravenous heparin and, then, warfarin at discharge. At a 16-month review, the patient remained pain-free with normal renal function and with antiplatelet and dual antihypertensive therapy. In conclusion, renal infarction complicating FMD is rare, with most cases involving causative cardiovascular risk factors, including coagulopathy, ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation or structural cardiac abnormalities, none of which was present in this case. What makes this case interesting are the clinically significant bilateral renal infarctions due to atypical asymmetric FMD in both kidneys in a young man.

  9. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  10. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  11. Placental Insufficiency Associated with Loss of Cited1 Causes Renal Medullary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Duncan B.; Boyle, Scott C.; Sams, Rebecca S.; Mazuruk, Bogdan; Zhang, Li; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that placental insufficiency affects embryonic patterning of the kidney and leads to a decreased number of functioning nephrons in adulthood; however, there is circumstantial evidence that placental insufficiency may also affect renal medullary growth, which could account for cases of unexplained renal medullary dysplasia and for abnormalities in renal function among infants who had experienced intrauterine growth retardation. We observed that mice with late gestational placental insufficiency associated with genetic loss of Cited1 expression in the placenta had renal medullary dysplasia. This was not caused by lower urinary tract obstruction or by defects in branching of the ureteric bud during early nephrogenesis but was associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and increased apoptosis in the expanding renal medulla. Loss of placental Cited1 was required for Cited1 mutants to develop renal dysplasia, and this was not dependent on alterations in embryonic Cited1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that renal medullary dysplasia in Cited1 mutant mice is a direct consequence of decreased tissue oxygenation resulting from placental insufficiency. PMID:19297558

  12. Partial Renal Embolization for Pediatric Renovascular Hypertension Secondary to Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Ishijima, Hideyuki; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minako; Ito, Kazuto; Endo, Keigo

    1997-09-15

    We report a 7-year-old boy with renovascular hypertension showing multiple stenoses and microaneurysms of the dorsal branch of the left renal artery caused by fibromuscular dysplasia. Hypertension was successfully treated with transcatheter alcohol and gelatin sponge embolization of the dorsal branch and its distribution. The vertebral branch remained intact. No severe complication was encountered. Loss of renal function by renal scintigraphy was minimal. The patient remains asymptomatic at 1 year.

  13. [Congenital mydriasis as an initial sign of septo-optic dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Carrascosa-Romero, M C; Ruiz-Cano, R; Martínez-López, F; Alfaro-Ponce, B; Pérez-Pardo, A

    2013-10-01

    Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD)[MIM182230] consisting of a heterogeneous and uncommon condition characterised by the classictriad: optic nerve hypoplasia, abnormalities of pituitary hormone, and defects of thebrain midline (including agenesis of the septum pellucidum and/or the corpus callosum; ithas also been described associated cortical malformations, it was referred to as SOD plus syndrome).We report the first known case in which the initial diagnostic sign of SOD was a bilateralmydriasis as a manifestation ofhypoplasia of both optic nerves, pituitary hypoplasia andcerebral dysgenesis with neuronal migration disorder.We discuss thedifferential diagnosis of congenital mydriasis.

  14. The First Turkish Case of Hypoparathyroidism, Deafness and Renal Dysplasia (HDR) Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Döneray, Hakan; Usui, Takeshi; Kaya, Avni; Dönmez, Ayşe Sena

    2015-06-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia. We herein present the first Turkish patient with HDR syndrome, who has a p.R367X mutation. This report indicates that p.R367X is not a mutation specific for the Far Eastern populations and also that urological findings in infants with hypoparathyroidism should be carefully examined because clinical findings relating to the p.R367X mutation may show a variable age of onset.

  15. Renal Artery Stenosis in a Young Female without Fibromuscular Dysplasia with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Paloma; Cholankeril, Matthew; Goldberg, Daniel; Koneru, Jayanth; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is rare in young patients without fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). RAS is primarily classified as having two major etiologies, namely, atherosclerosis and FMD, with 90% and 10%, respectively. We report a case of a female in her mid 20s who developed hypertension due to RAS with no evidence of FMD or underlying renal dysfunction and underwent successful angioplasty and stenting. PMID:27398034

  16. Developmental dysplasia of the hip in infants with congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Minihane, Keith P; Grayhack, John J; Simmons, Todd D; Seshadri, Roopa; Wysocki, Robert W; Sarwark, John F

    2008-09-01

    Infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) are at increased risk for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), which has led to increased use of diagnostic procedures. Our goal in this study was to establish indications for imaging the hips of infants presenting with CMT. We reviewed the cases of 292 patients with the diagnosis of CMT, 16 of whom were found to have DDH. Each patient with DDH had an abnormal clinical hip examination. Our study results demonstrate that, despite the association of these disorders, an infant presenting with CMT does not require routine hip imaging in light of a normal clinical hip examination. The coexistence rate for CMT and DDH requiring treatment is 4.5%, which is lower than the commonly accepted 20%.

  17. The aetiology behind torticollis and variable spine defects in patients with Müllerian duct/renal aplasia-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia syndrome: 3D CT scan analysis.

    PubMed

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ganger, Rudolf; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the article is fourfold; firstly, to detect the aetiology of torticollis in patients with Müllerian duct/renal aplasia-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia syndrome; secondly, spine pathology in Müllerian duct/renal aplasia-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia syndrome varies considerably from one patient to another and there are remarkable differences in severity and localization; thirdly, mismanagement of congenital spine pathology is a frequent cause of morbid/fatal outcome; and fourthly, the application of prophylactic surgical treatment to balance the growth of the spine at an early stage is mandatory. Reformatted CT scans helped in exploring the craniocervical and the entire spine in these patients. The reason behind torticollis ranged between aplasia of the posterior arch of the atlas, assimilation of the atlas and extensive fusion of the lower cervical vertebrae (bilateral failure of segmentation) in four patients; in one patient, in addition to the hypoplastic posterior arch of the atlas, we observed ossification of the anterior and the posterior longitudinal spinal ligaments giving rise to a block vertebrae-like suggestive of early senile ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis (Forestier disease). Scoliosis at different spine levels was attributable to variable spine defects. Pelvic ultrasound showed the classical renal agenesis in four patients; whereas in one patient, the MRI showed pelvic cake kidney (renal fused ectopia) associated with ovarian, uterine and vaginal abnormalities. This is the first exploratory study on the craniocervical and the entire spine in a group of patients with MURCS association.

  18. Congenital renal tumor: metanephric adenoma, nephrogenic rest, or malignancy?

    PubMed

    Yin, Minzhi; Cai, Jiaoyang; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2015-01-01

    We report a renal tumor detected by prenatal ultrasound and resected at 2 months of age. This 9-cm, solid mass was composed of tubular and papillary structures lined by small, uniform epithelial cells. There was local invasion into renal parenchyma and a tumor deposit in a hilar lymph node. The tumor was immunopositive for WT1, pankeratin, and CD10; focally positive for CK7; and negative for EMA and TFE3. Based on morphology and immunophenotype, the favored diagnosis was metanephric adenoma over Wilms tumor, renal cell carcinoma, and nephrogenic rest. However, metanephric adenoma only occasionally occurs in children and has never been reported prenatally. Alternatively, this tumor might be a congenital Wilms tumor that differentiated completely. Although the nature of the tumor remains unconfirmed, resection appears to have been curative; the patient remains disease-free 18 months following surgery alone. PMID:25734608

  19. Rupture of the Renal Artery After Cutting Balloon Angioplasty in a Young Woman With Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Oguzkurt, Levent Tercan, Fahri; Gulcan, Oner; Turkoz, Riza

    2005-04-15

    A 24-year-old woman with uncontrollable high blood pressure for 3 months had significant stenosis of the left renal artery caused by fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). The lesion was resistant to percutaneous transluminal angioplasty at 18 atm with a semicompliant balloon. Angioplasy with a 6 x 10 mm cutting balloon (CB) caused rupture of the artery. Low-pressure balloon inflation decreased but did not stop the leak. An attempt to place a stent-graft (Jostent; Jomed, Rangendingen, Germany) failed, and a bare, 6-mm balloon-expandable stent (Express SD; Boston Scientific, MN) was deployed to seal the leak, which had decreased considerably after long-duration balloon inflation. The bleeding continued, and the patient underwent emergent surgical revascularization of the renal artery with successful placement of a 6-mm polytetrafluoroethylene bypass graft. CBs should be used very carefully in the treatment of renal artery stenosis, particularly in patients with FMD.

  20. Insights into the renal pathogenesis in Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia: A renal histological characterization and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Sanjay; Javidan, Ashkan; Boivin, Felix; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Lukic, Dusan; Svajger, Bruno; Chu, Stephanie; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Rosenblum, Norman D; Bridgewater, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is a pleiotropic disorder caused by mutations in the SWI/SNF2-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like-1 (SMARCAL1) gene, with multiple clinical features, notably end-stage renal disease. Here we characterize the renal pathology in SIOD patients. Our analysis of SIOD patient renal biopsies demonstrates the tip and collapsing variants of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Additionally, electron microscopy revealed numerous glomerular abnormalities most notably in the podocyte and Bowman's capsule. To better understand the role of SMARCAL1 in the pathogenesis of FSGS, we defined SMARCAL1 expression in the developing and mature kidney. In the developing fetal kidney, SMARCAL1 is expressed in the ureteric epithelium, stroma, metanephric mesenchyme, and in all stages of the developing nephron, including the maturing glomerulus. In postnatal kidneys, SMARCAL1 expression is localized to epithelial tubules of the nephron, collecting ducts, and glomerulus (podocytes and endothelial cells). Interestingly, not all cells within the same lineage expressed SMARCAL1. In renal biopsies from SIOD patients, TUNEL analysis detected marked increases in DNA fragmentation. Our results highlight the cells that may contribute to the renal pathogenesis in SIOD. Further, we suggest that disruptions in genomic integrity during fetal kidney development contribute to the pathogenesis of FSGS in SIOD patients.

  1. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  2. Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Normotensive Patient Presented With Renal Infarct: Case Report and Endovascular Technique.

    PubMed

    Rostambeigi, Nassir; Goldfarb, Robert; Hunter, David W; Anderson, James Kyle

    2015-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a well-known disease, but its diagnosis can be challenging. Typically, the symptomatic FMD are reported by young and middle aged people with high blood pressure refractory to medical treatment. We present a rare case of a young, healthy, and normotensive patient who presented with pain secondary to renal infarction, without any prior signs or symptoms or history of hypertension. This presentation of FMD has not been previously described. The typical but subtle angiographic findings of the macro-aneurysmal FMD as well as the successful endovascular treatment are discussed herein. The macro-aneurysmal form of FMD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute renal infarction in young and middle aged patients even if they do not have a history of hypertension.

  3. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  4. Timing and Outcome of Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients with Congenital Malformations of the Kidney and Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Verrina, Enrico; Bjerre, Anna; Wanner, Christoph; Heaf, James Goya; Zurriaga, Oscar; Hoitsma, Andries; Niaudet, Patrick; Palsson, Runolfur; Ravani, Pietro; Jager, Kitty J.; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the leading cause of ESRD in children, but the proportion of patients with individual CAKUT entities progressing to ESRD during adulthood and their long-term clinical outcomes are unknown. This study assessed the age at onset of renal replacement therapy (RRT) and patient and renal graft survival in patients with CAKUT across the entire age range. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients with CAKUT were compared with age-matched patients who were undergoing RRT for other renal disorders on the basis of data from the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry. Competing risk and Cox regression analyses were conducted. Results Of 212,930 patients commencing RRT from 1990 to 2009, 4765 (2.2%) had renal diagnoses consistent with CAKUT. The proportion of incident RRT patients with CAKUT decreased from infancy to childhood and then increased until age 15–19 years, followed by a gradual decline throughout adulthood. Median age at RRT start was 31 years in the CAKUT cohort and 61 years in the non-CAKUT cohort (P<0.001). RRT was started earlier (median, 16 years) in patients with isolated renal dysplasia than in those with renal hypoplasia and associated urinary tract disorders (median, 29.5–39.5 years). Patients with CAKUT survived longer than age- and sex-matched non-CAKUT controls because of lower cardiovascular mortality (10-year survival rate, 76.4% versus 70.7%; P<0.001). Conclusions CAKUT leads to ESRD more often at adult than pediatric age. Treatment outcomes differ from those of acquired kidney diseases and vary within CAKUT subcategories. PMID:23085722

  5. FGF-23 in fibrous dysplasia of bone and its relationship to renal phosphate wasting.

    PubMed

    Riminucci, Mara; Collins, Michael T; Fedarko, Neal S; Cherman, Natasha; Corsi, Alessandro; White, Kenneth E; Waguespack, Steven; Gupta, Anurag; Hannon, Tamara; Econs, Michael J; Bianco, Paolo; Gehron Robey, Pamela

    2003-09-01

    FGF-23, a novel member of the FGF family, is the product of the gene mutated in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR). FGF-23 has been proposed as a circulating factor causing renal phosphate wasting not only in ADHR (as a result of inadequate degradation), but also in tumor-induced osteomalacia (as a result of excess synthesis by tumor cells). Renal phosphate wasting occurs in approximately 50% of patients with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) and fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), which result from postzygotic mutations of the GNAS1 gene. We found that FGF-23 is produced by normal and FD osteoprogenitors and bone-forming cells in vivo and in vitro. In situ hybridization analysis of FGF-23 mRNA expression identified "fibrous" cells, osteogenic cells, and cells associated with microvascular walls as specific cellular sources of FGF-23 in FD. Serum levels of FGF-23 were increased in FD/MAS patients compared with normal age-matched controls and significantly higher in FD/MAS patients with renal phosphate wasting compared with those without, and correlated with disease burden bone turnover markers commonly used to assess disease activity. Production of FGF-23 by FD tissue may play an important role in the renal phosphate-wasting syndrome associated with FD/MAS.

  6. No skeletal dysplasia in the Nariokotome boy KNM-WT 15000 (Homo erectus)--a reassessment of congenital pathologies of the vertebral column.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Regula; Haeusler, Martin

    2013-03-01

    The Nariokotome boy skeleton KNM-WT 15000 is the most complete Homo erectus fossil and therefore is key for understanding human evolution. Nevertheless, since Latimer and Ohman (2001) reported on severe congenital pathology in KNM-WT 15000, it is questionable whether this skeleton can still be used as reference for Homo erectus skeletal biology. The asserted pathologies include platyspondylic and diminutive vertebrae implying a disproportionately short stature; spina bifida; condylus tertius; spinal stenosis; and scoliosis. Based on this symptom complex, the differential diagnosis of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, an extremely rare form of skeletal dysplasia, has been proposed. Yet, our reanalysis of these pathologies shows that the shape of the KNM-WT 15000 vertebrae matches that of normal modern human adolescents. The vertebrae are not abnormally flat, show no endplate irregularities, and thus are not platyspondylic. As this is the hallmark of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda and related forms of skeletal dysplasia, the absence of platyspondyly refutes axial dysplasia and disproportionate dwarfism. Furthermore, we neither found evidence for spina bifida occulta nor manifesta, whereas the condylus tertius, a developmental anomaly of the cranial base, is not related to skeletal dysplasias. Other fossils indicate that the relatively small size of the vertebrae and the narrow spinal canal are characteristics of early hominins rather than congenital pathologies. Except for the recently described signs of traumatic lumbar disc herniation, the Nariokotome boy fossil therefore seems to belong to a normal Homo erectus youth without pathologies of the axial skeleton. PMID:23283736

  7. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C; Sørensen, S S; Haedersdal, M

    2015-11-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK and delays SCC development in mice. We investigated the effect of repeated PDT over 5 years for primary prophylaxis of skin dysplasia. These data represent an interim analysis of an on-going randomized controlled trial. During 2008-2011, 25 renal transplant recipients with clinically normal skin were randomized to split-side PDT of the face, forearm and hand, the contralateral side serving as untreated control. Patients received PDT on inclusion and at 6-monthly intervals for 5 years. Blinded evaluation was performed at each visit. We found that prophylactic PDT significantly delayed onset of AK compared with untreated skin, p = 0.020. At 3-year follow-up, we observed AK in 63% of patients in untreated skin areas compared with 28% of patients in PDT-treated skin, with a total number of cumulated AKs in untreated skin (n = 43) compared with PDT-treated skin (n = 8), p = 0.005. These preliminary data indicate a novel approach to early prevention of skin dysplasia that may reduce morbidity from multiple AKs and SCCs in OTR. PMID:26018207

  8. A patient with Mullerian abnormalities, renal dysplasia, cervical spine fusion, cataracts and intellectual disability: MURCS-plus?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tiong Yang; Whitelaw, Charlotte; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2007-10-01

    We report a 15-year-old girl with features of the MURCS (Mullerian abnormalities, renal agenesis/ectopy and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association and birth defects not typically associated with MURCS. In addition to seizures and intellectual disability, she has cortical brain heterotopia, bilateral subclinical cataracts, submucous cleft palate and patent ductus arteriosus. We propose that this patient represents a more severe form of MURCS, or 'MURCS-plus', which may represent a defect of or insult to mesodermal morphogenesis. PMID:17786121

  9. Neonatal diagnosis of a patient with hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome associated with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Juan Diego; Cervantes, Luisa; Puerta, Herminia; Bauer, Mislen; Diaz, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome (HDRS) is comprised of a triad of conditions. It is an autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the GATA3 gene, located at 10p15, a critical region in the development of the embryonic parathyroid glands, inner ear, and kidneys. Here we describe the case of a patient with all three components of HDR syndrome diagnosed in the neonatal period who presented with cerebral infarction, hypocalcemia, and renal anomalies. Upon chromosomal microarray he was found to have an interstitial deletion at 10p, which produced a partial deletion in the GATA3 gene.

  10. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... HSIL - dysplasia; Low-grade dysplasia; High-grade dysplasia; Carcinoma in situ - dysplasia; CIS - dysplasia; ASCUS - dysplasia; Atypical ... to marked dysplasia CIN III -- severe dysplasia to carcinoma in situ Some strains of HPV are known ...

  11. Novel NEK8 Mutations Cause Severe Syndromic Renal Cystic Dysplasia through YAP Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Grampa, Valentina; Odye, Gweltas; Thomas, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Filhol, Emilie; Niel, Olivier; Silbermann, Flora; Lebreton, Corinne; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Devisme, Louise; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capri, Yline; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonavy; Sigaudy, Sabine; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Benmerah, Alexandre; Terzi, Fabiola; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of genetic multi-systemic disorders related to dysfunction of the primary cilium, a sensory organelle present at the cell surface that regulates key signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis. In order to identify novel genes whose mutations would cause severe developmental ciliopathies, >500 patients/fetuses were analyzed by a targeted high throughput sequencing approach allowing exome sequencing of >1200 ciliary genes. NEK8/NPHP9 mutations were identified in five cases with severe overlapping phenotypes including renal cystic dysplasia/hypodysplasia, situs inversus, cardiopathy with hypertrophic septum and bile duct paucity. These cases highlight a genotype-phenotype correlation, with missense and nonsense mutations associated with hypodysplasia and enlarged cystic organs, respectively. Functional analyses of NEK8 mutations in patient fibroblasts and mIMCD3 cells showed that these mutations differentially affect ciliogenesis, proliferation/apoptosis/DNA damage response, as well as epithelial morphogenesis. Notably, missense mutations exacerbated some of the defects due to NEK8 loss of function, highlighting their likely gain-of-function effect. We also showed that NEK8 missense and loss-of-function mutations differentially affect the regulation of the main Hippo signaling effector, YAP, as well as the expression of its target genes in patient fibroblasts and renal cells. YAP imbalance was also observed in enlarged spheroids of Nek8-invalidated renal epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, as well as in cystic kidneys of Jck mice. Moreover, co-injection of nek8 MO with WT or mutated NEK8-GFP RNA in zebrafish embryos led to shortened dorsally curved body axis, similar to embryos injected with human YAP RNA. Finally, treatment with Verteporfin, an inhibitor of YAP transcriptional activity, partially rescued the 3D spheroid defects of Nek8-invalidated cells and the abnormalities of NEK8-overexpressing zebrafish embryos

  12. The occurrence and suspected mode of inheritance of congenital subaortic stenosis and tricuspid valve dysplasia in Dogue de Bordeaux dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohad, D G; Avrahami, A; Waner, T; David, L

    2013-08-01

    The Dogue de Bordeaux (DdB) breed has gone through several genetic 'bottle necks' and has a relatively small effective population size. Importing new stock into Israel has been limited, further narrowing the already restricted local gene-pool and increasing the chances of inherited defects. In 56 DdB dogs examined between 2003 and 2010, the authors sought to study the proportion congenital subaortic stenosis (SAS) and tricuspid valve dysplasia (TVD). The aim was also to identify a probable mode of inheritance (MOI) using segregation and pedigree analyses of genealogical data available from 13/21 DdB dogs diagnosed with these conditions between 2004 and 2007. Among all breeds in the country, TVD was highest in the DdB breed, which also displayed the second highest proportion of SAS. Echocardiographic measurements and selected physical examination findings from 26 normal DdB dogs, 18 DdB dogs with SAS, and 12 DdB dogs with TVD are reported. Based on pedigree and segregation analyses, the most probable MOI appeared to be autosomal recessive. Pedigree analyses helped to identify three ancestors that might have introduced these two congenital heart defects into the local DdB population. Excluding those three dogs and their progeny from future mating could therefore reduce the prevalence of these diseases in the DdB population in Israel. The unusual local breeding circumstances may offer a unique opportunity to identify associated SAS and TVD genes in the DdB, as well as in other dog breeds. PMID:23434219

  13. The occurrence and suspected mode of inheritance of congenital subaortic stenosis and tricuspid valve dysplasia in Dogue de Bordeaux dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohad, D G; Avrahami, A; Waner, T; David, L

    2013-08-01

    The Dogue de Bordeaux (DdB) breed has gone through several genetic 'bottle necks' and has a relatively small effective population size. Importing new stock into Israel has been limited, further narrowing the already restricted local gene-pool and increasing the chances of inherited defects. In 56 DdB dogs examined between 2003 and 2010, the authors sought to study the proportion congenital subaortic stenosis (SAS) and tricuspid valve dysplasia (TVD). The aim was also to identify a probable mode of inheritance (MOI) using segregation and pedigree analyses of genealogical data available from 13/21 DdB dogs diagnosed with these conditions between 2004 and 2007. Among all breeds in the country, TVD was highest in the DdB breed, which also displayed the second highest proportion of SAS. Echocardiographic measurements and selected physical examination findings from 26 normal DdB dogs, 18 DdB dogs with SAS, and 12 DdB dogs with TVD are reported. Based on pedigree and segregation analyses, the most probable MOI appeared to be autosomal recessive. Pedigree analyses helped to identify three ancestors that might have introduced these two congenital heart defects into the local DdB population. Excluding those three dogs and their progeny from future mating could therefore reduce the prevalence of these diseases in the DdB population in Israel. The unusual local breeding circumstances may offer a unique opportunity to identify associated SAS and TVD genes in the DdB, as well as in other dog breeds.

  14. Characterization of GATA3 mutations in the hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, M Andrew; Bowl, Michael R; Harding, Brian; Ali, Asif; Ayala, Alejandro; Crowe, Carol; Dobbie, Angus; Hampson, Geeta; Holdaway, Ian; Levine, Michael A; McWilliams, Robert; Rigden, Susan; Sampson, Julian; Williams, Andrew J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2004-05-21

    The hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations of the dual zinc finger transcription factor, GATA3. The C-terminal zinc finger (ZnF2) binds DNA, whereas the N-terminal finger (ZnF1) stabilizes this DNA binding and interacts with other zinc finger proteins, such as the Friends of GATA (FOG). We have investigated seven HDR probands and their families for GATA3 abnormalities and have identified two nonsense mutations (Glu-228 --> Stop and Arg-367 --> Stop); two intragenic deletions that result in frameshifts from codons 201 and 355 with premature terminations at codons 205 and 370, respectively; one acceptor splice site mutation that leads to a frameshift from codon 351 and a premature termination at codon 367; and two missense mutations (Cys-318 --> Arg and Asn-320 --> Lys). The functional effects of these mutations, together with a previously reported GATA3 ZnF1 mutation and seven other engineered ZnF1 mutations, were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift, dissociation, yeast two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays. Mutations involving GATA3 ZnF2 or adjacent basic amino acids resulted in a loss of DNA binding, but those of ZnF1 either lead to a loss of interaction with specific FOG2 ZnFs or altered DNA-binding affinity. These findings are consistent with the proposed three-dimensional model of ZnF1, which has separate DNA and protein binding surfaces. Thus, our results, which expand the spectrum of HDR-associated GATA3 mutations and report the first acceptor splice site mutation, help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that alter the function of this zinc finger transcription factor and its role in causing this developmental anomaly. PMID:14985365

  15. Hirschsprung disease associated with polydactyly, unilateral renal agenesis, hypertelorism, and congenital deafness: a new autosomal recessive syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, H; Mateus, J; Leal, M J

    1988-01-01

    An association of Hirschsprung disease with polydactyly, unilateral renal agenesis, hypertelorism, and congenital deafness is described in sibs (brother and sister) of consanguineous parents. It is suggested that this might represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. Images PMID:3351909

  16. Unilateral renal agenesis associated with additional congenital abnormalities of the urinary tract in a Pekingese bitch.

    PubMed

    Agut, A; Fernandez del Palacio, M J; Laredo, F G; Murciano, J; Bayon, A; Soler, M

    2002-01-01

    An eight-month-old Pekingese bitch with urinary incontinence was found to have three congenital anomalies of the urinary tract: left renal agenesis, bilateral ectopic ureters with a left cranial blind-ending ureter, and urinary bladder hypoplasia. The diagnoses were made by retrograde vaginourethrography, excretory urography, ultrasonography and duplex Doppler ultrasonography. Although urological anomalies associated with renal agenesis have been frequently observed, a cranial blind-end ectopic ureter has not, to the authors' knowledge, been described in the bitch. The dog was managed medically with a restricted protein diet because of a compromised unilateral kidney with hydronephrosis and hydroureter.

  17. Focal preauricular dermal dysplasia: distinctive congenital lesions with a bilateral and symmetric distribution.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Trine; Devriendt, Koen; Hamel, Ben; Pasch, Marcel C; Peeters, Hilde; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Tallerås, Ola

    2006-01-01

    We present three unrelated children with distinctive congenital facial skin lesions. All three children had two to three well-circumscribed, round or oval vesicular lesions, 1/2-1 cm in diameter on each cheek at birth. The lesions were located along an arc from the top of the ear to the corner of the mouth. Patient 1 was born with a unilateral cleft lip and palate, and a cutaneous hemangioma in the right palm. She is developing normally. Patient 2 has neurological sequelae after suffering an unexplained large left-sided intracerebral hemorrhage perinatally. Patient 3 has a small chin, somewhat cupped ears and a nevus on the left foot. He is developing normally. This condition has been described in the dermatological literature as focal facial dermal hypoplasia with preauricular localization. No cases with associated anomalies have been published previously. Most cases have been sporadic but familial occurrence compatible with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been documented. If an embryonic fusion defect of the mandibular and maxillary prominences underlies the anomaly, the cleft lip and palate seen in one of our patients may be non-coincidental. No mutations in the TWIST2 gene were found in DNA extracted from peripheral leukocytes in the two children who were investigated.

  18. Rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm and renal infarction: 2 complications of fibromuscular dysplasia that mimic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jones, H J; Staud, R; Williams, R C

    1998-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is one of the most important mimics of vasculitis. FMD is more prevalent in women and may cause infarcts of organ systems including the brain, intestines, and extremities. These acute clinical presentations often raise the suspicion of vasculitis and therefore rheumatologists will be asked to evaluate these patients. One of the frequent manifestations of FMD is renal artery involvement. Angiographic evaluation often shows a "string of beads" appearance of the renal arteries but sometimes only tapering of the vascular lumen or cutoffs may be seen. In contrast, hepatic artery involvement with FMD occurs much less frequently and may initially present with life threatening intraabdominal bleeding. Celiac angiograms of these patients often show aneurysms, a presentation similar to vasculitis. Only a high level of suspicion for FMD and careful evaluation of clinical facts will lead to correct diagnosis. This will prevent the wrong diagnosis of vasculitis and subsequent treatment with potentially toxic medications. We present 2 cases of FMD involving the renal and hepatic arteries that illustrate this diagnostic challenge.

  19. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel–Joubert, short rib, Bardet–Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  20. Congenital renal anomaly: evaluation with 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, S.; Kawamura, J.; Tomoyoshi, T.; Yoshida, O.

    1983-05-01

    Technetium 99m-2,3, dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) preferentially accumulates in the renal cortex, demonstrating functioning cortical mass. We used 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy in ten patients with horseshoe kidneys and five patients with unilateral fused kidneys. The results show that 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy reliably establishes the diagnosis of horseshoe kidney and clearly shows the isthmus, which is very essential for proper management. The technique also aids in the definitive assessment of separate kidney function and of total radionuclide uptake is possible using 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy.

  1. A Novel De Novo GATA Binding Protein 3 Mutation in a Turkish Boy with Hypoparathyroidism, Deafness, and Renal Dysplasia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Nakamura, Akie; Fukami, Maki; Hatun, Şükrü

    2015-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR; OMIM 146255) syndrome is a rare disease, inherited dominantly and found to be related with GATA3 (GATA binding protein 3) gene mutations. A 13-year and 8-month-old boy who presented with hypocalcemia was diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism. He also had dysmorphic facial features, renal anomaly (pelvic kidney), and mild sensorineural hearing loss. His cranial computed tomography revealed multiple calcifications in bilateral centrum semiovale, corona radiata, and basal ganglions suggesting a persistent hypoparathyroidism. Thus, the presence of triad of HDR syndrome was considered, and genetic analysis using a next-generation sequencer identified a novel de novo missense mutation in exon 4 p.R276Q (c.827G>A) of GATA3 gene. This is the second patient who was reported to have a mutation in GATA3 gene from Turkey. In conclusion, although HDR syndrome is a rare condition, it should be kept in mind in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Classical triad can easily be identified if patients diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism are also evaluated with a urinary tract ultrasound and an audiometer. PMID:26777049

  2. Novel Allelic Variants in the Canine Cyclooxgenase-2 (Cox-2) Promoter Are Associated with Renal Dysplasia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Mary H.; Bell, Jerold S.; Rothman, Debby A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia (RD) in dogs is a complex disease with a highly variable phenotype and mode of inheritance that does not follow a simple Mendelian pattern. Cox-2 (Cyclooxgenase-2) deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that has striking similarities to RD in dogs suggesting to us that mutations in the Cox-2 gene could be the cause of RD in dogs. Our data supports this hypothesis. Sequencing of the canine Cox-2 gene was done from clinically affected and normal dogs. Although no changes were detected in the Cox-2 coding region, small insertions and deletions of GC boxes just upstream of the ATG translation start site were found. These sequences are putative SP1 transcription factor binding sites that may represent important cis-acting DNA regulatory elements that govern the expression of Cox-2. A pedigree study of a family of Lhasa apsos revealed an important statistical correlation of these mutant alleles with the disease. We examined an additional 22 clinical cases from various breeds. Regardless of the breed or severity of disease, all of these had one or two copies of the Cox-2 allelic variants. We suggest that the unusual inheritance pattern of RD is due to these alleles, either by changing the pattern of expression of Cox-2 or making Cox-2 levels susceptible to influences of other genes or environmental factors that play an unknown but important role in the development of RD in dogs. PMID:21346820

  3. Responses of proximal tubular cells to injury in congenital renal disease: fight or flight.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L; Forbes, Michael S; Galarreta, Carolina I; Thornhill, Barbara A

    2014-04-01

    Most chronic kidney disease in children results from congenital or inherited disorders, which can be studied in mouse models. Following 2 weeks of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the adult mouse, nephron loss is due to proximal tubular mitochondrial injury and cell death. In neonatal mice, proximal tubular cell death is delayed beyond 2 weeks of complete UUO, and release of partial UUO allows remodeling of remaining nephrons. Progressive cyst expansion develops in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a common inherited renal disorder. The polycystic kidney and fibrosis (pcy)-mutant mouse (which develops late-onset PKD) develops thinning of the glomerulotubular junction in parallel with growth of cysts in adulthood. Renal insufficiency in nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited renal disorder, results from progressive tubular cystine accumulation. In the Ctns knockout mouse (a model of cystinosis), proximal tubular cells become flattened, with loss of mitochondria and thickening of tubular basement membrane. In each model, persistent obstructive or metabolic stress leads ultimately to the formation of atubular glomeruli. The initial "fight" response (proximal tubular survival) switches to a "flight" response (proximal tubular cell death) with ongoing oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage. Therapies should be directed at reducing proximal tubular mitochondrial oxidative injury to enhance repair and regeneration.

  4. A Case of Cryptorchidism with Ipsilateral Congenital Unilateral Absence of the Vas Deferens and Contralateral Renal Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Young Dong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an uncommon anomaly and this clinical condition is responsible for up to 1-2% of male infertility. It can be either unilateral or bilateral and the associated anomalies include cryptorchidism, seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts anomalies, and renal anomalies such as renal agenesis. We hereby present a case of congenital unilateral absence of vas deferens, which was found incidentally during an evaluation of undescended testis in a patient with ipsilateral renal agenesis. Case Presentation. A 10-month-old boy was referred to the urology clinic with an undescended right testis. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography showed agenesis of the right kidney and the absence of right vas deferens and epididymis was confirmed during laparoscopic orchiectomy performed due to short right spermatic cord. There were no other concomitant anomalies of the genitourinary system observed in evaluation. Conclusion. Congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens with cryptorchidism and renal agenesis is a rare diagnostic entity. Cryptorchidism or absent vas deferens found incidentally should lead the physician to evaluate the status of the contralateral vas deferens and conduct a renal tract ultrasound study. PMID:27597925

  5. A Case of Cryptorchidism with Ipsilateral Congenital Unilateral Absence of the Vas Deferens and Contralateral Renal Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young Dong; Hong, Young Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an uncommon anomaly and this clinical condition is responsible for up to 1-2% of male infertility. It can be either unilateral or bilateral and the associated anomalies include cryptorchidism, seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts anomalies, and renal anomalies such as renal agenesis. We hereby present a case of congenital unilateral absence of vas deferens, which was found incidentally during an evaluation of undescended testis in a patient with ipsilateral renal agenesis. Case Presentation. A 10-month-old boy was referred to the urology clinic with an undescended right testis. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography showed agenesis of the right kidney and the absence of right vas deferens and epididymis was confirmed during laparoscopic orchiectomy performed due to short right spermatic cord. There were no other concomitant anomalies of the genitourinary system observed in evaluation. Conclusion. Congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens with cryptorchidism and renal agenesis is a rare diagnostic entity. Cryptorchidism or absent vas deferens found incidentally should lead the physician to evaluate the status of the contralateral vas deferens and conduct a renal tract ultrasound study. PMID:27597925

  6. Congenital renal arteriovenous malformation presenting with gross hematuria after a routine jog: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital renal arteriovenous malformations are abnormal communications between the intrarenal venous and arterial systems. An unusual cause of massive gross hematuria and an even rarer cause of hemodynamically significant anemia, its presentation remains variable from incidental imaging findings to severe hypertension and congestive heart failure. Case presentation We present a case of a 44-year-old Chinese man with no personal or familial history of bleeding diasthesis that presented with gross hematuria leading to clot retention after routine physical activity. Conclusions We have presented this case in an effort to highlight the possibility of this entity as a cause of acute upper urinary tract hemorrhage and the need for a computed tomography angiogram to clinch the diagnosis. PMID:24555667

  7. Electro-rentinal abnormalities in heterozygotes of renal-retinal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hogewind, B L; Veltkamp, J J; Polak, B C; van Es, L A

    1977-01-01

    The relatives of two patients with medullary cystic disease associated with retinitis pigmentosa were studied. A new case was found in one of these families, and consanguinity of the parents was established in another. Conventional fundoscopic examination of relatives without renal disease did not show retinal abnormalities, but electro-ophthalmologic investigation demonstrated retinal dysfunction in three relatives, including two of the four parents who may be considered obligatory heterozygotes under the assumption of autosomal recessive inheritance of this syndrome. Less severe electro-ophthalmological abnormalities were observed in the other two parents. It is considered highly probable that all three patients are homozygous for a mutant gene causing both the renal and the retinal abnormalities. The results of this study support the view that medullary cystic disease associated with retinitis pigmentosa is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, in contrast to the dominant form, which is reported not to be associated with eye abnormalities. With respect to genetic couseling and donation of kidneys by relatives, it is important to establish the mode of inheritance of cystic medullary disease in a given family. Electro-ophthalmologic examination should therefore be included in the examination of families in which medullary cystic disease occurs.

  8. Mutations in STRA6 cause a broad spectrum of malformations including anophthalmia, congenital heart defects, diaphragmatic hernia, alveolar capillary dysplasia, lung hypoplasia, and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Pasutto, Francesca; Sticht, Heinrich; Hammersen, Gerhard; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fitzpatrick, David R; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Brasch, Frank; Schirmer-Zimmermann, Heidemarie; Tolmie, John L; Chitayat, David; Houge, Gunnar; Fernández-Martínez, Lorena; Keating, Sarah; Mortier, Geert; Hennekam, Raoul C M; von der Wense, Axel; Slavotinek, Anne; Meinecke, Peter; Bitoun, Pierre; Becker, Christian; Nürnberg, Peter; Reis, André; Rauch, Anita

    2007-03-01

    We observed two unrelated consanguineous families with malformation syndromes sharing anophthalmia and distinct eyebrows as common signs, but differing for alveolar capillary dysplasia or complex congenital heart defect in one and diaphragmatic hernia in the other family. Homozygosity mapping revealed linkage to a common locus on chromosome 15, and pathogenic homozygous mutations were identified in STRA6, a member of a large group of "stimulated by retinoic acid" genes encoding novel transmembrane proteins, transcription factors, and secreted signaling molecules or proteins of largely unknown function. Subsequently, homozygous STRA6 mutations were also demonstrated in 3 of 13 patients chosen on the basis of significant phenotypic overlap to the original cases. While a homozygous deletion generating a premature stop codon (p.G50AfsX22) led to absence of the immunoreactive protein in patient's fibroblast culture, structural analysis of three missense mutations (P90L, P293L, and T321P) suggested significant effects on the geometry of the loops connecting the transmembrane helices of STRA6. Two further variations in the C-terminus (T644M and R655C) alter specific functional sites, an SH2-binding motif and a phosphorylation site, respectively. STRA6 mutations thus define a pleiotropic malformation syndrome representing the first human phenotype associated with mutations in a gene from the "STRA" group.

  9. ATF4 mediation of NF1 functions in osteoblast reveals a nutritional basis for congenital skeletal dysplasiae.

    PubMed

    Elefteriou, Florent; Benson, M Douglas; Sowa, Hideaki; Starbuck, Michael; Liu, Xiuyun; Ron, David; Parada, Luis F; Karsenty, Gerard

    2006-12-01

    The transcription factor ATF4 enhances bone formation by favoring amino acid import and collagen synthesis in osteoblasts, a function requiring its phosphorylation by RSK2, the kinase inactivated in Coffin-Lowry Syndrome. Here, we show that in contrast, RSK2 activity, ATF4-dependent collagen synthesis, and bone formation are increased in mice lacking neurofibromin in osteoblasts (Nf1(ob)(-/-) mice). Independently of RSK2, ATF4 phosphorylation by PKA is enhanced in Nf1(ob)(-/-) mice, thereby increasing Rankl expression, osteoclast differentiation, and bone resorption. In agreement with ATF4 function in amino acid transport, a low-protein diet decreased bone protein synthesis and normalized bone formation and bone mass in Nf1(ob)(-/-) mice without affecting other organ weight, while a high-protein diet overcame Atf4(-/-) and Rsk2(-/-) mice developmental defects, perinatal lethality, and low bone mass. By showing that ATF4-dependent skeletal dysplasiae are treatable by dietary manipulations, this study reveals a molecular connection between nutrition and skeletal development. PMID:17141628

  10. ATF4 mediation of NF1 functions in osteoblast reveals a nutritional basis for congenital skeletal dysplasiae

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriou, Florent; Benson, M. Douglas; Sowa, Hideaki; Starbuck, Michael; Liu, Xiuyun; Ron, David; Parada, Luis F.; Karsenty, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor ATF4 enhances bone formation by favoring amino acid import and collagen synthesis in osteoblasts, a function requiring its phosphorylation by RSK2, the kinase inactivated in Coffin-Lowry Syndrome. Here, we show that in contrast, RSK2 activity, ATF4-dependent collagen synthesis, and bone formation are increased in mice lacking neurofibromin in osteoblasts (Nf1ob−/− mice). Independently of RSK2, ATF4 phosphorylation by PKA is enhanced in Nf1ob−/− mice, thereby increasing Rankl expression, osteoclast differentiation, and bone resorption. In agreement with ATF4 function in amino acid transport, a low-protein diet decreased bone protein synthesis and normalized bone formation and bone mass in Nf1ob−/− mice without affecting other organ weight, while a high-protein diet overcame Atf4−/− and Rsk2−/− mice developmental defects, perinatal lethality, and low bone mass. By showing that ATF4-dependent skeletal dysplasiae are treatable by dietary manipulations, this study reveals a molecular connection between nutrition and skeletal development. PMID:17141628

  11. Fibromuscular dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Plouin, Pierre-François; Perdu, Jérôme; La Batide-Alanore, Agnès; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), formerly called fibromuscular fibroplasia, is a group of nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory arterial diseases that most commonly involve the renal and carotid arteries. The prevalence of symptomatic renal artery FMD is about 4/1000 and the prevalence of cervicocranial FMD is probably half that. Histological classification discriminates three main subtypes, intimal, medial and perimedial, which may be associated in a single patient. Angiographic classification includes the multifocal type, with multiple stenoses and the 'string-of-beads' appearance that is related to medial FMD, and tubular and focal types, which are not clearly related to specific histological lesions. Renovascular hypertension is the most common manifestation of renal artery FMD. Multifocal stenoses with the 'string-of-beads' appearance are observed at angiography in more than 80% of cases, mostly in women aged between 30 and 50 years; they generally involve the middle and distal two-thirds of the main renal artery and in some case also renal artery branches. Cervicocranial FMD can be complicated by dissection with headache, Horner's syndrome or stroke, or can be associated with intracerebral aneurysms with a risk of subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. The etiology of FMD is unknown, although various hormonal and mechanical factors have been suggested. Subclinical lesions are found at arterial sites distant from the stenotic arteries, and this suggests that FMD is a systemic arterial disease. It appears to be familial in 10% of cases. Noninvasive diagnostic tests include, in increasing order of accuracy, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomography angiography. The gold standard for diagnosing FMD is catheter angiography, but this invasive procedure is only used for patients in whom it is clinically pertinent to proceed with revascularization during the same procedure. Differential diagnosis include atherosclerotic stenoses and

  12. Creatinine clearance, urinary excretion of glomerular basement membrane antigens and renal histology in congenital nephrotic syndrome of Finnish type.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, N P

    1977-04-01

    The endogenous creatinine clearance and urinary excretion rate of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antigens were followed from 2 to 19 months in fifteen patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNF). The quantitative examination of renal morphology was made on fourteen of these patients. Creatinine clearance increased during the first few months of life and thereafter gradually decreased. The urinary excretion rate of GBM antigens rose during the course of the disease. The creatinine clearance did not correlate significantly with glomerular fibrosis but it did correlate with tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The urinary excretion of GBM antigens correlated significantly with glomerular and interstitial fibrosis and with tubular atrophy. It is concluded that there is a clear progress in the disease and the renal histological changes probably are caused by accumulation of GBM material in glomeruli.

  13. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... following early in life: blood-filtering treatments called dialysis a kidney transplant Children with dysplasia in only ... mild dysplasia of both kidneys may not need dialysis or a kidney transplant for several years. Kidney ...

  14. Very Long Segment Congenital Thoracoabdominal Aortic Coarctation (Diffuse Aortic Dysplasia) with Infrarenal Aortobi-Iliac and Cavobi-Iliac Aplasia in a 30-Year-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Luther, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Congenital dysplastic aortic syndromes range from coarctation at the aortic isthmus to more extended aortic disease (midaortic syndrome). The latter is usually restricted to dysplastic aortic segments of up to 15 cm. Long segment dysplasia of the entire abdominal or thoracic aorta is extremely rare. This case of a 30-year-old patient with a very long segment congenital thoracoabdominal aortic coarctation and infrarenal aortobi-iliac and cavobi-iliac aplasia represents to our knowledge the most extended congenital vascular malformation in a surviving adult patient. The developed extensive collateral pathways ensured the survival of the patient, so that the main clinical manifestation was a refractory hypertension. Because of the extent of the disease, open surgery represented the only viable option. Interestingly, after 30 years of uncontrollable hypertension, the patient's blood pressure promptly responded to surgical treatment. A concomitant infrarenal aplasia of both the aorta and cava vein is also very unusual and points to a major developmental deficit during vascular embryogenesis.

  15. Potential Usefulness of 99mTc-DMSA for Radio-Guided Surgery in Pediatric Renal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Demetrio; Di Franco, Davide; Cacciaguerra, Sebastiano; Ruggeri, Antonella; Russo, Simona; Fornito, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of an ectopic/hypoplastic kidney removed by radio-guided surgery. A 7-year-old girl, with a history of vaginal drainage of urine, underwent renal scintigraphy with Tc-DMSA. SPECT/CT revealed a focal uptake in the pelvis, corresponding to hypoplastic kidney as confirmed by MRI. Based on SPECT/CT findings, the patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, using Tc-DMSA scan to help the surgeon to detect the small ectopic kidney. Intraoperatory histological report confirmed the renal origin of the specimen.

  16. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  17. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and congenital heart disease in preterm infants. A case report of a preterm infant with recurrent pulmonary hypertension after corrective cardiac surgery and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Muneuchi, Jun; Kuraoka, Ayako; Watanabe, Mamie; Ochiai, Yoshie; Joo, Kunitaka

    2015-01-01

    In preterm infants with congenital heart disease, concomitant bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is associated with relatively poor clinical outcomes because of the increased pulmonary vascular resistance and adverse effects of inflammation on the damaged lungs, even after surgery. We present herein a 1-year-old female who developed recurrent pulmonary arterial hypertension 6 months after closure of a ventricular septal defect. She was born at 26 weeks of gestation (birth weight, 470 g), and developed BPD requiring oxygen supplementation. Her systemic-to-pulmonary blood flow ratio was 2.1 preoperatively and 1.0 postoperatively, pulmonary arterial pressure was 61/15 (mean 39) mmHg preoperatively and 41/17 (mean 24) mmHg postoperatively, and pulmonary vascular resistance was 4.2 mmHg/L·minute·m(2) preoperatively and 3.6 mmHg/L·minute·m(2) postoperatively. At 1 year of age, echocardiography showed an increase in her estimated right ventricular pressure, indicating worsening pulmonary hypertension. After 3 years of treatment with oxygen supplementation, prostacyclin, and bosentan, her pulmonary arterial pressure improved to the normal range. The pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension is heterogeneous in preterm infants with congenital heart disease and concomitant BPD. Careful management of these patients is warranted even after corrective cardiac surgery.

  18. Dysplasia of the contralateral hip in patients with unilateral late-detected congenital dislocation of the hip: 50 years' follow-up of 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Terjesen, T

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of dysplasia in the 'normal' contralateral hip in patients with unilateral developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH) and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of such hips. A total of 48 patients (40 girls and eight boys) were treated for late-detected unilateral DDH between 1958 and 1962. After preliminary skin traction, closed reduction was achieved at a mean age of 17.8 months (4 to 65) in all except one patient who needed open reduction. In 25 patients early derotation femoral osteotomy of the contralateral hip had been undertaken within three years of reduction, and later surgery in ten patients. Radiographs taken during childhood and adulthood were reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 50.9 years (43 to 55) at the time of the latest radiological review. In all, eight patients (17%) developed dysplasia of the contralateral hip, defined as a centre-edge (CE) angle < 20° during childhood or at skeletal maturity. Six of these patients underwent surgery to improve cover of the femoral head; the dysplasia improved in two after varus femoral osteotomy and in two after an acetabular shelf operation. During long-term follow-up the dysplasia deteriorated to subluxation in two patients (CE angles 4° and 5°, respectively) who both developed osteoarthritis (OA), and one of these underwent total hip replacement at the age of 49 years. In conclusion, the long-term prognosis for the contralateral hip was relatively good, as OA occurred in only two hips (4%) at a mean follow-up of 50 years. Regular review of the 'normal' side is indicated, and corrective surgery should be undertaken in those who develop subluxation. PMID:25183584

  19. Holoprosencephaly with caudal dysplasia. Pseudo-trisomy 13 or a distinct entity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.P.B.; Aylsworth, A.S.; Timmons, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    We have studied three chromosomally normal patients with multiple anomalies that include holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia. Each has features found in patients with pseudo-trisomy 13, though each lacks malformations common in that syndrome. Patients 1 and 2 did not have polydactyly and patients 2 and 3 had no congenital heart malformation. Patient 1 is also unusual in that he does not have typical holoprosencephalic facies and is alive at age 25 months. We have also identified two other similar patients in the London Dysmorphology Database, each of which had holoprosencephaly, congenital heart malformation, and imperforate anus. Isolated caudal dysplasia and holoprosencephaly are both causally heterogeneous. They have been reported together rarely in patients with several different syndromes including chromosomal abnormalities, monogenic syndromes, teratogenic insults, and syndromes of unknown cause. Over thirty cases of {open_quotes}pseudo-trisomy 13{close_quotes} have now been reported and eight of these have had features of caudal dysplasia. There have been four with imperforate anus or anal stenosis, one with lumbosacral vertebral anomaly, and three others with bilateral renal agenesis or hypoplasia. Based on our patients and this review of other reported and unreported cases, we suggest that caudal dysplasia may be a significant clinical feature of pseudo-trisomy 13. Alternatively, holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia with a normal karyotype may represent a similar though distinct entity. Some may have submicroscopic chromosomal deletions. Molecular studies of regions known to be associated with holoprosencephaly are currently in progress on tissue from Patient 1. We hope these observations will stimulate reports of similarly affected patients to allow better definition of pseudo-trisomy 13 and other overlap syndromes.

  20. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  1. Unknown syndrome: ischiadic hypoplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and a pattern of minor congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Braegger, C; Bottani, A; Hallé, F; Giedion, A; Leumann, E; Seger, R; Willi, U; Schinzel, A

    1991-01-01

    We report a 6 year old male with a pattern of malformations and anomalies including intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, a pattern of craniofacial anomalies (flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, strabismus, short nose, low set ears), hypospadias and cryptorchidism, bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly between fingers 2 to 5 and toes 2 to 4, postaxial polydactyly of the fingers and toes, severe conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the ischiadic bones, complex renal dysfunction, hypogammaglobulinaemia with proneness to bacterial infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and recurrent pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The parents are cousins of Turkish origin.

  2. Oculomotor-corpus callosum dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Acers, T E; Blackwell, C

    1982-01-01

    An infant with congenital bilateral ophthalmoplegia with levator and pupillary sparing is presented. The eyes are fixed in a divergent position with no apparent motility. The baby is otherwise clinically normal and is developing in a normal fashion except for delayed growth pattern. Visual attention is present and he fixates with either eye. Computed tomography demonstrates an associated dysplasia of the corpus callosum and an abnormal ventricular system. Neuroendocrine studies performed at one year of age demonstrate subnormal levels of growth hormone. It is postulated that this represents an embryodysgenesis involving the developing mesencephalic tegmentum (oculomotor nuclei) and the diencephalic lamina reuniens (corpus callosum). It is the first reported case of congenital ophthalmoplegia with corpus callosum dysplasia. The "embryodysgenic" relationship with other forebrain-ocular anomalies has been alluded to and remains speculative. PMID:7182958

  3. Fibrous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Fibrous dysplasia is a bone disease that destroys and replaces normal bone with fibrous ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bone Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  4. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  5. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome plus; a contiguous gene constellation of congenital anomalies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    A term female infant was referred to the University Hospital because of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral choanal stenosis. Her examination revealed bilateral pre-auricular pits, branchial fistulae, cupped shaped ears, and bilateral athelia. She failed ABR screening; her creatinine was elevated to 1.5 mgs% and renal ultra-sonography showed reduced kidney size bilaterally. She was the product of her mother`s third pregnancy. The first produced a now normal 5 year old son. The second pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios and resulted in a premature delivery at 27 weeks gestation. The infant expired secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia. The mother had bilateral neurosensory deafness, pre-auricular pits, cupped shaped ears, lacrimal stenois and bilateral athelia. She wore dentures having earlier been diagnosed with dentogeneis imperfecta. She was shorter than her three normal sisters and had experienced academic problems throughout her school years. The maternal grandfather had an adult onset neurosensory hearing loss, but he and the maternal grandmother exhibited no other features of the BOR syndrome. Althelia was present only in the mother and daughter. The mother clearly has BOR syndrome transmitted to one, and possibly two, of her three offspring. The additional features of athelia, choanal stenosis and dentogenesis imperfecta are thought to represent additional autosomal dominant traits. Greenberg described an infant with athelia and choanal atresia. By family linkage studies, the BOR syndrome has been mapped to 8q13-21 with no recombination observed with loci D8S530 and D8S279. Given a normal prophase karyotype in the proband, it is speculated that a sub-microscopic deletion at 8q13-21 is the likely basis for the constellation of birth defects seen in this mother and daughter. Analysis of D8S530 and D8S279 is currently underway in this family.

  6. Intraoperative coronary artery dissection in fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiaoying; Mitter, Sumeet S; Blair, John E; Benzuly, Keith; Gambardella, Ivancarmine; Malaisrie, S Chris

    2015-04-01

    A 61-year-old woman with bicuspid aortic stenosis, an ascending aortic aneurysm, and a remote history of renal fibromuscular dysplasia underwent aortic root replacement complicated by extensive dissection of the left circumflex artery extending retrograde into the left anterior descending artery. This was managed by coronary artery bypass grafting, left ventricular support, and percutaneous coronary intervention for propagation of the dissection. This case highlights the prevalence, diagnosis, and management of intraoperative coronary dissection secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia. PMID:25841833

  7. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Overview What is arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (say: “uh-rith-mo-jen-ic right ven-trick- ...

  8. Ectodermal dysplasia: a review and case report.

    PubMed

    Itthagarun, A; King, N M

    1997-09-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a hereditary disease characterized by a congenital dysplasia of one or more ectodermal structures and their accessory appendages. Common manifestations include defective hair follicles and eyebrows, frontal bossing with prominent supraorbital ridges, nasal bridge depression, and protuberant lips. Intraorally, common findings are anodontia or hypodontia, conical teeth, and, consequently, generalized spacing. The patient may suffer from dry skin, hyperthermia, and unexplained high fever as a result of the deficiency of sweat glands. The present review focuses on the clinical manifestations, classifications, and diagnosis of ectodermal dysplasia. A 6-year-old girl, described in the case report, exhibited many of the manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia as well as behavioral problems and a severe gag reflex. The treatment to improve her appearance and oral function included a removable prosthesis, acid-etch-retained indirect resin composite veneers, and a fixed partial denture. PMID:9477874

  9. Birth prevalence rates of skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Dott, B; Roth, M P; Alembik, Y

    1989-02-01

    This study establishes the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias which can be diagnosed in the perinatal period or during pregnancy. Using a population-based register of congenital anomalies, a prevalence rate of 3.22 0/000 was observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.64 0/000, 1/15,000 births), thanatophoric dysplasia and achondrogenesis (0.28 0/000). The mutation rate for achondroplasia was higher in our material than in the other studies: 3.3 x 10(-5) per gamete per generation. Our study demonstrates that prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound is possible in some skeletal dysplasias. PMID:2785882

  10. Thanatophoric Dysplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jyoti; Jain, Rekha; Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) is a congenital, sporadic and the most lethal skeletal dysplasia caused by new mutation in the FGFR3 gene. At birth, it is characterized by shortening of the limbs (micromelia), small conical thorax, platyspondyly (flat vertebral bodies) and macrocephaly. TD is divided into two clinically defined subtypes: type I and II with some clinical overlap between the two subtypes. They can be differentiated by the skull shape and femur morphology. Ultrasound examination in the second trimester is often straight forward in diagnosing the congenital anomaly. We report a case of pre term fresh stillborn baby with dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, micromelia with short stubby fingers and deep skin creases, narrow thorax and protuberant abdomen which delivered at our hospital. The ultrasound examination showed shortening of long bones with femur shaped like telephone receiver. Dysmorphic facial features and skeletal abnormalities in the baby lead us to make the diagnosis of TD type I. Because of the rarity of this condition we report this case of thanatophoric dysplasia with a short review of literature. PMID:26675119

  11. Thanatophoric Dysplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Jyoti; Jain, Rekha; Devendra

    2015-11-01

    Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) is a congenital, sporadic and the most lethal skeletal dysplasia caused by new mutation in the FGFR3 gene. At birth, it is characterized by shortening of the limbs (micromelia), small conical thorax, platyspondyly (flat vertebral bodies) and macrocephaly. TD is divided into two clinically defined subtypes: type I and II with some clinical overlap between the two subtypes. They can be differentiated by the skull shape and femur morphology. Ultrasound examination in the second trimester is often straight forward in diagnosing the congenital anomaly. We report a case of pre term fresh stillborn baby with dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, micromelia with short stubby fingers and deep skin creases, narrow thorax and protuberant abdomen which delivered at our hospital. The ultrasound examination showed shortening of long bones with femur shaped like telephone receiver. Dysmorphic facial features and skeletal abnormalities in the baby lead us to make the diagnosis of TD type I. Because of the rarity of this condition we report this case of thanatophoric dysplasia with a short review of literature. PMID:26675119

  12. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: physiopathology, decoupling of tout court pelvic dilatation-obstruction semantic connection, biomarkers to predict renal damage evolution.

    PubMed

    Alberti, C

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of fetal ultrasonography results in a frequent antenatally observation of hydronephrosis, ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) accounting for the greatest fraction of congenital obstructive nephropathy. UPJO may be considered, in most cases, as a functional obstructive condition, depending on defective fetal smooth muscle/nerve development at this level, with lack of peristaltic wave propagation--aperistaltic segment--and, therefore, poor urine ejection from the renal pelvis into the ureter. The UPJO-related physiopathologic events are, at first, the compliant dilatation of renal pelvis that, acting as hydraulic buffer, protects the renal parenchyma from the rising intrapelvic pressure-related potential damages, and, subsequently, beyond such phase of dynamic balance, the tubular cell stretch-stress induced by increased intratubular pressure and following parenchymal inflammatory lesions: inflammatory infiltrates, fibroblast proliferation, activation of myofibroblasts, tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), several chemo- and cytokines, growth factors, prostaglandins and eicosanoids, angiotensin-II are the main pathogenetic mediators of the obstructive nephropathy. Apoptosis of tubular cells is the major cause of the tubular atrophy, together with epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation. Some criticisms on tout court semantic renal pelvis dilatation-obstruction connection have been raised considering that the renal pelvis expansion isn't, in any case, linked to an ostructive condition, as it may be verified by diuretic (furosemide) renogram together with scintiscan-based evaluation of differential renal function. In this regard, rather than repetitive invasive nuclear procedures that expose the children to ionizing radiations, an intriguing noninvasive strategy, based on the evaluation of urinary biomarkers and urinary proteome, can define the UPJO-related possible progress of parenchymal lesions

  13. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure.

  14. Skeletal Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Synoposis The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  15. Florid osseous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shivani; Shetty, Subraj; Bablani, Deepika; Kulkarni, Sandip; Kumar, Vinay; Desai, Rajiv

    2011-01-01

    The concept of ‘fibro-osseous lesions’ of bone has evolved over the last several decades and now includes two major entities, viz., fibrous dysplasia and ossifying fibroma, as well as other less common entities such as periapical dysplasia, focal osseous dysplasia, florid osseous dysplasia and familial gigantiform cementoma. Florid osseous dysplasia is a central lesion of the bone and periodontium, which has caused considerable controversy because of confusion regarding terminology and criteria for diagnosis. This paper reports a rare case of florid osseous dysplasia affecting maxilla and mandible bilaterally in a 14-year-old Indian male patient. PMID:22529580

  16. A novel phenotype in N-glycosylation disorders: Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura skeletal dysplasia due to pathogenic variants in ALG9.

    PubMed

    Tham, Emma; Eklund, Erik A; Hammarsjö, Anna; Bengtson, Per; Geiberger, Stefan; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Malmgren, Helena; Nilsson, Daniel; Grigelionis, Gintautas; Conner, Peter; Lindgren, Peter; Lindstrand, Anna; Wedell, Anna; Albåge, Margareta; Zielinska, Katarzyna; Nordgren, Ann; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Nishimura, Gen; Grigelioniene, Giedre

    2016-02-01

    A rare lethal autosomal recessive syndrome with skeletal dysplasia, polycystic kidneys and multiple malformations was first described by Gillessen-Kaesbach et al and subsequently by Nishimura et al. The skeletal features uniformly comprise a round pelvis, mesomelic shortening of the upper limbs and defective ossification of the cervical spine. We studied two unrelated families including three affected fetuses with Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura syndrome using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, comparative genome hybridization and homozygosity mapping. All affected patients were shown to have a novel homozygous splice variant NM_024740.2: c.1173+2T>A in the ALG9 gene, encoding alpha-1,2-mannosyltransferase, involved in the formation of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor of N-glycosylation. RNA analysis demonstrated skipping of exon 10, leading to shorter RNA. Mass spectrometric analysis showed an increase in monoglycosylated transferrin as compared with control tissues, confirming that this is a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Only three liveborn children with ALG9-CDG have been previously reported, all with missense variants. All three suffered from intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, microcephaly and renal cysts, but none had skeletal dysplasia. Our study shows that some pathogenic variants in ALG9 can present as a lethal skeletal dysplasia with visceral malformations as the most severe phenotype. The skeletal features overlap with that previously reported for ALG3- and ALG12-CDG, suggesting that this subset of glycosylation disorders constitutes a new diagnostic group of skeletal dysplasias. PMID:25966638

  17. Oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  18. [Acute renal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis in an infant with congenital solitary kidney].

    PubMed

    Kato, Taiki; Hamano, Atsushi; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    We report a 35 month-old boy with acute renal failure caused by an obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis. He visited his family physician because of fever, abdominal pain and vomiting. He was diagnosed as acute gastroenteritis. The symptoms relieved once, but abdominal pain and vomiting recurred two days after the visit and the volume of urine decreased. He was diagnosed as norovirus gastoenteritis and acute renal failure which was unresponsive to fluid replacement. Ultrasound study of the abdomen showed a solitary kidney with mild hydronephrosis. He was then admitted to our hospital. He was finally diagnosed as acute postrenal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone with left solitary kidney by abdominal computer tomography (CT). We performed transurethral catheterization immediately. The creatinine and blood urea nitrogen returned to normal level in 2 days. The CT performed on the 28th day post operation showed disappearance of the stone after uric alkalization. Recently, some cases of postrenal failure due to bilateral obstructive ureteral stones, mainly ammonium acid urate stones, associated with viral gastroenteritis were reported. As clinical features, they are common in boys three years or younger after an episode of rotavirus gastroenteritis with high uric acid concentration. By far, the most common cause of acute renal failure in patients with severe gastroenteritis is prerenal failure resulting from hypovolemia. But postrenal cause due to bilateral obstructive stones should be taken in a consideration.

  19. [Connective tissue dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Piantkovskiĭ, A S

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a diagnosis of dysplasia of connective tissue in athletes, where the most important are the methods of clinical assessment using diagnostic tests and rating scales manifestation of connective tissue dysplasia. Evaluation of patients with suspected connective tissue dysplasia should include inspection of an ophthalmologist, orthopedic trauma, cardiology. Should also be carried out by criteria diagnosis degree of connective tissue dysplasia by T. Y. Smolnova (2003) (Large and small diagnostic criteria), which include: increased skin extensibility, joint hypermobility (sprain, dislocation and subluxation, flat feet), muscle hypotonia, a hereditary predisposition to the disease, evaluation of signs joint hypermobility (Beighton criteria). If during routine medical examination revealed athletes with manifestations of connective tissue dysplasia, they are subject to a more in-depth examination and observation. Early diagnosis of connective tissue dysplasia allows not only to plan the training process, but also reduces the trauma of athletes.

  20. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  1. Renal complications in 6p duplication syndrome: microarray-based investigation of the candidate gene(s) for the development of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura-Furuhata, Megumi; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Amano, Yoshiro; Ehara, Takashi; Hamasaki, Yuko; Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Aikawa, Atsushi; Hamada, Riku; Ishikura, Kenji; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Noda, Shunsuke; Koike, Kenichi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Awazu, Midori; Miyake, Noriko; Kosho, Tomoki

    2015-03-01

    6p duplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder that frequently manifests renal complications, including proteinuria, hypoplastic kidney, and hydronephrosis. We report a girl with the syndrome, manifesting left hydronephrosis, proteinuria/hematuria, and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS) resulting in chronic end-stage renal failure, successfully treated with renal transplantation. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization showed the derivative chromosome 6 to have a 6.4-Mb duplication at 6p25.3-p25.1 with 32 protein-coding genes and a 220-Kb deletion at 6p25.3 with two genes of no possible relation to the renal pathology. Review of the literature shows that variation of renal complications in the syndrome is compatible with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). FSGS, observed in another patient with 6p duplication syndrome, could be a non-coincidental complication. FOXC1, located within the 6.4-Mb duplicated region at 6p25.3-p25.2, could be a candidate gene for CAKUT, but its single gene duplication effect would not be sufficient. FSGS would be a primary defect associated with duplicated gene(s) albeit no candidate could be proposed, or might occur in association with CAKUT.

  2. [Fibrous dysplasia of bone in a 12-year old girl].

    PubMed

    Bieniasz, Jolanta; Maj, Anna; Noczyńska, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a rare congenital bone disease, usually coming out before the age of 30. It is 2.5% of all bone tumours and 7.5 % of benign tumours of bones. The authors present a case of a 12-years old girl with fibrous dysplasia of bone admitted to the Department with hyperparathyroidism suspicion. Pathological changes were localized in the orbital cavity and sinuses. The diagnosis was established on the basis of the clinical course, imaging and histopathological examinations. The therapy with pamidronian acid was applied.

  3. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Clinical Overview for the Dental Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Halai, Tina; Stevens, Claire

    2015-10-01

    The term ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is used to describe a group of rare congenital disorders characterized by abnormalities of two or more ectodermal structures such as the skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands. This paper will give an overview of the aetiology of ED and describe the manifestations and dental management of this condition. In particular, the important role of the dental practitioner in the identification and management of patients with ED will be highlighted. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Dental practitioners should be aware of the oral features of ectodermal dysplasia and be able to make timely referrals and provide appropriate continuing care for these patients. PMID:26685476

  4. Neonatal vascularization and oxygen tension regulate appropriate perinatal renal medulla/papilla maturation.

    PubMed

    Phua, Yu Leng; Gilbert, Thierry; Combes, Alexander; Wilkinson, Lorine; Little, Melissa H

    2016-04-01

    Congenital medullary dysplasia with obstructive nephropathy is a common congenital disorder observed in paediatric patients and represents the foremost cause of renal failure. However, the molecular processes regulating normal papillary outgrowth during the postnatal period are unclear. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the renal medulla across postnatal development revealed enrichment of non-canonical Wnt signalling, vascular development, and planar cell polarity genes, all of which may contribute to perinatal medulla/papilla maturation. These pathways were investigated in a model of papillary hypoplasia with functional obstruction, the Crim1(KST264/KST264) transgenic mouse. Postnatal elongation of the renal papilla via convergent extension was unaffected in the Crim1(KST264/KST264) hypoplastic renal papilla. In contrast, these mice displayed a disorganized papillary vascular network, tissue hypoxia, and elevated Vegfa expression. In addition, we demonstrate the involvement of accompanying systemic hypoxia arising from placental insufficiency, in appropriate papillary maturation. In conclusion, this study highlights the requirement for normal vascular development in collecting duct patterning, development of appropriate nephron architecture, and perinatal papillary maturation, such that disturbances contribute to obstructive nephropathy. PMID:26800422

  5. Unusual association between cardiac, skeletal, urogenital and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Goryaeva, Maria; Sykes, Mark Christopher; Lau, Benjamin; West, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with an array of congenital abnormalities. She has been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease (PCKD) with no detectable mutations in PKD1 or PKD2, spina bifida occulta, thoracic skeletal abnormalities, a uterus didelphys and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). There are several associations reported in the literature that include abnormalities similar to the patient's, but none describe her presentation in its entirety. The MURCS association is characterised by (MU)llerian duct aplasia, (R)enal dysplasia and (C)ervical (S)omite anomalies and goes some way in explaining these condition. Patients with both MURCS and PCKD have not been described in current literature. Through this report, we hope to bring a potential diagnosis to light and provide the patient with an improved understanding of her health. PMID:27402585

  6. Developmental Genetics and Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Uy, Natalie; Reidy, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are common birth defects and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in children. There is a wide spectrum of renal abnormalities, from mild hydronephrosis to more severe cases, such as bilateral renal dysplasia. The etiology of the majority of cases of CAKUT remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that genomic imbalance contributes to the pathogenesis of CAKUT. Advances in human and mouse genetics have contributed to increased understanding of the pathophysiology of CAKUT. Mutations in genes involved in both transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in renal development are associated with CAKUT. Large cohort studies suggest that copy number variants, genomic, or de novo mutations may explain up to one-third of all cases of CAKUT. One of the major challenges to the use of genetic information in the clinical setting remains the lack of strict genotype-phenotype correlation. However, identifying genetic causes of CAKUT may lead to improved diagnosis of extrarenal complications. With the advent of decreasing costs for whole genome and exome sequencing, future studies focused on genotype-phenotype correlations, gene modifiers, and animal models of gene mutations will be needed to translate genetic advances into improved clinical care. PMID:27617142

  7. The birth prevalence rates for the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Barbosa-Neto, J G

    1986-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias that can be recognised in the perinatal period. Using the data base of the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), for the years 1978 to 1983, on 349 470 births (live and stillbirths), a crude prevalence rate of 2.3/10 000 was observed. However, several indications of under-registration suggest that the real value is about twice that observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia, with a prevalence rate between 0.5 and 1.5/10 000 births, the thanatophoric dysplasia/achondrogenesis group (0.2 and 0.5/10 000 births), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.4/10 000 births). The mutation rate for autosomal dominant achondroplasia was estimated at between 1.72 and 5.57 X 10(-5) per gamete per generation. PMID:3746832

  8. The birth prevalence rates for the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Barbosa-Neto, J G

    1986-08-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias that can be recognised in the perinatal period. Using the data base of the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), for the years 1978 to 1983, on 349 470 births (live and stillbirths), a crude prevalence rate of 2.3/10 000 was observed. However, several indications of under-registration suggest that the real value is about twice that observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia, with a prevalence rate between 0.5 and 1.5/10 000 births, the thanatophoric dysplasia/achondrogenesis group (0.2 and 0.5/10 000 births), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.4/10 000 births). The mutation rate for autosomal dominant achondroplasia was estimated at between 1.72 and 5.57 X 10(-5) per gamete per generation. PMID:3746832

  9. Mesenteric Arteriovenous Dysplasia/Vasculopathy Is Distinct From Fibromuscular Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Patil, Deepa T; Kissiedu, Juliana; Rodriguez, E Rene; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Liu, Xiuli; Rybicki, Lisa A; Tan, Carmela D

    2016-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a noninflammatory, nonatherosclerotic vasculopathy that usually affects the carotid and renal arteries. We have observed FMD-like vascular changes in specimens resected for ischemia or Crohn's disease (CD). On the basis of a systematic clinicopathologic review of these 11 cases identified between 1982 and 2014, we describe a distinct mesenteric vasculopathy that involves both arteries and veins [mesenteric arteriovenous dysplasia/vasculopathy (MAVD/V)] and is characterized by (1) concentric/eccentric smooth muscle collarette around the tunica media of both the artery and the vein in ≥2 foci, (2) varying degrees of intimal and medial hyperplasia and adventitial fibrosis, and (3) lack of inflammation or thrombi. MAVD/V cases were clinically diagnosed as CD (45%), mass/lesion (27%), ischemia (9%), obstruction (9%), or rectal prolapse (9%). Abdominal pain for >1 year was the most common symptom. Most patients were women (M:F=1:2.7; mean age, 63 y). Mucosal changes mimicking CD, such as architectural distortion (55%), multifocal ulcers (73%), and pyloric gland metaplasia (64%), were common; however, no granulomas or transmural lymphoid aggregates were identified. Ischemic pattern of injury was seen in 4 cases. Upon follow-up (mean, 31.2 mo), 8 patients were found to be asymptomatic, 2 had died of unrelated causes, and 1 was lost to follow-up. We propose the name MAVD/V for a distinct noninflammatory, nonatherosclerotic, localized form of mesenteric vasculopathy that involves both arteries and veins, distinct from FMD. Unlike FMD, surgical resection appears to be curative, with a favorable clinical outcome. Awareness of this vascular entity is important as patients may be potentially misdiagnosed as having CD and ischemic bowel disease. PMID:27487739

  10. [A new case of fronto-nasal dysplasia associated with craniosynostosis].

    PubMed

    Calzolari, C; Seracini, D; Burgio, G; Gaeta, G; Marvulli, I; Giovannucci-Uzielli, M L; Scarano, E; Pacini, M

    1988-01-01

    The Authors report a case of frontonasal dysplasia, a rare congenital syndrome, accompanied by multiple cranial synostosis. According to Cohen, frontonasal dysplasia associated with craniosynostosis may be considered as a separate syndrome and Cohen himself has described its occurrence in members of two families as "Craniofrontonasal Dysplasia". The Authors describe a sporadical case presenting various minor abnormality reported by Cohen, in addition to the hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, demonstrated by the Cranial Ultrasonography and by the NMR study of the brain. PMID:3071780

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Greenberg dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop properly, causing a distinctive spotted appearance called moth-eaten bone, which is visible on x-ray ... Greenberg dysplasia is also called hydrops-ectopic calcification-moth-eaten skeletal dysplasia (HEM), which reflects the condition's ...

  12. Os trigonum syndrome in a patient with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Molay, M; Wilson, R; Lasker, A

    1982-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (M.E.D.) is a rare, congenital, developmental condition characterized by epiphyseal abnormalities. Salient features of this condition are discussed. A case history is presented of a patient with os trigonum and coexisting M.E.D. The importance of weight reduction and control of excessive pronatory forces is emphasized in patients with M.E.D., thus reducing chronic microtrauma to foot structures.

  13. Renal outcome in adults with renal insufficiency and irregular asymmetric kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Neild, Guy H; Thomson, Gill; Nitsch, Dorothea; Woolfson, Robin G; Connolly, John O; Woodhouse, Christopher RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background The commonest cause of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) in children and young adults is congenital malformation of the kidney and urinary tract. In this retrospective review, we examine whether progression to ESRF can be predicted and whether treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) can delay or prevent this. Methods We reviewed 78 patients with asymmetric irregular kidneys as a consequence of either primary vesico-ureteric reflux or renal dysplasia (Group 1, n = 44), or abnormal bladder function (Group 2, n = 34). Patients (median age 24 years) had an estimated GFR (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 with at least 5 years of follow up (median 143 months). 48 patients received ACEI. We explored potential prognostic factors that affect the time to ESRF using Cox-regression analyses. Results At start, mean (SE) creatinine was 189 (8) μmol/l, mean eGFR 41 (1) ml/min 1.73 m2, mean proteinuria 144 (14) mg/mmol creatinine (1.7 g/24 hrs). Of 78 patients, 36 (46%) developed ESRF, but none of 19 with proteinuria less than 50 mg/mmol and only two of 18 patients with eGFR above 50 ml/min did so. Renal outcome between Groups 1 and 2 appeared similar with no evidence for a difference. A benefit in favour of treatment with ACEI was observed above an eGFR of 40 ml/min (p = 0.024). Conclusion The similar outcome of the two groups supports the nephrological nature of progressive renal failure in young men born with abnormal bladders. There is a watershed GFR of 40–50 ml/min at which ACEI treatment can be successful at improving renal outcome. PMID:15462683

  14. Spondylometepiphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C E; Sillence, D O; Lachman, R S; Toomey, K; Bull, M; Dorst, J; Rimoin, D L

    1982-11-01

    The clinical and radiographic observations in eight patients, radiographs on an additional six patients, and morphologic observations on chondro-osseous tissue from two of these 14 patients form the basis for delineating an entity distinct from the heterogeneous group of skeletal dysplasia involving spine and tubular bones, the spondyloepiphyseal, and spondylometaphyseal dysplasias. Disproportionately short limbs and delayed epiphyseal maturation are present at birth, and the entity is radiographically indistinguishable from spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita during infancy. The metaphyseal change that allows identification of the entity described here develops during early childhood, and radiographically is seen as "dappling," ie, the mottled appearance of alternating zones of osteosclerosis and osteopenia. Severe scoliosis and cord compression may be important clinical problems related to the spine changes in adulthood. We have identified one family with two affected sibs and normal parents, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance and distinguishing the entity from SED congenita that has autosomal dominant inheritance.

  15. Florid osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Florid osseous dysplasia (FOD) is the most dramatic and rare variant of the cemento-osseous lesions in which the normal cancellous bone is replaced by dense, acellular cemento-osseous tissue in a background of fibrous connective tissue. It appears to be a widespread form of periapical cemental dysplasia (PCD). No clear definition indicates that when the multiple lesions of PCD can be termed as FOD. If PCD is identified in three or four quadrants or is extensive in one jaw, then it is considered as FOD. Here, in this article, we report a case of FOD in 35-year-old woman. PMID:23814216

  16. Congenital Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gravereaux, Edwin C.; Nguyen, Louis L.; Cunningham, Leslie D.

    2004-04-01

    Congenital vascular anomalies are rare. The cardiovascular specialist should nevertheless be aware of the more common types of vascular anomalies and understand the implications for patient treatment and the likelihood of associated morbidity. The presentation of congenital arteriovenous malformations can range from asymptomatic or cosmetic lesions, to those causing ischemia, ulceration, hemorrhage, or high-output congestive heart failure. Treatment of large, symptomatic arteriovenous malformations often requires catheter-directed embolization prior to the attempt at complete surgical excision. Later recurrence, due to collateral recruitment, is frequent. Graded compression stockings and leg elevation are the mainstays of treatment for the predominantly venous congenital vascular anomalies. Most congenital central venous disorders are clinically silent. An exception is the retrocaval ureter. Retroaortic left renal vein, circumaortic venous ring, and absent, left-sided or duplicated inferior vena cava are relevant when aortic or inferior vena cava procedures are planned. The treatment of the venous disorders is directed at prevention or management of symptoms. Persistent sciatic artery, popliteal entrapment syndrome, and aberrant right subclavian artery origin are congenital anomalies that are typically symptomatic at presentation. Because they mimic more common diseases, diagnosis is frequently delayed. Delay can result in significant morbidity for the patient. Failure to make the diagnosis of persistent sciatic artery and popliteal entrapment can result in critical limb ischemia and subsequent amputation. Unrecognized aberrant right subclavian artery origin associated with aneurysmal degeneration can rupture and result in death. The treatment options for large-vessel arterial anomalies are surgical, sometimes in combination with endovascular techniques.

  17. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  18. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-09-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed.

  19. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed. PMID:27607320

  20. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  1. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a hereditary disease characterized by dysplasia of tissues of ectodermal origin. The incidence of ectodermal dysplasia is rare (1 in 100,000 birth). This case report discusses the features, classification and prosthetic treatment plan (upper partial denture and lower complete denture for upper partial and lower complete edentulous arches respectively). This treatment plan would be able to provide psychological and functional boost to the sufferer.

  2. Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (tufting enteropathy).

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Salomon, Julie; Ruemmele, Frank; de Serres, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Brousse, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), also known as tufting enteropathy, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset severe intractable diarrhea causing sometimes irreversible intestinal failure. To date, no epidemiological data are available, however, the prevalence can be estimated at around 1/50,000-100,000 live births in Western Europe. The prevalence seems higher in areas with high degree of consanguinity and in patients of Arabic origin. Infants develop within the first days after birth a watery diarrhea persistent in spite of bowel rest and parenteral nutrition. Some infants are reported to have associated choanal rectal or esophageal atresia. IED is thought to be related to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. Nonspecific punctuated keratitis was reported in more than 60% of patients. Histology shows various degree of villous atrophy, with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria but specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium with disorganization of surface enterocytes with focal crowding, resembling tufts. Several associated specific features were reported, including abnormal deposition of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) in the basement membrane, increased expression of desmoglein and ultrastructural changes in the desmosomes, and abnormal distribution of alpha2beta1 integrin adhesion molecules. One model of transgenic mice in which the gene encoding the transcription factor Elf3 is disrupted have morphologic features resembling IED. Parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggest an autosomal recessive transmission but the causative gene(s) have not been yet identified making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Some infants have a milder phenotype than others but in most patients, the severity of the intestinal malabsorption even with enteral feeding make them totally dependent on daily long-term parenteral nutrition with a subsequent risk of complications

  3. Familial Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, MK; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia or mutational dysostosis or cleidocranial dysostosis is a generalized skeletodental dysplastic disorder, inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The expression of this disorder can vary widely in severity, even within the same family. This is a relatively rare disease and has no standard effective treatment option as of yet. Here we present a case report of affected mother and son with classical manifestations of the disease.

  4. Thanatophoric dysplasia: A review.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, H

    2016-06-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia is a well-known cause of potentially lethal short-limbed dwarfism in the newborn. The diagnosis is usually made by the recognition of characteristic radiological changes and confirmed at autopsy by demonstration of specific morphological and histological changes in the brain. This review is based upon the author's personal experience and archived data of 19 cases and concerns the clinical and radiographic manifestations, autopsy findings, molecular pathogenesis and the approach to antenatal diagnosis. PMID:27245526

  5. "Baby rattle" pelvis dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Daire, V; Savarirayan, R; Lachman, R S; Neidich, J A; Grace, K; Rimoin, D L; Wilcox, W R

    2001-04-15

    We report an apparently previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia, clinically resembling achondrogenesis, but with distinct radiologic and chondro-osseous morphologic features. These comprise bifid distal ends of the long bones of the limbs, absent vertebral body ossification, a unique "baby rattle" pelvic configuration with tall and broad ilia, absent endochondral ossification, regions of mesenchymal cells within the resting cartilage, and abnormal mesenchymal ossification. PMID:11337746

  6. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  7. de la Chapelle dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Whitley, C B; Burke, B A; Granroth, G; Gorlin, R J

    1986-09-01

    Since the description by de la Chapelle and colleagues of two sibs with a unique skeletal dysplasia, two additional cases have occurred, one in the original Finnish family and one sporadic patient born to unrelated parents of Belgian descent. The original Finnish family has later had a fourth child, a normal daughter who was found to be unaffected upon radiographic examination in the 19th week of gestation. These additional findings are compatible with recessive inheritance. Physical features common to these four patients include cleft palate, small thorax, moderately severe micromelia with small hands, and equinovarus deformity. In each case, the ulnae and fibulae were reduced to an almost triangular osseous remnant. Other long bones were short and bowed. Neonatal death occurred in all cases and may be attributed to a consistent triad of respiratory tract malformations: laryngeal stenosis, tracheobronchomalacia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. Clinical and radiographic features are sufficiently unique to distinguish de la Chapelle dysplasia from other disorders in the spectrum of neonatal lethal osteochondrodysplasias. Lacunar halos were identified as a distinctive histopathologic feature also observed in achondrogenesis but not in several other skeletal dysplasias. PMID:3799721

  8. Evolution of the term and definition of dysplasia of the hip - a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Musielak, Bartosz; Idzior, Maciej; Jóźwiak, Marek

    2015-10-12

    There is no consensus on the definition of dysplasia of the hip (DH). Past and present concepts used to describe DH do not form a complete view of the pathology. Moreover, some authors still present the disease as congenital, not developmental. This prompted authors to analyze the evolution of the definition of DH. Based on the biomedical databases 500 articles and books in the field of hip dysplasia were found and analyzed. Fifteen definitions of hip dysplasia met inclusion criteria, subsequently were analyzed and presented in chronological order. The analysis revealed that currently there is no single, universal definition of hip dysplasia in the aspect of morphological, clinical, and radiological studies. Despite the widely-used term of DH, it is described imprecisely and in different ways. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a multidisciplinary definition of this pathology covering all aspects of hip disorders considered valid in modern orthopaedics. PMID:26528350

  9. The wide spectrum of the asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cortina, H; Beltran, J; Olague, R; Ceres, L; Alonso, A; Lanuza, A

    1979-04-19

    Seven cases of A. T. D. are presented. Radiological findings were extraordinarily diverse. The prognosis of the disease is difficult for each individual case, because of the frequent pulmonary complications and cystic renal lesions are not always directly related to the severity of the bone changes. The authors believe that the term "thoracic-pelvic-phalangeal dysplasia" proposed by Langer, is the most adequate, since it points to the key factors in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:450492

  10. Congenital hypotrichosis and partial anodontia in a crossbred beef calf

    PubMed Central

    Barlund, Christy S.; Clark, Edward G.; Leeb, Tosso; Drögemüller, Cord; Palmer, Colin W.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical examination, skin biopsies, skull radiographs, and DNA analysis of a 2-day-old Red Angus-Charolais-Simmental cross bull calf confirmed the diagnosis of congenital hypotrichosis and anodontia defect (HAD), also called anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, which is a rare anomaly caused by a deletion in the bovine EDA gene on the X chromosome. PMID:17616058

  11. Systemic Hypertension and Transient Ischemic Attack in a 6-Year-Old Girl with Fibromuscular Dysplasia Treated with Percutaneous Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Foa-Torres, Gustavo; Ganame, Javier; Juaneda, Ernesto; Peirone, Alejandro; Barcudi, Maria Silvina; Achaval, Alberto

    2010-02-15

    We describe a 6-year-old girl with arterial hypertension secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia with stenoses of both renal arteries and transient ischemic attack due to extracranial right internal carotid artery subtotal occlusion as well as left internal carotid artery stenosis. She was treated with percutaneous angioplasty of both renal and both carotid arteries.

  12. Systemic hypertension and transient ischemic attack in a 6-year-old girl with fibromuscular dysplasia treated with percutaneous angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Foa-Torres, Gustavo; Ganame, Javier; Juaneda, Ernesto; Peirone, Alejandro; Barcudi, Maria Silvina; Achaval, Alberto

    2010-02-01

    We describe a 6-year-old girl with arterial hypertension secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia with stenoses of both renal arteries and transient ischemic attack due to extracranial right internal carotid artery subtotal occlusion as well as left internal carotid artery stenosis. She was treated with percutaneous angioplasty of both renal and both carotid arteries.

  13. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Pat; Magliocca, Kelly R; Lee, Janice S

    2012-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the natural history and molecular abnormalities, many questions remain surrounding the progression and management of fibrous dysplasia (FD). In the absence of comorbidities, the expected behavior of craniofacial FD (CFD) is to be slow growing and without functional consequence. Understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to the various phenotypes of this condition, as well as the predictors of the different behaviors of FD lesions, must be improved. Long-term follow-up of patients with CFD is vital because spontaneous recovery is unlikely, and the course of disease can be unpredictable. PMID:22771278

  14. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  15. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  16. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital lues; Fetal syphilis ... which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all ... Saunders; 2014:chap 143. Duff P. Maternal and fetal infections. In: Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, ...

  17. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  18. Congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Romero, Norma Beatriz; Clarke, Nigel F

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders, characterized by the predominance of particular histopathological features on muscle biopsy, such as cores (central core disease) or rods (nemaline myopathy). Clinically, early onset of the disease, stable or slowly progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia and delayed motor development are common in most forms. As a result, the diagnosis of a subtype of congenital myopathy is largely based on the presence of specific structural abnormalities in the skeletal muscle detected by enzyme-histochemistry and electron microscopy studies. During the last decades there have been significant advances in the identification of the genetic basis of most congenital myopathies. However, there is significant genetic heterogeneity within the main groups of congenital myopathies, and mutations in one particular gene may also cause diverse clinical and morphological phenotypes. Thus, the nosography and nosology in this field is still evolving. PMID:23622357

  19. [Congenital analgesia].

    PubMed

    Accornero, N; Bini, G; Cruccu, G

    1980-01-01

    The case of a 12 years old boy with a congenital anaesthesia covering all cutaneous and visceral districts is reported. There were no other neurological abnormalities apart a light mental retardation and loss of axon reflex after intradermal injection of hystamine. Notwithstanding this last finding a diagnosis of congenital indifference to pain was made. The differential diagnosis between indifference and insensitivity to pain is discussed. PMID:6162189

  20. Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia: a potentially lethal bone dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Kamoda, T; Nakajima, R; Matsui, A; Nishimura, G

    2001-02-01

    We report a Japanese boy, who is considered as having Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia, a rare, as yet undefined, skeletal dysplasia. The diagnosis was warranted by the constellation of skeletal abnormalities - mild platyspondyly, hypoplastic ilia, broad proximal femora with prominent lesser trochanters, mild brachymetacarpalia and, most importantly, rhizomelic shortening of the upper limbs with lateral bowing, medial cortical thickening, and medial metaphyseal notching of the humeri. Our patient, unlike previously reported patients, had respiratory distress and died suddenly of unknown cause in late infancy. Our experience may imply the heterogeneity or phenotypic variability of Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia. PMID:11214690

  1. Coronary Artery Manifestations of Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Michelis, Katherine C.; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; d’Escamard, Valentina; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) involving the coronary arteries is an uncommon but important condition that can present as acute coronary syndrome, left ventricular dysfunction, or potentially sudden cardiac death. Although the classic angiographic “string of beads” that may be observed in renal artery FMD does not occur in coronary arteries, potential manifestations include spontaneous coronary artery dissection, distal tapering or long, smooth narrowing that may represent dissection, intramural hematoma, spasm, or tortuosity. Importantly, FMD must be identified in at least one other noncoronary arterial territory to attribute any coronary findings to FMD. Although there is limited evidence to guide treatment, many lesions heal spontaneously; thus, a conservative approach is generally preferred. The etiology is poorly understood, but there are ongoing efforts to better characterize FMD and define its genetic and molecular basis. This report reviews the clinical course of FMD involving the coronary arteries and provides guidance for diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:25190240

  2. Coronary artery manifestations of fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Katherine C; Olin, Jeffrey W; Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; d'Escamard, Valentina; Kovacic, Jason C

    2014-09-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) involving the coronary arteries is an uncommon but important condition that can present as acute coronary syndrome, left ventricular dysfunction, or potentially sudden cardiac death. Although the classic angiographic "string of beads" that may be observed in renal artery FMD does not occur in coronary arteries, potential manifestations include spontaneous coronary artery dissection, distal tapering or long, smooth narrowing that may represent dissection, intramural hematoma, spasm, or tortuosity. Importantly, FMD must be identified in at least one other noncoronary arterial territory to attribute any coronary findings to FMD. Although there is limited evidence to guide treatment, many lesions heal spontaneously; thus, a conservative approach is generally preferred. The etiology is poorly understood, but there are ongoing efforts to better characterize FMD and define its genetic and molecular basis. This report reviews the clinical course of FMD involving the coronary arteries and provides guidance for diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  3. A distinct form of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with multiple dislocations.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, C M; Elçioglu, N H; Shaw, D G

    1998-01-01

    Three unrelated patients with identical radiological features are presented. Hypotonia was noted at birth and one patient was diagnosed as having congenital fibre type disproportion in the neonatal period. Later muscle biopsies, however, were entirely normal. All patients, now in their teens and twenties, are of normal intelligence, show striking epiphyseal and metaphyseal changes of the long bones, and have joint laxity and multiple dislocations of large joints, which are particularly incapacitating at the knees. These three cases represent a sporadic, previously unreported skeletal dysplasia with spondyloepimetaphyseal distribution and multiple large joint dislocations. Images PMID:9678701

  4. Valvular dysplasia and congestive heart failure in a juvenile African penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Allyson; Frasca, Salvatore; Mishra, Neha; Tuttle, Allison D

    2014-12-01

    Abstract: An aquarium-housed, 6-mo-old African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) presented with acute respiratory distress. Auscultation revealed a grade II-III systolic murmur in the absence of adventitial sounds, and an enlarged heart without pulmonary edema was seen radiographically. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed atrioventricular (AV) valvular dysplasia and ventricular enlargement. The penguin was treated with enalapril, furosemide, and pimobendan but died within 3 wk of detection of the murmur. Congenital dysplasia of the right AV valve with right atrial and ventricular dilation and ventricular hypertrophy were diagnosed on postmortem examination. PMID:25632699

  5. Valvular dysplasia and congestive heart failure in a juvenile African penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Allyson; Frasca, Salvatore; Mishra, Neha; Tuttle, Allison D

    2014-12-01

    Abstract: An aquarium-housed, 6-mo-old African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) presented with acute respiratory distress. Auscultation revealed a grade II-III systolic murmur in the absence of adventitial sounds, and an enlarged heart without pulmonary edema was seen radiographically. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed atrioventricular (AV) valvular dysplasia and ventricular enlargement. The penguin was treated with enalapril, furosemide, and pimobendan but died within 3 wk of detection of the murmur. Congenital dysplasia of the right AV valve with right atrial and ventricular dilation and ventricular hypertrophy were diagnosed on postmortem examination.

  6. Cushing syndrome, sexual precocity, and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (Albright syndrome) in infancy.

    PubMed

    Danon, M; Robboy, S J; Kim, S; Scully, R; Crawford, J D

    1975-12-01

    The sexual precocity of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia is occasionally accompanied by other endocrine disorders, but in only two previous instances has Cushing syndrome been reported. The history of a 6-month-old girl is presented, in whom this syndrome was complicated by congenital Cushings syndrome. Although endocrinopathies of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia have usually been ascribed to a central (hypothalamic) origin, the findings in this patient suggest autonomous hyperfunction of the peripheral endocrine glands, with the Cushing syndrome caused by hyperplastic nodules in the adrenal glands and the precocity by luteinized follicular cysts of the ovary.

  7. Computed tomography of fibrous dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Daffner, R.H.; Kirks, D.R.; Gehweiler, J.A. Jr.; Heaston, D.K.

    1982-11-01

    Skeletal fibrous dysplasia produces changes that are usually readily recognized on plain radiographs. Occasionally, routine radiography may not demonstrate the characteristic appearance of the disease. The density of abormal bone in craniofacial fibrous dysplasia may preclude adequate assessment of areas where soft-tissue impingement may occur. Computed tomography (CT) is useful in demonstrating the amorphous ''ground-glass'' texture of the lesion and in defining the extent of craniofacial disease including impingement upon orbital structures. CT was useful in five patients with fibrous dysplasia in whom the nature or extent of involvement was not entirely clear.

  8. Increased skeletal:renal uptake ratio. [Bone-seekers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, T.H.; Holman, B.L.

    1980-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with increased skeletal:renal uptake ratios of /sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate were studied. Increased uptake was central in metastatic prostate carcinoma, peripheral in hematologic disorders, and heterogeneous in Paget disease and fibrous dysplasia. There was no discernible redistribution of skeletal uptake in patients with renal failure. Absence of both renal and bladder activity was not observed in patients with normal renal function. An increased ratio was always abnormal and frequently indicated diffuse bone disease.

  9. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, RK

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  10. Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Christodoulou, Michael; Sasalos, Gregory; Babis, George C

    2014-09-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH) is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is challenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH) differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term. PMID:25386570

  11. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a common genetically and clinically heterogeneous skeletal dysplasia characterized by early-onset osteoarthritis, mainly in the hip and knee, and mild-to-moderate short stature. Here we report on a 6-generation MED family with 17 affected members. Method The clinical and radiographic data on the 12 affected members still living were scrutinized. A structured inquiry comprising state of health and MED-related symptoms since birth up to the present time and the osteoarthritis outcome (KOOS) questionnaire were sent to all living family members with MED. The 5 known gene loci for autosomal dominant MED were analyzed for linkage, using fluorescence-labeled microsatellite markers. Linkage was ascertained with markers close to the COL9A2 gene, which was analyzed for mutations by sequencing. Results We identified an exon 3 donor splice mutation in the COL9A2 gene in all affected family members. Clinical, radiographic, and questionnaire data from affected family members suggested that MED caused by COL9A2 mutations starts in early childhood with knee pain accompanied by delayed ossification of femoral epiphyses. The disease then either stabilizes during puberty or progresses with additional joints becoming affected; joint surgery might be necessary. The progression of the disease also affects muscles, with increasing atrophy, resulting in muscle fatigue and pain. Muscular atrophy has not been reported earlier in cases with COL9A2 mutations. Interpretation In a patient with clinically suspected or verified MED, it is important to perform DNA-based analysis to identify a possible disease-causing mutation. This information can be used to carry out genetic risk assessment of other family members and to achieve an early and correct diagnosis in the children. PMID:19995321

  12. Genetics Home Reference: osteoglophonic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... images. Premature fusion of certain bones in the skull (craniosynostosis) typically occurs in osteoglophonic dysplasia . The craniosynostosis ... in the medical literature as a tower-shaped skull , or a relatively mild version of a deformity ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: frontometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowed limbs, an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), and abnormalities of the fingers and hands. Characteristic ... and genetic heterogeneity in frontometaphyseal dysplasia: severe progressive scoliosis in two families. Am J Med Genet A. ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: metatropic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a skeletal disorder characterized by short stature (dwarfism) with other skeletal abnormalities. The term "metatropic" is ... my area? Other Names for This Condition metatropic dwarfism metatropic dysplasia type 1 Related Information How are ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: campomelic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a severe disorder that affects development of the skeleton, reproductive system, and other parts of the body. ... those that are important for development of the skeleton and reproductive organs. Most cases of campomelic dysplasia ...

  16. Guide to Understanding Fibrous Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is usually involved. It can also result in cranial nerve problems. If the temporal bone is affected, the ... paralysis or dizziness. However, any of our 12 cranial nerves can be involved with fibrous dysplasia. The more ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: craniometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Craniofacial Association International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, UCLA National ... F, Sørensen ES, Kaartinen MT, McKee MD. Pyrophosphate inhibits mineralization of osteoblast cultures by binding to mineral, up-regulating osteopontin, and ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: frontonasal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Frontonasal dysplasia 3 KidsHealth from Nemours: Cleft Lip and Palate MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Head and Face Reconstruction ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Centers for Disease Control and ...

  19. Defining dysplasia in Barrett esophagus.

    PubMed

    Robert, Marie E

    2003-01-01

    Histologic grading of esophageal biopsies remains the cornerstone of management in patients with Barrett esophagus. This remains true despite ongoing research into the genetic abnormalities that occur in the setting of intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. As of this writing, there are no objective tests that can replace the pathologist's eyes in predicting prognosis in this setting. However, pathologists and clinicians are well aware that the histologic interpretation of biopsies is an inherently subjective practice. The validity of this exercise depends entirely on the experience of the pathologist. Having said that, two interobserver studies on the grading of dysplasia in Barrett esophagus suggest that, if published criteria are adhered to, the histologic grading of dysplasia is a useful tool in patient management. In this review, the updated pathologic criteria for each category of dysplasia are presented, and the results of two large interobserver variability studies are reviewed.

  20. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  1. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... Renal arteriography is often needed to help decide on the best treatment after other tests are done ...

  2. [Congenital torticollis].

    PubMed

    Wicart, P

    2012-03-01

    Congenital torticollis is a very common postural deformity, characterized by a more or less severe retraction of sternocleidomastoid muscle. Any treatment, else that "good sense" counsels given to the parents, is indicated. The evolution is spontaneously favorable in the majority of cases before the age of one year old. The elimination of differential diagnosis (vertebral and/or neurological malformations, ocular, tumor) is the key-point. Screening of congenital hip dislocation is mandatory because the physiopathology is the same in both diseases. A remaining torticolis after 18 months of age may be an indication to sternocleidomastoid muscle lengthening.

  3. Pediatric aspects of skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ozono, Keiichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Kitaoka, Taichi; Miura, Kohji; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Fujiwara, Makoto; Miyoshi, Yoko; Michigami, Toshimi

    2012-10-01

    Skeletal dysplasia is a disorder of skeletal development characterized by abnormality in shape, length, a number and mineral density of the bone. Skeletal dysplasia is often associated with manifestation of other organs such as lung, brain and sensory systems. Skeletal dysplasias or dysostosis are classified with more than 400 different names. Enchondral bone formation is a coordinated event of chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation and exchange of terminally maturated chondrocyte with bone. Impaired enchondral bone formation will lead to skeletal dysplasia, especially associated with short long bones. Appropriate bone volume and mineral density are achieved by balance of bone formation and bone resorption and mineralization. The gene encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 is responsible for achondroplasia, representative skeletal dysplasia with short stature. The treatment with growth hormone is approved for achondroplasia in Japan. Osteogenesis imperfecta is characterized by low bone mineral density and fragile bone. Data on the beneficial effect of bisphosphonate for osteogenesis imperfecta are accumulating. Osteopetrosis has high bone mineral density, but sometimes show bone fragility. In Japan as well as other countries, pediatrician treat larger numbers of patients with skeletal dysplasia with short stature and fragile bones compared to 20 years ago.

  4. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Schmid Metaphyseal Chondrodysplasia in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Efat; Vakili, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of hereditary diseases, which are autosomal recessive. CAH occurs due to defect in one of the cortisol coding genes and often clinically presents itself with signs of androgen overproduction. In this article, we report a case of CAH and Schmid metaphyseal dysplasia. Our literature review indicated that this report is the first attempt on CYP11B1 and Schmid dysplasia in a child. The specific diagnosis of 11-β-hydroxylase deficiency can be determined using high basal levels of deoxycorticosterone and/or 11-deoxycortisol serums. PMID:26722148

  5. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  6. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." PMID:25726292

  7. Evolution of the term and definition of dysplasia of the hip – a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Idzior, Maciej; Jóźwiak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    There is no consensus on the definition of dysplasia of the hip (DH). Past and present concepts used to describe DH do not form a complete view of the pathology. Moreover, some authors still present the disease as congenital, not developmental. This prompted authors to analyze the evolution of the definition of DH. Based on the biomedical databases 500 articles and books in the field of hip dysplasia were found and analyzed. Fifteen definitions of hip dysplasia met inclusion criteria, subsequently were analyzed and presented in chronological order. The analysis revealed that currently there is no single, universal definition of hip dysplasia in the aspect of morphological, clinical, and radiological studies. Despite the widely-used term of DH, it is described imprecisely and in different ways. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a multidisciplinary definition of this pathology covering all aspects of hip disorders considered valid in modern orthopaedics. PMID:26528350

  8. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-01-01

    ‘Acro-renal syndrome’ refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  9. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prashanth, S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. It is a genetic disorder affecting the development or function of the teeth, hair, nails and sweat glands. Depending on the particular syndrome ectodermal dysplasia can also affect the skin, the lens or retina of the eye, parts of the inner ear, the development of fingers and toes, the nerves and other parts of the body. Each syndrome usually involves a different combination of symptoms, which can range from mild to severe. The history and lessons learned from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) may serve as an example for unraveling of the cause and pathogenesis of other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes by demonstrating that phenotypically identical syndromes can be caused by mutations in different genes (EDA, EDAR, EDARADD), that mutations in the same gene can lead to different phenotypes and that mutations in the genes further downstream in the same signaling pathway (NEMO) may modify the phenotype quite profoundly. The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss the etiology, genetic review, clinical manifestations and treatment options of this hereditary disorder. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Prashanth S. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):197-202. PMID:25206167

  10. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure.

  11. [Congenital aniridia].

    PubMed

    Chiruţa, Daria; Stan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Aniridia is a rare congenital, hereditary, bilateral disease which is associated with various systemic and ocular defects. We present the case of a 61 year old patient who was admitted in the hospital of ophthalmology Cluj Napoca, for the symptoms caused by the ocular defects associated with aniridia. In this case, aniridia is autosomal dominant transmitted with incomplete penetrance and it is not accompanied by any systemic defects. The disease also affects three of her sons and two nephews of the patient.

  12. Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia Corner Fracture (Sutcliffe) Type.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nikhil; Satapathy, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Jana, Manisha

    2016-10-01

    Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia corner fracture type (Sutcliffe) is an uncommon form of skeletal dysplasia which has some unique imaging features. The differential diagnoses include other forms of spondylometaphyseal dysplasias and non-accidental injury. The case report describes a child with typical imaging findings of this clinical entity with a brief discussion of the diagnostic clue and differential diagnoses. PMID:27130511

  13. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering. PMID:25242838

  14. Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity (Beighton type): A unique South African disorder.

    PubMed

    Honey, E M

    2016-06-01

    Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity (SEMD-JL) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia in which stunted stature, articular hypermobility and spinal malalignment are the major manifestations. Structural cardiac abnormalities are sometimes present. Approximately 30 affected children have been recognised previously in the Afrikaans-speaking community in South Africa, and in several, mutations in the B3GALT6 gene have been incriminated. In this article, case details of three additional affected children in two families are documented, and four additional families are mentioned. The Pierre-Robin sequence and unilateral renal agenesis are previously unreported concomitants. The mutational status where known is recorded. PMID:27245527

  15. Bilateral renal lymphoangiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Raed, Alqahtani; Sultan, Alkhateeb; Bader, Al-Mutairi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare congenital benign disease of renal lymphatic system, here we are presenting a very rare form of disease which is bilateral form. Presentation of the case A young adult presented to our clinic after being referred from primary care clinic with intermittent bilateral flank pain and no other symptoms after extensive radiological investigations diagnosis has been made and confirmed by radiological finding of disease. Active treatment usually preserved for complex cases and for the complications of the disease but in our patient as needed analgesia worked well in controlling his intermittent pain and his wish not to pursue any intervention. The vague presentation with initial imaging rising suspicion of renal tumor or complex renal cyst might cause psychological street on the patient, which our patient had, but reassurance after extensive radiological work up relive that's stress. Discussion Although it is very rare disease to be bilateral but wide variety of other differential diagnoses make importance of disease recognition and accurate diagnosis is the key. Conclusion Renal lymphangiomatosis is a rare benign disease of renal lymphatic, which usually affect one side, but bilateral form is very rare form, which may raise the suspicions of genetic form of renal malignancy. Accurate diagnosis requires work up to role out malignant and other renal tumor, which require active surgical management. PMID:26719997

  16. [Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: definitions and classifications].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Luna, M; Moreno Hernando, J; Botet Mussons, F; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Herranz Carrillo, G; Rite Gracia, S; Salguero García, E; Echaniz Urcelay, I

    2013-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common sequelae related to very low birth weight infants, mostly with those of extremely low birth weight. Even with advances in prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome associated with prematurity, there is still no decrease in the incidence in this population, although a change in its clinical expression and severity has been observed. There are, however, differences in its frequency between health centres, probably due to a non-homogeneously used clinical definition. In this article, the Committee of Standards of the Spanish Society of Neonatology wishes to review the current diagnosis criteria of bronchopulmonary dysplasia to reduce, as much as possible, these inter-centre differences.

  17. Congenital dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ko, J Y; Shih, C H; Wenger, D R

    1999-01-01

    Between February 1988 and June 1995, 24 congenital dislocations of the knee joints (17 patients) were reduced with closed methods including immediate reduction, serial casting, or traction in patients from 10 min to 26 days old. At an average follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, an excellent or good result was achieved if there were no associated anomalies. Fair or poor results were the result of delayed treatment or associated musculoskeletal anomalies including arthrogryposis multiplex congenita or Larsen's syndrome. Routine check of the hip dislocation is suggested. Diagnosis with manual testing was difficult, and other methods such as radiography or sonography were suggested in combination to detect hip dysplasia. The dislocated knee should be reduced before treating the hip dislocation. Concomitant treatment of the congenital dislocation of the knee and the hip with Pavlik harness provided satisfactory results. When late, progressive, genu valgus deformity occurred because of global instability of the knee and asymmetric physeal growth, reconstruction of the medial structures of the knee and prolonged bracing provided good results. PMID:10088699

  18. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Elmer E.

    1976-01-01

    Congenital dislocation or subluxation of the hip (congenital acetabular dysplasia) is a complete or partial displacement of the femoral head out of the acetabulum. The physical signs essential for diagnosis are age related. In newborns the tests for instability are the most sensitive. After the neonatal period, and until the age of walking, tightness of the adductor muscles is the most reliable sign. Early diagnosis is vital for successful treatment of this partially genetically determined condition. Various therapeutic measures, ranging from abduction splinting to open reduction and osteotomy, may be required. Following diagnosis in the first month of life, the average treatment time in one recent series was only 2.3 months from initiation of therapy to attainment of a normal hip. When the diagnosis was not made until 3 to 6 months of age, ten months of treatment was required to achieve the same outcome. When the diagnosis is not made, or the treatment is not begun until after the age of 6, a normal hip will probably not develop in any patient. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:1251603

  19. Congenital hypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Vanathi; Vijayakumar, M; Janakiraman, Lalitha; Nammalwar, B R

    2008-08-01

    Congenital hypoaldosteronism due to an isolated aldosterone biosynthesis defect is rare. We report a 4 month old female infant who presented with failure to thrive, persistent hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. Investigations revealed normal serum 17 hydroxy progesterone and cortisol. A decreased serum aldosterone and serum 18 hydroxy corticosterone levels with a low 18 hydroxy corticosterone: aldosterone ratio was suggestive of corticosterone methyl oxidase type I deficiency. She was started on fludrocortisone replacement therapy with a subsequent normalization of electrolytes. Further molecular analysis is needed to ascertain the precise nature of the mutation.

  20. Ocular manifestations of frontonasal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Roarty, J D; Pron, G E; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Posnick, J C; Buncic, J R

    1994-01-01

    The ophthalmologic findings associated with frontonasal dysplasia have not been defined previously in a large series of untreated children. We reviewed the ophthalmic manifestations of a series of patients with frontonasal dysplasia who were seen as part of their craniofacial evaluation. All had undergone a complete ophthalmologic examination before any manipulation of either the orbits or the soft tissues of the orbital contents. From 1986 to 1991, 23 patients with frontonasal dysplasia were seen; ophthalmologic abnormalities were found in 20 (87 percent). Abnormalities included significant refractive errors, strabismus, nystagmus, and eyelid ptosis. Three patients had amblyopia, a treatable cause of visual loss, from strabismus or anisometropia. Ten eyes in seven patients (30 percent) had severe structural anomalies, such as optic nerve hypoplasia, optic nerve colobomas, microphthalmia, cataract, corneal dermoid, or inflammatory retinopathy, that resulted in an acuity of 20/100 or worse. The high incidence of ocular abnormalities indicates that early assessment by an ophthalmologist should be part of the initial evaluation of patients with frontonasal dysplasia to detect treatable visual or ocular problems. PMID:8278482

  1. Genetics Home Reference: oculodentodigital dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paznekas W, Seki A, Taffet S, Jabs EW, Delmar M, Musa H. Functional characterization of connexin43 mutations found in patients with oculodentodigital dysplasia. Circ Res. 2005 May 27;96(10):e83-91. Epub 2005 May 5. Citation on PubMed Vreeburg M, de Zwart-Storm EA, Schouten MI, Nellen RG, ...

  2. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD. PMID:25497206

  3. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  4. Congenital uterine anomalies affecting reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reichman, David E; Laufer, Marc R

    2010-04-01

    The following review seeks to summarise the current data regarding reproductive outcomes associated with congenital uterine anomalies. Such malformations originate from adverse embryologic events ranging from agenesis to lateral and vertical fusion defects. Associated renal anomalies are common both for the symmetric and asymmetric malformations. While fertility is minimally impacted upon by müllerian anomalies in most cases, such malformations have historically been associated with poor obstetric outcomes such as recurrent miscarriage, second trimester loss, preterm delivery, malpresentation and intrauterine foetal demise (IUFD). The following review delineates the existing literature regarding such outcomes and indicates therapies, where applicable, to optimise the care of such patients.

  5. [Hereditary cerebro-oculo-renal syndromes].

    PubMed

    Sessa, Galina; Hjortshøj, Tina Duelund; Egfjord, Martin

    2014-02-17

    Although many congenital diseases present disturbances of the central nervous system, eyes and renal function, only few of these have a defined genetic basis. The first clinical features of cerebro-oculo-renal diseases usually develop in early childhood and deterioration of kidney function and even end-stage kidney disease may occur in a young age. The syndromes should be considered in patients with retarded growth and development, central nervous system abnormalities, impaired vision or blindness and progressive renal failure.

  6. Vojta method in the treatment of developmental hip dysplasia – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kiebzak, Wojciech; Żurawski, Arkadiusz; Dwornik, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Background Developmental dysplasia of the hip joint is one of the most common congenital defects and often results in functional and structural disorders. Such cases particularly demand optimizing therapeutic effects and maximally reducing the duration of therapy. Purpose The aim of this case report is to present the therapeutic process in a child with developmental hip dysplasia. Case report This is a case report of a female child with a birth weight of 2,800 g and an Apgar score of 9 points born to a gravida 3 para 3 mother at 37 weeks. The child was delivered by cesarean section, and the pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios. Subluxation of the left hip joint was diagnosed by an orthopedist in the third month of life. The treatment followed was the Vojta method (the first phase of reflex turning and reflex crawling). Results During the 6 weeks of the Vojta treatment, the left half of the femoral head was centralized, and the process of formation of the hip joint acetabulum was influenced effectively enough to change the acetabulum’s Graff type from the baseline D to IIb after 41 days of treatment. Conclusion The diagnostic work-up of congenital hip joint dysplasia should involve a physiotherapist who will investigate the child’s neuromuscular coordination, in addition to a neonatologist and a pediatrician. The therapy for a disorder of hip joint development of neuromotor origin should involve the application of global patterns according to Vojta. Children with congenital dysplasia of the hip joint should commence rehabilitation as early as possible. PMID:27578980

  7. New patterns in genetic and congenital otonephropathies.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, L; Thompson, P; Wood, R P

    1979-02-01

    In a series of chronic renal and congenitally deaf patients 24 were identified as having inborn renal and otologic disease. Sixteen patients, representing 14 families, had genetic disorders. Only two had the features of Alport's syndrome. The patients were classified as follows: 1) Probable Alport's--2 patients (1 family); 2) Atypical hereditary nephritis and sensorineural hearing loss--7 patients; 3) Renal and inner ear anomalies--1 patient; 4) Renal, inner ear and multiple anomalies--4 patients. The temporal bone pathology in one case showed primary neural atrophy and a mild Mondini malformation. In another a Scheibe defect and unusual calcific structures were found in the cochlear duct. 5) Renal, external or middle ear and multiple anomalies--6 patients (5 families); 6 Renal, middle and inner ear anomalies and multiple anomalies--2 patients. A temporal bone obtained from one case showed combined middle and inner ear defects. In the other, who had a chromosome defect, predominantly middle ear anomalies were found. 7) Nephrotic syndrome and congenital hearing loss--1 patient; 8) Unclassified--1 patient. Some cases represent entities apparently not previously described. Probably most interesting is the delineation of hereditary nephritis and deafness distinct from Alport's disease. PMID:423658

  8. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  9. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  10. Skeletal dysplasias: A radiographic approach and review of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are not uncommon entities and a radiologist is likely to encounter a suspected case of dysplasia in his practice. The correct and early diagnosis of dysplasia is important for management of complications and for future genetic counselling. While there is an exhaustive classification system on dysplasias, it is important to be familiar with the radiological features of common dysplasias. In this article, we enumerate a radiographic approach to skeletal dysplasias, describe the essential as well as differentiating features of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias and conclude by presenting working algorithms to either definitively diagnose a particular dysplasia or suggest the most likely differential diagnoses to the referring clinician and thus direct further workup of the patient. PMID:25349664

  11. Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: Prosthetic and Endodontic Management

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Alok; Rahangdale, Tripty

    2010-01-01

    Individuals affected by ectodermal dysplasia syndromes have abnormalities of the glands, tooth buds, hair follicles, and nail development. Oral finding in ectodermal dysplasia patient are significant and can include multiple abnormalities of the dentition such as anodontia, hy-podontia or malformed and widely spaced peg like teeth, loss of occlusal vertical dimension, protuberant lips and lack of normal alveolar ridge development. This clinical report describes a combined surgical, pedodontic, and prosthodontic approach for the treatment of a patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

  12. Mechanical Ventilation and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Keszler, Martin; Sant'Anna, Guilherme

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important potentially modifiable risk factor for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Effective use of noninvasive respiratory support reduces the risk of lung injury. Lung volume recruitment and avoidance of excessive tidal volume are key elements of lung-protective ventilation strategies. Avoidance of oxidative stress, less invasive methods of surfactant administration, and high-frequency ventilation are also important factors in lung injury prevention. PMID:26593078

  13. Skeletal dysplasia in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Chahira

    2008-12-01

    The ancient Egyptian civilization lasted for over 3000 years and ended in 30 BCE. Many aspects of ancient Egyptian culture, including the existence of skeletal dysplasias, and in particular achondroplasia, are well known through the monuments and records that survived until modern times. The hot and dry climate in Egypt allowed for the preservation of bodies and skeletal anomalies. The oldest dwarf skeleton, the Badarian skeleton (4500 BCE), possibly represents an epiphyseal disorder. Among the remains of dwarfs with achondroplasia from ancient Egypt (2686-2190 BCE), exists a skeleton of a pregnant female, believed to have died during delivery with a baby's remains in situ. British museums have partial skeletons of dwarfs with achondroplasia, humeri probably affected with mucopolysaccharidoses, and a skeleton of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta. Skeletal dysplasia is also found among royal remains. The mummy of the pharaoh Siptah (1342-1197 BCE) shows a deformity of the left leg and foot. A mummified fetus, believed to be the daughter of king Tutankhamun, has scoliosis, spina bifida, and Sprengel deformity. In 2006 I reviewed the previously existing knowledge of dwarfism in ancient Egypt. The purpose of this second historical review is to add to that knowledge with an expanded contribution. The artistic documentation of people with skeletal dysplasia from ancient Egypt is plentiful including hundreds of amulets, statues, and drawing on tomb and temple walls. Examination of artistic reliefs provides a glance of the role of people with skeletal dysplasia and the societal attitudes toward them. Both artistic evidence and moral teachings in ancient Egypt reveal wide integration of individuals with disabilities into the society.

  14. Paleodysmorphology and paleoteratology: Diagnosing and interpreting congenital conditions of the skeleton in anthropological contexts.

    PubMed

    Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Boer, Lucas; van der Merwe, Alie E

    2016-10-01

    Most congenital conditions have low prevalence, but collectively they occur in a few percent of all live births. Congenital conditions are rarely encountered in anthropological studies, not least because many of them have no obvious effect on the skeleton. Here, we discuss two groups of congenital conditions that specifically affect the skeleton, either qualitatively or quantitatively. Skeletal dysplasias (osteochondrodysplasias) interfere with the histological formation, growth and maturation of skeletal tissues leading to diminished postural length, but the building plan of the body is unaffected. Well- known skeletal dysplasias represented in the archeological record include osteogenesis imperfecta and achondroplasia. Dysostoses, in contrast, interfere with the building plan of the body, leading to e.g. missing or extraskeletal elements, but the histology of the skeletal tissues is unaffected. Dysostoses can concern the extremities (e.g., oligodactyly and polydactyly), the vertebral column (e.g., homeotic and meristic anomalies), or the craniofacial region. Conditions pertaining to the cranial sutures, i.e., craniosynostoses, can be either skeletal dysplasias or dysostoses. Congenital conditions that are not harmful to the individual are known as anatomical variations, several of which have a high and population-specific prevalence that could potentially make them useful for determining ethnic origins. In individual cases, specific congenital conditions could be determinative in establishing identity, provided that ante-mortem registration of those conditions was ensured. Clin. Anat. 29:878-891, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists.

  15. Paleodysmorphology and paleoteratology: Diagnosing and interpreting congenital conditions of the skeleton in anthropological contexts.

    PubMed

    Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Boer, Lucas; van der Merwe, Alie E

    2016-10-01

    Most congenital conditions have low prevalence, but collectively they occur in a few percent of all live births. Congenital conditions are rarely encountered in anthropological studies, not least because many of them have no obvious effect on the skeleton. Here, we discuss two groups of congenital conditions that specifically affect the skeleton, either qualitatively or quantitatively. Skeletal dysplasias (osteochondrodysplasias) interfere with the histological formation, growth and maturation of skeletal tissues leading to diminished postural length, but the building plan of the body is unaffected. Well- known skeletal dysplasias represented in the archeological record include osteogenesis imperfecta and achondroplasia. Dysostoses, in contrast, interfere with the building plan of the body, leading to e.g. missing or extraskeletal elements, but the histology of the skeletal tissues is unaffected. Dysostoses can concern the extremities (e.g., oligodactyly and polydactyly), the vertebral column (e.g., homeotic and meristic anomalies), or the craniofacial region. Conditions pertaining to the cranial sutures, i.e., craniosynostoses, can be either skeletal dysplasias or dysostoses. Congenital conditions that are not harmful to the individual are known as anatomical variations, several of which have a high and population-specific prevalence that could potentially make them useful for determining ethnic origins. In individual cases, specific congenital conditions could be determinative in establishing identity, provided that ante-mortem registration of those conditions was ensured. Clin. Anat. 29:878-891, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists. PMID:27554863

  16. Hip dysplasia screening - epidemiological data from Valcea County

    PubMed Central

    Colta, RC; Stoicanescu, C; Nicolae, M; Oros, S; Burnei, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale::In its most severe form, developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common congenital malformations. Uncorrected developmental dysplasia of the hip is associated with long-term morbidity such as gait abnormalities, chronic pain, and degenerative arthritis. Aims: (1) to identify the risks and predisposing factors involved in DDH (2) to define the incidence of the disease locally; (3) to emphasize the importance of ultrasonography in early diagnosis of DDH. Methods and results:1021 newborns in the Neonatal Department of Valcea County Emergency Hospital were analyzed. The information contained in the observation sheets was collected and upon this, the ultrasound was performed accordingly to Graf’s classification. The following parameters were analyzed: sex, area of origin, gestational age, birthweight, type of delivery, parturition. Out of 1021 newborns, 27 had an abnormal ultrasound examination. 20 infants were diagnosed with DDH. Regarding the risk factors: cephalic delivery was associated with a lower risk/ the lowest of DDH (with p=0.045 for the right hip and p=0.001 for the left hip). Increased gestational age and increased birthweight were incriminating factors in the occurrence of DDH. Discussion:Ultrasound imaging has become an accepted tool for accurately diagnosing DDH. PMID:27489571

  17. Genetics of human isolated acromesomelic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saadullah; Basit, Sulman; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Muhammad, Noor; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-04-01

    Acromesomelic dysplasia is a type of skeletal malformation affecting distal and middle segments of the extremities. It occurs in both isolated (non-syndromic) and syndromic forms. In later case, it shows association with cardiac, respiratory, neurological and genital abnormalities. Acromesomelic dysplasia segregates in autosomal recessive mode. Mutations in three genes (GDF5, NPR2, BMPR1B) have been reported to cause different forms of acromesomelic dysplasia. In the present review, we have discussed clinical spectrum, genetics and signalopathies of isolated acromesomelic dysplasias. PMID:26926249

  18. Genetics of human isolated acromesomelic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saadullah; Basit, Sulman; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Muhammad, Noor; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-04-01

    Acromesomelic dysplasia is a type of skeletal malformation affecting distal and middle segments of the extremities. It occurs in both isolated (non-syndromic) and syndromic forms. In later case, it shows association with cardiac, respiratory, neurological and genital abnormalities. Acromesomelic dysplasia segregates in autosomal recessive mode. Mutations in three genes (GDF5, NPR2, BMPR1B) have been reported to cause different forms of acromesomelic dysplasia. In the present review, we have discussed clinical spectrum, genetics and signalopathies of isolated acromesomelic dysplasias.

  19. Microcephaly, ectodermal dysplasia, multiple skeletal anomalies and distinctive facial appearance: delineation of cerebro-dermato-osseous-dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Pascolini, Giulia; Parisi, Valentina; Sana, Maria Elena; Novelli, Antonio; Nürnberg, Peter; Iascone, Maria; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-04-01

    In 1980, a novel multiple malformation syndrome has been described in a 17-year-old woman with micro- and turricephaly, intellectual disability, distinctive facial appearance, congenital atrichia, and multiple skeletal anomalies mainly affecting the limbs. Four further sporadic patients and a couple of affected sibs are also reported with a broad clinical variability. Here, we describe a 4-year-old girl strikingly resembling the original report. Phenotype comparison identified a recurrent pattern of multisystem features involving the central nervous system, and skin and bones in five sporadic patients (including ours), while the two sibs and a further sporadic case show significant phenotypic divergence. Marked clinical variability within the same entity versus syndrome splitting is discussed and the term "cerebro-dermato-osseous dysplasia" is introduced to define this condition.

  20. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Maynika V; LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs in approximately 1:2,000 to 1:4,000 newborns. The clinical manifestations are often subtle or not present at birth. This likely is due to trans-placental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone, while many infants have some thyroid production of their own. Common symptoms include decreased activity and increased sleep, feeding difficulty, constipation, and prolonged jaundice. On examination, common signs include myxedematous facies, large fontanels, macroglossia, a distended abdomen with umbilical hernia, and hypotonia. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Thyroid dysgenesis accounts for 85% of permanent, primary CH, while inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis (dyshormonogeneses) account for 10-15% of cases. Secondary or central CH may occur with isolated TSH deficiency, but more commonly it is associated with congenital hypopitiutarism. Transient CH most commonly occurs in preterm infants born in areas of endemic iodine deficiency. In countries with newborn screening programs in place, infants with CH are diagnosed after detection by screening tests. The diagnosis should be confirmed by finding an elevated serum TSH and low T4 or free T4 level. Other diagnostic tests, such as thyroid radionuclide uptake and scan, thyroid sonography, or serum thyroglobulin determination may help pinpoint the underlying etiology, although treatment may be started without these tests. Levothyroxine is the treatment of choice; the recommended starting dose is 10 to 15 mcg/kg/day. The immediate goals of treatment are to rapidly raise the serum T4 above 130 nmol/L (10 ug/dL) and normalize serum TSH levels. Frequent laboratory monitoring in infancy is essential to ensure optimal neurocognitive outcome. Serum TSH and free T4 should be measured every 1-2 months in the first 6 months of life and every 3-4 months thereafter. In general, the prognosis

  1. Ectodermal Dysplasia with Amastia: A Case of One-Step Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, M.; Caviggioli, F.; Banzatti, B.; Fossati, C.; Villani, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Female patients presenting amastia associated with ectodermal dysplasia are not frequently encountered, but they are of great clinical interest and surgically demanding. Traditionally, skin alterations related to Ectodermal Dysplasia have addressed plastic surgeons to perform a two-stage approach in amastia associated with this congenital pathologic condition. This article describes an alternative method for correcting this deformity trough a mammary reconstruction in one surgical stage. Materials and Methods. We report a case of 26-year-old female patient with bilateral amastia associated with ectodermal dysplasia. Amastia in this patient was treated with implantation of subpectoral silicone gel prostheses, without previously breast tissue expansion. Results. At 18 months of follow-up after surgey, there were no complications and excellent cosmetic results were achieved. Patient and surgeon satisfaction was high and the patient underwent a bilateral areola-tattoo. Conclusions. One-stage mammary reconstruction have showed to be a reliable and effective technique also when amastia is associated with Ectodermal Dysplasia, suggesting a still satisfying biomechanical performance of the skin in this pathology. PMID:19710934

  2. Ectodermal dysplasia with amastia: a case of one-step reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Klinger, M; Caviggioli, F; Banzatti, B; Fossati, C; Villani, F

    2009-01-01

    Background. Female patients presenting amastia associated with ectodermal dysplasia are not frequently encountered, but they are of great clinical interest and surgically demanding. Traditionally, skin alterations related to Ectodermal Dysplasia have addressed plastic surgeons to perform a two-stage approach in amastia associated with this congenital pathologic condition. This article describes an alternative method for correcting this deformity trough a mammary reconstruction in one surgical stage. Materials and Methods. We report a case of 26-year-old female patient with bilateral amastia associated with ectodermal dysplasia. Amastia in this patient was treated with implantation of subpectoral silicone gel prostheses, without previously breast tissue expansion. Results. At 18 months of follow-up after surgey, there were no complications and excellent cosmetic results were achieved. Patient and surgeon satisfaction was high and the patient underwent a bilateral areola-tattoo. Conclusions. One-stage mammary reconstruction have showed to be a reliable and effective technique also when amastia is associated with Ectodermal Dysplasia, suggesting a still satisfying biomechanical performance of the skin in this pathology.

  3. Ectrodactyly and Lethal Pulmonary Acinar Dysplasia Associated with Homozygous FGFR2 Mutations Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher P; Nataren, Nathalie J; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Schwarz, Quenten; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young K; Bruno, Damien L; Lipsett, Jill; McPhee, Andrew J; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-09-01

    Ectrodactyly/split hand-foot malformation is genetically heterogeneous with more than 100 syndromic associations. Acinar dysplasia is a rare congenital lung lesion of unknown etiology, which is frequently lethal postnatally. To date, there have been no reports of combinations of these two phenotypes. Here, we present an infant from a consanguineous union with both ectrodactyly and autopsy confirmed acinar dysplasia. SNP array and whole-exome sequencing analyses of the affected infant identified a novel homozygous Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) missense mutation (p.R255Q) in the IgIII domain (D3). Expression studies of Fgfr2 in development show localization to the affected limbs and organs. Molecular modeling and genetic and functional assays support that this mutation is at least a partial loss-of-function mutation, and contributes to ectrodactyly and acinar dysplasia only in homozygosity, unlike previously reported heterozygous activating FGFR2 mutations that cause Crouzon, Apert, and Pfeiffer syndromes. This is the first report of mutations in a human disease with ectrodactyly with pulmonary acinar dysplasia and, as such, homozygous loss-of-function FGFR2 mutations represent a unique syndrome. PMID:27323706

  4. Sibs with mental retardation, supraorbital sclerosis, and metaphyseal dysplasia: frontometaphyseal dysplasia, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, or a new syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, W; Hall, C M; Dillon, M J; Baraitser, M

    1991-01-01

    A brother and sister are presented with unusual facies, bilateral mixed hearing loss, mental retardation, and widespread radiological abnormalities. The clinical and radiological evidence for and against the two most likely diagnoses of frontometaphyseal dysplasia and craniometaphyseal dysplasia is considered. Images PMID:1956063

  5. [Chylous reflux and chylous ascites in lymphatic dysplasia, with the lymphographic demonstration of mediastinal and retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts].

    PubMed

    Hermanutz, K D; Boldt, I; Frotscher, U

    1975-01-01

    Two patients with congenital dysplasia of the lymphatic system and with chylous ascites are described. In one 24-year old woman with this rare condition, it was possible to demonstrate for the first time numerous mediastinal lymphatic cysts during lymphangiography. Both patients showed an abnormality of the retroperitoneal lymphatics, consisting of lymphatic dilatation and cysts. In the investigation of chylous ascites, direct lymphangiography must be regarded as a valuable and necessary investigation.

  6. [Crossed renal ectopy without fusion associated with lithiasis].

    PubMed

    Mottola, A; Bartoletti, R; Dami, A

    1990-06-01

    A case of crossed unfused renal ectopia associated with lithiasis, that was incidentally discovered during IVP, is described. The clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of this rare congenital anomaly are discussed.

  7. Cleidocranial dysplasia: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mehta, D N; Vachhani, R V; Patel, M B

    2011-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder that presents with skeletal dysplasia. It commonly presents with significant dental problems such as retention of multiple deciduous teeth, impaction or delay in eruption of permanent teeth, and often with the presence of supernumerary teeth. We report two cases showing clinical and radiographic features of CCD. PMID:21985884

  8. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad A; Afifi, Ashraf M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency present at birth. Babies with CH who are not identified and treated promptly develop severe mental retardation. Most of the babies with CH do not manifest the typical known signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, and this is most likely due to transplacental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone in addition to some residual neonatal thyroid function, as might be seen with thyroid hypoplasia, an ectopic gland, or mild dyshormonogenesis. Screening for CH has enabled the virtual eradication of the devastating effects of mental retardation due to sporadic CH in most developed countries of the world. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Permanent CH refers to a persistent deficiency of thyroid hormone that requires life-long treatment. Transient CH refers to a temporary deficiency of thyroid hormone that is discovered at birth but recovers to normal in the first few months or years of life. In the last several decades, there have been exciting advances in our understanding of fetal and neonatal thyroid physiology. In addition, advances in molecular biology have helped in understanding the early events in thyroid gland embryogenesis, mechanisms of thyroid action in the brain, the molecular basis for many of the inborn errors of thyroid hormonogenesis, and thyroid hormone action. However, many questions and challenges are still not answered. For example, the increasing numbers of surviving small and premature neonates with abnormalities in thyroid function need definite diagnostic criteria and whether they require medical therapy. Another challenge is the dilemma of finding the best screening methodology that is sensitive and cost effective. PMID:22570946

  9. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  10. Maxillonasal dysplasia (Binder's syndrome) and its treatment with costal cartilage graft: A follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Yogesh C.; Vyas, Kinnari A.; Tandale, Mangesh S.; Panse, Nikhil S.; Bakshi, Harpreet S.; Srivastava, Rajat K.

    2008-01-01

    Maxillonasal dysplasia or Binder's syndrome is an uncommon congenital condition characterized by a retruded mid-face with an extremely flat nose. We report here six patients with maxillonasal dysplasia whose noses were corrected with onlay costal cartilage grafts using a combined oral vestibular and external rhinoplasty approach for nasal dorsal augmentation, columellar lengthening, and premaxillary augmentation. The cartilage graft was dipped in a solution of 100 ml 0.9% NaCl and one vial (80mg) gentamicin for 30 min to prevent warping. L struts made for nasal augmentation, columellar lengthening, and premaxillary augmentation were fixed to one another by slots made in the graft. This technique has been used in children, adults, and for secondary cases with promising results. All patients were of class I dental occlusion. The nasal and premaxillary augmentation which was monitored by serial photography was found to be stable over a follow-up period of three years. PMID:19753255

  11. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a child affected from anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Bucci, Paolo; Carile, Francesco; Riccitiello, Francesco; Scotti, Claudio; Coccia, Erminia; Rappelli, Giorgio

    2005-08-15

    The aim of this clinical report is to describe the management of a young patient, affected by ectodermal dysplasia, during a nine-year period. Dental treatment can vary depending on the severity of the disease (tooth size, morphology, and amount of available alveolar bone). New technologies, such as adhesive dentistry, and new materials, such as composite resin, represent current options in the management of the dental rehabilitation of patients affected by ectodermal dysplasia. Removable partial dentures were used to replace congenitally missing teeth, and composite resin materials were used to restore conical-shaped maxillary teeth to achieve a favorable esthetic result. This option minimized the sacrifice of healthy dental tissue. Prosthodontic and restorative treatment was provided for the psychological and social comfort of the young patient.

  12. Contribution of congenital malformation to perinatal mortality in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abudu, O O; Uguru, V; Olude, O

    1988-08-01

    Over a 17-month period we prospectively recorded identifiable congenital malformations at delivery in singleton births in our hospital. Despite the prevailing religious and cultural belief we carried out autopsies in 41% of the perinatal deaths that occurred during the study period. Out of a total of 63 (21/1000 singleton births) congenital malformations discovered, 21 (33%) were identified at autopsy only. About 16% of total perinatal deaths were due to congenital malformation. Cardiovascular malformations accounted for about 40% of perinatal deaths from congenital malformations followed by central nervous system malformation (23.3%), gastrointestinal malformations (20%), musculo-skeletal malformations (6.7%); renal malformations (3.3%) and others (6.7%). No relationship between maternal age, parity and congenital malformation was found. The results from this study suggest that with the use of autopsy, teratology may contribute significantly to the prevailing high perinatal mortality in Lagos more than was previously thought. PMID:2905300

  13. Diagnosis and management of gastric dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jae Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Gastric dysplasia is a neoplastic lesion and a precursor of gastric cancer. The Padova, Vienna, and World Health Organization classifications were developed to overcome the discrepancies between Western and Japanese pathologic diagnoses and to provide a universally accepted classification of gastric epithelial neoplasia. At present, the natural history of gastric dysplasia is unclear. Much evidence suggests that patients with high-grade dysplasia are at high risk of progression to carcinoma or synchronous carcinoma. Therefore, endoscopic resection is required. Although patients with low-grade dysplasia have been reported to be at low risk of progression to carcinoma, due to the marked histologic discrepancies between forceps biopsy and endoscopic specimens, endoscopic resection for this lesion is recommended, particularly in the presence of other risk factors (large size; depressed gross type; surface erythema, unevenness, ulcer, or erosion; and tubulovillous or villous histology). Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with dysplasia after endoscopic resection appear to reduce the incidence of metachronous lesions. PMID:26932397

  14. Is there a reduction of congenital abnormalities in the offspring of diabetic pregnant women after folic acid supplementation? A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Dakhlaoui, Abdallah; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew A E

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the preventive effect of folic acid for structural birth defects (i.e. congenital abnormalities [CAs]) in the offspring of pregnant women with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM-1). The occurrence of medically recorded DM-1 in pregnant women who had malformed fetuses/newborns (cases) and delivered healthy babies (controls) with or without folic acid supplementation was compared in the population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. The case group included 22,843 offspring, and there were 79 (0.35%) pregnant women with DM-1, while the control group comprised of 38,151 newborns, and 88 (0.23%) had mothers with DM-1. Case mothers with DM-1 associated with a higher risk of total rate of CAs in their offspring (OR with 95% CI: 1.5, 1.1-2.0) compared to the total rate of CAs in the offspring of non-diabetic case mothers. This higher risk can be explained by four specific types/groups of CAs: isolated renal a/dysgenesis; obstructive CA of the urinary tract; cardiovascular CAs; and multiple CAs, namely caudal dysplasia sequence. However, there was no higher rate of total CAs in the children of pregnant women with DM-1 after folic acid supplementation; in addition, neural-tube defect and renal a/dysgenesis did not occur. However, this benefit cannot be explained by the CA reduction effect of folic acid during the critical period of major CAs. In conclusion, there was a certain reduction in maternal teratogenic effect of DM-1 after folic acid supplementation during pregnancy, but the explanation of this effect requires further study.

  15. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Das, Bijay Kumar; Das, Surya Narayan; Gupta, Aprna; Nayak, Suryakanti

    2013-01-01

    Floridcemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) is a"fibro-osseouslesion" that characteristically affects the jaw bones of the middle-aged with multi-quadrant radiopaque cementum-like masses. In thepast, the condition was known with a variety of names causing confusion in diagnosis and treatment. The condition is usually asymptomatic and needs no treatment as such. The diagnosis of FCOD is made on the basis of typical clinico-radiological features and biopsy is usually not recommended due to the risk of postoperative infection. This paper reports a rare case of FCOD affecting mandible bilaterally in a forty-two years old woman. PMID:23798858

  16. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Das, Bijay Kumar; Das, Surya Narayan; Gupta, Aprna; Nayak, Suryakanti

    2013-01-01

    Floridcemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) is a"fibro-osseouslesion" that characteristically affects the jaw bones of the middle-aged with multi-quadrant radiopaque cementum-like masses. In thepast, the condition was known with a variety of names causing confusion in diagnosis and treatment. The condition is usually asymptomatic and needs no treatment as such. The diagnosis of FCOD is made on the basis of typical clinico-radiological features and biopsy is usually not recommended due to the risk of postoperative infection. This paper reports a rare case of FCOD affecting mandible bilaterally in a forty-two years old woman.

  17. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease. PMID:20822331

  18. Congenital Intralabyrinthine Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sanjay; Prasad, Kiran; Azadarmaki, Roya

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma is presented. High-resolution computerized tomographic scans and intraoperative photomicrographs display features of intralabyrinthine extension. We discuss pathogenetic theories for the development of congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma. The distinction of this condition from congenital cholesteatoma with labyrinthine erosion is discussed. PMID:25057421

  19. [Skeletal dysplasias. The network SKELNET].

    PubMed

    Després, S; Engel, M W; Zabel, B

    2007-12-01

    The network concept of SKELNET was developed to meet the problems and requirements encountered caring for patients with skeletal dysplasias. Skeletal dysplasias are a clinically and genetically extremely diverse group of chronic genetic diseases, which primarily affect the development of the skeleton. The rarity, extensive heterogeneity and complex pathophysiology have made these conditions a challenge to diagnose and study. They represent a group of 200 to 300 specific disorders with patients located all across Germany. So far the diagnostic process in Germany relies on a few specialists who evaluate the X-rays and clinical picture of the patient. In addition, diagnostic tests are restricted to a few laboratories across Europe. Consequences are low efficiency in diagnosis, clinical management, treatment, follow-up and scientific knowledge resulting in extremely prolonged periods between upcoming symptoms and correct diagnosis, and probably a high number of unknown and insufficiently treated cases. The improvement of cooperation among the experts is one of the key points to optimize diagnostic procedures. As the cooperating clinical and scientific specialists are at various locations in Germany, one of the major efforts is to channel the different levels of clinical and research information, making patient data files accessible and transparent to experts. This approach aims at the development of new strategies for all-embracing high level patient care fulfilling all requirements concerning the protection of personal data.

  20. DYSPLASIA OF HIP DEVELOPMENT: UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Guarniero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The term “developmental dysplasia of the hip” (DDH) includes a wide spectrum of abnormalities that affect the hip during its growth, ranging from dysplasia to joint dislocation and going through different degrees of coxofemoral subluxation. The incidence of DDH is variable, and depends on a number of factors, including geographical location. Approximately one in 1,000 newborn infants may present hip dislocation and around 10 in 1,000 present hip instability. Brazil has an incidence of five per 1,000 in terms of findings of a positive Ortolani sign, which is the early clinical sign for detecting the disorder. The risk factors for DDH include: female sex, white skin color, primiparity, young mother, breech presentation at birth, family history, oligohydramnios, newborns with greater weight and height, and deformities of the feet or spine. Hip examinations should be routine for newborns, and should be emphasized in maternity units. Among newborns and infants, the diagnosis of DDH is preeminently clinical and is made using the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers. Conventional radiography is of limited value for confirming the diagnosis of DDH among newborns, and ultrasound of the hip is the ideal examination. The treatment of DDH is challenging, both for pediatric orthopedists and for general practitioners. The objectives of the treatment include diagnosis as early as possible, joint reduction and stabilization of the hip in a secure position. Classically, treatment options are divided according to different age groups, at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27022528

  1. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  2. [DTPA-99mTc in pediatric renal disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Abós Olivares, M D; Banzo Marraco, J; Teijeiro Vidal, J; Mateo Navarro, A; Carreras Delgado, J L; García López, F

    1980-01-01

    99MTc is an ideal nuclide for Pediatric use. Combined with DTPA is an adequate agent for renal studies. 15 patients with ages ranging from eight days to eleven years were studied (10 patients with congenital malformation and five with renal tumour). The dosimetric advantages, the obtention with a single nuclide dose of multiple images and the diagnostic usefulness in congenital malformation and renal tumour suggest their use. PMID:7369638

  3. Ultrasonography in Diagnosis of Congenital Absence of the Vas Deferens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an important cause of obstructive azoospermia, and the lack of an imaging diagnostic test is a critical problem. The aim of this study is to discuss the use of ultrasonography in congenital absence of vas deferens, including dysplasia of the epididymis and the seminal vesical. Material/Methods Five fresh spermatic cord specimens were detected by ultrasonography (US) to evaluate the image of the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens. Fifty normal males had scrotal US to confirm whether the normal spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected and to measure the internal and external diameter on the long axis view. Forty-six males clinically diagnosed as having congenital absence of vas deferens underwent scrotal US to evaluate the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens and the epididymis. The seminal vesicals were detected with transrectal ultrasonography. We evaluated images of the vas deferens, epididymis, and seminal vesical. Results Scrotal ultrasonography can distinguish the vas deferens from the other cord-like structures in the spermatic cord, and the vas deferens has a characteristic image. Scrotal ultrasonography detected all 50 normal males and measured the diameter. No statistically significant difference was found between the left and right measurements. In the 46 patients, the following anomalies were observed: 1) 42 cases of congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens; 2) 2 cases of congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens; and 3) 1 case of congenital segmental absence of the vas deferens. All 46 cases were accompanied with epididymis and seminal vesical anomalies. Conclusions The spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected by US, which is a valuable tool in diagnosis of congenital absence of the vas deferens. Seminal vesical and epididymis anomalies often associated with congenital absence of the vas deferens were revealed by ultrasonography. PMID

  4. Pulmonary vascular development goes awry in congenital lung abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kool, Heleen; Mous, Daphne; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Rottier, Robbert J

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular diseases of the newborn comprise a wide range of pathological conditions with developmental abnormalities in the pulmonary vasculature. Clinically, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is characterized by persistent increased resistance of the vasculature and abnormal vascular response. The classification of PH is primarily based on clinical parameters instead of morphology and distinguishes five groups of PH. Congenital lung anomalies, such as alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) and PH associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), but also bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), are classified in group three. Clearly, tight and correct regulation of pulmonary vascular development is crucial for normal lung development. Human and animal model systems have increased our knowledge and make it possible to identify and characterize affected pathways and study pivotal genes. Understanding of the normal development of the pulmonary vasculature will give new insights in the origin of the spectrum of rare diseases, such as CDH, ACD, and BPD, which render a significant clinical problem in neonatal intensive care units around the world. In this review, we describe normal pulmonary vascular development, and focus on four diseases of the newborn in which abnormal pulmonary vascular development play a critical role in morbidity and mortality. In the future perspective, we indicate the lines of research that seem to be very promising for elucidating the molecular pathways involved in the origin of congenital pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:25424472

  5. Glaucoma in oculo-dento-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, E I; Parks, M M

    1990-03-15

    Two patients with oculo-dento-osseous dysplasia developed glaucoma in infancy or early childhood. Aggressive surgical management resulted in the preservation of vision in both patients in at least one eye. A review of published reports disclosed that glaucoma in oculo-dento-osseous dysplasia develops at different ages and is possibly secondary to a variety of mechanisms. Glaucoma is the main cause of visual loss in this syndrome, for which patients otherwise have a good prognosis for life and intellect. Early screening for glaucoma in oculo-dento-osseous dysplasia is mandatory, especially when there are symptoms that suggest high intraocular pressure.

  6. A Case of Craniofacial Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Justin; Carson, William

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with craniofacial polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia is relatively rare and usually presents in late childhood/early adulthood. It is occasionally associated with endocrine disorders such as McCune-Albright syndrome. The benign pathology of this bone tumor belies its implications in the region of the skull base. Craniofacial polyostotic fibrous dysplasia can have devastating complications depending on which ostia are involved, including vision loss. Our patient was already beginning to experience visual field deficits from ischemic neuropathy. He was treated surgically with optic nerve decompression; however, the efficacy of this approach is currently being debated. PMID:22470752

  7. Focal Cortical Dysplasia in Childhood Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Tarek; Bernier, Anne; Carmant, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a common cause of medication resistant epilepsy. A better understanding of its presentation, pathophysiology and consequences have helped us improved its treatment and outcome. This paper reviews the most recent classification, pathophysiology and imaging findings in clinical research as well as the knowledge gained from studying genetic and lesional animal models of focal cortical dysplasia. This review of this recently gained knowledge will most likely help develop new research models and new therapeutic targets for patients with epilepsy associated with focal cortical dysplasia. PMID:27544467

  8. Autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: I. An undescribed dysplasia/malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bustos, T; Simosa, V; Pinto-Cisternas, J; Abramovits, W; Jolay, L; Rodriguez, L; Fernandez, L; Ramela, M

    1991-12-15

    We describe 27 individuals of 7 families related to each other with high probability who showed manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia and other anomalies affecting females as severely as males with variable expressivity. All parents were normal. These families were detected in a relatively isolated and inbred population with very small neighbouring communities from a Caribbean Sea island, Margarita Island, in Northeastern Venezuela (Nueva Esparta State). The clinical picture common to all patients could not be classified within the heterogeneous group of known ectodermal dysplasias and the published cases do not resemble our patients. We believe that this condition constitutes a newly recognized autosomal recessive dysplasia/malformation syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:1776626

  9. [Oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia complicated by glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Kan'shina, N F; Rykov, V A; Lakhno, P A

    1990-01-01

    Clinico-anatomical data of a rare condition congenital oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia with a glomerulonephritis as a complication are available for a 13-year-old girl who died of chronic renal failure. Large aglomerular zones consisting of primitive canaliculi in a loose stroma were observed in kidneys that were decreased in size. The glomeruli were few in number, some of them of a large size (2-2.5-fold), firmly attached to the capsule, with pronounced extracapillary proliferation.

  10. The Retroperitoneal Laparoscopic Renal Capsulectomy for Spontaneous Renal Subcapsular Fluid Collection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wu, Kaijie; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Zhishang; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Linlin; He, Dalin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection may occur as a rare presentation of nephritic syndrome, and distension of the renal capsula and Gerota fascia due to massive fluid accumulation may cause pain. In addition, hypertension secondary to renal ischemia and activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system may also occur. The objective of this study is to evaluate the surgical outcome of retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy for patients with this disease. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 10 female patients with spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection, diagnosed with B ultrasound and enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. Eight patients first underwent percutaneous renal subcapsular drainage, which seemed to be less effective, and then all patients underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy. The volume of renal subcapsular fluid was documented, the fluid was examined by routine biochemical tests, and the excised renal capsules underwent pathological examination individually. The postoperative drainage time for each patient was documented, and follow-up was conducted 1, 3, 6, 12 months, and 2 years postoperatively. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal capsulectomy was successfully performed in all patients with no major complications. The average volume of renal subcapsular fluid was 436 milliliter (mL, 180–880 mL) in light yellow color, and the concentration of creatinine and urea nitrogen was quite similar to that of serum. The pathological findings revealed fibrous dysplasia of the renal capsule with chronic infiltration of inflammatory cells. The average drainage time was 11.5 days (5–30 days) postoperatively. All patients recovered 1 month after the operation and there were no recurrences with a mean follow-up period of 12 months (6–24 months). The reason for spontaneous renal subcapsular fluid collection is unknown, and the aim of treatment is mainly to alleviate symptoms. In our

  11. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: septo-optic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Septo-optic dysplasia is a disorder of early brain development. Although its signs and symptoms vary, this condition ... in the brain. In the early stages of brain development, these structures may form abnormally or fail to ...

  13. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  14. Genetic skeletal dysplasia in Thailand: the Siriraj experience.

    PubMed

    Wasant, P; Waeteekul, S; Rimoin, D L; Lachman, R S

    1995-01-01

    Genetic skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders associated with abnormalities in the skeletal system frequently presenting with disproportionate short stature. There are over 100 distinct skeletal dysplasias which have been classified primarily on the basis of the clinical or radiographic characteristics. We have identified many genetic skeletal dysplasia disorders at Department of Pediatrics, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. We have cases of achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, atelosteogenesis, pyknodysostosis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita, spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), osteogenesis imperfecta type I, II and III, Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, cleidocranial dysostosis, thanatophoric dysplasia, rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis I, II, IV and VI, mucolipidosis II, osteopetrosis, camptomelic dysplasia, metaphyseal dysplasia with spine involvement (Kozlowski type), Langer-Gideon syndrome and hypophosphatemic rickets. We have established a Genetic Skeletal Dysplasia Clinic at Siriraj Hospital since 1992, and see referrals from around the country. Genetic counseling is provided, including prenatal diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach.

  15. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed.

  16. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  17. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance During the First Week of Life and Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in the Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Gustavo; Ribeiro, Orquídea; Guimarães, Hercília

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early fluid and electrolyte imbalances may be associated with an increased risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. OBJECTIVE: We sought to establish an association between fluid and electrolyte balance in the first week of life and the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. METHODS: Clinical charts of 205 neonates <32 weeks gestational age and/or <1,250 g birth weight (admitted to our NICU between 1997 and 2008) were analyzed. Clinical features, fluid and electrolyte balance were analyzed for the first 7 days of life using multivariate models of generalized estimation equations. A p value <0.05 was considered significant in all of the hypothesis tests. RESULTS: The prevalence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia was 22%. Lower gestational age and birth weight, male gender, less frequent use of antenatal steroids, respiratory distress syndrome, use of surfactant, patent ductus arteriosus, duration of invasive ventilation and NICU stay were significantly associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The variation in serum values of potassium, phosphorus and creatinine during the first week of life also revealed an association with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Higher mean plasma calcium values were associated with spontaneous closure of the patent ductus arteriosus. The use of indomethacin to induce patent ductus arteriosus closure was significantly higher in bronchopulmonary dysplasia patients. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in renal function and tubular handling of potassium and phosphorus are present during the first week of life among preterm neonates who will develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The higher rate of patent ductus arteriosus and indomethacin use may influence these differences. Serum levels of calcium also appear to play a role in spontaneous ductus arteriosus closure. PMID:20668623

  18. Renal branching morphogenesis: morphogenetic and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blake, Joshua; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2014-12-01

    The human kidney is composed of an arborized network of collecting ducts, calyces and urinary pelvis that facilitate urine excretion and regulate urine composition. The renal collecting system is formed in utero, completed by the 34th week of gestation in humans, and dictates final nephron complement. The renal collecting system arises from the ureteric bud, a derivative of the intermediate-mesoderm derived nephric duct that responds to inductive signals from adjacent tissues via a process termed ureteric induction. The ureteric bud subsequently undergoes a series of iterative branching and remodeling events in a process called renal branching morphogenesis. Altered signaling that disrupts patterning of the nephric duct, ureteric induction, or renal branching morphogenesis leads to varied malformations of the renal collecting system collectively known as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and is the most frequently detected congenital renal aberration in infants. Here, we describe critical morphogenetic and cellular events that govern nephric duct specification, ureteric bud induction, renal branching morphogenesis, and cessation of renal branching morphogenesis. We also highlight salient molecular signaling pathways that govern these processes, and the investigative techniques used to interrogate them. PMID:25080023

  19. Spectrum of pediatric renal diseases in dubai.

    PubMed

    Abou-Chaaban, M; Al Murbatty, B; Majid, M A

    1997-01-01

    A total of 712 patients with renal problems, aged 13 years or below (mean age 4.12 years) were seen in the Department of Health and Medical Services Hospitals in Dubai in the period from 1991 to 1996. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. UAE citizens constituted 32% of the total, with a male to female ratio of 1:1.2. Nephrotic syndrome (26.3%) had the highest prevalence among the renal diseases seen, followed by urinary tract infection (19.1%), glomerulonephritis (GN) (9.7%), congenital renal anomalies (9.7%), and chronic renal failure (CRF) (7%). Congenital renal anomalies were the main cause of CRF in our patients followed by GN. Acute renal failure (ARF) occurred in 1.4% of the patients and was not an alarming problem; it had an uncomplicated course and good prognosis. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis was the mode of replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease. Eight patients underwent renal transplantation; one cadaver donor, four living non-related donor (abroad) and three living related donor.

  20. [Renal angiomyolipoma rupture during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Raft, J; Lalot, J-M; Meistelman, C; Longrois, D

    2006-10-01

    A 40 year-old 2nd gesta pregnant woman (34.5 weeks of amenorhea) was admitted to hospital for abdominal pain and arterial hypotension which were rapidly related to a retroperitoneal haematoma due to left kidney bleeding. Emergency cesarean delivery under general anaesthesia was undertaken because of foetal distress. Exploration of the retroperitonal space after foetal extraction confirmed the presence of a large haematoma and abnormal left renal morphology. The retroperitoneal space was drained without any further intervention. Subsequently, abdominal and thoracic computerised tomographic examination showed bilateral dysplasia of the kidneys and pulmonary cysts consistent with the diagnosis of renal angiomyolipoma and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. The case report is of interest because of the circumstances of discovery of the disease and because nephrectomy was not necessary to control the bleeding of the left kidney. Six months after the incident the patient and the child are in good condition.

  1. Congenital myopathies: an update.

    PubMed

    Nance, Jessica R; Dowling, James J; Gibbs, Elizabeth M; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2012-04-01

    Congenital myopathy is a clinicopathological concept of characteristic histopathological findings on muscle biopsy in a patient with early-onset weakness. Three main categories are recognized within the classical congenital myopathies: nemaline myopathy, core myopathy, and centronuclear myopathy. Recent evidence of overlapping clinical and histological features between the classical forms and their different genetic entities suggests that there may be shared pathomechanisms between the congenital myopathies. Animal models, especially mouse and zebrafish, have been especially helpful in elucidating such pathomechanisms associated with the congenital myopathies and provide models in which future therapies can be investigated. PMID:22392505

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  3. Late-presenting developmental dysplasia of the hip in Jordanian males

    PubMed Central

    Samarah, Omar Q.; Hadidi, Fadi A. Al; Hamdan, Mohammad Q.; Hantouly, Ashraf T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the pattern of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in late presenting Jordanian male patients and identify the risk factors and associated findings. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1145 male patients who attended the Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for a DDH check up. This study was carried out in the Orthopedic Section, Special Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between March 2011 and October 2014. Data was collected from medical records, and x-ray measurements were evaluated. Results: Of the 1145 male patients, 43 (3.75%) with 70 involved hips were diagnosed with late- presenting DDH. Being a first-born baby resulted in 41.9% increased risk for DDH. Cesarian delivery was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip dislocation (p=0.004) while normal delivery was significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia (p=0.004). No predictable risk factors were found in 44.2% patients with DDH. Bilateral cases were more common than unilateral cases: (26 [60.5%] versus 17 [39.5%]). Limited abduction was a constant finding in all dislocated hips (p<0.001). Associated conditions, such as club foot and congenital muscular torticollis were not observed. Conclusion: Cesarian section is a significant risk for dislocated hips while normal delivery is significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia. Bilateral DDH is more common than the unilateral. Club foot and torticollis were not observed in this series. PMID:26837397

  4. Bilateral renal agenesis in an alpaca cria

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Mathew P.; Spaulding, Kathy A.; Geissler, Kyleigh A.; Anderson, Kevin L.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A 3-day-old male alpaca cria was presented for lack of vigor and failure to urinate since birth. Based on the history, laboratory data, ultrasonographs, surgical findings, and postmortem examination, the cria was diagnosed with bilateral renal agenesis and hypoplastic bladder, a congenital condition rarely seen in veterinary medicine. PMID:16579043

  5. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  6. [Thirty-eight cases of dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Cormier, F; Cormier, J-M

    2005-07-01

    Dysplasia of the renal and cervical arteries are well known, but dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is less frequent and has specific presentation. There have been few reports on the different types of presentations. We report a series of 38 cases and present the characteristic features together with a comparison with data in the literature. These non-atheromatous non-inflammatory lesions of the arterial wall occurred either in a context of fibromuscular disease which cause is unknown (30/38 patients) or in patients with genetic disease such as neurofibromatosis (3/38) or Ehlers-Danlos disease (5/38). The fibromuscular disease presented three aspects with specific characteristics. a) stenosing lesions found predominantly in women with a different morphology than in the other localization (usually associated): irregular diffuse stenosis discovered in patients with hypertension, or ischemic digestive symptoms (6/14 patients). b) Aneurysms, also found predominantly in women, but less frequently associated with other dysplasias. These aneurysms were generally sacciform. Unlike data in the literature, our series only included rupture in 1/8 cases. The aneurysm was discovered during the exploration of abdominal pain or hypertension. c) The third type of fibromuscular disease concerned dissections which were observed in the male population, (except one case of segmental dysplasia), and presented with signs of digestive ischemia in the other seven patients, four in an emergency context requiring immediate treatment. Two genetic diseases were observed. a) Neurofibromatosis led to dysplasia analogous to fibromuscular disease, but with abnormal nerve formations in the wall. For the three cases observed, one involved only the visceral arteries and the two others thoraco-abdominal coarctation. b) We had five patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery. For three there was a fusiform dilatation and in one small aneurysms

  7. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Babies Born with CMV (Congenital CMV Infection) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Detection and Intervention Helping Children With Congenital CMV Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  8. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  9. Oxidative Stress and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Serafina; Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the major cause of pulmonary disease in infants. The pathophysiology and management of BPD changed with the improvement of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) management and with the increase of survival rates. Despite the improvements made, BPD is still a public health concern, resulting in frequent hospitalizations with high rates of mortality, impaired weight and height growth, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Lung injury in the neonatal period has multiple etiologic factors – genetic, hemodynamic, metabolic, nutritional, mechanical, and infectious mechanisms – act in a cumulative and synergic way. Free radical (FR) generation is largely recognized as the major cause of lung damage. Oxidative stress (OS) is the final common endpoint for a complex convergence of events, some genetically determined and some triggered by in utero stressors. Inflammatory placental disorders and chorioamnionitis also play an important role due to the coexistence of inflammatory and oxidative lesions. In addition, the contribution of airway inflammation has been extensively studied. The link between inflammation and OS injury involves the direct activation of inflammatory cells, especially granulocytes, which potentiates the inflammatory reaction. Individualized interventions to support ventilation, minimize oxygen exposure, minimize apnea, and encourage growth should decrease both the frequency and severity of BPD. Future perspectives suggest supplementation with enzymatic and/or non-enzymatic antioxidants. The use of antioxidants in preterm newborns particularly exposed to OS and at risk for BPD represents a logical strategy to ameliorate FRs injury, but further studies are needed to support this hypothesis. PMID:24027702

  10. Pulmonary Biomarkers of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alecia; Bhandari, Vineet

    2008-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or BPD, is a chronic pulmonary disorder of premature infants, commonly defined as having an oxygen requirement at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. It is an important source of morbidity and mortality in premature neonates. Its’ etiology appears to be multifactorial with the most common associations being prematurity, need for mechanical ventilation, and oxygen exposure. Implied in the pathogenesis of BPD is the role of cytokines which are immune mediators produced by most cell types. This is evidenced by studies in which there exist alterations in the levels of “pro-inflammatory” and “anti-inflammatory” cytokines. The imbalance of these cytokines have either heralded the onset or predicted the presence of BPD, or indicated a decreased propensity to developing this chronic respiratory disorder of preterm infants. Many other pulmonary markers have been shown to be altered in patients with BPD. These include markers indicative of altered lung repair processes, decreased endothelial integrity, oxidative damage and abnormal fibrinolytic activity, all of which are thought to be mechanisms contributing to the development of BPD. In this review, we will discuss the physiologic role of specific biomarkers in the pulmonary tract of the human premature neonate, the perturbations that enable them to be deranged, and their proposed association with BPD. PMID:19430584

  11. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Noordin, Shahryar; Umer, Masood; Hafeez, Kamran; Nawaz, Haq

    2010-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a spectrum of anatomical abnormalities of the hip joint in which the femoral head has an abnormal relationship with the acetabulum. Most studies report an incidence of 1 to 34 cases per 1,000 live births and differences could be due to different diagnostic methods and timing of evaluation. Risk factors include first born status, female sex, positive family history, breech presentation and oligohydramnios. Clinical presentations of DDH depend on the age of the child. Newborns present with hip instability, infants have limited hip abduction on examination, and older children and adolescents present with limping, joint pain, and/or osteoarthritis. Repeated, careful examination of all infants from birth and throughout the first year of life until the child begins walking is important to prevent late cases. Provocative testing includes the Barlow and Ortolani maneuvers. Other signs, such as shorting of the femur with hips and knees flexed (Galeazzi sign), asymmetry of the thigh or gluteal folds, and discrepancy of leg lengths are potential clues. Treatment depends on age at presentation and outcomes are much better when the child is treated early, particularly during the first six months of life. PMID:21808709

  12. Right Renal Vein Aplasia Associated With Diverted Renal Venous Drainage Through Lower Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Bozlar, Ugur; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Bedir, Selahattin; Ors, Fatih; Coskun, Unsal; Aydur, Emin

    2008-07-15

    We report a unique anomalous renal venous drainage on a 25-year-old man who had congenital absence of the right renal vein and an aberrant venous drainage through the lower pole of the kidney into the inferior vena cava. To our knowledge, this anomaly has not been previously reported in the peer-reviewed literature. State-of-the-art imaging findings are presented.

  13. Skeletal dysplasia in perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta. A complex disorder of endochondral and intramembranous ossification.

    PubMed

    Marion, M J; Gannon, F H; Fallon, M D; Mennuti, M T; Lodato, R F; Kaplan, F S

    1993-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) Type II is a rare heritable disorder of bone matrix that results in catastrophic congenital skeletal dysplasia. Two cases of OI Type II had symmetric rhizomelic skeletal dysplasia apparent on ultrasound at 16 and 20 weeks' gestation. Histologic and histochemical studies performed on skeletal tissue from fetal autopsies showed the following: (1) abnormal growth plate tissue characterized by failure of formation of primary bony spongiosa; (2) persistence of calcified cartilage bars in the diaphysis; (3) metaphyseal microfractures; (4) abundant cartilaginous fracture callus; (5) absence of bony callus; (6) failure of formation of intramembranous cortical diaphyseal bone; (7) angulation of long bones in portions of the metadiaphyses bordered by fracture callus; and (8) mechanical failure of the perichondral ring of LaCroix with a normal fibrous ossification groove of Ranvier. These findings suggest that skeletal dysplasia in OI Type II results from the action of muscular forces on a skeleton weakened by a complex disorder of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. The paucity of primary metaphyseal trabeculae and subperiosteal cortical bone leads to pathologic fractures of the immature fiber bone and an imperfect attempt at fracture repair. Angulation and shortening of long bones occurs between numerous sites of focal endochondral fracture callus. Mechanical failure of the fibrous perichondral ring leads to further collapse and shortening without obvious functional impairment of the fibrous ossification groove. Perinatal lethal OI provides insight into how a molecular disorder predominantly of Type I collagen metabolism results in pathology of numerous tissues, leading to severe skeletal dysplasia without primarily affecting chondrogenesis. PMID:8339500

  14. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  15. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  16. Prospective study of outcome in antenatally diagnosed renal pelvis dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Jaswon, M.; Dibble, L.; Puri, S.; Davis, J.; Young, J.; Dave, R.; Morgan, H.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To ascertain the outcome associated with antenatal renal pelvis dilatation; to recommend guidelines for postnatal investigation and determine an upper limit of normal for the anterioposterior dimensions of the fetal renal pelvis.
METHODS—Infants whose antenatal ultrasound scan showed a fetal renal pelvis of 5 mm or greater were investigated using postnatal renal tract ultrasound and a micturating cystogram. Isotope studies were also performed, where appropriate.
RESULTS—Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), the most common diagnosis, was evident in 23/104 (22%). In 14 infants with VUR the postnatal ultrasound scan was normal. There was no evidence of renal scarring or dysplasia in any of the refluxing kidneys. Other diagnoses were pelviureteric junction obstruction, renal dysplasia, and idiopathic dilatation. Antenatal counselling and parental information facilitated postnatal assessment.
CONCLUSIONS—Infants with antenatal renal pelvis measurements of 5 mm or greater should be investigated postnatally, as a significant percentage will have VUR. A normal postnatal ultrasound scan does not preclude the presence of VUR. 

 PMID:10325792

  17. Complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed cleidocranial dysplasia patient

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Zeng, Binghui; Yu, Dongsheng; Jing, Xiangyi; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital disorder, typically characterized by persistently open skull sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, and supernumerary teeth. Mutations in the gene encoding the runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) protein are responsible for approximately two thirds of CCD patients. We report a 20-year-old CCD patient presenting not only with typical skeletal changes, but also complex dental anomalies. A previously undiagnosed odontoma, 14 supernumerary teeth, a cystic lesion, and previously unreported fused primary teeth were discovered on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Mutation analysis identified the causal c.578G>A (p.R193Q) mutation in the RUNX2 gene. At 20 years of age, the patient had already missed the optimal period for dental intervention. This report describes the complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed CCD patient, and emphasizes the significance of CBCT assessment for the detection of dental anomalies and the importance of early treatment to achieve good outcomes. PMID:26389062

  18. Septo-optic dysplasia: fitting the pieces together

    PubMed Central

    Ferraria, Nélia; Castro, Sofia; Amaral, Daniela; Lopes, Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy was admitted for a general tonic-clonic seizure with severe hypoglycaemia (1.39 mmol/l). His medical history was remarkable for a congenital left eye strabismus, unilateral cryptorchidism and three previous episodes of hypoglycaemic seizures with inconclusive metabolical and neurological investigations. Physical examination revealed a hoarse tone voice, dry skin, cold extremities and height in the third percentile (target height between 50th and 85th percentile). Left wrist radiography revealed a bone age of 4.5 years ±6 months Laboratory studies confirmed growth hormone deficiency and central hypothyroidism. The brain MRI showed an ectopic neurohypophysis. Neuroophthalmology investigation revealed left optic nerve hypoplasia and septo-optic dysplasia was then diagnosed. Thyroid and recombinant growth hormone replacement were started showing clinical improvement. A detailed clinical history and a careful physical examination in children presenting with multiple clinical signs of hypopituitarism may lead to a timely diagnosis, avoiding clinical morbidity associated to untreated hormonal abnormalities. PMID:23709551

  19. Fibrous dysplasia of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Mallina, S; Philip, R; Chong, A W; Gurdeep, S

    2007-06-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a benign disease characterized by a progressive replacement of normal bone elements with fibrous tissue and the temporal bone involvement is uncommon. It has a male:female ratio of 2:1 and is seen more commonly in the first two decades of life. Diagnosis is made based on radiological findings and the modality of treatment is mainly conservative. However, surgery is reserved for preserving function and preventing complications. Fibrous dysplasia in the region of craniofacial bones is of particular interest to the otolaryngologist as it causes deformity and dysfunction that can be debilitating. We present a 49 year old Chinese gentleman with complaints of chronic dizziness over the last one year and had no obvious hearing impairment. Computed tomography of the mastoid revealed fibrous dysplasia of the right temporal bone. This case is of particular interest due to the late presentation as it is more commonly seen in the first two decades of life.

  20. Early Childhood Presentation of Czech Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Lu, James T.; Liu, David S.; Moss, Timothy J.; Gibbs, Richard; Schlesinger, Alan E.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lee, Brendan H.

    2013-01-01

    Czech dysplasia, metatarsal type is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder that is characterized by early-onset, progressive arthritis, brachydactyly of the 3rd and 4th toes, and characteristic radiographic findings in patients of normal stature. Patients with Czech dysplasia typically present in late childhood or later. In the present report, whole exome sequencing identified a mutation in COL2A1 (c.823C>T, p.R275C) known to be associated with Czech dysplasia in a 3.5 year old female who had a family history of early-onset arthritis and who was asymptomatic except for prominent knees. The use of whole exome sequencing facilitated diagnosis of this rare disease (less than 15 families in the literature) in the presymptomatic period and thus enabled us to provide early anticipatory guidance and genetic counseling for the family. PMID:23448908

  1. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  2. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, S; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causing dyshormonogenesis. Genes associated with thyroid gland dysgenesis include the TSH receptor in non-syndromic congenital hypothyroidism, and Gsα and the thyroid transcription factors (TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax-8), associated with different complex syndromes that include congenital hypothyroidism. Among those causing dyshormonogenesis, the thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin genes were initially described, and more recently PDS (Pendred syndrome), NIS (sodium iodide symporter), and THOX2 (thyroid oxidase 2) gene defects. There is also early evidence for a third group of congenital hypothyroid conditions associated with iodothyronine transporter defects associated with severe neurological sequelae. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of primary congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:15863666

  3. Denosumab Treatment for Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, AM; Chong, WH; Yao, J; Gafni, RI; Kelly, MH; Chamberlain, CE; Bassim, C; Cherman, N; Ellsworth, M; Kasa-Vubu, JZ; Farley, FA; Molinolo, AA; Bhattacharyya, N; Collins, MT

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a skeletal disease caused by somatic activating mutations of the cAMP-regulating protein, Gsα. These mutations lead to replacement of normal bone by proliferative osteogenic precursors, resulting in deformity, fracture, and pain. Medical treatment has been ineffective in altering the disease course. RANK ligand (RANKL) is a cell surface protein involved in many cellular processes, including osteoclastogenesis, and is reported to be overexpressed in FD-like bone cells. Denosumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody to RANKL approved for treatment of osteoporosis and prevention of skeletal-related events from bone metastases. We present the case of a 9-year-old boy with severe FD who was treated with denosumab for a rapidly expanding femoral lesion. Immunohistochemical staining on a pre-treatment bone biopsy specimen revealed marked RANKL expression. He was started on monthly denosumab, with an initial starting dose of 1 mg/kg and planned 0.25 mg/kg dose escalations every three months. Over seven months of treatment he showed marked reduction in pain, bone turnover markers, and tumor growth rate. Denosumab did not appear to impair healing of a femoral fracture that occurred while on treatment. With initiation of treatment he developed hypophosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism, necessitating supplementation with phosphorus, calcium and calcitriol. Bone turnover markers (BTM) showed rapid and sustained suppression. With discontinuation there was rapid and dramatic rebound of BTM) with CTX (reflecting osteoclast activity) exceeding pre-treatment levels, and accompanied by severe hypercalcemia. In this child, denosumab lead to dramatic reduction of FD expansion and FD-related bone pain. Denosumab was associated with clinically significant disturbances of mineral metabolism both while on treatment and after discontinuation. Denosumab treatment of FD warrants further study to confirm efficacy and determine potential morbidity, as well as

  4. Glenoid Dysplasia: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Josef K; Galvin, Joseph W; Grassbaugh, Jason A; Parada, Stephen A; Li, Xinning

    2016-06-01

    ➤Subtle forms of glenoid dysplasia may be more common than previously thought and likely predispose some patients to symptomatic posterior shoulder instability. Severe glenoid dysplasia is a rare condition with characteristic radiographic findings involving the posteroinferior aspect of the glenoid that often remains asymptomatic.➤Instability symptoms related to glenoid dysplasia may develop over time with increased activities or trauma. Physical therapy focusing on rotator cuff strengthening and proprioceptive control should be the initial management.➤Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic arthrograms are useful for detecting subtle glenoid dysplasia by revealing the presence of an abnormally thickened or hypertrophic posterior part of the labrum, increased capsular volume, glenoid retroversion, and posteroinferior glenoid deficiency.➤Open and arthroscopic labral repair and capsulorrhaphy procedures have been described for symptomatic posterior shoulder instability. Glenoid retroversion of >10° may be a risk factor for failure following soft-tissue-only procedures for symptomatic glenoid dysplasia.➤Osseous procedures are categorized as either glenoid reorientation (osteotomy) or glenoid augmentation (bone graft), and no predictable results have been demonstrated for any surgical strategy. Glenoid osteotomies have been described for increased retroversion, with successful results, although others have noted substantial complications and poor outcomes.➤In severe glenoid dysplasia, the combination of bone deficiency and retroversion makes glenoid osteotomy extremely challenging. Bone grafts placed in a lateralized position to create a blocking effect may increase the risk of the development of arthritis, while newer techniques that place the graft in a congruent position may decrease this risk. PMID:27252441

  5. Maxillofacial fibrous dysplasia: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Markov, Peter; Syed, Ali Zakir; Markova, Christiana; Mendes, Rui Amaral

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented for orthodontic treatment, with a chief symptom of a 'shifting bite' and concurrent facial asymmetry with aesthetic concerns. The patient had previously received treatment from several general dentists and several specialists, without accurate diagnosis. Radiological investigation coupled with biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. Proper diagnosis led to changes in the treatment plan and gave the patient realistic expectations about the options she had for the outcome of treatment. Prompt diagnosis by dental practitioners is critical to patient satisfaction and successful outcome; therefore, it is important to familiarise ourselves with the signs, symptoms and proper course of management of fibrous dysplasia. PMID:27358102

  6. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, D J; Bergin, A; Rotenberg, A; Peters, J; Gorman, M; Poduri, A; Cryan, J; Lidov, H; Madsen, J; Harini, C

    2014-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and discuss the literature on this topic. PMID:25667877

  7. Turner's syndrome, fibromuscular dysplasia, and stroke.

    PubMed

    Lancman, M; Mesropian, H; Serra, P; Granillo, R

    1991-02-01

    We report a 43-year-old woman who presented with a right frontoparietotemporal ischemic stroke. She had been diagnosed with Turner's syndrome during childhood and had a history of chronic estrogen therapy. Cerebral angiography showed lesions characteristics of fibromuscular dysplasia involving the right internal carotid and right vertebral arteries. We are not aware of any previous reports describing an association between fibromuscular dysplasia and Turner's syndrome. Although chronic estrogen therapy cannot be ruled out as a cause of this patient's stroke, we suggest a possible etiologic relation between these two entities.

  8. Ultrasonic demonstration of fetal skeletal dysplasia. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Muller, L M; Cremin, B J

    1985-02-01

    Reports on prenatal diagnosis in cases of skeletal dysplasia have mostly been in high-risk mothers with a suspect genetic background where the fetal lesion could probably be predetermined. We deal with routine ultrasonographic appraisal of the fetal skeleton when dysplasia is not initially suspected, and relate our experience of the lethal forms of this condition. During the 4-year period 1981-1984, 6 cases of skeletal dysplasia, including thanatophoric dysplasia, achondrogenesis, the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (chondro-ectodermal dysplasia) and osteogenesis imperfecta, were detected; the ultrasonographic findings are discussed. PMID:3885435

  9. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  10. Congenital lobar emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Tural-Kara, Tuğçe; Özdemir, Halil; Çiftçi, Ergin; İnce, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema is a rare disease, which is characterized by pulmoner hyperinflation. Depending on the degree of bronchial obstruction, the clinical presentation may be variable. We report a rare case with congenital lobar emphysema in a 38-days-old male infant who presented with severe respiratory distress and hypertension. Air trapping in the left upper lung and significant mediastinal shift to the right were observed on the chest x-ray. Emphysematous changes were detected on the thorax computed tomography and considered as congenital lobar emphysema. The upper left lobectomy was successfully performed by pediatric surgeons. On postoperative follow up, no sign of respiratory distress occurred and the patient was normotensive. In this report, a case with congenital lobar emphysema, which is a rare cause of respiratory distress and hypertension is discussed. PMID:27381542

  11. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... pigmented nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... baby grows in the womb. In some families bathing trunk nevi may be inherited. The condition may ...

  12. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  13. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  14. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Platelet storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... disorder may also cause severe bleeding. Platelet storage pool disorder (also called platelet secretion disorder) occurs when ...

  15. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Intestinal type villous adenoma of the renal pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Jill; Arnason, Thomas; Merrimen, Jennifer L.O.; Lawen, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal type villous adenomas are uncommon in the genitourinary tract. Most reported cases have been located in the urinary bladder or urachus. Villous adenoma arising in the renal pelvis or ureter is very rare. We present a case of an 81-year-old female who presented with difficulty voiding and mucosuria. A computed tomography scan identified right-sided hydronephrosis, renal parenchymal atrophy, nonobstructing calculi and a lower pole renal mass. She underwent open right nephrectomy. Histopathologic examination of the kidney revealed an intestinal type villous adenoma of the renal pelvis with high-grade dysplasia and focal areas suspicious for invasive adenocarcinoma. We review the four previously reported cases of intestinal type villous adenoma in the renal pelvis and discuss diagnosis and management of this unusual neoplasm. PMID:23671505

  17. Recurrent Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nilton; de Oliveira, Reinaldo José; Takehana, Denise; Deana, Naira Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a condition in which normal bone marrow is replaced by an abnormal proliferation of new fibrous connective tissue. Female patient, white, 20 years old, attended the dental clinic reporting a slow increase in volume in the right mandible region over the last 5 years. She was examined by imaging: the panoramic X-ray revealed a lesion with the appearance of ground glass while the cone-beam computed tomography showed an extensive lesion in the region of the right hemimandible. The histopathological examination was compatible with fibrous dysplasia. Bone gammagraphy was indicated, plus an endocrinological study to eliminate polyostotic forms, which produced a negative result. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the right hemimandible was diagnosed. Conservative surgery was carried out and after 1 year recurrence of the tumour was observed. We may conclude that conservative surgery might not be the best choice for treatment for monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the mandible and that other options must be considered, such as radical surgery or the use of bisphosphonates. In our study, we may also conclude that it is very important to explain to the patient the possibility of recurrence of the lesion and the need for monitoring with periodic imaging studies. PMID:27340572

  18. IQ Measurement in Children with Skeletal Dysplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John G.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    IQ studies on 68 children (5 months-15 years) with skeletal dysplasia (dwarfism) were reviewed to provide counseling to parents of newborn affected children. Results of the study show that this population performs intellectually in the same range as other children. Journal availability: see EC 115 198. (PHR)

  19. Recurrent Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Reinaldo José; Takehana, Denise; Deana, Naira Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a condition in which normal bone marrow is replaced by an abnormal proliferation of new fibrous connective tissue. Female patient, white, 20 years old, attended the dental clinic reporting a slow increase in volume in the right mandible region over the last 5 years. She was examined by imaging: the panoramic X-ray revealed a lesion with the appearance of ground glass while the cone-beam computed tomography showed an extensive lesion in the region of the right hemimandible. The histopathological examination was compatible with fibrous dysplasia. Bone gammagraphy was indicated, plus an endocrinological study to eliminate polyostotic forms, which produced a negative result. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the right hemimandible was diagnosed. Conservative surgery was carried out and after 1 year recurrence of the tumour was observed. We may conclude that conservative surgery might not be the best choice for treatment for monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the mandible and that other options must be considered, such as radical surgery or the use of bisphosphonates. In our study, we may also conclude that it is very important to explain to the patient the possibility of recurrence of the lesion and the need for monitoring with periodic imaging studies. PMID:27340572

  20. Scintigraphic findings in progressive diaphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, M.M.; Billingsley, J.L.; Redwine, M.D.; Turnbull, G.L.; Brown, T.J.

    1982-04-01

    A 14-yr-old white male with a severe form of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann-Camurati disease) was referred to our institution for evaluation of splenomegaly, which is not usually associated with the disease. Our studies included bone-marrow, and liver-spleen scans. These scintigraphic findings, along with the probable cause for splenomegaly, are discussed.

  1. Scintigraphic findings in progressive diaphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, M.M.; Billingsley, M.L.; Redwine, M.D.; Turnbull, G.L.; Brown, T.J.

    1982-04-01

    A 14-yr-old white male with a severe form of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann-Camurati disease) was referred to our institution for evaluation of splenomegaly, which is not usually associated with the disease. Our studies included Tc-99m bone, bone-marrow, and liver-spleen scans. These scintigraphic findings, along with the probable cause for splenomegaly, are discussed.

  2. Specific skeletal dysplasias in utero: sonographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, D H; Rumack, C M; Manco-Johnson, M L; Manchester, D; Meier, P; Bramble, J; Clewell, W

    1986-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed of 13 short-limbed fetuses with lethal skeletal dysplasias that were evaluated with ultrasound (US) from 1981 to 1984. The specific diagnoses were thanatophoric dwarfism, achondrogenesis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and campomelic dwarfism. Death occurred in utero or within 2 weeks after delivery in all cases. US examination showed other associated abnormalities, including polyhydramnios, hydrops, shortened femurs, and CNS abnormalities. Radiographs confirmed these findings and provided more information regarding the shape of the limbs and thorax and the appearance of the spine. The probable diagnosis of lethal short-limbed dwarfism was made antenatally using US in eleven of the fetuses. Spinal appearance, thoracic shape, and associated hydrops and polyhydramnios were most helpful in determining the specific type of dysplasia present. Lethal short-limbed skeletal dysplasia may be diagnosed confidently in utero using US examination; however, obstetric plain film radiography may be required to determine the definitive type of dysplasia. In certain cases, US may be sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:3513248

  3. Antenatal diagnosis of lethal skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Tretter, A E; Saunders, R C; Meyers, C M; Dungan, J S; Grumbach, K; Sun, C C; Campbell, A B; Wulfsberg, E A

    1998-02-17

    Lethal skeletal dysplasias (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of rare but important genetic disorders characterized by abnormal growth and development of bone and cartilage. We describe the diagnosis and outcome of 29 cases of lethal skeletal dysplasias evaluated between January 1989 and December 1996 at the University of Maryland Medical Center and the Ultrasound Institute of Baltimore. Two cases presented at delivery with no prenatal care while the remaining 27 cases were identified by antenatal sonography. Final diagnoses included thanatophoric dysplasia (14), osteogenesis imperfecta, type II (6), achondrogenesis (2), short rib syndromes (3), campomelic syndrome (2), atelosteogenesis (1), and no evidence of a skeletal dysplasia (1). Twenty out of 27 pregnancies were terminated with an average at detection of 21.6 weeks. The other 7 pregnancies that went on to deliver had an average age at detection of 29.2 weeks. Fetal abnormalities in the terminated pregnancies were identified at a significantly earlier gestational age (P = 0.0016) than the pregnancies that continued. While the identification of LSD by sonography was excellent (26/27), only 13/27 (48%) were given an accurate specific antenatal diagnosis. In 8/14 (57%) cases with an inaccurate or nonspecific diagnosis there was a significant or crucial change in the genetic counseling. Thus, while antenatal sonography is an excellent method for discovering LSD, clinical examination, radiographs, and autopsy are mandatory for making a specific diagnosis. PMID:9489797

  4. Autosomal dominant optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Pierpont, M.E.; Carpenter, B.L.M.

    1995-11-06

    We describe a father and 3 sons with optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies. The youngest son had congenital renal failure and ultimately underwent renal transplantation. The father and one son had high frequency hearing loss. There were no other affected relatives. We conclude that the association of optic nerve colobomas, renal anomalies, and vesicoureteral reflux comprises a unique autosomal dominant syndrome. Molecular investigations have determined this disorder to be associated with a single nucleotide deletion in the PAX2 gene. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Surgical Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Congenital Solitary Pelvic Kidney and Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takaaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Sano, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the rare case of a 54-year-old man with uncontrolled renovascular hypertension, who was found to have an abdominal aortic aneurysm with congenital solitary pelvic kidney and superior mesenteric artery stenosis. A single renal artery branched from aneurysmal aortic bifurcation, and both the renal artery and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) had severe stenosis at their origins. The aneurysm was repaired with a bifurcated Dacron graft, to which the renal artery was anastomosed. SMA bypass was created between the graft’s left limb and the SMA using another Dacron graft. The operation was successful, with improvement in renal functions and control of hypertension. PMID:27738466

  6. A Triad of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Meckel's Diverticulum, and Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Al Saied, Amer; Ali, Mansour J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a common developmental anomaly encountered by paediatric surgeons. It is known to be associated with extradiaphragmatic malformations, which include cardiac, renal, genital, and chromosomal abnormalities. Herein, we report a newborn born with concurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia, Meckel's diverticulum, and heterotopic pancreatic tissue. This is the first case report of such a triad with description of possible mechanisms of the development. PMID:24804135

  7. Fetal imaging in the skeletal dysplasias: overview and experience.

    PubMed

    Lachman, R S

    1994-01-01

    The skeletal dysplasias (osteochondrodysplasias) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by generalized abnormalities of skeletal growth and development. Of approximately 125 well-described skeletal dysplasias, about 50 are clinically apparent and identifiable at birth. The prevalence of these dysplasias in the newborn is quite frequent and has been estimated to be between 3-4.5 per 10,000, and the overall frequency of skeletal dysplasias among perinatal deaths to be about 9 per 1,000. Over the past 23 years we have acquired an enormous experience in the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry with skeletal dysplasias diagnosable at birth or earlier. More and more cases referred to the registry over the past 2 years have been diagnosed as abnormal by ultrasound during the second trimester. The results of our evaluation of almost 400 fetuses and stillborn babies with reference to detailed prenatal history and postmortem evaluation including radiographs, chondro-osseous morphology and even some biochemical and molecular studies are presented. The most common disorders diagnosed were osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), thanatophoric dysplasia, campomelic dysplasia and achondrogenesis type II. Twenty-two types of neonatally diagnosable skeletal dysplasias are discussed together with potential fetal (second trimester) ultrasound findings, the number of fetal ultrasound cases referred to this registry, the number of total cases of that disorder sent to our registry, and the inheritance pattern of that skeletal dysplasia. This information should prove helpful in the evaluation of future cases ascertained by ultrasonography in the second trimester. PMID:7700717

  8. Urine β 2-Microglobolin in the Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Noor Mohammad; Sadeghi, Simin; Shahramian, Iraj; Keshavarz, Kambiz

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the renal tubular function in the patients with congenital heart disease using β2-microglobulin. Methods In this case-control study, based on oxymetry, the patients with congenital heart disease were divided into two groups of cyanotic (n=20) and acyanotic (n=20). Congenital heart disease was diagnosed by echocardiography. Healthy individuals within the same age and sex groups were used as controls. Na+, β2-micro globulin, creatinine (Cr), and β2-microglobulin/Cr ratio were measured in random urine samples and the results were compared to the same parameters in the control group using Tukey, One-Way ANOVA, and X2 tests. Results Based on the study results, urine sodium in the patients with cyanotic heart disease was significantly different from that of the controls (P=0.023). The results also revealed a significant difference between the two groups with congenital heart disease regarding urine β2-microglobulin (P=0.045). In addition, the patients with cyanotic heart disease were significantly different from those with acyanotic heart disease and the controls regarding urine β2-micro globulin/Cr ratio (P=0.012 and P=0.026, respectively). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrated that renal tubular dysfunction began in the patients with congenital heart disease, especially in those with cyanotic congenital heart disease. Besides, early diagnosis before cardiac surgery leads to better control of renal tubular disease. PMID:24757623

  9. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  10. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  11. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. PMID:27301600

  12. Snapping during manual stretching in congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J C; Chen, T M; Tang, S P; Shum, S L; Wong, M W; Metreweli, C

    2001-03-01

    Manual stretching frequently is used in the treatment of congenital muscular torticollis in infants. During manipulation, it is not uncommon for the sternocleidomastoid muscle to snap or suddenly give way. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the predisposing causes and clinical significance of such snapping. Four hundred fifty-five patients younger than 1 year of age with congenital muscular torticollis treated with a standardized gentle manual stretching program during a 13-year period were studied. Using prospective standardized assessment parameters, the pretreatment, treatment, and followup results of a group of 41 patients with snapping detected during treatment were compared with the results of a group of 404 patients without snapping during treatment. The group with snapping was associated with a more severe sternomastoid tumor, higher incidence of hip dysplasia, earlier clinical presentation, and shorter duration of treatment. With a mean followup of 3.5 years, the group with snapping was not different from the group that had no snapping in the final assessment score and percentage requiring surgery. From this study, unintentional snapping during the gentle manipulation treatment of congenital muscular torticollis has clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of partial or complete rupture of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. No long-term deleterious effect on the outcome was observed after the snapping.

  13. Post-mortem cytogenomic investigations in patients with congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Montenegro, Marilia Moreira; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Rocha, Mariana; Madia, Fabricia Andreia Rosa; Costa, Thais Virgínia Moura Machado; Milani, Cintia; Schultz, Regina; Gonçalves, Fernanda Toledo; Fridman, Cintia; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2016-08-01

    Congenital anomalies are the second highest cause of infant deaths, and, in most cases, diagnosis is a challenge. In this study, we characterize patterns of DNA copy number aberrations in different samples of post-mortem tissues from patients with congenital malformations. Twenty-eight patients undergoing autopsy were cytogenomically evaluated using several methods, specifically, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), microsatellite marker analysis with a MiniFiler kit, FISH, a cytogenomic array technique and bidirectional Sanger sequencing, which were performed on samples of different tissues (brain, heart, liver, skin and diaphragm) preserved in RNAlater, in formaldehyde or by paraffin-embedding. The results identified 13 patients with pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs). Of these, eight presented aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y (two presented inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism). In addition, other abnormalities were found, including duplication of the TYMS gene (18p11.32); deletion of the CHL1 gene (3p26.3); deletion of the HIC1 gene (17p13.3); and deletion of the TOM1L2 gene (17p11.2). One patient had a pathogenic missense mutation of g.8535C>G (c.746C>G) in exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene consistent with Thanatophoric Dysplasia type I. Cytogenomic techniques were reliable for the analysis of autopsy material and allowed the identification of inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of congenital malformations. PMID:27450648

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Edwards, Donna H.; Buckley, Paul F., III; DeCosta, Joseph F.; Haggitt, Rodger C.

    1996-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether laser-induced fluorescence could detect high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus. Four-hundred-ten nm laser light was used to induce autofluorescence of Barrett's mucosa in 36 patients during routine endoscopy. The spectra were analyzed using the Differential Normalized Fluorescence (DNF) Index technique to differentiate high grade dysplasia from either low grade or non-dysplastic mucosa. Each spectrum was classified as either premalignant or benign using two different DNF indices. Analyzing the fluorescence spectra from all patients using one DNF Index, 96% of non- dysplastic Barrett's samples classified as benign tissue. All low grade dysplasia samples classified as benign. Ninety percent of high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. Twenty-eight percent of mixed low grade/focal high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. In summary, high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus patients can be detected by endoscopic laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using differential normalized fluorescence technique.

  15. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26115617

  16. The association of sphenoidal encephalocele and right anophthalmia with septo-optic dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Erol, Fatih Serhat; Ucler, Necati; Kaplan, Metin; Yilmaz, Ilhan

    2012-01-01

    Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is an extremely rare congenital anomaly, characterized with optic nerve hypoplasia and absence of septum pellucidum and/or pituitary dysfunction. In addition to classical findings of SOD, we report for the first time an 11-year-old boy, with encephalocele extending to the right sphenoidal sinus, right anophthalmia and normal pituitary functions. Despite all the major anomalies, the patient's presenting symptoms were very few and during the 11-year period the SDO had caused no complaints in our case. These findings show that the SOD course may be fairly benign. No neurological problem was encountered in the patient's follow-up, except headache. We believe that SOD should be kept in mind because of its rarity and the severity of its combined pathologies.

  17. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy.

  18. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  19. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  20. Treatment of Dysplasia in Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Hernandez, Javier; Cirocco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Barrett esophagus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage with a 5-year survival rate of 15%. Most of these patients present de novo and are not part of a surveillance program. Endoscopic screening with improvement in recognition of early lesions may change this pattern. In the past, patients diagnosed with dysplasia and mucosal cancer were best managed by esophagectomy. Endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and radiofrequency ablation have resulted in high curative rates and a shift away from esophagectomy. This pathway is supported by the literature review of esophagectomies performed for mucosal disease, as well as pathologists' interpretation of endoscopic mucosal specimens, which document the low risk of lymph node metastasis. The role of endoscopic therapy for superficial submucosal disease continues to be a challenge. PMID:24570884

  1. Cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking right ventricular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Jun; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Shimoo, Kazutoshi; Katsume, Asako; Mani, Hiroki; Kobara, Miyuki; Shirayama, Takeshi; Azuma, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Masao

    2003-02-01

    A 59-year-old woman with skin sarcoidosis was admitted to hospital for assessment of complete atrioventricular block. Cross-sectional echocardiography showed that the apical free wall of the right ventricle was thin and dyskinetic with dilation of the right ventricle. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging revealed a normal distribution. Both gallium-67 and technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy revealed no abnormal uptake in the myocardium. Right ventriculography showed chamber dilation and dyskinesis of the apical free wall, whereas left ventriculography showed normokinesis, mimicking right ventricular dysplasia. Cardiac sarcoidosis was diagnosed on examination of an endomyocardial biopsy specimen from the right ventricle. A permanent pacemaker was implanted to manage the complete atrioventricular block. After steroid treatment, electrocardiography showed first-degree atrioventricular block and echocardiography revealed an improvement in the right ventricular chamber dilation. Reports of cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking right ventricular dysplasia are extremely rare and as this case shows, right ventricular involvement may be one of its manifestations.

  2. Thanatophoric dysplasia. A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sundkvist, L

    1983-09-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia is an osteochondrodysplasia always lethal already in the neonatal period. Three cases, showing the characteristic X-ray picture of the disease, are described. Histopathologically, an abnormality in the endochondral ossification process was observed. In sections from tubular bones the growth zone was found to be irregular with deficient chondrocyte maturation, absence of orderly chondrocyte columns, and the development of coarse bone trabeculae. Moreover, prominent subperiostal bone formation could be demonstrated. A constant finding was also a fibrous band, continuous with the periosteum/perichondrium, and extending into the growth zone. From this fibrous tissue membranous bone formation, directed towards the metaphysis and appearing to add to bone length, was observed. It seems as if direct bone formation predominates in thanatophoric dysplasia.

  3. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. A cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, R I; Wood, B P

    1980-07-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita is a form of primary short dwarfism, that is manifest at birth generally has not been regarded as a cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism. Seven neonates with severe dwarfism are presented. The first survived the newborn period, but the other six were early neonatal deaths. All displayed the clinical and radiologic features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. The striking similarities between spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita and achondrogenesis type 2 are discussed. PMID:6773018

  4. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  5. [Thanatophoric dysplasia: case-based bioethical analysis].

    PubMed

    Abarca, Edgar; Rodríguez, Alejandra; Casas, Donovan; Espíndola, Esteban

    2014-04-29

    This paper presents a case report of thanatophoric dysplasia diagnosed in the prenatal period using ultrasound standards. The course of the case pregnancy, birth process, and postnatal period is described. This report invites bioethical analysis using its principles, appealing to human dignity, diversity and otherness, particularly in the mother-child dyad and their family. An early diagnosis allows parental support as they face the course of this condition and its potentially fatal outcome.

  6. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K V S Hari; Aravinda, K; Narayanan, K

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone disorder characterized by alteration in bone morphology. Monostotic FD is the commonest variant and affects the craniofacial bones. Raynaud's phenomenon is recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes due to cold exposure. The disease is usually idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disorders. Raynaud's phenomenon is not described previously with FD. We recently encountered two interesting patients of craniofacial monostotic FD with Raynaud's phenomenon and report the same in this report.

  7. Newer Imaging Techniques for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Laura L; Woods, Jason C

    2015-12-01

    Imaging has played a vital role in the clinical assessment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) since its first recognition. In this review, how chest radiograph, computerized tomography (CT), nuclear medicine, and MRI have contributed to the understanding of BPD pathology and how emerging advancements in these methods, including low-dose and quantitative CT, sophisticated proton and hyperpolarized-gas MRI, influence the future of BPD imaging are discussed. PMID:26593084

  8. Analysis of Renal Anomalies in VACTERL Association

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bridget K.; Khromykh, Alina; Martinez, Ariel F.; Carney, Tyler; Hadley, Donald W.; Solomon, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    VACTERL association refers to a combination of congenital anomalies that can include: Vertebral anomalies, Anal atresia, Cardiac malformations, Tracheo-Esophageal fistula with esophageal atresia, Renal anomalies (typically structural renal anomalies), and Limb anomalies. We conducted a description of a case series to characterize renal findings in a cohort of patients with VACTERL association. Out of the overall cohort, 48 patients (with at least 3 component features of VACTERL and who had abdominal ultrasound performed) met criteria for analysis. Four other patients were additionally analyzed separately, with the hypothesis that subtle renal system anomalies may occur in patients who would not otherwise meet criteria for VACTERL association. Thirty-three (69%) of the 48 patients had a clinical manifestation affecting the renal system. The most common renal manifestation (RM) was vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in addition to a structural defect (present in 27%), followed by unilateral renal agenesis (24%), and then dysplastic/multicystic kidneys or duplicated collected system (18% for each). Twenty-two (88%) of the 25 patients with a structural RM had an associated anorectal malformation. Individuals with either isolated lower anatomic anomalies, or both upper and lower anatomic anomalies were not statistically more likely to have a structural renal defect than those with isolated upper anatomic anomalies (p=0.22, p=0.284 respectively). Given the high prevalence of isolated VUR in our cohort, we recommend a screening VCUG or other imaging modality be obtained to evaluate for VUR if initial renal US shows evidence of obstruction or renal scarring, as well as ongoing evaluation of renal health. PMID:25196458

  9. [Retinal and corneal dysplasias in the Yorkshire terrier and other dog breeds in Austria].

    PubMed

    Walde, I

    1997-01-01

    Mother and son of a Yorkshire Terrier family showed excessive multifocal retinal dysplasia (RD1) and geographical retinal dysplasia (RD2), intra- and preretinal hemorrhages partial and total retinal detachment (total RD/RD3), residues of the pupillary membrane and as a newness in this combination a geographical, subepithelial corneal opacity, composed of small dots. One, not examined son of the same litter was congenitally blind. Similar corneal opacities were also found in two Rough Collies affected with CEA, RD, and microphthalmia, a young German Wirehair Pointer with primary absolute glaucoma in conjunction with goniodysplasia and RD in the healthy seeming fellow eye as well as in a poodle puppy affected with bilateral posterior suture-line cataract in connection with persistent primary hyperplastic vitreous (PHPV) in one and a globe-shaped deformed retina in connection with a persistent, blood conducting hyaloid artery in the other eye. The latter finally resulted in intraocular hemorrhage and secondary glaucoma. A pathogenetic connection between ocular malformations and subepithelial corneal opacity seems to be likely.

  10. Optic disc anomalies and frontonasal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, P; Lees, M; Lawson, J; Reardon, W; Leitch, J; Thorogood, P; Winter, R; Taylor, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To document the optic disc abnormalities in patients with frontonasal dysplasia in association with basal encephalocele.
METHODS—Names and hospital numbers of patients with midline clefts were obtained from the ophthalmology and genetics database. Six patients were identified who had the following common findings: midline facial cleft with midline cleft lip and palate; hypertelorism; absent corpus callosum; basal (sphenoethmoidal) encephalocele; and pituitary deficiency (five out of six cases). Ophthalmic examination was performed with fundal photography where possible.
RESULTS—Two patients had unilateral and one a bilateral peripapillary staphyloma. Two patients had bilateral optic disc hypoplasia and one appeared to have a peripapillary staphyloma in one eye and a morning glory disc in the other.
CONCLUSION—Optic disc abnormalities were found in all patients with this constellation of clinical findings. This association appears to represent a distinct subgroup within the spectrum of frontonasal dysplasia. The presence of midline facial anomalies and any dysplastic disc should alert the physician as to the presence of an encephalocele.

 Keywords: frontonasal dysplasia; optic disc; encephalocele PMID:9602627

  11. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  12. Histopathology in Barrett Esophagus and Barrett Esophagus-Related Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic specimens, both biopsies and endoscopic mucosal resections, for Barrett esophagus and Barrett-associated dysplasia and malignancy are common for pathologists in North America, and the incidence in South Asian countries seems to be increasing. Dysplasia and malignancy arising in intestinalized gastric-type mucosa raises issues in the interpretation of dysplasia and the evaluation of the depth of invasion of malignancies that are not seen in squamous dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma. We review the North American approach to these lesions. PMID:24570881

  13. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia: review and a case report.

    PubMed

    Salem, Y M Y; Osman, Y I; Norval, E J G

    2010-10-01

    Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia is a benign fibro-osseous condition that can be seen in dentate and edentulous patients. It is an asymptomatic lesion and needs no treatment; however follow-up is essential due to the possibility that focal cemento-osseous dysplasia can progress to a condition called florid osseous dysplasia that involves multiple sites. A case report is presented here, along with a review of the differential diagnoses considered in order to reach a final diagnosis of focal cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  14. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  15. Management of Renal Artery Stenosis - an Update

    PubMed Central

    Alhadad, A

    2008-01-01

    The role of the renal vasculature in eliciting renovascular hypertension (RVH) was established in 1934, when Goldblatt et al. [1] in a classical experimental study demonstrated that partial obstruction of the renal artery increased mean arterial blood pressure (BP). The pathophysiology of renal artery stenosis (RAS) is incompletely understood but has been postulated to be related to increased afterload from neurohormonal activation and cytokine release [2]. Atherosclerotic RAS (ARAS) is increasingly diagnosed in the expanding elderly population, which also has a high prevalence of arterial hypertension. There is still considerable uncertainty concerning the optimal management of patients with RAS. Many hypertensive patients with RAS have co-existing essential hypertension and furthermore, it is often difficult to determine to what degree the RAS is responsible for the impairment of renal function. There are three possible treatment strategies: medical management, surgery, or percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) with or without stent implantation. The use of stents has improved the technical success rate of PTRA and also led to lower risk of restenosis, in particular for ostial RAS. PTRA with stenting has therefore replaced surgical revascularisation for most patients with RAS and has led to a lower threshold for intervention. The treatment of choice to control hypertension in fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is generally accepted to be PTRA [3]. In ARAS, on the other hand, the benefits with PTRA are less clear [4] and the challenge to identify which patients are likely to benefit from revascularisation remains unknown. PMID:21499465

  16. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  17. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  18. Fibrocartilaginous Dysplasia of the Bone: A Rare Variant of Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Fibrocartilaginous dysplasia (FCD) is a rare variant of fibrous dysplasia (FD) which frequently involves the long bones, and the proximal femur is the most commonly affected site. This benign, lytic, and expansile bone lesion causes progressive deformity in the bones and may lead to pathological fracture. Radiologically, this lesion may mimic cartilaginous benign and malignant bone tumors. Therefore, histopathological differentiation of FCD from other cartilaginous tumors is of the utmost importance. The treatment is often surgical, in the form of curettage and bone grafting or corrective osteotomy, to treat progressive deformity in the long bones. The risk of pathological fracture is high in FCD with bony deformity and often requires surgery. PMID:26918216

  19. Glomerulonephritis and managing the risks of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmeet R

    2009-12-01

    The rising global burden of chronic renal disease, the high cost of providing renal replacement therapies, and renal disease also being a risk factor for cardiovascular disease is increasing focus on renal disease prevention. This article focuses on the aspects of renal disease (specifically poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis [PSGN] and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) in Indigenous populations in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States that diverge from those typically seen in the general population of those countries. The spectrum of renal and many other diseases seen in Indigenous people in developed countries is similar to that seen in developing countries. Diseases like PSGN that have largely disappeared in developed countries still occur frequently in Indigenous people. CKD during the childhood years is due to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in up to 70% of cases and occurs later in polycystic kidney disease and childhood-onset diabetes. Several risk factors for CKD in adulthood are already present in childhood.

  20. [Diagnosis of congenital infection].

    PubMed

    Sampedro Martínez, Antonio; Martínez, Luis Aliaga; Teatino, Pablo Mazuelas; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier

    2011-12-01

    In general, congenital diagnosis is based on: a) maternal serologic assays; b) microbiologic study of amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling; and c) serology in children and microorganism detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or culture. Congenital infections due to cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, varicella, B19 erythrovirus and toxoplasmosis are usually the result of primary infection in the mother. Therefore, when IgG antibodies are detected before pregnancy, these infections are ruled out. Definitive serologic diagnosis of acute infection in pregnant women requires the demonstration of seroconversion (i.e., from seronegative to seropositive). In these cases, amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling should be performed to determine the presence of intrauterine congenital infection. Cytomegalovirus, rubella and toxoplasmosis can be diagnosed by detection of specific IgM antibodies in fetal blood. However, PCR in amniotic fluid has replaced conventional prenatal diagnostic techniques, including fetal blood sampling, in the diagnosis of these infections. In the newborn, these infections may be confirmed by measuring IgM specific antibodies. B19 erythrovirus can be detected by PCR in amniotic fluid or fetal blood. Congenital varicella-zoster infection may be diagnosed on the basis of persistence of IgG antibodies after birth. Definitive diagnosis of herpes simplex virus infection requires viral isolation. Swabs or scraping from clinical specimens can be inoculated into susceptible cell lines for isolation. PMID:22305665

  1. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  2. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  3. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  4. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barmash and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  5. Autism and Congenital Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Lee, Anthony; Brown, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    This study compared a group of nine children (ages 3 to 8) with congenital blindness and an autism-like syndrome with nine sighted children. Children with autism had more severe abnormalities in terms of their relationships with people and emotional expressions, and were more impaired in the area of pretend play. (CR)

  6. Multiple congenital coagulation deficiencies.

    PubMed

    BONNIN, J A; HICKS, N D; INNIS, M D; SIMPSON, D A

    1960-07-01

    A 6-week-old infant is presented who suffered from a congenital haemorrhagic disorder which caused death from subdural haemorrhage following mild trauma. Haematological investigation revealed deficiencies of factor VII and Christmas factor. Prower-Stuart factor was probably also deficient although investigation of this clotting factor was carried out only on serum obtained at necropsy.

  7. Retrospective analysis of co-occurrence of congenital aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kander, M; Pasławska, U; Staszczyk, M; Cepiel, A; Pasławski, R; Mazur, G; Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2015-01-01

    The study has focused on the retrospective analysis of cases of coexisting congenital aortic stenosis (AS) and pulmonary artery stenosis (PS) in dogs. The research included 5463 dogs which were referred for cardiological examination (including clinical examination, ECG and echocardiography) between 2004 and 2014. Aortic stenosis and PS stenosis were detected in 31 dogs. This complex defect was the most commonly diagnosed in Boxers - 7 dogs, other breeds were represented by: 4 cross-breed dogs, 2 Bichon Maltais, 3 Miniature Pinschers, 2 Bernese Mountain Dogs, 2 French Bulldogs, and individuals of following breeds: Bichon Frise, Bull Terrier, Czech Wolfdog, German Shepherd, Hairless Chinese Crested Dog, Miniature Schnauzer, Pug, Rottweiler, Samoyed, West Highland White Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier. In all the dogs, the murmurs could be heard, graded from 2 to 5 (on a scale of 1-6). Besides, in 9 cases other congenital defects were diagnosed: patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve dysplasia, pulmonary or aortic valve regurgitation, tricuspid valve dysplasia, ventricular or atrial septal defect. The majority of the dogs suffered from pulmonary valvular stenosis (1 dog had supravalvular pulmonary artery stenosis) and subvalvular aortic stenosis (2 dogs had valvular aortic stenosis). Conclusions and clinical relevance - co-occurrence of AS and PS is the most common complex congenital heart defect. Boxer breed was predisposed to this complex defect. It was found that coexisting AS and PS is more common in male dogs and the degree of PS and AS was mostly similar.

  8. [Prevalence of bone dysplasias in newborns at the Ruíz y Páez Hospital in Bolívar City. Venezuela. 1978-1990].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, O; Brito-Arreaza, A; Alvarez-Arratia, M C; Ramírez, N

    1991-01-01

    A congenital malformations surveillance program in effect at the Ruiz y Páez Hospital in Ciudad Bolívar since April 1978, has allowed us to detect 25 patients with osteochondrodysplasias (OCD) in a total of 70,152 newborns, up to August 1990, for a prevalence of one case of OCD every 2,806 newborns. The clinical entities found were: Achondroplasia, Thanatophoric Dysplasia, Osteogenesis Imperfecta II-A, Camptomelic Dysplasia, Kniest Dysplasia, Conradi-Hunnerman syndrome, Parenti-Fracaro type Achondrogenesis and Jeune Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia. The results presented in this paper indicate that this type of diseases represent a relatively important group of nosological entities adding up to more than 200 new annual cases in the country. This relatively high frequency, the different inheritance mechanisms involved, the variable complications and the high morbidity and mortality rate of these diseases, make the patients affected, a problematic group not receiving, in general, adequate medical attention regarding diagnosis, genetic counselling and treatment. PMID:1807399

  9. The dental management of troublesome twos: renal tubular acidosis and rampant caries

    PubMed Central

    B, Sandhyarani; Huddar, Dayanand; Patil, Anil; Sankeshwari, Banashree

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis is a group of disorders in which there is metabolic acidosis due to defect in renal tubular acidification mechanism to maintain normal plasma bicarbonate and blood pH. Irrespective of organ system involved, oral cavity often reflects the disease occurring anywhere in the body. Thus congenital chronic renal diseases, causing acid–base disturbances affects development and structure of the teeth. Chronic renal tubular acidosis causes enamel defects, dental caries, oral candidiasis, angular cheilitis, etc. We hereby present an unusual case report of a 4-year-old boy suffering from renal tubular acidosis associated with rampant caries, whose full mouth rehabilitation has been done. PMID:23667245

  10. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, R L; Campbell, F; Brenbridge, A N

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis. PMID:6462825

  11. A novel association of alveolar capillary dysplasia, atypical duodenal atresia, and subglottic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takeru; Fukuda, Taeko; Inomata, Shinichi; Satsumae, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD), which is a rare and lethal congenital pulmonary anomaly found in newborns, begins its onset or causes deterioration of the infant's condition some time after birth. Various congenital anomalies in combination with ACD have been reported, except for subglottic stenosis. Therefore, we aim to report a novel association in a case of ACD with the combination of atypical duodenal atresia and subglottic stenosis. The male infant was scheduled for duodeno-duodenostomy because a double-bubble sign was observed on a chest radiograph. He arrived at the operating theater without any symptoms. After induction of general anesthesia, although mask ventilation was performed without difficulties throughout the entire procedure, oxygen saturation values of the upper and lower extremities dissociated after several attempts of intubation. Surgery was canceled because of instability of the respiratory condition. Respiratory insufficiency worsened progressively, and the infant died at 5 days of age. An autopsy confirmed ACD and revealed cartilaginous subglottic stenosis, which had made intubation difficult. This report highlights the hazards of the onset and worsening of ACD, and the importance of thorough echocardiography before surgery when atypical duodenal atresia is suspected. Anesthesiologists should also be prepared for the difficulty of intubation.

  12. Update on congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Anil K; Chakrabarti, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma is a global problem and poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. A detailed evaluation under general anesthesia is advisable to establish the diagnosis and plan for management. Medical therapy has a limited role and surgery remains the primary therapeutic modality. While goniotomy or trabeculotomy ab externo is valuable in the management of congenital glaucoma, primary combined trabeculotomy–trabeculectomy offers the best hope of success in advanced cases. Trabeculectomy with antifibrotic agent and glaucoma drainage devices has a role in the management of refractory cases, and cyclodestructive procedures should be reserved for patients where these procedures have failed. Early diagnosis, prompt therapeutic intervention and proper refractive correction are keys to success. Management of residual vision and visual rehabilitation should be an integral part of the management of children with low vision and lifelong follow-up is a must. PMID:21150027

  13. Congenital idiopathic clubfoot deformities.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S P; Stark, S L

    1995-03-01

    Clubfoot is a birth defect that is marked primarily by a deformed talus (ie, ankle) and calcaneous (ie, heel) that give the foot a characteristic "club-like" appearance. In congenital idiopathic clubfoot (ie, talipes equinovarus), the infant's foot points downward (ie, equinus) and turns inward (ie, varus), while the forefoot curls toward the heel (ie, adduction). This congenital disorder has an incidence of 1 in 400 live births, with boys affected twice as often as girls. Unilateral clubfoot is somewhat more common than bilateral clubfoot and may occur as an isolated defect or in association with other disorders (eg, chromosomal aberrations, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, arthrogryposis). Infantile clubfoot deformity is painless and is correctable with early diagnosis and prompt treatment. PMID:7778903

  14. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshingkar, S A; Barpande, S R; Bhavthankar, J D

    2011-07-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  15. Congenital lipodystrophies and dyslipidemias.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Xavier; Le May, Cedric; Magré, Jocelyne; Cariou, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    Lipodystrophies are rare acquired and genetic disorders characterized by the selective loss of adipose tissue. One key metabolic feature of patients with congenital inherited lipodystrophy is hypertriglyceridemia. The precise mechanisms by which the lack of adipose tissue causes dyslipidemia remain largely unknown. In recent years, new insights have arisen from data obtained in vitro in adipocytes, yeast, drosophila, and very recently in several genetically modified mouse models of generalized lipodystrophy. A common metabolic pathway involving accelerated lipolysis and defective energy storage seems to contribute to the dyslipidemia associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy syndromes, although the pathophysiological changes may vary with the nature of the mutation involved. Therapeutic management of dyslipidemia in patients with lipodystrophy is primarily based on specific approaches using recombinant leptin therapy. Preclinical studies suggest a potential efficacy of thiazolidinediones that remains to be assessed in dedicated clinical trials.

  16. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Deshingkar, S. A.; Barpande, S. R.; Bhavthankar, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  17. Renal cell carcinoma arising in ipsilateral duplex system.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Harsh; Kundu, Reetu; Dalal, Usha

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract are common and include a wide anatomic spectrum. Duplex systems are one of the more common renal anomalies, with the majority being asymptomatic. Little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of these anomalies; however, certain causative genes have been implicated. The finding of renal cell carcinoma arising in a kidney with the duplication of pelvicalyceal system and ureters, as in the present case, is uncommon. The association between a duplex system and renal cell carcinoma may be more than a coincidence, requiring a deeper insight and further elucidation. PMID:26328175

  18. Chondroblastoma of the acromion mimicking fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Carsten; Hardes, Jendrik; Streitbürger, Arne; Vieth, Volker; Bürger, Horst; Winkelmann, Winfried; Gosheger, Georg

    2004-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with an expansive osteolytic lesion in the right acromion, mimicking cystic fibrous dysplasia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lesion with intermediate-signal intensity on T1-weighted images and a high-signal intensity on fat suppressed T2-weighted images. The biopsy led to the diagnosis of chondroblastoma. This tumour is rare in flat bones, and may mimic other benign or malignant lesions. It is therefore essential to perform a biopsy in order to obtain a definite diagnosis. The acromion was excised, and replaced with an iliac crest graft. PMID:15669467

  19. Hip dysplasia in the skeletally mature patient.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Kaye, Ian David; Slover, James; Feldman, David

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hip development causes one-quarter to one-half of all hip disease. Dysplastic hips typically share characteristic anatomic abnormalities. The dysplastic acetabulum is typically shallow, lateralized, and anteverted with insufficient coverage anteriorly, superiorly, and laterally. The dysplastic proximal femur has a small femoral head with excessive femoral neck anteversion and a short neck with an increased neck shaft angle. These characteristic changes result in intraarticular pathology leading to hip arthritis. A variety of treatment options exist based on the degree of dysplasia and the amount of concomitant hip arthritis. Treatment options include hip arthroscopy, acetabular or femoral osteotomies, hip arthrodesis, and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25150325

  20. [Dysplasia in the development of the hip].

    PubMed

    Moraleda, L; Albiñana, J; Salcedo, M; Gonzalez-Moran, G

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) causes anatomical changes that cause early coxarthrosis. Although risf factors have been determined, the aetiology and physiopathology remains exactly unknown. Neonatal screening with physical examination and ultrasound have been stablished in order to diagnose this disease early in life. A diagnosis in the first months of life is essential as it enables a normal hip to form and prevent the appearance of early coxarthrosis. Treatment principles are to be able to reduce the hip without provoking avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and to normalize the acetabular development. Knowledge of the orthopaedic and surgical options is essential in order to achieve success in the treatment.

  1. Oxygen Saturation Targeting and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Darlow, Brian A; Morley, Colin J

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen saturation targeting is widely used in neonatal intensive care, but the optimal target range in very preterm infants has been uncertain and is the subject of recent debate and research. This review briefly discusses the technology of oxygen monitoring and the role of oxygen toxicity in preterm infants. The background to the recent trials of oxygen saturation targeting in acute and continuing care of very preterm infants is reviewed, and the findings and implications of the recent trials, particularly with respect to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, are discussed.

  2. Congenital brachymetatarsia: three cases.

    PubMed

    Ferrández, L; Yubero, J; Usabiaga, J; Ramos, L

    1993-01-01

    We report on three cases with congenital brachymetatarsia, one with bilateral affectation, together with the results of a lengthening of the short metatarsal bones by progressive axial distraction using an external minifixator. The method proved to be easy to implement, permitting immediate functionality of the ankle and early load bearing. The immediate results (cosmetic) and later findings (functional) were excellent in all three cases. PMID:8314189

  3. Congenital scoliosis - Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ujjwal K; Goel, Vivek; Harshavardhana, Nanjanduppa; Webb, John K

    2010-04-01

    Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV) which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions) and patient's age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only) surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the armamentarium of the

  4. Stroboscopy in detection of laryngeal dysplasia effectiveness and limitations.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Vojko; Milovanovic, Jovica; Jotic, Ana D; Vukasinovic, Milan

    2014-03-01

    Vocal fold pathology changes the appearance and vibratory patterns observed during stroboscopic examination, but a strict correlation between the vibratory pattern and the dysplasia type does not exist. The aims of this study were to determine the role of stroboscopy in vocal fold dysplasia assessment and to determine whether stroboscopy is the deciding factor when performing laryngomicroscopy with biopsy in suspicious lesions. This prospective controlled study involved 112 patients with laryngeal dysplasia treated over a 2-year period at a tertiary medical center. Patient data and clinical, stroboscopy, laryngomicroscopy, and histopathologic reports were reviewed. During the stroboscopy, glottic occlusion, phase symmetry, periodicity, amplitude, mucosal wave, and nonvibratory segments were followed. Laryngomicroscopy with different types of endoscopic cordectomies (types I-III) was performed as a therapeutic measure, with a 12-month follow-up period. Nonvibrating segments were present in 15.1% of the patients with mild dysplasia and in 38.5% of the patients with moderate dysplasia. In 45.5% of the patients with severe dysplasia (carcinoma in situ), nonvibrating segments were absent. The amplitude of vocal fold vibrations in patients with mild dysplasia (P=0.03) was a significant factor indicative of recurrent disease, but none of the stroboscopic signs was significant for the disease progression. Severe dysplasia can be related to both nonvibrating and vibrating vocal fold segments. Stroboscopy cannot be used reliably for classifying laryngeal dysplasia and may indicate the need to perform laryngomicroscopy with biopsy in suspicious vocal fold lesions. The warning factors for recurrence and progression of dysplasia are treatment modality, abnormal amplitude of vibration, and nonvibrating segment. PMID:24275461

  5. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  6. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  7. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is.

  8. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  9. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  10. Congenital Cataract Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  11. Congenital anomalies of kidney and upper urinary tract in children with congenital hypothyroidism; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Rafeie, Mohammad; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Safi, Fatemeh; Amiri, Mohammad; Ebrahimimonfared, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may be significantly associated with congenital malformations. However, there is little evidence on the relationship between renal and urinary tract anomalies and CH. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the renal and upper urinary tract anomalies in children with and without primary CH (PCH). Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 200 children aged 3 months to 1 year, referring to Amir-Kabir hospital, Arak, Iran. One hundred children with PCH, as the case group, and 100 children without CH, as the control group, were selected. For all children, ultrasonography and other diagnostic measures (if necessary) were performed to evaluate renal and upper urinary tract anomalies (ureter and bladder). Results: The frequency of renal and upper urinary tract anomalies among 43 children with primary CH, with 83 cases (72.8%), was significantly higher than the frequency of anomalies among the 19 children in the control group, with 31 cases (27.1%) (OR = 3; CI 95%: 1.6-5.4; P = 0.001). Among the anomalies studied, only the differences in frequency of uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) (OR = 6; CI 95%: 1.3-28; P = 0.018) and hydronephrosis (OR = 22; CI 95%: 5-95; P = 0.001) was significant between the two groups. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that PCH is significantly associated with the frequency of congenital anomalies of the kidneys and upper urinary tracts. However, further studies are recommended to determine the necessity of conducting screening programs for anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract in children with CH at birth. PMID:26693499

  12. Resistant Hypertension due to Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Male: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hossein; Khaheshi, Isa; Memaryan, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Roxana; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2016-06-01

    Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) is a sporadic non-atherosclerotic disease. FMD has been established in nearly every arterial bed. However, the most frequent arteries affected are the renal and carotid arteries. Disease presentation may vary broadly, depending upon the arterial bed complication and the severity of illness. Hypertension, particularly resistant type, headache and dizziness are the most common presentations. String of beads appearance in angiographic views due to post-stenotic aneurysms is the characteristic view. It is most commonly described in young aged females; but in rare male cases has also been reported. Moreover, balloon angioplasty is standard and effective therapy for FMD. We present a young 28-year-old man who was referred for evaluation of resistant hypertension for nearly 3 years without comprehensive workup. The patient underwent renal artery angiography which confirmed beading narrowing of the right renal artery with significant stenosis at mid portion compatible with FMD; and balloon angioplasty was done. This case highlights that FMD should be kept in mind as a rare cause of resistant hypertension in young males; although it is most common in young females. PMID:27504335

  13. Congenital hemangiopericytoma: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bosch, A M; Hack, W W; Ekkelkamp, S

    1998-03-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumor consisting of capillaries surrounded by pericytes. Only histologically can the tumor be distinguished from other vascular hamartomas. For a long time the congenital type was considered benign; however, metastases have recently been described. A histologic diagnosis of all soft-tissue sarcomas should be made. We describe two patients with congenital hemangiopericytomas in whom the diagnosis was not suspected until after histologic examination. Long-term follow-up is indicated.

  14. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  15. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  16. A novel SMARCAL1 missense mutation that affects splicing in a severely affected Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Belinchón, Alberta; Fernández-Camblor, Carlota; Valenciano-Fuente, Blanca; Lapunzina, Pablo; Heath, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal failure and immunodeficiency. In this work, we report the molecular studies undertaken in a severely affected SIOD patient that died at six years old due to nephropathy. The patient was screened for mutations using a targeted skeletal dysplasias panel. A homozygous novel missense mutation was identified, c.1615C > G (p.[Leu539Val]) that was predicted as mildly pathogenic by in silico pathogenicity prediction tools. However, splicing prediction software suggested that this variant may create a new splicing donor site in exon 9, which was subsequently confirmed using a minigene assay in HEK293 cells. Thus, the splicing alteration, c.1615C > G; r.1615c > g, 1615_1644del; (p.[Leu539_Ile548del]), results in the loss of 10 amino acids of the HARP-ATPase catalytic domain and the RPA-binding domain. Several studies have demonstrated a weak genotype-phenotype correlation among such patients. Thus, the molecular characterization has helped us to understand why a predicted weakly pathogenic missense mutation results in severe SIOD and should be considered in similar scenarios. PMID:27282802

  17. Micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, M J; Jones, B; Waagner, D C; Dunn, D

    1989-01-01

    Micropenis is often an early sign of congenital hypopituitarism. It has also been associated with congenital adrenal hypoplasia in infants with anencephaly and pituitary agenesis. This report is on two infants with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia. One presented with a similar clinical course and postmortem findings to previously reported cases of adrenal hypoplasia and pituitary agenesis. The other patient represents the first reported case of an infant with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia in the absence of pituitary agenesis. The histologic patterns of adrenal hypoplasia, as well as the etiologic and clinical implications of its association with micropenis, are discussed.

  18. Non-adenomatous forms of gastro-oesophageal epithelial dysplasia: an under-recognised entity?

    PubMed

    Serra, Stefano; Chetty, Runjan

    2014-10-01

    Foveolar dysplasia is an uncommon form of dysplasia that is encountered in the stomach and oesophagus in the context of Barrett’s oesophagus. Glands displaying foveolar dysplasia also show architectural abnormalities that are similar to those encountered in adenomatous dysplasia. However, from a cytological point of view, foveolar dysplasia glands are lined by low-cuboidal to columnar epithelium, the cytoplasm is often clear with round-to-oval nuclei. Nuclear stratification as seen in adenomatous dysplasia is not common, although there is loss of nuclear polarity, pleomorphism and mitotic activity. It is important to distinguish low-grade foveolar dysplasia from regenerative change.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry: Leber congenital amaurosis 9 National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis These resources from MedlinePlus ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  1. RUNX2 mutations in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, K-E; Seymen, F; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Kim, J-W

    2013-01-01

    The runt-related transcription factor 2 gene (RUNX2), which is also known as CBFA1, is a master regulatory gene in bone formation. Mutations in RUNX2 have been identified in cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) patients. CCD is a rare autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia that is characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicle formation, short stature, and dental anomalies, including malocclusion, supernumerary teeth, and delayed eruption of permanent teeth. In this study, we recruited three de novo CCD families and performed mutational analysis of the RUNX2 gene as a candidate gene approach. The mutational study revealed three disease-causing mutations: a missense mutation (c.674G>A, p.Arg225Gln), a frameshift mutation (c.1119delC, p.Arg374Glyfs*), and a nonsense mutation (c.1171C>T, p.Arg391*). Clinical examination revealed a unique dental phenotype (no typical supernumerary teeth, but duplication of anterior teeth) in one patient. We believe that this finding will broaden the understanding of the mechanism of supernumerary teeth formation and CCD-related phenotypes. PMID:24222232

  2. [Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Gallesio, C; Tagliabue, M; Mazzeo, R; De Gioanni, P P

    1996-11-01

    The authors present a severe case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in which there was considerable involvement of cranial bone and facial skeleton. Numerous lesions were present at the level of the long bones of limbs. Endocrine dysfunction was also present in the form of a hypophyseal adenoma secreting prolactin and ACTH. The concomitance of acromegaly or gigantism and/or hyperprolactinemia and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia has only been reported to date in a few cases in literature. The authors describe the appearance of the subject, correlating clinical photographs with X-rays. They report the clinical excursus of the patient characterised by the gradual increase in deformities which seriously jeopardized the patient's relational life, in particular the appearance of a bulk on the forehead and checks and the deformation of the symphyseal portion of the mandible with presence of interdental diastemata. The patient also complained diplopia, difficulty in chewing owing to the mobilisation of teeth, and increasing bone pain probably due to nerve compression by exuberant bone. It was not possible to perform corrective surgery owing to the patient's overall poor health conditions. In fact, dilatative cardiomyopathy which continued to worsen in spite of numerous forms of medical treatment resulted in the patient's death owing to cardiac decompensation. Even the attempt to treat the patient's primary endocrine dysfunction using bromocryptine and subsequently octreotide failed to produce positive results owing to the onset of collateral effects which led to the early suspension of treatment.

  3. [Pierre Marie-Sainton cleidocranial dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Diaconescu, Smaranda; Păduraru, Gabriela; Vâscu, Ana-Maria; Burlea, M

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a family with hereditary transmitted Marie-Sainton dysplasia affecting the father and his both children. This is a rare syndrome presenting an autosomal pattern of inheritance, characterized by a generalized defect in both membranous and endochondral bone formation resulting in clavicular aplasia, delayed ossification of the fontanelles and the sutures of the skull and prolonged retention of deciduous dentition with delayed eruption of the permanent teeth. The diagnosis is suggested by more or less complete clinical picture and confirmed by multiple radiological explorations (skull, thorax, spinal column, pelvis) and genetical examination. The genetic mutation for cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is found on chromosome six and is called CBFA1 (short for core biding factor al or RUNX2) and is the only gene known to be associated with CCD. The normal version of CBFA1 acts to induce osteoblasts which are the type of cells that lay down bone. Although associated psychosocial disorders can occur, the prognosis and life expectancy of this condition are favorable being conditioned however by the complexity of orthodontic procedures which are determinant for these patients life quality. PMID:21870721

  4. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia: Surgery and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Suresh; Venkatswamy, Srihari; Ramu, Veena; Banu, Khurshida; Ehtaih, Sham; Kashyap, Vinay M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To highlight the clinical and radiologic features and management of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia with review of literature. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 6 patients who underwent surgical treatment in a tertiary healthcare centre was done using the parameters of patients' details, clinical features, radiological findings, management and postoperative review. Results: Of the six patients, 3 females and 2 males were in the 2nd decade of life and 1 male in the 1st decade of life. The disease was restricted to maxilla in 3 patients, involved the temporal and frontal bones in addition to maxilla in one, involved the frontal bone in one patient and involved frontal and parietal bones in one patient. The primary reason for seeking treatment in all the 6 cases was facial deformity. There was absence of pain in all 6 cases. For surgical treatment in all three cases involving the maxilla, the approach was intraoral while bicoronal approach was used for the other three cases. Treatment consisted of surgical contouring and reshaping the area. All cases were followed up over a period of 2 years with no signs of recurrence. Conclusion: Treatment of craniofacial fibro-osseous lesions is highly individualized. Most cases of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia manifest as swellings that cause facial deformity and surgical recontouring after cessation of growth seems to provide the best results. PMID:23662263

  5. [Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Gallesio, C; Tagliabue, M; Mazzeo, R; De Gioanni, P P

    1996-11-01

    The authors present a severe case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in which there was considerable involvement of cranial bone and facial skeleton. Numerous lesions were present at the level of the long bones of limbs. Endocrine dysfunction was also present in the form of a hypophyseal adenoma secreting prolactin and ACTH. The concomitance of acromegaly or gigantism and/or hyperprolactinemia and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia has only been reported to date in a few cases in literature. The authors describe the appearance of the subject, correlating clinical photographs with X-rays. They report the clinical excursus of the patient characterised by the gradual increase in deformities which seriously jeopardized the patient's relational life, in particular the appearance of a bulk on the forehead and checks and the deformation of the symphyseal portion of the mandible with presence of interdental diastemata. The patient also complained diplopia, difficulty in chewing owing to the mobilisation of teeth, and increasing bone pain probably due to nerve compression by exuberant bone. It was not possible to perform corrective surgery owing to the patient's overall poor health conditions. In fact, dilatative cardiomyopathy which continued to worsen in spite of numerous forms of medical treatment resulted in the patient's death owing to cardiac decompensation. Even the attempt to treat the patient's primary endocrine dysfunction using bromocryptine and subsequently octreotide failed to produce positive results owing to the onset of collateral effects which led to the early suspension of treatment. PMID:9026699

  6. A family with cleidocranial dysplasia and crossed ectopic kidney in one child.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Saraswathivilasam S

    2009-08-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia or dysostosis (CCD) is a condition characterised by failure of membranous ossification resulting in absence or pseudarthrosis of the clavicle, open fontanelles, wormian bones and supernumerary teeth. The aetiology though not completely known is thought to be due to a CBFA1 (core binding factor activity 1) gene defect on the short arm of chromosome 6p21. CBFA1 is essential for differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts, so any defect in this gene will cause defects in membranous and endochondral bone formation. Since the first description, over 700 cases have been reported in literature. The authors report a family with mother and her four sons affected with CCD and Crossed Renal Ectopia (CRE) in one child, which has not been reported in CCD before. PMID:19774820

  7. Congenital fibro-osseous dysplasia of jaws ("hippopotamus face"). An anaesthetic problem.

    PubMed

    Kundu, J P; Pan, A K

    1979-05-01

    Two brothers with "hippopotamus face" deformities presented for corrective surgery under general anaesthesia. In the first patient, blind nasal intubation was successful. In the second patient, tracheotomy was avoided by the use of an intubating bronchoscope.

  8. Fetal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings In Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection With Postnatal Imaging Correlation.

    PubMed

    Averill, Lauren W; Kandula, Vinay V R; Akyol, Yakup; Epelman, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool in the diagnosis of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection, requiring a detailed search for specific features. A combination of anterior temporal lobe abnormalities, white matter lesions, and polymicrogyria is especially predictive. Fetal MRI may provide a unique opportunity to detect anterior temporal cysts and occipital horn septations, as dilation of these areas may decrease later in development. Cortical migration abnormalities, white matter abnormalities, cerebellar dysplasia, and periventricular calcifications are often better depicted on postnatal imaging but can also be detected on fetal MRI. We present the prenatal brain MRI findings seen in congenital cytomegalovirus infection and provide postnatal imaging correlation, highlighting the evolution of findings at different times in prenatal and postnatal developments. PMID:26614131

  9. Congenital defects in northern elephant seals stranded along the central California coast.

    PubMed

    Trupkiewicz, J G; Gulland, F M; Lowenstine, L J

    1997-04-01

    Eleven cases of congenital anomalies were identified in 210 (5%) juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) found stranded along the central California (USA) coast from 1 January 1988 to 31 December 1995. Seven individuals had mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus involving the lateral ventricles bilaterally, or the lateral and third ventricles. Two animals had severe cardiac anomalies: hypoplasia of the right ventricle with overriding aorta, and ventricular septal defect. Other anomalies included single cases of hydronephrosis, focal pulmonary dysplasia, and congenital epidermal angiomatosis. Common intercurrent disease processes were verminous pneumonia and arteritis, verminous enteritis and coliti, and splenic and hepatic hemosiderosis. The more severe anomalies were considered to be the cause of debilitation and stranding. Milder anomalies were found incidentally during routine gross necropsy and histopathologic examination. PMID:9131551

  10. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  11. The pathogenesis and diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, C L; Remedios, A M

    1995-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common developmental problem affecting the canine population. Despite extensive research into the condition, many questions remain unanswered and numerous misconceptions are present among the general public. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the development of hip dysplasia, factors modifying its development, and current diagnostic techniques. A computerized literature search was conducted for the period of January 1983 to April 1985 using the MEDLINE and CAB databases, and the keywords hip dysplasia, hip, dog, and canine. Other articles, wherever possible original research articles, published before 1983 were also reviewed. Animals affected by hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but quickly develop subluxation of the femoral head. Degenerative joint disease follows. Hip dysplasia is a complex, inherited, polygenic trait. Selective breeding of only normal dogs with normal littermates, parents, and grandparents is the recommended method of reducing the incidence in the general population. Gene expression in affected individuals may be modified by a number of environmental factors. These factors do not cause hip dysplasia, but they alter manifestations of the trait and its severity. Nutrition is a major environmental factor. Excess energy consumption increases the frequency and severity of hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed dogs. Food intake should be regulated to maintain a slender figure with the ribs and dorsal vertebral spines easily palpable, but not visible. Excess dietary calcium and vitamin D contribute to hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed individuals and should be avoided. High dose vitamin C supplementation in growing puppies does not prevent hip dysplasia, and this practice should be discontinued.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7585436

  12. Cleidocranial dysplasia: A report of two cases with brief review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kusum; Goswami, Mridula

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a genetic disorder primarily causing dysplasia of bones and teeth with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Affected individuals presented with several skeletal and dental abnormalities mainly hypoplasia of clavicles, open fontanelles, short stature, retention of primary teeth, supernumerary teeth, delayed eruption of permanent teeth, multiple impacted permanent teeth etc. The present series of two cases illustrates the clinical and radiological features of pediatric patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. The early diagnosis of the condition helps in proper orientation of the treatment thereby offering better quality of life to such patients. PMID:27195196

  13. Cleidocranial dysplasia: A report of two cases with brief review.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Kusum; Goswami, Mridula

    2016-05-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a genetic disorder primarily causing dysplasia of bones and teeth with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Affected individuals presented with several skeletal and dental abnormalities mainly hypoplasia of clavicles, open fontanelles, short stature, retention of primary teeth, supernumerary teeth, delayed eruption of permanent teeth, multiple impacted permanent teeth etc. The present series of two cases illustrates the clinical and radiological features of pediatric patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. The early diagnosis of the condition helps in proper orientation of the treatment thereby offering better quality of life to such patients. PMID:27195196

  14. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7880297

  15. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-12-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7877211

  16. [Protein-energy malnutrition in patients with connective tissue dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Lialiukova, E A

    2013-01-01

    In the conditions of the specialized Center of a dysplasia of a connecting tissue the assessment of an protein--energy malnutrition at 121 patients with signs of a dysplasia of a connecting tissue is carried out. High frequency of an oligotrophy at patients with a dysplasia of a connecting tissue is registered. The I degree of a gipotorofiya is taped at 26.21% of the patients, II degree--at 18.44%, the III degree--at 3.88% of patients.

  17. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia masquerading as a residual cyst.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Rajat; Sandhu, Simarpreet V; Bansal, Himanta; Behl, Rashi; Bhullar, Ramanpreet Kaur

    2012-04-01

    Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) is a benign fibroosseous condition that can be seen in dentulous and edentulous patients. It is an asymptomatic lesion and needs no treatment; however, follow-up is essential due to the possibility that it can progress to a condition called florid cemento-osseous dysplasia. We report a case of FCOD of mandible in a 25-year-old female. Clinically, the lesion resembled periapical pathosis of odontogenic origin. An attempt has been made to discuss the clinical and histopathologic features along with differential diagnosis of cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  18. [Anesthetic management of a patient with metatropic dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Marie; Niiyama, Yukitoshi; Nawa, Yuko; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2013-02-01

    A 5-year-old girl with metatropic dysplasia was scheduled for an operation of posterior cervical fusion. This disease is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by long trunk and short limbs and severe scoliosis. As she had been suspected to have a difficult airway, we attempted fiberoptic intubation with a nasopharyngeal airway to prevent airway obstruction. The nasopharyngeal airway ensured a patent airway sufficient oxygenation, and anesthesia. Thus, it was possible to perform a fiberoptic intubation via the opposite nostril with no adverse event. The combination of a nasopharyngeal airway and fiberoptic guided tracheal intubation is a reliable and safe procedure for small children with metatropic dysplasia and difficult airway. PMID:23479930

  19. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; Mackie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-11-20

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  20. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; MacKie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  1. Congenital granular cell epulis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Rachel; Perez, Mia C N

    2014-01-01

    Congenital granular cell epulis is a rarely reported lesion of unknown histogenesis with a strong predilection for the maxillary alveolar ridge of newborn girls. Microscopically, it demonstrates nests of polygonal cells with granular cytoplasm, a prominent capillary network, and attenuated overlying squamous epithelium. The lesion lacks immunoreactivity for S-100, laminin, chromogranin, and most other markers except neuron-specific enolase and vimentin. Through careful observation of its unique clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical features, this lesion can be distinguished from the more common adult granular cell tumor as well as other differential diagnoses.

  2. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  3. [Congenital linear nevus sebaceus].

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Anders; Bygum, Anette; Fenger-Grøn, Jesper

    2011-09-01

    An unusual case of nevus sebaceous is described. Nevus sebaceous is a congenital epidermal hamartoma of the skin and the predilection site is the head or neck. In this case the nevus followed the lines of Blaschko along the back of the left lower extremity. The linear lesion seemed papulovesicular which caused suspicion of incontinentia pigmenti or infection, and the boy received antimicrobial treatment until a biopsy revealed the correct diagnosis. We wish to emphasize this clinical picture to spare the patient and relatives from unnecessary tests, treatment and concern. PMID:21893006

  4. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  5. Congenital echovirus 21 infection causing fulminant hepatitis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Cristina; Lage, Maria João; Virella, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Enteroviral infection in pregnancy is common and there is growing evidence relating it to congenital anomalies and neonatal mortality. Neonatal disease may range from unapparent infection to overwhelming systemic illness. Passively acquired maternal serotype specific antibodies determine the severity of the disease in the newborn. A fatal case of congenital echovirus 21 infection, confirmed by PCR in the patient's blood and positive culture of the mother's stools, is reported. A sibling had symptoms of respiratory tract infection and their mother had fever, which prompted iatrogenic delivery that same day. The newborn presented with bradycardia and hypotonia in the first minutes of life and later developed respiratory distress, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, fulminant hepatitis, acute renal failure and necrotising enterocolitis. Death occurred on the 8 day of life. This case highlights the potential severity of Enteroviral infection in the newborn. Since only supportive treatment is available, prevention is paramount. PMID:23576650

  6. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  7. [Enzymopathic congenital hyperlactacidemia].

    PubMed

    Leroux, J P; Marsac, C; Saudubray, J M

    1976-01-01

    Congenital enzymopathic hyperlactacidemia results from a defect of utilisation of pyruvate either at the level of the pyruvate junction (pyruvate-carboxylase, pyruvate-dehydrogenase and Kreb's cycle), or at the level of the unidirectional enzymes on neo-glucogenesis and of neo-glycogenogenesis, e.g. glucose-6-phosphatase, phosphoenol-pyruvate-carboxykinase and glycogen synthetase. The enzymopathies which affect neoglucogenesis associate hyper-lactacidemia and fasting hypoglycemia and more or less marked hepatomegaly. Type I glycogenesis (von Gierke's disease) is the best known example. Enzymopathies which affect the pyruvate junction and the Krebs cycle, may be manifested in addition by: --either chronic neuropathies, e.g. Leigh's disease, recurrent ataxia, and moderate hyperalactacidemia,--or, as in congenital lactic acidoses, which have a rapid and severe prognosis with major hyperlactacidemia. Functional investigation, in particular, loading tests are of great value in orientation and justify the practice of tissue biopsy which permits the enzyme diagnosis. Recent, still unconfirmed knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases emphasizes the considerable importance of estimation of blood lactic acid in the investigation of metabolic acidoses of hereditary origin. PMID:184725

  8. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F.; Miner, Lonnie; Petheram, Susan J.

    2002-05-01

    Intrauterine infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a betaherpesvirus, remains the most frequent congenital virus infection in many regions of the world. Although most CMV-infected newborns lack signs of CMV infection, approximately 10% have signs that can consist of low birth weight, jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, skin rash, microcephaly, and chorioretinitis. Neonates with signs of CMV infection at birth have high rates of audiologic and neurodevelopmental sequelae. Although postnatal therapy with ganciclovir transiently reduces virus shedding and may lessen the audiologic consequences of CMV in some infected infants, additional strategies are needed to prevent congenital CMV disease and to improve the neurodevelopmental prognosis of infants infected with CMV in utero. Some cases of intrauterine infections can be prevented in susceptible women by avoiding contact with the urine or saliva of young children who may be shedding CMV. Vaccines against CMV remain in the experimental stages of development. Termination of pregnancy can be offered to women whose infants have evidence of intrauterine CMV infection and sonographic signs of central nervous system damage. Infants who survive symptomatic intrauterine infections have high rates of neurodevelopmental sequelae and require comprehensive evaluation and therapy through center and home-based early intervention programs. PMID:11931729

  9. [Genetics of congenital lipodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Buffet, A; Lombes, M; Caron, P

    2015-10-01

    Congenital lipodystrophies are heterogeneous genetic diseases, leading to the loss of adipose tissue. This loss of adipose tissue can be generalized or partial, thus defining different phenotypes. These lipodystrophies have a major metabolic impact, secondary to lipotoxicity. This lipotoxicity is responsible for insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis. The severity of the metabolic impact correlates with the severity of the loss of adipose tissue. Mutations in 15 predisposition genes are currently described; BSCL2 and AGPT2 genes are the major genes in the generalized forms. On the contrary, LMNA and PPARG gene mutations are recovered in partial lipodystrophies forms. These different genes encode for proteins involved in adipocyte physiology, altering adipocyte differentiation, triglycerides synthesis and lysis or playing a major role in the lipid droplet formation. Congenital lipodystrophies treatment is based on the management of metabolic comorbidities but recombinant leptin therapy appears to have promising results. These different points have been recently discussed during the 2015 Endocrine Society Congress, notably by S. O'Rahilly and are highlighted in this review.

  10. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    PubMed

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.

  11. Guidelines for genetic skeletal dysplasias for pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasia (SD) is a kind of heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by abnormal growth, development, differentiation, and maintenance of the bone and cartilage. The patients with SD most likely to be seen by a pediatrician or orthopedic surgeon are those who present with short stature in childhood. Because each category has so many diseases, classification is important to understand SD better. In order to diagnose a SD accurately, clinical and radiographic findings should be evaluated in detail. In addition, genetic diagnosis of SD is important because there are so various SDs with complex phenotypes. To reach an exact diagnosis of SDs, cooperative approach by a clinician, a radiologist and a geneticist is important. This review aims to provide an outline of the diagnostic approach for children with disproportional short stature. PMID:26817005

  12. Cortical dysplasia, genetic abnormalities and neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vinters, H V; Park, S H; Johnson, M W; Mischel, P S; Catania, M; Kerfoot, C

    1999-11-01

    Cortical dysplasia (CD) represents a common neuropathologic substrate of pediatric epilepsy, one frequently encountered in surgical resection specimens from infants and children with intractable seizure disorders, including infantile spasms. Severe CD shows similarities to structural features noted in tubers from individuals with tuberous sclerosis (TSC). The latter disorder, one with neurocutaneous and visceral manifestations, results from mutations in one of two recently cloned genes, TSC1 or TSC2, which encode (respectively) the proteins hamartin and tuberin. There is circumstantial evidence that both proteins may influence cell growth and differentiation, specifically that they may represent growth suppressors. Neither protein has a defined role in brain development. We discuss and illustrate neuropathologic features of both CD and TSC, and discuss the patterns and time course of hamartin/tuberin expression in normal brain, CD and TSC. Other recently cloned genes associated with cortical malformations encompassed by the term CD are briefly described. PMID:10575248

  13. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia - an overview about pathophysiologic concepts.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, Sophie; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal chronic lung disease in the preterm infant, i.e. bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by impaired pulmonary development with its effects persisting into adulthood. Triggered in the immature lung by infectious complications, oxygen toxicity and the impact of mechanical ventilation, a sustained inflammatory response, extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix, increased apoptosis as well as altered growth factor signaling characterize the disease. The current review focuses on selected pathophysiologic processes and their interplay in disease development. Furthermore, the potential of both, acute and long-term changes to the pulmonary scaffold and the cellular interface in concert with dysregulated growth factor signaling to affect aging and repair processes in the adult lung is discussed. PMID:26542292

  14. Cleidocranial dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  15. Cleidocranial Dysplasia with Autosomal Dominant Inheritance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  16. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia1

    PubMed Central

    Indik, Julia H; Marcus, Frank I

    2003-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is characterized by the patchy replacement of myocardium by fatty or fibrofatty tissue. These changes lead to structural abnormalities including right ventricular enlargement and wall motion abnormalities that can be detected by echocardiography, angiography, and cine MRI. ARVC/D is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, since it has been linked to several chromosomal loci. Myocarditis may also be a contributing etiological factor. Patients are typically diagnosed during adolescence or young adulthood. Presenting symptoms are generally related to ventricular arrhythmias. Concern for the risk of sudden cardiac death may lead to the implantation of an intracardiac defibrillator. An ongoing multicenter international registry should further our understanding of this disease. PMID:16943913

  17. Emerging targeted drug therapies in skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Yap, Patrick; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2016-10-01

    Quantum advances have occurred in the field of human genetics in the six decades since Watson and Crick expressed their "wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid." These culminated with the human genome project, which has opened up myriad possibilities, including that of individualized genetic medicine, the ability to deliver medical advice, management, and therapy tailored to an individual's genetic blueprint. Advances in genetic diagnostic capabilities have been rapid, to the point where the genome can be sequenced for several thousand dollars. Crucially, it has facilitated the identification of targets for "precision" treatments to combat genetic diseases at their source. This manuscript will review the innovative, pathogenesis-based therapies that are revolutionizing management of skeletal dysplasias, giving patients and families new options and outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27155200

  18. Guidelines for genetic skeletal dysplasias for pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal dysplasia (SD) is a kind of heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by abnormal growth, development, differentiation, and maintenance of the bone and cartilage. The patients with SD most likely to be seen by a pediatrician or orthopedic surgeon are those who present with short stature in childhood. Because each category has so many diseases, classification is important to understand SD better. In order to diagnose a SD accurately, clinical and radiographic findings should be evaluated in detail. In addition, genetic diagnosis of SD is important because there are so various SDs with complex phenotypes. To reach an exact diagnosis of SDs, cooperative approach by a clinician, a radiologist and a geneticist is important. This review aims to provide an outline of the diagnostic approach for children with disproportional short stature. PMID:26817005

  19. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia – trends over three decades

    PubMed Central

    Zysman-Colman, Zofia; Tremblay, Genevieve M; Bandeali, Suhair; Landry, Jennifer S

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the characteristics of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and respiratory distress syndrome subjects, along with the trends in severity and mortality associated with BPD over the past three decades. METHODS: Retrospective study of BPD and respiratory distress syndrome subjects born between 1980 and 2008, and admitted to Montreal Children’s Hospital (Montreal, Quebec). Data were abstracted from hospital records. RESULTS: Gestational age and birth weight were correlated with the occurrence of BPD with each additional week of gestation and 100 g in birth weight being associated with an OR of developing BPD of 0.77 and 0.89, respectively. BPD severity was associated with male sex, Apgar score and the occurrence of neonatal pneumonia. Significant trends were observed for lower mortality despite lower gestational age and birth weight, greater maternal age and multiple gestations. CONCLUSION: Mortality from BPD has improved over the past three decades despite significant trends toward more pronounced prematurity and lower birth weights. PMID:24421662

  20. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia of mandible.

    PubMed

    Cankaya, Abdülkadir Burak; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Olgac, Vakur; Firat, Deniz Refia

    2012-09-03

    Fibro-osseous lesions are disturbances in bone metabolism in which normal bone is replaced by a connective tissue matrix that then gradually develops into cemento-osseous tissue. Typically, the lesion is asymptomatic and is detected on routine radiographic examination. Radiologically, this lesion has three stages of maturation: pure radiolucent, radiopaque/mixed radiolucent, and radiopaque appearance. During these stages the lesion can be misdiagnosed. In this case report a 69-year- old patient with a a complaint of painless swelling of the left mandibular molar and premolar area is presented along with a review of the differential diagnoses considered in order to reach a final diagnosis of focal cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  1. Craniofrontonasal dysplasia in two male sibs.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, U; Baraitser, M; Nicolaides, K; Gosden, C

    1993-10-01

    Craniofrontonasal dysplasia (CFND) was diagnosed in a male child who had bilateral coronal craniosynostosis, midline facial clefting with cleft lip and palate, a broad and high forehead, and hypertelorism. The parents were normal and there was no family history suggestive of CFND. A small recurrence risk was counselled and prenatal ultrasound was recommended in the next pregnancy. At 23 weeks, the ultrasound scan detected a number of dysmorphic features and the pregnancy was terminated. Autopsy of the aborted male foetus showed the following features: High arched palate, a sloping forehead, flattened nose and receding chin, multiple joint contractures, particularly of the mid phalangeal joints, elbows and ankles. This report highlights the occurrence of CFND in two male siblings born to normal parents, and therefore the need to perform prenatal ultrasound in a subsequent pregnancy, even if CFND is diagnosed in an isolated case.

  2. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  3. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  4. Perinatal and early infantile symptoms in congenital disorders of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Funke, Simone; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Kouwenberg, Dorus; Mohamed, Miski; Wortmann, Saskia B; Korsch, Eckhard; Adamowicz, Maciej; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wevers, Ron A; Horvath, Adrienne; Lefeber, Dirk J; Morava, Eva

    2013-03-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a rapidly growing family of inborn errors. Screening for CDG in suspected cases is usually performed in the first year of life by serum transferrin isoelectric focusing or mass spectrometry. Based on the transferrin analysis patients can be biochemically diagnosed with a type 1 or type 2 transferrin pattern, and labeled as CDG-I, or CDG-II. The diagnosis of CDG is frequently delayed due to the highly variable phenotype, some cases showing single organ involvement and others mimicking syndromes, like skeletal dysplasia, cutis laxa syndrome, or congenital muscle dystrophy. The aim of our study was to evaluate perinatal abnormalities and early discriminative symptoms in 58 patients consecutively diagnosed with diverse CDG-subtypes. Neonatal findings and clinical features in the first months of life were studied in 36 children with CDG-I and 22 with CDG-II. Maternal complications were found in five, small for gestational age in nine patients. Five children had abnormal neonatal screening results for hypothyroidism. Congenital microcephaly and neonatal seizures were common in CDG-II. Inverted nipples were uncommon with 5 out of 58 children. Dysmorphic features were mostly nonspecific, except for cutis laxa. Early complications included feeding problems, cardiomyopathy, thrombosis, and bleeding. Cases presenting in the neonatal period had the highest mortality rate. Survival in CDG patients is highly dependent on early intervention therapy. We recommend low threshold screening for glycosylation disorders in infants with neurologic symptoms, even in the absence of abnormal fat distribution. Growth retardation and neonatal bleeding increase suspicion for CDG. PMID:23401092

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 links) Health Topic: Bone Diseases Health Topic: Dwarfism Health Topic: Immune System and Disorders Health Topic: ... Immune Deficiency Conditions University of Kansas Medical Center: Dwarfism/Short Stature GeneReviews (1 link) Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia ...

  6. Cemento-osseous dysplasia in Jamaica: review of six cases.

    PubMed

    Ogunsalu, C; Miles, D

    2005-09-01

    Six cases of cemento-osseous dysplasia (COD) of the jaw bone in Jamaicans are reviewed. Five were documented over a 15-year period (1980-1995). These include a case of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (previously called gigantiform cementoma). Three of the initial cases were histologically diagnosed as gigantiform cementoma. There was no indication in the patient's case file whether these were familial or non-familial. The other two cases were diagnosed histologically as periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia and cementoblastoma respectively. Based on the current understanding of the nature of florid-cemento-osseous dysplasia (FLCOD), a new case was diagnosed as such solely on radiological findings. This single case of FLCOD is reported and discussed against the background of other cemento-osseous lesions. Special emphasis is placed on the radiology of COD in this paper. The confirmative role of radiology without the need for histophathology and treatment for asymptomatic FLCOD is emphasized.

  7. A complex case of congenital cystic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordiner, David S; Evans, Clair A; Brundler, Marie-Anne; McPhillips, Maeve; Murio, Enric; Darling, Mark; Taheri, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    This case outlines the potential complexity of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). It highlights the challenges involved in managing this condition, some of the complications faced and areas of uncertainty in the decision making process. With a paucity of published paediatric cases on this subject, this should add to the pool of information currently available. PMID:22605879

  8. A compound heterozygote of novel and recurrent DTDST mutations results in a novel intermediate phenotype of Desbuquois dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, and recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Atsushi; Nishimura, Gen; Futami, Toru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) is required for synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans in cartilage, and its loss-of-function mutations result in recessively inherited chondrodysplasias. The 40 or so DTDST mutations reported to date cause a group of disorders termed the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) group. The group ranges from the mildest recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (r-MED) through the most common DTD to perinatally lethal atelosteogenesis type II and achondrogenesis 1B. Furthermore, the relationship between DTDST mutations, their sulfate transport function, and disease phenotypes has been described. Here we report a girl with DTDST mutations: a compound heterozygote of a novel p.T266I mutation and a recurrent p.DeltaV340 mutation commonly found in severe phenotypes of the DTD group. In infancy, the girl presented with skeletal manifestations reminiscent of Desbuquois dysplasia, another recessively inherited chondrodysplasia, the mutations of which have never been identified. Her phenotype evolved with age into an intermediate phenotype between r-MED and DTD. Considering her clinical phenotypes and known phenotypes of p.DeltaV340, p.T266I was predicted to be responsible for mild phenotypes of the DTD group. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum of DTDST mutations, adding Desbuquois dysplasia to the list of differential diagnosis of the DTD group. PMID:18553123

  9. Auditing hip ultrasound screening of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, C; Donoghue, V; Murphy, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clinical examination, while useful, has been shown to be insufficient as the sole screening method in infants. Ultrasound examination at 8 weeks in high risk infants is an integral part of the screening process in some units. Aims: To show the efficiency of hip sonography in detection of developmental dysplasia of the hips in those without clinically dislocated hips. Methods: All infants born at the National Maternity Hospital between January 1994 and December 2001 were included. All those with clinically dislocated hips were treated by a Pavlik harness and referred for follow up to a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon. An 8 week hip ultrasound scan was performed for those infants with stable hips on examination but who met the following criteria: (1) a first degree relative with congenital dislocation of hips; (2) breech presentation at birth; and (3) a persistent "click" at birth in an otherwise stable hip. Results: During the period of study a total of 52 893 infants were born in the National Maternity Hospital. Based on the criteria above, 5485 hip ultrasound scans were performed. Of those scanned, 18 (0.33%) were found to have dislocated hips and 153 (2.78%) to have dysplasic hips. The 18 infants with dislocation were treated with Pavlik harness; the remaining 153 were followed up by serial ultrasound examinations but did not require active intervention. Conclusions: Among the population of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip, the hip screening programme identified 18 cases among 5485 infants; a rate of 3.2 per 1000. Hip sonography is therefore worthwhile. PMID:15908620

  10. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  11. Initial respiratory management in preterm infants and bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    López, Ester Sanz; Rodríguez, Elena Maderuelo; Navarro, Cristina Ramos; Sánchez-Luna, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventilator injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Avoiding invasive ventilation could reduce lung injury, and early respiratory management may affect pulmonary outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of initial respiratory support on survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia at a gestational age of 36 weeks. DESIGN/METHODS: A prospective 3-year observational study. Preterm infants of <32 weeks gestational age were classified into 4 groups according to the support needed during the first 2 hours of life: room air, nasal continuous positive airway pressure, intubation/surfactant/extubation and prolonged mechanical ventilation (defined as needing mechanical ventilation for more than 2 hours). RESULTS: Of the 329 eligible patients, a total of 49% did not need intubation, and 68.4% did not require prolonged mechanical ventilation. At a gestational age of 26 weeks, there was a significant correlation between survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia and initial respiratory support. Preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation showed a higher risk of death and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. After controlling for gestational age, antenatal corticosteroid use, maternal preeclampsia and chorioamnionitis, the survival rate without bronchopulmonary dysplasia remained significantly lower in the mechanically ventilated group. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, the need for more than 2 hours of mechanical ventilation predicted the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants with a gestational age >26 weeks (sensitivity = 89.5% and specificity = 67%). The need for prolonged mechanical ventilation could be an early marker for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. This finding could help identify a target population with a high risk of chronic lung disease. Future research is needed to determine other strategies to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in this high-risk group of patients. PMID

  12. A probably distinct autosomal recessive thoraco-limb dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, H; Perez-Salas, J M; Nazara, Z; Ramirez, M L

    1988-01-01

    A Mexican mestizo family is reported in which two opposite sexed sibs, born to consanguineous parents, had a skeletal dysplasia. The salient features were a bell shaped thorax owing to short ribs, short limbed dwarfism, pelvic hypoplasia, dislocatable radial heads, elongated distal fibulae, and improvement with age. It is concluded that the present observation probably represents a distinct autosomal recessive thoraco-limb dysplasia identifiable at birth. Images PMID:3184141

  13. Risk factors for cervical dysplasia in Kerala, India.

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, C.; Amma, N. S.; Chitrathara, K.; Dhakad, N.; Rani, P.; Malathy, L.; Nair, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    A study in Kerala, India, confirmed the importance of genital hygiene in the fight against infections that have a role in the development of cervical dysplasia and cancer. Many women cannot afford sanitary pads, while adequate facilities for washing after coitus are often unavailable. Health education, satisfactory living standards, and the empowerment of women are prerequisites for reducing the incidence of cervical dysplasia. PMID:10212523

  14. Renal cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Renal cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 57. National Cancer Institute: PDQ renal cell cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. ...

  15. Retrocaval ureter and contra lateral renal agenesis – a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza, Felix; Shambhulinga, C. K.; Rajeevan, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Associated congenital anomalies are seen in 21% of retrocaval ureter patients; among them, associated contralateral renal agenesis is a very rare entity. We report one such case of right circumcaval ureter with left renal agenesis, diagnosed after febrile UTI. Surgical correction with uretero-ureterostomy was successful. In literature very few such cases are reported and only one case with renal failure was reported. Unilateral renal agenesis cases complicated by associated such anomalies need definitive management and lifelong clinical monitoring to diagnose and prevent chronic kidney disease. PMID:27564299

  16. Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Heather R; Castro, Diana; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2014-08-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) and myopathies (CM) are a diverse group of diseases that share features such as early onset of symptoms (in the first year of life), genetic causes, and high risks for restrictive lung disease and orthopedic deformities. Understanding for disease mechanism is available and a fairly well-structured genotype-phenotype correlation for all the CMDs and CMs is now available. To best illustrate the clinical spectrum and diagnostic algorithm for these diseases, this article presents 5 cases, including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, nemaline myopathy, centronuclear myopathy, merosin deficiency congenital muscular dystrophy, and core myopathy.

  17. Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Heather R; Castro, Diana; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2014-08-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) and myopathies (CM) are a diverse group of diseases that share features such as early onset of symptoms (in the first year of life), genetic causes, and high risks for restrictive lung disease and orthopedic deformities. Understanding for disease mechanism is available and a fairly well-structured genotype-phenotype correlation for all the CMDs and CMs is now available. To best illustrate the clinical spectrum and diagnostic algorithm for these diseases, this article presents 5 cases, including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, nemaline myopathy, centronuclear myopathy, merosin deficiency congenital muscular dystrophy, and core myopathy. PMID:25037085

  18. Congenital Self-Healing Reticulohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young H.; Talekar, Mala K.; Chung, Catherine G.; Bell, Moshe D.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis, also known as congenital self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis or Hashimoto-Pritzker disease, is a Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It is characterized by skin lesions in the newborn period in an otherwise healthy infant that show a Langerhans cell infiltrate in the skin on histological analysis. These findings subsequently spontaneously involute. This report describes two newborns who presented at birth with differing presentations of congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis. A review of the disorder, including diagnosis and evaluation, is presented. PMID:24578781

  19. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  20. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, C; Lang, K; Bolsen, K; Lehmann, P; Ruzicka, T

    1998-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is one of the rarest autosomal-recessive disorders of the porphyrin metabolism caused by the homozygous defect of uroporphyrinogen III cosynthase. High amounts of uroporphyrin I accumulate in all cells and tissues, reflected by an increased erythrocyte porphyrin concentration and excretion of high porphyrin amounts in urine and feces. Dermal deposits of uroporphyrin frequently induce a dramatic phototoxic oxygen-dependent skin damage with extensive ulcerations and mutilations. Splenomegaly and hemolytic anemia are typical internal symptoms. Skeletal changes such as osteolysis and calcifications are frequent. Up to date 130 cases of CEP have been published. Splenectomy and erythrocyte transfusions showed some beneficial effect. Bone marrow transplantation was performed in 3 patients and stem cell transplantation in 1. The best therapy is the avoidance of sunlight. We give a report on our latest cases of CEP. PMID:10343205

  1. Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register. Methods Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records. Results 540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%). Interpretation One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips. PMID:21434808

  2. The Erlenmeyer Flask Bone Deformity in the Skeletal Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Maha A.; Krakow, Deborah; Ezgu, Fatih; Rimoin, David L.; Lachman, Ralph S.

    2010-01-01

    Erlenmeyer flask bone deformity (EFD) is a long-standing term used to describe a specific abnormality of the distal femora. The deformity consists of lack of modeling of the di-metaphysis with abnormal cortical thinning and lack of the concave di-metaphyseal curve resulting in an Erlenmeyer flask-like appearance. Utilizing a literature review and cohort study of 12 disorders we found 20 distinct disorders were associated with EFD. We interrogated the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (ISDR) radiographic database (1988–2007) to determine which skeletal dysplasias or syndromes were highly associated with EFD, whether it was a uniform finding in these disorders, and if forms of EFD could be differentiated. EFD was classified into three groups. The first catogory was the typical EFD shaped bone (EFD-T) resultant from absent normal di-metaphyseal modeling with relatively normal appearing radiographic trabecular bone. EFD-T was identified in: frontometaphyseal dysplasia, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, craniodiaphyseal dysplasia, diaphyseal dysplasia-Engelmann type, metaphyseal dysplasia-Pyle type, Melnick–Needles osteodysplasty, and otopalatodigital syndrome type I. The second group was the atypical type (EFD-A) due to absence of normal di-metaphyseal modeling with abnormal radiographic appearance of trabecular bone and was seen in dysosteosclerosis and osteopetrosis. The third group was EFD-marrow expansion type (EFD-ME) in which bone marrow hyperplasia or infiltration leads to abnormal modeling (e.g., Gaucher disease). Further, radiographic review determined that it was not always a consistent finding and that there was variability in both appearance and location within the skeleton. This analysis and classification aided in differentiating disorders with the finding of EFD. PMID:19444897

  3. [Congenital heart diseases in women].

    PubMed

    Putotto, Carolina; Unolt, Marta; Caiaro, Angela; Marino, Dario; Massaccesi, Valerio; Marino, Bruno; Digilio, Maria Cristina

    2013-02-01

    Are there gender differences in prevalence, surgical results and long-term survival of patients with congenital heart disease? Available literature data allow us to state what follows. At birth there is a mild but significant prevalence of congenital heart disease in females. The most severe congenital heart diseases are less frequent in girls, but when they are present in females, they are linked to a higher surgical mortality rate, due perhaps to lower weight at birth and to the prevalence of extracardiac malformations and/or of associated genetic syndromes. On the other hand, in adults, surgery for congenital heart disease is at higher risk in males, and so the long-term survival rate is higher in females. Particular psychological attitudes, a higher incidence of pulmonary hypertension, as well as specific problems linked to the reproductive function characterize congenital heart disease in adult women. The knowledge and analysis of these data are essential for a correct management of congenital heart disease in neonates, children and adults.

  4. Renal actinomycosis with concomitant renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Suk; Jang, Won Ik; Jung, Ji Yoon; Chung, Sarah; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki-Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook; Shin, Yong-Tai

    2012-02-01

    Renal actinomycosis is a rare infection caused by fungi of the genus Actinomyces. A 74-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of gross hematuria with urinary symptoms and intermittent chills. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed thrombosis in the left renal vein and diffuse, heterogeneous enlargement of the left kidney. After nephrectomy, sulfur granules with chronic suppurative inflammation were seen microscopically, and the histopathological diagnosis was renal actinomycosis. Our case is the first report of renal actinomycosis with renal vein thrombosis.

  5. Cleidocranial dysplasia: report of six clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rosemary Baptista; de Souza, Ricardo Salgado; Giovani, Elcio Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that occurs due to mutations in the Cbfa 1 gene, also called Runx 2, located on the short arm of chromosome 6, affecting osteoblast skeletal-specific bones that have intramembranous ossification. This condition is characterized by hypoplastic clavicles, short stature, and great clinical significance in the stomatognathic complex, with involvement of facial bones, changes in the eruption patterns, including multiple supernumerary and retained teeth. This study reports six subjects of the same family with CCD identified in the Dentistry Clinic of Oral Diagnosis Department, Universidade Paulista, Campus Sorocaba, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. All cases had clinical and radiographic aspects of this important condition, such as short stature, hypertelorism, severe mobility of the shoulders, and supernumerary and retained teeth. Due to the rare incidence and phenotypic manifestations, CCD can be easily misdiagnosed. The oral commitments are one of the main (functional and aesthetic) causes of complaints in these subjects; and a dentist must establish the diagnosis as early as possible, followed by behaviors and practices that can minimize harmful manifestations of the syndrome and improve health associated with oral and multidisciplinary integration offering improvements in quality of life of these subjects. PMID:24712510

  6. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia in Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is a rare, genetic disorder predominantly affecting the right ventricle. There is increasing evidence that in some cases, ARVD is due to mutations in genes, which have also been implicated in primary myopathies. This review gives an overview about myopathy-associated ARVD and how these patients can be managed. METHODS A literature review was done using appropriate search terms. RESULTS The myopathy, which is most frequently associated with ARVD, is the myofibrillar myopathy due to desmin mutations. Only in a single patient, ARVD was described in myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, there are a number of genes causing either myopathy or ARVD. These genes include lamin A/C, ZASP/cypher, transmembrane protein-43, titin, and the ryanodine receptor-2 gene. Diagnosis and treatment are identical for myopathy-associated ARVD and nonmyopathy-associated ARVD. CONCLUSIONS Patients with primary myopathy due to mutations in the desmin, dystrophia myotonica protein kinase, lamin A/C, ZASP/cypher, transmembrane protein-43, titin, or the ryanodine receptor-2 gene should be screened for ARVD. Patients carrying a pathogenic variant in any of these genes should undergo annual cardiological investigations for cardiac function and arrhythmias. PMID:27790050

  7. Scattering attenuation microscopy of oral epithelial dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Pete H.; Adegun, Oluyori; Hagi-Pavli, Eleni; Piper, Kim; Bader, Dan; Fortune, Farida

    2010-11-01

    We present a new method for quantitative visualization of premalignant oral epithelium called scattering attenuation microscopy (SAM). Using low-coherence interferometry, SAM projects measurements of epithelial optical attenuation onto an image of the tissue surface as a color map. The measured attenuation is dominated by optical scattering that provides a metric of the severity of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). Scattering is sensitive to the changes in size and distribution of nuclear material that are characteristic of OED, a condition recognized by the occurrence of basal-cell-like features throughout the epithelial depth. SAM measures the axial intensity change of light backscattered from epithelial tissue. Scattering measurements are obtained from sequential axial scans of a 3-D tissue volume and displayed as a 2-D SAM image. A novel segmentation method is used to confine scattering measurement to epithelial tissue. This is applied to oral biopsy samples obtained from 19 patients. Our results show that imaging of tissue scattering can be used to discriminate between different dysplastic severities and furthermore presents a powerful tool for identifying the most representative tissue site for biopsy.

  8. Morphologic studies in the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, D. O.; Horton, W. A.; Rimoin, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the delineation of the genetic skeletal dysplasias, a heterogeneous group of disorders, that consist of over 80 distinct conditions. Morphologic studies have added a further dimension to the delineation of these conditions, their diagnosis, and the investigation of their pathogenetic mechanisms. In certain diseases, the morphologic alterations are characteristic and pathognomonic. In others only nonspecific alterations are observed, whereas in still other disorders growth-plate structure is essentially normal. Histologic, histochemical, and electronmicroscopic studies of growth-plate cartilage have provided new insights into the complexity of morphogenetic events in normal growth through the demonstration of morphologic defects in the genetic disorders of skeletal growth. As yet, very little is known of the biochemical abnormalities underlying the morphologic abnormalities. However, the great variety of morphologic findings points to a number of different pathogenetic defects in the synthesis, release, and assembly of connective tissue macromolecules and in the cells involved in growth-plate metabolism. Images Figure 4 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 10 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 PMID:474720

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Deere, M.; Blanton, S.H.; Scott, C.I.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is generally an autosomal dominant hereditary chondrodystrophy characterized by abnormal epiphyseal centers of the long bones. There are at least two clinical and radiographical MED phenotypes, Fairbank and Ribbing forms, with the former having been better characterized. While less frequent, there are also reports of an autosomal recessive type which does not differ radiographically from the autosomal dominant type. Recently, a family with MED has been shown to map to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19. We have tested linkage to six short tandem repeat markers from chromosome 19 in three multigenerational families with Fairbank MED and another MED family in which there were three of seven affected siblings with unaffected parents. The three families with autosomal dominant MED were linked to D19S215 with a maximum lod score of 3.82 at {theta} = 0.0. Linkage to chromosome 19 was excluded in the fourth family under autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant models with either reduced penetrance or germline mosaicism. Lod scores were -{infinity} and -2.37 at {theta} = 0.0 for D19S215, respectively. Linkage to candidate genes, Col9A1, Col9A2, and Col11A1 was tested and excluded for both models in this family. Col11A1 was excluded under a recessive model. We have confirmed linkage of MED, Fairbank, to chromosome 19 and demonstrated that MED is genetically heterogeneous.

  10. Genetic heterogeneity in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Deere, M.; Hecht, J.T.; Blanton, S.H.; Scott, C.I.; Langer, L.O.; Pauli, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) comprises a group of hereditary chondrodysplasias in which there are major anatomic abnormalities of the long tubular bones. The Fairbank and Ribbing types are the most frequently cited types of MED. They are primarily defined radiographically and are autosomal dominant conditions. Recently, MED in one family was shown to map to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19 and is probably allelic to pseudoachondroplasa. We have tested linkage with six short tandem repeat markers from chromosome 19 to autosomal dominant MED in one four-generation family and to MED in a unique family with three of seven siblings affected and with unaffected parents. Autosomal dominant MED in family 1 was linked with a maximum LOD score, at D19S212, of 3.22 at a recombination fraction ({theta}) of .00. Linkage to chromosome 19 was excluded with MED in the other family, under both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant, with either reduced-penetrance or germ line-mosaicism models. Linkage to candidate genes COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL11A2 was tested and excluded for both genetic models in this family. COL11A1 was excluded under a recessive model. We have confirmed linkage of autosomal dominant Fairbank MED to chromosome 19 and have demonstrated that MED is genetically heterogeneous. 16 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gien, Jason; Kinsella, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease of infancy affecting mostly premature infants with significant morbidity and mortality. Improved survival of very immature infants has led to increased numbers of infants with this disorder. Acute and chronic lung injury and impaired postnatal lung growth are thought to be responsible for the development of BPD. While changes in clinical practice have improved the clinical course and outcomes for infants with BPD, over the last decade, the overall incidence of BPD has not changed. This review will describe the pre and postnatal factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of BPD as well as current and experimental therapies for treatment of BPD. Recent findings The factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of BPD are well described, however recent studies have better defined how these factors modulate lung growth. Inflammation, proinflammatory cytokines and altered angiogenic gene signaling contribute to lung injury and impair pre and postnatal lung growth resulting in BPD, however to date no therapy has been identified that potently and consistently prevents or reverses their effects on lung growth. We will discuss the cell signaling pathways affected in BPD and current therapies available for modulating these pathways. Summary Despite current advances in neonatal care, BPD remains a heavy burden on health care resources. New treatments directed either at reducing lung injury or improving lung growth are under study. PMID:21494147

  12. Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia: clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Roghi, Marco; Scapparone, Chiara; Crippa, Rolando; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Angiero, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia (PCOD) is a rare benign lesion, often asymptomatic, in which fibrous tissue replaces the normal bone tissue, with metaplasic bone and neo-formed cement. We present a rare case of mandibular PCOD in a woman of 55 years, who presented with moderate swelling and mobility of teeth 32-33-34. Endoral radiography showed that these teeth had been devitalized; they had deep periodontal pockets and marked radicular radiotransparency; the root apices exhibited mixed radiotransparency and radio-opacity. Clinical and radiographical findings led to a diagnosis of periapical rarefying osteitis, and the three teeth were thus extracted. Due to the persistence of swelling and slight pain post-extraction, a cone-beam computed tomographic scan was taken; this showed a mixed radiotransparent and radio-opaque lesion in the area of the extracted teeth. A bone biopsy of the affected area was taken for histopathological evaluation; a diagnosis of PCOD was rendered. This case demonstrates the importance of a full investigation when a patient presents after tooth extraction with non-healing socket, pain, and swelling. A multidisciplinary approach is required to manage these rare cases. PMID:24778071

  13. Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia: clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Roghi, Marco; Scapparone, Chiara; Crippa, Rolando; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Angiero, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia (PCOD) is a rare benign lesion, often asymptomatic, in which fibrous tissue replaces the normal bone tissue, with metaplasic bone and neo-formed cement. We present a rare case of mandibular PCOD in a woman of 55 years, who presented with moderate swelling and mobility of teeth 32-33-34. Endoral radiography showed that these teeth had been devitalized; they had deep periodontal pockets and marked radicular radiotransparency; the root apices exhibited mixed radiotransparency and radio-opacity. Clinical and radiographical findings led to a diagnosis of periapical rarefying osteitis, and the three teeth were thus extracted. Due to the persistence of swelling and slight pain post-extraction, a cone-beam computed tomographic scan was taken; this showed a mixed radiotransparent and radio-opaque lesion in the area of the extracted teeth. A bone biopsy of the affected area was taken for histopathological evaluation; a diagnosis of PCOD was rendered. This case demonstrates the importance of a full investigation when a patient presents after tooth extraction with non-healing socket, pain, and swelling. A multidisciplinary approach is required to manage these rare cases.

  14. Epithelial dysplasia of the oral cavity and lips.

    PubMed

    Kaugars, G E; Burns, J C; Gunsolley, J C

    1988-11-15

    Between 1970 and 1986, 1651 biopsy specimens from the oral cavity or lips with a diagnosis of epithelial dysplasia were accessioned by the Medical College of Virginia Oral Pathology Diagnostic Service (Richmond, VA). Of the four histologic grades of epithelial dysplasia (focal mild, mild, moderate, and severe), most of the cases were diagnosed as mild (54.1%) and the fewest (8.1%) were in the severe category. The overall mean age at time of diagnosis was 56.7 years. A predilection for occurrence in males was confirmed, but a lower than expected incidence in blacks was noted. The most common anatomic sites were the buccal mucosa, palate, and floor of mouth. The anatomic areas which were most likely to have a severe epithelial dysplasia were the ventral surface of the tongue and the lip. Patients with dysplasias in more than one site had a slightly higher probability of being diagnosed as either moderate or severe. The cases associated with lichen planus usually were found on the buccal mucosa and demonstrated a shift toward a milder degree of dysplasia. PMID:3179929

  15. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dağistan, Saadettin; Tozoğlu, Ummühan; Göregen, Mustafa; Cakur, Binali

    2007-09-01

    Cemento-osseous dysplasias are a group of disorders known to originate from periodontal ligament tissues and involve, essentially, the same pathological process. They are usually classified, depending on their extent and radiographic appearances, into three main groups: periapical (surrounds the periapical region of teeth and are bilateral), florid (sclerotic symmetrical masses) and focal (single lesion) cemental dysplasias. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia clearly appears to be a form of bone and cemental dysplasia that is limited to jaws. Patients do not have laboratory or radiologic evidence of bone disease in other parts of the skeleton. For the asymptomatic patient, the best management consists of regular recall examinations with prophylaxis and reinforcement of good home hygiene care to control periodontal disease and prevent tooth lose. Management of the symptomatic patient is more difficult. At this stage, there is an inflammatory component to the disease and the process is basically a chronic osteomyelitis involving dysplastic bone and cementum. Antibiotics may be indicated but may not be effective. A case of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia occurring in a 47-year-old Caucasian female is reported which was rare in regard to race and sex.

  16. Mitochondrial Factors and VACTERL Association-Related Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, S.; Solomon, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    VACTERL/VATER association is a group of congenital malformations characterized by at least 3 of the following findings: vertebral defects, anal atresia, cardiac defects, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, and limb abnormalities. To date, no unifying etiology for VACTERL/VATER association has been established, and there is strong evidence for causal heterogeneity. VACTERL/VATER association has many overlapping characteristics with other congenital disorders that involve multiple malformations. In addition to these other conditions, some of which have known molecular causes, certain aspects of VACTERL/VATER association have similarities with the manifestations of disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction can result from a number of distinct causes and can clinically manifest in diverse presentations; accurate diagnosis can be challenging. Case reports of individuals with VACTERL association and confirmed mitochondrial dysfunction allude to the possibility of mitochondrial involvement in the pathogenesis of VACTERL/VATER association. Further, there is biological plausibility involving mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible etiology related to a diverse group of congenital malformations, including those seen in at least a subset of individuals with VACTERL association. PMID:23653577

  17. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  18. [Polyarteritis nodosa with renal agenesis and immunosuppressive treatment].

    PubMed

    Alcocer, J; Fraga, A; Gudiño, J; Lavalle, C

    1976-01-01

    A case of a 44 years old man with the unique combination of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) and the congenital absence of a kidney is presented. The clinical picture consisted of fever, general symptoms, hypertermia, peripheric neuropathy, subcutaneous nodules and renal damage. Laboratory findings included increased WBC, telescoped urinary sediment, renal insufficiency, positive rheumatoid factor, policlonal gammopathy and positive Australia antigen. A review of the pertinent literature and the etiopathogenic role of Australia antigen in PAN is discussed. Efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy was evident in this case. PMID:13359

  19. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  20. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  1. [Consanguinity and congenital abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Marie; Vedsted-Jakobsen, Agnete

    2003-04-28

    Knowledge of consanguinity is relevant for employees in the Danish national health service, since about 7.5% of the Danish population has another ethnic background than Danish and the majority comes from cultures where consanguineous marriages are not unusual. In the literature it is found that consanguineous couples have a higher risk of having children with congenital malformations. The risk is increased by a factor 2 to 2 1/2. The average risk in Denmark is about 3%. Primarily, the autosomal recessive diseases are expressed in children with consanguineous parents. In order to advise and diagnose it is essential to clarify the consanguinity state. In case of pregnancy with consanguineous parents, we recommend: 1) Counselling to estimate the risk of foetal illness and information about possible examination possibilities. 2) An ultrasound scan at the gestational age of 11-14 weeks in order to measure nuchal translucency and an early malformation scan. 3) An ultrasound scan for malformations at the gestational age of 18-20 weeks. 4) An ultrasound scan especially in order to detect foetal heart malformations at the gestational age of 20-24 weeks.

  2. Congenital mirror movements

    PubMed Central

    Méneret, Aurélie; Depienne, Christel; Riant, Florence; Trouillard, Oriane; Bouteiller, Delphine; Cincotta, Massimo; Bitoun, Pierre; Wickert, Julia; Lagroua, Isabelle; Westenberger, Ana; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Doummar, Diane; Romano, Marcello; Rossi, Simone; Defebvre, Luc; De Meirleir, Linda; Espay, Alberto J.; Fiori, Simona; Klebe, Stephan; Quélin, Chloé; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Plessis, Ghislaine; Dale, Russell C.; Sklower Brooks, Susan; Dziezyc, Karolina; Pollak, Pierre; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Vidailhet, Marie; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We screened a large series of individuals with congenital mirror movements (CMM) for mutations in the 2 identified causative genes, DCC and RAD51. Methods: We studied 6 familial and 20 simplex CMM cases. Each patient had a standardized neurologic assessment. Analysis of DCC and RAD51 coding regions included Sanger sequencing and a quantitative method allowing detection of micro rearrangements. We then compared the frequency of rare variants predicted to be pathogenic by either the PolyPhen-2 or the SIFT algorithm in our population and in the 4,300 controls of European origin on the Exome Variant Server. Results: We found 3 novel truncating mutations of DCC that segregate with CMM in 4 of the 6 families. Among the 20 simplex cases, we found one exonic deletion of DCC, one DCC mutation leading to a frameshift, 5 missense variants in DCC, and 2 missense variants in RAD51. All 7 missense variants were predicted to be pathogenic by one or both algorithms. Statistical analysis showed that the frequency of variants predicted to be deleterious was significantly different between patients and controls (p < 0.001 for both RAD51 and DCC). Conclusion: Mutations and variants in DCC and RAD51 are strongly associated with CMM, but additional genes causing CMM remain to be discovered. PMID:24808016

  3. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  4. Positive gallium-67 citrate uptake in a patient with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Creagh, M.F.; Nunan, T.O.

    1988-04-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is an uncommon bone condition with characteristic radiologic features. It is well known that there is increased uptake of Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HMDP) and methylene diphosphonate (MDP) in fibrous dysplasia. There are no reports of uptake of Ga-67 citrate by fibrous dysplasia. A case is reported in which positive Ga-67 uptake was seen in a patient with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.

  5. Congenital anatomic variants of the kidney and ureter: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M R; Adarsh, K M; Jeeson, Riya; Ashwini, C; Nagaraj, B R

    2016-03-01

    Congenital renal parenchymal and pelvicalyceal abnormalities have a wide spectrum. Most of them are asymptomatic, like that of ectopia, cross fused kidney, horseshoe kidney, etc., while a few of them become complicated, leading to renal failure and death. It is very important for the radiologist to identify these anatomic variants and guide the clinicians for surgical and therapeutic procedures. Cross-sectional imaging with a volume rendered technique/maximum intensity projection has overcome ultrasonography and IVU for identification and interpretation of some of these variants. PMID:26747433

  6. Inverse association between severe nausea and vomiting in pregnancy and some congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, Andrew E; Puhó, Erzsébet; Acs, Nándor; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the possible association between nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy and congenital abnormalities. The prevalence of medically-recorded severe nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy in cases with congenital abnormalities and their available matched population controls without any defect was compared in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of congenital abnormalities, 1980-1996. Of 22,843 cases with as 25 different congenital abnormality groups, 1,713 (7.5%) cases had mothers with medically recorded and treated severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Of 38,151 matched population controls, 3,777 (9.9%) had mothers with severe nausea and vomiting (adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) with 95% CI: 0.74, 0.68-0.79). Five congenital abnormality groups: cleft lip with or without cleft palate (0.50, 0.37-0.70), posterior cleft palate (0.53, 0.32-0.89), renal a/dysgenesis (0.23, 0.06-0.96), obstructive defects of urinary tract (0.32, 0.18-0.58), and cardiovascular malformations (0.68, 0.57-0.81) had mothers with a lower prevalence of severe nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (adjusted PORs with 95% CI included in parentheses). Of 25 congenital abnormality groups, 22 had POR lower than 1. Thus in this study the mothers of cases with congenital abnormalities were 26% less likely to have had severe nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy than the mothers of population controls without congenital abnormalities.

  7. Familial florid Cemento-osseous dysplasia - case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Thorawat, Amit; Kalkur, Chaitra; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-12-01

    Familial Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia is a very uncommon condition. Cemento-osseous dysplasia is totally asymptomatic in many cases, in those conditions, lesions are detected in a radiograph taken for other purposes. In this report, we describe a family in which mother and daughter exhibited clinical, radiographic, and histologic features of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia. PMID:26734141

  8. Repeated salicylic acid peels for the treatment of hyperplastic sebaceous glands in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sgontzou, Themis; Armyra, Kalliopi; Kouris, Anargyros; Bokotas, Charalampos; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2014-12-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome) is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia. Hypertrophic sebaceous glands (HSGs) are rarely present but they cause an aesthetic problem. We report a case of a patient suffering from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, treated with salicylic acid peels for the hyperplastic sebaceous glands.

  9. Familial florid Cemento-osseous dysplasia - case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Thorawat, Amit; Kalkur, Chaitra; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-12-01

    Familial Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia is a very uncommon condition. Cemento-osseous dysplasia is totally asymptomatic in many cases, in those conditions, lesions are detected in a radiograph taken for other purposes. In this report, we describe a family in which mother and daughter exhibited clinical, radiographic, and histologic features of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  10. Observations of different patterns of dysplasia in barretts esophagus - a first step to harmonize grading.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Michael; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Riddell, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed a set of cases of early neoplasia (low grade / high grade dysplasia / IEN and mucosal carcinoma) to reach better defined criteria for subtypes of dysplasia/differentiation in the columnar lined (Barretts) esophagus. We discuss criteria that we categorized for recognizing low and high-grade dysplasia and mucosal carcinoma in patterns of neoplasia that we regarded as intestinal, gastric and mixed.

  11. Relationship Between Developmental Dislocation of the Hip in Infant and Acetabular Dysplasia at Skeletal Maturity

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa; Ninomiya, Yoshikazu; Matsubayashi, Shohei; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous reports demonstrated 8–60% patients treated for developmental dislocation of hip (DDH) in infancy have residual acetabular dysplasia (AD) at skeletal maturity. AD patients reportedly exhibit abnormal morphology of the pelvis, high rates of comorbid spinal congenital anomalies and high bone mineral density. These physical findings suggest that AD patients have genetic background. We examined the percentage of AD patients with hip pain at skeletal maturity having a history of DDH in infancy and the correlation between the severity of AD at skeletal maturity and history of DDH treatment to investigate the relationship between AD and DDH. A total of 245 patients were radiographically examined for any history of DDH treatment in infancy. The study included 226 women and 19 men with a mean age at examination of 40.7 years (range 17–59 years). Eighty-eight patients (36%) had a history of DDH treatment (DDH group) and the remaining 157 patients (64%) had no history of DDH treatment (non-DDH group). The average age was lower and acetabular angle was larger in the DDH group. There was a significant increasing trend of the percentage of DDH patients associated with the severity of AD classified with CE, acetabular angle, and acetabular roof angle. Our data suggest that there are several AD patients without a history of DDH in Japan, and AD in patients without a history of DDH has different characteristics from AD in patients with a history of DDH. PMID:25569642

  12. Computer aided diagnosis and treatment planning for developmental dysplasia of the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Lu, Hongbing; Cai, Wenli; Li, Xiang; Meng, Jie; Liang, Zhengrong

    2005-04-01

    The developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a congenital malformation affecting the proximal femurs and acetabulum that are subluxatable, dislocatable, and dislocated. Early diagnosis and treatment is important because failure to diagnose and improper treatment can result in significant morbidity. In this paper, we designed and implemented a computer aided system for the diagnosis and treatment planning of this disease. With the design, the patient received CT (computed tomography) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan first. A mixture-based PV partial-volume algorithm was applied to perform bone segmentation on CT image, followed by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and display of the segmented image, demonstrating the special relationship between the acetabulum and femurs for visual judgment. Several standard procedures, such as Salter procedure, Pemberton procedure and Femoral Shortening osteotomy, were simulated on the screen to rehearse a virtual treatment plan. Quantitative measurement of Acetabular Index (AI) and Femoral Neck Anteversion (FNA) were performed on the 3D image for evaluation of DDH and treatment plans. PC graphics-card GPU architecture was exploited to accelerate the 3D rendering and geometric manipulation. The prototype system was implemented on PC/Windows environment and is currently under clinical trial on patient datasets.

  13. Relationship between developmental dislocation of the hip in infant and acetabular dysplasia at skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa; Ninomiya, Yoshikazu; Matsubayashi, Shohei; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuro

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrated 8-60% patients treated for developmental dislocation of hip (DDH) in infancy have residual acetabular dysplasia (AD) at skeletal maturity. AD patients reportedly exhibit abnormal morphology of the pelvis, high rates of comorbid spinal congenital anomalies and high bone mineral density. These physical findings suggest that AD patients have genetic background. We examined the percentage of AD patients with hip pain at skeletal maturity having a history of DDH in infancy and the correlation between the severity of AD at skeletal maturity and history of DDH treatment to investigate the relationship between AD and DDH.A total of 245 patients were radiographically examined for any history of DDH treatment in infancy. The study included 226 women and 19 men with a mean age at examination of 40.7 years (range 17-59 years).Eighty-eight patients (36%) had a history of DDH treatment (DDH group) and the remaining 157 patients (64%) had no history of DDH treatment (non-DDH group). The average age was lower and acetabular angle was larger in the DDH group. There was a significant increasing trend of the percentage of DDH patients associated with the severity of AD classified with CE, acetabular angle, and acetabular roof angle.Our data suggest that there are several AD patients without a history of DDH in Japan, and AD in patients without a history of DDH has different characteristics from AD in patients with a history of DDH. PMID:25569642

  14. CMV-induced embryonic mouse organ of Corti dysplasia: network architecture of dysfunctional lateral inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Michael; Jaskoll, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital CMV infection is the major non-genetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss at birth and beyond. Among other pathologies, there is a striking dysplasia/hyperplasia of organ of Corti hair and supporting cells (HC/SC). Using an in vitro embryonic mouse model of CMV-induced cochlear teratogenesis that mimics the known human pathology, and functional signaling network modeling, we tested the hypothesis that CMV disrupts the highly ordered HC/SC pattern by dysregulating Notch and Fgfr3, their cognate ligands and downstream effectors. Several novel emergent properties of the critical lateral inhibition subnetwork became apparent. The subnetwork has classic small-world properties such as short paths between most gene pairs, few long-distance links, and considerable clustering. Concomitantly, the calculated probability that our specific gene expression dataset is from dysplastic organs of Corti is highly significant (p < 1 × 10−12). Further, we determined that the subnetwork has a highly heterogeneous scale-free topology in which the highly linked genes (hubs), Notch and Fgfr3, play a central role in mediating interactions among the less linked genes. This phenomenon has important biologic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26178632

  15. Quantitative measurement and analysis for detection and treatment planning of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Lu, Hongbing; Chen, Hanyong; Zhao, Li; Shi, Zhengxing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-02-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is a congenital hip joint malformation affecting the proximal femurs and acetabulum that are subluxatable, dislocatable, and dislocated. Conventionally, physicians made diagnoses and treatments only based on findings from two-dimensional (2D) images by manually calculating clinic parameters. However, anatomical complexity of the disease and the limitation of current standard procedures make accurate diagnosis quite difficultly. In this study, we developed a system that provides quantitative measurement of 3D clinical indexes based on computed tomography (CT) images. To extract bone structure from surrounding tissues more accurately, the system firstly segments the bone using a knowledge-based fuzzy clustering method, which is formulated by modifying the objective function of the standard fuzzy c-means algorithm with additive adaptation penalty. The second part of the system calculates automatically the clinical indexes, which are extended from 2D to 3D for accurate description of spatial relationship between femurs and acetabulum. To evaluate the system performance, experimental study based on 22 patients with unilateral or bilateral affected hip was performed. The results of 3D acetabulum index (AI) automatically provided by the system were validated by comparison with 2D results measured by surgeons manually. The correlation between the two results was found to be 0.622 (p<0.01).

  16. The surgical treatment of fibrous dysplasia. With emphasis on recent contributions from cranio-maxillo-facial surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Edgerton, M T; Persing, J A; Jane, J A

    1985-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a congenital, metabolic, nonfamilial disturbance that occurs in one or more bones, at times in association with skin pigmentations or endocrine abnormalities. The authors report on a large personal series of 23 patients with fibrous dysplasia involving the craniofacial skeleton. The etiology, clinical findings, pathology, and differential diagnosis of this condition are reviewed and a working hypothesis is offered for the pathophysiology of this disorder. Approximately one-third of patients with fibrous dysplasia have involvement of the cranial or facial bones. The authors describe how new techniques in craniofacial surgery have opened up additional options for this group of patients. Deformity, diplopia, proptosis, sinus infection, deafness, and loss of vision, are some of the clinical features that may require early surgical management. Evidence is given to support more complete resection of bony lesions with immediate reconstruction by several techniques. The removal, remodeling, and replacement of the dysplastic bone is advanced as a promising new method for the management of these complex problems. Successful use of this technique in four patients is reported. In a separate group of patients, continuing good experience is reported with cranio-orbital reconstruction by means of large methyl-methacrylate implants. Both of these surgical approaches eliminate donor site morbidity that results from the grafting of large amounts of autogenous bone. Both techniques also avoid the problems associated with postoperative absorption of bone grafting. Several patients are reported in whom serious disturbances in visual function appear to have been prevented or reversed by early treatment. Factors leading to malignant change in patients with fibrous dysplasia are reviewed. Images FIG. 1A. FIG. 1B. FIG. 1C. FIG. 1D. FIG. 1E. FIG. 1F. FIG. 2A. FIG. 2B. FIG. 2C. FIG. 2D. FIG. 2E. FIG. 2F. FIG. 2G. FIG. 2H. FIGS. 2I and J. FIG. 3A. FIG. 3B. FIG. 3C. FIG. 3

  17. Congenital idiopathic chylothorax in neonates: chemical pleurodesis with povidone-iodine (Betadine).

    PubMed

    Brissaud, O; Desfrere, L; Mohsen, R; Fayon, M; Demarquez, J L

    2003-11-01

    Chylothorax is defined as an accumulation of chyle in the pleural space. This condition usually occurs after an operation, the congenital idiopathic form being rare (1/15000 births). Recovery is observed within four to six weeks of diagnosis in most cases. Treatment is either conservative or surgical. Four cases are reported of congenital chylothorax (three idiopathic, one accompanied by diffuse lymphangectasia) managed by chemical pleurodesis (intrapleural injection of povidone-iodine). Tolerance was satisfactory: unaltered thyroid function in the three cases explored; one case of transient generalised oedema. Treatment was deemed successful in three of the four cases. One child died from renal failure (unrelated to the chemical pleurodesis). Pleurodesis by povidone-iodine appears to be well tolerated and may represent a good alternative to mechanical abrasion or surgery for congenital idiopathic chylothorax. Its use for refractory chylothorax may also decrease the morbidity related to prolonged hospital stay.

  18. Frontorbital Fibrous Dysplasia Resection and Reconstruction With Custom Polyetherlatone Alloplast.

    PubMed

    Nahumi, Nadav; Shohet, Michael R; Bederson, Joshua B; Elahi, Ebrahim

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign, pathological development of bone. Craniofacial bones are the most commonly involved and can potentially cause visual disturbance, proptosis, orbital dystopia, and facial deformity. This case involves a 13-year-old girl with significant proptosis (20 mm left, 17.5 mm right) and downward displacement of the left globe (1.5 mm) due to fibrous dysplasia. Reconstruction was performed with computed tomography-derived and 3D printed custom polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implantation. PEEK is a nonabsorbable, nonporous thermoplastic polymer notable for its ability to be modified intraoperatively and ideal imaging properties postoperatively. Never, to our knowledge, has PEEK been used for primary reconstruction of the frontal orbital region in fibrous dysplasia in a child. The lesion was successfully repaired with excellent aesthetic and no apparent damage to neurovascular or ocular structures. PMID:26594985

  19. A pedigree study of perinatally lethal renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bankier, A; de Campo, M; Newell, R; Rogers, J G; Danks, D M

    1985-01-01

    A family study of perinatally lethal renal disease (PLRD) was undertaken in the State of Victoria, Australia, for the years 1961 to 1980. A total of 221 cases was ascertained through hospital and necropsy records and confirmed by necropsy findings. There were 134 cases of bilateral renal agenesis (BRA), 34 cases of unilateral agenesis with dysplasia of the other kidney (URA/RD), 42 cases of bilateral renal dysplasia (BRD), and 11 cases of renal aplasia. Parents of 131 babies were interviewed and 153 parents from 82 families had a renal ultrasound examination. In the period of best ascertainment (1975 to 1980) the frequency of PLRD was 0.27 per 1000 and of BRA 0.16 per 1000. There were 10 cases of sirenomelia, a frequency of 0.008 per 1000. For all families of PLRD, 15 of 423 (3.6%) sibs and three of 1579 (0.2%) first cousins were affected. One family had three sibs with BRA and four had two sibs with BRA. One pair of sibs and two first cousins had BRA in one and URA/RD in the other affected. One baby had BRD with an affected first cousin. The nature of the renal lesion was not established. When the index case had BRA, 14 in 283 (5.6%) sibs had PLRD. Where the index case had BRA and urogenital defects, but no birth defects in other organs, 12 of 148 sibs (8%) were affected. None of the sibs had BRA when the index case had BRA as part of a multiple malformation complex. In the multiple malformation group, however, five of 40 (12.5%) sibs had similar patterns of malformations. Renal ultrasound abnormalities were no more frequent in parents of two affected babies (one of 18) than in the other parents (nine of 135). Our findings confirm that BRA and URA are genetically related. There are a number of conclusions which are important for genetic counselling. There is a high likelihood of recurrence (8%) in sibs when the index case has BRA and urogenital abnormalities alone. When BRA is part of a multiple malformation complex, the risk of recurrence of multiple

  20. Mechanisms of Lung Injury and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Alan H

    2016-09-01

    Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most frequent adverse outcome for infants born at < 30 weeks gestational age, there remain major gaps in understanding the pathophysiology, and thus there are few effective targeted therapies to prevent and treat BPD. This review will focus on the substantial problems and knowledge gaps for the clinician and investigator when considering lung injury and BPD. The epidemiology of BPD is clear: BPD is a lung injury syndrome predominantly in extremely low-birth-weight infants with an incidence that increases as gestation/birth weight decrease, with growth restriction, in males and with fetal exposures and with injury from postdelivery respiratory care. However, we do not have a good definition of BPD that identifies the infants that die of respiratory disease before 36 weeks or that predicts long-term outcomes as well. The injury resulting in BPD likely begins as altered lung development before delivery in many infants (small for gestational age, chorioamnionitis, tobacco exposure), can be initiated by resuscitating at birth, and then amplified by postnatal exposures (oxygen, mechanical ventilation, infection). Conceptually the events leading to BPD are the continued interplay of lung development that is altered progressively by injury and repair to result in poorly defined phenotypes of BPD. The injury pathways prominently cause inflammation, and as a proof of principle, corticosteroids can decrease the incidence and severity of BPD, as demonstrated by three recent trials of the early use of steroids. There are likely "adaptation" and "tolerance" responses that modulate the injury and repair to increase or decrease the damage, interactions that are not understood. BPD is a more complex disease. PMID:27603539

  1. Integrated Genomic Analyses in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Cotten, C. Michael; Page, Grier P.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Mariani, Thomas J.; Cuna, Alain C.; Faye-Petersen, Ona M.; Kelly, David; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and pathways associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) because O2 requirement at 36 weeks’ post-menstrual age risk is strongly influenced by heritable factors. Study design A genome-wide scan was conducted on 1.2 million genotyped SNPs, and an additional 7 million imputed SNPs, using a DNA repository of extremely low birth weight infants. Genome-wide association and gene set analysis was performed for BPD or death, severe BPD or death, and severe BPD in survivors. Specific targets were validated using gene expression in BPD lung tissue and in mouse models. Results Of 751 infants analyzed, 428 developed BPD or died. No SNPs achieved genome-wide significance (p<10−8) although multiple SNPs in adenosine deaminase (ADARB2), CD44, and other genes were just below p<10−6. Of approximately 8000 pathways, 75 were significant at False Discovery Rate (FDR) <0.1 and p<0.001 for BPD/death, 95 for severe BPD/death, and 90 for severe BPD in survivors. The pathway with lowest FDR was miR-219 targets (p=1.41E-08, FDR 9.5E-05) for BPD/death and Phosphorous Oxygen Lyase Activity (includes adenylate and guanylate cyclases) for both severe BPD/death (p=5.68E-08, FDR 0.00019) and severe BPD in survivors (p=3.91E-08, FDR 0.00013). Gene expression analysis confirmed significantly increased miR-219 and CD44 in BPD. Conclusions Pathway analyses confirmed involvement of known pathways of lung development and repair (CD44, Phosphorus Oxygen Lyase Activity) and indicated novel molecules and pathways (ADARB2, Targets of miR-219) involved in genetic predisposition to BPD. PMID:25449221

  2. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  3. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis.

  4. Congenital Scoliosis (Mini-review).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis is a lateral deformity of the spine with a disturbance of the sagittal profile caused by malformations of vertebra and ribs. Typically, early surgical intervention is the suggested treatment (before three-years-old) for young patients with congenital scoliosis. While a previous study was conducted in 2011 to investigate long-term studies supporting the necessity for this recommendation and no evidence was found, this current review, is an updated search for evidence published from 2011 through March 2015. This also failed to find any prospective or randomized controlled studies to support the hypothesis that spinal fusion surgery in patients with congenital scoliosis should be considered as evidence-based treatment. Contradictory results exist on the safety of hemivertebra resection and segmental fusion using pedicle screw fixation. When using the VEPTR (vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib) device, studies show a high rate of complications exist. It is difficult to predict the final outcome for patients with congenital scoliosis. However, it is possible that many patients with congenital scoliosis may be able to avoid spinal surgery with the application of advanced bracing technology. Therefore, it is only prudent to advocate for conservative management first before spinal surgery is considered. PMID:26769614

  5. Congenital Scoliosis (Mini-review).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis is a lateral deformity of the spine with a disturbance of the sagittal profile caused by malformations of vertebra and ribs. Typically, early surgical intervention is the suggested treatment (before three-years-old) for young patients with congenital scoliosis. While a previous study was conducted in 2011 to investigate long-term studies supporting the necessity for this recommendation and no evidence was found, this current review, is an updated search for evidence published from 2011 through March 2015. This also failed to find any prospective or randomized controlled studies to support the hypothesis that spinal fusion surgery in patients with congenital scoliosis should be considered as evidence-based treatment. Contradictory results exist on the safety of hemivertebra resection and segmental fusion using pedicle screw fixation. When using the VEPTR (vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib) device, studies show a high rate of complications exist. It is difficult to predict the final outcome for patients with congenital scoliosis. However, it is possible that many patients with congenital scoliosis may be able to avoid spinal surgery with the application of advanced bracing technology. Therefore, it is only prudent to advocate for conservative management first before spinal surgery is considered.

  6. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively.

  7. Skeletal Dysplasias That Cause Thoracic Insufficiency in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    İpek, Mehmet Sah; Akgul Ozmen, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with various abnormalities of the skeleton. Some of them are perinatally lethal and can be diagnosed at birth. Lethality is usually due to thoracic underdevelopment and lung hypoplasia. A correct diagnosis and typing of the skeletal disorder is essential for the prognosis as is genetic counseling of the family. A retrospective review of 12 cases of clinico-radiologic diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia, leading to thoracic insufficiency, was conducted. We aimed to make differential diagnosis with special emphasis on radiological findings, and to emphasize the importance of parental counseling. PMID:27057899

  8. Dental management of oculodentodigital dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aminabadi, Naser A; Pourkazemi, Maryam; Oskouei, Sina G; Jamali, Zahra

    2010-06-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is an extremely rare autosomal dominant pleiotropic disorder. The syndrome is characterized by abnormal facial features, central nervous system involvement, syndactyly and clinodactyly of fourth and fifth fingers, dry and lusterless hair, generalized enamel hypoplasia and odontodysplasia. Combination of odontodysplasia, poor oral hygiene, and parental neglect can lead to extensive destruction of tooth structure and the treatment options become limited. Early diagnosis with a proper treatment plan and meticulous oral hygiene program helps eliminate the necessity of multiple tooth extractions. This case report describes the comprehensive dental treatment aimed at rehabilitation of function and aesthetics of the dentition in an 8-year-old boy with oculodentodigital dysplasia.

  9. Hip dysplasia and the performing arts: is there a correlation?

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert; O'Sullivan, Eilish; Edelstein, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Dancers frequently present with hip pain. The etiology of this pathology has not been clearly identified from an anatomical perspective. Structural variations including hip dysplasia and dynamic variables from the foot to the pelvis will be discussed. Understanding the etiology as a structural entity, neuromuscular entity or a combination of the two, allows for a successful rehabilitative process and a successful return to dance. This article describes the possible correlation between hip dysplasia and hip pain in the dancer, the relationship of dance postures to the kinematic chain and outlines possible treatment strategies for management.

  10. Autosomal Recessive Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Ghosh, Epsita; Dayal, Surabhi

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (AED) with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, a very rare entity, in a 2-year-old female child of two asymptomatic, consanguineous parents. Their previous child also had a similar condition. Autosomal recessive AED (AR-AED) can have its full expression both in males and females and it is clinically indistinguishable from the x-linked recessive AED (XL-AED), which is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia. Unlike the partially symptomatic carriers of XL-AED, the heterozygotes of AR-AED are phenotypically asymptomatic. PMID:25071285

  11. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  12. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  13. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26, ... person with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  15. Congenital Anomalies of the Limbs

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, G.; Mongeau, M.; Moreault, P.; Dupuis, M.; Hebert, B.; Corriveau, C.

    1964-01-01

    As a preparatory step towards the development of a complete habilitation program for children with congenital limb anomalies associated with maternal ingestion of thalidomide, the medical records of all patients with congenital limb anomalies referred to the Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal in the past decade were studied, and an examination and a thorough reassessment were made of 41 patients (21 males and 20 females). In this paper, Part I, the medical and prosthetic aspects are dealt with and a form of management is described for each type of anomaly. The conclusions are reached that prosthetic fitting and training should be initiated very early in life and that co-operation of the parent is essential to successful habilitation of a child with congenital limb anomalies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:14154297

  16. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management. PMID:26981222

  17. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-02-28

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management. PMID:26981222

  18. Renal infarction after aerobics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, J H; Moinuddin, M; Buchignani, J S; Rockett, J F; Callison, M K

    1984-11-01

    Renal infarction is most frequently due to emboli from the heart or aorta. Other causes include atheromatous disease, renal artery aneurysm, vasculitis, hypotension, hypercoagulable states, aortic dissection, and major trauma. Most renal infarctions are segmental. The extent of disease is dependent upon the size and number of renal vessels involved, coexistent renal disease, and collateral circulation. Flank pain, fever, leukocytosis, hematuria, renal failure, or hypertension may suggest the diagnosis, but these findings are nonspecific and diagnosis will depend not only on history and physical examination, but also on the appropriate imaging tests. The type of treatment is dictated by the etiology of the infarction.

  19. Cranioplasty Using a Modified Split Calvarial Graft Technique in Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young Taek; Cho, Jae Ik

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia is a well-documented rare autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by hypoplastic/aplastic clavicles, brachycephalic skull, patent sutures and fontanelles, midface hypoplasia, and abnormalities of dentition. Patients with cleidocranial dysplasia often complain about undesirable esthetic appearance of their forehead and skull. Notwithstanding many studies of molecular, genetics and skeletal abnormalities of this congenial disorder, there have been very few written reports of cranioplasty involving cleidocranial dysplasia. Thus, we report a rare case of successful cranioplasty using a modified split calvarial graft technique in patient with cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:26279819

  20. A relatively mild skeletal ciliopathy phenotype consistent with cranioectodermal dysplasia is associated with a homozygous nonsynonymous mutation in WDR35.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher; Lamont, Ryan E; Wade, Andrew; Bernier, Francois P; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil

    2016-03-01

    Ciliopathies are a class of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by deficits of the primary cilium, an important organelle for cellular signaling and development. Here we report on a patient from a consanguineous family presenting with renal cysts, short stature, distinctive facial features, missing teeth, brachydactyly, narrow chest, and abnormal ribs. His phenotype resembled a skeletal ciliopathy and the initial clinical differential diagnosis included Jeune thoracic dystrophy and cranioectodermal dysplasia. Due to the presence of parental consanguinity, a homozygous recessive mutation was the suspected cause and homozygosity mapping was used to direct candidate gene sequencing. WDR35, an intraflagellar transport protein previously associated with cranioectodermal dysplasia, the more severe short rib polydactyly syndrome type V and recently Ellis van Creveld syndrome, is present within a region of homozygosity and sequencing of all coding exons identified a novel homozygous nonsynonymous variant, p.Trp1153Cys. This variant affects a highly conserved tryptophan residue, is predicted to be deleterious, and is the most distal mutation yet reported in WDR35. This case expands the spectrum of phenotypes caused by WDR35 mutations, which we review herein. PMID:26691894

  1. Congenital Sialolipoma in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Mazlumoglu, Muhammed Recai; Altas, Enver; Oner, Fatih; Ucuncu, Harun; Calik, Muhammed

    2015-11-01

    Sialolipoma is a newly recognized tumor of the major and minor salivary glands and represents only 0.3% of all salivary gland tumors. Only 3 cases of congenital sialolipoma are available in the literature. In the current case, we performed a total parotidectomy with facial nerve preservation on a 12-week-old infant exhibiting huge mass in the parotid region. Histopathology results showed sialolipoma. There was no recurrence at the 18-month follow-up. Although it is a very rare disease in infants, congenital sialolipoma should be kept in mind in patients with parotid mass. The primary treatment is parotidectomy with facial nerve preservation. PMID:26594977

  2. Bilateral renal agenesis and Mullerian anomalies in a 47,XXX fetus.

    PubMed

    Hogge, W A; Vick, D J; Schnatterly, P A; MacMillan, R H

    1989-06-01

    Congenital absence of the kidneys (bilateral renal agenesis, BRA) is a genetically heterogeneous condition, and all modes of inheritance have been suggested as causes. The finding of a 47,XXX chromosome constitution in a fetus with BRA and developmental arrest of the mesonephric and paramesonephric systems raises the possibility that X chromosome trisomy also may cause the urogenital adysplasia sequence.

  3. HPV immunohistochemical testing and cervical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    MUREŞAN, DANIEL; ROTAR, IOANA CRISTINA; APOSTOL, SILVANA; COROIU, GEORGIANA; STAMATIAN, FLORIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) infection represents a necessary condition for cervical carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of HPV testing using an immunohistochemical staining kit with implications upon both diagnosis and treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Methods Seventy-nine patients and eighty-six controls were enrolled in the study. Each patient had completed a physical examination, gynecological examination with cervical sampling using a liquid-based cytology system and also colposcopy. The cervical samples were analyzed according to Bethesda terminology and HPV-HR immunohistochemical staining was performed. In all the patients with high-grade lesion a surgical excision procedure was performed followed by pathological examination of the specimen. The collected data were analyzed using statistical software. Results The colposcopic examination has detected acetowhite modifications of the cervical epithelium in 47% of patients with ASC-US (Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance) in 71% of patients with LSIL (Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and in 100% of patients with HSIL ( High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion). The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of LSIL in 27% of biopsy specimens in patients with ASC-US and in 79.99% of patients with LSIL respectively. In all patients with HSIL the diagnosis was CIN II or higher. The percentage of HPV-HR (Human Papilloma Virus – High Risk) positivity porportionaly increased with the severity of cytological diagnosis: 30% in ASC-US, 42.86% in LSIL and 75% in HSIL patients. The sensitivity of detection of HPV-HR was 50% with CI 95% [17.45;82.55] for ASC-US, 77.77% with CI 95% [51.91;92.62] for LSIL and 81.81% with CI 95% [58.99;94.00] for HSIL. Conclusion HPV testing can be an important screening tool for cervical dysplasia. The HPV testing targeting high risk types is indicated for ASC-US and LSIL triage. The present work

  4. Severe congenital thrombocytopaenia – first clinical manifestation of Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Aguilar, Sara; Prado, Sara Noéme; Palaré, Maria João; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela

    2012-01-01

    This report focuses on a male infant, the first born of non-consanguineous parents diagnosed with polyhydramnios at 26 weeks of gestation. The newborn was admitted during the neonatal period with bleeding diathesis associated with a low platelet count at birth (5×109/l).The authors registered a persistent low platelet count (9000–129 000/l) during the infants 1st year of life. Physical examination revealed a petechial rash, a dysmorphic face and bilateral cryptorchidism, in the absence of organomegaly. Additionally, cardiologic evaluation revealed an aortic valve dysplasia and an atrial septal defect, while bone marrow biopsy and aspiration were found normal. Throughout the investigation, the authors excluded congenital infection, alloimmune and familiar thrombocytopaenia, Fanconi anaemia and thrombocytopaenia absent radius syndrome. The cytogenetic analysis revealed a mutation in the PTPN11 gene associated with Noonan syndrome. Here the author highlights that severe neonatal thrombocytopaenia is a manifestation that should be considered in the diagnosis and clinical management of Noonan’s syndrome. PMID:22605701

  5. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  6. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  7. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  8. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  9. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  10. Tortuosity of the retinal vessels in Aarskog syndrome (faciogenital dysplasia).

    PubMed

    Pizio, H F; Scott, M H; Richard, J M

    1994-03-01

    Aarskog syndrome (faciogenital dysplasia) is a genetic growth disorder characterized by short stature, cryptorchidism, shawl scrotum, and dysmorphic facial features. Ophthalmic findings include hypertelorism, blepharoptosis, strabismus, and ophthalmoplegia. The authors report a patient with Aarskog syndrome and bilateral retinal vessel tortuosity. This is the first retinal anomaly associated with Aarskog syndrome.

  11. Photodynamic therapy of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1997-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy using Photofrin has been used as an alternative to esophagectomy for patients with dysplasia or superficial cancer associated with Barrett's esophagus. In this update we present the results in 71 patients treated and followed for 6-72 months. 54 patients had high grade dysplasia/early cancer, and 17 had low grade dysplasia. 22 Patients had early cancer and 1 had T2 cancer. Three separate PDT treatments were required in 3 patients, 2 in 20 patients and 1 in 48. All patients were maintained on omeprazole. Patients received a photofrin dose of 2 mg/kg followed two days later by 630 nm laser light from an either argon/dye laser or KTP/dye laser. The majority of patients received light from a balloon light delivery device. Dysplasia and carcinoma was eliminated or reduced in majority of the cases. 75-80 percent of Barrett's mucosa was replaced by squamous epithelium. 34 patients developed strictures. All responded well to dilation.

  12. Multidisciplinary management of hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Suja; Cherackal, George J; Jacob, Jose; Varghese, Alex K

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a hereditary disorder, which affects ectodermal derivatives. It manifests several abnormalities of the teeth, and is commonly inherited through female carriers. This case report presents a patient with compromised esthetics and function. A multidisciplinary approach was planned involving an oral pathologist, endodontist, orthodontist and a prosthodontist. PMID:25984305

  13. Use of Zoledronic Acid in Paediatric Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rossin, Sara; Divisic, Antuan; De Gregorio, Alesandra; Agosto, Caterina; Catalano, Igor; Mazza, Alessandro; Sartori, Leonardo; Benini, Franca

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a paediatric patient affected by mandibular fibrous dysplasia (FD) with severe and chronic pain who was successfully treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL): a third-generation bisphosphonate. Further research is needed to assess its safety and efficacy as a treatment option for FD in the paediatric population. PMID:27747122

  14. Fibrous dysplasia-like tumor of the lacrimal sac.

    PubMed

    Scott, Garrett R; Frueh, Bartley R; Flint, Andrew; Elner, Victor M

    2008-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman developed epiphora and a slowly enlarging right medial canthal mass for 1 year. CT revealed a mass with ground-glass radiodensity and hazy borders in the lacrimal sac. At external dacryocystorhinostomy, a tan, gritty, spherical mass was easily removed from the sac lumen. Histopathologic characteristics were typical of fibrous dysplasia. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  15. Avascular necrosis of the hip in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, W.G.; Bassett, G.S.; Mandell, G.A.; Scott, C.I. Jr. )

    1989-11-01

    We observed radiographic changes of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the capital femoral epiphysis in 9 hips of 11 patients with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Plain roentgenography, bone scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies all revealed characteristic asymmetric changes in the presence of AVN superimposed on dysplastic femoral heads.

  16. Clinical features of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia expressed in the knee.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Noguchi, Y; Mitsuyasu, H; Nagamine, R; Urabe, K; Matsuda, S; Iwamoto, Y

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of the knee affected by multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Thirty-one cases of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia were reviewed. Of the patients, 11 were male and 20 were female. The average age at onset of symptoms was 22.5 years. The average age at initial visit to the authors' hospital was 28.9 years. Radiographic findings showed epiphyseal abnormality of the knee in all but two (93%) cases. Irregularity, segmentation of the epiphysis, widening of the joint space, and genu valgum deformity were the dominant findings before epiphyseal closure. After epiphyseal closure, the most characteristic finding was a shallow femoral trochlear groove, which was observed in 56.5% of the cases. Other findings in adult patients included early onset osteoarthritic change, genu valgum, depression of the lateral tibial plateau, and multiple free bodies. However, there still is a possibility that multiple epiphyseal dysplasia exists, even if the patient lacks a shallow femoral trochlear groove. If genu valgum or varum, free bodies, and premature osteoarthritis are observed, one should evaluate other joints, keeping a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia in mind. Patients with knees that have a femoral trochlear groove of normal or near normal shape do exist, and premature osteoarthritic changes may develop in such patients. PMID:11064990

  17. Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) lesion analysis with complex diffusion approach.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Jeny; Kannan, K; Kesavadas, C; Thomas, Bejoy

    2009-10-01

    Identification of Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) can be difficult due to the subtle MRI changes. Though sequences like FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) can detect a large majority of these lesions, there are smaller lesions without signal changes that can easily go unnoticed by the naked eye. The aim of this study is to improve the visibility of focal cortical dysplasia lesions in the T1 weighted brain MRI images. In the proposed method, we used a complex diffusion based approach for calculating the FCD affected areas. Based on the diffused image and thickness map, a complex map is created. From this complex map; FCD areas can be easily identified. MRI brains of 48 subjects selected by neuroradiologists were given to computer scientists who developed the complex map for identifying the cortical dysplasia. The scientists were blinded to the MRI interpretation result of the neuroradiologist. The FCD could be identified in all the patients in whom surgery was done, however three patients had false positive lesions. More lesions were identified in patients in whom surgery was not performed and lesions were seen in few of the controls. These were considered as false positive. This computer aided detection technique using complex diffusion approach can help detect focal cortical dysplasia in patients with epilepsy. PMID:19560319

  18. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on…

  19. Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia of the Rib: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevappa, Asha; Patel, Sapna; Ravishankar, Sunila; Manjunath, Gubbanna V.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a noninherited bone disease in which abnormal differentiation of osteoblasts leads to replacement of normal marrow and cancellous bone by immature bone with fibrous stroma. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia accounts for 28% in the ribs. It is often asymptomatic and incidentally detected on radiographs. As with many bone abnormalities, it can be superimposed by the formation of aneurysmal bone cysts. We report a case of a 70-year-old lady who presented with swelling on the chest wall of 20-ear duration and sudden increase in size for 8 months. Radiologically, X-ray and CT scan showed an expansible lesion of the medullary cavity with a ground-glass centre and thinning of cortex of the 5th rib. The resected lesion was a firm, well-defined solid, grey-white expansile mass replacing the medullary cavity. Histopathologically, benign fibrous spindle areas with disorganized irregular bony trabeculae were seen. Hemorrhagic spaces lined by osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells were also noted. The diagnosis was fibrous dysplasia with aneurysmal bone cyst changes. Although fibrous dysplasia with aneurysmal bone cyst is rare, it should be taken into account in differential diagnosis of the rapidly growing solitary rib lesion. PMID:23304592

  20. A Case of Solitary Nonvascularized Corneal Epithelial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Morii, Tomoya; Sumioka, Takayoshi; Izutani-Kitano, Ai; Takada, Yukihisa; Okada, Yuka; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Saika, Shizuya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epithelial dysplasia is categorized as conjunctival/corneal intraepithelial neoplasia which is a precancerous lesion. The lesion is usually developed at the limbal region and grows towards central cornea in association with neovascularization into the lesion. Here, we report a case of isolated nonvascularized corneal epithelial dysplasia surrounded by normal corneal epithelium with immune histochemical finding of ocular surface tissues cytokeratins, for example, keratin 13 and keratin 12. Case Presentation. A 76-year-old man consulted us for visual disturbance with localized opacification of the corneal epithelium in his left eye. His visual acuity was 20/20 and 20/200 in his right and left eye, respectively. Slit lamp examination showed a whitish plaque-like lesion at the center of his left corneal epithelium. No vascular invasion to the lesion was found. The lesion was surgically removed and subjected to histopathological examination and diagnosed as epithelial dysplasia. Amyloidosis was excluded by direct fast scarlet 4BS (DFS) staining. Immunohistochemistry showed that the dysplastic epithelial cells express keratin 13 and vimentin, but not keratin 12, indicating that the neoplastic epithelial cells lacked corneal-type epithelium differentiation. Conclusions. The lesion was diagnosed as nonvascularized epithelial dysplasia of ocular surface. Etiology of the lesion is not known. PMID:27042371