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Sample records for congolense infected mice

  1. Effect of crude extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on parasitaemia of mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Kifleyohannes, Tsegabirhan; Terefe, Getachew; Tolossa, Yacob H; Giday, Mirutse; Kebede, Nigatu

    2014-06-24

    Treatment of trypanosomosis is currently facing a number of problems including toxicity of trypanocidal drugs and development of resistance by the parasites. These limitations have prompted the search for alternative active substances (such as of natural origin). The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on Trypanosoma congolense in mice. Swiss white male mice aged 8-12 weeks were divided into six experimental groups of six animals. Water and methanol extracts of the two plants were prepared. T. congolense was isolated from cattle at Ghibe valley (Ethiopia). All experimental mice received approximately 1 x 10(5) trypanosomes in 0.2 ml of blood. Plant extracts were given orally to four groups (2 plant species and two extraction methods) at 400 mg/kg body weight for seven consecutive days. One group remained as distilled water treated control and the other as diminzene aceturate treated control. The effect of the extracts on levels of parasitaemia, body weight, packed cell volume (PCV) and mice survival was monitored for 25 days. All treatments have significantly reduced parasitaemia and helped improve body weight, PCV and survival of mice compared to the water-treated control (P < 0.01 in all cases). These effects were comparable to that with diminazene aceturate. No significant difference was observed in the reduction of parasitaemia between plant extract treatment groups. However, mice with extracts of A. absinthium had significantly higher body weight than those with extracts of M. stenopetala (P < 0.05). The two plants have antitrypanosomal potential against T. congolense by reducing the levels of parasitaemia, maintaining good PCV and body weight, and prolonging the lives of infected animals.

  2. Effect of crude extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on parasitaemia of mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of trypanosomosis is currently facing a number of problems including toxicity of trypanocidal drugs and development of resistance by the parasites. These limitations have prompted the search for alternative active substances (such as of natural origin). The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on Trypanosoma congolense in mice. Methods Swiss white male mice aged 8–12 weeks were divided into six experimental groups of six animals. Water and methanol extracts of the two plants were prepared. T. congolense was isolated from cattle at Ghibe valley (Ethiopia). All experimental mice received approximately 1 x 105 trypanosomes in 0.2 ml of blood. Plant extracts were given orally to four groups (2 plant species and two extraction methods) at 400 mg/kg body weight for seven consecutive days. One group remained as distilled water treated control and the other as diminzene aceturate treated control. The effect of the extracts on levels of parasitaemia, body weight, packed cell volume (PCV) and mice survival was monitored for 25 days. Results All treatments have significantly reduced parasitaemia and helped improve body weight, PCV and survival of mice compared to the water-treated control (P < 0.01 in all cases). These effects were comparable to that with diminazene aceturate. No significant difference was observed in the reduction of parasitaemia between plant extract treatment groups. However, mice with extracts of A. absinthium had significantly higher body weight than those with extracts of M. stenopetala (P < 0.05). Conclusions The two plants have antitrypanosomal potential against T. congolense by reducing the levels of parasitaemia, maintaining good PCV and body weight, and prolonging the lives of infected animals. PMID:24962241

  3. Isometamidium sensitivity of Trypanosoma congolense stocks from cattle in West Africa tested in mice and the drug incubation infectivity test.

    PubMed

    Knoppe, Tanja Nikola; Bauer, Burkhard; McDermott, John J; Peregrine, Andrew S; Mehlitz, Dieter; Clausen, Peter-Henning

    2006-01-01

    Four Trypanosoma (T.) congolense reference clones with known isometamidium sensitivity and 16 T. congolense stocks from cattle in Kénédougou in south-western Burkina Faso, an area with known history of drug resistance, were characterised with the standard mouse test (SMT) and the drug incubation infectivity test (DIIT). All field stocks from Kénédougou were resistant to 1.0 mg/kg bw isometamidium in the SMT. Fourteen stocks (87.5%) also proved to be refractory to 10 mg/kg bw. Testing with the DIIT confirmed the results of the SMT. By comparison to reference clones, all the Kénédougou populations expressed high levels of resistance to isometamidium.

  4. Drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense in naturally infected donkeys in north Omo Zone, southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Assefa, E; Abebe, G

    2001-08-31

    A three-part study was conducted to determine the efficacy of isometamidium chloride in donkey populations naturally infected with trypanosomes in north Omo Zone, southern Ethiopia. In the first, 373 randomly selected donkeys from four villages were examined for trypanosome infections by the dark ground/phase contrast buffy coat technique (BCT) in November 1999. The trypanosome prevalence was 18.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14.4, 22.5) and Trypanosoma congolense was the most common species accounting for 66.2% of the overall infections. In the second part, 40 infected donkeys were selected and treated with a prophylactic dose of 1.0mg/kg of isometamidium chloride and thereafter monitored every 14 days for 90 days. Trypanosomes were detected in eight donkeys within 1 month and in 20 donkeys within 2 months of treatment. About 16% (5/32) of donkeys infected with T. congolense were detected parasitemic 1 month after treatment. In addition, the result also revealed that all relapse/breakthrough infections were due to T. congolense. In the third part of this study mice were infected with two T. congolense field isolates from donkeys that were found to be parasitemic within 1 or 2 months after isometamidium treatment. The mice were treated with ranges of doses of isometamidium chloride or diminazene aceturate and thereafter followed for relapse infection. Isometamidium chloride at doses 0.5-4 mg/kg body weight and diminazene aceturate at doses of 3.5-28 mg/kg body weight failed completely to cure T. congolense infections in any of the mice.

  5. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Desquesnes, Marc; Dorso, Laetitia; Ravel, Sophie; Bossard, Géraldine; Charbonneau, Morgane; Garand, Annabelle; Roux, Françoise A.

    2016-01-01

    A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L), anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly), 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one). Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected) remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental. PMID:26795063

  6. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Desquesnes, Marc; Dorso, Laetitia; Ravel, Sophie; Bossard, Géraldine; Charbonneau, Morgane; Garand, Annabelle; Roux, Françoise A

    2016-01-01

    A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L), anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly), 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one). Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected) remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental.

  7. Expression of resistance to isometamidium and diminazene in Trypanosoma congolense in Boran cattle infected by Glossina morsitans centralis.

    PubMed

    Moloo, S K; Kutuza, S B

    1990-02-01

    Investigations were conducted on the sensitivity to isometamidium chloride (Samorin) and diminazene aceturate (Berenil) of derivatives of three of the Trypanosoma congolense stocks isolated between 1978 and 1983 from Zebu cattle in the Bobo-Dioulasso region of Burkina Faso. Boran cattle were used in the drug-sensitivity tests and were infected using Glossina morsitans centralis. The results showed that T. congolense stock IL 2466 isolated in 1978 was sensitive to the standard therapeutic dose of isometamidium chloride (0.25 mg kg-1) and of diminazene aceturate (a.i. 3.5 mg kg-1). However, T. congolense stock IL 2468 isolated in 1982 was resistant to both the prophylactic (0.5 and 1.0 mg kg-1) as well as the therapeutic doses of isometamidium chloride (up to 1.0 mg kg-1) although the sensitivity to the therapeutic dose of diminazene aceturate (3.5 mg kg-1) was not affected. The T. congolense stock IL 2856 isolated in 1983 was highly resistant to the therapeutic action of diminazene aceturate (up to 10.5 mg kg-1), as well as to the prophylactic (up to 1.0 mg kg-1) and therapeutic action of isometamidium chloride (up to 2.0 mg kg-1). The infection rates of the drug-resistant stocks of T. congolense in G.m. centralis, when goats were used as reservoir hosts, were as high (range, 22.3-56.3%) as of the drug sensitive stock (49.5%). The resistance trait in the two stocks remained stable after their cyclical development in the tsetse vectors. The rate of transmission of the drug-resistant stocks to mice by the infected tsetse was also high (mean 81.3%).

  8. Comparative haematological study of single and mixed infections of mongrel dogs with Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Ezeokonkwo, Romanus C; Ezeh, I O; Onunkwo, J I; Obi, P O; Onyenwe, I W; Agu, W E

    2010-10-11

    The haematological effects of single and mixed infections of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei brucei were compared in experimentally infected mongrel dogs. Twenty mongrel dogs of both sexes aged between 3 and 6 months, and weighing between 2.5 and 5.9 kg were used for the study. The dogs were kept in clean metal cages in a fly-proof house and were adequately fed and given water ad libitum. The twenty dogs were divided into four groups of five dogs each. Group I dogs were uninfected control, group II dogs were infected with T. congolense, group III dogs were infected with T. brucei brucei and group IV dogs were infected with both T. congolense and T. brucei brucei. Parasitaemia occurred in the infected dogs in groups II, III, and IV; 10-13 days post-infection (PI) with the mean pre-patent period (PPP) of 12, 10, and 11 days respectively. Mixed infection persisted throughout the duration of the experiment. T. brucei predominated T. congolense in the mixed infection constituting about 70% of the trypanosomes. The significant (P<0.05) decrease in the mean haemoglobin concentration (Hb) and packed cell volume (PCV) caused by the infection did not differ significantly (P>0.05) between the infected groups. Also the significant (P<0.05) reduction in the total white blood cell count (TWBC) caused by the infection did not differ significantly (P>0.05) between the infected groups. The decline in the total WBC count was due primarily to significant (P<0.05) reduction in the lymphocyte counts of the infected dogs. It was thus concluded that single or mixed infection of mongrel dogs with T. congolense and T. brucei brucei resulted in anaemia and leucopenia which did not differ significantly (P>0.05) among the infected groups. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cross-resistance associated with development of resistance to isometamidium in a clone of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Peregrine, A S; Gray, M A; Moloo, S K

    1997-07-01

    Resistance to isometamidium was increased 94-fold in a clone of Trypanosoma congolense (clone IL 1180) by repeated subcurative treatment of infected mice for 11 months. This was associated with 3.4-, 33-, and 4.2-fold increases in resistance to diminazene, homidium, and quinapyramine, respectively. Both T. congolense IL 1180 and the resistant derivative were able to undergo cyclical development in Glossina morsitans centralis tsetse flies, producing hypopharyngeal infection rates of 40.0 and 39.8%, respectively.

  10. Comparative serum biochemical changes in mongrel dogs following single and mixed infections of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Ezeokonkwo, R C; Ezeh, I O; Onunkwo, J I; Onyenwe, I W; Iheagwam, C N; Agu, W E

    2012-11-23

    The serum activities of alkaline phosphatase (AP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the serum levels of conjugated bilirubin (CB), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were studied following single and mixed infections of mongrel dogs with Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Twenty mongrel dogs of both sexes aged between 3 and 6 months, and weighing between 2.5 and 5.9 kg were used for the study. The dogs were kept in clean metal cages in a fly-proof house and were fed and given water ad libitum. The twenty dogs were divided into four groups of five dogs each. Group I dogs were uninfected control, group II were infected with T. congolense, group III were infected with T. brucei brucei and group IV were infected with both T. congolense and T. brucei brucei. Each dog in the infected groups II and III was inoculated intraperitonealy (i/p) with 1.0 ml of PBS diluted blood containing 1.0×10(6) trypanosomes whereas each infected dog in group IV (mixed infection) was inoculated with 0.5 ml of the PBS diluted blood containing 0.5×10(6)T. congolense and 0.5 ml of the PBS diluted blood containing 0.5×10(6)T. brucei brucei i/p. Parasites were detectable in the blood of the infected dogs in groups II, III, and IV 10-13 days post infection (PI) with the mean pre-patent period (PP) of 12, 10, and 11 days respectively. Trypanosome infection caused a significant (P<0.05) increase in the serum activities of AP, ALT, AST and the serum levels of creatinine, CB, and BUN. The significant increases in the serum levels of CB, BUN, and creatinine and serum activities of AP and AST became noticeable from day seven PI in all the infected groups whereas that of ALT became noticeable from day 14 PI and increased continuously until the experiment was terminated. These increases however did not differ significantly (P>0.05) between the infected groups in most cases. It was thus concluded that single or mixed infection of mongrel dogs

  11. Assessment of sensitivity of Trypanosoma congolense to isometamidium chloride: a comparison of tests using cattle and mice.

    PubMed

    Sones, K R; Njogu, A R; Holmes, P H

    1988-06-01

    The sensitivities of 3 strains of Trypanosoma congolense to isometamidium chloride (Samorin) were determined in mice and cattle, with the objective of evaluating sensitivity testing in mice as a means of predicting curative doses in cattle. Comparison of mouse effective dose 80% (ED80) or curative dose 80% (CD80) values with cattle minimum curative dose (MCD) values demonstrated a wide variation between trypanosome strains. Although a mouse test may give a broad indication of the sensitivity of a strain, it cannot be used to predict curative doses for cattle. It was concluded that care should be exercised in extrapolating the results of a mouse test to cattle.

  12. The effect of L-thyroxine on the anaemia response in Trypanosoma congolense infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lomo, P O; Makawiti, D W; Konji, V N

    1995-06-01

    The development of anaemia is a major pathological manifestation in chronic trypanosomosis. The anaemia in African trypanosomosis coincides with a marked decrease in plasma concentration of both thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3' triiodothyronine (T3). To evaluate the effect of trypanosome-induced hypothyroidism on the development of anaemia, sexually mature white New Zealand rabbits were used. Three groups were set up, each of ten rabbits: one group was infected with Trypanosoma congolense; the second group was infected but given replacement doses of thyroxine (treated); the third group was not infected. Small volumes of blood were collected for the determination of parasitaemia and packed cell volume (PCV). The concentrations of T3 and T4 were measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay. The decrease in PCV correlated closely (y = -0.38x + 15.2; r = 0.82, P = 0.001) with the intensity and duration of parasitaemia. The critical PCV value was 0.15 11-1 with a peak parasitaemia of approximately 5 x 10(6) trypanosomes ml-1 of blood. There was a significant correlation between the plasma T3 and PCV (y = 0.049x + 0.57; r = 0.66, P = 0.020). There was also a good positive correlation between T4 and PCV (y = 14.5 + 3.03; r = 0.95, P < 0.001) in the infected untreated group. The PCV levels were significantly different among the three groups of animals (P < 0.05). The infected-treated animals sustained longer periods of infection than the infected and untreated ones. The sustained physiological level of bioactive thyroid hormones T3 and T4 significantly arrested the decline in PCV as the disease progressed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Genetic and expression analysis of cattle identifies candidate genes in pathways responding to Trypanosoma congolense infection

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Harry; Brass, Andy; Obara, Isaiah; Anderson, Susan; Archibald, Alan L.; Bradley, Dan G.; Fisher, Paul; Freeman, Abigail; Gibson, John; Gicheru, Michael; Hall, Laurence; Hanotte, Olivier; Hulme, Helen; McKeever, Declan; Murray, Caitriona; Oh, Sung Jung; Tate, Catriona; Smith, Ken; Tapio, Miika; Wambugu, John; Williams, Diana J.; Agaba, Morris; Kemp, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    African bovine trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma sp., is a major constraint on cattle productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Some African Bos taurus breeds are highly tolerant of infection, but the potentially more productive Bos indicus zebu breeds are much more susceptible. Zebu cattle are well adapted for plowing and haulage, and increasing their tolerance of trypanosomiasis could have a major impact on crop cultivation as well as dairy and beef production. We used three strategies to obtain short lists of candidate genes within QTL that were previously shown to regulate response to infection. We analyzed the transcriptomes of trypanotolerant N'Dama and susceptible Boran cattle after infection with Trypanosoma congolense. We sequenced EST libraries from these two breeds to identify polymorphisms that might underlie previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL), and we assessed QTL regions and candidate loci for evidence of selective sweeps. The scan of the EST sequences identified a previously undescribed polymorphism in ARHGAP15 in the Bta2 trypanotolerance QTL. The polymorphism affects gene function in vitro and could contribute to the observed differences in expression of the MAPK pathway in vivo. The expression data showed that TLR and MAPK pathways responded to infection, and the former contained TICAM1, which is within a QTL on Bta7. Genetic analyses showed that selective sweeps had occurred at TICAM1 and ARHGAP15 loci in African taurine cattle, making them strong candidates for the genes underlying the QTL. Candidate QTL genes were identified in other QTL by their expression profile and the pathways in which they participate. PMID:21593421

  14. The effect of aqueous extracts of Hibiscus sabdariffa (Sorrel) calyces on heamatological profile and organ pathological changes in Trypanasoma congolense - infected rats.

    PubMed

    Umar, Ismaila A; Maryoms, Nelson G; Daikwo, Emmanuel; Gidado, Abubakar; Buratai, Lawan B; Igbokwe, Ikechukwu O; Ibrahim, Mohammed A

    2009-07-03

    The effects of aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces on haematology and pathological changes in some selected organs during experimental Trypanosoma congolense infection of rats were investigated. Three groups of rats were intraperitoneally infected with T. congolense (Karu stock). One group was administered with the aqueous extract and another given a solution of vitamin C in drinking water; the remaining infected group was left untreated. Data from these groups were compared with those of two groups of healthy rats, one of which was similarly treated with the aqueous extract. The experiment was terminated three weeks, post-infection (pi). The uninfected and infected rats administered the extract consumed the equivalent of 9.94 mg - and 9.61 mg ascorbic acid / 100g / day during the experiment. Consumption of the extract significantly (p<0.01) retarded the rate of weight gain in both healthy and infected rats; even though the feed-intake was not significantly affected. After two weeks of infection the extract and vitamin C kept the parasitaemia significantly (p<0.01) lower than the untreated infected group. The anaemia in the untreated infected group was significantly (p<0.01) more severe than that of the corresponding extract- or vitamin-treated groups. Trypanosoma congolense infection caused significant (p<0.01) decreases in serum total proteins and albumin; serum and organ ascorbic acid as well as significant (p<0.01) elevation of serum alanine amino transferase levels in untreated rats. Consumption of the extract or vitamin C, however, prevented these disease-induced anomalies in the treated infected rats. Serum creatinine and urea levels were not affected by infection but the extract elevated these parameters significantly (p<0.01) above infection levels. It was concluded that consumption of the extract ameliorated the pathological changes in blood and organs of T. congolense-infected rats.

  15. Cross-resistance associated with development of resistance to isometamidium in a clone of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed Central

    Peregrine, A S; Gray, M A; Moloo, S K

    1997-01-01

    Resistance to isometamidium was increased 94-fold in a clone of Trypanosoma congolense (clone IL 1180) by repeated subcurative treatment of infected mice for 11 months. This was associated with 3.4-, 33-, and 4.2-fold increases in resistance to diminazene, homidium, and quinapyramine, respectively. Both T. congolense IL 1180 and the resistant derivative were able to undergo cyclical development in Glossina morsitans centralis tsetse flies, producing hypopharyngeal infection rates of 40.0 and 39.8%, respectively. PMID:9210695

  16. Protective efficacy of isometamidium chloride and diminazene aceturate against natural Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax infections in cattle under a suppressed tsetse population in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Magona, J W; Mayende, J S P; Okiria, R; Okuna, N M

    2004-09-01

    The protective efficacy of isometamidium chloride (ISMM) and diminazene aceturate (DIM) against Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax infections in cattle under a suppressed tsetse population was assessed in southeast Uganda. A total of 66 and 57 trypanosome-infected cattle were treated with ISMM and DIM, respectively together with 177 trypanosome-free animals not treated were followed for 12 months, checked every 4 weeks. There was no statistical difference in the mean time to infection with any trypanosome species in animals treated with ISMM or DIM. However, the mean time to trypanosome infection was significantly longer for treated animals than controls. The mean time to infection with each of the three trypanosome species differed significantly, with the average time to T. vivax infection the lowest, followed by T. congolense and then T. brucei. The protective efficacy of DIM was as good as that of ISMM; implying curative treatments against trypanosomosis are sufficient for combination with tsetse control. Isometamidium chloride or DIM had the highest impact on T. brucei and T. congolense infections in cattle.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and tissue residues of [14C]isometamidium in non-infected and Trypanosoma congolense-infected Boran cattle.

    PubMed

    Murilla, G A; Mdachi, R E; Karanja, W M

    1996-08-01

    In this paper, pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and tissue residues are reported in non-infected and Trypanosoma congolense-infected Boran steers following either intravenous or intramuscular injection of [14C]isometamidium at a dose rate of 1 mg kg-1 body weight. Two differently labelled compounds of isometamidium were used; 6-14C (ISMM-1) and ring-U-14C (ISMM-2). The cattle were divided into 5 groups: group 1 consisted of 3 non-infected cattle treated with ISMM-1 by intravenous injection; group 2 consisted of 2 non-infected cattle treated with ISMM-1 by intramuscular injection; group 3 consisted of 2 Trypanosoma congolense-infected cattle given similar treatment as group 2 cattle; group 4 consisted of 3 non-infected and group 5 of 2 infected cattle treated with ISMM-2 by intramuscular injection. Radioactivity was measured in plasma, urine, faeces and tissues, and drug concentrations were calculated. Data obtained following i.v. treatment were best described by tri-exponential equations with half-lives of 0.13, 1.22 and 120.7 h. Bioavailability of the intramuscular dose was 58% in group 2 cattle. The major route of excretion was in faeces. Approximately 80% of the intravenous dose given was excreted within 21 days out of which only 18% was through urine. Total residues accounted for approximately 15% the total dose given. Drug residues remained high in organs with excretory functions including the liver and kidneys.

  18. CD5+ B lymphocytes are the main source of antibodies reactive with non-parasite antigens in Trypanosoma congolense-infected cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Buza, J; Sileghem, M; Gwakisa, P; Naessens, J

    1997-01-01

    Mice infected with African trypanosomes produce exceptionally large amounts of serum IgM, a major part of which binds to non-trypanosome antigens such as trinitrophenol and single-strand DNA. In this paper, we describe that in cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense and T. vivax, similar antibodies are found, although they bind mainly to protein antigens, such as beta-galactosidase, ovalbumin and ferritin. The parasite non-specific IgM antibodies appear around the same time as the parasite-specific antibodies, but their origin and function are not clear. We tested the hypothesis that CD5+ B cells (or B-1 cells), which increase during trypanosome infections in cattle, are responsible for production of antibodies to non-trypanosome antigens. Splenic CD5+ and CD5- B cells from infected cattle were sorted and tested in a single cell blot assay. The numbers of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were similar in both B-cell populations. However, antibodies with reactivity for non-trypanosome antigens were significantly more prevalent in the CD5+ B-cell fraction and were exclusively IgM. The preference for production of these antibodies by CD5+ B cells and the expansion of this subpopulation during infections in cattle, strongly suggest that CD5+ B cells are the main source of trypanosome non-specific antibodies. We propose that these antibodies are natural, polyreactive antibodies that are predominantly secreted by CD5+ B cells. Since B-1 cells are up-regulated in many states of immune insufficiency, the immunosuppression associated with trypanosome infections may be responsible for the increase of this subset and the concomitant increase in trypanosome non-specific antibodies. PMID:9415031

  19. Effect of experimental infection with Trypanosoma congolense and scrotal insulation on Leydig cell steroidogenesis in the ram.

    PubMed

    Mutayoba, B M; O'Shaughnessy, P J; Jeffcoate, I A; Eckersall, P D; Cestnik, V; Holmes, P H

    1997-08-01

    Testicular steroid content and Leydig cell steroidogenesis in vitro were investigated in rams on Days 28 and 58 after Trypanosoma congolense infection and were compared with those of rams in which testicular temperature had been raised artificially by insulation of the scrotum for 58 d. Testicular testosterone content increased significantly on Day 28 after infection but was lower than that of controls on Day 58 while it increased in scrotal-insulated rams compared with that of controls by Day 58. Testicular progesterone was undetectable in the control and trypanosome-infected groups throughout the experiment, but it increased in the insulated rams by day 58. Basal (unstimulated) Leydig cell testosterone production in the infected rams was similar to that of control rams on Day 28 but was significantly lower on Day 58. Stimulation of Leydig cell testosterone production with hCG or 22R-hydroxycholesterol (22ROHC) significantly reduced in infected rams at both 28 and 58 d after infection as well as in scrotal-insulated rams on Day 58. It is concluded that the increase in testicular testosterone content in the infected and scrotal-insulated rams on Days 28 and 58, respectively, was induced by elevation of testicular temperature by trypanosome infection, perhaps through an effect on testicular blood flow. Reduced testosterone production by Leydig cells from infected and scrotal-insulated rams in response to hCG and 22ROHC suggests that trypanosome-induced pyrexia might be involved in reducing Leydig cell steroidogenesis and subsequent plasma testosterone levels, possibly by affecting enzymes involved in steroid biosynthesis.

  20. Development of real time PCR to study experimental mixed infections of T. congolense Savannah and T. b. brucei in Glossina morsitans morsitans.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Heba A; MacLeod, Ewan T; Welburn, Susan C; Picozzi, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Tsetse flies are able to acquire mixed infections naturally or experimentally either simultaneously or sequentially. Traditionally, natural infection rates in tsetse flies are estimated by microscopic examination of different parts of the fly after dissection, together with the isolation of the parasite in vivo. However, until the advent of molecular techniques it was difficult to speciate trypanosomes infections and to quantify trypanosome numbers within tsetse flies. Although more expensive, qPCR allows the quantification of DNA and is less time consuming due to real time visualization and validation of the results. The current study evaluated the application of qPCR to quantify the infection load of tsetse flies with T. b. brucei and T. congolense savannah and to study the possibility of competition between the two species. The results revealed that the two qPCR reactions are of acceptable efficiency (99.1% and 95.6%, respectively), sensitivity and specificity and can be used for quantification of infection load with trypanosomes in experimentally infected Glossina morsitans morsitans. The mixed infection of laboratory Glossina species and quantification of the infection suggests the possibility that a form of competition exists between the isolates of T. b. brucei and T. congolense savannah that we used when they co-exist in the fly midgut.

  1. Differential protein expression throughout the life cycle of Trypanosoma congolense, a major parasite of cattle in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Eyford, Brett A.; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Smith, Derek; Loveless, Bianca; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Donelson, John E.; Inoue, Noboru; Pearson, Terry W.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is an important pathogen of livestock in Africa. To study protein expression throughout the T. congolense life cycle, we used culture-derived parasites of each of the three main insect stages and bloodstream stage parasites isolated from infected mice, to perform differential protein expression analysis. Three complete biological replicates of all four life cycle stages were produced from T. congolense IL3000, a cloned parasite that is amenable to culture of major life cycle stages in vitro. Cellular proteins from each life cycle stage were trypsin digested and the resulting peptides were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). The peptides were then analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). This method was used to identify and relatively quantify proteins from the different life cycle stages in the same experiment. A search of the Wellcome Trust's Sanger Institute's semi-annotated T. congolense database was performed using the MS/MS fragmentation data to identify the corresponding source proteins. A total of 2088 unique protein sequences were identified, representing 23% of the ∼9000 proteins predicted for the T. congolense proteome. The 1291 most confidently identified proteins were prioritized for further study. Of these, 784 yielded annotated hits while 501 were described as “hypothetical proteins”. Six proteins showed no significant sequence similarity to any known proteins (from any species) and thus represent new, previously uncharacterized T. congolense proteins. Of particular interest among the remainder are several membrane molecules that showed drastic differential expression, including, not surprisingly, the well-studied variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), invariant surface glycoproteins (ISGs) 65 and 75, congolense epimastigote specific protein (CESP), the surface protease GP63, an amino acid transporter, a pteridine transporter and a haptoglobin–hemoglobin receptor. Several of

  2. Infection rate of Trypanosoma brucei s.l., T. vivax, T. congolense "forest type", and T. simiae in small wild vertebrates in south Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Njiokou, F; Simo, G; Nkinin, S W; Laveissière, C; Herder, S

    2004-10-01

    In order to identify the infection rate of trypanosome species infecting wild animals in four localities (Bipindi, Campo, Fontem and Nditam) of southern Cameroon, 1,141 wild animals were sampled. These animals belonged to 36 species grouped in 8 orders including 407 primates, 347 artiodactyls, 264 rodents, 54 pangolins, 53 small carnivores, 11 saurians and crocodilians and 5 hyraxes. PCR using specific primers for Trypanosoma vivax, T. brucei s.l., T. congolense "forest type", and T. simiae showed that 18.7% of the animals were infected by at least one of these trypanosome species. A positive PCR result may not indicate absolutely an active infection because PCR can detect also transient infections. T. vivax (Duttonella) had the highest infection rate (9.5%) and was found in almost all the host orders studied. T. brucei s.l. mostly infected primates, rodents and some duikers (Cephalophus dorsalis and C. monticola). Trypanosomes of the subgenus Nannomonas had a lower infection rate of 5.5% (2.4% for T. simiae and 3.1% for T. congolense "forest type"). They were harboured mainly by primates, ungulates and rodents. Trypanosome infection rates were highest in Nditam (24.5%) and Bipindi (21%). T. brucei s.l. (Trypanozoon) had its maximum infection rate of 10.4% in Bipindi. The "Quantitative Buffy Coat" (QBC) and Kit for in vitro isolation techniques were used to identify 48 (6.1%) infected animals. 13 were positive using QBC, and 42 were positive by KIVI. However, PCR was negative on 16 of these infected animals, probably due to infections with other trypanosome species. This study showed that trypanosomes of the subgenera Duttonella, Nannomonas and Trypanozoon could infect small wild vertebrates as has been shown for large ungulates and carnivores. The presence of T. brucei s.l. in a large range of wild animals strengthens the hypothesis of the existence of a wild animal reservoir of T. b. gambiense in Cameroon.

  3. Multiple-drug resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of Metekel district, north-west Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Afewerk, Y; Clausen, P H; Abebe, G; Tilahun, G; Mehlitz, D

    2000-10-02

    Investigations were carried out to determine the prophylactic activity of isometamidium chloride in village populations of cattle naturally infected with trypanosomes in Metekel district, northwest Ethiopia. In a cross-sectional study in March 1997, 484 randomly selected cattle from four villages were examined for trypanosome infections by the dark ground/phase contrast buffy coat technique (BCT). The trypanosome prevalence was 17.2%. Trypanosoma congolense was the dominant species accounting for 47.6% of the overall infections. Fifty parasitaemic cattle from two villages were treated with isometainidium chloride (Trypamidium(R)) at a prophylactic dose of 1.0 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) and thereafter monitored on a monthly basis for parasitaemia. Trypanosomes were detected in six cattle within 1 month and in 18 cattle within 2 months of treatment. Twenty three percent (6/26) of cattle infected with T. congolense at the time of treatment were detected parasitaemic with this trypanosome species 1 month after treatment. Mice were infected with three T. congolense isolates obtained from cattle which were detected parasitaemic within one or 2 months after isometamidium treatment. The mice were subsequently treated with ranges of doses of isometamidium chloride or diminazene aceturate (Berenil(R)) and thereafter monitored for parasitaemia for a period of 60 days. Isometamidium chloride at doses of 0.5-4.0 mg/kg b.w. and diminazene aceturate at doses of 3.5-28.0 mg/kg b.w. failed to cure T. congolense infections in any of the animals. Three clones were derived from one of the isolates; each clone expressed high levels of resistance to both trypanocides when tested in mice. Based on these results it is concluded that the prophylactic activity of isometamidium is greatly reduced for some of the T. congolense populations present in the area, and in addition there is resistance to diminazene aceturate in this trypanosome species.

  4. Toxicity and anti-trypanosomal effects of ethanolic extract of Butyrospermum paradoxum (Sapotaceae) stem bark in rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Mbaya, Albert W; Nwosu, Chukwunyere O; Onyeyili, Patrick A

    2007-05-22

    The ethanolic extract of Butyrospermum paradoxum stem bark, commonly used in the traditional treatment of various diseases including animal and human trypanosomosis in north-eastern Nigeria, was tested for toxicity and anti-trypanosomal efficacy in rats infected with Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei. Following intra-peritoneal administration, the extract induced behavioural changes, morbidity and mortality in the rats. The symptoms observed included anorexia, dehydration, depression, prostration, coma and death. These symptoms were noted at high doses (> 800 mg/kg) only. At necropsy, the pathological lesions were mainly congestion and oedema of the lungs, bronchi, bronchioles and the kidney, hepatomegally and focal necrosis of the liver cells. The severity of the symptoms and lesions were dose related. The intra-peritoneal LD50 of the extract was 820 mg/kg. The extract produced anti-trypanosomal effect through the complete suppression or delay in parasite establishment with reduction in the level of parasitaemia and the severity of the attendant disease as well as enhanced survival of the rats infected with Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei. The results suggest that the folkloric medicinal application of the extracts of Butyrospermum paradoxum has a pharmacological basis.

  5. Virulence of Trypanosoma congolense strains isolated from cattle and African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Motloang, Makhosazana Y; Masumu, Justin; Mans, Ben J; Latif, Abdalla A

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax are major species that infect cattle in north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. Of the two genetically distinct types of T. congolense, Savannah and Kilifi sub-groups, isolated from cattle and tsetse flies in KZN, the former is more prevalent and thought to be responsible for African animal trypanosomosis outbreaks in cattle. Furthermore, variation in pathogenicity within the Savannah sub-group is ascribed to strain differences and seems to be related to geographical locations. The objective of the present study was to compare the virulence of T. congolense strains isolated from African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) inside Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, and from cattle on farms near wildlife parks (< 5 km), to isolates from cattle kept away (> 10 km) from parks. To obtain T. congolense isolates, blood of known parasitologically positive cattle or cattle symptomatically suspect with trypanosomosis, as well as isolates from buffaloes kept inside Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park were passaged in inbred BALB/c mice. A total of 26 T. congolense isolates were obtained: 5 from buffaloes, 13 from cattle kept near parks and 8 from cattle distant from parks. Molecular characterisation revealed 80% and 20% of isolates to belong to T. congolense Savannah and Kilifi, respectively. To compare virulence, each isolate was inoculated into a group of six mice. No statistical differences were observed in the mean pre-patent period, maximum parasitaemia or drop in packed cell volume (PCV). Significant differences were found in days after infection for the drop in PCV, the patent period and the survival time. These differences were used to categorise the isolates as being of high, moderate or low virulence. Based on the virulence, 12 of 26 (46%) isolates were classified as highly virulent and 27% each as either of moderate or of low virulence. Whilst 11 of 12 high virulent strains were from buffaloes or cattle near the park, only 1 of 7 low virulent

  6. Identification and genetic characterization of Trypanosoma congolense in domestic animals of Fontem in the South-West region of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Simo, Gustave; Sobgwi, Pythagore Fogue; Njitchouang, Guy Roger; Njiokou, Flobert; Kuiate, Jules Roger; Cuny, Gerard; Asonganyi, Tazoacha

    2013-08-01

    To understand the circulation and the spread of Trypanosoma congolense genotypes in animals of Fontem in the southwest region of Cameroon, T. congolense forest and T. congolense savannah were investigated in 397 domestic animals in eight villages. Out of the 397 domestic animals, 86 (21.7%) were found infected by trypanosomes, using the capillary tube centrifugation test. The PCR with specific primers identified 163 (41.1%) and 81 (20.4%) animals infected by T. congolense forest and T. congolense savannah, respectively; showing for the first time the circulation of T. congolense savannah in the Fontem region. No infection with T. congolense savannah was found in pigs whereas goats and sheep were infected by T. congolense forest and/or T. congolense savannah. The prevalence of trypanosomes varied significantly amongst villages and animal species. The genotyping of T. congolense forest positive samples using microsatellites markers showed that multiple genotypes occurred in 27.2% (44/163) of animals sampled, whereas single genotypes were found in 73.8% (119/163) of samples. Some alleles were found in all animal species as well as in all villages and were responsible for major genotypes, whereas others (rare alleles) were identified only in some animals of few villages. These rare alleles were characteristic of specific genotypes, assimilated to minor genotypes which can be spread in the region through tsetse flies. The microsatellite markers show a low genetic variability and an absence of sub-structuration within T. congolense forest. The analysis of the microsatellite data revealed a predominant clonal reproduction within T. congolense forest. Pigs were the animal species with the highest number of different genotypes of T. congolense forest. They seem to play an important epidemiological role in the propagation and spread of different genotypes of T. congolense.

  7. Virulence in Trypanosoma congolense Savannah subgroup. A comparison between strains and transmission cycles.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, P; Chitanga, S; Masumu, J; Marcotty, T; Delespaux, V

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma congolense strains have been shown to differ in their virulence both between subgroups and within the Savannah subgroup between strains. This review revisits these findings and complements them with information on the virulence of T. congolense Savannah subgroup strains isolated from cattle (domestic transmission cycle) in different geographical areas and of strains isolated in protected areas where trypanotolerant wildlife species are the reservoir of the trypanosomes (sylvatic transmission cycle). The virulence of a total of 62 T. congolense Savannah subgroup strains (50 domestic and 12 sylvatic), determined using a standard protocol in mice, was compared. Virulence varied substantially between strains with, depending on the strain, the median survival time of infected mice varying from five to more than sixty days. The proportion of highly virulent strains (median survival time <10 days) was significantly (P = 0·005) higher in strains from the sylvatic transmission cycle. The analysis highlights repercussions of the domestication of the trypanosomiasis transmission cycle that may have to be taken in consideration in the development of trypanosomiasis control strategies.

  8. Prevalence of bovine trypanosomosis and trypanocidal drug sensitivity studies on Trypanosoma congolense in Wolyta and Dawero zones of southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Miruk, A; Hagos, A; Yacob, H T; Asnake, F; Basu, A K

    2008-03-25

    Cross-sectional studies were conducted in tsetse and non-tsetse-controlled areas of the Southern Nation Nationalities and Peoples Regional State (SNNPRS) of Ethiopia to determine the prevalence of bovine trypanosomosis as well as drug sensitivity tests on Trypanosoma congolense in both naturally and experimentally infected cattle and mice, respectively. A total trypanosome prevalence of 4.8% (95% CI: 1.8-7.5) and 20.4% (95% CI: 14-26.8) were recorded in the tsetse-controlled study area of Humbo district and the non-tsetse-controlled area of Mareka district, respectively, indicated statistically significant difference between the two areas (P<0.001). The mean PCV value for Humbo and Mareka was 26.2 (95%: 25.7-26.7) and 22.7 (95% CI: 22.1-23.3), respectively, which were also statistically significant (P<0.001). The prophylactic activity of isometamidium chloride (ISMM) was observed in Humbo on nine naturally positive zebu cattle. Breakthrough infections were recorded in (6/9) 66.7% of the cases in less than 5 weeks. A qualitative assay on mice was conducted on two T. congolense isolates obtained from the breakthrough cases with ranges of doses of ISMM and diminazene diaceturate (DA). Thereafter the mice were followed for relapse infection. ISMM at doses 0.5-4 mg/kg body weight (bw) and DA at doses of 3.5-28 mg/kg bw failed completely to cure T. congolense infections in any of the mice. A quantitative assay on mice was conducted on four T. congolense isolates obtained from Mareka. The four isolates were pooled into two pools (Pool-1 and Pool-2) for the quantitative assay on mice. The pooled isolates were tested with the same trypanocidal drugs and ranges of doses as it was used for the qualitative assay on mice. The minimum curative dose (MCD) of ISMM that cleared T. congolense infected mice was 4 and 2mg/kg bw for Pool-1 and Pool-2, respectively, whereas MCD of DA was 28 and 14 mg/kg bw, in Pool-1 and Pool-2, respectively. Although cloned populations were not used to

  9. Trypanosomiasis:goats as a possible reservoir of Trypanosoma congolense in the Republic of the Sudan.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, M M; Elmalik, K H

    1977-08-01

    Experimental Trypanosoma congolense infections of goats and calves were compared. Goats developed a chronic form of trypanosomiasis, often recovering spontaneously from a strain which caused an acute fatal disease in calves. Goats may be important in the maintenace of T. congolense in nature in the Sudan.

  10. Micro RNA expression profiles in peripheral blood cells of rats that were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma congolense and different Trypanosoma brucei subspecies.

    PubMed

    Simo, Gustave; Lueong, Smiths; Grebaut, Pascal; Guny, Gerard; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2015-08-01

    To identify miRNAs whose expression are differentially regulated during trypanosome infections a microarray targeting more than 600 rat miRNA was used to analyze the miRNA expression profiles between uninfected rats and animals infected by Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei s.l. The potential targets of dysregulated miRNAs as well as their biological pathways and functions were predicted using several bioinformatics software tools. Irrespective of the infecting trypanosome species, eight miRNAs (seven up- and one down-regulated) were dysregulated during infections. Moreover, other miRNAs were differentially regulated in rats infected by specific trypanosome species. Functional analyses of differentially regulated miRNAs indicated their involvement in diverse biological processes. Among these, transcription repressor activity, gene expression control as well as protein transporter activity were predominant. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis of dysregulated miRNAs revealed their involvement in several biological pathways and disease conditions. This suggests possible modulation of such pathways following trypanosome infection; for example, the MAPK signaling pathway which is known to play vital roles in apoptosis, innate immune response and response to viral infections was highly affected. Axon guidance was equally highly impacted and may indicate a cross reactivity between pathogen proteins and guidance molecules representing one pathological mechanism as it has been observed with influenza HA. Furthermore, Ingenuity pathway analyses of dysregulated miRNAs and potential targets indicated strong association with inflammatory responses, cell death and survival as well as infectious diseases. The data generated here provide valuable information to understand the regulatory function of miRNAs during trypanosome infections. They improved our knowledge on host-parasite cross-talks and provide a framework for investigations to

  11. Influence of an experimental Trypanosoma congolense infection and plane of nutrition on milk production and some biochemical parameters in West African Dwarf goats.

    PubMed

    Faye, Déthié; Fall, Abdou; Leak, Stephen; Losson, Bertrand; Geerts, Stanny

    2005-03-01

    The interactions of trypanosomosis and plane of nutrition on health and productivity of multiparous and primiparous West African Dwarf (WAD) does were studied in a multi-factorial experiment including diet (supplementation or basal diet) and infection (infected or control). Experimental does were infected with Trypanosoma congolense at the beginning of the second week post-kidding and monitored for 16 weeks after infection. Trypanosome infection significantly reduced packed cell volume (PCV) (control: 30.1+/-0.3% versus infected: 22.2+/-0.3%; P<0.0001). Regardless of infection, the drop in PCV from the pre-infection period to the end of the experiment was more severe in animals under restricted diet (interaction dietxperiod, P<0.001). Trypanosome parasitaemia tended to be higher in the supplemented group than in the basal diet group (P>0.05) and multiparous animals had a higher parasitaemia (score: 2.6+/-0.1) than primiparous animals (score: 2.2+/-0.1) (P<0.05). Trypanosome infection as well as dietary supplement had a significant effect on lactation length. Milk off-take from trypanosome-infected does was significantly lower than that from the uninfected control group (17.5+/-3.2l versus 35.5+/-3.2l, P<0.001) and there was a positive effect of plane of nutrition (supplemented: 32.8+/-3.2l and basal diet: 20.2+/-3.5l, P=0.01). The drop in milk off-take due to trypanosome infection was more severe in the supplemented group (control: 46.7+/-4.7l versus infected: 18.9+/-4.2l) than in the group receiving a basal diet (control: 24.2+/-5.0l versus infected: 16.1+/-4.7l) (interaction infectionxdiet, P=0.04) due to the number of does from the supplemented group that were withdrawn from the experiment. The effect of trypanosome infection on doe's live-weight was only noticeable during the first 8 weeks of lactation and there was no significant effect on offspring growth rate unless the mother died. Plasma total protein (TP), albumin and cholesterol concentrations were

  12. Investigation of the antitrypanosomal activity of Buchholzia coriacea seed extract against a field strain of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Nweze, N E; Anene, B M; Asuzu, I U

    2011-01-01

    The antitrypanosomal activity of the methanol extract of Buchholzia coriacea seed against a field strain of Trypanosoma congolense was investigated using experimentally infected mice of both sexes. Monitoring of parasitaemia was by the rapid matching technique. When parasitaemia was approximately log 7.8 (63 × 10(6) parasites/ml), treatment with graded doses of the extract (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) was instituted for 5 consecutive days. Diminazene diaceturate (Dimivet SKM Pharma Pvt. Ltd.) was given at 3.5 mg/kg i.p. to the positive control mice. No significant differences in body weights were observed. The rectal temperatures of infected mice showed fluctuations. The PCV of infected mice were significantly (p < 0.05) lower than those of the uninfected controls. There was no significant difference between the PCV of the extract-treated and untreated animals. Parasitaemia increased steadily in the extract-treated and untreated mice groups till all the animals died. Three days post-treatment with diminazene diaceturate parasitaemia was cleared. Six days later, there was a relapse of infection. By the end of the experiment, a 50 % relapse rate was recorded in the diminazene diaceturate-treated group. The methanol extract of Buchholzia coriacea seeds did not show any antitrypanosomal activity in mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense at the doses tested.

  13. Therapeutic and prophylactic activity of isometamidium chloride against a tsetse-transmitted drug-resistant clone of Trypanosoma congolense in Boran cattle.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, I A; Moloo, S K; Holmes, P H; Peregrine, A S

    1991-04-01

    An investigation was conducted on the therapeutic and prophylactic activity of isometamidium chloride (SamorinR) in Boran (Bos indicus) cattle against a Trypanosoma congolense clone, IL 3270. This clone was derived, without drug selection, from a stock originally isolated in Burkina Faso and has previously been shown to be resistant to isometamidium in both cattle and mice using an infection and treatment regimen. A group of 5 cattle were treated intramuscularly with 1.0 mg kg-1 isometamidium chloride and 28 days later challenged with Glossina morsitans centralis infected with T. congolense IL 3270. All 5 cattle and 17 untreated cattle challenged on the same day became parasitaemic by day 16 post challenge, indicating that prophylaxis did not extend to 28 days post treatment. The cattle were then treated with isometamidium chloride at one of the following doses and by different routes of administration; 1.0 or 2.0 mg kg-1 intramuscularly, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 or 1.0 mg kg-1 intravenously. Infections relapsed in all cattle at an interval of 12-21 days following treatment, with the exception of those treated with 2.0 mg kg-1 intramuscularly in which the development of relapse infections was delayed. Similar studies were also conducted with a highly sensitive clone of T. congolense, IL 1180. Infections in cattle with this clone were eliminated by intravenous treatment with 0.25 mg kg-1 isometamidium chloride or intramuscular treatment with 0.5 mg kg-1 isometamidium chloride. Thus, although intravenous administration of isometamidium eliminated a fully sensitive infection, treatment by this route appeared not to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of the drug in the treatment of a T. congolense clone which expresses a high level of resistance.

  14. Derivation and characterization of a quinapyramine-resistant clone of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed Central

    Ndoutamia, G; Moloo, S K; Murphy, N B; Peregrine, A S

    1993-01-01

    Over a period of 208 days a quinapyramine-resistant population was derived in vivo from a quinapyramine-susceptible clone of Trypanosoma congolense: IL 1180. While the dose of quinapyramine sulfate required to cure 50% of mice infected with the parental clone was 0.23 mg/kg of body weight, the 50% curative dose for the resistant derivative, IL 1180/Stabilate 12, was greater than 9.6 mg/kg. This approximately 40-fold increase in resistance to quinapyramine was shown to be associated with an 8-fold increase in resistance to isometamidium, a 28-fold increase in resistance to homidium, and a 5.5-fold increase in resistance to diminazene. Cross-resistance to homidium and diminazene was also demonstrated in goats. Two clones derived from the drug-resistant derivative underwent cyclical development in Glossina morsitans centralis, producing mature infection rates of 39.6 and 23.9%. Thus, induction of resistance to quinapyramine in T. congolense IL 1180 was associated with cross-resistance to isometamidium, homidium, and diminazene and did not compromise the population's ability to undergo full cyclical development in tsetse flies. PMID:8517707

  15. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Eyford, Brett A.; Kaufman, Laura; Salama-Alber, Orly; Loveless, Bianca; Pope, Matthew E.; Burke, Robert D.; Matovu, Enock; Boulanger, Martin J.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF) of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests. Methods Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay. Results The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome-infected

  16. Antitrypanosomal activity of aloin and its derivatives against Trypanosoma congolense field isolate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for the development of new, cheap, safe and highly effective drugs against African trypanosomiasis that affects both man and livestock in sub-Saharan Africa including Ethiopia. In the present study the exudate of Aloe gilbertii, an endemic Aloe species of Ethiopia, aloin, aloe-emodin and rhein were tested for their in vitro and in vivo antitrypanosomal activities against Trypanosoma congolense field isolate. Aloin was prepared from the leaf exudate of A. gilbertii by acid catalyzed hydrolysis. Aloe-emodin was obtained by oxidative hydrolysis of aloin, while rhein was subsequently derived from aloe-emodin by oxidation. In vitro trypanocidal activity tests were conducted on parasites obtained from infected mice, while mice infected with T. congolense were used to evaluate in vivo antitrypanosomal activity of the test substances. Results Results of the study showed that all the test substances arrested parasites motility at effective concentration of 4.0 mg/ml within an incubation period ranging from 15 to 40 min. Moreover, the same concentration of the test substances caused loss of infectivity of the parasites to mice during 30 days observation period. Among the tested substances, rhein showed superior activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.4 mg/ml. No adverse reactions were observed when the test substances were administered at a dose of 2000 mg/kg. Rhein at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, and the exudate, aloin and aloe-emodin at a dose of 400 mg/kg reduced the level of parasitaemia significantly (P < 0.05) and improved anaemia. Conclusion The results obtained in this investigation indicate that aloin and its derivatives particularly rhein have the potential to be used as a scaffold for the development of safe and cost effective antitrypanosomal drugs that can be useful in the continuing fight against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:24612613

  17. The life cycle of Trypanosoma (Nannomonas) congolense in the tsetse fly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The tsetse-transmitted African trypanosomes cause diseases of importance to the health of both humans and livestock. The life cycles of these trypanosomes in the fly were described in the last century, but comparatively few details are available for Trypanosoma (Nannomonas) congolense, despite the fact that it is probably the most prevalent and widespread pathogenic species for livestock in tropical Africa. When the fly takes up bloodstream form trypanosomes, the initial establishment of midgut infection and invasion of the proventriculus is much the same in T. congolense and T. brucei. However, the developmental pathways subsequently diverge, with production of infective metacyclics in the proboscis for T. congolense and in the salivary glands for T. brucei. Whereas events during migration from the proventriculus are understood for T. brucei, knowledge of the corresponding developmental pathway in T. congolense is rudimentary. The recent publication of the genome sequence makes it timely to re-investigate the life cycle of T. congolense. Methods Experimental tsetse flies were fed an initial bloodmeal containing T. congolense strain 1/148 and dissected 2 to 78 days later. Trypanosomes recovered from the midgut, proventriculus, proboscis and cibarium were fixed and stained for digital image analysis. Trypanosomes contained in spit samples from individually caged flies were analysed similarly. Mensural data from individual trypanosomes were subjected to principal components analysis. Results Flies were more susceptible to infection with T. congolense than T. brucei; a high proportion of flies infected with T. congolense established a midgut and subsequent proboscis infection, whereas many T. brucei infections were lost in the migration from foregut to salivary glands. In T. congolense, trypomastigotes ceased division in the proventriculus and became uniform in size. The trypanosomes retained trypomastigote morphology during migration via the foregut to the

  18. Variation in resistance to isometamidium chloride and diminazene aceturate by clones derived from a stock of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Peregrine, A S; Knowles, G; Ibitayo, A I; Scott, J R; Moloo, S K; Murphy, N B

    1991-02-01

    Nine clones were derived from a drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense stock (IL 2856) and characterized in mice for their sensitivity to isometamidium chloride and diminazene aceturate. All clones were derived from the stock without drug selection and expressed high levels of resistance to isometamidium chloride (50% curative dose [CD50] values ranging from 1.5 to 5.1 mg/kg) and intermediate to high levels of resistance to diminazene aceturate (CD50 values ranging from 5.1 to 21.0 mg/kg). By contrast, the isometamidium chloride and diminazene aceturate CD50 values for a drug-sensitive clone, T. congolense IL 1180, were 0.018 mg/kg and 2.3 mg/kg, respectively. For both drugs, there appeared to be significantly different levels in expression of drug resistance amongst the 9 clones derived from IL 2856. Isoenzyme analysis of 7 enzymes showed that all 9 clones expressed the same electrophoretic variants. Thus, all 9 clones were identical for these phenotypic markers. The clone which expressed the highest level of resistance to isometamidium in mice (IL 3270) was transmitted to Boran cattle via the bite of infected Glossina morsitans centralis. IL 3270 produced an infection rate in tsetse of 5.0%. The resulting infections in cattle were shown to be resistant to intramuscular treatment with 2.0 mg/kg isometamidium chloride and 14.0 mg/kg diminazene aceturate. This contrasts with doses of 0.25 mg/kg isometamidium chloride or 3.5 mg/kg diminazene aceturate which are deemed sufficient to cure fully sensitive infections. Finally, 9 clones (subclones) were derived from IL 3270 and characterized in mice for their sensitivity to isometamidium chloride.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Chemosensitization of Trypanosoma congolense strains resistant to isometamidium chloride by tetracyclines and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Delespaux, Vincent; Vitouley, Hervé Sèna; Marcotty, Tanguy; Speybroeck, Niko; Berkvens, Dirk; Roy, Krisna; Geerts, Stanny; Van den Bossche, Peter

    2010-09-28

    Because of the development of resistance in trypanosomes to trypanocidal drugs, the livelihood of millions of livestock keepers in sub-Saharan Africa is threatened now more than ever. The existing compounds have become virtually useless and pharmaceutical companies are not keen on investing in the development of new trypanocides. We may have found a breakthrough in the treatment of resistant trypanosomal infections, through the combination of the trypanocide isometamidium chloride (ISM) with two affordable veterinary antibiotics. In a first experiment, groups of mice were inoculated with Trypanosoma congolense strains resistant to ISM and either left untreated or treated with (i) tetracycline, (ii) ISM or (iii) the combination of the antibiotic and the trypanocide. Survival analysis showed that there was a significant effect of treatment and resistance to treatment on the survival time. The groups treated with ISM (with or without antibiotic) survived significantly longer than the groups that were not treated with ISM (P<0.01). The group treated with the combination trypanocide/antibiotic survived significantly longer than the group treated with ISM (P<0.01). In a second experiment, groups of cattle were inoculated with the same resistant trypanosome strain and treated with (i) ISM, (ii) ISM associated with oxytetracycline or (iii) ISM associated with enrofloxacine. All animals treated with ISM became parasitaemic. In the groups treated with ISM-oxytetracycline and ISM-enrofloxacine, 50% of the animals were cured. Animals from the groups treated with a combination trypanocide/antibiotic presented a significantly longer prepatent period than animals treated with ISM (p<0.001). The impact of the disease on the haematocrit was low in all ISM treated groups. Yet, it was lower in the groups treated with the combination trypanocide/antibiotic (p<0.01). After optimization of the administration protocol, this new therapeutic combination could constitute a promising

  20. Chemosensitization of Trypanosoma congolense Strains Resistant to Isometamidium Chloride by Tetracyclines and Enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Delespaux, Vincent; Vitouley, Hervé Sèna; Marcotty, Tanguy; Speybroeck, Niko; Berkvens, Dirk; Roy, Krisna; Geerts, Stanny; Van den Bossche, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of the development of resistance in trypanosomes to trypanocidal drugs, the livelihood of millions of livestock keepers in sub-Saharan Africa is threatened now more than ever. The existing compounds have become virtually useless and pharmaceutical companies are not keen on investing in the development of new trypanocides. We may have found a breakthrough in the treatment of resistant trypanosomal infections, through the combination of the trypanocide isometamidium chloride (ISM) with two affordable veterinary antibiotics. Methodology/Principal Findings In a first experiment, groups of mice were inoculated with Trypanosoma congolense strains resistant to ISM and either left untreated or treated with (i) tetracycline, (ii) ISM or (iii) the combination of the antibiotic and the trypanocide. Survival analysis showed that there was a significant effect of treatment and resistance to treatment on the survival time. The groups treated with ISM (with or without antibiotic) survived significantly longer than the groups that were not treated with ISM (P<0.01). The group treated with the combination trypanocide/antibiotic survived significantly longer than the group treated with ISM (P<0.01). In a second experiment, groups of cattle were inoculated with the same resistant trypanosome strain and treated with (i) ISM, (ii) ISM associated with oxytetracycline or (iii) ISM associated with enrofloxacine. All animals treated with ISM became parasitaemic. In the groups treated with ISM-oxytetracycline and ISM-enrofloxacine, 50% of the animals were cured. Animals from the groups treated with a combination trypanocide/antibiotic presented a significantly longer prepatent period than animals treated with ISM (p<0.001). The impact of the disease on the haematocrit was low in all ISM treated groups. Yet, it was lower in the groups treated with the combination trypanocide/antibiotic (p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance After optimization of the administration protocol

  1. Antitrypanosomal activity of Verbascum sinaiticum Benth. (Scrophulariaceae) against Trypanosoma congolense isolates.

    PubMed

    Mergia, Ermias; Shibeshi, Workineh; Terefe, Getachew; Teklehaymanot, Tilahun

    2016-09-15

    African Trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease with a large impact on the livelihood of the rural poor in Sub-Saharan Africa. The available drugs for managing this disease are old, expensive and are facing the problem of drug resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo antitrypanosomal efficacy of aqueous and absolute methanol leaf extracts of Verbascum sinaiticum Benth. against Trypanosoma congolense field isolate. Verbascum sinaiticum (Local name 'qetetina') is a biennial plant, and 60-150 cm tall. It is traditionally used to treat wound, stomachache, viral infection, cancer, sunstroke, fever, abdominal colic, diarrhea, hemorrhage, anthrax, and hepatitis. The efficacy of aqueous and absolute methanol leaf extracts of V. sinaiticum was evaluated in a randomized experiment with Swiss albino mice infected with T. congolense field isolate. The extracts were administered at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection for seven days at 12 Days Post-Infection (DPI) when the peak parasitaemia level was approximately 10(8) trypanosomes/ml. Parasitaemia, Packed Cell Volume (PCV), mean survival time and change in body weight were used as indices for monitoring the efficacy of the extracts. Diminazene (28 mg/kg) was used as a positive control while 2 % Tween was used as the negative control. Phytochemicals screening were conducted following standard methods. The extracts showed no toxicity effect in Swiss albino mice and had LD50 above 2000 mg/kg. The phytochemicals screened in V. sinaiticum were alkaloids, flavonoids, glycoside, saponins, steroids, phenolic compounds, and tannins. The mice treated with absolute methanol leaf extract of V. sinaiticum at 400 mg/kg dose had significantly lower mean parasitaemia (7.20 ± 0.16) (p < 0.001) as compared to the negative control group (8.82 ± 0.12) on day 14 of treatment. Animals treated with the same dose had significant (p < 0.001) higher PCV value and body

  2. Concentrations of isometamidium in the sera of cattle challenged with drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Eisler, M C; Gault, E A; Moloo, S K; Holmes, P H; Peregrine, A S

    1997-02-01

    The relationship between serum concentrations of the prophylactic trypanocidal drug isometamidium chloride and protection against tsetse challenge with two populations of Trypanosoma congolense was investigated in Boran (Bos indicus) cattle, using an isometamidium-ELISA. Isometamidium chloride (Samorin) was administered to cattle at a dose rate of 1.0 mg/kg body weight by deep intramuscular injection. Thereafter, the animals were challenged at monthly intervals with either a drug-sensitive clone (T. congolense IL 1180) or a clone expressing a moderate level of resistance to isometamidium (T. congolense IL 3343). Untreated control cattle were used to confirm the infectivity of each challenge. Of ten drug-treated cattle that were challenged with T. congolense IL 3343, all were refractory to infection at the first challenge. 1 month after drug administration. However, all ten animals succumbed to infection at either the second (seven cattle) or third (three cattle) monthly challenges. By contrast, all five drug-treated cattle challenged with T. congolense IL 1180 resisted four monthly challenges. The mean isometamidium concentration at the time of the first, 1 month, challenge was 5.6 +/- 2.8 ng/ml. At the time of the second monthly challenge the mean concentration was 2.0 +/- 0.86 ng/ml: at this time, concentrations were not significantly different between those cattle refractory to challenge with T. congolense IL 3343 and those cattle that were not. Thus, differences in susceptibility to challenge at this time would appear to be due to differences in the drug sensitivity of the parasite challenge. Finally, the mean isometamidium concentration in uninfected cattle at the time of the fourth monthly challenge was 0.4 +/- 0.18 ng/ml. These results indicate that when T. congolense infection occurs in cattle under isometamidium prophylaxis, the parasites may be considered at least moderately drug resistant if the concentration of isometamidium in serum is 2.0 ng/ml. At

  3. Evaluation of in vivo antitrypanosomal activity of crude extracts of Artemisia abyssinica against aTrypanosoma congolense isolate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background African trypanosomiasis is a major disease of economic and public health importance affecting agricultural and human development. The search for alternative compounds against African trypanosomiasis is justified by various limitations of existing chemotherapeutic agents. This study was aimed at screening the hydromethanolic and dichloromethane (DCM) crude extracts of aerial parts of Artemisia abyssinica for in vivo antitrypanosomal activity against Trypanosoma congolense isolate in mice. Methods The aerial parts of the plant were extracted by maceration technique using dichloromethane and 80% methanol to obtain the corresponding crude extracts. The plant extracts at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight were administered intraperitoneally daily for 7 days to mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense. Diminazene aceturate and distilled water were used as positive and as negative controls respectively. The level of parasitaemia, body weight, packed cell volume, differential leukocyte counts and mean survival period were monitored. Results The study showed that the DCM extract at 200 and 400 mg/kg, and the hydromethanolic extract at 400 mg/kg reduced parasitaemia (p < 0.05), ameliorated anaemia (p < 0.05), prevented body weight loss (p < 0.05) and resulted in significant increase in neutrophil levels (p < 0.05) and marked decrease in lymphocyte levels (p < 0.05) compared to the negative control. Conclusions This study established that aerial parts of A. abyssinica have antitrypanosomal potential and can be considered a potential source of new drugs for the treatment of tropical diseases caused by trypanosomes. PMID:24684992

  4. Isometamidium chloride prophylaxis against Trypanosoma congolense challenge and the development of immune responses in Boran cattle.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, D D; Bell, I R; Holmes, P H; Moloo, S K; Hirumi, H; Urquhart, G M; Murray, M

    1986-06-28

    Twenty-four Boran cattle were injected with isometamidium chloride (1 mg/kg bodyweight) to investigate the duration of drug-induced prophylaxis against infection by metacyclic forms of Trypanosoma congolense and to determine if specific antibody responses to the organism were mounted by animals under chemoprophylactic cover. Complete protection against either single challenge by five tsetse flies infected with T congolense, or repeated challenge at monthly intervals by five tsetse flies, lasted for five months. Six months after treatment, two-thirds of the cattle were resistant to challenge, irrespective of whether subjected to single or multiple challenge with trypanosome-infected tsetse flies, or titrated doses of in vitro-cultured metacyclic forms of T congolense (5 X 10(2) to 5 X 10(5) organisms), inoculated intradermally. No animal which resisted infection developed detectable skin reactions at the site of deposition of metacyclic trypanosomes or produced trypanosome-specific antibodies. It was concluded that drug residues effectively limited trypanosome multiplication at the site of deposition in the skin, thus preventing subsequent parasitaemia or priming of the host's immune response.

  5. Biochemical Diversity in the Trypanosoma congolense Trans-sialidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Gbem, Thaddeus T.; Waespy, Mario; Hesse, Bettina; Dietz, Frank; Smith, Joel; Chechet, Gloria D.; Nok, Jonathan A.; Kelm, Sørge

    2013-01-01

    Trans-sialidases are key enzymes in the life cycle of African trypanosomes in both, mammalian host and insect vector and have been associated with the disease trypanosomiasis, namely sleeping sickness and nagana. Besides the previously reported TconTS1, we have identified three additional active trans-sialidases, TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4, and three trans-sialidase like genes in Trypanosoma congolense. At least TconTS1, TconTS2 and TconTS4 are found in the bloodstream of infected animals. We have characterised the enzymatic properties of recombinant proteins expressed in eukaryotic fibroblasts using fetuin as model blood glycoprotein donor substrate. One of the recombinant trans-sialidases, TconTS2, had the highest specific activity reported thus far with very low sialidase activity. The active trans-sialidases share all the amino acids critical for the catalytic reaction with few variations in the predicted binding site for the leaving or acceptor glycan. However, these differences cannot explain the orders of magnitudes between their transfer activities, which must be due to other unidentified structural features of the proteins or substrates selectivity. Interestingly, the phylogenetic relationships between the lectin domains correlate with their specific trans-sialylation activities. This raises the question whether and how the lectin domains regulate the trans-sialidase reaction. The identification and enzymatic characterisation of the trans-sialidase family in T. congolense will contribute significantly towards the understanding of the roles of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of Animal African Trypanosomiasis. PMID:24340108

  6. Biochemical diversity in the Trypanosoma congolense trans-sialidase family.

    PubMed

    Gbem, Thaddeus T; Waespy, Mario; Hesse, Bettina; Dietz, Frank; Smith, Joel; Chechet, Gloria D; Nok, Jonathan A; Kelm, Sørge

    2013-01-01

    Trans-sialidases are key enzymes in the life cycle of African trypanosomes in both, mammalian host and insect vector and have been associated with the disease trypanosomiasis, namely sleeping sickness and nagana. Besides the previously reported TconTS1, we have identified three additional active trans-sialidases, TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4, and three trans-sialidase like genes in Trypanosoma congolense. At least TconTS1, TconTS2 and TconTS4 are found in the bloodstream of infected animals. We have characterised the enzymatic properties of recombinant proteins expressed in eukaryotic fibroblasts using fetuin as model blood glycoprotein donor substrate. One of the recombinant trans-sialidases, TconTS2, had the highest specific activity reported thus far with very low sialidase activity. The active trans-sialidases share all the amino acids critical for the catalytic reaction with few variations in the predicted binding site for the leaving or acceptor glycan. However, these differences cannot explain the orders of magnitudes between their transfer activities, which must be due to other unidentified structural features of the proteins or substrates selectivity. Interestingly, the phylogenetic relationships between the lectin domains correlate with their specific trans-sialylation activities. This raises the question whether and how the lectin domains regulate the trans-sialidase reaction. The identification and enzymatic characterisation of the trans-sialidase family in T. congolense will contribute significantly towards the understanding of the roles of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of Animal African Trypanosomiasis.

  7. Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense "forest type" and T. simiae: prevalence in domestic animals of sleeping sickness foci of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nimpaye, H; Njiokou, F; Njine, T; Njitchouang, G R; Cuny, G; Herder, S; Asonganyi, T; Simo, G

    2011-05-01

    In order to better understand the epidemiology of Human and Animal trypanosomiasis that occur together in sleeping sickness foci, a study of prevalences of animal parasites (Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense "forest type", and T. simiae) infections was conducted on domestic animals to complete the previous work carried on T. brucei gambiense prevalence using the same animal sample. 875 domestic animals, including 307 pigs, 264 goats, 267 sheep and 37 dogs were sampled in the sleeping sickness foci of Bipindi, Campo, Doumé and Fontem in Cameroon. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method was used to identify these trypanosome species. A total of 237 (27.08%) domestic animals were infected by at least one trypanosome species. The prevalence of T. vivax, T. congolense "forest type" and T. simiae were 20.91%, 11.42% and 0.34% respectively. The prevalences of 7 vivax and T. congolense "forest type" differed significantly between the animal species and between the foci (p < 0.0001); however, these two trypanosomes were found in all animal species as well as in all the foci subjected to the study. The high prevalences of 7 vivax and T congolense "forest type" in Bipindi and Fontem-Center indicate their intense transmission in these foci.

  8. Recombinant expression and biochemical characterisation of two alanyl aminopeptidases of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Davita; Boulangé, Alain F V; Coustou, Virginie; Baltz, Théo; Coetzer, Theresa H T

    2013-12-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is a haemoprotozoan parasite that causes African animal trypanosomosis, a wasting disease of cattle and small ruminants. Current control methods are unsatisfactory and no conventional vaccine exists due to antigenic variation. An anti-disease vaccine approach to control T. congolense has been proposed requiring the identification of parasitic factors that cause disease. Immunoprecipitation of T. congolense antigens using sera from infected trypanotolerant cattle allowed the identification of several immunogenic antigens including two M1 type aminopeptidases (APs). The two APs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. As the APs were expressed as insoluble inclusion bodies it was necessary to develop a method for solubilisation and subsequent refolding to restore conformation and activity. The refolded APs both showed a distinct substrate preference for H-Ala-AMC, an optimum pH of 8.0, puromycin-sensitivity, inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, and cytoplasmic localisation. The two APs are expressed in procyclic metacyclic and bloodstream form parasites. Down-regulation of both APs by RNAi resulted in a slightly reduced growth rate in procyclic parasites in vitro.

  9. The transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense seems to be associated with its level of resistance to isometamidium chloride.

    PubMed

    van den Bossche, P; Akoda, K; Kubi, C; Marcotty, T

    2006-02-18

    In large parts of Africa the control of livestock trypanosomiasis relies on the use of trypanocidal drugs. Resistance against the available compounds is developing rapidly in the trypanosome population. The effect of the development of drug resistance on the fitness of the trypanosome is not well known. To determine the effect of the development of resistance to isometamidium chloride on the trypanosome's transmissibility, transmission experiments were conducted. Use was made of three isogenic clones of Trypanosoma congolense with different susceptibility to the drug. The infection rate in Glossina morsitans morsitans differed significantly between clones and was significantly higher in tsetse flies infected with the T. congolense clone with the highest level of drug resistance.

  10. Isometamidium concentrations in the sera of Boran cattle: correlation with prophylaxis against tsetse-transmitted Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Eisler, M C; Arowolo, R O; Gault, E A; Moloo, S K; Holmes, P H; Peregrine, A S

    1994-02-01

    Fifteen Boran cattle from a trypanosomiasis-free area were injected intramuscularly with isometamidium chloride at a dose of 1 mg/kg body weight. Thereafter, the cattle were challenged at monthly intervals with Glossina morsitans centralis infected with one of three populations of Trypanosoma congolense (IL 3893, IL 3889 or IL 1180) until all animals became infected. Isometamidium concentrations in the sera of these cattle were measured using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay over the first 105 days following treatment. All cattle challenged with IL 3893 or IL 3889 developed infection following the first challenge, at which time the mean serum drug concentration in all treated cattle was 6 ng/ml. Cattle challenged with IL 1180 became infected following 6 to 8 monthly challenges. The mean serum drug concentration in these cattle at the time of their third monthly challenge with IL 1180 was 0.75 ng/ml. Trypanosome populations IL 3893 and IL 3889 were considered to be highly resistant to isometamidium, while IL 1180, relatively sensitive. It was therefore concluded that T. congolense persisting at serum isometamidium concentrations greater than 0.75 ng/ml can be considered moderately resistant, while those persisting at concentrations greater than 6 ng/ml can be considered markedly resistant. These results will be most valuable in the investigation of isometamidium resistance of T. congolense in the field.

  11. Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163733.html Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice Study authors unsure ... 22, 2017 WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus can be sexually transmitted through semen, and ...

  12. A multigene family encoding surface glycoproteins in Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Thonnus, Magali; Guérin, Amandine; Rivière, Loïc

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense, the causative agent of the most important livestock disease in Africa, expresses specific surface proteins involved in its parasitic lifestyle. Unfortunately, the complete repertoire of such molecules is far from being deciphered. As these membrane components are exposed to the host environment, they could be used as therapeutic or diagnostic targets. By mining the T. congolense genome database, we identified a novel family of lectin-like glycoproteins (TcoClecs). These molecules are predicted to have a transmembrane domain, a tandem repeat amino acid motif, a signal peptide and a C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). This paper depicts several experimental arguments in favor of a surface localization in bloodstream forms of T. congolense. A TcoClec gene was heterologously expressed in U-2 OS cells and the product could be partially found at the plasma membrane. TcoClecs were also localized at the surface of T. congolense bloodstream forms. The signal was suppressed when the cells were treated with a detergent to remove the plasma membrane or with trypsin to « shave » the parasites and remove their external proteins. This suggests that TcoClecs could be potential diagnostic or therapeutic antigens of African animal trypanosomiasis. The potential role of these proteins in T. congolense as well as in other trypanosomatids is discussed. PMID:28357394

  13. The susceptibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei to isometamidium chloride and its synthetic impurities.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Annelise; Asencio, Corinne; Izotte, Julien; Pillay, Davita; Coustou, Virginie; Karembe, Hamadi; Baltz, Théo

    2014-07-14

    Since the 1950s, the chemotherapy of animal African trypanosomosis in cattle has essentially relied on only two compounds: isometamidium chloride (ISM), a phenanthridine, and diminazene aceturate, an aromatic diamidine. The commercial formulations of ISM, including Veridium(®) and Samorin(®), are a mixture of different compounds: ISM is the major component, mixed with the red isomer, blue isomer and disubstituted compound. To investigate the pharmacological effects of these individual compounds ISM, the blue and red isomers and the disubstituted compound were synthesised and purified by HPLC. The activity of each compound was analysed both in vitro, and in mice in vivo. For the in vitro analysis, a drug sensitivity assay was developed in 96-well tissue culture plates to determine the effective concentration which killed 50% of trypanosome population within 48 h of drug exposure (IC50). All compounds tested in vitro possessed trypanocidal activity, and purified ISM was the most active. Veridium(®) and Samorin(®) had similar IC50 values to purified ISM for both Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei brucei. The disubstituted compound had the highest IC50 values whereas intermediate IC50 values were obtained for the blue and red isomers. In vivo, single-dose tests were used to evaluate the trypanocidal and prophylactic activity against T. congolense. Interestingly, the prophylactic effect two months post treatment was as efficient with ISM, Veridium(®), Samorin(®) and the disubstituted compound at the highest dose of 1mg/kg whereas the red and blue isomers both showed much lower prophylactic activity. This study on T. congolense implies that it is necessary to limit the quantity of the blue and red isomers in the commercial mixture. Finally, the in vitro sensitivity assay may be useful for screening new trypanocides but also for the testing and detection of resistant trypanosome isolates.

  14. Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense “forest type” and T. simiae: prevalence in domestic animals of sleeping sickness foci of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Nimpaye, H.; Njiokou, F.; Njine, T.; Njitchouang, G.R.; Cuny, G.; Herder, S.; Asonganyi, T.; Simo, G.

    2011-01-01

    In order to better understand the epidemiology of Human and Animal trypanosomiasis that occur together in sleeping sickness foci, a study of prevalences of animal parasites (Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense “forest type”, and T. simiae) infections was conducted on domestic animals to complete the previous work carried on T. brucei gambiense prevalence using the same animal sample. 875 domestic animals, including 307 pigs, 264 goats, 267 sheep and 37 dogs were sampled in the sleeping sickness foci of Bipindi, Campo, Doumé and Fontem in Cameroon. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method was used to identify these trypanosome species. A total of 237 (27.08%) domestic animals were infected by at least one trypanosome species. The prevalence of T. vivax, T. congolense “forest type” and T. simiae were 20.91%, 11.42% and 0.34% respectively. The prevalences of T. vivax and T. congolense “forest type” differed significantly between the animal species and between the foci (p < 0.0001); however, these two trypanosomes were found in all animal species as well as in all the foci subjected to the study. The high prevalences of T. vivax and T. congolense “forest type” in Bipindi and Fontem-Center indicate their intense transmission in these foci. PMID:21678793

  15. Chemotherapy of experimental leptospiral infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Spradbrow, P. B.

    1963-01-01

    A strain of Leptospira zanoni was used to produce chronic renal infections in young white mice. A variant of this strain produced an acute disease with over 50% mortality. The responses of both forms of disease to chemotherapy were studied. When treatment of the acute disease was initiated before jaundice occurred, suitable single doses of streptomycin, chlortetracycline, tetracycline, erythromycin, oxytetracycline and oxytetracycline (in oil) prevented death and chronic renal infection in a high percentage of mice. Bicillin, a long-acting penicillin preparation, was more effective than other penicillins, but it prevented the development of chronic renal infection in only half the treated mice. Streptomycin was the only antibiotic of which a single administration regularly cured the chronic renal infections: chlortetracycline, tetracycline and oxytetracycline (in oil) were partially effective. Oxytetracycline, chloramphenicol, Bicillin, fortified penicillin, procaine penicillin and potassium penicillin had no permanent action. The suitability of mice as laboratory animals in the study of experimental leptospirosis and the need for complete cure of carriers of chronic renal infection are emphasized. The above findings indicate that streptomycin is the drug of choice for the treatment of leptospirosis in animals, and that it is worthy of further trial in man. PMID:13990247

  16. Aerosol infection of mice with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y; Izumiya, K; Sato, H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1980-01-01

    Aerosol inhalation of Bordetella pertussis Tohama phase I resulted in a reproducible and uniform infection of mice (strain DDY or ICR). Mice in groups of 10 exposed for 30 min to aerosols generated from bacterial suspensions of 10(9) and 10(10) organisms per ml resulted in mean bacterial counts of 2.3 (+/- 0.3) X 10(4) and 1.0 (+/- 0.3) X 10(5) colony-forming units, respectively, in the lung of each animal. Subsequent studies using a 30-min aerosol inoculation of ICR mice with 2 X 10(9) bacterial cells per ml showed: (i) B. pertussis cells reached a maximum of about 10(7) colony-forming units per lung 14 days after inhalation. (ii) Deaths (10 to 100%, depending on mouse age) occurred 10 to 14 days after exposure. (iii) The lung weight and the leukocyte count increased from basal values of 100 mg and 10(4) leukocytes per mm3 to a plateau of 950 mg and 1.95 X 10(5) leukocytes per mm3, respectively, 14 days after challenge. (iv) There was a significantly reduced rate of body weight gain by infected mice compared to noninfected mice. (v) With mortality as the criterion for disease, susceptibility varied with the age of mice as follows: 10 days old greater than 18 greater than 28 greater than 49. (vi) Bacteria were associated with ciliated respiratory epithelial cells by scanning electron microscopy. Images Fig. 4 PMID:6249758

  17. Factors influencing the duration of isometamidium chloride (Samorin) prophylaxis against experimental challenge with metacyclic forms of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Peregrine, A S; Ogunyemi, O; Whitelaw, D D; Holmes, P H; Moloo, S K; Hirumi, H; Urquhart, G M; Murray, M

    1988-04-01

    The duration of a single isometamidium chloride (Samorin) prophylactic treatment against Trypanosoma congolense ILNat. 3.1 and T. congolense IL 285 was examined in 24 Boran steers with regard to (1) the dose of drug, (2) the level of metacyclic challenge and (3) the influence of infection with an unrelated serodeme at the time of treatment. The cattle were repeatedly challenged at monthly intervals between 2 and 7 months following treatment, either by five infected Glossina morsitans centralis or by intradermal inoculation of 5 X 10(3) or 5 X 10(5) in vitro-derived metacyclic trypanosomes. A dose of 1 mg kg-1 afforded complete protection for 4 months and 0.5 mg kg-1 for 3 months against the two T. congolense serodemes examined, irrespective of the method or weight of challenge. In another group of cattle, which had an established infection at the time of treatment, the duration of chemoprophylaxis against an unrelated serodeme was the same as the other groups which had no previous experience of trypanosome infection. Antibodies to metacyclics did not appear in any of the cattle as long as the chemoprophylaxis was effective. An exception to this was the group challenged with 5 X 10(5) in vitro-derived metacyclic parasites, in which low antibody titres were detected. In all cases these proved to be non-protective. It was concluded that, under the experimental conditions employed, (1) there was a direct relationship between drug dosage and the duration of chemoprophylaxis, (2) the weight of metacyclic challenge did not affect the duration of chemoprophylaxis and (3) when used to treat an existing infection, isometamidium chloride exerted the same degree of chemoprophylactic activity.

  18. Prevention of murine norovirus infection in neonatal mice by fostering.

    PubMed

    Compton, Susan R

    2008-05-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) causes subclinical chronic infections in adult immunocompetent mice and is endemic in many mouse colonies. The susceptibility of neonatal mice to MNV infection was investigated. Intestinal homogenates from Swiss Webster (SW) mice inoculated orally with MNV-L on postpartum days (ppd) 1 to 3 were negative for MNV by RT-PCR at postinoculation days (pid) 3 and 7. In contrast, 69% of intestinal homogenates prepared on pid 3 and 7 from mice inoculated orally at ppd 5 to 8 were MNV-positive by RT-PCR. Because only mice 10 d of age or older were infected by contact with infected dams, a study was performed to determine whether fostering of neonatal mice from MNV-infected to MNV-naïve dams could be effective at preventing infection of neonatal mice. Four litters each of 1-, 2-, 4-, or 6 d-old mice from MNV-L- infected dams were transferred to naïve dams with similar-aged litters and vice versa. On ppd 21, feces from all MNV-infected dams and litters transferred to them were MNV-positive. In contrast on ppd 21, feces from all MNV-naïve dams and litters transferred to them were MNV-negative. Fostering of 2-d-old mice from 5 of 5 MNV-C-, 5 of 6 MNV-D-, and 7 of 8 MNV-G- infected dams onto MNV-naïve dams prevented MNV infection of the foster mice. In the 2 litters where MNV was detected, dams were infected within 7 d of transfer, suggesting that the neonatal mice had served as fomites. In summary, fostering was effective at preventing MNV infection in 33 of 35 litters of neonatal mice. Precautions to prevent transmission of virus on the surface of neonatal mice to foster dams could increase the efficiency of the fostering process.

  19. Prevention of Murine Norovirus Infection in Neonatal Mice by Fostering

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Susan R

    2008-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) causes subclinical chronic infections in adult immunocompetent mice and is endemic in many mouse colonies. The susceptibility of neonatal mice to MNV infection was investigated. Intestinal homogenates from Swiss Webster (SW) mice inoculated orally with MNV-L on postpartum days (ppd) 1 to 3 were negative for MNV by RT-PCR at postinoculation days (pid) 3 and 7. In contrast, 69% of intestinal homogenates prepared on pid 3 and 7 from mice inoculated orally at ppd 5 to 8 were MNV-positive by RT-PCR. Because only mice 10 d of age or older were infected by contact with infected dams, a study was performed to determine whether fostering of neonatal mice from MNV-infected to MNV-naïve dams could be effective at preventing infection of neonatal mice. Four litters each of 1-, 2-, 4-, or 6 d-old mice from MNV-L–infected dams were transferred to naïve dams with similar-aged litters and vice versa. On ppd 21, feces from all MNV-infected dams and litters transferred to them were MNV-positive. In contrast on ppd 21, feces from all MNV-naïve dams and litters transferred to them were MNV-negative. Fostering of 2-d-old mice from 5 of 5 MNV-C–, 5 of 6 MNV-D–, and 7 of 8 MNV-G–infected dams onto MNV-naïve dams prevented MNV infection of the foster mice. In the 2 litters where MNV was detected, dams were infected within 7 d of transfer, suggesting that the neonatal mice had served as fomites. In summary, fostering was effective at preventing MNV infection in 33 of 35 litters of neonatal mice. Precautions to prevent transmission of virus on the surface of neonatal mice to foster dams could increase the efficiency of the fostering process. PMID:18459709

  20. [Digestive tract dilation in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi].

    PubMed

    Guillén-Pernía, B; Lugo-Yarbuh, A; Moreno, E

    2001-09-01

    This paper will analyze alterations in the digestive tract (DT) of mice with chronic Chagas' disease infection produced by Trypanosoma cruzi from different sources. X-rays of the DT of 18 mice infected with T. cruzi and 6 control mice were compared after the ingestion of a barium sulfate solution over a period of 6 hours. 120 days post-infection (pi) the X-rays of the DT of the 5 mice of group 1A infected with trypanosomes DMI isolated from the opossum Didelphis marsupialis, and 4 mice in group 2A infected with the isolate EP taken from a patient with acute Chagas' disease, showed swelling of the stomach and the colon (C). 180 days pi, the X-rays of the DT of the 5 mice of group 1B infected with isolated DMI and the 4 mice in group 2B infected with isolate EP, showed an even greater swelling of the C. Histological examination of the DT of all infected mice showed extensive changes of the intestinal muscle layer, such as the diminution of the muscular and mucous layers and the loss of colonic folds and myoenteric plexus. These results suggest that T. cruzi populations caused severe alterations in the digestive system of the mice used in the experiment, and that the same alterations could occur in the digestive organs of humans, especially those living in areas where Chagas' disease is endemic, but where these abnormalities have not yet been reported.

  1. Studies of macrophage function during Trichinella spiralis infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, E J; Krahenbuhl, J L; Remington, J S

    1979-01-01

    Studies were made to investigate the quantitative and functional changes which occur in peritoneal macrophage populations obtained from mice infected orally with Trichinella spiralis larvae. C57BL/6 mice infected with T. spiralis larvae became parasitized with adult worms which were rejected from the intestine from 14 to 20 days after infection. Infected mice developed a striking increase in peritoneal exudate cells, composed largely of macrophages, which was maximal at from 16 to 18 days after infection. T. spiralis larvae and eosinophils were not seen in the peritoneal exudates. Macrophages from mice infected more than 11 days earlier inhibited DNA synthesis of syngeneic and allogeneic tumour cells, a property atributed to activated macrophages. In addition, macrophages from T. spiralis-infected mice had the functional ability to kill EL-4 tumour cells as measured by 51Cr release. Unlike activated macrophages, however, macrophages from infected mice did not develop the ability to inhibit multiplication of the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. These studies demonstrate that T. spiralis infection in mice induces changes in macrophage function that differ from changes associated with infections by intracellular pathogens. PMID:437839

  2. Catabolism of proline by procyclic culture forms of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Obungu, V H; Kiaira, J K; Njogu, R M; Olembo, N K

    1999-05-01

    The effect of various metabolic inhibitors on the rate of oxygen consumption by procyclic culture forms of Trypanosoma congolense utilizing proline as substrate was investigated. Cyanide inhibited the rate of oxygen consumption by 81.0 +/- 6.7%, malonate inhibited the rate by 51.6 +/- 1.6% and Antimycin A by 73.1 +/- 5.9%. A combination of cyanide and malonate inhibited the rate of oxygen consumption by 84.9 +/- 6.7% while a combination of antimycin A and malonate inhibited the rate by 81.6 +/- 7.6%. Rotenone had no effect on the rate of respiration except when the intact cells were first permeabilized by digitonin after which rotenone decreased the rate of respiration by 20-30%. Salicylhydroxamate (SHAM) did not have any effect on the rate of oxygen consumption. Enzymes involved in the catabolism of proline with high activities were: proline dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarase, NADP-linked malic enzyme, alanine aminotransferase and malate dehydrogenase. Activities of 1-pyrroline-5 carboxylate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and NAD-linked malic enzyme were detectable but lower. The end products of proline catabolism were alanine and glutamate. Unlike the case in Trypanosoma brucei brucei aspartate was not detected. Possible pathways of proline catabolism in procyclic culture forms of T. congolense and of electron transfer are proposed.

  3. Blood-stage malaria infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Elased, K; De Souza, J B; Playfair, J H

    1995-03-01

    Infection of mice with blood-stage Plasmodium yoelii and P. chabaudi malaria induced hypoglycaemia in normal mice and normalized the hyperglycaemia of mice made moderately diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ). Injection of parasite supernatants induced hypoglycaemia accompanied by hyperinsulinaemia in normal mice, and in STZ-diabetic mice induced a profound drop in blood glucose and restored insulin secretion; however, severely diabetic mice (two injections of STZ) remained hyperglycaemic with no change in insulin levels. We conclude that malaria infection and parasite-derived molecules lower blood glucose concentration, but only in the presence of some residual pancreatic function. Diabetic mice were less anaemic, exerted a significant control of parasitaemia, and showed enhanced phagocytic activity compared with normal mice.

  4. Helicobacter Infection Significantly Alters Pregnancy Success in Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Tara C; Cooper, Caitlin A; Ali, Zil; Truong, Ha; Moore, Julie M

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter spp. are gram-negative, helically shaped bacteria that cause gastric and enterohepatic infections in mammalian species. Although Helicobacter infection frequently is implicated to interfere with reproductive success, few experimental data support these claims. We therefore retrospectively investigated the effect of Helicobacter infection on murine pregnancy outcome after the identification of endemic Helicobacter infection in an animal research facility. Multiplex conventional PCR analysis was used to characterize Helicobacter infection status in one inbred and 2 transgenic strains of mice in 2 self-contained rooms assigned to the same investigator. Outcomes of timed-mating experiments were compared among Helicobacter spp.-infected and uninfected mice of the same strain; Helicobacter infection was eradicated from the colony through fostering with uninfected dams. Although Helicobacter infection affected fecundity in only one strain of transgenic mouse, the total number of embryos per gravid uterus was significantly reduced in C57BL/6J mice that were infected with a single Helicobacter species, H. typhlonius. Helicobacter infection was also associated with a significant increase in the number of resorbing embryos per uterus and significant decreases in pregnancy-associated weight gain relative to uninfected mice in C57BL6/J mice and one transgenic strain. Helicobacter spp.-infected mice of all tested strains exhibited higher frequency of intrauterine hemorrhaging relative to uninfected mice. These results indicate that naturally-acquired Helicobacter infection not only reduces the productivity of a research animal breeding colony, but also negatively impacts embryo health. Despite these deleterious effects, these data suggest that colonies can be rederived to be Helicobacter-free by Cesarean section and fostering with uninfected dams. This paper provides the first evidence that H. typhlonius infection is sufficient to interfere with reproductive success

  5. Experimental infection of mice with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to infect mice. Two mice each were either mock infected or inoculated with one of three BVDV strains by the intraperitoneal (IP) (n = 8) or intranasal (IN) (n = 8) route. All mice were euthanized at day 7 postinfection (p.i.). None of the infected mice exhibited any clinical signs of illness; however, the tissues harvested after BVDV challenge showed significant histopathological changes. Blood samples from five mice that were injected IP and one mouse that was inoculated IN were positive for BVDV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the presence of viral antigen in the organs of mice infected with three BVDV strains. In IP-injected mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the spleen (5/6), mesenteric lymph nodes (4/6), lymphatic tissue of the lung (3/6), lung (1/6), and stomach (1/6) of the infected mice; however, it was not detected in the liver (0/6) or kidney (0/6). In IN-inoculated mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the lung and mesenteric lymph nodes of one BVDV-infected mouse but was not detected in other tissues. The results of this study suggest that the spleen is the most reliable tissue for BVDV antigen detection using IHC in the IP-injected group. Our study demonstrates that mice can be infected by BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV infection in mice.

  6. Endemic type of animal trypanosomiasis is not associated with lower genotype variability of Trypanosoma congolense isolates circulating in livestock.

    PubMed

    Masumu, J; Geysen, D; Van den Bossche, P

    2009-10-01

    In order to verify whether the low impact on livestock production in endemic areas is related to a low number of trypanosome strains circulating in livestock, 37 Trypanosoma congolense isolates collected from cattle in 11 sites in an endemic trypanosomiasis area in Eastern Zambia were characterised for genotype variability using a modified amplified fragment length polymorphism technique (AFLP). Isolates were further cloned to evaluate the occurrence of mixed infections in individuals. The results obtained revealed a high genotype diversity (94.6%) among these isolates. Apart from one site, all isolates gave different AFLP profiles in each of the sites. When clones were compared, three (8%) of the 37 isolates had mixed infections. These results indicate the circulation of a high number of strains in this trypanosomiasis endemic area despite the low impact the disease has on livestock production.

  7. Dermal mast cell responses in Paragonimus westermani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, M H

    1997-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether dermal mast cell responses to Paragonimus westermani in an abnormal host, the mouse, were dependent on the site of metacercarial inoculation. In mice during subcutaneous infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at the first week (38.3/mm2) and then persisted at a high level until the sixth week (45.2/mm2) of infection compared with PBS-injected (control) mice (range: 19.4-25.1/mm2). In mice during oral infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at two weeks (33.5/mm2) after infection and remained at these levels thereafter compared with non-infected (control) mice (range: 17.4-22.3/mm2). In mice both during subcutaneous and oral infection, the recruited dermal mast cells showed extensive degranulation at the second week (68.4% and 60.7%, respectively), reached a peak at the third week (81.4%, and 92.1%, respectively) and then declined slightly thereafter. By contrast, in both control mice, about 10% of dermal mast cells were degranulated. In conclusion, this study suggests that dermal mast cell responses to P. westermani in mice are dependent on cutaneous sensitization by larval excretory-secretory antigens, irrespective of infection route.

  8. Sleep and fatigue in mice infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Olivadoti, Melissa D; Weinberg, Jason B; Toth, Linda A; Opp, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue, a common symptom of many acute and chronic medical conditions, reduces both quality of life and workplace productivity and can be disabling. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie fatigue can be difficult to study in human populations due to the patient heterogeneity, the variety of underlying causes and potential triggering events, and an inability to collect samples that may be essential to elucidation of mechanisms (e.g., brain). Although the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains elusive, some studies have implicated viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) is a mouse pathogen that shares many similarities with human γHVs, including EBV. In this study, we use γHV68-infected C57BL/6J mice as a model system for studying the impact of chronic viral infection on sleep-wake behavior, activity patterns, and body temperature profiles. Our data show that γHV68 alters sleep, activity, and temperature in a manner suggestive of fatigue. In mice infected with the highest dose used in this study (40,000plaque forming units), food intake, body weight, wheel running, body temperature, and sleep were normal until approximately 7days after infection. These parameters were significantly altered during days 7 through 11, returned to baseline levels at day 12 after infection, and remained within the normal range for the remainder of the 30-day period after inoculation. At that time, both infected and uninfected mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and their responses monitored. Uninfected mice given LPS developed a modest and transient febrile response during the initial light phase (hours 12 through 24) after injection. In contrast, infected mice developed changes in core body temperatures that persisted for at least 5days. Infected mice showed an initial hypothermia that lasted for approximately 12h

  9. Infections of Brugia pahangi in conventional and nude (athymic) mice.

    PubMed

    Suswillo, R R; Owen, D G; Denham, D A

    1980-12-01

    AKR, BALB/c and CBA/Ca and T.O. mice were completely resistant to infection with third stage infective larvae of Brugia pahangi. Third, fourth and fifth stage worms transplanted from the peritoneal cavity of jirds into the peritoneal cavity of mice continued to develop. BALB/c mice were the most susceptible of the strains tested and adult worms were obtained after each type of transplanted infection. Congenitally athymic nude mice were much less resistant to transplanted worms and infective larvae developed to full maturity in most of them. Ten of 14 athymic mice infected by the intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of infective larvae had microfilariae in their blood or peritoneal cavities. At autopsy a percentage recovery of adult worms of 0-38% (mean 11.1%) was obtained. Microfilariae were only found in the blood of 2 of 6 athymic mice infected by subcutaneous (sc) infection and at autopsy 0-19.1% (mean 6.1%) recoveries were obtained. The thymic littermates of the nudes were more resistant than those most of the other strains used.

  10. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  11. Kinetic modelling of isometamidium chloride (Samorin) uptake by Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, I A; Mounsey, A; Eisler, M; Holmes, P H

    1992-08-01

    Clones of Trypanosoma congolense which express resistance to the widely used trypanocide isometamidium chloride accumulate less of the drug than clones which are sensitive to drug treatment. A mathematical model has been developed which was able to predict theoretical lines representing the uptake kinetics in trypanosomes which were sensitive to isometamidium, as well as for resistant trypanosomes in which reduced accumulation was a result of either reduced uptake or enhanced efflux of the drug. Data from drug uptake experiments were then fitted to these theoretical lines. While the value for drug efflux could not be separated from the dissociation constant of the trypanosomes for isometamidium, it was demonstrated that reduced accumulation is not a result of reduced uptake of isometamidium by drug-resistant trypanosomes.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Interferes with HIV Vaccination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ignatowicz, Lech; Mazurek, Jolanta; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Sköld, Markus; Hinkula, Jorma; Källenius, Gunilla; Pawlowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has emerged as the most prominent bacterial disease found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals worldwide. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections, the future HIV vaccine in areas highly endemic for TB will often be administrated to individuals with an ongoing Mtb infection. The impact of concurrent Mtb infection on the immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine candidate, MultiHIV DNA/protein, was investigated in mice. We found that, depending on the vaccination route, mice infected with Mtb before the administration of the HIV vaccine showed impairment in both the magnitude and the quality of antibody and T cell responses to the vaccine components p24Gag and gp160Env. Mice infected with Mtb prior to intranasal HIV vaccination exhibited reduced p24Gag-specific serum IgG and IgA, and suppressed gp160Env-specific serum IgG as compared to respective titers in uninfected HIV-vaccinated controls. Importantly, in Mtb-infected mice that were HIV-vaccinated by the intramuscular route the virus neutralizing activity in serum was significantly decreased, relative to uninfected counterparts. In addition mice concurrently infected with Mtb had fewer p24Gag-specific IFN-γ-expressing T cells and multifunctional T cells in their spleens. These results suggest that Mtb infection might interfere with the outcome of prospective HIV vaccination in humans. PMID:22848444

  13. Kinetics of Bartonella birtlesii Infection in Experimentally Infected Mice and Pathogenic Effect on Reproductive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Henri J.; Barrat, Francine; Bermond, Delphine; Bernex, Florence; Thibault, Danièle; Heller, Rémy; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques; Piémont, Yves; Chomel, Bruno B.

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of infection and the pathogenic effects on the reproductive function of laboratory mice infected with Bartonella birtlesii recovered from an Apodemus species are described. B. birtlesii infection, as determined by bacteremia, occurred in BALB/c mice inoculated intravenously. Inoculation with a low-dose inoculum (1.5 × 103 CFU) induced bacteremia in only 75% of the mice compared to all of the mice inoculated with higher doses (≥1.5 × 104). Mice became bacteremic for at least 5 weeks (range, 5 to 8 weeks) with a peak ranging from 2 × 103 to 105 CFU/ml of blood. The bacteremia level was significantly higher in virgin females than in males but the duration of bacteremia was similar. In mice infected before pregnancy (n = 20), fetal loss was evaluated by enumerating resorption and fetal death on day 18 of gestation. The fetal death and resorption percentage of infected mice was 36.3% versus 14.5% for controls (P < 0.0001). Fetal suffering was evaluated by weighing viable fetuses. The weight of viable fetuses was significantly lower for infected mice than for uninfected mice (P < 0.0002). Transplacental transmission of Bartonella was demonstrated since 76% of the fetal resorptions tested was culture positive for B. birtlesii. The histopathological analysis of the placentas of infected mice showed vascular lesions in the maternal placenta, which could explain the reproductive disorders observed. BALB/c mice appeared to be a useful model for studying Bartonella infection. This study provides the first evidence of reproductive disorders in mice experimentally infected with a Bartonella strain originating from a wild rodent. PMID:11500400

  14. Oxygen effects on mortality of mice infected with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrick, E. J.; Somerson, N. L.; Weiss, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Diplococcus pneumoniae were held at 1 atm in either hypoxic (12%), hyperoxic (75%), or a normal (21%) oxygen environment. Mortality rates indicated prolongation of survival in hypoxia and shortened survival in hyperoxia. Exposure of mice to the experimental gas mixtures prior to inoculation did not alter the results.

  15. Tumor development after polyoma infection in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Stutman

    1975-04-01

    Nude (nu/nu) mice in a CBA/H background show an age-dependent ssuceptibility to tumor development after polyoma virus infection (strain LID-1) when compared with nu/ + or CBA/H mice, which is apparent when 15- or 30-day-old mice are used: tumor incidence was 83 to 90% in nudes and 0 to 10% in controls. Latent perids for tumor development were also shortened in nudes. However, with increasing age nude mice become partially resistant and only 25% develop tumors when infected at 120 days of age. This partial resistance could be transferred with spleen cells to newborn mice. The cells in spleen responsible for this transfer can be eliminated by lysis with anti-Ig and complement or by pre-treatment of the donor with 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide and were not affected by treatment in vitro with anti-Thy.1.2 or procedures that remove adherent cells and/or macrophages. When the cells in 15-day-old nu/ + spleen were studied, both anti-Ig or anti-Thy.1.2 treatment eliminated tranfer of resistance to newborn. Virus replication in tissues of nude mice was increased 5 days after infection when compared with nu/ + but became comparable by day 15 after infection. Hemagglutination-inhibition antibodies in serum of nude and nu/ + had comparable titers when measured early after infection but higher titers were observed in nu/ + later after infection.

  16. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jessica; Huang, Yumeng; Liu, Yuanjun; Schenken, Robert; Arulanandam, Bernard; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity) correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  17. Bioluminescence Imaging of Chlamydia muridarum Ascending Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jessica; Huang, Yumeng; Liu, Yuanjun; Schenken, Robert; Arulanandam, Bernard; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity) correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24983626

  18. Prophylactic effects of isometamidium- and ethidium-sustained release devices against Trypanosoma congolense in cattle.

    PubMed

    Geerts, S; Kageruka, P; De Deken, R; Brandt, J R; Kazadi, J M; Diarra, B; Eisler, M C; Lemmouchi, Y; Schacht, E; Holmes, P H

    1997-04-30

    Two successive experiments were carried out in which three cows were treated by intramuscular injection of either 0.5 mg/kg isometamidium or 1 mg/kg ethidium and compared with another group of three cows which received a subcutaneously implanted sustained release device (SRD) containing the same dose of drug. The prophylactic effect of both drug formulations was evaluated by exposing the animals at monthly intervals to Glossina morsitans morsitans infected with Trypanosoma congolense. The average protection period using the isometamidium- and the ethidium-SRD was extended by a factor of 3.2 and 2.8, respectively in comparison with the intramuscular injection of the drugs. In the analysis of isometamidium concentrations in the serum of the animals using a competitive drug-ELISA the drugs remained present for much longer periods in the sera of the implanted animals than in those of the intramuscularly treated cattle. The animals were still protected, however, a long time after the disappearance of detectable drug levels in the serum. No difference in drug sensitivity could be observed, when breakthrough isolates were compared from animals which received the ethidium-SRD and those treated intramuscularly, although a slight loss sensitivity occurred in the breakthrough isolates as compared to the parent trypanosome population.

  19. Transmammary infection in BALB/c mice with chronic toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Aguiar, Patricia; Furtado, Raquel Dutra; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; de Lima Telmo, Paula; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Scaini, Carlos James

    2015-04-01

    Human toxocariasis is a neglected public health problem. Infection of humans generally results from the accidental ingestion of embryonated Toxocara canis eggs, but it is important to broaden knowledge about other forms of transmission. This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of transmammary transmission in mice with chronic toxocariasis. BALB/c mice in groups 1 (G1) and 3 (G3) were inoculated with 1200 T. canis eggs 60days before mating, whereas those of group 2 (G2) were not infected. After delivery, the G1 neonates were transferred to G2 females to be nursed, and vice versa. Thus, the mice generated by G2 females and breastfed by G1 females could be infected only during lactation. In the G3 group, offspring were not exchanged. The search for T. canis larvae in the bodies of the lactating females and their offspring was performed after weaning and at 60days old, respectively. The frequency of transmammary infection in the mice generated by G2 uninfected females and breastfed by G1 infected females was 19.8%, which was similar to that observed (19.6%) in the mice bred and fed by G3 females. The frequency of infection in the mice generated by G1 females and breastfed by G2 females was only 4.2%, which was lower than that of G1 (p=0.0064) and G3 (p=0.0062) groups. Transmammary infection by mice with chronic toxocariasis was found to be more prevalent than congenital infection.

  20. Brain schistosomiasis in mice experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, José Roberto; Fidelis, Thiago André; Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Araujo, Neuza; Souza, Márcia Maria de; Brasileiro Filho, Geraldo; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Antunes, Carlos Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Human neuroschistosomiasis has been reported in the literature, but the possibility of modeling neuroschistosomiasis in mice is controversial. In two research laboratories in Brazil that maintain the Schistosoma mansoni life cycle in rodents, two mice developed signs of brain disease (hemiplegia and spinning), and both were autopsied. S. mansoni eggs, both with and without granuloma formation, were observed in the brain and meninges of both mice by optical microscopy. This is the first description of eggs in the brains of symptomatic mice that were experimentally infected with S. mansoni. An investigation of experimental neuroschistosomiasis is now feasible.

  1. Long-term occurrence of Trypanosoma congolense resistant to diminazene, isometamidium and homidium in cattle at Ghibe, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, W; Wilkes, J; Mulatu, W; Majiwa, P A; Masake, R; Peregrine, A S

    1997-04-15

    Ten trypanosome isolates were collected at random from cattle at Ghibe, Ethiopia, in February 1993 and all shown to be savannah-type Trypanosoma congolense. When inoculated into naïve Boran (Bos indicus) calves, all 10 isolates were resistant to diminazene aceturate (Berenil), isometamidium chloride (Samorin) and homidium chloride (Novidium) at doses of 7.0 mg/kg body weight (b.w.), 0.5 mg/kg b.w. and 1.0 mg/kg b.w., respectively. In order to determine whether this multiple-drug resistance was expressed by individual trypanosomes, clones were derived from two of the isolates and characterised in mice for their sensitivity to the three compounds; by comparison to drug-sensitive populations, the two clones expressed high levels of resistance to all 3 trypanocides. In experiments to characterise the uptake kinetics of [14C]-Samorin, the maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) for 4 Ghibe isolates ranged from 9.2 to 15.0 ng/10(8) trypanosomes/min. In contrast, Vmax for the isometamidium-sensitive clone T. congolense IL 1180 was 86.7 +/- 8.6 ng/10(8) trypanosomes/min. Lastly, molecular karyotypes were determined for eight isolates: seven different chromosome profiles were observed. These data indicate that in February 1993 there was a high prevalence of drug-resistant trypanosome populations with different chromosome profiles in cattle at Ghibe. Since a similar situation existed at the same site in July 1989, this suggests that the drug-resistance phenotype of trypanosomes at Ghibe had not altered over a 4 year period.

  2. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection. PMID:27644341

  3. Systemic Coccidioides immitis infection in nude and beige mice.

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, K V; Leathers, C R; Lee, K W

    1985-01-01

    The course of experimental systemic Coccidioides immitis infection was assessed quantitatively and histologically in beige mice, congenitally athymic nude mice, and their respective normal counterparts. After intravenous inoculation with 50 arthroconidia, the number of viable C. immitis cultured from the spleens, livers, and lungs progressively increased throughout the assay in the organs of all mice. During the first 2 weeks of infection, significantly greater numbers of CFU were recovered from the spleens and livers, but not the lungs, of nude mice than from the respective organs of their phenotypically normal littermates. Significantly greater numbers of CFU were cultured from the lungs and spleens of beige mice compared with the number recovered from their functionally normal littermates. After intranasal inoculation, extrapulmonary dissemination of C. immitis occurred at an equal rate and resulted in similar organ burdens in nude mice and their normal littermates. Histological examination of infected tissues revealed a characteristic mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate in euthymic mice; the response in nude mice was less severe, consisting predominantly, if not solely, of granulocytes. In addition, in tissue sections from nude mice, but not in those from their euthymic counterparts, mature spherules were frequently observed to be devoid of an associated inflammatory response. The inflammatory lesion in beige mice contained a predominance of mononuclear cells, whereas their littermates responded with a typical mixed granulomatous infiltrate. Collectively, these results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that resistance to C. immitis infection involves two primary cell populations, one under the direct influence of T-cells and the other independent of T-lymphocytes. Images PMID:3972455

  4. Intramacrophage growth of Mycobacterium avium during infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Frehel, C; de Chastellier, C; Offredo, C; Berche, P

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the virulent Mycobacterium avium strain TMC 724 in host tissues during persistent infection of mice was studied. Following intravenous infection of C57BL/6 mice, the kinetics of bacterial growth was biphasic in the spleen and liver, with a significant reduction of the multiplication rate after day 21 to 28 of infection. An electron-microscopic study of the liver and spleen of infected mice showed that the bacteria were strictly intracellular. They were observed within inflammatory macrophages populating granulomas disseminated in host tissues. The bacteria were confined to the phagosome compartment, and they were encapsulated. Phagosome-lysosome fusions were encountered, but the bacteria showed no visible signs of degradation and continued to multiply. These results are the first in vivo evidence that virulent M. avium multiplies exclusively intracellularly and that encapsulated bacteria resist the microbicidal mechanisms of macrophages inside the phagosomal compartment. Images PMID:2037382

  5. Experimental infection in mice with Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Joens, L A; Glock, R D

    1979-01-01

    Nineteen of 22 female mice (CF1 strain) inoculated intragastrically with Treponema hyodysenteriae developed cecal and colonic lesions consisting of catarrhal inflammation, edema, and occasional hemorrhage. Images PMID:489130

  6. Histologic Lesions Induced by Murine Norovirus Infection in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Charlie C.; Piotrowski, Stacey L.; Meeker, Stacey M.; Smith, Kelly D.; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Treuting, Piper M.

    2017-01-01

    Murine noroviruses (MNV) are highly prevalent in laboratory mice, can cause persistent infections, and have been shown to infect macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. To address the potential impact of MNV infection on research outcomes, numerous studies have been conducted with various mouse models of human disease and have generated mixed results ranging from no impact to significant disease. Many of these studies included histologic evaluations after MNV infection, and similarly these results have been variable as to whether MNV induces lesions despite the fact that localization of MNV by viral culture and molecular techniques have demonstrated systemic distribution regardless of mouse immune status. The aim of this review is to summarize the histologic findings that have been reported with MNV infection in several mouse models. The studies demonstrate that experimental infection of MNV in wild-type mice results in minimal to no histologic changes. In contrast, immunodeficient mice consistently have detectable MNV-induced lesions that are typically inflammatory and, in the most severe cases, accompanied by necrosis. In these, the liver is commonly affected with more variable lesions reported in the lung, gastrointestinal tract, mesenteric lymph nodes, brain, and spleen. In specific disease models including atherosclerosis, MNV infection had a variable impact that was dependent upon the mouse model, viral strain, timing of infection, or other experimental variables. It is important to recognize the reported MNV lesions to help discern the possible influence of MNV infection on data generated in mouse models. PMID:26792844

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Richt, Jürgen A; Casey, Thomas A; Rasmussen, Mark A; Kehrli, Marcus E; Petrich, Jacob W

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated with the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model system to study age-related accumulation of lipofuscin, which has been investigated by monitoring the increasing fluorescence with age covering its entire life span. The current work aims at developing mice retina as a convenient model system to diagnose scrapie and other fatal TSE diseases in animals such as sheep and cows. The objective of the research reported here was to determine whether the spectral features are conserved between two different species namely mice and sheep, and whether an appropriate small animal model system could be identified for diagnosis of scrapie based on the fluorescence intensity in retina. The results were consistent with the previous reports on fluorescence studies of healthy and scrapie-infected retina of sheep. The fluorescence from the retinas of scrapie-infected sheep was significantly more intense and showed more heterogeneity than that from the retinas of uninfected mice. Although the structural characteristics of fluorescence spectra of scrapie-infected sheep and mice eyes are slightly different, more importantly, murine retinas reflect the enhancement of fluorescence intensity upon infecting the mice with scrapie, which is consistent with the observations in sheep eyes.

  8. Effect of Amphotericin B Nanodisks on Leishmania major Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cole, PA; Bishop, JV; Beckstead, JA; Titus, R; Ryan, RO

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of a novel formulation of the polyene antibiotic, amphotericin B (AMB), as therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis in different mouse strains. Methods (AMB), was formulated into water-soluble transport particles, termed nanodisks (ND). Balb/c and CH3 mice infected with Leishmania major on Day 0 were administered vehicle alone, empty ND or AMB-ND on Day 1 and day 7, via the tail vein. Mice were sacrificed 25 or 50 days post inoculation and tissue histology evaluated. Balb/c mice treated with vehicle or empty ND showed signs of severe infection while CH3 mice had less inflammation and fewer parasites. AMB-ND treatment (2 mg/kg) had a marked therapeutic effect on L. major infected Balb/c mice and a discernable therapeutic benefit on CH3 mice. Conclusions AMB-ND is efficacious in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. It may be inferred that AMB-ND may be useful for prophylactic and/or treatment of early stage Leishmania spp. infection. PMID:25584195

  9. Time-dose response of Trypanosoma congolense bloodstream forms to diminazene and isometamidium.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, R; Chuma, F; Wasike, R P

    1994-04-01

    Trypanosoma congolense bloodstream forms were propagated in vitro axenically in a simplified cultivation medium at 34 degrees C. Viability of a drug-sensitive and a drug-resistant clone were examined for 10 days following exposure to 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 micrograms ml-1 of diminazene aceturate and 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 ng ml-1 of isometamidium chloride for various time intervals. Drug-sensitive T. congolense were irreversibly damaged after incubation with 10 micrograms ml-1 or 1 microgram ml-1 diminazene aceturate for 30 min or 2 h, respectively, while drug-resistant trypanosomes were not affected. Exposure to 10 ng ml-1 isometamidium chloride eliminated drug-sensitive trypanosomes after 24 h and drug-resistant trypanosomes after 96 h. The data obtained on in vitro time-dose responses of T. congolense were related to pharmacokinetic data of diminazene and isometamidium in cattle plasma.

  10. [Infection of Mice with Normal Immune Function by Taenia asiatica].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-yan; Guo, Guang-wu; Chen, Li-hong; Mo, Xing-ze; Yu, Yue-sheng

    2015-08-01

    The Taenia asiatica eggs pre-incubated with sodium hypochlorite solution for 4 min, 6 min and 8 mins were subcutaneously injected into mice with normal immune function(groups Al-A3 respectively, n=20 in each) and mice with immunosuppression (groups B1-B3, n=20 in each). All groups of mice began to show body discomfort on day 5 after infection and develop lumps on the back about on day 15. In groups Al-A3, animal death occurred during days 7-15, with a same survival rate of 95.0%(19/20) and infection rate of 89.4%(17/19), 73.6%(14/19) and 47.3%(9/19) respectively. In groups B1-B3, animal death occurred during days 7-50, with survival rate of 60%(13/20), 55%(11/20)and 55%(11/20) and infection rate of 76.9% (10/13), 54.5% (6/11) and 45.4% (5/11) respectively. After the scolex of cysticercus was evaginated with 15% pig bile, four suckers, an apparent rostellum and two distinct hook-like puncta structures were seen. These results indicate that mice with normal immune function can be used as a replacement of immunosuppressive mice to establish a T. asiatica oncosphere infection model. In addition, the T. asiatica eggs pre-incubated with sodium hypochlorite solution for 4 min have the strongest infection ability.

  11. Fluorescence analysis of the interaction of isometamidium with Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed Central

    Zilberstein, D; Wilkes, J; Hirumi, H; Peregrine, A S

    1993-01-01

    Isometamidium chloride (Samorin) is the only compound recommended for prophylaxis against bovine trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. The fluorescence property of this compound was used to investigate the interaction of the molecule with in vitro-derived bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma congolense IL 1180. Incubation of isometamidium with trypanosomes at 37 degrees C for 180 min resulted in a gradual alteration of the lambda max. with time (from 600 to 584 nm) and an increase in the intensity of trypanosome-associated fluorescence of approx. 2-fold. The alteration in fluorescence was temperature-dependent and inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide. In contrast, with intact cells addition of digitonin caused a rapid increase in fluorescence intensity to approximately four times that observed with intact cells. Uptake of isometamidium was also determined using radiolabelled drug; the results indicated that the time course of the uptake process resembled the fluorescence profile and was temperature-dependent. The results therefore indicate that the alteration of fluorescence is due to interaction of isometamidium with an intracellular component(s) and that isometamidium is transported across the plasma membrane via a protein carrier. The data also indicate that the described fluorescence technique can be used to investigate the role of membrane transport in resistance to isometamidium. PMID:8503859

  12. Fluorescence analysis of the interaction of isometamidium with Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Zilberstein, D; Wilkes, J; Hirumi, H; Peregrine, A S

    1993-05-15

    Isometamidium chloride (Samorin) is the only compound recommended for prophylaxis against bovine trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. The fluorescence property of this compound was used to investigate the interaction of the molecule with in vitro-derived bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma congolense IL 1180. Incubation of isometamidium with trypanosomes at 37 degrees C for 180 min resulted in a gradual alteration of the lambda max. with time (from 600 to 584 nm) and an increase in the intensity of trypanosome-associated fluorescence of approx. 2-fold. The alteration in fluorescence was temperature-dependent and inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide. In contrast, with intact cells addition of digitonin caused a rapid increase in fluorescence intensity to approximately four times that observed with intact cells. Uptake of isometamidium was also determined using radiolabelled drug; the results indicated that the time course of the uptake process resembled the fluorescence profile and was temperature-dependent. The results therefore indicate that the alteration of fluorescence is due to interaction of isometamidium with an intracellular component(s) and that isometamidium is transported across the plasma membrane via a protein carrier. The data also indicate that the described fluorescence technique can be used to investigate the role of membrane transport in resistance to isometamidium.

  13. Virus Infections on Prion Diseased Mice Exacerbate Inflammatory Microglial Response

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Nara; Mourão, Luiz; Trévia, Nonata; Passos, Aline; Farias, José Augusto; Assunção, Jarila; Bento-Torres, João; Consentino Kronka Sosthenes, Marcia; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated possible interaction between an arbovirus infection and the ME7 induced mice prion disease. C57BL/6, females, 6-week-old, were submitted to a bilateral intrahippocampal injection of ME7 prion strain (ME7) or normal brain homogenate (NBH). After injections, animals were organized into two groups: NBH (n = 26) and ME7 (n = 29). At 15th week after injections (wpi), animals were challenged intranasally with a suspension of Piry arbovirus 0.001% or with NBH. Behavioral changes in ME7 animals appeared in burrowing activity at 14 wpi. Hyperactivity on open field test, errors on rod bridge, and time reduction in inverted screen were detected at 15th, 19th, and 20th wpi respectively. Burrowing was more sensitive to earlier hippocampus dysfunction. However, Piry-infection did not significantly affect the already ongoing burrowing decline in the ME7-treated mice. After behavioral tests, brains were processed for IBA1, protease-resistant form of PrP, and Piry virus antigens. Although virus infection in isolation did not change the number of microglia in CA1, virus infection in prion diseased mice (at 17th wpi) induced changes in number and morphology of microglia in a laminar-dependent way. We suggest that virus infection exacerbates microglial inflammatory response to a greater degree in prion-infected mice, and this is not necessarily correlated with hippocampal-dependent behavioral deficits. PMID:28003864

  14. Noninvasive monitoring of salmonella infections in young mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olomu, Isoken N.; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    A recently developed bioluminescent assay was used to study the influence of age and inoculum size on the acute susceptibility of newborn and juvenile BALB/c mice to Salmonella gastrointestinal infection. Three strains of Salmonella were tagged by expression of the lux operon from Photohabdus luminescenes. Using a range of inoculum sizes varied over 6 orders of magnitude, mice aged 0-6 weeks were infected by oral inoculation. LIght emitted from the tagged bacteria and transmitted through mouse tissues was used to noninvasively monitor disease progression over 7 days. In neonatal mice there was evidence of gastrointestinal infection at 24 hours even with small inocular, and at 4-7 days, the patterns of photon emission and remained and healthy throughout the study period. Inoculation of neonates with tagged LB5000 and BJ66 resulted in severe gastrointestinal infections with low and intermediate sizes of inocula respectively. These strains are known to be of reduced virulence in adult mice. These age-related differences in susceptibility emphasize the need to define virulence in the context of age of the host, and implicate maturation of innate resistance factors in determining disease patterns. Identifying these host-factors and further defining the bacterial determinants of virulence in the neonatal host will be facilitated by this noninvasive study of infection using bioluminenscent methods.

  15. Cytokines profile in immunocompetent mice during Trichosporon asahii infection.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Alexandra M; González, Gloria M; Martinez-Castilla, Azalia M; Aguilar, Sonia A; Franco-Molina, Moises A; Coronado-Cerda, Erika; Rosas-Taraco, Adrián G

    2017-03-15

    Trichosporon asahii is an opportunistic yeastlike fungus commonly associated with systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Neutropenia is recognized as the main risk factor in infections by T. asahii; however, little is known about the cytokine response during trichosporonosis. Here, we evaluated systemic and local cytokine production and histological damage in immunocompetent mice during systemic infection with T. asahii. We found a significant increased presence of G-CSF, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-6 in sera samples. High levels of G-CSF were found in organs (kidney, liver and spleen); meanwhile IL-10, IL-17A, IL-2, IL-4 and TNF-α were found in low levels. Neutrophils and fungal structures were found in early stage in analyzed organs. Our results demonstrated that T. asahii induces a systemic inflammatory response and G-CSF environment in infected organs in immunocompetent mice and neutrophil recruitment in analyzed tissue suggests the importance of these cells for fungal control.

  16. THE INFECTION OF MICE WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1935-01-01

    The experiments confirm the earlier observation of Andrewes, Laidlaw and Smith that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for white mice when administered intranasally. Two field strains of the swine influenza virus were found to differ in their initial pathogenicity for mice. One strain was apparently fully pathogenic even in its 1st mouse passage while the other required 2 or 3 mouse passages to acquire full virulence for this species. Both strains, however, were initially infectious for mice, without the necessity of intervening ferret passages. There is no evidence that bacteria play any significant rôle in the mouse disease though essential in that of swine, and fatal pneumonias can be produced in mice by pure virus infections. Mice surviving the virus disease are immune to reinfection for at least a month. In mice the disease is not contagious though it is notably so in swine. The virus, while regularly producing fatal pneumonias when administered intranasally to mice, appears to be completely innocuous when given subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. Prolonged serial passage of the virus in mice does not influence its infectivity or virulence for swine or ferrets. It is a stable virus so far as its infectivity is concerned, and can be transferred at will from any one of its three known susceptible hosts to any other. In discussing these facts the stability of the swine influenza virus has been contrasted with the apparent instability of freshly isolated strains of the human influenza virus. Though the mouse is an un-natural host for the virus it is, nevertheless, useful for the study of those aspects of swine influenza which have to do with the virus only. PMID:19870434

  17. Effect of Cyclophosphamide on Histoplasma capsulatum Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cozad, George C.; Lindsey, Terri J.

    1974-01-01

    Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 300 mg of cyclophosphamide (CY)/kg of body weight, and 24 h later were injected i.p. with varying dosages of yeast-phase cells of Histoplasma capsulatum. At specific time intervals organs were removed, ground, and cultured to determine the number of viable organisms contained in the spleen, liver, and lungs. Injection of mice with CY was found to cause a dramatic increase in the numbers of parasites isolated from these organs when compared with non-drug-treated controls. Mice given 107 yeast cells showed the largest increase in colony numbers. A greater than fivefold increase in the numbers of organisms isolated from the spleens of CY and 103 yeast cell-treated mice, as compared with non-drug-treated animals, was observed at all time periods. The general trend for infected control animals was a decrease in colony numbers. All mice given CY plus 107 yeast cells intravenously (i.v.) died by day 20 postinfection. Mice given CY and 107 yeast cells i.p. showed no evidence of fatal Histoplasma infection. Deaths occurring by day 5 in CY-treated animals injected with H. capsulatum yeast cells i.v. or i.p. were considered due to bacterial infection or toxicity, or both. Hepatosplenomegaly was observed in mice treated with CY and 107 yeast cells of H. capsulatum. Enlarged lungs were also noted. CY control mouse spleens weighed 30% less than normal spleens. Organs of animals injected with H. capsulatum alone did not vary significantly from those of normal mice. Complete drug-induced suppression of humoral antibody response was achieved for 10 days, as determined by hemagglutination titrations. PMID:4816459

  18. Low dose chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection increases susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Elias, D; Akuffo, H; Thors, C; Pawlowski, A; Britton, S

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of mycobacterial diseases is high and the efficacy of Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) is low in most areas of the world where chronic worm infections are common. However, if and how concurrent worm infections could affect immunity to mycobacterial infections has not been elucidated. In this study we investigated whether infection of mice with Schistosoma mansoni could affect the ability of the animals to control Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection and the immune response to mycobacterial antigens. BALB/c mice subclinically infected with S. mansoni were challenged with M. bovis BCG via the intravenous route. The ability of the animals to contain the replication of M. bovis BCG in their organs, lung pathology as well as the in vitro mycobacterial and worm antigen induced immune responses were evaluated. The results showed that S. mansoni coinfected mice had significantly higher levels of BCG bacilli in their organs and sustained greater lung pathology compared to Schistosoma uninfected controls. Moreover, Schistosoma infected mice show depressed mycobacterial antigen specific Th1 type responses. This is an indication that chronic worm infection could affect resistance/susceptibility to mycobacterial infections by impairing mycobacteria antigen specific Th1 type responses. This finding is potentially important in the control of TB in helminth endemic parts of the world. PMID:15730384

  19. Targeted photodynamic therapy for infected wounds in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; O'Donnell, David A.; Zahra, Touqir; Contag, Christopher H.; McManus, Albert T.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2002-06-01

    Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We report on the use of a targeted polycationic photosensitizer conjugate between poly-L-lysine and chlorin(e6) that can penetrate the Gram (-) outer membrane together with red laser light to kill Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting excisional wounds in mice. We used genetically engineered luminescent bacteria that allowed the infection to be imaged in mouse wounds using a sensitive CCD camera. Wounds were infected with 5x106 bacteria, followed by application of the conjugate in solution and illumination. There was a light-dose dependent loss of luminescence as measured by image analysis in the wound treated with conjugate and light, not seen in control wounds. This strain of E coli is non-invasive and the infection in untreated wounds spontaneously resolved in a few days and all wounds healed equally well showing the photodynamic treatment did not damage the host tissue. P aeruginosa is highly invasive and mice with untreated or control wounds all died while 90% of PDT treated mice survived. PDT may have a role to play in the rapid treatment of infected wounds in view of the worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance.

  20. Experimental infections with Fasciola in snails, mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdel-Nasser A; Khalifa, R M A

    2008-05-01

    Experimental infection trails of Lymnaea (cailliaudi) natalensis snails with miracidia of Fasciola hepatica revealed neither cercariae nor larval stages shed. Infection of white mice with metacercariae from field-collected snails proved to be negative for Fasciola eggs and immature juveniles or adults after 84 days post infection. The infection of eight rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has succeeded; two rabbits were infected, with a very low infection rate. Faeces of rabbits were negative for eggs. The worm burden was one and three worms from 40 fed metacercariae. The obtained fluke measures 23 mm in length by 4 mm in width. The tegument is covered with sharp-ending spines. The uterus contains few eggs. The intrauterine eggs measured 158 microm x 80 microm. According to the morphological characters of these flukes, they belong to F. gigantica.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection through the Oral Route Promotes a Severe Infection in Mice: New Disease Form from an Old Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-de-Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva-dos-Santos, Danielle; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; de Santana-van-Vliet, Eliane; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Roggero, Eduardo; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carla Eponina; Jurberg, José; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; de Meis, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Oral transmission of Chagas disease has been documented in Latin American countries. Nevertheless, significant studies on the pathophysiology of this form of infection are largely lacking. The few studies investigating oral route infection disregard that inoculation in the oral cavity (Oral infection, OI) or by gavage (Gastrointestinal infection, GI) represent different infection routes, yet both show clear-cut parasitemia and heart parasitism during the acute infection. Herein, BALB/c mice were subjected to acute OI or GI infection using 5x104 culture-derived Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. OI mice displayed higher parasitemia and mortality rates than their GI counterparts. Heart histopathology showed larger areas of infiltration in the GI mice, whereas liver lesions were more severe in the OI animals, accompanied by higher Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase serum contents. A differential cytokine pattern was also observed because OI mice presented higher pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF) serum levels than GI animals. Real-time PCR confirmed a higher TNF, IFN-γ, as well as IL-10 expression in the cardiac tissue from the OI group compared with GI. Conversely, TGF-β and IL-17 serum levels were greater in the GI animals. Immunolabeling revealed macrophages as the main tissue source of TNF in infected mice. The high mortality rate observed in the OI mice paralleled the TNF serum rise, with its inhibition by an anti-TNF treatment. Moreover, differences in susceptibility between GI versus OI mice were more clearly related to the host response than to the effect of gastric pH on parasites, since infection in magnesium hydroxide-treated mice showed similar results. Overall, the present study provides conclusive evidence that the initial site of parasite entrance critically affects host immune response and disease outcome. In light of the occurrence of oral Chagas disease outbreaks, our results raise important implications in terms of the current

  2. Photodynamic Therapy for Acinetobacter baumannii Burn Infections in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-29

    Acinetobacter baumannii Burn Infections in Mice Tianhong Dai,1,2 George P. Tegos,1,2 Zongshun Lu,1,3 Liyi Huang,1,2,4 Timur Zhiyentayev,1,5 Michael J...Agents Che- mother. 50:1402–1410. 28. Vallenet, D., P. Nordmann, V. Barbe, L. Poirel, S. Mangenot, E. Bataille , C. Dossat, S. Gas, A. Kreimeyer, P

  3. Type I interferon signaling protects mice from lethal henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Kévin P; Mathieu, Cyrille; Chalons, Marie; Reynaud, Joséphine M; Vallve, Audrey; Raoul, Hervé; Horvat, Branka

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are closely related, recently emerged paramyxoviruses that form Henipavirus genus and are capable of causing considerable morbidity and mortality in a number of mammalian species, including humans. However, in contrast to many other species and despite expression of functional virus entry receptors, mice are resistant to henipavirus infection. We report here the susceptibility of mice deleted for the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR-KO) to both HeV and NiV. Intraperitoneally infected mice developed fatal encephalitis, with pathology and immunohistochemical features similar to what was found in humans. Viral RNA was found in the majority of analyzed organs, and sublethally infected animals developed virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. Altogether, these results reveal IFNAR-KO mice as a new small animal model to study HeV and NiV pathogenesis, prophylaxis, and treatment and suggest the critical role of type I interferon signaling in the control of henipavirus infection.

  4. Zika virus infection damages the testes in mice.

    PubMed

    Govero, Jennifer; Esakky, Prabagaran; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Fernandez, Estefania; Drury, Andrea; Platt, Derek J; Gorman, Matthew J; Richner, Justin M; Caine, Elizabeth A; Salazar, Vanessa; Moley, Kelle H; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-12-15

    Infection of pregnant women with Zika virus (ZIKV) can cause congenital malformations including microcephaly, which has focused global attention on this emerging pathogen. In addition to transmission by mosquitoes, ZIKV can be detected in the seminal fluid of affected males for extended periods of time and transmitted sexually. Here, using a mouse-adapted African ZIKV strain (Dakar 41519), we evaluated the consequences of infection in the male reproductive tract of mice. We observed persistence of ZIKV, but not the closely related dengue virus (DENV), in the testis and epididymis of male mice, and this was associated with tissue injury that caused diminished testosterone and inhibin B levels and oligospermia. ZIKV preferentially infected spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and Sertoli cells in the testis, resulting in cell death and destruction of the seminiferous tubules. Less damage was caused by a contemporary Asian ZIKV strain (H/PF/2013), in part because this virus replicates less efficiently in mice. The extent to which these observations in mice translate to humans remains unclear, but longitudinal studies of sperm function and viability in ZIKV-infected humans seem warranted.

  5. Studying NK cell responses to ectromelia virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe methods for the in vivo study of antiviral NK cell responses using the mouse Orthopoxvirus ectromelia virus as a model, the agent of mousepox. The methods include those specific for the preparation and use of ectromelia virus such as the production of virus stocks in tissue culture and in live mice, the purification of virus stocks, the titration of virus stocks and virus loads in organs, and the infection of mice. The chapter also includes methods for the specific study of NK cell responses in infected mice such as the preparation of organs (lymph nodes, spleen, and liver) for analysis, the study of NK cell responses by flow cytometry, the adoptive transfer of NK cells, the measurement of NK cell cytolytic activity ex vivo and in vivo, and the determination of NK cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine loading or by dilution of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE).

  6. Role of iron in Trypanosoma cruzi infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, R G; Holbein, B E

    1984-01-01

    The role of iron in experimental infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi was investigated. B6 mice had a transient parasitemia and a transient anemia, both of maximal intensity 28 d after the inoculation of T. cruzi. There was a biphasic hypoferremic host response to infection with T. cruzi with the peak hypoferremia also occurring 28 d after inoculation of the parasite. The mortality rate from infection was increased from 23% in phosphate-buffered saline-treated B6 mice to 50% in a group of B6 mice receiving iron-dextran (P less than or equal to 0.025), whereas depletion of iron stores with the iron chelator desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet provided complete protection of B6 mice (P less than or equal to 0.05). The mortality rate in the highly susceptible C3H strain was reduced from 100% in the control group to 45% (P less than or equal to 0.025) in the iron-depleted group. The tissue iron stores were altered in mice receiving either iron-dextran or desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet. In vitro, T. cruzi was shown to require both a heme and a nonheme iron source for an optimal growth rate. The effects of iron excess or depletion on the outcome of infection with T. cruzi correlated both with the growth requirements of the parasite for iron and with the availability of intracellular iron. Thus, it was suggested that the hypoferremic response, by sequestering iron within intracellular stores, potentially enhanced the pathogenicity of the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of iron excess and depletion correlated with an effect of iron on the growth rate and pathogenicity of the parasite. PMID:6421877

  7. [Abortive infection of mice inoculated intraperitoneally with Chlamydia ovis].

    PubMed

    Rodolakis, A

    1976-01-01

    A mouse adaptated strain of Chlamydia ovis, when inoculated in the peritoneal cavity, caused the death of both pregnant and non pregnant mice. In addition, mice inoculated late in pregnancy (12 to 16 days after breeding) aborted 4 to 6 days after inoculation. Chlamydia was recovered from foetuses and from the organs of the mice (Liver, Spleen, Lungs). The severity of the disease was related to the inoculum concentration, so it was possible to induce late abortions with a rapid recovery of the females, like in the natural infection of the ewes. In the same conditions, the original Chlamydia strain maintained by passage on yolk sac, induced only an inapparent disease transmissible to the young mice.

  8. Photodynamic therapy controls of Staphylococcus aureus intradermal infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Palloma Porto; Pereira, Ítalo Sousa; Rodrigues, Karine Bitencourt; Leal, Lorena Santos; Marques, Andressa Souza; Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; da Silva, Robson Amaro Augusto

    2017-08-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus lead to skin infections, as well as soft tissues and bone infections. Given the communal resistance to antibiotics developed by strains of this bacterium, photodynamic therapy emerges as a promising alternative treatment to control and cure infections. Females of the Balb/C mice were infected with 10(8) CFU of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and divided into four distinct groups: P-L- (negative control group), P+L- (group exposed only to curcumin), P-L+ (group exposed only to LED incidence of 450 nm, 75 mW/cm(2), and 54 J/cm(2) for 10 min), and P+L+ (group exposed to curcumin followed by 10 min of LED irradiation) (n = 24). The mice were euthanized 48 and 72 h after infection, and biologic materials were collected for analysis of the bacterial load, peripheral blood leukocyte counts, and draining lymph nodes cell counts. The normalization of data was checked and the ANOVA test was applied. The bacterial load in the draining lymph node of P+L+ group was lower when compared to the control groups 72 h post infection (p < 0.0001), indicating that the LED incidence associated with curcumin controls of the staphylococci intradermal infection. The number of the total lymph node cells shows to be lower than control groups in the two availed times (p < 0.01). The histological analysis and the counting of white blood cells did not show differences among cells in the blood and in the tissue of infection. This is the first report showing that photodynamic therapy may be effective against MRSA infection in a murine model of intradermal infection.

  9. Interleukin-18 protects mice from Enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Hongbin; Chen, Yihui; Niu, Junling; Guo, Qiuhong; Leng, Qibin; Huang, Zhong; Deng, Zhirui; Meng, Guangxun

    2017-08-01

    Previous study has demonstrated that the NLRP3 inflammasome is essential for protecting murine host against Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection. However, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here we discovered that the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18), an NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent effector protein, exhibits a protective capability against EV71 challenge. Deficiency of IL-18 in mice exacerbated EV71 infection, which was reflected by increased viral replication, elevated production of interferons (IFN-β, IFN-γ), proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) and chemokine CCL2,as well as decreased survival of experimental animals. Conversely, administration of recombinant IL-18 considerably restrained EV71 infection in IL-18 deficient mice. Thus, our results revealed a protective role for IL-18 against EV71 challenge, and indicated a novel therapeutic application for IL-18 in EV71 associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of a genetic marker for isometamidium chloride resistance in Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Delespaux, V; Geysen, D; Majiwa, Phelix A O; Geerts, S

    2005-02-01

    Isometamidium chloride has remained a very important prophylactic and therapeutic drug against trypanosomosis in cattle since its introduction into the market in the 1950s with, unfortunately, a concomitant development of resistance in trypanosomosis endemic areas. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) was used to compare two isogenic clones of Trypanosoma congolense. The parent clone, sensitive to isometamidium, has a CD50 (the curative dose that gives complete cure in 50% of the animals) in the mouse of 0.018 mg/kg and its derivative exposed to increasing doses of isometamidium, has a CD50 that is 94-fold higher. Sixty-four combinations of eight Eco RI and eight Mse I primers were used in comparative AFLP analysis to detect subtle genetic differences between the two clones. Thirty-five polymorphic fragments of DNA that were observed only in the resistant clone were purified and then sequenced. The nucleotide sequences were used in searching the GeneDB T. congolense database to find surrounding sequences upstream of an open reading frame and downstream to a stop codon. The sequences of the open reading frames were subsequently compared to the sequences in the genomic databases. A predicted gene coding for an 854 amino acids protein was thus identified. The protein contains a putative ATP binding site, Walker B and LSGG motifs and eight predicted trans-membrane domains. The gene in the resistant strain of T. congolense has a triplet insertion coding for an extra lysine. Using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, the insertion was sought in the genomes of 35 T. congolense strains isolated from different geographic origins and whose response to isometamidium chloride had been determined through single dose mouse tests. The presence of the insertion, specifying an extra codon was found to always be present in the genomes of T. congolense clones that were resistant to isometamidium chloride.

  11. Clostridium difficile infection aggravates colitis in interleukin 10-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Na; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Jung Mogg; Im, Jong Pil; Jung, Hyun Chae; Kim, Joo Sung

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection in an interleukin 10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells isolated from wild type (WT) and IL-10-/-mice were stimulated for 4 h with C. difficile toxin A (200 μg/mL), and gene expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-12 and IL-23 was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. WT and IL-10-/- mice (n = 20 each) were exposed to an antibiotic cocktail for three days and then were injected with clindamycin (i.p.). Mice (n = 10 WT, 10 IL-10-/-) were then challenged with oral administration of C. difficile (1 × 105 colony forming units of strain VPI 10463). Animals were monitored daily for 7 d for signs of colitis. Colonic tissue samples were evaluated for cytokine gene expression and histopathologic analysis. RESULTS: C. difficile toxin A treatment induced IFN-γ gene expression to a level that was significantly higher in BDMCs from IL-10-/- compared to those from WT mice (P < 0.05). However, expression of IL-12 and IL-23 was not different among the groups. Following C. difficile administration, mice developed diarrhea and lost weight within 2-3 d. Weight loss was significantly greater in IL-10-/- compared to WT mice (P < 0.05). C. difficile infection induced histopathologic features typical of colitis in both IL-10-/- and WT mice. The histopathologic severity score was significantly higher in the IL-10-/- than in WT mice (mean ± standard error; 5.50 ± 0.53 vs 2.44 ± 0.46; P < 0.05). This was accompanied by a significantly greater increase in IFN-γ gene expression in colonic tissues from IL-10-/- than from WT mice challenged with C. difficile (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that colitis is more severe after C. difficile infection in IL-10-/-mice, and that IFN-γ expression is involved in this process. PMID:25493020

  12. Hepatitis in Mice Infected with Coxsackie Virus B1*

    PubMed Central

    Burch, G. E.; Tsui, C. Y.; Harb, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The livers of mice of different ages were readily damaged by Coxsackie virus B1 infection. The severity of liver damage decreased as the age of the mice increased. Coxsackie B1 viral crystals were not found in the damaged liver cells in spite of severe pathological changes of the liver, both histologically and electron microscopically, and even though characteristic crystal formation was observed in the pancreas of three of these same animals. Nevertheless, the hepatic damage was considered to be due to direct viral invasion of the hepatic cells. This injury was followed by a variety of degenerative and necrotic processes displaying somewhat characteristic morphological manifestations. The severe hepatic infection produced in the newborn mice resulted in their death from a rather fulminating illness, whereas in the older mice there was recovery from mild to moderate hepatic injury with cellular regeneration by the fourth day after viral inoculation. The experimental preparation used here provides an excellent means for the study of the processes of injury and healing of the liver infected with a virus that is also infectious for man. ImagesFigs. 6-7Fig. 1Figs. 2-3Figs. 4-5 PMID:4718266

  13. Characterization of Lethal Zika Virus Infection in AG129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Emma C.; Larkin, Katrina E.; Camacho, Erwin; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) typically causes a mild and self-limiting illness known as Zika fever, which often is accompanied by maculopapular rash, headache, and myalgia. During the current outbreak in South America, ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been hypothesized to cause microcephaly and other diseases. The detection of ZIKV in fetal brain tissue supports this hypothesis. Because human infections with ZIKV historically have remained sporadic and, until recently, have been limited to small-scale epidemics, neither the disease caused by ZIKV nor the molecular determinants of virulence and/or pathogenicity have been well characterized. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type ZIKV of the Asian lineage. Methodology/Principal Findings Using mice deficient in interferon α/β and Ɣ receptors (AG129 mice), we report that these animals were highly susceptible to ZIKV infection and disease, succumbing within seven to eight days. Rapid viremic dissemination was observed in visceral organs and brain; but only was associated with severe pathologies in the brain and muscle. Finally, these results were consistent across challenge routes, age of mice, and inoculum doses. These data represent a mouse model for ZIKV that is not dependent on adapting ZIKV to intracerebral passage in mice. Conclusions/Significance Foot pad injection of AG129 mice with ZIKV represents a biologically relevant model for studying ZIKV infection and disease development following wild-type virus inoculation without the requirement for adaptation of the virus or intracerebral delivery of the virus. This newly developed Zika disease model can be exploited to identify determinants of ZIKV virulence and reveal molecular mechanisms that control the virus-host interaction, providing a framework for rational design of acute phase therapeutics and for vaccine efficacy testing. PMID:27093158

  14. Characterization of Lethal Zika Virus Infection in AG129 Mice.

    PubMed

    Aliota, Matthew T; Caine, Elizabeth A; Walker, Emma C; Larkin, Katrina E; Camacho, Erwin; Osorio, Jorge E

    2016-04-01

    Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) typically causes a mild and self-limiting illness known as Zika fever, which often is accompanied by maculopapular rash, headache, and myalgia. During the current outbreak in South America, ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been hypothesized to cause microcephaly and other diseases. The detection of ZIKV in fetal brain tissue supports this hypothesis. Because human infections with ZIKV historically have remained sporadic and, until recently, have been limited to small-scale epidemics, neither the disease caused by ZIKV nor the molecular determinants of virulence and/or pathogenicity have been well characterized. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type ZIKV of the Asian lineage. Using mice deficient in interferon α/β and Ɣ receptors (AG129 mice), we report that these animals were highly susceptible to ZIKV infection and disease, succumbing within seven to eight days. Rapid viremic dissemination was observed in visceral organs and brain; but only was associated with severe pathologies in the brain and muscle. Finally, these results were consistent across challenge routes, age of mice, and inoculum doses. These data represent a mouse model for ZIKV that is not dependent on adapting ZIKV to intracerebral passage in mice. Foot pad injection of AG129 mice with ZIKV represents a biologically relevant model for studying ZIKV infection and disease development following wild-type virus inoculation without the requirement for adaptation of the virus or intracerebral delivery of the virus. This newly developed Zika disease model can be exploited to identify determinants of ZIKV virulence and reveal molecular mechanisms that control the virus-host interaction, providing a framework for rational design of acute phase therapeutics and for vaccine efficacy testing.

  15. Baylisascaris procyonis infection in white-footed mice: predicting patterns of infection from landscape habitat attributes.

    PubMed

    Beasley, J C; Eagan, T S; Page, L K; Hennessy, C A; Rhodes, O E

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that habitat fragmentation resulting from anthropogenic land use can alter the transmission dynamics of infectious disease. Baylisascaris procyonis , a parasitic roundworm with the ability to cause fatal central nervous system disease in many mammals, including humans, is a zoonotic threat, and research suggests that parasite recruitment rates by intermediate hosts are highly variable among forest patches in fragmented landscapes. During 2008, we sampled 353 white-footed mice ( Peromyscus leucopus ) from 22 forest patches distributed throughout a fragmented agricultural ecosystem to determine the influence of landscape-level habitat attributes on infection rates of B. procyonis in mice. We characterized each mouse in terms of infection status and intensity of infection, and calculated (on a patch-wide basis) prevalence, mean abundance of B. procyonis , and mean intensity of infection. We used an information-theoretic approach to develop a suite of candidate models characterizing the influence of landscape attributes on each of our measured characteristics of B. procyonis infection in white-footed mice, based on previous knowledge of raccoon ( Procyon lotor ) ecology and B. procyonis distribution in agricultural ecosystems. We observed evidence of B. procyonis infection in mice across all 22 habitat patches sampled. However, parasite recruitment rates and intensity were highly variable among patches, and the results of our analyses suggest that spatial variability in B. procyonis infections was primarily driven by emergent properties of fragmented ecosystems. In particular, prevalence, abundance, and intensity of B. procyonis infections in mice were negatively associated with the size and connectivity of forest patches. These results support previous studies indicating that habitat fragmentation can alter the transmission dynamics of infectious disease, and suggest that factors below the scale of landscape, i.e., fine

  16. Deltamethrin Increases Candida albicans infection susceptibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Rehman, H; Mohan, A; Tabassum, H; Ahmad, F; Rahman, S; Parvez, S; Raisuddin, S

    2011-05-01

    Deltamethrin, an alpha-cyano type II synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, is used to control a wide range of insects on a variety of crops and vectors of diseases. Deltamethrin has been previously reported for its immunotoxic effects and therefore its exposure may affect the host resistance to infection and tumour challenge. Effect of exposure of deltamethrin on host resistance to Candida albicans infection was examined in Swiss albino mice. The objective of this study was to investigate the modulatory action of deltamethrin in C. albicans infected mice. The dose of deltamethrin was initially tested and selected from our previous study (18 mg/kg). Percentage of infection in deltamethrin treated animals increased faster when compared to that of the controls. Deltamethrin exposure along with C. albicans infection caused alteration of humoral immune response. The number of colony forming unit in liver and spleen were also found to be significantly increased in the treated group. The results from our present study suggest that deltamethrin exhibits an immunosuppressive effect and has a negative impact on host resistance to C. albicans infection. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. [Nematode infections in mice--an experimental model of immunoregulation].

    PubMed

    Donskow-Schmelter, Katarzyna; Jóźwicka, Kinga; Doligalska, Maria

    2009-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in the incidence of autoimmune and allergic diseases in Western countries in the past few decades. However, in the geographic area endemic for parasitic helminth infections, such diseases remain relatively rare. It has been hypothesized that helminths may protect against immune disorders that have been observed in urbanized area. Studies on rodents infected with nematodes Trichinella spiralis, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Trichuris muris have provided considerable information about immune mechanisms in aspects of host-parasite interaction and immunoregulation. Helminths inducing a long-lasting asymptomatic infection are regarded as major modifiers of the host immune system. Parasitic worms can establish and reproduce in mammalian hosts switching off inflammation and inducing a tolerant response to parasitic antigens. In this review we summarized recent information on the immunoregulation during nematode infection and mechanisms used by nematodes, including the induction of regulatory T cells and apoptosis in the host. The innate immune response seems to determine the different sensitivity of mice to nematode infection. In this review we also discuss results of our own studies on H. polygyrus, demonstrating that it induces different mechanisms in different strains of mice which might play important role in the modulation of immune response. In the slow responder mice apoptosis would play a key role in the outcome of immune response. Contrary to that, in fast responder mice a defensive inflammatory response is mostly down-regulated via endogenous opioids pathway. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects that helminths have on the immune system will provide information that can be exploited to prevent inflammatory diseases.

  18. [Intestinal pathological changes of Kunming mice infected by Cryptosporidium and the therapeutic efficacy of spiramycin on infected mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan

    2014-06-01

    To observe the symptom, disease course of Crytosporidium-infected mice, and the therapeutic effect of spiramycin on infected mice. Seventy Kunming mice were randomly divided into normal control group (A, n = 10) and 3 experimental groups (B, C, and D). Mice in groups B, C, and D (n = 20) were immunosuppressed with 5, 7.5, and 10 mg/L dexamethasone in drinking water for two weeks, respectively. The mice were observed and the number of oocysts in fecal sample was counted daily after immunosuppression. Two weeks post immunosuppression, 50% of mice in each group were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed for observation of parasitic site. The pathological changes of mucous membrane were observed under microscope, and sIgA level in intestinal fluid was determined. Immunosuppression was withdrawn in the rest mice, and after two weeks unrecovered mice were divided into treatment group (n = 6) and control group (n = 7). Mice in treatment group were each given 2 mg/d spiramycin for 10 d. Each mouse in control group was given same amount of normal saline. The mice were observed and the oocysts shedding in fecal pellets were counted after treatment. On the 6th day post immunosuppression, Cryptosporidium sp. positive fecal samples were found in the experimental groups. The number of oocysts per gram of feces in groups D (70.3 +/- 4.0) and B (31.9 +/- 2.4) reached a peak on the 12th day and 10th day post immunosuppression, respectively (P < 0.05). The conspicuous enteron symptom was observed in each experimental group. Cryptosporidium parasitized mainly in upper jejunum. Pathological examination of intestinal mucous membrane showed that swollen mucous membrane and hemorrhages were observed in group D, and less inflammatory cell occurred in groups B and C. sIgA level in intestinal fluid of experiment mice descended, there was a statistical significance between groups D [(2.7 +/- 0.6) microg/ml], C [(3.2 +/- 0.8) microg/ml], B [(4.9 +/- 1.3) microg/ml] and A [(6.1 +/- 1

  19. Alopecia in mice infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV).

    PubMed Central

    Mims, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    When mouse cytomegalovirus was injected subcutaneously into 4-12 day old CDI mice there was infection of dermal cells and the dermal papillae of hair follicles. Infected cells were never seen in the epidermis nor in the epithelium of hair follicles. When larger doses of virus (5 X 10(4) pfu) were given, dermal infection led to gross necrosis of the skin, ulceration, scabbing and healing with alopecia. Smaller doses (10(4) pfu) did not cause gross necrosis but damage to follicles resulted in alopecia or sparse hair growth. Skin lesions were not seen after infection of 4-8 week old mice, even when the inoculated skin area had been epilated, or when hyaluronidase was mixed with the virus inoculum. These experiments show that cytomegalovirus, in contrast to herpes simplex and varicella-zoster viruses, infects dermal but not epidermal cells, and that dermal tropism is age-restricted. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3002414

  20. Intracerebral Infusion of Antisense Oligonucleotides Into Prion-infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nazor Friberg, Karah; Hung, Gene; Wancewicz, Ed; Giles, Kurt; Black, Chris; Freier, Sue; Bennett, Frank; DeArmond, Stephen J; Freyman, Yevgeniy; Lessard, Pierre; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-01-01

    Mice deficient for the cellular prion protein (PrPC) do not develop prion disease; accordingly, gene-based strategies to diminish PrPC expression are of interest. We synthesized a series of chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted against mouse Prnp messenger RNA (mRNA) and identified those that were most effective in decreasing PrPC expression. Those ASOs were also evaluated in scrapie-infected cultured cells (ScN2a) for their efficacy in diminishing the levels of the disease-causing prion protein (PrPSc). When the optimal ASO was infused intracerebrally into FVB mice over a 14-day period beginning 1 day after infection with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) strain of mouse prions, a prolongation of the incubation period of almost 2 months was observed. Whether ASOs can be used to develop an effective therapy for patients dying of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease remains to be established. PMID:23344724

  1. Detection of multiple drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of south-east Mali

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tsetse fly-transmitted African animal trypanosomosis causes annual losses that run into billions of dollars. The disease is assumed to cause hunger and poverty in most sub-Saharan countries since it represents a serious impediment to sustainable livestock production. Both a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study were carried out from November to December 2007 to evaluate trypanosomosis risk and susceptibility of trypanosomes to trypanocidal drug treatment in village cattle populations in south-east Mali. Methods Eight purposively selected villages participated in the study. In each village, eight traps deployed along drainage lines over 24hour duration were used to catch tsetse. One hundred systematically selected cattle in the study villages were examined for trypanosomes. All trypanosome-positive cattle were randomly allocated into two treatment groups: a group treated with 0.5 mg/kg bw. isometamidium chloride (ISMM) and a group treated with 3.5 mg/kg bw. diminazene aceturate (DIM). The cattle were monitored for trypanosomes at day 14 and 28 post-treatment. Results Of the 796 cattle examined, 125 (15.7%) were trypanosome-positive. Village trypanosome prevalences ranged between 11% and 19%. There were no significant (p > 0.05) differences in the village trypanosome prevalences. Trypanosoma congolense was the dominant trypanosome species accounting for 73% (91/125) of the infections and T. vivax the remainder. Twenty (31.7%) of the 63 cattle on 0.5 mg/kg bw. ISMM treatment were still positive14 days post-treatment. Of the 43 aparasitaemic cattle monitored to day 28, 25.6% (11) became parasitaemic, resulting in a cumulative failure rate of 49.2% (31/63). Trypanosoma congolense accounted for 77.4% (24/31) of failed ISMM treatments. The 62 cattle treated with 3.5 mg/kg bw. DIM resulted in 30.6% (19/62) failed treatments. Although 42.2% (19/45) of T. congolense positive cattle did not respond to DIM treatment, all T. vivax positive cattle

  2. Detection of multiple drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of south-east Mali.

    PubMed

    Mungube, Erick O; Vitouley, Hervé S; Allegye-Cudjoe, Emmanuel; Diall, Oumar; Boucoum, Zakaria; Diarra, Boucader; Sanogo, Yousouf; Randolph, Thomas; Bauer, Burkhard; Zessin, Karl-Hans; Clausen, Peter-Henning

    2012-08-01

    Tsetse fly-transmitted African animal trypanosomosis causes annual losses that run into billions of dollars. The disease is assumed to cause hunger and poverty in most sub-Saharan countries since it represents a serious impediment to sustainable livestock production. Both a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study were carried out from November to December 2007 to evaluate trypanosomosis risk and susceptibility of trypanosomes to trypanocidal drug treatment in village cattle populations in south-east Mali. Eight purposively selected villages participated in the study. In each village, eight traps deployed along drainage lines over 24 hour duration were used to catch tsetse. One hundred systematically selected cattle in the study villages were examined for trypanosomes. All trypanosome-positive cattle were randomly allocated into two treatment groups: a group treated with 0.5 mg/kg bw. isometamidium chloride (ISMM) and a group treated with 3.5 mg/kg bw. diminazene aceturate (DIM). The cattle were monitored for trypanosomes at day 14 and 28 post-treatment. Of the 796 cattle examined, 125 (15.7%) were trypanosome-positive. Village trypanosome prevalences ranged between 11% and 19%. There were no significant (p > 0.05) differences in the village trypanosome prevalences. Trypanosoma congolense was the dominant trypanosome species accounting for 73% (91/125) of the infections and T. vivax the remainder. Twenty (31.7%) of the 63 cattle on 0.5 mg/kg bw. ISMM treatment were still positive14 days post-treatment. Of the 43 aparasitaemic cattle monitored to day 28, 25.6% (11) became parasitaemic, resulting in a cumulative failure rate of 49.2% (31/63). Trypanosoma congolense accounted for 77.4% (24/31) of failed ISMM treatments. The 62 cattle treated with 3.5 mg/kg bw. DIM resulted in 30.6% (19/62) failed treatments. Although 42.2% (19/45) of T. congolense positive cattle did not respond to DIM treatment, all T. vivax positive cattle responded positively to DIM

  3. Effect of cobra venom factor on experimental infection of mice against Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Kijima, M; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, T; Nakamura, M

    1992-10-01

    The effect of cobra venom factor (CoVF) treatment was examined to clarify the mechanism of resistance of mice to Clostridium chauvoei infection. In CoVF-treated mice inoculated with spores of C. chauvoei, no death occurred and the organisms in the infected muscle progressively decreased, similar to that of non-treated control mice. These results indicated that C3 did not play a significant role in the resistance of mice against C. chauvoei infection.

  4. Cytotoxic cells induced after Chlamydia psittaci infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, J.K.

    1982-03-01

    The ability of spleen cells from Chlamydia psittaci-infected mice to lyse C. psittaci-infected and uninfected target cell monolayers was studied. The cytotoxicity assay used was a terminal label method in which the number of adherent target cells surviving the interaction with effector cells was determined by measuring the uptake of (3H)uridine by such cells. It was observed that in the first few days postinfection (3 to 5), spleens contained cells that lysed infected and uninfected targets with equal efficiency. Subsequently, infected targets were killed primarily. The activity of effector spleen cells for infected targets continued, although at a reduced level, beyond 21 days postinfection. Intact effector cells were required since a disruption by sonication resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity. The enhanced killing observed with infected targets was also observed when target cells were sensitized with heat- or UV-inactivated C. psittaci. This study suggests that the induction of cytotoxic cells after C. psittaci infection may contribute to the ability of the host to control multiplication of the microorganism.

  5. The treatment of mice with Lactobacillus casei induces protection against Babesia microti infection.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Garfias, C R; Gómez, M B; Aguilar, B R; Ixta, O; Martínez, F; Mosqueda, J

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we report that administration of Lactobacillus casei confers protection to mice against the intracellular protozoan Babesia microti. Mice treated with L. casei orally or intraperitoneally were inoculated 7 days later with an infectious dose of B. microti. Mice treated with lactobacilli showed significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes (PPE) compared to untreated mice. When mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with L. casei 3 or 0 days before challenge with B. microti, the PPE was significantly lower compared to untreated mice and there were no differences between treated mice and mice immune to B. microti infection. When mice treated with live or dead L. casei were compared to mice inoculated with Freund Complete Adjuvant before a B. microti infection, a significant reduction of PPE was observed. These results show the protective effect of L. casei administered to mice against a B. microti infection and suggest that it might act by stimulating the innate immune system.

  6. Chlamydial infection in vitamin D receptor knockout mice is more intense and prolonged than in wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Ananaba, Godwin A.; Patrickson, John; Pitts, Sidney; Yi, Yeming; Yan, Fengxia; Eko, Francis O.; Lyn, Deborah; Black, Carolyn M.; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D hormone (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) is involved in innate immunity and induces host defense peptides in epithelial cells, suggesting its involvement in mucosal defense against infections. Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease worldwide. We tested the hypothesis that the vitamin D endocrine system would attenuate chlamydial infection. Vitamin D receptor knock-out mice (VDR−/−) and wild-type mice (VDR+/+) were infected with 103 inclusion forming units of Chlamydia muridarum and cervical epithelial cells (HeLa cells) were infected with C. muridarum at multiplicity of infection 5:1 in the presence and absence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.VDR−/− mice exhibited significantly higher bacterial loading than wild-type VDR+/+ mice (P<0.01) and cleared the chlamydial infection in 39 days, compared with 18 days for VDR+/+ mice. Monocytes and neutrophils were more numerous in the uterus and oviduct of VDR−/− mice than in VDR+/+ mice (P< 0.05) at d 45 after infection. Pre-treatment of HeLa cells with 10nM or 100nM 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 decreased the infectivity of C. muridarum (P< 0.001). Several differentially expressed protein spots were detected by proteomic analysis of chlamydial-infected HeLa cells pre-treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Leukocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI), an anti-inflammatory protein, was up-regulated. Expression of LEI in the ovary and oviduct of infected VDR+/+ mice was greater than that of infected VDR−/− mice. We conclude that the vitamin D endocrine system reduces the risk for prolonged chlamydial infections through regulation of several proteins and that LEI is involved in its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:23201171

  7. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice - A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 106, 1 x 104, 1 x 102 and 4 x 100 spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 106, 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species. PMID:26890814

  8. Exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunodeficient (scid) mice by concurrent infection with a pneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Bray, M V; Barthold, S W; Sidman, C L; Roths, J; Smith, A L

    1993-04-01

    scid mice naturally infected with Pneumocystis carinii and inoculated with a normally apathogenic pneumovirus had significantly higher P. carinii cyst counts and developed significantly more severe P. carinii-related disease than did sham-inoculated, P. carinii-infected scid mice. P. carinii-free, virus-infected scid mice survived for 2 months despite high pulmonary virus titers. These results show that a respiratory virus infection can exacerbate P. carinii disease in an immunocompromised-rodent model.

  9. In vivo imaging of mice infected with bioluminescent Trypanosoma cruzi unveils novel sites of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase opens up new possibilities for following the fate of parasites in infected mammals. Methods D-luciferin potassium salt stock solution was prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 15 mg/ml. To produce bioluminescence, infected and control mice received an intraperitoneal injection of luciferin stock solution (150 mg/kg). All mice were immediately anesthetized with 2% isofluorane, and after 10 minutes were imaged. Ex vivo evaluation of infected tissues and organs was evaluated in a 24-well plate in 150 μg/ml D-luciferin diluted in PBS. Images were captured using the IVIS Lumina image system (Xenogen). Dissected organs were also evaluated by microscopy of hematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Results Here we describe the results obtained using a genetically modified Dm28c strain of T. cruzi expressing the firefly luciferase to keep track of infection by bioluminescence imaging. Progression of infection was observed in vivo in BALB/c mice at various intervals after infection with transgenic Dm28c-luc. The bioluminescent signal was immediately observed at the site of T. cruzi inoculation, and one day post infection (dpi) it was disseminated in the peritoneal cavity. A similar pattern in the cavity was observed on 7 dpi, but the bioluminescence was more intense in the terminal region of the large intestine, rectum, and gonads. On 14 and 21 dpi, bioluminescent parasites were also observed in the heart, snout, paws, hind limbs, and forelimbs. From 28 dpi to 180 dpi in chronically infected mice, bioluminescence declined in regions of the body but was concentrated in the gonad region. Ex vivo evaluation of dissected organs and tissues by bioluminescent imaging confirmed the in vivo bioluminescent foci. Histopathological analysis of dissected organs demonstrated parasite nests at the rectum and snout, in muscle fibers of mice infected with Dm28c

  10. Therapeutic activity of isometamidium chloride in Boran cattle against a tsetse-transmitted clone of Trypanosoma congolense with a low level of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, I A; Codjia, V; Moloo, S K; Holmes, P H; Peregrine, A S

    1992-08-01

    Experiments were conducted with a clone of Trypanosoma congolense, IL 3580, which exhibited a low level of resistance to isometamidium chloride. Five cattle were treated intramuscularly with isometamidium chloride at a dose rate of 0.5 mg kg-1 body weight (BW) and challenged 28 days later with 5 Glossina morsitans centralis infected with T. congolense IL 3580. All 5 cattle and 15 untreated steers challenged on the same day became parasitaemic by day 15 post-infection. Thus, at a dose of 0.5 mg kg-1 BW, the prophylactic action of isometamidium chloride did not extend to 28 days following treatment. Subsequently, the 20 steers were divided into 4 groups of 5 animals each and treated with isometamidium chloride at one of the following dose rates; 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg-1 BW intramuscularly and 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg-1 BW intravenously (Groups A, B, C and D, respectively). Group A consisted of the 5 animals that had previously been treated with isometamidium chloride. Animals relapsed in all groups except those in Group B, treated intramuscularly with isometamidium chloride at a dose of 1.0 mg kg-1 BW. Four of the 5 animals in Group A, treated intramuscularly with isometamidium chloride at a dose of 0.5 mg kg-1 BW relapsed following a mean interval of 16 days post-treatment. Similarly, infections in all animals in Groups C and D, given intravenous injections of isometamidium chloride at a dose of 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg-1 BW, respectively, were not eliminated as a result of treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Absence of correlation between karyotype profiles of Trypanosoma congolense and resistance to isometamidium chloride.

    PubMed

    Shahada, Francis; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Tietjen, Uwe; Chuma, Takehisa; Okamoto, Karoku

    2007-07-20

    Chromosome profiles of 10 Trypanosoma (T.) congolense populations with different isometamidium sensitivities were compared using the pulsed field gel electrophoresis technique. The aim was to elucidate whether there was a karyotype pattern specific to eight isometamidium resistant phenotypes. Analysis of the profiles indicated that all populations displayed several discrete bands at the region of small, intermediate and large chromosomes. The highest similarity was observed between two isolates originating from Burkina Faso, indicating that they had the same genetic origin. Other eight strains exhibited different patterns in terms of chromosome size and numbers such that there was no characteristic karyotype pattern that was established specifically to identify resistant populations and discriminate them from the sensitive ones. This study has revealed that isometamidium resistance is not correlated to karyotype profile in T. congolense.

  12. Parasitic Infection Improves Survival from Septic Peritonitis by Enhancing Mast Cell Responses to Bacteria in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Rachel E.; Xu, Xiang; Kim, Sophia S.; Seeley, Eric J.; Caughey, George H.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals are serially infected with a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria and parasites. Each infection reprograms the immune system's responses to re-exposure and potentially alters responses to first-time infection by different microorganisms. To examine whether infection with a metazoan parasite modulates host responses to subsequent bacterial infection, mice were infected with the hookworm-like intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, followed in 2–4 weeks by peritoneal injection of the pathogenic bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. Survival from Klebsiella peritonitis two weeks after parasite infection was better in Nippostrongylus-infected animals than in unparasitized mice, with Nippostrongylus-infected mice having fewer peritoneal bacteria, more neutrophils, and higher levels of protective interleukin 6. The improved survival of Nippostrongylus-infected mice depends on IL-4 because the survival benefit is lost in mice lacking IL-4. Because mast cells protect mice from Klebsiella peritonitis, we examined responses in mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice, in which parasitosis failed to improve survival from Klebsiella peritonitis. However, adoptive transfer of cultured mast cells to KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice restored survival benefits of parasitosis. These results show that recent infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis protects mice from Klebsiella peritonitis by modulating mast cell contributions to host defense, and suggest more generally that parasitosis can yield survival advantages to a bacterially infected host. PMID:22110673

  13. Dhori virus (Orthomyxoviridae: Thogotovirus) infection in mice: a model of the pathogenesis of severe orthomyxovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rosa I; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Lei, Hao; DA Rosa, Amelia P A Travassos; Tesh, Robert B

    2007-04-01

    After intranasal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal infection with Dhori virus (DHOV), adult mice developed a fulminant and uniformly fatal illness with many of the clinical and pathologic findings seen in mice infected with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus. Histopathologic findings in lungs of DHOV-infected mice consisted of hemorrhage, inflammation, and thickening of the interstitium and the alveolar septa and alveolar edema. Extra-pulmonary findings included hepatocellular necrosis and steatosis, widespread severe fibrinoid necrosis in lymphoid organs, marked lymphocyte loss and karyorrhexis, and neuronal degeneration in brain. Similar systemic histopathologic findings have been reported in the few fatal human H5N1 cases examined at autopsy. Because of the relationship of DHOV to the influenza viruses, its biosafety level 2 status, and its similar pathology in mice, the DHOV-mouse model may offer a low-cost, relatively safe, and realistic animal model for studies on the pathogenesis and management of H5N1 virus infection.

  14. Clearance of Giardia muris infection in mice deficient in natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, M F; Kung, J E; Eriksson, E C

    1986-01-01

    Immunocompetent C57BL/6J mice and beige mice (which are deficient in natural killer cells) were infected with Giardia muris. Both types of mice cleared G. muris infection at similar rates. This observation suggests that clearance of G. muris parasites from the mouse intestine is not mediated by natural killer cells. PMID:3781631

  15. Effect of phenylhydrazine pretreatment on splenectomized Rauscher leukemia virus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bergson, A; Lobue, J; Gordon, A S; Fredickson, T N

    1978-01-01

    The protective effect of phenylhydrazine pretreatment seen in Rauscher leukemia virus-infected intact mice is not observed when splenectomized mice are used. Such mice succumb to infection even earlier than viral potency controls. Since phenylhydrazine is known to increase both splenic erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell numbers, the results suggest that these two events may be involved in phenylhydrazine prophylaxis.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON IMMUNOBLOT VERSUS PCR IN DIAGNOSIS OF SCHISTOSOMIASIS MANSONI IN EXPERIMENTAL INFECTED MICE.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mousa A M; Mousa, Wahed Mohammed Ali; Abu-Sarea, Enas Yahia; Basyouni, Maha M A; Mohammed, Samah Sayed

    2016-04-01

    This study compared PCR and Western blot techniques in diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni. Forty Swiss albino mice were used, thirty two mice were infected with cercariae of S. mansoni and eight mice were kept uninfected which were used as a control. Blood was obtained from four infected mice weekly beginning from the 1st week to the 8th week post infection. The study found that PCR was positive from the first week post infection, while Western blot technique was positive from the second week post infection. Thus, PCR diagnosed schistosomiasis mansoni earlier than Western blot technique, but both were able to diagnose.

  17. Echinacea purpurea aerial extract alters course of influenza infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Dahlene; Liu, Xinyan; Savage, Caroline; Taur, Ying; Xiao, Weilie; Kennelly, Edward; Yuan, Jianda; Cassileth, Barrie; Salvatore, Mirella; Papanicolaou, Genovefa A.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza infection is a major clinical problem and Echinacea purpurea, a widely consumed botanical product, is purported to alter the course of respiratory infections including influenza. Mice infected with WSN influenza A and treated with E. purpurea polysaccharide extract had less weight loss than untreated mice but similar pulmonary viral titers. Echinacea-treated mice had lower systemic and pulmonary KC and IL-10 levels and lower systemic IFN-γ levels following influenza infection. These suggest that E. purpurea alters the clinical course of influenza infection in mice through modulation of cytokines and not direct antiviral activity. PMID:20382242

  18. Echinacea purpurea aerial extract alters course of influenza infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Dahlene; Liu, Xinyan; Savage, Caroline; Taur, Ying; Xiao, Weilie; Kennelly, Edward; Yuan, Jianda; Cassileth, Barrie; Salvatore, Mirella; Papanicolaou, Genovefa A

    2010-05-21

    Influenza infection is a major clinical problem and Echinacea purpurea, a widely consumed botanical product, is purported to alter the course of respiratory infections including influenza. Mice infected with WSN influenza A and treated with E. purpurea polysaccharide extract had less weight loss than untreated mice but similar pulmonary viral titers. Echinacea-treated mice had lower systemic and pulmonary KC and IL-10 levels and lower systemic IFN-gamma levels following influenza infection. These suggest that E. purpurea alters the clinical course of influenza infection in mice through modulation of cytokines and not direct antiviral activity. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Vaccine protection of leukopenic mice against Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts-α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)-are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI.

  20. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  1. Effects of astaxanthin in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Ortiz, José María Eloy; Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto; Oros-Pantoja, Rigoberto; Aparicio-Burgos, José Esteban; Zepeda-Escobar, José Antonio; Hassan-Moustafa, Wael Hegazy; Ochoa-García, Laucel; Uxúa Alonso-Fresan, María; Tenorio Borroto, Esvieta; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    During Trypanosoma cruzi infection, oxidative stress is considered a contributing factor for dilated cardiomyopathy development. In this study, the effects of astaxanthin (ASTX) were evaluated as an alternative drug treatment for Chagas disease in a mouse model during the acute infection phase, given its anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, and anti-oxidative properties. ASTX was tested in vitro in parasites grown axenically and in co-culture with Vero cells. In vivo tests were performed in BALB/c mice (4-6 weeks old) infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and supplemented with ASTX (10 mg/kg/day) and/or nifurtimox (NFMX; 100 mg/kg/day). Results show that ASTX has some detrimental effects on axenically cultured parasites, but not when cultured with mammalian cell monolayers. In vivo, ASTX did not have any therapeutic value against acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, used either alone or in combination with NFMX. Infected animals treated with NFMX or ASTX/NFMX survived the experimental period (60 days), while infected animals treated only with ASTX died before day 30 post-infection. ASTX did not show any effect on the control of parasitemia; however, it was associated with an increment in focal heart lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, a reduced number of amastigote nests in cardiac tissue, and less hyperplasic spleen follicles when compared to control groups. Unexpectedly, ASTX showed a negative effect in infected animals co-treated with NFMX. An increment in parasitemia duration was observed, possibly due to ASTX blocking of free radicals, an anti-parasitic mechanism of NFMX. In conclusion, astaxanthin is not recommended during the acute phase of Chagas disease, either alone or in combination with nifurtimox. © J.M.E. Contreras-Ortiz et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  2. Effects of astaxanthin in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Ortiz, José María Eloy; Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto; Oros-Pantoja, Rigoberto; Aparicio-Burgos, José Esteban; Zepeda-Escobar, José Antonio; Hassan-Moustafa, Wael Hegazy; Ochoa-García, Laucel; Uxúa Alonso-Fresan, María; Tenorio Borroto, Esvieta; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    During Trypanosoma cruzi infection, oxidative stress is considered a contributing factor for dilated cardiomyopathy development. In this study, the effects of astaxanthin (ASTX) were evaluated as an alternative drug treatment for Chagas disease in a mouse model during the acute infection phase, given its anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, and anti-oxidative properties. ASTX was tested in vitro in parasites grown axenically and in co-culture with Vero cells. In vivo tests were performed in BALB/c mice (4–6 weeks old) infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and supplemented with ASTX (10 mg/kg/day) and/or nifurtimox (NFMX; 100 mg/kg/day). Results show that ASTX has some detrimental effects on axenically cultured parasites, but not when cultured with mammalian cell monolayers. In vivo, ASTX did not have any therapeutic value against acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, used either alone or in combination with NFMX. Infected animals treated with NFMX or ASTX/NFMX survived the experimental period (60 days), while infected animals treated only with ASTX died before day 30 post-infection. ASTX did not show any effect on the control of parasitemia; however, it was associated with an increment in focal heart lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, a reduced number of amastigote nests in cardiac tissue, and less hyperplasic spleen follicles when compared to control groups. Unexpectedly, ASTX showed a negative effect in infected animals co-treated with NFMX. An increment in parasitemia duration was observed, possibly due to ASTX blocking of free radicals, an anti-parasitic mechanism of NFMX. In conclusion, astaxanthin is not recommended during the acute phase of Chagas disease, either alone or in combination with nifurtimox. PMID:28560955

  3. An Ultrastructural Analysis of Nocardia During Experimental Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, Blaine L.

    1973-01-01

    Several strains of Nocardia that varied from virulent to avirulent were injected intraperitoneally into young mice. Histological and ultrastructural analysis of the resultant infections revealed that the bacteria and the lesions they induced were different depending upon the strain of organism used. Further, the morphological and tinctorial characteristics of the bacteria grown in vitro changes during growth in vivo. These observations strongly suggested that chemical and physical alterations occurred in the cell envelope of the Nocardia when grown in mice. Electron microscopy confirmed that significant structural modification occurred, especially in the cell envelope, when the nocardial cells established themselves within the host tissue. It was shown that the least virulent strain exhibited the most dramatic changes whereas the most virulent organism appeared to be affected the least. Images PMID:4584055

  4. The migration of larvae of Toxascaris leonina (Linstow, 1909) in experimentally infected white mice.

    PubMed

    Prokopic, J; Figallová, V

    1982-01-01

    The migration of larvae of Toxascaris leonina was studied in 168 white mice. The larvae were found in lungs of 96% of infected mice on days 4-135, in genital organs (84%), intestinal mucosa (81%) and skeletal muscles (100%) on day 10 post infection. The maximum number of larvae were detected in intercostal muscles on day 105 post infection.

  5. Infection dynamics and clinical features of cryptosporidiosis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mead, J R; Ilksoy, N; You, X; Belenkaya, Y; Arrowood, M J; Fallon, M T; Schinazi, R F

    1994-01-01

    Cryptosporidial infections in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice produce a chronic disease state which in the later stages leads to extraintestinal involvement and hepatic dysfunction. To further characterize the infection dynamics in this model and monitor the changes in the hepatic system, a dose titration of the oocyst inoculum was performed and alkaline phosphatase levels in the sera were assayed. Ten SCID mice per dose were inoculated with 10(3), 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), or 10(7) oocysts. Oocyst shedding in the feces was quantified by microscopic enumeration. Mice inoculated with 10(6) oocysts and those inoculated with 10(7) oocysts demonstrated similar oocyst shedding patterns, but the 10(7)-oocyst group exhibited signs of distress (e.g., weight loss and icterus) earlier. The intensity of the infection increased markedly approximately 14 days postinoculation (p.i.) and continued to increase steadily over the next 6 weeks. Inoculation with lower oocyst doses produced a delay in patency (e.g., it occurred 7 days later with the 10(5)-oocyst inoculum and 14 days later with the 10(4)-oocyst inoculum). Mean serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the 10(7)-oocyst group were more than twice control values at 5 weeks p.i. and continued to increase over the next 8 weeks. Oocyst doses and alkaline phosphatase levels were positively correlated with hepatobiliary colonization (r = 0.71) and liver necrosis (r = 0.65) at 13 weeks p.i. A strong positive correlation between hepatobiliary colonization and liver necrosis at 13 weeks p.i. (r = 0.87) was observed. PMID:8168930

  6. Cathepsin L Helps to Defend Mice from Infection with Influenza A.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang; Greenland, John R; Gotts, Jeffrey E; Matthay, Michael A; Caughey, George H

    2016-01-01

    Host-derived proteases can augment or help to clear infections. This dichotomy is exemplified by cathepsin L (CTSL), which helps Hendra virus and SARS coronavirus to invade cells, but is essential for survival in mice with mycoplasma pneumonia. The present study tested the hypothesis that CTSL protects mice from serious consequences of infection by the orthomyxovirus influenza A, which is thought to be activated by host-supplied proteases other than CTSL. Ctsl-/- mice infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1) had larger lung viral loads and higher mortality than infected Ctsl+/+ mice. Lung inflammation in surviving infected mice peaked 14 days after initial infection, accompanied marked focal distal airway bronchiolization and epithelial metaplasia followed by desquamation and fibrotic interstitial remodeling, and persisted for at least 6 weeks. Most deaths occurred during the second week of infection in both groups of mice. In contrast to mycoplasma pneumonia, infiltrating cells were predominantly mononuclear rather than polymorphonuclear. The histopathology of lung inflammation and remodeling in survivors was similar in Ctsl-/- and Ctsl+/+ mice, although Ctsl+/+ mice cleared immunoreactive virus sooner. Furthermore, Ctsl-/- mice had profound deficits in CD4+ lymphocytes before and after infection and weaker production of pathogen-specific IgG. Thus, CTSL appears to support innate as well as adaptive responses, which confer a survival advantage on mice infected with the orthomyxovirus influenza A.

  7. Cathepsin L Helps to Defend Mice from Infection with Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Greenland, John R.; Gotts, Jeffrey E.; Matthay, Michael A.; Caughey, George H.

    2016-01-01

    Host-derived proteases can augment or help to clear infections. This dichotomy is exemplified by cathepsin L (CTSL), which helps Hendra virus and SARS coronavirus to invade cells, but is essential for survival in mice with mycoplasma pneumonia. The present study tested the hypothesis that CTSL protects mice from serious consequences of infection by the orthomyxovirus influenza A, which is thought to be activated by host-supplied proteases other than CTSL. Ctsl-/- mice infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1) had larger lung viral loads and higher mortality than infected Ctsl+/+ mice. Lung inflammation in surviving infected mice peaked 14 days after initial infection, accompanied marked focal distal airway bronchiolization and epithelial metaplasia followed by desquamation and fibrotic interstitial remodeling, and persisted for at least 6 weeks. Most deaths occurred during the second week of infection in both groups of mice. In contrast to mycoplasma pneumonia, infiltrating cells were predominantly mononuclear rather than polymorphonuclear. The histopathology of lung inflammation and remodeling in survivors was similar in Ctsl-/- and Ctsl+/+ mice, although Ctsl+/+ mice cleared immunoreactive virus sooner. Furthermore, Ctsl-/- mice had profound deficits in CD4+ lymphocytes before and after infection and weaker production of pathogen-specific IgG. Thus, CTSL appears to support innate as well as adaptive responses, which confer a survival advantage on mice infected with the orthomyxovirus influenza A. PMID:27716790

  8. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia. PMID:27242974

  9. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia.

  10. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. PMID:7201455

  11. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-06-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes.

  12. A Study of the Immunologic Response to Second Heterotypic Bluetongue Virus Infection in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    A STUDY OF THE IMMUNOLOGIC RESPONSE TO SECOND HETEROTYPIC BLUETONGUE VIRUS INFECTION IN MICE A Dissertation by WILLIAM MAX WITT Submitted to the...ABSTRACT U A Study of the Immunologic Response to Second Heterotypic Bluetongue Virus Infection in Mice. (May 1983) William Max Witt, A.A., Cisco Junior...immunoperoxidase staining procedure, for the detection and measurement of serological responses of mice to bluetong,-e virus (BTV) infection and the

  13. Oxidative stress fuels Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Claudia N.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Carneiro, Vitor C.; Freitas, Guilherme B.; Alves, Letícia S.; Mesquita, Jacilene; Fortes, Guilherme B.; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Souza, Heitor S.P.; Fantappié, Marcelo R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage contributes to microbe elimination during macrophage respiratory burst. Nuclear factor, erythroid-derived 2, like 2 (NRF2) orchestrates antioxidant defenses, including the expression of heme-oxygenase–1 (HO-1). Unexpectedly, the activation of NRF2 and HO-1 reduces infection by a number of pathogens, although the mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. We studied Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice in which NRF2/HO-1 was induced with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). CoPP reduced parasitemia and tissue parasitism, while an inhibitor of HO-1 activity increased T. cruzi parasitemia in blood. CoPP-induced effects did not depend on the adaptive immunity, nor were parasites directly targeted. We also found that CoPP reduced macrophage parasitism, which depended on NRF2 expression but not on classical mechanisms such as apoptosis of infected cells, induction of type I IFN, or NO. We found that exogenous expression of NRF2 or HO-1 also reduced macrophage parasitism. Several antioxidants, including NRF2 activators, reduced macrophage parasite burden, while pro-oxidants promoted it. Reducing the intracellular labile iron pool decreased parasitism, and antioxidants increased the expression of ferritin and ferroportin in infected macrophages. Ferrous sulfate reversed the CoPP-induced decrease in macrophage parasite burden and, given in vivo, reversed their protective effects. Our results indicate that oxidative stress contributes to parasite persistence in host tissues and open a new avenue for the development of anti–T. cruzi drugs. PMID:22728935

  14. Hepatitis C Virus Infects Rhesus Macaque Hepatocytes and Simianized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scull, Margaret A.; Shi, Chao; de Jong, Ype P.; Gerold, Gisa; Ries, Moritz; von Schaewen, Markus; Donovan, Bridget M.; Labitt, Rachael N.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Gaska, Jenna M.; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Xiao, Jing W.; Flatley, Brenna; Fung, Canny; Chiriboga, Luis; Walker, Christopher M.; Evans, David T.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    At least 170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Due to the narrow host range of HCV and restricted use of chimpanzees, there is currently no suitable animal model for HCV pathogenesis studies or the development of a HCV vaccine. To identify cellular determinants of interspecies transmission and establish a novel immunocompetent model system, we examined the ability of HCV to infect hepatocytes from a small non-human primate, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We show that the rhesus orthologs of critical HCV entry factors support viral glycoprotein-dependent virion uptake. Primary hepatocytes from rhesus macaques are also permissive for HCV RNA replication and particle production, which is enhanced when antiviral signaling is suppressed. We demonstrate that this may be due to the diminished capacity of HCV to antagonize MAVS-dependent innate cellular defenses. To test the ability of HCV to establish persistent replication in vivo, we engrafted primary rhesus macaque hepatocytes into immunocompromised xenorecipients. Inoculation of resulting simian liver chimeric mice with either HCV genotype 1a or 2a resulted in HCV serum viremia for up to 10 weeks. Conclusion: Together, these data indicate that rhesus macaques may be a viable model for HCV and implicate host immunity as a potential species-specific barrier to HCV infection. We conclude that suppression of host immunity or further viral adaptation may allow robust HCV infection in rhesus macaques and creation of a new animal model for studies of HCV pathogenesis, lentivirus coinfection and vaccine development. PMID:25820364

  15. Anticoccidial activities of Chitosan on Eimeria papillata-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud; Abdel-Haleem, Heba M; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S

    2016-07-01

    Eimeria spp. multiply within the intestinal tract causing severe inflammatory responses. Chitosan (CS), meanwhile, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities in different experimental models. Here, we investigated the effect of CS on the outcome of inflammation caused by Eimeria papillata in the mouse intestine. Investigations were undertaken into the oocyst output in feces and developmental stages and goblet cells in intestinal tissue. Assays for lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were also performed. T cells in intestinal tissue were counted using immunohistochemistry while total IgA in serum or intestinal wash was assayed using ELISA. In addition, mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-4 were detected using real-time PCR. The data indicated a reduction in both oocyst output and in the number of parasite developmental stages following CS treatment, while the goblet cell hypoplasia in infected mice was also inhibited. CS decreased lipid peroxidation, NO, and MPO but did not alter the T cell count or IgA levels in comparison to the infected group. The expression of TNF-α and TGF-β decreased but IL-10 and IL-4 increased after CS treatment in comparison to the non-treated infected group. In conclusion, CS showed anti-inflammatory and protective effects against E. papillata infection.

  16. Spontaneous Hymenolepis nana infection in a breeding colony of nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hauff, P; Arnold, W

    1990-01-01

    The spontaneous occurrence of a parasitic infection with the dwarf tapeworm Hymenolepis nana is nude mice was observed under conventional conditions. Clinical, pathological and histological observations are described.

  17. Sarcocystis neurona infection in gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mice: comparative infectivity of sporocysts in two strains of KO mice, effect of trypsin digestion on merozoite viability, and infectivity of bradyzoites to KO mice and cell culture.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Sundar, N; Kwok, O C H; Saville, W J A

    2013-09-01

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is the primary cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM). EPM or EPM-like illness has been reported in horses, sea otters, and several other mammals. The gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mouse is often used as a model to study biology and discovery of new therapies against S. neurona because it is difficult to induce clinical EPM in other hosts, including horses. In the present study, infectivity of three life cycle stages (merozoites, bradyzoites, sporozoites) to KO mice and cell culture was studied. Two strains of KO mice (C57-black, and BALB/c-derived, referred here as black or white) were inoculated orally graded doses of S. neurona sporocysts; 12 sporocysts were infective to both strains of mice and all infected mice died or became ill within 70 days post-inoculation. Although there was no difference in infectivity of sporocysts to the two strains of KO mice, the disease was more severe in black mice. S. neurona bradyzoites were not infectious to KO mice and cell culture. S. neurona merozoites survived 120 min incubation in 0.25% trypsin, indicating that trypsin digestion can be used to recover S. neurona from tissues of acutely infected animals.

  18. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  19. Bordetella pertussis Infection or Vaccination Substantially Protects Mice against B. bronchiseptica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Xuqing; Harvill, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Although B. bronchiseptica efficiently infects a wide range of mammalian hosts and efficiently spreads among them, it is rarely observed in humans. In contrast to the many other hosts of B. bronchiseptica, humans are host to the apparently specialized pathogen B. pertussis, the great majority having immunity due to vaccination, infection or both. Here we explore whether immunity to B. pertussis protects against B. bronchiseptica infection. In a murine model, either infection or vaccination with B. pertussis induced antibodies that recognized antigens of B. bronchiseptica and protected the lower respiratory tract of mice against three phylogenetically disparate strains of B. bronchiseptica that efficiently infect naïve animals. Furthermore, vaccination with purified B. pertussis-derived pertactin, filamentous hemagglutinin or the human acellular vaccine, Adacel, conferred similar protection against B. bronchiseptica challenge. These data indicate that individual immunity to B. pertussis affects B. bronchiseptica infection, and suggest that the high levels of herd immunity against B. pertussis in humans could explain the lack of observed B. bronchiseptica transmission. This could also explain the apparent association of B. bronchiseptica infections with an immunocompromised state. PMID:19707559

  20. Compensatory T cell responses in IRG-deficient mice prevent sustained Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    PubMed

    Coers, Jörn; Gondek, Dave C; Olive, Andrew J; Rohlfing, Amy; Taylor, Gregory A; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-06-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. In women C. trachomatis can establish persistent genital infections that lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and sterility. In contrast to natural infections in humans, experimentally induced infections with C. trachomatis in mice are rapidly cleared. The cytokine interferon-γ (IFNγ) plays a critical role in the clearance of C. trachomatis infections in mice. Because IFNγ induces an antimicrobial defense system in mice but not in humans that is composed of a large family of Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs), we questioned whether mice deficient in IRG immunity would develop persistent infections with C. trachomatis as observed in human patients. We found that IRG-deficient Irgm1/m3((-/-)) mice transiently develop high bacterial burden post intrauterine infection, but subsequently clear the infection more efficiently than wildtype mice. We show that the delayed but highly effective clearance of intrauterine C. trachomatis infections in Irgm1/m3((-/-)) mice is dependent on an exacerbated CD4(+) T cell response. These findings indicate that the absence of the predominant murine innate effector mechanism restricting C. trachomatis growth inside epithelial cells results in a compensatory adaptive immune response, which is at least in part driven by CD4(+) T cells and prevents the establishment of a persistent infection in mice.

  1. Interleukin-13 is involved in the formation of liver fibrosis in Clonorchis sinensis-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanquan; Liang, Pei; Bian, Meng; Chen, Wenjun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Jinsi; Shang, Mei; Qu, Hongling; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-07-01

    Clonorchiasis is a chronic infection disease often accompanied by formation of liver fibrosis. Previous study has identified that Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs) infection and CsRNASET2 (a member of CsESPs) immunization can drive Th2 immune response. IL-13, a multifunctional Th2 cytokine, has been widely confirmed to be profibrotic mediator. We want to determine whether IL-13 is involved in the generation of liver fibrosis during C. sinensis infection. A part of mice were infected with C. sinensis or immunized with CsRNASET2, respectively. Another part of mice were intravenously injected with rIL-13. Liver tissues of C. sinensis-infected mice were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome, respectively. The transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1 in the livers of infected mice and rIL-13-treated mice were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, splenocytes of C. sinensis-infected and CsRNASET2-immunized mice were isolated, respectively. The levels of IL-13 in splenocytes were detected by ELISA. Our results displayed that the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice had serious chronic inflammation and collagen deposition. The transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1 in the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice were obviously increased. Splenocytes from both C. sinensis-infected and CsRNASET2-immunized mice expressed high levels of IL-13. Moreover, rIL-13 treatment markedly promoted the transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1. These data implied that hepatic fibrosis was formed in the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice, and IL-13 induced by C. sinensis infection and CsRNASET2 immunization might favor this progression.

  2. Sex influence on chronic intestinal inflammation in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Robert S; Myles, Mathew H; Livingston, Beth A; Criley, Jennifer M; Franklin, Craig L

    2004-06-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a bacterial pathogen of mice that has been reported to cause chronic intestinal inflammation in A/JCr, germfree Swiss Webster, and immunodeficient mice. To the authors' knowledge, the influence of sex on development of chronic intestinal inflammation in H. hepaticus-infected mice has not been investigated. The purposes of the study reported here were to determine whether severity of intestinal inflammation differs between male and female A/JCr mice chronically infected with H. hepaticus and to characterize the mucosal immune response in these mice. The cecum of male and female A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus for 1 month and 3 months was objectively evaluated histologically for intestinal disease. Also, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was done to measure interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interferon-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10), and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) mRNA values in the cecal tissue of these mice. Significant differences in cecal lesion scores were not present at 1 month after infection. However, infected female mice had significantly up-regulated expression of cecal IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA compared with that in uninfected females, and expression of IL-10 and MIP-1alpha was significantly greater than that detected in infected male mice (P < or = 0.05). At 3 months after infection, cecal lesion scores were significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased in female and male mice compared with uninfected controls, and infected female mice had significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher cecal lesion scores than did infected male mice. In addition, infected females had significant (P < or = 0.05) increases in cecal IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA values compared with values in uninfected females and infected males

  3. Saccharomyces boulardii reduces infection intensity of mice with toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Dutra, Gisele Ferreira; de los Santos, Diego Gil; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Scaini, Carlos James

    2012-06-08

    Several studies have shown the benefit of the use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of diseases; however, few of them have investigated the effect of probiotics on parasitosis. In this study, the effect of Saccharomyces boulardii on the intensity of infection of mice with toxocariasis was evaluated. The animals were fed with a diet supplemented with S. boulardii for 15 days before inoculation with Toxocara canis eggs and for 2 or 60 days post-inoculation. S. boulardii promoted a reduction of approximately 36% in the average number of recovered T. canis larvae, suggesting that it can be used as an alternative to help control toxocariasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-25

    including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae , Staphylococcusaureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, enterococ----ci, Neissr•~n...97 SAD "Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H" Final Comprehensive Report J. Kenneth McClatchy, Ph.D...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED "TREATMENT OF MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE - Final Comprehensive Report INFECTED MICE WITH WALTER REED COMPOUND H"li G

  5. Participation of platelets in protection against larval Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, T; Ooi, H K; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M

    1996-03-01

    The participation of platelets in the protection against larval Taenia taeniaeformis was studied. CB-17 SCID mice, susceptible to T. taeniaeformis, were protected against a challenge infection with T. taeniaeformis by the passive transfer of platelets from T. taeniaeformis-infected normal CB-17 mice, resistant to T. taeniaeformis.

  6. Immunopathological assessments of human Blastocystis spp. in experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Abdelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Hassanin, Kamel M A; Abdel-Razik, Abdel-Razik H; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis spp., one of the most common parasites colonizing the human intestine, is an extracellular, luminal protozoan with controversial pathogenesis. The host's immune response against Blastocystis spp. infection has also not been defined yet. Therefore, this research aimed to assess the potential pathogenicity of this parasite and its ability to modulate the immune response in experimental infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice. These results demonstrated that the infected immunosuppressed mice were more affected than infected immunocompetent mice. Histopathological examination of the small intestine in the infected immunosuppressed mice showed that Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the layers. Moreover, the epithelia showed exfoliation and inflammatory cell infiltration in submucosa compared to that of the infected immunocompetent mice. As well, examination of the large intestine of the infected immunosuppressed group showed severe goblet cell hyperplasia. Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the large intestine layers compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group. Furthermore, there was a significant upregulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines: interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the infected immunosuppressed mice compared to that of the infected immunocompetent ones (p ≤ 0.004 and p ≤ 0.002, respectively). However, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) was significantly downregulated in the infected immunosuppressed group compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group one at 10 days postinfection (p ≤ 0.002 and p ≤ 0.001, respectively). The results of this study revealed that Blastocystis spp. affected the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups of mice compared to healthy normal (naive) group. Additionally, these data showed that there was a significant upregulation (p ≤ 0.005) of the locally

  7. Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases Protects Mice from Ascending Infection and Chronic Disease Manifestations Resulting from Urogenital Chlamydia muridarum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Muhammad T.; Schripsema, Justin H.; Sigar, Ira M.; Kasimos, John N.; Ramsey, Kyle H.

    2006-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are a family of host-derived enzymes involved in the turnover of extracellular matrix molecules. We have previously reported enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinases in Chlamydia muridarum urogenital tract infection of female mice. Kinetics and patterns of MMP expression as well as enhanced expression in susceptible strains of mice in the prior study implied a role for MMP in pathogenesis. To explore this further, we infected a susceptible strain of mice (C3H/HeN) with C. muridarum and treated two groups of mice with either one of two chemical inhibitors of MMP (MMPi; captopril and a chemically modified tetracycline) and reserved infected sham-treated mice as controls. Neither of the treatments affected shedding of viable chlamydiae from the lower urogenital tract, but the administration of either MMPi protected mice from the formation of hydrosalpinx—a surrogate marker of oviduct occlusion and infertility. Interestingly, the mechanism of protection for mice treated with chemically modified tetracycline 3, appeared to be related to prevention of ascending upper genital tract infection. These results imply that MMP are involved in pathogenesis of chlamydial infection in this model by mediating ascension of the infection into the upper genital tract. PMID:16988226

  8. Immunomodulatory effect of diethylcarbamazine in mice infected with Nocardia brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, M; Castro-Corona, M A; Segoviano-Ramírez, J C; Brattig, N W; Medina-De la Garza, C E

    2014-11-01

    We tested whether diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM), both antiparasitic drugs with reported immunomodulatory properties, were able to affect the immune system to potentiate host defense mechanisms and protect against actinomycetoma in a mouse model. Male BALB/c mice of 10-12 weeks of age were injected with either Nocardia brasiliensis or saline solution. Recorded were the effects of a treatment by DEC (6 mg/kg per os daily for one week) or IVM (200 μg/kg subcutaneously on days 1 and 3) on (i) the development of mycetoma lesion, (ii) the expression of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by phagocytes, (iii) the proliferation index of lymphocytes and (iv) antibody production of IgG and IgM. After an initial lesion in all mice, DEC inhibited a full development and progression of actinomycetoma resulting in a reduced lesion size (p < 0.001). IVM had no inhibitory effect on the development of mycetoma. Furthermore, DEC treatment was associated with a significant enhancement of ROI expression (p < 0.05) by polymorphonuclear neutrophils at day 3 after infection. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to N. brasiliensis antigens and concanavalin A in DEC-treated group was higher than in non-treated group at day 21 and 28 postinfection (p < 0.01). Significant changes in antibody response were not observed. By all parameters tested, DEC was superior to IVM regarding immunostimulatory potency. In conclusion, DEC expressed an in vivo influence on the immune status during the infection by N. brasiliensis leading to retrogression of the mycetoma and increasing cellular immune responses. Our findings may indicate a potential use of DEC as a putative adjuvant in infectious disease or vaccination.

  9. Enhancement of intestinal eosinophilia during Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-03-01

    The ability of Hymenolepis nana oncosphere extract to induce eosinophil chemotactic response was examined in vitro and in vivo. The extract showed a chemotactic activity specific for eosinophils but not for neutrophils. Partially purified eosinophil chemotactic factors (ECFs) from the oncosphere extract showed apparent molecular mass from 5.5 to 9.6kDa and 30 to 40kDa. These were resistant to heating and proteinase K digestion but sensitive to periodate oxidation. Peritoneal injection of the crude extract or partially purified ECFs to mice resulted in a preferential eosinophil infiltration. The chemotactic activity for eosinophils was not separable from the adhesion molecule expression or oxygen radical-inducing activity by means of chromatography or chemical treatments. Furthermore, histological examination demonstrated a marked tissue eosinophilia around H. nana larvae in the intestinal lamina propria of both humoral and cell-mediated immunodeficiency mice. The present findings suggest that H. nana oncosphere-derived molecules facilitate in vivo the intestinal eosinophilia during the infection.

  10. Changes in immunoglobulin levels in zinc-deficient mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, P. A.; Lee, C. M.; Ashraf, M.

    1994-01-01

    A metabolic imbalance technique was used to study the effects of zinc deficiency on immunoglobulin levels in mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi or immunized with parasite products. Zinc-deficient mice developed higher numbers of parasitemia earlier and exhibited prolonged infection. Irrespective of the diet, higher IgG1, IgG2b, and IgM levels, lower IgG2a and IgA levels, and uniform IgG3 levels were exhibited primarily by mice infected with T musculi and to a lesser extent by mice immunized with parasite products. Zinc-deficient mice showed smaller increases in IgG1 and IgM, but larger gains in IgG2b compared with mice on full-complement and pair-fed diets. However, IgG2a decreased significantly in zinc-deficient mice. PMID:7932840

  11. Trypanosoma congolense: Natural and Acquired Resistance in the Bovine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    ONE ANIMAL INFECTED FOR 196 DAYS AND RECIIALLENiED 501 DAYS LATER HAD A PREPATENT PERIOD OF 14 DAYS AS COMPARED TO 5 DAYS FfIR CONTROLS . TlIS ANIMAL...RECHALLENGED FROM 600 TO 900 DAYS LATER, SHOWED SOME RESISTANCE TO INFECTION. PREPATENT PERIODS WERE EXTENDED FROM 1 TO 3 DAYS OVER THOSE OF CONTROL ...IMUNE ANIMALS DID NOT BECOME PATENT WHILE THE OTHER SEVEN DEVELOPED MILD INFEC’IONS WITHOUT SEVERE CLINICAL SIGNS. ALL NINE CONTROLS DEVELOPED SEVERE

  12. Increased mucosal damage during parasite infection in mice fed an elemental diet.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A; Logan, R F; MacDonald, T T

    1980-01-01

    We have examined the effects of parasite infection on the mucosal architecture of mice maintained on an elemental diet (Vivonex). Techniques used were conventional histology, micro-dissection and measurement of individual villi and crypts, and measurement of crypt cell proliferation rate by a metaphase accumulation technique. In normal, non-parasitised mice the elemental diet caused no change in villus height, crypt depth, or crypt cell proliferation. Likewise, the only effects of chronic protozoal infection or Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection on the intestine of mice fed a normal diet have been a slight crypt hypertrophy and an increase in crypt cell proliferation rate without villous atrophy. However, the combination of elemental diet and parasite infection resulted in increased mucosal damage when compared with infected mice on a normal diet. Elemental diet mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis had significantly reduced villus height and correspondingly raised crypt length and metaphase accumulation rate. Elemental diet mice infected with the protozoan Giardia muris did not have villous atrophy but there was a significant increase in crypt length and metaphase accumulation when compared with infected normal diet mice. These experiments show that in two animal models of enteric infection, elemental diet has altered the host parasite relationship to the detriment of the host. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7364318

  13. Helicobacter sp. MIT 01-6451 infection during fetal and neonatal life in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hitoki; Nakanishi, Tai; Takagi, Toshikazu; Ohsawa, Makiko; Kubo, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Takemoto, Takahira; Ohsawa, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter sp. MIT 01-6451 has been detected in SPF mice kept in Japan. To characterize strain MIT 01-6451, its infection route during fetal and neonatal life and effects on pregnancy were investigated using immunocompetent and immunodeficient mouse strains (BALB/c, C57BL/6, and SCID). MIT 01-6451 was detected in the uterus, vagina, and mammary glands of 50% of infected SCID mice, whereas these tissues were all negative in immunocompetent mice. No fetal infections with MIT 01-6451 were detected at 16-18 days after pregnancy in any mouse strain. In newborn mice, MIT 01-6451 was detected in intestinal tissue of C57BL/6 and SCID mice at 9-11 days after birth, but not in BALB/c mice. The IgA and IgG titers to MIT 01-6451 in sera of C57BL/6 female mice were significantly lower than those of BALB/c mice. Although no significant differences in the number of newborns per litter were observed between MIT 01-6451-infected and MIT 01-6451-free dams, the birth rate was lower in infected SCID mice than in control SCID mice. The present results indicated that MIT 01-6451 infects newborn mice after birth rather than by vertical transmission to the fetus via the placenta and that MIT 01-6451 infection shows opportunistically negative effects on the birth rate. In addition, the maternal immune response may affect infection of newborn mice with MIT 01-6451 through breast milk.

  14. Helicobacter sp. MIT 01-6451 infection during fetal and neonatal life in laboratory mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Hitoki; Nakanishi, Tai; Takagi, Toshikazu; Ohsawa, Makiko; Kubo, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Takemoto, Takahira; Ohsawa, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter sp. MIT 01-6451 has been detected in SPF mice kept in Japan. To characterize strain MIT 01-6451, its infection route during fetal and neonatal life and effects on pregnancy were investigated using immunocompetent and immunodeficient mouse strains (BALB/c, C57BL/6, and SCID). MIT 01-6451 was detected in the uterus, vagina, and mammary glands of 50% of infected SCID mice, whereas these tissues were all negative in immunocompetent mice. No fetal infections with MIT 01-6451 were detected at 16–18 days after pregnancy in any mouse strain. In newborn mice, MIT 01-6451 was detected in intestinal tissue of C57BL/6 and SCID mice at 9–11 days after birth, but not in BALB/c mice. The IgA and IgG titers to MIT 01-6451 in sera of C57BL/6 female mice were significantly lower than those of BALB/c mice. Although no significant differences in the number of newborns per litter were observed between MIT 01-6451-infected and MIT 01-6451-free dams, the birth rate was lower in infected SCID mice than in control SCID mice. The present results indicated that MIT 01-6451 infects newborn mice after birth rather than by vertical transmission to the fetus via the placenta and that MIT 01-6451 infection shows opportunistically negative effects on the birth rate. In addition, the maternal immune response may affect infection of newborn mice with MIT 01-6451 through breast milk. PMID:26134357

  15. Toxoplasma gondii: the effects of infection at different stages of pregnancy on the offspring of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Min; Gao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis can cause fetal damage in humans and domestic animals. This study was focused on the effects of Toxoplasma gondii (Prugniaud strain) infection at different stages of pregnancy on the offspring of mice. Results showed that newborn mice from all infected groups were significantly lower in weight than those from the control group but significant difference was not found among these groups at day 60 after birth. The survival rate of the offspring from the group of mice infected at the earlier stage of pregnancy was significantly lower than those of infected and control groups. The positive offspring (with cysts found in their brain tissues) born from the mice infected at the earlier and intermediate stages of pregnancy showed a shorter latency and greater number of errors in the step-through passive avoidance test than those born from the mice infected at the late stage of pregnancy, the control group and the negative offspring from the infected groups. The number of cysts in the brain tissue was significantly higher in the offspring born from the groups of mice infected at the earlier and intermediate stages of pregnancy than those from the group of mice infected at the late stage of pregnancy. In addition, our results indicated that a high congenital transmission rate (90%) occurred in this NIH mouse model. In conclusion, the earlier and intermediate maternal infection of T. gondii can result in severe congenital toxoplasmosis, exhibiting conditions such as stillbirth or non-viability, and learning or memory capability damage in this mouse model. These results not only provide useful data for better understanding the effects of T. gondii infection on the offspring of mice infected at different stages of pregnancy but also for better consideration of the effect of this infection on other mammalian hosts including humans.

  16. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection. PMID:28337193

  17. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection.

  18. Arthritis is developed in Borrelia-primed and -infected mice deficient of interleukin-17.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Joseph; Warner, Thomas F; Munson, Erik L; Nardelli, Dean T; Schell, Ronald F

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been shown to participate in the development of Lyme arthritis in experimental mice. For example, neutralization of IL-17 with antibodies inhibits induction of arthritis in Borrelia-primed and -infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice. We hypothesized that mice lacking IL-17 would fail to develop Borrelia-induced arthritis. IL-17-deficient and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were primed with heat-inactivated Borrelia and then infected with viable spirochetes 3 weeks later. No swelling or major histopathological changes of the hind paws were detected in IL-17-deficient or wild-type mice that were primed with Borrelia or infected with viable spirochetes. By contrast, IL-17-deficient and wild-type mice that were primed and subsequently infected with heterologous Borrelia developed severe swelling and histopathological changes of the hind paws. In addition, Borrelia-primed and -infected IL-17-deficient mice exhibited elevated gamma-interferon (IFN-γ) levels in sera and increased frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing lymphocytes in popliteal lymph nodes compared to Borrelia-primed and -infected wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that IL-17 is not required for development of severe pathology in response to infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, but may contribute to disease through an interaction with IFN-γ. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. DSCG reduces RSV-induced illness in RSV-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koichi; Mori, Syuichi; Hashimoto, Yuko; Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Ishibashi, Kei; Ishioka, Ken; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Peebles, Ray Stokes; Munakata, Mitsuru; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2009-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the pathogens generally associated with the common cold, lower respiratory infection, and exacerbation of asthma. Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) is a safe and widely used drug for the prevention of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis attacks. The effect of DSCG on acute upper respiratory tract viral infections remains controversial. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of DSCG on parameters of RSV induced-illness. Using a well-characterized murine model of RSV infection, the effect of DSCG on RSV-induced illness was evaluated by body weight, respiratory function, viral replication, level of IFN-gamma in lungs, serology, and histopathology. Mice treated with DSCG were protected against RSV-induced weight loss. The baseline Penh in RSV-infected mice treated with DSCG was less than that in mice treated with saline. In methacholine challenge, the increase in Penh in RSV-infected mice treated with DSCG was suppressed to the same level as that in the mock-infected group. Further, there were no differences in viral replication between the mice treated with DSCG and those treated with saline, and the level of inflammation observed in the lungs in RSV-infected mice treated with DSCG was not as severe as that in mice treated with saline. These findings indicate that DSCG may be an effective agent for the prevention of RSV induced disease and the relief of symptoms of RSV infection. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Excessive inflammatory response of cystic fibrosis mice to bronchopulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Heeckeren, A; Walenga, R; Konstan, M W; Bonfield, T; Davis, P B; Ferkol, T

    1997-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), defective function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells and submucosal glands results in chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pulmonary infection incites an intense host inflammatory response, causing progressive suppurative pulmonary disease. Mouse models of CF, however, fail to develop pulmonary disease spontaneously. We examined the effects of bronchopulmonary infection on mice homozygous for the S489X mutation of the CFTR gene using an animal model of chronic Pseudomonas endobronchial infection. Slurries of sterile agarose beads or beads containing a clinical isolate of mucoid P. aeruginosa were instilled in the right lung of normal or CF mice. The mortality of CF mice inoculated with Pseudomonas-laden beads was significantly higher than that of normal animals: 82% of infected CF mice, but only 23% of normal mice, died within 10 d of infection (P = 0.023). The concentration of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-alpha, murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and KC/N51, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in CF mice 3 d after infection and before any mortality, was markedly elevated compared with normal mice. This inflammatory response also correlated with weight loss observed in both CF and normal littermates after inoculation. Thus, this model may permit examination of the relationship of bacterial infections, inflammation, and the cellular and genetic defects in CF. PMID:9389746

  1. Resistance of mice to infection with the human strain of Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    al-Baldawi, F A; Mahdi, N K; Abdul-Hafidh, B A

    1989-06-01

    Six attempts were made to infect mice by feeding them eggs of the human strain of Hymenolepis nana, but none was successful. No eggs were found in the mouse faeces 14 days after feeding, and no adult worms were recovered at post mortem examination. In attempts to induce cysticercoids to infect mice, beetles were either fed on infected human faeces or given Hymenolepis eggs on filter paper. Both methods were unsuccessful, as no cysticercoids were recovered six days after exposure of the beetles.

  2. Cytokine patterns in experimental schistosomiasis mansoni infected mice treated with silymarin.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Fathy, Ghada Mahmoud; Abdel-Rahman, Sara Abdel-Rahman; El-Shafei, Mahmoud Abdel-Atei

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine cytokine patterns in experimental schistosomiasis mansoni infected mice treated with silymarin. The study was conducted upon 100 mice that were divided into five groups; 20 each: uninfected control group, Schistosoma mansoni infected untreated mice (infected control), infected mice treated with praziquantel (PZQ), infected mice treated with silymarin and infected mice treated with both praziquantel and silymarin. 10 mice from each group were sacrificed at 10th and 18th weeks post infection respectively. Histopathological investigations were performed. Liver sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome stain to evaluate changes of granuloma sizes and numbers. Serum levels of the cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-4 and TGF-β1) were assessed in the sera of all groups by immunoassay. The measured levels of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-α, TGF-β1) were found to be significantly increased in infected mice compared to normal control. At the same time, treated groups with silymarin alone or combined with PZQ showed significant decrease in IL-4, TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels compared to infected control. On the other hand, there was a significant increase in IFN-γ level observed in all treated groups compared to infected control. In addition, the histopathological examination of the liver in the group treated with PZQ showed a reduction in the number of livers eggs granuloma at all periods of sacrification compared with the infected untreated group. However, there was more decrease in granulomas diameter in both silymarin treated group or combined with PZQ at all periods of sacrification when compared to infected untreated group. In conclusion; treatment with silymarin combined with PZQ in murine schistosomiasis could reduce hepatic fibrosis by their action on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  3. Lactic dehydrogenase virus infection enhances parasite egg production and inhibits eosinophil and mast cell responses in mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, M; Yamada, M; Arizono, N; Hayashi, T

    1998-01-01

    The effects of lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection on the protective immune responses to the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were studied. Mice with chronic LDV infection showed significantly higher levels of parasite egg production than non-LDV-infected (control) mice after N. brasiliensis infection. Concurrent LDV infection also suppressed peripheral blood eosinophilia and the lung mastocytosis induced by this nematode. LDV infection showed higher expression levels of the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA in lymph nodes compared with control mice before N. brasiliensis infection. In addition, the IgG2a production in LDV-infected mice was higher than that in control mice before and after N. brasiliensis infection. These results suggest that LDV infection modulates protective immune responses against N. brasiliensis infection by the activation of T-helper type 1 cells. PMID:9659227

  4. Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis in murine malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi AS, infected NC mice.

    PubMed

    Yashima, Akihito; Mizuno, Masashi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Shimada, Koki; Suzuki, Norihiko; Tawada, Hideo; Sato, Waichi; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Matsuo, Seiichi; Ohno, Tamio

    2017-08-01

    Malaria is an important tropical disease and has remained a serious health problem in many countries. One of the critical complications of malarial infection is renal injury, such as acute renal failure and chronic glomerulopathy. Few animal models of nephropathy related to malarial infection have been reported. Therefore, we developed and investigated a novel malarial nephropathy model in mice infected by murine malaria parasites. NC mice and C57BL/6J mice were infected with Ttwo different murine malaria parasites, Plasmodium (P.) chabaudi AS and P. yoelii 17X. After the infection, renal pathology and blood and urinary biochemistry were analyzed. NC mice infected by the murine malaria parasite P. chabaudi AS, but not P. yoelii 17X, developed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with endothelial damage, and decreased serum albumin concentration and increased proteinuria. These pathological changes were accompanied by deposition of immunoglobulin G and complement component 3, mainly in the mesangium until day 4 and in the mesangium and glomerular capillaries from day 8. On day 21, renal pathology developed to focal segmental sclerosis according to light microscopy. In C57BL/6J mice, renal injuries were not observed from either parasite infection. The clinical and pathological features of P. chabaudi AS infection in NC mice might be similar to quartan malarial nephropathy resulting from human malaria parasite P. malariae infection. The NC mouse model might therefore be useful in analyzing the underlying mechanisms and developing therapeutic approaches to malaria-related nephropathy.

  5. Effect of the purinergic receptor P2X7 on Chlamydia infection in cervical epithelial cells and vaginally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Darville, Toni; Welter-Stahl, Lynn; Cruz, Cristiane; Sater, Ali Abdul; Andrews, Charles W; Ojcius, David M

    2007-09-15

    Ligation of the purinergic receptor, P2X7R, with its agonist ATP has been previously shown to inhibit intracellular infection by chlamydiae and mycobacteria in macrophages. The effect of P2X7R on chlamydial infection had never been investigated in the preferred target cells of chlamydiae, cervical epithelial cells, nor in vaginally infected mice. In this study, we show that treatment of epithelial cells with P2X7R agonists inhibits partially Chlamydia infection in epithelial cells. Chelation of ATP with magnesium or pretreatment with a P2X7R antagonist blocks the inhibitory effects of ATP. Similarly to previous results obtained with macrophages, ATP-mediated inhibition of infection in epithelial cells requires activation of host-cell phospholipase D. Vaginal infection was also more efficient in P2X7R-deficient mice, which also displayed a higher level of acute inflammation in the endocervix, oviduct, and mesosalpingeal tissues than in infected wild-type mice. However, secretion of IL-1beta, which requires P2X7R ligation during infection by other pathogens, was decreased mildly and only at short times of infection. Taken together, these results suggest that P2X7R affects Chlamydia infection by directly inhibiting infection in epithelial cells, rather than through the ability of P2X7R to modulate IL-1beta secretion.

  6. Dietary lactosucrose suppresses influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    KISHINO, Eriko; TAKEMURA, Naho; MASAKI, Hisaharu; ITO, Tetsuya; NAKAZAWA, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lactosucrose (4G-β-D-galactosylsucrose) on influenza A virus infections in mice. First, the effects of lactosucrose on fermentation in the cecum and on immune function were investigated. In female BALB/c mice, lactosucrose supplementation for 6 weeks promoted cecal fermentation and increased both secretory IgA (SIgA) levels in feces and total IgA and IgG2a concentrations in serum. Both the percentage of CD4+ T cells in Peyer’s patches and the cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer (NK) cells increased significantly in response to lactosucrose. Next, we examined the effects of lactosucrose on low-dose influenza A virus infection in mice. After 2 weeks of dietary supplementation with lactosucrose, the mice were infected with low-dose influenza A virus. At 7 days post infection, a comparison with control mice showed that weight loss was suppressed, as were viral titers in the lungs. In the spleens of lactosucrose-fed mice, there was an increase in the percentage of NK cells. Lastly, mice fed lactosucrose were challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. The survival rate of these mice was significantly higher than that of mice fed a control diet. These results suggested that lactosucrose supplementation suppresses influenza A virus infection by augmenting innate immune responses and enhancing cellular and mucosal immunity. PMID:26594606

  7. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  8. Efficacy of Microencapsulated Rifampin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quenelle, Debra C.; Staas, Jay K.; Winchester, Gary A.; Barrow, Esther L. W.; Barrow, William W.

    1999-01-01

    Rifampin is a first-line drug useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. By using biocompatible polymeric excipients of lactide and glycolide copolymers, two microsphere formulations were developed for targeted and sustained delivery of rifampin, with minimal dosing. A small-microsphere formulation, with demonstrated ability to inhibit intracellularly replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, was tested along with a large-microsphere formulation in an infected mouse model. Results revealed that by using a single treatment of the large-microsphere formulation, it was possible to achieve a significant reduction in M. tuberculosis H37Rv CFUs in the lungs of mice by 26 days postinfection. A combination of small (given as two injections on day 0 and day 7) and large (given as one injection at day 0) rifampin-loaded microsphere formulations resulted in significant reductions in CFUs in the lungs by 26 days, achieving a 1.23 log10 reduction in CFUs. By comparison, oral treatment with 5, 10, or 20 mg of rifampin/kg of body weight, administered every day, resulted in a reduction of 0.42, 1.7, or 1.8 log10 units, respectively. Thus the microsphere formulations, administered in one or two doses, were able to achieve results in mice similar to those obtained with a daily drug regimen within the range of the highest clinically tolerated dosage in humans. These results demonstrate that microsphere formulations of antimycobacterial drugs such as rifampin can be used for therapy of tuberculosis with minimal dosing. PMID:10223927

  9. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  10. Course of Infection with the Emergent Pathogen Brucella microti in Immunocompromised Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, María P.; de Martino, Alba; Quintana, Juan F.; Alcaraz, Ana; Pardo, Julián

    2011-01-01

    A new Brucella species, Brucella microti, has been isolated from wild rodents and found to be pathogenic in mice. The biological relevance of this new mouse pathogen is clear, as it allows us to study Brucella infection in a species-specific model. The course of infection in wild-type (wt) and immunodeficient mice that lack B (Jh), T and B (SCID), or T, B, and NK (SCID.Beige) cells was analyzed over 3 weeks. wt mice completely cleared bacteria from the liver and spleen after that time. However, SCID mice showed a much higher bacterial load in the spleen and liver than wt and Jh mice after 1 week and maintained the same level during the next 2 weeks. All mice tested survived for the 3 weeks. In contrast, the bacterial levels in mice that lacked NK cell activity progressively increased and these mice succumbed to infection after 16 to 18 days. Histopathology analysis of infected mice showed extensive areas of necrotic tissue and thrombosis in liver after 1 week in all infected SCID.Beige mice but were not seen in either SCID or wt animals. These processes were dramatically increased after 21 days, corresponding with the death of SCID.Beige animals. Our results indicate that T and/or B cells are required for the control of infection with the mouse pathogen Brucella microti in liver and spleen but that NK cells are crucial for survival in the absence of B and T cells. In addition, they suggest that controlled granuloma formation is critical to clear this type of infection in wt mice. PMID:21825066

  11. Course of infection with the emergent pathogen Brucella microti in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Jiménez de Bagüés, María P; de Martino, Alba; Quintana, Juan F; Alcaraz, Ana; Pardo, Julián

    2011-10-01

    A new Brucella species, Brucella microti, has been isolated from wild rodents and found to be pathogenic in mice. The biological relevance of this new mouse pathogen is clear, as it allows us to study Brucella infection in a species-specific model. The course of infection in wild-type (wt) and immunodeficient mice that lack B (Jh), T and B (SCID), or T, B, and NK (SCID.Beige) cells was analyzed over 3 weeks. wt mice completely cleared bacteria from the liver and spleen after that time. However, SCID mice showed a much higher bacterial load in the spleen and liver than wt and Jh mice after 1 week and maintained the same level during the next 2 weeks. All mice tested survived for the 3 weeks. In contrast, the bacterial levels in mice that lacked NK cell activity progressively increased and these mice succumbed to infection after 16 to 18 days. Histopathology analysis of infected mice showed extensive areas of necrotic tissue and thrombosis in liver after 1 week in all infected SCID.Beige mice but were not seen in either SCID or wt animals. These processes were dramatically increased after 21 days, corresponding with the death of SCID.Beige animals. Our results indicate that T and/or B cells are required for the control of infection with the mouse pathogen Brucella microti in liver and spleen but that NK cells are crucial for survival in the absence of B and T cells. In addition, they suggest that controlled granuloma formation is critical to clear this type of infection in wt mice.

  12. Naïve B cells reduce fungal dissemination in Cryptococcus neoformans infected Rag1(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Dufaud, Chad; Rivera, Johanna; Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2017-08-24

    IgM and B-1 cell deficient mice exhibit early C. neoformans dissemination from lungs to brain, but a definitive role for B cells in conferring resistance to C. neoformans dissemination has not been established. To address this question, we developed an intranasal (i.n.) C. neoformans infection model in B and T cell deficient Rag1(-/-) mice and found they also exhibit earlier fungal dissemination and higher brain CFU than wild-type C57Bl/6 (wild-type) mice. To probe the effect of B cells on fungal dissemination, Rag1(-/-) mice were given splenic (intravenously) or peritoneal (intraperitoneally) B cells from wild-type mice and infected i.n. with C. neoformans 7 d later. Mice that received B cells had lung histopathology resembling wild type mice 14 d post-infection, and B-1, not B-2 or T cells in their lungs, and serum and lung IgM and IgG 21 d post-infection. Lung CFU were comparable in wild-type, Rag1(-/-,) and Rag1(-/-) mice that received B cells 21 d post-infection, but brain CFU were significantly lower in mice that received B cells than Rag1(-/-) mice that did not. To determine if natural antibody can promote immunity in our model, we measured alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of C. neoformans in Rag1(-/-) mice treated with naive wild-type IgM-sufficient or sIgM(-/-) IgM-deficient sera before infection. Compared to IgM-deficient sera, IgM-sufficient sera significantly increased phagocytosis. Our data establish B cells are able to reduce early C. neoformans dissemination in mice and suggest natural IgM may be a key mediator of early antifungal immunity in the lungs.

  13. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    LESCANO, Susana A. Zevallos; dos SANTOS, Sergio Vieira; ASSIS, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; CHIEFFI, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canisand grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocaraantibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- ToxocaraIgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ. PMID:26422159

  14. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Susana A Zevallos; Santos, Sergio Vieira dos; Assis, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canis and grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocara antibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- Toxocara IgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ.

  15. Macrophages are the determinant of resistance to and outcome of nonlethal Babesia microti infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Cao, Shinuo; Herbas, Maria S; Nishimura, Maki; Li, Yan; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Pyarokhil, Asadullah Hamid; Kondoh, Daisuke; Kitamura, Nobuo; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kato, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Zhou, Jinlin; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the contributions of macrophages to the outcome of infection with Babesia microti, the etiological agent of human and rodent babesiosis, in BALB/c mice. Mice were treated with clodronate liposome at different times during the course of B. microti infection in order to deplete the macrophages. Notably, a depletion of host macrophages at the early and acute phases of infection caused a significant elevation of parasitemia associated with remarkable mortality in the mice. The depletion of macrophages at the resolving and latent phases of infection resulted in an immediate and temporal exacerbation of parasitemia coupled with mortality in mice. Reconstituting clodronate liposome-treated mice at the acute phase of infection with macrophages from naive mice resulted in a slight reduction in parasitemia with improved survival compared to that of mice that received the drug alone. These results indicate that macrophages play a crucial role in the control of and resistance to B. microti infection in mice. Moreover, analyses of host immune responses revealed that macrophage-depleted mice diminished their production of Th1 cell cytokines, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Furthermore, depletion of macrophages at different times exaggerated the pathogenesis of the infection in deficient IFN-γ(-/-) and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Collectively, our data provide important clues about the role of macrophages in the resistance and control of B. microti and imply that the severity of the infection in immunocompromised patients might be due to impairment of macrophage function.

  16. Effect of nematode Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and status of macrophage in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideyuki; Ikeda, Takahide; Kajita, Kazuo; Mori, Ichiro; Hanamoto, Takayuki; Fujioka, Kei; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Usui, Taro; Takahashi, Noriko; Kitada, Yoshihiko; Taguchi, Koichiro; Uno, Yoshihiro; Morita, Hiroyuki; Wu, Zhiliang; Nagano, Isao; Takahashi, Yuzo; Kudo, Takuya; Furuya, Kazuki; Yamada, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and (pro- or anti-inflammatory) macrophage status in adipose tissue. Ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice (obesity model) and C57/BL mice (control mice) were orally infected with (infected group) or without (uninfected group) 400 Trichinella per mouse. Four weeks later, the mice were subjected to investigation, which showed that fasting plasma glucose levels decreased in the infected group of C57/BL and ob/ob mice. Glucose tolerance, evaluated with intraperitoneal GTT, improved in the infected group of ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice compared with the uninfected groups. Additional assay included anti-inflammatory macrophage (M2) markers and pro-inflammatory macrophage (M1) markers, with the aim to explore the effect of Trichinella infection on adipose tissue inflammation, since our previous study identified anti-inflammatory substances in secreted proteins by Trichinella. The result showed that mRNA levels of M2 markers, such as CD206, arginase and IL-10, increased, whereas M1 markers, such as CD11c, iNOS and IL-6, decreased in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) isolated from epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Residential macrophages obtained from the peritoneal lavage exhibited lower M1 markers and higher M2 markers levels in the infected group than in the uninfected group. Trichinella infection increases the ratio of M2/M1 systemically, which results in an improvement in pro-inflammatory state in adipose tissue and amelioration of glucose tolerance in obese mice.

  17. Stage-specific immunity to Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice. A histological study of the course of infection in mice vaccinated with either oncosphere or metacestode antigens.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, H O; Lightowlers, M W; Sullivan, N D; Mitchell, G F; Rickard, M D

    1990-03-01

    The course of Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice previously vaccinated with antigens prepared from either oncosphere (TtO) or metacestode (TtM) was followed by histological examination of livers from mice killed at various times post-infection (p.i.). Distinctly different immune responses occurred in the two groups. Very few cysts were seen at any stage of infection in TtO-vaccinated mice and most of those which were present appeared histologically similar to cysts in control mice. In TtM-vaccinated mice many cysts were present from early in infection but histologically it was apparent that most were dying from 15 days p.i. because the tegument had lost its integrity, and degranulated polymorphonuclear leucocytes were present inside the parasites. These findings support earlier suggestions that stage-specific antigens are expressed in oncospheres and metacestodes. Parasites developing normally were surrounded by a halo of alcian blue staining amorphous acellular material. This material appeared to act as a barrier to attack by host inflammatory cells, and disappearance of this layer signalled death of the parasite. The possibility that the gut acted as a barrier to delay migration of oncospheres to the liver in vaccinated mice was investigated, but no evidence for this could be found.

  18. Persistent hepatitis C virus infections and hepatopathological manifestations in immune-competent humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jizheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Hairong; Feng, Jin; Chi, Xiumei; Pan, Yu; Du, Jun; Guo, Min; Cao, Huang; Chen, Honghe; Wang, Zilong; Pei, Rongjuan; Wang, Qian; Pan, Lei; Niu, Junqi; Chen, Xinwen; Tang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection develops chronic infection, which causes steatosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, understanding HCV chronicity and pathogenesis is hampered by its narrow host range, mostly restricted to human and chimpanzee. Recent endeavour to infect a variety of humanized mice has not been able to achieve persistent HCV infection unless the essential innate immune responsive genes are knocked out. Nevertheless, such immune-compromised humanized mice still lacked HCV infection-induced hepatopathogenesis. Here we report that transgenic mice in ICR background harboring both human CD81 and occludin genes (C/OTg) are permissive to HCV infection at a chronicity rate comparable to humans. In this mouse model, HCV accomplishes its replication cycle, leading to sustained viremia and infectivity for more than 12 months post infection with expected fibrotic and cirrhotic progression. Host factors favorable for HCV replication, and inadequate innate immune-response may contribute to the persistence. Lastly, NS3/4 protease inhibitor telaprevir can effectively inhibit de novo RNA synthesis and acute HCV infection of C/OTg mice. Thus, chronic HCV infection with complete replication cycle and hepatopathologic manifestations is recapitulated, for the first time, in immune-competent mice. This model will open a new venue to study the mechanisms of chronic hepatitis C and develop better treatments. PMID:25155355

  19. Developmental profile of select immune cells in mice infected with Trichinella spiralis during the intestinal phase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trichinella spiralis can cause immunosuppression during the intestinal phase of early infection. However, changes in the peripheral blood during T. spiralis early infection remain unclear. Here, select immune cells in mice infected with 500 muscle larvae (ML) of T. spiralis during the intestinal pha...

  20. Effects of low protein diet and pregnancy on course of Plasmodium berghei infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Rabiu, O R; Arinola, O G; Odaibo, A B; Ademowo, O G

    2012-12-01

    Pregnancy and malnutrition influence the severity or trend of malaria especially in sub-Saharan Africa where parasitic infections are highly predominant. This study was used to evaluate the combined effects of low protein diet and pregnancy on the course of Plasmodium berghei infection in mice. Thirty female BALB/c mice were divided into six groups viz: Non-infected mice fed on normal diet (NIND), Infected mice fed on normal diet (IND), Noninfected mice fed on low protein diet (NILP), Infected mice fed on low protein diet (ILP), Non-infected gravid mice fed on low protein diet (NIGLP) and Gravid infected mice fed on low protein diet (GILP). Malaria parasite count, packed cell volume, body weight and plasma nitric oxide (NO) production were determined. Data were compared statistically across the groups using Student t-test and ANOVA. Parasite detection in peripheral blood was delayed in ILP (day 7) and GILP (day 11) relative to IND (day 3). The peak parasitaemia and mean survival time were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in GILP relative to other infected groups. GILP could not carry the pregnancy to term. Nitric oxide production was observed to increase more rapidly in IND relative to ILP after parasite detection with a peak production by day 15. Mortality commenced in both groups afterwards. Low protein diet delayed the peak production of NO supporting its protective influence on malaria infection. However, the combined effects of low protein diet and pregnancy resulted in early mortality and inability of mice to carry pregnancy to term.

  1. Aspirin treatment of mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and implications for the pathogenesis of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shankar; Machado, Fabiana S; Huang, Huang; Oz, Helieh S; Jelicks, Linda A; Prado, Cibele M; Koba, Wade; Fine, Eugene J; Zhao, Dazhi; Factor, Stephen M; Collado, J Elias; Weiss, Louis M; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Ashton, Anthony W

    2011-02-15

    Chagas disease, caused by infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiovascular disease. It is increasingly clear that parasite-derived prostaglandins potently modulate host response and disease progression. Here, we report that treatment of experimental T. cruzi infection (Brazil strain) beginning 5 days post infection (dpi) with aspirin (ASA) increased mortality (2-fold) and parasitemia (12-fold). However, there were no differences regarding histopathology or cardiac structure or function. Delayed treatment with ASA (20 mg/kg) beginning 60 dpi did not increase parasitemia or mortality but improved ejection fraction. ASA treatment diminished the profile of parasite- and host-derived circulating prostaglandins in infected mice. To distinguish the effects of ASA on the parasite and host bio-synthetic pathways we infected cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) null mice with the Brazil-strain of T. cruzi. Infected COX-1 null mice displayed a reduction in circulating levels of thromboxane (TX)A(2) and prostaglandin (PG)F(2α). Parasitemia was increased in COX-1 null mice compared with parasitemia and mortality in ASA-treated infected mice indicating the effects of ASA on mortality potentially had little to do with inhibition of prostaglandin metabolism. Expression of SOCS-2 was enhanced, and TRAF6 and TNFα reduced, in the spleens of infected ASA-treated mice. Ablation of the initial innate response to infection may cause the increased mortality in ASA-treated mice as the host likely succumbs more quickly without the initiation of the "cytokine storm" during acute infection. We conclude that ASA, through both COX inhibition and other "off-target" effects, modulates the progression of acute and chronic Chagas disease. Thus, eicosanoids present during acute infection may act as immunomodulators aiding the transition to and maintenance of the chronic phase of the disease. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of ASA action may provide clues to the differences

  2. Behavioral perturbation and sleep in healthy and virus-infected inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Rita A; Toth, Linda A

    2014-08-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus (MuGHV) is a natural pathogen of wild rodents that has been studied extensively in terms of host immune responses to herpesviruses during acute infection, latency, and reactivation from latency. Although herpesvirus infections in people can be associated with fatigue and excessive sleepiness during both acute and latent infection, MuGHV has not been assessed extensively as a model for studying the behavioral consequences of chronic latent herpesvirus infections. To assess MuGHV infection as a model for evaluating fatigue and assessing potential mechanisms that underlie the exacerbation of fatigue during chronic viral disease, we evaluated sleep, temperature, and activity after exposure of healthy and latently MuGHV-infected mice to sleep fragmentation and social interaction. Neither treatment nor infection significantly affected temperature. However, at some time points, latently infected mice that underwent sleep fragmentation had less locomotor activity and more slow-wave sleep than did mice exposed to social interaction. In addition, delta-wave amplitude during slow-wave sleep was lower in infected mice exposed to sleep fragmentation compared with uninfected mice exposed to the same treatment. Both reduced locomotor activity and increased time asleep could indicate fatigue in infected mice after sleep fragmentation; reduced delta-wave amplitude during slow-wave sleep indicates a light plane of sleep from which subjects would be aroused easily. Identifying the mechanisms that underlie sleep responses of mice with chronic latent MuGHV infection may increase our understanding of fatigue during infec- tions and eventually contribute to improving the quality of life for people with chronic viral infections.

  3. Effect of route of infection on outcome of Toxoplasma gondii infection in hu-PBL SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Desiree J; Allan, Jane E; Beaman, Miles H

    2013-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) causes serious infection, especially in immunocompromised hosts. The relevance of animal models of toxoplasmosis to human disease is unclear, but have indicated that the route of Toxoplasma infection may affect the outcome. A humanized model of toxoplasmosis of immunocompromised mice (i.e. hu-PBL SCID), using the intraperitoneal (IP) route demonstrated long-term engraftment of human cells and worsening of inflammation compared to controls. In this study, we examined the effect of route of infection on this hu-PBL SCID model using a Toxoplasma strain (i.e. DAG) isolated from an immunocompromised human. Oral infection led to an asymptomatic infection, whereas animals infected by the IP route succumbed more quickly to infection. Human cells, detected through species-specific β-actin mRNA, were not as prominent in IP-infected animals as compared to orally infected and uninfected animals. There was evidence of control of toxoplasmosis in some orally infected animals, and this was associated with the presence of human cells in multiple tissues. Thus, the route of infection dramatically affects the outcome of infection, either by affecting parasite replication or expansion of human immune cells. Further studies of oral Toxoplasma infection using hu-PBL SCID mice may help in developing chemotherapies and immunotherapeutic strategies for toxoplasmosis.

  4. Detection of Corynebacterium bovis infection in athymic nude mice from a research animal facility in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Ju-Hee; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Kyung-Sul; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hak

    2014-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) bovis infection in nude mice causes hyperkeratosis and weight loss and has been reported worldwide but not in Korea. In 2011, nude mice from an animal facility in Korea were found to have white flakes on their dorsal skin. Histopathological testing revealed that the mice had hyperkeratosis and Gram-positive bacteria were found in the skin. We identified isolated bacteria from the skin lesions as C. bovis using PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. bovis infection in nude mice from Korea.

  5. Interleukin-18 Mediates Immune Responses to Campylobacter jejuni Infection in Gnotobiotic Mice.

    PubMed

    Bereswill, Stefan; Alutis, Marie E; Grundmann, Ursula; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2016-01-01

    Human Campylobacter jejuni infections are progressively rising worldwide. Information about the molecular mechanisms underlying campylobacteriosis, however, are limited. In the present study we investigated whether cytokines such as IL-23, IL-22 and IL-18, which share pivotal functions in host immunity, were involved in mediating intestinal and systemic immunopathological responses upon C. jejuni infection. To assure stable infection, gnotobiotic (i.e. secondary abiotic) IL-23p19-/-, IL-22-/- and IL-18-/- mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. Following peroral C. jejuni strain 81-176 infection, mice of all genotypes harbored comparably high pathogenic loads in their intestines. As compared to wildtype controls, however, IL-18-/- mice displayed less distinct C. jejuni induced sequelae as indicated by less pronounced large intestinal shrinkage and lower numbers of apoptotic cells in the colonic epithelial layer at day 8 postinfection (p.i.). Furthermore, lower colonic numbers of adaptive immune cells including regulatory T cells and B lymphocytes were accompanied by less distinct secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF and IFN-γ and lower IL-17A mRNA expression levels in colonic ex vivo biopsies of infected IL-18-/- as compared to wildtype mice. Upon C. jejuni infection, colonic IL-23p19 expression was up-regulated in IL-18-/- mice only, whereas IL-22 mRNA levels were lower in uninfected and infected IL-23p19-/- as well as infected IL-18-/- as compared to respective wildtype control mice. Remarkably, not only intestinal, but also systemic infection-induced immune responses were less pronounced in IL-18-/- mice as indicated by lower TNF, IFN-γ and IL-6 serum levels as compared to wildtype mice. We here show for the first time that IL-18 is essentially involved in mediating C. jejuni infection in the gnotobiotic mouse model. Future studies need to further unravel the underlying regulatory mechanisms orchestrating pathogen

  6. Vitamin E deficiency intensifies the myocardial injury of coxsackievirus B3 infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Beck, M A; Kolbeck, P C; Rohr, L H; Shi, Q; Morris, V C; Levander, O A

    1994-03-01

    Feeding a vitamin E-deficient diet increases pathology in hearts of mice infected with a myocarditic coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3/20). Hearts from infected mice fed a vitamin E-deficient diet rich in highly unsaturated fat (menhaden oil) exhibited more severe pathology than hearts from infected mice fed a vitamin E-deficient diet based largely on saturated fat (lard). Furthermore, a cloned and sequenced amyocarditic coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3/0), which caused little or no pathology in the hearts of vitamin E-supplemented mice, induced extensive cardiac pathology in vitamin E-deficient mice. In infected mice, both mitogen and antigen responses were depressed by vitamin E deficiency, although neutralizing antibody responses were unaffected. Natural killer cell responses were comparable in infected mice fed a lard-based diet with or without supplemented vitamin E. However, a menhaden oil-based diet, whether supplemented with vitamin E or not, significantly depressed natural killer cell activity in infected mice compared with mice fed the lard-based diet. Coxsackievirus B3/0 recovered from the heart of a vitamin E-deficient donor mouse, passaged one time onto HeLa cells, caused significant heart damage when passed back into vitamin E-supplemented recipient mice, demonstrating that the amyocarditic CVB3/0 had changed to a virulent phenotype. Enhanced virulence was also seen with CVB3/20 virus similarly passaged in a vitamin E-deficient donor. Our work demonstrates the important role of host nutritional antioxidant status in determining the severity of certain viral infections.

  7. Pertussis toxin B-oligomer inhibits HIV infection and replication in hu-PBL-SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Caterina; Spada, Massimo; Santini, Stefano M; Racca, Sara; Dorigatti, Fernanda; Poli, Guido; Belardelli, Filippo; Alfano, Massimo

    2005-04-01

    Bordetella pertussis toxin B-oligomer (PTX-B) has been shown to inhibit HIV infection and replication in vitro. The potential anti-viral effect of PTX-B was tested here in an in vivo surrogate model of HIV infection, i.e. SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) (hu-PBL-SCID) and infected with a CCR5-dependent (R5) HIV-1 strain. SCID mice inoculated intra-peritoneal (i.p.) with PTX-B and then infected with the R5 strain SF-162 were sacrificed 7 days later and analyzed for human PBL (hu-PBL) lymphoid tissue reconstitution, infection of hu-PBL, plasma viremia and viral rescue from ex vivo-cultivated i.p. hu-PBL. Unlike mice treated with 500 ng per animal of PTX-B showing no evidence of viral inhibition, daily administration of PTX-B (50 ng per mouse) strongly inhibited virus infection and replication, as determined by undetectable viremia, absence of infected hu-PBL and lack of rescue of infectious HIV in most animals. Furthermore, PTX-B injection 2 h before and twice after infection prevented HIV-1 infection and replication in all (10/10) tested animals. Thus, PTX-B potently inhibited virus infection and replication in hu-PBL-SCID mice, supporting the hypothesis that it may represent a new pharmacological agent against HIV-1 infection.

  8. Increased susceptibility of IgA-deficient mice to pulmonary Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain infection.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoichi; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S; Roberts, Sean; Metzger, Dennis W

    2013-09-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is most deadly in the pneumonic form; therefore, mucosal immunity is an important first line of defense against this pathogen. We have now evaluated the lethality of primary F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) pulmonary infection in mice that are defective in IgA (IgA(-/-) mice), the predominant mucosal Ig isotype. The results showed that IgA(-/-) mice were more susceptible than IgA(+/+) mice to intranasal F. tularensis LVS infection, despite developing higher levels of LVS-specific total, IgG, and IgM antibodies in the bronchoalveolar lavage specimens following infection. In addition, the absence of IgA resulted in a significant increase in bacterial loads and reduced survival. Interestingly, IgA(-/-) mice had lower pulmonary gamma interferon (IFN-γ) levels and decreased numbers of IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the lung on day 9 postinfection compared to IgA(+/+) mice. Furthermore, IgA(-/-) mice displayed reduced interleukin 12 (IL-12) levels at early time points, and supplementing IgA(-/-) mice with IL-12 prior to LVS challenge induced IFN-γ production by NK cells and rescued them from mortality. Thus, IgA(-/-) mice are highly susceptible to primary pulmonary LVS infections not only because of IgA deficiency but also because of reduced IFN-γ responses.

  9. Respiratory Influenza Virus Infection Induces Memory-like Liver NK Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yanshi; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    Although NK cells are classified as innate immune cells, recent studies have demonstrated the transformation of NK cells into long-lived memory cells that contribute to secondary immune responses in certain mouse models. However, whether NK cells mount an Ag-specific memory response to acute influenza virus infection has not yet been examined. Here, we show that, consistent with previous studies, lung NK cells play an important role in controlling viral proliferation after primary influenza virus infection. However, although lung NK cells display a memory phenotype at the late stage of infection, these cells do not protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Interestingly, liver NK cells from influenza virus-infected mice possess a memory phenotype and protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Memory-like liver NK cells display a CD49a(+)DX5(-) phenotype, and the adoptive transfer of purified liver CD49a(+)DX5(-) NK cells into naive mice followed by viral infection results in protective immunity and decreased viral titer. Moreover, we demonstrate that primary inactivated influenza virus induces memory NK cells residing in the liver of Rag1(-/-) mice. Collectively, these data suggest that liver CD49a(+)DX5(-) NK cells remember encountered Ag from influenza virus after primary infection and are more protective upon subsequent infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Factors associated with the risk of Giardia species infection in two sympatric species of Peromyscus mice.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Peter E; Wade, Susan E; Oliver, Joanne; Schaaf, Stephanie L; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2009-10-01

    An epidemiologic case-control study was conducted to identify factors that predispose Peromyscus spp. to the risk of infection with Giardia sp. in watersheds. A total of 200 Giardia sp.-positive mice (cases) and a similar number of Giardia sp.-negative mice (controls) were selected from a population 2,528 mice captured in a watershed in southeastern New York State. The Giardia sp. infection status of the mice was determined by centrifugation concentration flotation and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mice were later classified into 2 species, Peromyscus maniculatus and P. leucopus, using cellulose acetate electrophoresis of individual saliva samples. The risk of infection was evaluated while controlling for indigenous factors (age and sex) and exogenous factors (habitat and land use) that were hypothesized to influence the likelihood of infection with Giardia sp. The study population consisted of 257 (59%) P. leucopus and 165 (41%) P. maniculatus. Peromyscus leucopus mice were at a higher risk of becoming infected with Giardia in comparison to P. maniculatus (adjusted odds ratio = 40). The risk of Giardia sp. infection varied with the age of the animals, since adult animals were at higher risk than juvenile animals. This study suggested a difference in susceptibility to Giardia sp. between different species of mice.

  11. Helminth infections predispose mice to pneumococcal pneumonia but not to other pneumonic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Thomas, Paul G; Kuhn, Raymond E; Herbert, De'Broski R; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-10-01

    Pneumonia is the leading killer of children worldwide. Here, we report that helminth-infected mice develop fatal pneumonia when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mice were chronically infected with either the flatworm Taenia crassiceps or the roundworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus. Upon challenge with a pneumonic type 3 strain of S. pneumoniae (A66.1), the worm-infected mice developed pneumonia at a rate and to a degree higher than age-matched control mice as measured by bioluminescent imaging and lung titers. This predisposition to pneumonia appears to be specific to S. pneumoniae, as worm-infected mice did not show evidence of increased morbidity when challenged with a lethal dose of influenza virus or sublethal doses of Staphylococcus aureus or Listeria monocytogenes. The defect was also present when worm-infected mice were challenged with a type 2 sepsis-causing strain (D39); an increased rate of pneumonia, decreased survival, and increased lung and blood titers were found. Pneumococcal colonization and immunity against acute otitis media were unaffected. Anti-helminthic treatment in the H. polygyrus model reversed this susceptibility. We conclude that helminth coinfection predisposes mice to fatal pneumococcal pneumonia by promoting increased outgrowth of bacteria in the lungs and blood. These data have broad implications for the prevention and treatment for pneumonia in the developing world, where helminth infections are endemic and pneumococcal pneumonia is common.

  12. Nramp1 Is Not a Major Determinant in the Control of Brucella melitensis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guilloteau, Laurence A.; Dornand, Jacques; Gross, Antoine; Olivier, Michel; Cortade, Fabienne; Vern, Yves Le; Kerboeuf, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in animals and humans, can survive and proliferate within macrophages. Macrophages mediate mouse resistance to various pathogens through the expression of the Nramp1 gene. The role of this gene in the control of Brucella infection was investigated. When BALB/c mice (Nramp1s) and C.CB congenic mice (Nramp1r) were infected with Brucella melitensis, the number of Brucella organisms per spleen was significantly larger in the C.CB mice than in the BALB/c mice during the first week postinfection (p.i.). This Nramp1-linked susceptibility to Brucella was temporary, since similar numbers of Brucella were recovered from the two strains of mice 2 weeks p.i. The effect of Nramp1 expression occurred within splenocytes intracellularly infected by Brucella. However, there was no difference between in vitro replication rates of Brucella in macrophages isolated from the two strains of mice infected in vivo or in Nramp1 RAW264 transfectants. In mice, infection with Brucella induced an inflammatory response, resulting in splenomegaly and recruitment of phagocytes in the spleen, which was amplified in C.CB mice. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), performed 5 days p.i., showed that inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-12 p40 (IL-12p40), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-10 mRNAs were similarly induced in spleens of the two strains. In contrast, the mRNA of KC, a C-X-C chemokine, was induced only in infected C.CB mice at this time. This pattern of mRNA expression was maintained at 14 days p.i., with IFN-γ and IL-12p40 mRNAs being more intensively induced in the infected C.CB mice, but TNF-α mRNA was no longer induced. The higher recruitment of neutrophils observed in the spleens of infected C.CB mice could explain the temporary susceptibility of C.CB mice to B. melitensis infection. In contrast to infections with Salmonella, Leishmania, and Mycobacterium, the expression of the Nramp1 gene

  13. Wound infection kinetics probed by MALDI-MS: rapid profiling of Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Jayaram Lakshmaiah; Gopal, Judy; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2012-07-21

    Using direct matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), we were able to investigate the role of the clinically important bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, in wound infections using mice. The infection kinetics of S. aureus at the wound site and the host immune response has been investigated using MALDI-MS. In this study, for the first time, we report the growth pattern of S. aureus infection at a wound site. Using mice wound infection models; the following study fingerprints the bacterial-host (mice) response at the wound site as a function of increasing wound infection in order to establish the infection pattern of Staphylococcus aureus in wounds. The current approach is extremely simple, rapid, highly selective, sensitive and established MALDI-MS as a versatile tool for detecting bacteria in clinical samples, such as those collected from wound sites.

  14. Scrapie infection can be established readily through skin scarification in immunocompetent but not immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D M; McConnell, I; Fraser, H

    1996-07-01

    Scarification of the skin is a possible route of entry for scrapie infectivity in sheep, and for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent in humans within the context of occupational exposure to infected brain in the autopsy room or laboratory. The effectiveness of skin scarification routes as portals of entry for infectivity had not previously been tested experimentally but this study has shown that these are efficient routes for establishing infection in mice using the 139A and ME7 strains of scrapie agent. Scarification had much the same efficiency as inoculation by the intraperitoneal, intravenous or perivenous routes but was not effective in immunocompromised (SCID) mice. It was concluded that replication of infectivity within the lymphoreticular system, which is precluded in SCID mice, is a necessary prerequisite for the development of infection in the central nervous system following inoculation via scarification.

  15. Mucosal vaccine made from live, recombinant Lactococcus lactis protects mice against pharyngeal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Mannam, Praveen; Jones, Kevin F; Geller, Bruce L

    2004-06-01

    A novel vaccine (LL-CRR) made from live, nonpathogenic Lactococcus lactis that expresses the conserved C-repeat region (CRR) of M protein from Streptococcus pyogenes serotype 6 was tested in mice. Nasally vaccinated mice produced CRR-specific salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) and serum IgG. Subcutaneously vaccinated mice produced CRR-specific serum IgG but not salivary IgA. A combined regimen produced responses similar to the salivary IgA of nasally vaccinated mice and serum IgG of subcutaneously vaccinated mice. Mice vaccinated nasally or with the combined regimen were significantly protected against pharyngeal infection following a nasal challenge with S. pyogenes M serotype 14. Mice vaccinated subcutaneously were not protected against pharyngeal infection. Mice in all three LL-CRR vaccination groups were significantly protected against the lethal effects of S. pyogenes. Only 1 of 77 challenged mice that were vaccinated with LL-CRR died, whereas 60 of 118 challenged mice that were vaccinated with a control strain or phosphate-buffered saline died. In conclusion, mucosal vaccination with LL-CRR produced CRR-specific salivary IgA and serum IgG, prevented pharyngeal infection with S. pyogenes, and promoted survival.

  16. Infection with the Lyme disease pathogen suppresses innate immunity in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Javid, Ashkan; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Eshghi, Azad; Tang, Tian Tian; Arya, Anoop; Bansal, Anil; Matar, Fatima; Parikh, Maitry; Ebady, Rhodaba; Koh, Adeline; Gupta, Nupur; Song, Peng; Zhang, Yang; Newbigging, Susan; Wormser, Gary P; Schwartz, Ira; Inman, Robert; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a major global public health concern. Immune responses implicated in obesity also control certain infections. We investigated the effects of high-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) on infection with the Lyme disease bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi in mice. DIO was associated with systemic suppression of neutrophil- and macrophage-based innate immune responses. These included bacterial uptake and cytokine production, and systemic, progressive impairment of bacterial clearance, and increased carditis severity. B. burgdorferi-infected mice fed normal diet also gained weight at the same rate as uninfected mice fed high-fat diet, toll-like receptor 4 deficiency rescued bacterial clearance defects, which greater in female than male mice, and killing of an unrelated bacterium (Escherichia coli) by bone marrow-derived macrophages from obese, B. burgdorferi-infected mice was also affected. Importantly, innate immune suppression increased with infection duration and depended on cooperative and synergistic interactions between DIO and B. burgdorferi infection. Thus, obesity and B. burgdorferi infection cooperatively and progressively suppressed innate immunity in mice. © 2016 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Infection with the Lyme disease pathogen suppresses innate immunity in mice with diet‐induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Javid, Ashkan; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Eshghi, Azad; Tang, Tian Tian; Arya, Anoop; Bansal, Anil; Matar, Fatima; Parikh, Maitry; Ebady, Rhodaba; Koh, Adeline; Gupta, Nupur; Song, Peng; Zhang, Yang; Newbigging, Susan; Wormser, Gary P.; Schwartz, Ira; Inman, Robert; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is a major global public health concern. Immune responses implicated in obesity also control certain infections. We investigated the effects of high‐fat diet‐induced obesity (DIO) on infection with the Lyme disease bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi in mice. DIO was associated with systemic suppression of neutrophil‐ and macrophage‐based innate immune responses. These included bacterial uptake and cytokine production, and systemic, progressive impairment of bacterial clearance, and increased carditis severity. B. burgdorferi‐infected mice fed normal diet also gained weight at the same rate as uninfected mice fed high‐fat diet, toll‐like receptor 4 deficiency rescued bacterial clearance defects, which greater in female than male mice, and killing of an unrelated bacterium (Escherichia coli) by bone marrow‐derived macrophages from obese, B. burgdorferi‐infected mice was also affected. Importantly, innate immune suppression increased with infection duration and depended on cooperative and synergistic interactions between DIO and B. burgdorferi infection. Thus, obesity and B. burgdorferi infection cooperatively and progressively suppressed innate immunity in mice. PMID:27794208

  18. Dermal mast cells reduce progressive tissue necrosis caused by subcutaneous infection with Streptococcus pyogenes in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Sekiya, Yukie; Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Imanishi, Ken'ichi; Yoshida, Haruno; Murayama, Somay Yamagata; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuchimoto, Kanji; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2011-01-01

    A single subcutaneous (s.c.) infection with 1×10(7) c.f.u. GAS472, a group A streptococcus (GAS) serotype M1 strain isolated from the blood of a patient suffering from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, led to severe damage of striated muscle layers in the feet of mast cell (MC)-deficient WBB6F(1)-Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) (W/W(v)) mice 72 h after infection. In contrast, no damage was recognized in striated muscle layers in the feet of the control WBB6F(1)-Kit(+/+) (+/+) mice 72 h after infection. In addition, adoptively transferred MCs reduced progressive tissue necrosis of the feet of W/W(v) mice after infection. However, there was no significant difference in the mortality rates between the W/W(v) and +/+ mice, or between the human CD46-expressing transgenic (Tg) mouse bone marrow-derived cultured MC-reconstituted W/W(v) and non-Tg mouse bone marrow-derived cultured MC-reconstituted W/W(v) mice after infection. Consequently, although MCs can help to reduce the severity of necrosis of the feet caused by s.c. infection with GAS472, such reduction of tissue necrosis scarcely improves the mortality rates of these mice. Moreover, human CD46 does not play a crucial role in the MC-mediated innate immune defence against GAS infection.

  19. Co-infection with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei increases severity of malaria and trypanosomiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ademola, Isaiah Oluwafemi; Odeniran, Paul Olalekan

    2016-07-01

    Individuals in natural populations may be infected with multiple different parasites at a time. These parasites may interact with each other or act independently in the host, and this may result to varying outcomes on host health and survival. This study therefore aimed at investigating the health impact of co-infection of mice with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei. Forty Swiss albino mice (14-17g) were divided into four groups of ten. Mice in groups A and B received 10(6)P. berghei and groups B and C 10(5)T. brucei, while group D were uninfected. The co-infected mice had higher P. berghei and T. brucei parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice. The co-infected mice had significantly (p<0.05) lower survival rate compared with the mono-infected mice. Co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei resulted in rapid P. berghei and T. brucei development and increased parasitaemia. The leukocyte numbers significantly (p<0.05) reduced on days 12 and 15 post infection among P. berghei infected mice, in the presence or absence of T. brucei. Anaemia and hypoglycaemia was more severe in the co-infected mice. Therefore, co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei may increase pathologic impact to the host by increasing parasitaemia.

  20. Immune responses in mice against herpes simplex virus: mechanisms of protection against facial and ganglionic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Zweerink, H J; Martinez, D; Lynch, R J; Stanton, L W

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments with mice to determine the nature of the immune response(s) that prevents primary infections of the skin and the trigeminal ganglia with herpes simplex virus. Immunization with infectious herpes simplex virus, inactivated virus, or material enriched for viral glycoproteins protected hairless mice against primary facial and ganglionic infections. Live and inactivated viruses induced neutralizing antibodies, whereas glycoprotein material did not. Instead, glycoprotein material induced antibodies that were largely directed against two glycopolypeptides with molecular weights of 120,000 to 130,000. Hairless mice immunized with glycoprotein material responded faster than control mice in the synthesis of neutralizing antibodies after challenge with infectious virus. Congenital athymic BALB/c (nu/nu) mice were protected against primary facial infections after immunization with glycoprotein material, but glycoprotein-specific antibodies were not induced. Images PMID:6260662

  1. Protection of mice from infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae by anti-phosphocholine antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Yother, J; Forman, C; Gray, B M; Briles, D E

    1982-01-01

    Anti-phosphocholine (PC) antibody mediated protection against many strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, and hybridoma anti-PC antibodies protected mice from fatal infections with types 1 and 3 S. pneumoniae. Live types 1, 3, 5, 6A, and 19F S. pneumoniae had similar amounts of surface PC accessible to antibody. Furthermore, mice expressing the X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) of the CBA/N strain were found to be more susceptible to infection with S. pneumoniae of types 3, 6A, and 19F than were immunologically normal mice. The only exception to these results was with the type 5 strain, which was highly virulent for both xid and normal mice. In addition, we were unable to protect mice against infection with the type 5 strain by using anti-PC antibody. PMID:7076292

  2. Diphenyl diselenide modulates nucleotidases, reducing inflammatory responses in the liver of Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Doleski, Pedro H; Leal, Daniela B R; Machado, Vanessa S; Bottari, Nathieli B; Manzoni, Alessandra G; Casali, Emerson A; Moritz, Cesar E J; Rocha, Ana C A; Camillo, Giovana; Vogel, Fernanda F; Stefani, Lenita M; Mendes, Ricardo E; da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer

    2017-08-16

    The aim of this study was to verify the effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 on hepatic nucleotidases and on the concentration of purines in mice infected by Toxoplasma gondii. The animals were divided into four groups: Group A (uninfected), Group B (uninfected and treated with (PhSe)2), Group C (infected), and Group D (infected and treated with (PhSe)2). The inoculation (groups C and D) was performed with 50 cysts of T. gondii (ME-49 strain). Mice from groups B and D were treated with 5 μmol kg(-1) of (PhSe)2. Liver tissue from infected mice showed less severe inflammation, elevated ATP/ADO ratio, elevated NTPDase, 5'nucleotidase, and ADA activities compared to the uninfected group (Group A; P < 0.05). However, infected and treated mice showed decreased ATP levels and elevated ADO levels, as well as higher NTPDase and 5'nucleotidase activities and decreased ADA activity in the hepatic tissue compared to the infected group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the (PhSe)2 treatment of infected mice reduced the hepatic inflammation and showed an immunomodulatory effect on ectonucleotidases of hepatic lymphocytes, which it returned to basal levels. Therefore, chronic infection by T. gondii induces hepatic inflammation in mice, and it is possible that purine levels and nucleotidase activities in hepatic tissue are related to the pathogenesis of the infection in this tissue. The treatment with (PhSe)2 was able to reverse the hepatic inflammation in mice chronically infected, possibly due to the modulation of purinergic enzymes that produce an anti-inflammatory profile through the purinergic system in the liver tissue.

  3. Effects of muramyl dipeptide treatment on resistance to infection with Toxoplasma gondii in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, J L; Sharma, S D; Ferraresi, R W; Remington, J S

    1981-01-01

    Studies were carried out to determine whether treatment of mice with the synthetic adjuvant muramyl dipeptide afforded any resistance to infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. Marked resistance to lethal challenge infection was observed in CBA but not C57BL/6 mice pretreated with muramyl dipeptide. In CBA mice, a single muramyl dipeptide treatment administered 14, 7, or 4 days before Toxoplasma challenge did not afford protection, whereas mice treated at -1 day were highly resistant. Additional studies carried out to investigate the mechanisms underlying the enhanced resistance to Toxoplasma in muramyl dipeptide-treated mice failed to reveal either enhanced cytolytic antibodies to the parasite or evidence that peritoneal macrophages from treated mice were activated as determined in vitro by their microbicidal capacity for Toxoplasma or cytotoxic capacity for tumor target cells. PMID:7216470

  4. Effects of toltrazuril and ponazuril on Hammondia heydorni (syn. Neospora caninum) infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Darius, Anne Kathrin; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Heydorn, Alfred Otto

    2004-04-01

    Mice infected with tachyzoites of Neospora caninum (syn.: Hammondia heydorni) must be pretreated with cortisone in order to show disease symptoms. This indicates the status of an opportunistic agent of disease. Toltrazuril was an effective curative agent.

  5. Parainfluenza Virus Sendai Infection in Macrophages, Ependyma, Choroid Plexus, Vascular Endothelium and Respiratory Tract of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mims, Cedric A.; Murphy, Frederick A.

    1973-01-01

    Immunofluorescent observations showed that after intranasal instillation of parainfluenza 1 (Sendai) virus into adult mice, infection is confined to the epithelial lining of the larger airways. Alveolar macrophages were not significantly involved, although they could be infected in vitro. In suckling mice, the infection was more acutely lethal and extended into the terminal air spaces. The intranasal susceptibility of adult mice was not reproducibly affected by treatment with potent antithymocyte serum, and there were no obvious pathogenic effects when heterologous antiserum was instilled intranasally into infected mice. Peritoneal macrophages were infected by intraperitoneally injected Sendai virus, with production of a highly viscous peritoneal exudate. Kupffer cells of the liver and endothelial cells in large veins and auricles were infected by intravenously injected virus. When injected intracerebrally, Sendai virus infected ependyma and choroid plexus epithelium. Adult mice often survived, in spite of ependymal destruction and changes in ventricular morphology. Astrocytes were activated but not infected. ImagesFig 9Fig 10Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8 PMID:4347621

  6. Evaluation of Nitrofurantoin Combination Therapy of Metronidazole-Sensitive and -Resistant Helicobacter pylori Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jenks, Peter J.; Ferrero, Richard L.; Tankovic, Jacques; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Labigne, Agnès

    2000-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine whether the nitroreductase enzyme encoded by the rdxA gene of Helicobacter pylori was responsible for reductive activation of nitrofurantoin and whether a triple-therapy regimen with nitrofurantoin was able to eradicate metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori infections from mice. The susceptibilities to nitrofurantoin of parent and isogenic rdxA mutant strains (three pairs), as well as a series of matched metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant strains isolated from mice (30) and patients (20), were assessed by agar dilution determination of the MIC. Groups of mice colonized with the metronidazole-sensitive H. pylori SS1 strain or a metronidazole-resistant rdxA SS1 mutant were treated with either metronidazole or nitrofurantoin as part of a triple-therapy regimen. One month after the completion of treatment the mice were sacrificed and their stomachs were cultured for H. pylori. The nitrofurantoin MICs for all strains tested were between 0.5 and 4.0 μg/ml. There was no significant difference between the susceptibility to nitrofurantoin of the parental strains and those of respective rdxA mutants or between those of matched metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori isolates. The regimen with metronidazole eradicated infection from all eight SS1-infected mice and from one of eight mice inoculated with the rdxA mutant (P ≤ 0.001). The regimen with nitrofurantoin failed to eradicate infection from any of the six SS1-infected mice (P ≤ 0.001) and cleared infection from one of seven mice inoculated with the rdxA mutant. These results demonstrate that, despite the good in vitro activity of nitrofurantoin against H. pylori and the lack of cross-resistance between metronidazole and nitrofurantoin, eradication regimens involving nitrofurantoin are unable to eradicate either metronidazole-sensitive or -resistant H. pylori infections from mice. PMID:10991835

  7. Activity of Clarithromycin or Rifampin Alone or in Combination against Experimental Rhodococcus equi Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Alexandra J.; Berghaus, Londa J.; Hondalus, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of mice with the combination of clarithromycin with rifampin resulted in a significantly lower number of Rhodococcus equi CFU in the organs of mice than treatment with either drug alone or placebo. There was no significant difference in the number of R. equi CFU between mice treated with clarithromycin monotherapy, rifampin monotherapy, or placebo. The combination of clarithromycin with rifampin conferred a clear advantage over either drug as monotherapy in this model of chronic R. equi infection. PMID:25824218

  8. Susceptibility of immunodeficient mice to aerosol and systemic infection with virulent strains of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wangxue; KuoLee, Rhonda; Shen, Hua; Conlan, J Wayne

    2004-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and NOS-2, but not B cells, are crucial for host defense against primary systemic infection with the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. In this study, we examined the importance of these and additional immune components in host resistance against infection with virulent strains of F. tularensis initiated by systemic and airborne routes. Wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient in IFN-gamma, TNFR1R2, NOS-2, or B cells were equally susceptible to low dose ( approximately 10 colony forming units) aerosol or intradermal challenge with virulent type B F. tularensis, and succumbed to the infection between days 6 and 8 post-inoculation. Quantitative bacteriology showed that IFN-gamma-/- and B cell-/- mice consistently harbored up to one log(10) more bacteria in their lungs, spleens and livers than WT mice at day 5 post aerosol exposure. Surprisingly, however, compared to other strains of KO mice and WT control mice, IFN-gamma-/- mice showed only mild liver damage as assessed by histopathology and liver function tests. Additional experiments established that even mice with broad immunodeficiency (SCID, neutropenic, splenectomized or thymectomized mice and mice treated with corticosteroid) were no more susceptible to aerosol-initiated infection with virulent type B or type A F. tularensis than immunosufficient control mice. Combined, our results indicate that, unlike LVS, normal type A and type B F. tularensis strains are so extremely virulent that even immunocompetent mice are virtually defenseless to low dose aerosol and intradermal challenges with them.

  9. Virulence Alterations of Tacaribe Virus Infection in Adult Mice: Lethal Model for Fatal Encephalitis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-29

    Selection of lethal substrains of Tacaribe virus strain 11573 was done by successive serial intracerebral (I.c.) passage of the virus in adult mice...calculation of median intracerebral lethal dose values, and by histopathologic changes observed in brains of adult mice. Some of the derived virus substrains...declined with subsequent passages. Clinical signs of infection in adult mice were manifested by a rough hair-coat, ventriflexed posture, diminished

  10. Trypanosoma musculi Infections in Normocomplementemic, C5-Deficient, and C3-Depleted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jarvinen, Julie A.; Dalmasso, Agustin P.

    1977-01-01

    The role of complement in host resistance to infection with Trypanosoma musculi was studied in normal, C5-deficient, and C3-depleted mice. Infections in normocomplementemic strains (CBA and B10.D2/n) were generally similar to those in strains genetically deficient in C5 (A and B10.D2/o). There were no differences in inhibition of reproduction, duration of infection, persistence of parasites in the kidneys, or resistance to reinfection. However, peak parasitemias in B10.D2/o mice were slightly greater than in B10.D2/n mice. In addition, B10.D2/o mice had slightly decreased serum levels of C1 early in the course of infection and of C3 early during the elimination of adult forms. These components were unchanged or increased in infections of B10.D2/n. Depletion of C3 and late-acting components in B10.D2/n mice by treatment with cobra venom factor during the reproductive stage of infection resulted in an increase of reproductive forms before the apparent development of ablastic immunity as well as slightly greater peak parasitemias when compared with those of untreated controls. Cobra venom factor treatment of B10.D2/o mice during the reproductive stage did not alter the course of infection. Cobra venom factor treatment of C3H mice during the adult stage prolonged infections by interfering with parasite elimination. It is concluded that complement-mediated lysis is not involved in control of T. musculi. It is not clear whether a C3-dependent function such as phagocytosis may facilitate elimination of the parasites. The major difference in degree of parasitemias among the various strains of mice studied is due to genetic factors rather than the levels of C3, C5, or late-acting complement components. PMID:863515

  11. Dynamics of antibody production in mice infected with Toxascaris leonina Linstow, 1909.

    PubMed

    Figallová, V; Prokopic, J

    1990-01-01

    Using counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA tests the dynamics of antibody production in serum of mice experimentally infected with Toxascaris leonina was studied. The production of antibodies using both tests has already been detectable in serum of mice from 7 days post infection (DPI) and their level persisted till the end of the experiment, i.e. till 77 DPI. The most positive were reactions of sera with Antigens 1 and 3.

  12. Impact of Benznidazole on Infection Course in Mice Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi I, II, and IV

    PubMed Central

    Gruendling, Ana Paula; Massago, Miyoko; Teston, Ana Paula M.; Monteiro, Wuelton M.; Kaneshima, Edilson N.; Araújo, Silvana M.; Gomes, Mônica L.; Barbosa, Maria das Graças V.; Toledo, Max Jean O.

    2015-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis is an emerging zoonosis in the Brazilian Amazon. Studies on benznidazole (BZ) chemotherapy with Trypanosoma cruzi from this region have great relevance, given the different discrete typing units (DTUs) that infect humans in the Amazon and other regions of Brazil. We performed a parasitological, histopathological, and molecular analysis of mice inoculated with strains of T. cruzi I, II, and IV that were BZ-treated during the acute phase of infection. Groups of Swiss mice were inoculated; 13 received oral BZ, whereas the other 13 comprised the untreated controls. Unlike parasitemia, the infectivity and mortality did not vary among the DTUs. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in all tissues analyzed and the proportion of organs parasitized varied with the parasite DTU. The BZ treatment reduced the most parasitological parameters, tissue parasitism and the inflammatory processes at all infection stages and for all DTUs. However, the number of significant reductions varied according to the DTU and infection phase. PMID:25940197

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection can affect energy modulating hormones and body weight in germ free mice

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Yalda; Seow, Shih Wee; Amoyo, Arlaine Anne; Chiow, Kher Hsin; Tan, Tuan Lin; Wong, Whye Yen; Poh, Qian Hui; Sentosa, Ignatius Mario Doli; Bunte, Ralph M.; Pettersson, Sven; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, is an invariably commensal resident of the gut microbiome associated with gastric ulcer in adults. In addition, these patients also suffered from a low grade inflammation that activates the immune system and thus increased shunting of energy to host defense mechanisms. To assess whether a H. pylori infection could affect growth in early life, we determined the expression levels of selected metabolic gut hormones in germ free (GF) and specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice with and without the presence of H. pylori. Despite H. pylori-infected (SPFH) mice display alteration in host metabolism (elevated levels of leptin, insulin and peptide YY) compared to non-infected SPF mice, their growth curves remained the same. SPFH mice also displayed increased level of eotaxin-1. Interestingly, GF mice infected with H. pylori (GFH) also displayed increased levels of ghrelin and PYY. However, in contrast to SPFH mice, GFH showed reduced weight gain and malnutrition. These preliminary findings show that exposure to H. pylori alters host metabolism early in life; but the commensal microbiota in SPF mice can attenuate the growth retarding effect from H. pylori observed in GF mice. Further investigations of possible additional side effects of H. pylori are highly warranted. PMID:25736205

  14. Deficiency of LIGHT signaling pathway exacerbates Chlamydia psittaci respiratory tract infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hengling; Chen, Shenghua; Xu, Sha; Sun, Yuanbin; Bai, Qinqin; Lu, Chunxue; Chen, Yuyu; Fu, Xizong; Xu, Guilian; Chen, Lili

    2016-11-01

    LIGHT, a costimulatory member of the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig SF), can greatly impact T cell activation. The role of the LIGHT signaling pathway in chlamydial infection was evaluated in mice following respiratory tract infection with Chlamydia psittaci. Compared with wild type (WT) mice, LIGHT knockout (KO) mice showed significant reduction of body weight, much lower survival rate, higher bacterial burden, prolonged infection time courses and more severe pathological changes in lung tissue. The mRNA levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-12 in the lung tissue of LIGHT KO mice were significantly lower than those in WT mice. While there was no obvious difference in the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the spleens of the two groups of mice, there was a markedly elevated percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg cells in LIGHT KO mice. Together, these results demonstrate that the LIGHT signaling pathway is not only required for inflammatory cytokine production as part of the host response to chlamydial infection, but also influences the differentiation of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg cells, both of which may be essential for control of C. psittaci respiratory tract infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) Genotype 3 Infection of Human Liver Chimeric Mice as a Model for Chronic HEV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pas, Suzan D.; van der Net, Guido; de Man, Robert A.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.; Boonstra, Andre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genotype 3 (gt3) hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are emerging in Western countries. Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of chronic HEV infection and progressive liver damage, but no adequate model system currently mimics this disease course. Here we explore the possibilities of in vivo HEV studies in a human liver chimeric mouse model (uPA+/+Nod-SCID-IL2Rγ−/−) next to the A549 cell culture system, using HEV RNA-positive EDTA-plasma, feces, or liver biopsy specimens from 8 immunocompromised patients with chronic gt3 HEV. HEV from feces- or liver-derived inocula showed clear virus propagation within 2 weeks after inoculation onto A549 cells, compared to slow or no HEV propagation of HEV RNA-positive, EDTA-plasma samples. These in vitro HEV infectivity differences were mirrored in human-liver chimeric mice after intravenous (i.v.) inoculation of selected samples. HEV RNA levels of up to 8 log IU HEV RNA/gram were consistently present in 100% of chimeric mouse livers from week 2 to week 14 after inoculation with human feces- or liver-derived HEV. Feces and bile of infected mice contained moderate to large amounts of HEV RNA, while HEV viremia was low and inconsistently detected. Mouse-passaged HEV could subsequently be propagated for up to 100 days in vitro. In contrast, cell culture-derived or seronegative EDTA-plasma-derived HEV was not infectious in inoculated animals. In conclusion, the infectivity of feces-derived human HEV is higher than that of EDTA-plasma-derived HEV both in vitro and in vivo. Persistent HEV gt3 infections in chimeric mice show preferential viral shedding toward mouse bile and feces, paralleling the course of infection in humans. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 infections are emerging in Western countries and are of great concern for immunosuppressed patients at risk for developing chronic HEV infection. Lack of adequate model systems for chronic HEV infection hampers studies on HEV infectivity and transmission

  16. [TLR-4 involvement in pyroptosis of mice with pulmonary inflammation infected by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Hu, Peipei; Huang, Fushen; Niu, Junchao; Tang, Zhaoshan

    2015-05-04

    Pyroptosis is a caspase-1 dependent programmed cell death and involves pathogenesis of infectious diseases by releasing many pro-inflammatory cytokines to induced inflammation. TLR-4 plays an important role in mediating pathogenesis of some infectious diseases. In this study, we detected the expression of TLR-4 and some molecules (e. g caspase-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 ) related with pyroptosis to determine its involvement and mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation in mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. Mice were intranasally infected by A. pleuropneumoniae and killed 48 hours post infection. Pulmonary gross lesion and histological pathology by H-E were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1 , caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, and TLR-4 in lung of mice were detected by RT-PCR and qPCR. Serious pulmonary hemorrhage and inflammation in infected mice were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1, caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and TLR-4 increased, and expression levels of caspase-3 were not changed in lung of infected mice. TLR-4 might be involved in pulmonary inflammation of mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. After induced by activated TLR-4 some cells in this lesion expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines would induce pulmonary inflammation. This lesion might involve pyroptosis with caspase-1 expression.

  17. Portal veins of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni exhibit an increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Noël, F

    1998-01-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension and related vascular alterations usually develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. In order to investigate a putative direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein, mice infected only with male worms were used in the present study. An higher reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. Blockade of NO-synthase with l-NAME induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in portal vein from non-infected mice without changing the amplitude of the contractions, whereas it did not alter the reactivity of veins from infected mice. The present results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be partially related to an alteration in the nitric oxide release by endothelium.

  18. Increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine of portal veins from mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Lenzi, H L; Noël, F

    1998-07-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension accompanied by anatomical changes of the portal vasculature can develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. Mice infected unisexually with male worms were used in the present study in order to investigate a direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein. A higher reactivity in the presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), but not in the presence of KCl 100 mM solution, was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. It was characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity to 5-HT. Blockade of NO-synthase with N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in the portal vein from non-infected mice, but did not change the amplitude of the contractions. In portal veins from infected mice, preincubation with L-NAME did not affect the reactivity to 5-HT. Histological analysis indicated endothelial damage, subendothelial fibrous plaques, and focal areas of inflammatory infiltrates in the adventitial layer. As a conclusion, these results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be only partially related to an alteration in the endothelial production of nitric oxide.

  19. The role of neutrophils during mild and severe influenza virus infections of mice.

    PubMed

    Tate, Michelle D; Ioannidis, Lisa J; Croker, Ben; Brown, Lorena E; Brooks, Andrew G; Reading, Patrick C

    2011-03-14

    Neutrophils have been implicated in both protective and pathological responses following influenza virus infections. We have used mAb 1A8 (anti-Ly6G) to specifically deplete LyG6(high) neutrophils and induce neutropenia in mice infected with virus strains known to differ in virulence. Mice were also treated with mAb RB6-8C5 (anti-Ly6C/G or anti-Gr-1), a mAb widely used to investigate the role of neutrophils in mice that has been shown to bind and deplete additional leukocyte subsets. Using mAb 1A8, we confirm the beneficial role of neutrophils in mice infected with virus strains of intermediate (HKx31; H3N2) or high (PR8; H1N1) virulence whereas treatment of mice infected with an avirulent strain (BJx109; H3N2) did not affect disease or virus replication. Treatment of BJx109-infected mice with mAb RB6-8C5 was, however, associated with significant weight loss and enhanced virus replication indicating that other Gr-1(+) cells, not neutrophils, limit disease severity during mild influenza infections.

  20. Establishment of a superficial skin infection model in mice by using Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Kugelberg, Elisabeth; Norström, Tobias; Petersen, Thomas K; Duvold, Tore; Andersson, Dan I; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2005-08-01

    A new animal model for the purpose of studying superficial infections is presented. In this model an infection is established by disruption of the skin barrier by partial removal of the epidermal layer by tape stripping and subsequent application of the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. The infection and the infection route are purely topical, in contrast to those used in previously described animal models in mice, such as the skin suture-wound model, where the infection is introduced into the deeper layers of the skin. Thus, the present model is considered more biologically relevant for the study of superficial skin infections in mice and humans. Established topical antibiotic treatments are shown to be effective. The procedures involved in the model are simple, a feature that increases throughput and reproducibility. This new model should be applicable to the evaluation of novel antimicrobial treatments of superficial infections caused by S. aureus and S. pyogenes.

  1. Effects of Indomethacin on Acute, Subacute, and Latent Infections in Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Harry J.; Phares, Herbert F.; Graessle, Otto E.

    1968-01-01

    The comparative effect of indomethacin and hydrocortisone on the resistance of mice or rats to various acute, subacute, and latent bacterial infections was investigated. Large daily doses of indomethacin and hydrocortisone administered to mice challenged with bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae AD, Salmonella schottmuelleri 3010, Staphylococcus aureus (Smith), Streptococcus pyogenes C203, Salmonella pullorum #2, Proteus vulgaris 1810, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 2616, revealed that in essentially all of these acute infections, the mortality of the infected mice treated with indomethacin was essentially identical to that found in the infected controls. In contrast, hydrocortisone often lowered the resistance of mice to these acute infections. In a more chronic bacterial infection due to Corynebacterium kutscheri, hydrocortisone produced striking deleterious effects on resistance, whereas indomethacin administration in doses approaching the maximal tolerated level caused no observable adverse effects on host resistance. Indomethacin fed continuously to rats for 80 days, at maximal tolerated levels, caused no observable adverse effects on the host-parasite relationship of rats which were shown to harbor various latent infections. Hydrocortisone administration, however, lowered the resistance of rats as evidenced by increased mortality related directly to extensive bacterial infection. Insofar as infection is concerned, indomethacin behaved like other nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin and phenylbutazone. PMID:5663575

  2. Genetic identification of unique immunological responses in mice infected with virulent and attenuated Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Kingry, Luke C.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Bowen, Richard A.; Schenkel, Alan R.; Dow, Steven W.; Slayden, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a category A select agent based on its infectivity and virulence but disease mechanisms in Francisella tularensis infection remain poorly understood. Murine pulmonary models of infection were therefore employed to assess and compare dissemination and pathology and to elucidate the host immune response to infection with the highly virulent Type A F. tularensis strain Schu4 versus the less virulent Type B live vaccine strain (LVS). We found that dissemination and pathology in the spleen was significantly greater in mice infected with F. tularensis Schu4 compared to mice infected with F. tularensis LVS. Using gene expression profiling to compare the response to infection with the two F. tularensis strains, we found that there were significant differences in the expression of genes involved in the apoptosis pathway, antigen processing and presentation pathways, and inflammatory response pathways in mice infected with Schu4 when compared to LVS. These transcriptional differences coincided with marked differences in dissemination and severity of organ lesions in mice infected with the Schu4 and LVS strains. Therefore, these findings indicate that altered apoptosis, antigen presentation and production of inflammatory mediators explain the differences in pathogenicity of F. tularensis Schu4 and LVS. PMID:21070859

  3. Differential lymphocyte and antibody responses in deer mice infected with Sin Nombre hantavirus or Andes hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Schountz, Tony; Quackenbush, Sandra; Rovnak, Joel; Haddock, Elaine; Black, William C; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a rodent-borne disease with a high case-fatality rate that is caused by several New World hantaviruses. Each pathogenic hantavirus is naturally hosted by a principal rodent species without conspicuous disease and infection is persistent, perhaps for life. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the natural reservoirs of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the etiologic agent of most HCPS cases in North America. Deer mice remain infected despite a helper T cell response that leads to high-titer neutralizing antibodies. Deer mice are also susceptible to Andes hantavirus (ANDV), which causes most HCPS cases in South America; however, deer mice clear ANDV. We infected deer mice with SNV or ANDV to identify differences in host responses that might account for this differential outcome. SNV RNA levels were higher in the lungs but not different in the heart, spleen, or kidneys. Most ANDV-infected deer mice had seroconverted 14 days after inoculation, but none of the SNV-infected deer mice had. Examination of lymph node cell antigen recall responses identified elevated immune gene expression in deer mice infected with ANDV and suggested maturation toward a Th2 or T follicular helper phenotype in some ANDV-infected deer mice, including activation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) pathway in T cells and B cells. These data suggest that the rate of maturation of the immune response is substantially higher and of greater magnitude during ANDV infection, and these differences may account for clearance of ANDV and persistence of SNV. Hantaviruses persistently infect their reservoir rodent hosts without pathology. It is unknown how these viruses evade sterilizing immune responses in the reservoirs. We have determined that infection of the deer mouse with its homologous hantavirus, Sin Nombre virus, results in low levels of immune gene expression in antigen-stimulated lymph node cells and a poor antibody response. However, infection of deer mice with a

  4. Enhancement of resistance to Escherichia coli infection in mice by dihydroheptaprenol, a synthetic polyprenol derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Araki, S; Kagaya, K; Kitoh, K; Kimura, M; Fukazawa, Y

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a chemically synthesized polyprenol derivative, dihydroheptaprenol (DHP), on the nonspecific resistance of mice to infection with Escherichia coli was investigated. Mice that had been injected intramuscularly with 100 mg of DHP per kg of body weight, prepared as a microemulsion with lecithin, 1 to 4 days before infection showed enhanced resistance to subcutaneous (s.c.) infection with E. coli. When DHP-injected mice were inoculated s.c. with 3 X 10(8) E. coli, which induces fatal acute systemic infection in normal mice, propagation of bacteria in the blood, liver, and spleen was significantly inhibited. Enhanced resistance of athymic (nude) mice to E. coli infection was also induced by DHP. DHP markedly stimulated the generation of peripheral blood neutrophils, significantly enhanced clearance of E. coli from the bloodstream, and activated neutrophils and peritoneal macrophages for H2O2 generation. DHP restored the resistance to E. coli infection in cyclophosphamide-treated mice over the normal level. Furthermore, DHP shortened the period of the recovery of neutrophils and also enhanced clearance of E. coli from the bloodstream in cyclophosphamide-treated mice. DHP was nontoxic for mice and rats (400 mg/kg intramuscularly and 800 mg/kg s.c.) and nonpyrogenic at a dose of 30 mg/kg when administered intravenously to rabbits. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of DHP for enhancing resistance in mice may be, at least in part, its ability to stimulate the generation of potent neutrophils and to activate macrophages in the reticuloendothelial system. PMID:3114147

  5. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection.

  6. Ampicillin alone and in combination with riboflavin modulates Staphylococcus aureus infection induced septic arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Mal, Pinky; Ghosh, Deboshree; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Dutta, Kallol; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2012-10-01

    Effects of ampicillin (Amp) in combination with riboflavin on septic arthritis in mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus have been reported. Ampicillin was given at 100 mg/kg after 24 h of infection, followed by riboflavin (Ribo) at 20 mg/kg body wt, after 2 h of Amp treatment. Mice were sacrificed at 3, 9, 15 days post infection (dpi). Combined treatment of infected mice with ampicillin and riboflavin eradicated the bacteria from blood, spleen and synovial tissue and showed a significant gross reduction in arthritis, reduced serum levels of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. S. aureus infected mice exhibited higher synovial TNF-alpha and IL-6, which was also reduced by ampicillin and riboflavin treatment. S. aureus infected mice showed a disturbed antioxidant status measured in terms of cellular anti-oxidants like reduced glutathione and anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase and were ameliorated when the animals were co-treated with ampicillin along with riboflavin. Results of the study showed that combined treatment with anti-oxidant and antibiotic may protect from staphylococcal arthritis and may ameliorate oxidative stress caused by S. aureus infection.

  7. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection. PMID:26439498

  8. Taenia crassiceps infection disrupts estrous cycle and reproductive behavior in BALB/c female mice.

    PubMed

    Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Vargas-Villavicencio, José Antonio; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2009-02-01

    Previously, it has been shown that parasitic infections are able to alter the normal mammal physiology, at several extents. Thus, we investigated the effects on estrous cycle and sexual behavior induced by intraperitoneal infection with Taenia crassiceps in female host mice. Along the weeks of infection, parasites were collected from the peritoneal cavity of female mice, showing the maximum parasite load at 16 weeks. No parasites were found outside peritoneal cavity. Vaginal estrous cycle was monitored daily for 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of infection, and results compared against age-matched female mice. Female sexual behavior (FSB) tests were performed, one test per week. Immediately after the last behavioral test, blood was collected by cardiac puncture for steroid determinations. First of all, there was a strong tissular damage in the female reproductive tract in all infected females. The phases of the estrous cycle were interrupted at 12 and 16 weeks, with increased leukocytes and the presence of a few cornified epithelial cells and nucleated epithelial cells. The FSB decreased starting 6 weeks post infection. On the 16th week, all infected female mice ceased to exhibit sexual responses, and estradiol levels showed a significant decrease. Control mice continued showing FSB and the different phases of the estrous cycle throughout the observation period. Our results strength the notion that parasites may be considered as an evolutionary force in the reproductive ability of mammals.

  9. Glucocortiocoid Treatment of MCMV Infected Newborn Mice Attenuates CNS Inflammation and Limits Deficits in Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Kosmac, Kate; Bantug, Glenn R.; Pugel, Ester P.; Cekinovic, Djurdjica; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s) of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV) results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC) proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ) in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV. PMID:23505367

  10. Hepatitis D Virus Infection of Mice Expressing Human Sodium Taurocholate Co-transporting Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Fengfeng; Jing, Zhiyi; Li, Yunfei; Liu, Yang; Peng, Bo; Yan, Huan; Qi, Yonghe; Sun, Yinyan; Guo, Ju-Tao; Sui, Jianhua; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is the smallest virus known to infect human. About 15 million people worldwide are infected by HDV among those 240 million infected by its helper hepatitis B virus (HBV). Viral hepatitis D is considered as one of the most severe forms of human viral hepatitis. No specific antivirals are currently available to treat HDV infection and antivirals against HBV do not ameliorate hepatitis D. Liver sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) was recently identified as a common entry receptor for HDV and HBV in cell cultures. Here we show HDV can infect mice expressing human NTCP (hNTCP-Tg). Antibodies against critical regions of HBV envelope proteins blocked HDV infection in the hNTCP-Tg mice. The infection was acute yet HDV genome replication occurred efficiently, evident by the presence of antigenome RNA and edited RNA species specifying large delta antigen in the livers of infected mice. The resolution of HDV infection appears not dependent on adaptive immune response, but might be facilitated by innate immunity. Liver RNA-seq analyses of HDV infected hNTCP-Tg and type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNα/βR1) null hNTCP-Tg mice indicated that in addition to induction of type I IFN response, HDV infection was also associated with up-regulation of novel cellular genes that may modulate HDV infection. Our work has thus proved the concept that NTCP is a functional receptor for HDV infection in vivo and established a convenient small animal model for investigation of HDV pathogenesis and evaluation of antiviral therapeutics against the early steps of infection for this important human pathogen. PMID:25902143

  11. Myeloid depression follows infection of susceptible newborn mice with the parvovirus minute virus of mice (strain i).

    PubMed

    Segovia, J C; Bueren, J A; Almendral, J M

    1995-05-01

    The in vivo myelosuppressive capacity of strain i of the parovirus minute virus of mice (MVMi) was investigated in newborn BALB/c mice inoculated with a lethal intranasal dose. MVMi infection reached maximum levels of DNA synthesis and infectious titers in lymphohemopoietic organs at 4 to 6 days postinoculation and was restricted by an early neutralizing humoral immune response. After viral control (by 10 days postinoculation), a significant decrease in femoral and splenic cellularity, as well as in granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit and erythroid burst-forming unit hemopoietic progenitors, was observed in most inoculated animals. This delayed myeloid depression, although it may be not a major cause of the lethality of the infection, implies indirect pathogenic mechanisms induced by MVMi infection in a susceptible host.

  12. Myeloid depression follows infection of susceptible newborn mice with the parvovirus minute virus of mice (strain i).

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, J C; Bueren, J A; Almendral, J M

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo myelosuppressive capacity of strain i of the parovirus minute virus of mice (MVMi) was investigated in newborn BALB/c mice inoculated with a lethal intranasal dose. MVMi infection reached maximum levels of DNA synthesis and infectious titers in lymphohemopoietic organs at 4 to 6 days postinoculation and was restricted by an early neutralizing humoral immune response. After viral control (by 10 days postinoculation), a significant decrease in femoral and splenic cellularity, as well as in granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit and erythroid burst-forming unit hemopoietic progenitors, was observed in most inoculated animals. This delayed myeloid depression, although it may be not a major cause of the lethality of the infection, implies indirect pathogenic mechanisms induced by MVMi infection in a susceptible host. PMID:7707557

  13. Gastric Helicobacter Infection Inhibits Development of Oral Tolerance to Food Antigens in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; van Niel, Guillaume; Mégraud, Francis; Mayo, Kathryn; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; Moreau, Marie-Christiane; Heyman, Martine

    2003-01-01

    The increase in the transcellular passage of intact antigens across the digestive epithelium infected with Helicobacter pylori may interfere with the regulation of mucosal immune responses. The aim of this work was to study the capacity of Helicobacter infection to inhibit the development of oral tolerance or to promote allergic sensitization and the capacity of a gastro-protective agent, rebamipide, to interfere with these processes in mice. Oral tolerance to ovalbumin (OVA) was studied in 48 C3H/He 4-week-old mice divided into four groups: (i) OVA-sensitized mice; (ii) OVA-“tolerized” mice (that is, mice that were rendered immunologically tolerant); (iii) H. felis-infected, OVA-tolerized mice; (iv) and H. felis-infected, OVA-tolerized, rebamipide-treated mice. Oral sensitization to hen egg lysozyme (HEL) was studied in 48 mice divided into four groups: (i) controls; (ii) HEL-sensitized mice; (iii) H. felis-infected, HEL-sensitized mice; and (iv) H. felis-infected, HEL-sensitized, rebamipide-treated mice. Specific anti-OVA or anti-HEL immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG1/IgG2a serum titers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, the capacity of rebamipide to interfere with antigen presentation and T-cell activation in vitro, as well as absorption of rebamipide across the epithelial monolayer, was tested. H. felis infection led to the inhibition of oral tolerance to OVA, but rebamipide prevented this inhibitive effect of H. felis. H. felis infection did not enhance the sensitization to HEL, but rebamipide inhibited the development of this sensitization. Moreover, rebamipide inhibited in a dose-dependent manner antigen presentation and T-cell activation in vitro and was shown to be able to cross the epithelium at a concentration capable of inducing this inhibitory effect. We conclude that H. felis can inhibit the development of oral tolerance to OVA in mice and that this inhibition is prevented by rebamipide. PMID:12933867

  14. Iron and copper accumulation in the brain of coxsackievirus-infected mice exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Ilbaeck, N.-G. . E-mail: nils-gunnar.ilback@slv.se; Lindh, U.; Minqin, R.; Friman, G.; Watt, F.

    2006-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potentially toxic metal widely distributed in the environment and known to cause adverse health effects in humans. During coxsackievirus infection, the concentrations of essential and nonessential trace elements (e.g., iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and Cd) change in different target organs of the infection. Fe and Cu are recognized cofactors in host defence reactions, and Fe is known to be associated with certain pathological conditions of the brain. However, whether nonessential trace elements could influence the balance of essential trace elements in the brain is unknown. In this study the brain Fe, Cu, and Cd contents were measured through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and their distributions determined by nuclear microscopy in the early phase (day 3) of coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection in nonexposed and in Cd-exposed female Balb/c mice. In CB3 infection the brain is a well-known target that has not been studied with regard to trace element balance. The brain concentration of Cu compared with that of noninfected control mice was increased by 9% (P<0.05) in infected mice not exposed to Cd and by 10% (not significant) in infected Cd-exposed mice. A similar response was seen for Fe, which in infected Cd-exposed mice, compared to noninfected control mice, tended to increase by 16%. Cu showed an even tissue distribution, whereas Fe was distributed in focal deposits. Changes in Cd concentration in the brain of infected mice were less consistent but evenly distributed. Further studies are needed to define whether the accumulation and distribution of trace elements in the brain have an impact on brain function.

  15. Endogenous gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 in Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nakane, A; Okamoto, M; Asano, M; Kohanawa, M; Minagawa, T

    1995-01-01

    The production and roles of endogenous gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in both lethal and nonlethal infections of Staphylococcus aureus were investigated in mice. In the case of nonlethal infection, although no bacteria were detected in the bloodstreams, bacteria that colonized and proliferated persistently for 3 weeks were found in the kidneys. All mice given lethal injections died within 7 days, and large numbers of bacteria were detected in the bloodstreams, spleens, and kidneys. The first peaks of IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6 were observed in the bloodstreams and spleens of the mice with nonlethal and lethal infections within 24 h. Thereafter, in the nonlethal cases, IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6 peaked again in the spleens and kidneys during the period of maximum growth of bacteria in the kidneys, although only IL-6 was detected in the sera. In contrast, in the case of lethal infection, the titers of IFN-gamma and IL-6 in the sera and TNF in the kidneys peaked before death. Effects of in vivo administration of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against IFN-gamma and TNF on the fates of S. aureus-infected mice were studied. In the nonlethal infections, anti-TNF alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) MAb-treated mice, but not anti-IFN-gamma MAb-treated mice, died as a result of worsening infection, suggesting that endogenous TNF plays a protective role in host resistance to S. aureus infection. In the mice that received lethal doses, injection of anti-TNF-alpha MAb accelerated death. However, although injection of anti-IFN-gamma MAb inhibited host resistance of the infected mice early in infection, most of the animals survived the lethal infection by injection of anti-IFN-gamma MAb, suggesting that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a detrimental role in S. aureus infection. Thus, this study demonstrated that IFN-gamma and TNF play different roles in S. aureus infection. PMID:7890367

  16. Reactive oxygen intermediates from eosinophils in mice infected with Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-06-01

    A large number of eosinophils were recruited to the intestinal villi after infection with Hymenolepis nana. Eosinophil numbers were increased more rapidly in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Local intestinal eosinophils from challenged mice showed more extracellular oxygen radical release, as assessed by histochemical methods using nitro blue tetrazolium, accompanied with tissue injury and larval degradation. Intestinal eosinophils isolated from the lamina propria induced specific oxygen radical generation in response to H. nana oncosphere extract as measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. This response was stronger in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Radical generation from uninfected mice was negligible. Lipid peroxidation in the small intestine, as measured by formation of malondialdehyde, was increased during H. nana challenge infection, the peak activity coinciding with the elimination of challenge larvae. Continuous administration of a NADPH oxidase inhibitor to sensitized mice interfered with the degeneration of challenge larvae. These results suggest that intestinal eosinophils may be the major contributor to oxygen radical production in response to H. nana and that reactive oxygen species may play a part of effector molecule in the resistance to reinfection with H. nana.

  17. Role of interleukin-6 in the induction of protective T cells during mycobacterial infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Pedrosa, J; Minóprio, P

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been shown to regulate numerous functions of the immune system including the differentiation of T-cell subpopulations. Here we examined the involvement of this cytokine in the in vivo generation of a population of T cells able to protect mice against mycobacterial infections. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with Mycobacterium avium 2447 and anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies were administered intraperitoneally throughout the course of the infection. Control mice were able to control the mycobacterial proliferation 1 month after inoculation, whereas mice whose IL-6 had been blocked showed progressive bacterial growth. To distinguish a role for IL-6 associated to the induction or expression of immunity mediated by T cells, we immunized mice with M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Pasteur and challenged them 2 months later with M. avium. One group of mice received anti-IL-6 during the BCG vaccination and another during the M. avium challenge. When M. avium proliferation was assessed at day 30 of the challenge, it was found that the administration of anti-IL-6 during vaccination reduced the protection afforded by BCG compared to administration of the isotype control antibody. No difference in bacterial proliferation was observed at day 30 of challenge when antibodies were administered during M. avium challenge. Our results show that protective T cells arise during M. avium infections in mice after differentiating in the presence of IL-6. PMID:7959868

  18. Hepatic temporal gene expression profiling in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Samuel R; Rogers, Arlin B; Shen, Zeli; Fry, Rebecca C; Love, Jennifer A; Nambiar, Prashant R; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection of A/JCr mice is a model of infectious liver cancer. We monitored hepatic global gene expression profiles in H. hepaticus infected and control male A/JCr mice at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year of age using an Affymetrix-based oligonucleotide microarray platform on the premise that a specific genetic expression signature at isolated time points would be indicative of disease status. Model based expression index comparisons generated by dChip yielded consistent profiles of differential gene expression for H. hepaticus infected male mice with progressive liver disease versus uninfected control mice within each age group. Linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis allowed segregation of mice based on combined age and lesion status, or age alone. Up-regulation of putative tumor markers correlated with advancing hepatocellular dysplasia. Transcriptionally down-regulated genes in mice with liver lesions included those related to peroxisome proliferator, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism pathways. In conclusion, transcriptional profiling of hepatic genes documented gene expression signatures in the livers of H. hepaticus infected male A/JCr mice with chronic progressive hepatitis and preneoplastic liver lesions, complemented the histopathological diagnosis, and suggested molecular targets for the monitoring and intervention of disease progression prior to the onset of hepatocellular neoplasia.

  19. Infection susceptibility and immune senescence with advancing age replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lijun; Jiang, Tony T; Kinder, Jeremy M; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-12-01

    Aging confers increased susceptibility to common pathogens including influenza A virus. Despite shared vulnerability to infection with advancing age in humans and rodents, the relatively long time required for immune senescence to take hold practically restricts the use of naturally aged mice to investigate aging-induced immunological shifts. Here, we show accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice with spontaneous mutation in the nuclear scaffolding protein, lamin A, replicate infection susceptibility, and substantial immune cell shifts that occur with advancing age. Naturally aged (≥ 20 month) and 2- to 3-month-old Lmna(Dhe) mice share near identically increased influenza A susceptibility compared with age-matched Lmna(WT) control mice. Increased mortality and higher viral burden after influenza infection in Lmna(Dhe) mice parallel reduced accumulation of lung alveolar macrophage cells, systemic expansion of immune suppressive Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells, and skewed immune dominance among viral-specific CD8⁺T cells similar to the immunological phenotype of naturally aged mice. Thus, aging-induced infection susceptibility and immune senescence are replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF A CRYPTOSPORIDIUM MURIS INFECTION AND REINFECTION IN CF-1 MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To establish control values for circulating cells and immune associated organs over the course of a self-limiting Cryptosporidium muris infection and rechallenge infection, mice were evaluated at intervals starting before oral inoculation and ending after oocyst shedding had ceas...

  1. Zika virus infection confers protection against West Nile virus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida

    2017-09-20

    Flaviviruses are RNA viruses that constitute a worrisome threat to global human and animal health. Zika virus (ZIKV), which was initially reported to cause a mild disease, recently spread in the Americas, infecting millions of people. During this recent epidemic, ZIKV infection has been linked to serious neurological diseases and birth defects, specifically Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS) and microcephaly. Because information about ZIKV immunity remains scarce, we assessed the humoral response of immunocompetent mice to infection with three viral strains of diverse geographical origin (Africa, Asia and America). No infected animals showed any sign of disease or died after infection. However, specific neutralizing antibodies were elicited in all infected mice. Considering the rapid expansion of ZIKV throughout the American continent and its co-circulation with other medically relevant flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), the induction of protective immunity between ZIKV and WNV was analyzed. Remarkably, protection after challenge with WNV was observed in mice previously infected with ZIKV, as survival rates were significantly higher than in control mice. Moreover, previous ZIKV infection enhanced the humoral immune response against WNV. These findings may be relevant in geographical areas where both ZIKV and WNV co-circulate, as well as for the future development of broad-spectrum flavivirus vaccines.

  2. Small intestinal nematode infection of mice is associated with increased enterobacterial loads alongside the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Fischer, André; Heimesaat, Markus M; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Hartmann, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are potent modulators of immune reactivity in mice and men. Intestinal nematodes live in close contact with commensal gut bacteria, provoke biased Th2 immune responses upon infection, and subsequently lead to changes in gut physiology. We hypothesized that murine nematode infection is associated with distinct changes of the intestinal bacterial microbiota composition. We here studied intestinal inflammatory and immune responses in mice following infection with the hookworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri and applied cultural and molecular techniques to quantitatively assess intestinal microbiota changes in the ileum, cecum and colon. At day 14 post nematode infection, mice harbored significantly higher numbers of γ-Proteobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae and members of the Bacteroides/Prevotella group in their cecum as compared to uninfected controls. Abundance of Gram-positive species such as Lactobacilli, Clostridia as well as the total bacterial load was not affected by worm infection. The altered microbiota composition was independent of the IL-4/-13 - STAT6 signaling axis, as infected IL-4Rα(-/-) mice showed a similar increase in enterobacterial loads. In conclusion, infection with an enteric nematode is accompanied by distinct intestinal microbiota changes towards higher abundance of gram-negative commensal species at the small intestinal site of infection (and inflammation), but also in the parasite-free large intestinal tract. Further studies should unravel the impact of nematode-induced microbiota changes in inflammatory bowel disease to allow for a better understanding of how theses parasites interfere with intestinal inflammation and bacterial communities in men.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF A CRYPTOSPORIDIUM MURIS INFECTION AND REINFECTION IN CF-1 MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To establish control values for circulating cells and immune associated organs over the course of a self-limiting Cryptosporidium muris infection and rechallenge infection, mice were evaluated at intervals starting before oral inoculation and ending after oocyst shedding had ceas...

  4. Efficacy of UK-49,858 (fluconazole) against Candida albicans experimental infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Troke, P F; Andrews, R J; Brammer, K W; Marriott, M S; Richardson, K

    1985-01-01

    UK-49,858 (fluconazole), a new, orally absorbed bis-triazole derivative, has been evaluated against systemic infections with Candida albicans in normal and immunosuppressed mice and against an intestinal infection with C. albicans in immunosuppressed mice. Orally administered ketoconazole was used as a comparison agent throughout, and orally administered amphotericin B was included for comparative in the experimental intestinal infection. In a 10-day dosage regimen, UK-49,858 was far more active than ketoconazole against systemic infections with C. albicans in normal and immunosuppressed mice. In normal mice, extension of UK-49,858 dosing to 30 days resulted in prolongation of survival to over 90 days, and up to 60% of treated animals had no detectable C. albicans in their kidneys. In addition, over 90% of mice with intestinal candidiasis had culture-negative feces after a 3-day treatment with UK-49,858, but only 62 and 23% of mice gave this response after amphotericin B and ketoconazole therapy, respectively. These data suggest that UK-49,858 may be of value in the treatment of systemic and gastrointestinal infections due to C. albicans in humans. PMID:3002246

  5. Detection of murine cytomegalovirus DNA in circulating leukocytes harvested during acute infection of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, J.F. Jr.; O'Neil, M.E. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors used virus assay and in situ hybridization with a cloned fragment of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) genome to study MCMV infection of circulating leukocytes harvested from 3-week-old BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H mice infected with MCMV intraperitoneally. Infectious virus or MCMV DNA was detected in leukocytes on days 1 through 21 of infection in BALB/c mice and on days 3 through 7 in C57BL/6 mice. On days 5 and 7, MCMV DNA or infectious virus was detected in the leukocytes of 17 (94%) of 18 BALB/c mice and 10 (59%) of 17 C57BL/6 mice. In both strains infection peaked on days 5 and 7, when as many as 0.01 to 0.1% of the circulating leukocytes contained MCMV DNA. In C3H mice, however, infectious virus was rarely recovered from leukocyte fractions and MCMV DNA was detected in the circulating leukocytes of only one animal. Circulating leukocytes may have an important role in the dissemination of CMV infections in susceptible hosts.

  6. Characterization of Chronic Cutaneous Lesions from TNF-Receptor-1-Deficient Mice Infected by Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carolina Ferreira; Manzoni-de-Almeida, Daniel; Mello, Paula Seixas; Natale, Caio Cotta; Santiago, Helton da Costa; Miranda, Luíza da Silva; Ferraz, Fernanda Oliveira; dos Santos, Liliane Martins; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Vieira, Leda Quercia

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania major-infected TNF receptor 1 deficient (TNFR1 KO) mice resolve parasitism but fail to resolve lesions, while wild-type mice completely heal. We investigated the cell composition, cytokine production, and apoptosis in lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. Chronic lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice presented larger number of CD8+ T and Ly6G+ cells. In addition, higher concentrations of mRNA for IFN-γ CCL2 and CCL5, as well as protein, but lower numbers of apoptotic cells, were found in lesions from TNFR1 KO mice than in WT, at late time points of infection. Our studies showed that persistent lesions in L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice may be mediated by continuous migration of cells to the site of inflammation due to the presence of chemokines and also by lower levels of apoptosis. We suggest that this model has some striking similarities to the mucocutaneous clinical form of leishmaniasis. PMID:22203861

  7. The acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is attenuated in 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Canavaci, Adriana M C; Sorgi, Carlos A; Martins, Vicente P; Morais, Fabiana R; de Sousa, Érika V G; Trindade, Bruno C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Rossi, Marcos A; Aronoff, David M; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Nomizo, Auro

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we examine the contribution of 5-lipoxygenase- (5-LO-) derived lipid mediators to immune responses during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 5-LO gene knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, the 5-LO(-/-) mice developed less parasitemia/tissue parasitism, less inflammatory cell infiltrates, and a lower mortality. This resistance of 5-LO(-/-) mice correlated with several differences in the immune response to infection, including reduced PGE2 synthesis; sustained capacity of splenocytes to produce high levels of interleukin (IL)-12 early in the infection; enhanced splenocyte production of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ; rapid T-cell polarization to secrete high quantities of IFN-γ and low quantities of IL-10; and greater numbers of CD8(+)CD44(high)CD62L(low) memory effector T cells at the end of the acute phase of infection. The high mortality in WT mice was associated with increased production of LTB4/LTC4, T cell bias to produce IFN-γ, high levels of serum nitrite, and marked protein extravasation into the peritoneal cavity, although survival was improved by treatment with a cys-LT receptor 1 antagonist. These data also provide evidence that 5-LO-derived mediators negatively affect host survival during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection.

  8. The Acute Phase of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Attenuated in 5-Lipoxygenase-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Canavaci, Adriana M. C.; Sorgi, Carlos A.; Martins, Vicente P.; Morais, Fabiana R.; de Sousa, Érika V. G.; Trindade, Bruno C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Aronoff, David M.; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we examine the contribution of 5-lipoxygenase- (5-LO-) derived lipid mediators to immune responses during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 5-LO gene knockout (5-LO−/−) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, the 5-LO−/− mice developed less parasitemia/tissue parasitism, less inflammatory cell infiltrates, and a lower mortality. This resistance of 5-LO−/− mice correlated with several differences in the immune response to infection, including reduced PGE2 synthesis; sustained capacity of splenocytes to produce high levels of interleukin (IL)-12 early in the infection; enhanced splenocyte production of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ; rapid T-cell polarization to secrete high quantities of IFN-γ and low quantities of IL-10; and greater numbers of CD8+CD44highCD62Llow memory effector T cells at the end of the acute phase of infection. The high mortality in WT mice was associated with increased production of LTB4/LTC4, T cell bias to produce IFN-γ, high levels of serum nitrite, and marked protein extravasation into the peritoneal cavity, although survival was improved by treatment with a cys-LT receptor 1 antagonist. These data also provide evidence that 5-LO-derived mediators negatively affect host survival during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. PMID:25165415

  9. A survey of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum infecting house mice from a hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Hůrková-Hofmannová, L; Qablan, M A; Juránková, J; Modrý, D; Piálek, J

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum are closely related coccidian parasites infecting a wide range of wild and domestic animals as intermediate hosts, and rodents serve as important reservoir hosts during the life cycles of these parasites. The present study is aimed at identifying T. gondii and N. caninum infection in 360 wild house mice (Mus musculus) collected across the Czech-German border, where 2 genetically distinct mouse subspecies meet and hybridize. Toxoplasma gondii or N. caninum DNA was detected in the brains of individual mice by PCR, but mixed infections were never observed. No significant differences in gender or trapping localities were found in the positive mice. The survey reveals a low frequency of T. gondii (0.6%) and N. caninum (3.6%) occurrence in the house mice population of the monitored part of the hybrid zone.

  10. Effect of ammonium 5-tungsto-2-antimoniate on encephalomyocarditis and vesicular stomatitis virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Werner, G H; Jasmin, C; Chermann, J C

    1976-04-01

    Ammonium 5-tungsto-2-antimoniate (HPA 23) protected micr partially or completely against two strains of encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus and one strain of vesicular stomatitis (VSV) virus. The best protective effect was obtained with EMC strain VR 129 and VSV when a single i.p. injection of HPA 23 was administered shortly before virus inoculation. Mice protected by HPA 23 against EMC strain VR129 had virus titres in the blood and brain similar to those in untreated mice. A synergism between interferon and HPA 23 was observed in mice infected with EMC VR129. Our results demonstrate the in vivo activity of HPA 23 against two lethal viral infections and suggest that, at least in mice infected with EMC, death may not be related solely to virus multiplication.

  11. Experimental infection of mice with hamster parvovirus: evidence for interspecies transmission of mouse parvovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-04-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster.

  12. Experimental Infection of Mice with Hamster Parvovirus: Evidence for Interspecies Transmission of Mouse Parvovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-01-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster. PMID:20412687

  13. Topical treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced burn wound infection in mice using natural products.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Seema; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-30

    Burn wound infection remains the principal cause of death in burn patients. Efficacy of honey and aloe vera gel was evaluated in the treatment of burn wound infection induced with Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 and their efficacy was compared with an isolated and well-characterized Klebsiella specific phage Kpn5. A full thickness burn wound was induced in mice and infected with K. pneumoniae B5055 via topical route. The efficacy of natural antimicrobial agents (honey and aloe vera gel) topically applied daily was compared with the efficacy of phage Kpn5 suspended in hydrogel applied topically a single time on the burn wound. Efficacy of these antimicrobial agents was assessed on the basis of the percentage of infected mice that survived following treatment. In comparison to untreated control mice, those treated with a single dose of phage Kpn5 at MOI of 200 showed significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001). Daily application of honey and aloe vera gel provided significant protection (P < 0.001), but in combination with phage, no additional advantage was observed (P > 0.05) compared to the use of honey and aloe vera gel alone. The results of this study strongly suggest that phage Kpn5 has therapeutic value in treating burn wound infection in mice as a single topical application of this phage was able to rescue mice from infection caused by K. pneumoniae B5055 in comparison to multiple applications of honey and aloe vera gel.

  14. Expression profiling of lymph node cells from deer mice infected with Andes virus.

    PubMed

    Schountz, Tony; Shaw, Timothy I; Glenn, Travis C; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2013-04-09

    Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the principal reservoir hosts of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the cause of the great majority of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) cases in North America. SNV, like all hantaviruses with their reservoirs, causes persistent infection without pathology in deer mice and appear to elicit a regulatory T cell response. Deer mice are also susceptible to Andes virus (ANDV), which causes the great majority of HCPS cases in South America, but they clear infection by 56 days post infection without signs of disease. We examined lymph node cell responses of deer mice infected with ANDV to determine expression profiles upon in vitro recall challenge with viral antigen. Because the deer mouse genome is currently unannotated, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to use known lab mouse (Mus musculus) cDNAs to predict genes within the deer mouse genome and design primers for quantitative PCR (http://dna.publichealth.uga.edu/BlastPrimer/BlastPrimer.php). Of 94 genes examined, 20 were elevated, the plurality of which were Th2-specific, whereas 12 were downregulated. Other expressed genes represented Th1, regulatory T cells and follicular helper T cells, and B cells, but not Th17 cells, indicating that many cellular phenotypes participate in the host response to Andes virus. The ability to examine expression levels of nearly any gene from deer mice should allow direct comparison of infection with SNV or ANDV to determine the immunological pathways used for clearance of hantavirus infection in a reservoir host species.

  15. Acute Trypanosoma cruzi experimental infection induced renal ischemic/reperfusion lesion in mice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; da Silva, Tshaca Mahatma; Batista, Wanderson Silva; Franco, Marcello; Schor, Nestor

    2009-12-01

    Experimental acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in mice promotes an intense myocarditis and other systemic changes. However, the network of pathophysiological disorders and renal injury caused by the infection has not been elucidated. Our previous results with a murine model observed a discrete acute myocarditis and high mortality with significant inflammatory kidney injury with T. cruzi infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of kidney injury caused by the parasite in mice during the experimental acute phase. Results employing BALB/c mice infected with T. cruzi of Y strain showed renal injury on the 6th day postinfection (dpi) caused by a transitory decrease of renal blood flow. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was also observed similar to the model of ischemia/reperfusion lesion in these infected mice. The injury was not related to the presence (or multiplication) of parasites. Only rare nests were microscopically detected, and the presence of scattered parasites in renal parenchyma was seen on the 15th dpi. Thus, it was observed that during the acute phase of the disease, AKI in infected mice is linked to early cardiovascular effects, including heart failure, caused by striking inflammatory lesions in the myocardium, which lead to the high mortality rate of animals.

  16. Onset of resistance to light Hymenolepis nana infection in mice of different strains.

    PubMed

    Conchedda, M; Gabriele, F; Bortoletti, G; Palmas, C

    1995-04-01

    Rapidity in onset of resistance against Hymenolepis nana egg infection after a light primary infection was studied in low and high responder mice challenged at different time intervals. A very rapid acquisition of protection was observed in C57 and a delayed response in C3H mice. In both cases the effect of resistance on weight or worm number was related to the time of challenge infection, suggesting a "race against time" involving host response and parasite development, the outcome varying according to host genetic background.

  17. Congopain genes diverged to become specific to Savannah, Forest and Kilifi subgroups of Trypanosoma congolense, and are valuable for diagnosis, genotyping and phylogenetic inferences.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adriana C; Ortiz, Paola A; Costa-Martins, André G; Neves, Luis; Garcia, Herakles A; Alves, João M P; Camargo, Erney P; Alfieri, Silvia C; Gibson, Wendy; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2014-04-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is the most important agent of nagana, a wasting livestock trypanosomosis in sub-Saharan Africa. This species is a complex of three subgroups (Savannah, Forest and Kilifi) that differ in virulence, pathogenicity, drug resistance, vectors, and geographical distribution. Congopain, the major Cathepsin L-like cysteine protease (CP2) of T. congolense, has been extensively investigated as a pathogenic factor and target for drugs and vaccines, but knowledge about this enzyme is mostly restricted to the reference strain IL3000, which belongs to the Savannah subgroup. In this work we compared sequences of congopain genes from IL3000 genome database and isolates of the three subgroups of T. congolense. Results demonstrated that the congopain genes diverged into three subclades consistent with the three subgroups within T. congolense. Laboratory and field isolates of Savannah exhibited a highly polymorphic repertoire both inter- and intra-isolates: sequences sharing the archetypical catalytic triad clustered into SAV1-SAV3 groups, whereas polymorphic sequences that, in general, exhibited unusual catalytic triad (variants) assigned to SAV4 or not assigned to any group. Congopain homologous genes from Forest and Kilifi isolates showed, respectively, moderate and limited diversity. In the phylogenetic tree based on congopain and homologues, Savannah was closer to Forest than to Kilifi. All T. congolense subgroup nested into a single clade, which together with the sister clade formed by homologues from Trypanosoma simiae and Trypanosoma godfreyi formed a clade supporting the subgenus Nannomonas. A single PCR targeting congopain sequences was developed for the diagnosis of T. congolense isolates of the three subgroups. Our findings demonstrated that congopain genes are valuable targets for the diagnosis, genotyping, and phylogenetic and taxonomic inferences among T. congolense isolates and other members of the subgenus Nannomonas.

  18. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  19. Reproduction of epstein-barr virus infection and pathogenesis in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi

    2014-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically associated with a variety of diseases including lymphoproliferative diseases, lymphomas, carcinomas, and autoimmune diseases. Humans are the only natural host of EBV and limited species of new-world monkeys can be infected with the virus in experimental conditions. Small animal models of EBV infection, required for evaluation of novel therapies and vaccines for EBV-associated diseases, have not been available. Recently the development of severely immunodeficient mouse strains enabled production of humanized mice in which human immune system components are reconstituted and express their normal functions. Humanized mice can serve as infection models for human-specific viruses such as EBV that target cells of the immune system. This review summarizes recent studies by the author's group addressing reproduction of EBV infection and pathogenesis in humanized mice.

  20. Immunomodulatory properties of borage (Echium amoenum) on BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Nahid; Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2011-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by parasitic protozoa transmitted by the bite of a female sand fly and is currently endemic in 88 countries. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to the infection with the parasite Leishmania major, and this susceptibility has been attributed, in part, to the expansion of Th2 cells, production of their cytokines, and downregulation of Th1 cytokine, interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In this report, we used both aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Iranian borage (Echium amoenum Fisch & C.A. Mey) for treatment of L. major infection in BALB/c mice. We found that both extracts had immunomodulatory properties and increased the level of IFN-γ and lowered the parasite burden in the proximal lymph nodes and prevented the necrosis of the footpad as compared with the untreated infected mice. These results may provide a basis for further studies directed toward the use of the Iranian borage against L. major infection.

  1. Reduced infectivity of waterborne viable but nonculturable Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Fontaine, Clinton; Brewster, Rebecca; Wu, Jianfeng; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne VBNCH. pylori could cause gastric infection. We performed five mouse experiments to assess the infectivity of VBNCH. pylori in various exposure scenarios. VBNC viability was examined using Live/Dead staining and Biolog phenotype metabolism arrays. High doses of VBNCH. pylori in water were chosen to test the "worst-case" scenario for different periods of time. One experiment also investigated the infectious capabilities of VBNC SS1 using gavage. Further, immunocompromised mice were exposed to examine infectivity among potentially vulnerable groups. After exposure, mice were euthanized and their stomachs were examined for H. pylori infection using culture and PCR methodology. VBNC cells were membrane intact and retained metabolic activity. Mice exposed to VBNCH. pylori via drinking water and gavage were not infected, despite the various exposure scenarios (immunocompromised, high doses) that might have permitted infection with VBNCH. pylori. The positive controls exposed to viable, culturable H. pylori did become infected. While other studies that have used viable, culturable SS1 via gavage or drinking water exposures to successfully infect mice, in our study, waterborne VBNC SS1 failed to colonize mice under all test conditions. Future studies could examine different H. pylori strains in similar exposure scenarios to compare the relative infectivity of the VBNC vs the viable, culturable state, which would help inform future risk assessments of H. pylori in water. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The effect of diminazene aceturate and isometamidium chloride on cultured procyclic forms of susceptible and drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Elrayah, I E; Kaminsky, R

    1991-08-01

    Cultures of insect forms of Trypanosoma congolense stocks and clones with different susceptibilities to trypanocidal drugs in vivo were initiated from bloodstream trypomastigotes harvested from mammalian hosts and maintained axenically in vitro at 27 degrees C. Growth inhibition of procyclic forms of susceptible and drug-resistant T. congolense occurred after incubation for 48 h with 0.1 ng isometamidium chloride ml or 500 ng diminazene aceturate/ml. Procyclic forms were propagated in vitro in the presence of 10 or 100 ng diminazene aceturate/ml for 20 days without or with only minor loss of growth. In the presence of 0.1 or 1 ng isometamidium chloride/ml the trypanocidal effect was detectable after 6-8 days and the cultures died after 10-12 days. Concentrations of 1 or 10 ng isometamidium chloride/ml had an irreversible effect when the trypanosomes were exposed to the drug for 24 h. Both drugs used in this study thus showed antitrypanosomal activity on T. congolense procyclic forms but it was not possible to distinguish between drug-resistant and susceptible stocks or clones employing the criteria of growth inhibition or death of trypanosomes in culture.

  3. Cellular mechanisms involved in the increased contraction of portal veins from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L M; Lenzi, H L; Silva, V F M; Paulo, F O; Noël, F

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported that portal veins from mice infected with male Schistosoma mansoni exhibited an increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Here, we extended our observations to mice infected by both male and female worms and we further investigated another constrictor agent and the mechanism(s) responsible for the enhanced maximal contraction ( E(max)). Bisexual infection increased the E(max) of 5-HT (from 0.66+/-0.06 mN.s to 1.56+/-0.38 mN.s), in a similar way to the unisexual (male) infection. Infection with male worms increased portal vein reactivity to acetylcholine, as revealed by a higher E(max) (1.03+/-0.2 mN.s) in relation to non-infected control animals ( E(max)= 0.54+/-0.08 mN.s). Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibition with 100 nM thapsigargin reduced the E(max) of 5-HT by 35% in both tissues, discharging a deficiency of SERCA pump in infected animals. In contrast, the number of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (L-type) was higher in portal veins from infected than non-infected control mice. Inhibition of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (Cl(Ca)) with 10 micro M niflumic acid reduced the E(max) of 5-HT in portal veins more from infected than non-infected animals (remaining tension = 60.9+/-2.2% and 70.4+/-2.3%, respectively). Histopathological analysis revealed an increased content of collagen and elastin in portal veins from male S. mansoni-infected mice, compatible with an increased intraluminal pressure. In conclusion, male S. mansoni altered portal vein physiology, increasing the E(max) of two vasoconstrictors, possibly by increasing membrane depolarisation through a more effective opening of Cl(Ca) channels, with calcium entering through L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  4. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice--A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-02-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4), 1 x 10(2) and 4 x 10(0) spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species.

  5. Trichinella spiralis infection in mice. Mechanism of the resistance in animals genetically selected for high and low antibody production.

    PubMed Central

    Perrudet-Badoux, A; Binaghi, R A; Boussac-Aron, Y

    1978-01-01

    Mice genetically selected according to their capacity to produce antibody were orally infected with fifty muscle larvae. After 1 month, the number of larvae found in low responder mice was twice the number found in high responder mice. Following a second infection, low responder mice were completely protected while high responder mice showed only partial protection. It is suggested that the better resistance of high responder mice after a primary infection is due to their high and rapid antibody production. However, at the time of a secondary infection both lines of mice possess enough antibody to act on the effector cells (macrophages, eosinophils, etc.) and resistance is then dependent on the metabolic activity of these cells, which is more intense in the low responder mice. PMID:700780

  6. Administration of kefir-fermented milk protects mice against Giardia intestinalis infection.

    PubMed

    Franco, Mariana Correa; Golowczyc, Marina A; De Antoni, Graciela L; Pérez, Pablo F; Humen, Martín; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2013-12-01

    Giardiasis, caused by the protozoan Giardia intestinalis, is one of the most common intestinal diseases worldwide and constitutes an important problem for the public health systems of various countries. Kefir is a probiotic drink obtained by fermenting milk with 'kefir grains', which consist mainly of bacteria and yeasts that coexist in a complex symbiotic association. In this work, we studied the ability of kefir to protect mice from G. intestinalis infection, and characterized the host immune response to this probiotic in the context of the intestinal infection. Six- to 8-week-old C75BL/6 mice were separated into four groups: controls, kefir mice (receiving 1 : 100 dilution of kefir in drinking water for 14 days), Giardia mice (infected orally with 4×10(7) trophozoites of G. intestinalis at day 7) and Giardia-kefir mice (kefir-treated G. intestinalis-infected mice), and killed at 2 or 7 days post-infection. Kefir administration was able to significantly reduce the intensity of Giardia infection at 7 days post-infection. An increase in the percentage of CD4(+) T cells at 2 days post-infection was observed in the Peyer's patches (PP) of mice belonging to the Giardia group compared with the control and kefir groups, while the percentage of CD4(+) T cells in PP in the Giardia-kefir group was similar to that of controls. At 2 days post-infection, a reduction in the percentage of B220-positive major histocompatibility complex class II medium cells in PP was observed in infected mice compared with the other groups. At 7 days post-infection, Giardia-infected mice showed a reduction in RcFcε-positive cells compared with the control group, suggesting a downregulation of the inflammatory response. However, the percentages of RcFcε-positive cells did not differ from controls in the kefir and Giardia-kefir groups. An increase in IgA-positive cells was observed in the lamina propria of the kefir group compared with controls at 2 days post-infection. Interestingly, the

  7. Escherichia coli strains colonising the gastrointestinal tract protect germfree mice against Salmonella typhimurium infection

    PubMed Central

    Hudault, S; Guignot, J; Servin, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Escherichia coli is part of the normal gastrointestinal microflora which exerts a barrier effect against enteropathogens. Several E coli strains develop a protective effect against other Enterobacteriaceae.
AIMS—Two E coli strains, EM0, a human faecal strain, and JM105 K-12 were tested for their ability to prevent in vivo and in vitro infection by Salmonella typhimurium C5.
METHODS—Inhibition of C5 cell invasion by E coli was investigated in vitro using Caco-2/TC7 cells. The protective effect of E coli was examined in vivo in germfree or conventional C3H/He/Oujco mice orally infected by the lethal strain C5.
RESULTS—EMO expresses haemolysin and cytotoxic necrotising factor in vitro. In vitro, the two strains did not prevent the growth of C5 by secreted microcins or modified cell invasion of C5. In vivo, establishment of EM0 or JM105 in the gut of germfree mice resulted in a significant increase in the number of surviving mice: 11/12 and 9/12, respectively, at 58 days after infection (2×106/mouse) versus 0/12 in control germfree group at 13 days after infection. Colonisation level and translocation rate of C5 were significantly reduced during the three days after infection. In contrast, no reduction in faecal C5 excretion was observed in C5 infected conventional mice (1×108/mouse) receiving the EM0 or JM105 cultures daily.
CONCLUSIONS—Establishment of E coli strains, which do not display antimicrobial activity, protects germfree mice against infection and delays the establishment of C5 in the gut. Possible mechanisms of defence are discussed.


Keywords: Escherichia coli; gastrointestinal infection; Salmonella; germfree mice; bacterial antagonism PMID:11413110

  8. Role of neutrophils in response to Bordetella pertussis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Charlotte; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2009-03-01

    Pertussis is an acute respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis, for which humans are the only known reservoir. During infection, B. pertussis releases several toxins, including pertussis toxin (PT) and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), which have both been shown to play roles in promoting bacterial growth during early infection in a mouse model. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that PT and ACT affect neutrophil chemotaxis and/or function, thereby altering the innate immune response. In this study we depleted animals of neutrophils to investigate whether neutrophils play a protective role during B. pertussis infection in mice. In addition, by infection with toxin-deficient strains, we investigated whether neutrophils are the main targets for PT and/or ACT activity in promoting bacterial growth. Surprisingly, we found no role for neutrophils during B. pertussis infection in naïve mice. However, in previously infected (immune) mice or in mice receiving immune serum, we observed a significant role for neutrophils during infection. Furthermore, in this immune mouse model our evidence indicates that neutrophils appear to be the main target cells for ACT, but not for PT.

  9. [Calbindin and parvalbumin distribution in spinal cord of normal and rabies-infected mice].

    PubMed

    Monroy-Gómez, Jeison; Torres-Fernández, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal infectious disease of the nervous system; however, the knowledge about the pathogenic neural mechanisms in rabies is scarce. In addition, there are few studies of rabies pathology of the spinal cord. To study the distribution of calcium binding proteins calbindin and parvalbumin and assessing the effect of rabies virus infection on their expression in the spinal cord of mice. MATERIALES Y METHODS: Mice were inoculated with rabies virus, by intracerebral or intramuscular route. The spinal cord was extracted to perform some crosscuts which were treated by immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies to reveal the presence of the two proteins in normal and rabies infected mice. We did qualitative and quantitative analyses of the immunoreactivity of the two proteins. Calbindin and parvalbumin showed differential distribution in Rexed laminae. Rabies infection produced a decrease in the expression of calbindin. On the contrary, the infection caused an increased expression of parvalbumin. The effect of rabies infection on the two proteins expression was similar when comparing both routes of inoculation. The differential effect of rabies virus infection on the expression of calbindin and parvalbumin in the spinal cord of mice was similar to that previously reported for brain areas. This result suggests uniformity in the response to rabies infection throughout the central nervous system. This is an important contribution to the understanding of the pathogenesis of rabies.

  10. Antimalarial Potential of Carica papaya and Vernonia amygdalina in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Habila, Nathan; Ikwebe, Joseph; Upev, Vincent A.; Isaac, Omiagocho T.

    2016-01-01

    The study determined if administration of Vernonia amygdalina and Carica papaya plants provides synergistic effects in ameliorating plasmodium infection in mice. Thirty mice (17.88–25.3 g) were divided into 6 groups of 5 mice each. Group 1 was normal control, while groups 2–6 were intraperitoneally inoculated 2.5 × 107 Plasmodium berghei parasitized red blood cell, followed by daily administration of 350 mg/kg aqueous leaf extracts after establishment of infection. Group 2 was disease control, while group 6 was treated with standard drug for four consecutive days. The results showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in percentage of parasite load between the infected treatment groups and disease control group at day 3 after infection, which remained consistent until the end of the experiment. All infected treated groups showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in RBC and PCV recovery compared to the disease control, with the exception of WBC. There was insignificant (P > 0.05) change in mean body weight of all treated groups except in disease control group. Histological studies of the infected mice indicate recovery of hepatic cells from congested black pigmentation. The reduction in parasite load and recovery of hepatic cell damage/hematological parameters were induced by these plant extracts. This highlighted the important usage of the plant in traditional remedy of malaria infection. PMID:28042299

  11. Antimalarial Potential of Carica papaya and Vernonia amygdalina in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Okpe, Oche; Habila, Nathan; Ikwebe, Joseph; Upev, Vincent A; Okoduwa, Stanley I R; Isaac, Omiagocho T

    2016-01-01

    The study determined if administration of Vernonia amygdalina and Carica papaya plants provides synergistic effects in ameliorating plasmodium infection in mice. Thirty mice (17.88-25.3 g) were divided into 6 groups of 5 mice each. Group 1 was normal control, while groups 2-6 were intraperitoneally inoculated 2.5 × 10(7)Plasmodium berghei parasitized red blood cell, followed by daily administration of 350 mg/kg aqueous leaf extracts after establishment of infection. Group 2 was disease control, while group 6 was treated with standard drug for four consecutive days. The results showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in percentage of parasite load between the infected treatment groups and disease control group at day 3 after infection, which remained consistent until the end of the experiment. All infected treated groups showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in RBC and PCV recovery compared to the disease control, with the exception of WBC. There was insignificant (P > 0.05) change in mean body weight of all treated groups except in disease control group. Histological studies of the infected mice indicate recovery of hepatic cells from congested black pigmentation. The reduction in parasite load and recovery of hepatic cell damage/hematological parameters were induced by these plant extracts. This highlighted the important usage of the plant in traditional remedy of malaria infection.

  12. Petiveria alliacea L. extract protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection--effects on bone marrow progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Quadros, M R; Souza Brito, A R; Queiroz, M L

    1999-02-01

    In this study we have investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea on the hematopoietic response of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Our results demonstrate a protective effect of the crude extract of P. alliacea since the survival of the treated/infected was higher than that in the infected group. Moreover, the number of granulocyte/macrophage colonies (CFU-GM) and the serum colony stimulating activity levels were increased in the treated/infected mice in relation to the infected group. These results suggest an immunomodulation of Petiveria alliacea extract on hematopoiesis, which may be responsible, at least in part, for the increased resistance of mice to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

  13. X-linked immunodeficient mice exhibit enhanced susceptibility to Cryptococcus neoformans Infection.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Wendy A; Davis, Michael J; Lundy, Steven K; Dufaud, Chad; Olszewski, Michal; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2013-07-02

    ABSTRACT Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a signaling molecule that plays important roles in B-1 B cell development and innate myeloid cell functions and has recently been identified as a target for therapy of B cell lymphomas. We examined the contribution of B-1 B cells to resistance to Cryptococcus neoformans infection by utilizing X-linked immunodeficient (XID) mice (CBA-CaHN-XID), which possess a mutation in Btk. XID mice had significantly higher brain fungal burdens than the controls 6 weeks after infection with C. neoformans strain 52D (CN52D); however, consistent with the propensity for greater virulence of C. neoformans strain H99 (CNH99), CNH99-infected XID mice had higher lung and brain fungal burdens than the controls 3 weeks after infection. Further studies in a chronic CN52D model revealed markedly lower levels of total and C. neoformans-specific serum IgM in XID mice than in the control mice 1 and 6 weeks after infection. Alveolar macrophage phagocytosis was markedly impaired in CN52D-infected XID mice compared to the controls, with XID mice exhibiting a disorganized lung inflammatory pattern in which Gomori silver staining revealed significantly more enlarged, extracellular C. neoformans cells than the controls. Adoptive transfer of B-1 B cells to XID mice restored peritoneal B-1 B cells but did not restore IgM levels to those of the controls and had no effect on the brain fungal burden at 6 weeks. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that IgM promotes fungal containment in the lungs by enhancing C. neoformans phagocytosis and restricting C. neoformans enlargement. However, peritoneal B-1 B cells are insufficient to reconstitute a protective effect in the lungs. IMPORTANCE Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes an estimated 600,000 deaths per year. Most infections occur in individuals who are immunocompromised, with the majority of cases occurring in those with HIV/AIDS, but healthy individuals also develop disease

  14. Pilot-Scale Pulsed UV Light Irradiation of Experimentally Infected Raspberries Suppresses Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Immunocompetent Suckling Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, L; Hubert, B; Favennec, L; Villena, I; Ballet, J J; Agoulon, A; Orange, N; Gargala, G

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., a significant cause of foodborne infection, have been shown to be resistant to most chemical food disinfectant agents and infective for weeks in irrigation waters and stored fresh vegetal produce. Pulsed UV light (PL) has the potential to inactivate Cryptosporidium spp. on surfaces of raw or minimally processed foods or both. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PL on viability and in vivo infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present on raspberries, a known source of transmission to humans of oocyst-forming apicomplexan pathogens. The skin of each of 20 raspberries was experimentally inoculated with five 10-μl spots of an oocyst suspension containing 6 × 10(7) oocysts per ml (Nouzilly isolate). Raspberries were irradiated by PL flashes (4 J/cm(2) of total fluence). This dose did not affect colorimetric or organoleptic characteristics of fruits. After immunomagnetic separation from raspberries, oocysts were bleached and administered orally to neonatal suckling mice. Seven days after infection, mice were euthanized, and the number of oocysts in the entire small intestine was individually assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Three of 12 and 12 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10 and 100 oocysts isolated from nonirradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Four of 12 and 2 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Oocyst counts were lower in animals inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries (92 ± 144 and 38 ± 82, respectively) than in animals infected with 100 oocysts from nonirradiated raspberries (35,785 ± 66,221, P = 0.008). PL irradiation achieved oocyst reductions of 2 and 3 log for an inoculum of 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts, respectively. The present pilot-scale evaluation suggests that PL is an effective mode of decontamination for raspberries and prompts further applicability

  15. Induction and expression of protective T cells during Mycobacterium avium infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Pedrosa, J

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen that infects individuals suffering from chronic lung disease or immunocompromised patients such as AIDS patients. Here we show that a highly virulent isolate of M. avium proliferated as extensively in T cell deficient as in immunocompetent mice. T cell deficient mice allowed a progressive growth of a less virulent AIDS-derived isolate of M. avium while immunocompetent mice arrested the growth of this isolate. Adoptive transfer of T cell enriched spleen cells between congenic strains of mice differing at the Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus showed that only naturally resistant BALB/c.Bcgr (C.D2) mice infected with the highly virulent strain of M. avium or the naturally susceptible BALB/c mice infected with the lower virulence isolate developed protective T cells and that these cells only mediated protection when transferred to naturally susceptible, but not to naturally resistant, mice. Both strains of M. avium proliferated in bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured in vitro and they were both susceptible to the bacteriostatic effects induced in the macrophages by crude lymphokines produced by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells. PMID:1544223

  16. Noninvasive biophotonic imaging for monitoring of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L; Modi, Kshitij; Yu, Jun; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R

    2005-07-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections acquired by humans, particularly in catheterized patients. A major problem with catheterization is the formation of bacterial biofilms on catheter material and the risk of developing persistent UTIs that are difficult to monitor and eradicate. To better understand the course of UTIs and allow more accurate studies of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, we developed a catheter-based biofilm infection model with mice, using bioluminescently engineered bacteria. Two important urinary tract pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, were made bioluminescent by stable insertion of a complete lux operon. Segments of catheter material (precolonized or postimplant infected) with either pathogen were placed transurethrally in the lumen of the bladder by using a metal stylet without surgical manipulation. The bioluminescent strains were sufficiently bright to be readily monitored from the outside of infected animals, using a low-light optical imaging system, including the ability to trace the ascending pattern of light-emitting bacteria through ureters to the kidneys. Placement of the catheter in the bladder not only resulted in the development of strong cystitis that persisted significantly longer than in mice challenged with bacterial suspensions alone but also required prolonged antibiotic treatment to reduce the level of infection. Treatment of infected mice for 4 days with ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg of body weight twice a day cured cystitis and renal infection in noncatheterized mice. Similarly, ciprofloxacin reduced the bacterial burden to undetectable levels in catheterized mice but did not inhibit rebound of the infection upon cessation of antibiotic therapy. This methodology easily allows spatial information to be monitored sequentially throughout the entire disease process, including ascending UTI, treatment efficacy, and relapse, all without exogenous sampling, which is not

  17. Utility of humanized BLT mice for analysis of dengue virus infection and antiviral drug testing.

    PubMed

    Frias-Staheli, Natalia; Dorner, Marcus; Marukian, Svetlana; Billerbeck, Eva; Labitt, Rachael N; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the cause of a potentially life-threatening disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The lack of a small animal model that mimics the symptoms of DENV infection in humans has slowed the understanding of viral pathogenesis and the development of therapies and vaccines. Here, we investigated the use of humanized "bone marrow liver thymus" (BLT) mice as a model for immunological studies and assayed their applicability for preclinical testing of antiviral compounds. Human immune system (HIS) BLT-NOD/SCID mice were inoculated intravenously with a low-passage, clinical isolate of DENV-2, and this resulted in sustained viremia and infection of leukocytes in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. In addition, DENV infection increased serum cytokine levels and elicited DENV-2-neutralizing human IgM antibodies. Following restimulation with DENV-infected dendritic cells, in vivo-primed T cells became activated and acquired effector function. An adenosine nucleoside inhibitor of DENV decreased the circulating viral RNA when administered simultaneously or 2 days postinfection, simulating a potential treatment protocol for DENV infection in humans. In summary, we demonstrate that BLT mice are susceptible to infection with clinical DENV isolates, mount virus-specific adaptive immune responses, and respond to antiviral drug treatment. Although additional refinements to the model are required, BLT mice are a suitable platform to study aspects of DENV infection and pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of drug and vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Infection with dengue virus remains a major medical problem. Progress in our understanding of the disease and development of therapeutics has been hampered by the scarcity of small animal models. Here, we show that humanized mice, i.e., animals engrafted with components of a human immune system, that were infected with a patient-derived dengue virus strain developed clinical symptoms of the disease and mounted

  18. Contribution of dopamine neurotransmission in proconvulsant effect of Toxoplasma gondii infection in male mice.

    PubMed

    Babaie, Jalal; Sayyah, Mohammad; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Golkar, Majid; Gharagozli, Kourosh

    2017-10-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders worldwide with no distinguishable cause in 60% of patients. One-third of world's population is infected with Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). This intracellular parasite has high tendency to excitable cells including neurons. We assessed seizure susceptibility and involvement of dopaminergic system in male mice with acute and chronic T. gondii infection. Mice were infected by intraperitoneal injection of T. gondii cysts. Acute and chronic stages of infection were determined by quantification of SAG1/BAG1 transcripts and level of repetitive REP-529 sequence in the brain of mice by real-time PCR. Threshold of clonic seizures was measured by tail vein infusion of pentylenetetrazole. The infected mice were pretreated with D1 and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists, and seizure threshold was measured. Moreover, seizure threshold was determined after treatment of toxoplasmosis by sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. SAG1 level reached the maximum at week 2 after infection and then declined. The maximum level of BAG1 was observed at the week 3 and preserved till the week 8. REP-529 was detected at first week after infection, reached maximum at the week 3 and kept at this level till the eighth week. Threshold of seizures significantly decreased in both acute and chronic phases of infection. D1 and D2 receptors antagonists inhibited proconvulsant effect of toxoplasmosis. Chemotherapy inhibited parasite growth and multiplication, and returned seizure susceptibility to the level of non-infected mice. Dopaminergic neurotransmission participates in proconvulsant effect of T. gondii. The effect of parasite is eliminated by antibiotic therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Vaginal chlamydial clearance following primary or secondary infection in mice occurs independently of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Chaganty, Bharat K. R.; Gupta, Rishein; Guentzel, M. Neal; Chambers, James P.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of TNF-α in chlamydial clearance is uncertain. Antibody-mediated depletion of TNF-α in mice and guinea pigs has been shown not to significantly affect chlamydial clearance, whereas production of TNF-α in addition to IFN-γ from T cells has been shown to correlate with enhanced clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the mechanistic role of TNF-α in clearance of primary and secondary chlamydial infection from the genital tract (GT) using C57BL/6 TNF-α deficient (TNF-α−/−) and wild type (WT) mice. Chlamydial shedding from the lower GT was evaluated following primary and secondary intravaginal challenge. Also, antibody and antigen specific cytokine responses were analyzed from the infected GT and spleens, and oviduct pathology determined to analyze the role of TNF-α in upper GT pathological sequelae. MHC II−/− mice, known to display muted adaptive immune responses and failure to resolve genital chlamydial infections, were used as a negative control. Following both primary and secondary genital chlamydial infection, TNF-α−/− mice exhibited elevated granzyme B production, but similar IFN-γ and antibody responses. Importantly, absence of TNF-α did not significantly alter the resolution of infection. However, TNF-α−/− mice displayed significantly reduced upper genital tract (UGT) pathology compared to WT mice. This study demonstrates mechanistically that optimal chlamydial clearance following primary and secondary chlamydial genital infection can occur in the complete absence of TNF-α, and considered with the reduction of upper GT pathology in TNF-α−/− mice, suggests that targeted induction of anti-chlamydial TNF-α responses by vaccination may be unnecessary, and moreover could be potentially pathogenic. PMID:23483844

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Weaver, Eric A.; May, Shannon M.; Croatt, Anthony J.; Foreman, Oded; Kennedy, Richard B.; Poland, Gregory A.; Barry, Michael A.; Nath, Karl A.; Badley, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms of individual variation in severity of influenza infection and response to vaccination are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on vaccine response and outcome of influenza infection. HO-1-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice (kingdom, Animalia; phylum, Chordata; genus/species, Mus musculus) were infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 with or without prior vaccination with an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine. A genome-wide association study evaluated the expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HO-1 gene and the response to influenza vaccination in healthy humans. HO-1-deficient mice had decreased survival after influenza infection compared to WT mice (median survival 5.5 vs. 6.5 d, P=0.016). HO-1-deficient mice had impaired production of antibody following influenza vaccination compared to WT mice (mean antibody titer 869 vs. 1698, P=0.02). One SNP in HO-1 and one SNP in the constitutively expressed isoform HO-2 were independently associated with decreased antibody production after influenza vaccination in healthy human volunteers (P=0.017 and 0.014, respectively). HO-1 deficient mice were paired with sex- and age-matched WT controls. HO-1 affects the immune response to both influenza infection and vaccination, suggesting that therapeutic induction of HO-1 expression may represent a novel adjuvant to enhance influenza vaccine effectiveness.—Cummins, N. W., Weaver, E. A., May, S. M., Croatt, A. J., Foreman, O., Kennedy, R. B., Poland, G. A., Barry, M. A., Nath, K. A., Badley, A. D. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice. PMID:22490782

  1. Vaginal chlamydial clearance following primary or secondary infection in mice occurs independently of TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Gupta, Rishein; Guentzel, M Neal; Chambers, James P; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2013-01-01

    The role of TNF-α in chlamydial clearance is uncertain. Antibody-mediated depletion of TNF-α in mice and guinea pigs has been shown not to significantly affect chlamydial clearance, whereas production of TNF-α in addition to IFN-γ from T cells has been shown to correlate with enhanced clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the mechanistic role of TNF-α in clearance of primary and secondary chlamydial infection from the genital tract (GT) using C57BL/6 TNF-α deficient (TNF-α(-/-)) and wild type (WT) mice. Chlamydial shedding from the lower GT was evaluated following primary and secondary intravaginal challenge. Also, antibody and antigen specific cytokine responses were analyzed from the infected GT and spleens, and oviduct pathology determined to analyze the role of TNF-α in upper GT pathological sequelae. MHC II(-/-) mice, known to display muted adaptive immune responses and failure to resolve genital chlamydial infections, were used as a negative control. Following both primary and secondary genital chlamydial infection, TNF-α(-/-) mice exhibited elevated granzyme B production, but similar IFN-γ and antibody responses. Importantly, absence of TNF-α did not significantly alter the resolution of infection. However, TNF-α(-/-) mice displayed significantly reduced upper genital tract (UGT) pathology compared to WT mice. This study demonstrates mechanistically that optimal chlamydial clearance following primary and secondary chlamydial genital infection can occur in the complete absence of TNF-α, and considered with the reduction of upper GT pathology in TNF-α(-/-) mice, suggests that targeted induction of anti-chlamydial TNF-α responses by vaccination may be unnecessary, and moreover could be potentially pathogenic.

  2. Increased Susceptibility of Humanized NSG Mice to Panton-Valentine Leukocidin and Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching Wen; Kolar, Stacey L.; Müller, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Maria D.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Fan, Xuemo; Beenhouwer, David O.; Town, Terrence; Liu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft-tissue infections worldwide. Mice are the most commonly used animals for modeling human staphylococcal infections. However a supra-physiologic S. aureus inoculum is required to establish gross murine skin pathology. Moreover, many staphylococcal factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) elaborated by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), exhibit selective human tropism and cannot be adequately studied in mice. To overcome these deficiencies, we investigated S. aureus infection in non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immune deficiency (SCID)/IL2rγnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells. These “humanized” NSG mice require one to two log lower inoculum to induce consistent skin lesions compared with control mice, and exhibit larger cutaneous lesions upon infection with PVL+ versus isogenic PVL- S. aureus. Neutrophils appear important for PVL pathology as adoptive transfer of human neutrophils alone to NSG mice was sufficient to induce dermonecrosis following challenge with PVL+ S. aureus but not PVL- S. aureus. PMX53, a human C5aR inhibitor, blocked PVL-induced cellular cytotoxicity in vitro and reduced the size difference of lesions induced by the PVL+ and PVL- S. aureus, but PMX53 also reduced recruitment of neutrophils and exacerbated the infection. Overall, our findings establish humanized mice as an important translational tool for the study of S. aureus infection and provide strong evidence that PVL is a human virulence factor. PMID:26618545

  3. Migration of epithelial cells in the small intestine of mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5.

    PubMed

    Shadoff, N; Loria, R M; Kibrick, S; Broitman, S A

    1979-03-01

    The rate of cell migration in the small intestine during enteric viral infections has not been assessed previously. CD-1 mice (33 days old) were infected perorally with 1.0 X 10(8) plague-forming units of coxsackievirus B5 and 12 hr later were injected intraperitoneally with 2 micron Ci of [3H]thymidine/g of body weight. After 2, 12, 24, 48, 60, and 72 hr, mice were killed, and the small intestine was removed. Specimens obtained at each interval were examined by radioautography; similar specimens were titrated for virus by plaque assay in HeLa cells. In mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5, epithelial cells migrated from crypt to villus tip in 60 hr, as compared with 48 hr in uninfected control mice and 24 hr previously reported for mice perorally infected with enteric bacteria (e.g., Salmonella typhimurium). Virus was recovered from intestinal tissue, but no inflammatory response in the limina propria was apparent. These observations are consistent with previous report that substrate absorption rates may be altered during viral and bacterial enteric infection.

  4. Influence of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Silva, Déborah Maria Moreira da; Pinheiro, Laila; Azevedo, Cristiano Schetini; Costa, Guilherme de Paula; Talvani, André

    2017-01-01

    Enriched environments normally increase behavioral repertoires and diminish the expression of abnormal behaviors and stress-related physiological problems in animals. Although it has been shown that experimental animals infected with microorganisms can modify their behaviors and physiology, few studies have evaluated how environmental enrichment affects these parameters. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of confined mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The behaviors of 20 T. cruzi-infected mice and 20 non-infected mice were recorded during three treatments: baseline, enrichment, and post-enrichment. Behavioral data were collected using scan sampling with instantaneous recording of behavior every 30s, totaling 360h. Plasma TNF, CCL2, and IL-10 levels and parasitemia were also evaluated in infected enriched/non-enriched mice. Behavioral data were evaluated by Friedman's test and physiological data by one-way ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC) analysis. Results showed that environmental enrichment significantly increased exploratory behaviors and diminished inactivity. The use of environmental enrichment did not diminish circulating levels of TNF and IL-10 but diminished circulating levels of CCL2 and parasitemia. Positive behavioral and physiological effects of environmental enrichment were observed in mice living in enriched cages. Thus, environmental enrichment improved the welfare of these animals.

  5. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles exacerbate pneumonia in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Seiko; Yoshida, Hiroki; Akashi, Toshi; Komemoto, Keiji; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Miyauchi, Aki; Konno, Katsuhiko; Yamanaka, Sayoko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kurokawa, Masahiko; Watanabe, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles, used in cosmetics and building materials, on the immune response, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection mouse model was used. BALB/c mice were exposed once intranasally to TiO2 at 0.5mg/kg and infected intranasally with RSV five days later. The levels of IFN-γ and chemokine CCL5, representative markers of pneumonia, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of RSV-infected mice had increased significantly in TiO2-exposed mice compared with the control on day 5 post-infection, but not in uninfected mice. While pulmonary viral titers were not affected by TiO2 exposure, an increase in the infiltration of lymphocytes into the alveolar septa in lung tissues was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles near inflammatory cells in the severely affected region. Thus, a single exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles affected the immune system and exacerbated pneumonia in RSV-infected mice.

  6. Protective effect of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against abortion in mice infected by Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed

    Buzoni-Gatel, D; Bernard, F; Andersen, A; Rodolakis, A

    1990-08-01

    The role of antibody in preventing placental and fetal infection by Chlamydia psittaci was studied in mice. Pregnant mice were passively immunized with polyclonal sera or monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) at day 11 of gestation. The mice were intravenously challenged the following day with the virulent AB7 ovine abortion strain of C. psittaci. Mice were either killed on day 16 of gestation to determine placental and fetal chlamydial infection levels or were permitted to have and raise their young until 8 days old for comparison of survival rates. Immune sera produced a decrease in both placental and fetal infection and reduced the number of young dying in utero or shortly after birth. Polyclonal sera to the highly invasive AB7 and AB4 strains or to the invasive 1B strain were more effective than serum to the invasive AB13 strain. The B577/F3 and B577/A11 monoclonal antibodies gave almost complete protection, with only low levels of placental infection and no detectable fetal infection or decrease in survival rate. The study demonstrates that immune sera and type-specific mAbs can passively transfer resistance to placental and fetal colonization and to abortion and fetal loss in mice intravenously challenged with P. psittaci.

  7. IL-10 regulates viral lung immunopathology during acute respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Loebbermann, Jens; Schnoeller, Corinna; Thornton, Hannah; Durant, Lydia; Sweeney, Nathan P; Schuijs, Martijn; O'Garra, Anne; Johansson, Cecilia; Openshaw, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL-) 10 is a pleiotropic cytokine with broad immunosuppressive functions, particularly at mucosal sites such as the intestine and lung. Here we demonstrate that infection of BALB/c mice with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induced IL-10 production by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the airways at later time points (e.g. day 8); a proportion of these cells also co-produced IFN-γ. Furthermore, RSV infection of IL-10(-/-) mice resulted in more severe disease with enhanced weight loss, delayed recovery and greater cell infiltration of the respiratory tract without affecting viral load. In addition, IL-10(-/-) mice had a pronounced airway neutrophilia and heightened levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Notably, the proportion of lung T cells producing IFN-γ was enhanced, suggesting that IL-10 may act in an autocrine manner to dampen effector T cell responses. Similar findings were made in mice treated with anti-IL-10R antibody and infected with RSV. Therefore, IL-10 inhibits disease and inflammation in mice infected with RSV, especially during recovery from infection.

  8. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  9. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Calderon, Veronica E; Huante, Matthew B; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B; Lisinicchia, Joshua G; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J

    2016-02-24

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination.

  10. Effect of isometamidium chloride treatment on susceptibility of tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) to trypanosome infections.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bossche, P; Akoda, K; Djagmah, B; Marcotty, T; De Deken, R; Kubi, C; Parker, A; Van Den Abbeele, J

    2006-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of a single isometamidium chloride treatment of teneral tsetse flies, Glossina morsitans morsitans Westwood (Diptera: Glossinidae), on the subsequent susceptibility to an infection with Trypanosoma congolense or Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Flies were offered a first bloodmeal on sterile gamma-irradiated defibrinated bovine blood that contained either 10 or 100 microg ofisometamidium chloride/ml. Treated flies were subsequently infected with T. congolense IL 1180 or T. b. brucei AnTAR1 on day 3, 5, 10, or 20 posttreatment. To determine the effect of a single treatment with isometamidium chloride at 10 microg/ml on the fly's susceptibility to infection with isometamidium chloride-resistant trypanosome strains, treated flies were infected with one of two resistant isogenic T. congolense IL 1180 strains 3 d after the first feed. Results showed that a single isometamidium chloride treatment at 10 microg/ml blood sufficed to reduce significantly the fly's subsequent susceptibility to infection. Only 6.8% of the flies that were treated with isometamidium chloride developed a mature infection with T. congolense in the mouthparts compared with 34.3% of the control group. None of the flies that were administered isometamidium chloride and subsequently infected on day 3 or 6 with T. b. brucei developed a metacyclic infection in the salivary glands compared with 22.7% of the control flies. Likewise for the resistant T. congolense strains, a single treatment with isometamidium chloride significantly reduced the subsequent susceptibility to infection (6.5 and 33.5% of flies with metacyclic infections for treated and untreated flies, respectively). In practice and with respect to the release of sterile male flies to eradicate an isolated tsetse fly population, our results show that administering isometamidium chloride during the first bloodmeal (and before release) would significantly reduce the ability of these released males to

  11. Impaired NLRP3 inflammasome function in elderly mice during influenza infection is rescued by treatment with nigericin.

    PubMed

    Stout-Delgado, Heather W; Vaughan, Sarah E; Shirali, Anushree C; Jaramillo, Richard J; Harrod, Kevin S

    2012-03-15

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the lung during influenza viral infection; however, the impact of aging on inflammasome function during influenza infection has not been examined. In this study, we show that elderly mice infected with a mouse-adapted strain of influenza produced lower levels of IL-1β during in vitro and in vivo infection. Dendritic cells from elderly mice exhibited decreased expression of ASC, NLRP3, and capase-1 but increased expression of pro-IL-1β, pro-IL-18, and pro-IL-33 compared with dendritic cells from young infected mice. Treatment with nigericin during influenza infection augmented IL-1β production, increased caspase-1 activity, and decreased morbidity and mortality in elderly mice. Our study demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, that during influenza viral infection, elderly mice have impaired NLRP3 inflammasome activity and that treatment with nigericin rescues NLRP3 activation in elderly hosts.

  12. Impaired NLRP3 Inflammasome Function in Elderly Mice during Influenza Infection is Rescued by Treatment with Nigericin1

    PubMed Central

    Stout-Delgado, Heather W.; Vaughan, Sarah E.; Shirali, Anushree C.; Jaramillo, Richard J.; Harrod, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the lung during influenza viral infection; however the impact of aging on inflammasome function during influenza infection has not been examined. Here, we show that elderly mice infected with a mouse adapted strain of influenza produced lower levels of IL-1β during in vitro and in vivo infection. Dendritic cells from elderly mice exhibited decreased expression of ASC, NLRP3, and capase-1, but increased expression of pro-IL-1β, pro-IL-18, and pro-IL-33 when compared to young infected mice. Treatment with nigericin during influenza infection augmented IL-1β production, increased caspase-1 activity, and decreased morbidity and mortality in elderly mice. Our study demonstrates for the first time that during influenza viral infection, elderly mice have impaired NLRP3 inflammasome activity and that treatment with nigericin rescues NLRP3 activation in elderly hosts. PMID:22327078

  13. Altered lymphocyte proliferation and innate immune function in scrapie 139A- and ME7-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Soo; Spinner, Daryl S; Kascsak, Richard J; Meeker, H Cliff; Kim, Bo Sook; Park, Seung Yong; Schuller-Levis, Georgia; Park, Eunkyue

    2013-06-01

    Lymphoid organs play an important role in prion disease development and progression. While the role of lymphoid organs and changes in immune-related genes have been extensively investigated in scrapie-infected animals, innate immunity has not. Previous studies examined lymphocyte function in scrapie-infected C3H/HeJ mice, which exhibit defects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response now known to result from a mutation in Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. We examined immune function in scrapie-infected CD1 mice, which are LPS responders. Lymphocyte proliferation from CD1 mice infected with either 139A or ME7 scrapie was measured in response to concanavalin (Con) A or LPS at 1 and 3 months after infection. Following LPS exposure, mice infected 3 months with ME7, but not 139A, demonstrated significantly decreased lymphocyte proliferation compared to controls. After Con A exposure, lymphocyte proliferation in scrapie-infected mice did not differ from controls. Gender-specific comparison of lymphocyte proliferation showed significant decreases in mitogenic responses in females infected 3 months with either 139A or ME7, compared to controls. Males infected for 3 months with ME7, but not 139A, showed significantly decreased proliferation after lymphocyte exposure to LPS, but not Con A. Neither gender showed changes in lymphocyte proliferation after 1 month of scrapie infection. Innate immune activation of peritoneal macrophages was determined via production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, and TNF-α after exposure to TLR ligands. TNF-α and IL-6 production were reduced in macrophages from females infected with either scrapie strain for 3 months, while NO production after TLR agonist plus IFN-γ exposure was decreased in both females and males infected for 3 months with 139A, compared to ME7. These data demonstrated altered innate immunity, suggesting hormonal and/or other gender-specific regulation may contribute to gender differences in some immune functions. Our data demonstrate

  14. Mode of transmission and histology of M. leprae infection in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott-Lancaster, R. D.; McDougall, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Athymic (nude) mice were experimentally infected with Mycobacterium leprae via the alimentary and respiratory tracts and through the skin. Animals were allowed to inhale aerosols of M. leprae or had bacilli instilled into the nostrils or directly into the lungs. Others were fed M. leprae by gastric tube or had bacilli placed on the tongue. Attempts were also made to transmit M. leprae from infected footpads by Aedes aegyptii mosquitoes. The most successful infections resulted from nasal instillations and from bacilli inoculated onto the tongue surface: in these cases heavy systemic infections occurred. M. leprae was also shown to survive passage through the alimentary tract and bacilli recovered from the faeces were capable of causing infection in recipient nude mice. The possible epidemiological significance of these findings for the transmission of leprosy in man is discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2206990

  15. Schistosoma mansoni experimental infection in Mus spretus (SPRET/EiJ strain) mice

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Villar, Luis; Vicente, Belén; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Castellanos, Andrés; Pérez-Losada, Jesús; Muro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Most Schistosoma mansoni experimental infections are developed in several inbred strains of Mus musculus as definitive host. In contrast, Mus spretus is unexplored in Schistosoma infection studies. Mus spretus provides a high variation of immunological phenotypes being an invaluable tool for genetic studies and gene mapping. The aim of this study is to characterize hematological and immunological responses against Schistosoma mansoni infection in Mus spretus (SPRET/EiJ strain) vs. Mus musculus (CD1 strain) mice. Nine weeks after cercarial exposure, animals were perfused and the parasite burden was assessed. The parasitological data suggests that SPRET/EiJ mice tolerate higher parasite loads compared to CD1 strain. In addition, hematological parameters measured in Mus spretus group showed a significant increase in granulocytes population in early stages of infection compared to the CD1 cohort. Meanwhile, CD1 presented higher levels of lymphocytes and IgG1 in the late stages of S. mansoni experimental infection. PMID:23985166

  16. Subcutaneous Infection Model Facilitates Treatment Assessment of Secondary Alveolar Echinococcosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Küster, Tatiana; Hermann, Corina; Hemphill, Andrew; Gottstein, Bruno; Spiliotis, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval) stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible) assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal. PMID:23717701

  17. Engrafted human cells generate adaptive immune responses to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently used mouse models fail to fully reflect human immunity to tuberculosis (TB), which hampers progress in research and vaccine development. Bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) mice, generated by engrafting human fetal liver, thymus, and hematopoietic stem cells in severely immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ-/- (NSG) mice, have shown potential to model human immunity to infection. We engrafted HLA-A2-positive fetal tissues into NSG mice transgenically expressing human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2.1 (NSG-A2) to generate NSG-A2-BLT mice and characterized their human immune response to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection to assess the utility of this model for investigating human TB. Results NSG-A2-BLT mice were infected intravenously with BCG and the immune response of engrafted human immune cells was characterized. After ex vivo antigenic stimulation of splenocytes, interferon (IFN)-γ-producing cells were detected by ELISPOT from infected, but not uninfected NSG-A2-BLT mice. However, the levels of secreted IFN-γ, determined by ELISA, were not significantly elevated by antigenic stimulation. NSG-A2-BLT mice were susceptible to BCG infection as determined by higher lung bacillary load than the non-engrafted control NSG-A2 mice. BCG-infected NSG-A2-BLT mice developed lung lesions composed mostly of human macrophages and few human CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. The lesions did not resemble granulomas typical of human TB. Conclusions Engrafted human immune cells in NSG-A2-BLT mice showed partial function of innate and adaptive immune systems culminating in antigen-specific T cell responses to mycobacterial infection. The lack of protection was associated with low IFN-γ levels and limited numbers of T cells recruited to the lesions. The NSG-A2-BLT mouse is capable of mounting a human immune response to M. tuberculosis in vivo but a quantitatively and possibly qualitatively enhanced effector response will be needed to improve the utility of this

  18. Lethal exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in severe combined immunodeficiency mice after infection by pneumonia virus of mice.

    PubMed

    Roths, J B; Smith, A L; Sidman, C L

    1993-04-01

    Mice homozygous for the mutant allele scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) have been described as excellent models for Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) pneumonia (PCP), a major health problem in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other immunodeficiency states. Other microorganisms have been shown to infect AIDS patients simultaneously with Pc, but whether one opportunist is able to directly influence the pathogenicity of another has not been determined previously. We have deliberately coinfected scid mice (with extent Pc infection) with a variety of primarily pneumotropic viruses and bacteria and have identified pneumonia virus of mice as causing a dramatic increase in the density of Pc organisms and the morbidity due to PCP in immunodeficient scid mice. This finding has clinical significance in the management of PCP, in that the identification and treatment of coinfecting pneumotropic pathogens may be as important as treatment targeted at Pc. A search for other synergistic (or antagonistic) microorganisms and determination of their mechanism(s) of action in altering the progression of PCP is indicated.

  19. Microarray analysis reveals altered circulating microRNA expression in mice infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Tong, Lei; Zhao, Wenran; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yuan; Lin, Lexun; Liu, Bingchen; Zhai, Yujia; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common causative agent in the development of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. However, whether the expression of peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) is altered in this process is unknown. The present study investigated changes to miRNA expression in the peripheral blood of CVB3-infected mice. Utilizing miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression was examined between normal and CVB3-infected mice. The present results suggest that specific miRNAs were differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3, varying with infection duration. Using miRNA microarray analysis, a total of 96 and 89 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3 for 3 and 6 days, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs, revealing a consistency of these results with the miRNA microarray analysis results. The biological functions of the differentially expressed miRNAs were then predicted by bioinformatics analysis. The potential biological roles of differentially expressed miRNAs included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. These results may provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression of CVB3 infection. PMID:27698715

  20. Development of 116 kDa Fraction for Detecting Experimental Toxoplasma gondii Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    HASSANAIN, Mohey Abdel-Hafez; ABDEL-RAHMAN, Eman Hussien; TOALEB, Nagwa Ibrahim; SHAAPAN, Raafat Mohamed; ELFADALY, Hasan Ali; HASSANAIN, Nawal Abdel-Hafez

    2013-01-01

    Background Serological diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection using crude antigens may not be more accurate. To increase the diagnostic potency of antigens, isolation of their immunogenic fractions could be useful. The current research adopted to obtain an affinity isolated fraction from RH strain using CNBr Sepharose 4B column coupled with infected mice sera helping in detection of IgM and IgG of toxoplasmosis due to RH strain and other strains. Methods The isolated fraction was characterized by SDS-PAGE. Moreover, the diagnostic potency of the fraction was assessed by indirect ELISA in mice experimentally infected with RH strain and two other local strains; one of sheep origin and the other of human origin. Results The fraction was found to be consisted of a single band of 116 kDa compared with 17 bands ranged from 116 to 16 kDa associated with crude extract. The fraction proved potent diagnostic potentials of acute and chronic mice toxoplasmosis. Where it was detected both IgM and IgG antibodies as early as two days and as late as 2 months post experimental infection with any of the three strains. The level of detected IgM and IgG by RH fraction was higher in mice infected with RH strain than with local strains except IgM due to sheep strain parasite. Conclusions The 116 kDa fraction of T. gondii tachyzoites can be considered as a candidate in improving of serodiagnosisof Toxoplasma infections. PMID:24454439

  1. Antiviral activity of bacteria-derived human alpha interferons against encephalomyocarditis virus infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Weck, P K; Rinderknecht, E; Estell, D A; Stebbing, N

    1982-02-01

    Bacteria-derived human leukocyte interferon (IFN) subtypes, IFN-alpha A, -alpha B, and -alpha D, and two hybrid IFNs, IFN-alpha AD and -alpha DA, were examined for both in vitro and in vivo antiviral activity. Two of these materials in highly purified form (IFN-alpha D and -alpha D) protect mice against lethal doses of encephalomyocarditis virus infection. A single dose of 1 microgram of protein of IFN-alpha D 3 h before infection conferred protection in both BDF1 and CD-1 mice against encephalomyocarditis virus infection, and multiple treatments with IFN-alpha D or IFN-alpha AD extend the mean survival time of infected mice. On a weight basis, IFN-alpha AD was approximately 100-fold more effective than IFN-alpha D. There is a direct correlation between the antiviral activity of the various human IFN species in L-929 cells and in mice for both single and multiple treatments before infection, but none of the cloned human IFN subtypes were effective when administered 24 h after infection. Mixtures of the two parental materials, IFN-alpha A and -alpha D, were not as protective as the hybrid molecule IFN-alpha AD, suggesting that IFNs with unique and altered species specificity can be produced by recombinant DNA methods.

  2. Immunity to Trichinella spiralis infection in vitamin A-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Vitamin A-deficient (A-) mice make strikingly poor IgG responses when they are immunized with purified protein antigens. Previously, we showed that A- T cells overproduce interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), which then could inhibit interleukin 4 (IL-4)-stimulated B cell IgG responses. To determine if the altered IFN-gamma regulation pattern and its immunological consequences would extend to a natural infection, we studied mice infected with the parasitic helminth Trichinella spiralis. The course of the infection was similar in A- and A-sufficient (A+) mice. These mice did not differ with respect to newborn larvae/female/hour produced in the intestine, or muscle larvae burden 5 wk postinfection. They also did not differ in the intestinal worm expulsion rate until day 15, when A- mice still harbored parasites, whereas A+ mice had cleared intestinal worms. Vitamin A deficiency reduced both the frequency of B lymphocytes secreting IgG1 antibodies to parasite antigens, and the bone marrow eosinophilia associated with helminth infection. The cytokine secretion patterns in infected mice were consistent with these observations and with previous studies. Mesenteric lymph node cells from infected A- mice secreted significantly more IFN-gamma, and significantly less IL-2, IL-4, and IL- 5 than infected A+ controls. A- splenocytes secreted significantly more IFN-gamma, and equivalent amounts of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-5 compared with A+ controls. Interestingly, CD4-CD8- cells secreted the majority of the IL-4 produced in the spleen. The IL-2, IL-4, and IL-5 steady-state transcript levels correlated with secreted protein levels, but IFN- gamma transcripts did not. Although they secreted more protein, A- cells contained fewer IFN-gamma transcripts than A+ cells. These results suggest two vitamin A-mediated regulation steps in IFN-gamma gene expression: positive regulation of IFN-gamma transcript levels, and negative regulation posttranscriptionally. The essentially unaltered outcome of T

  3. Gene Expression Profile in the Liver of BALB/c Mice Infected with Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Vicente, Belén; Collía, Francisco; Muro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection still remains one of the helminthic neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). It has a huge worldwide distribution, affecting mainly cattle and, sometimes, human beings. In addition to data reported about the immunological response induced by helminthic infections and that induced by Fasciola hepatica, little is known about the gene expression profile in its organ target, the liver, which is where adult worms are established and live for long periods of time, causing its characteristic pathology. In the present work, we study both the early and late gene expression profiles in the livers of mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae using a microarray-based methodology. A total of 9 female-6-week-old BALB/c mice (Charles River Laboratories, Barcelona, Spain) weighing 20 to 35 g were used for the experiments. Two groups of BALB/c mice were orally infected with seven F. hepatica metacercariae, and the other group remained untreated and served as a control. Mice were humanely euthanized and necropsied for liver recovery, histological assessment of hepatic damage, RNA isolation, microarray design and gene expression analysis on the day of infection (t0), seven days post-infection (t7) and twenty-one days post-infection (t21). We found that F. hepatica infection induces the differential expression of 128 genes in the liver in the early stage of infection and 308 genes in the late stage, and most of them are up-regulated. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed significant changes in the pathways related to metabolism, biosynthesis and signaling as well as genes implicated in inducing liver-toxicity, injury and death. The present study provides us insights at the molecular level about the underlying mechanisms used by F. hepatica, leading to liver damage and its subsequent pathophysiology. The expression pattern obtained here could also be used to explain the lack of association between infection with F. hepatica and cholangiocarcinoma. However

  4. Influence of amitriptyline on eryptosis, parasitemia and survival of Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Brand, Verena; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Camelia; Jendrossek, Verena; Huber, Stephan M; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodia express a sphingomyelinase, which is apparently required for their development. On the other hand, the sphingomyelinase product ceramide has previously been shown to delay parasite development. Moreover, ceramide triggers suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface and cell shrinkage. Accelerated eryptosis of infected erythrocytes is considered to clear infected erythrocytes from circulating blood and, thus, to favourably influence the clinical course of malaria. The present experiments explored whether the sphingomyelinase inhibitor amitriptyline or genetic knockout of host acid sphingomyelinase influence in vitro parasite growth, eryptosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, in vivo parasitemia and survival of P. berghei-infected mice. Phosphatidylserine exposure was determined by annexin V-binding and cell volume by forward scatter in FACS analysis. In vitro infection of human erythrocytes increased annexin- binding, an effect blunted in the presence of amitriptyline (>or=50 microM). Amitriptyline did not significantly alter intraerythrocytic parasite development but significantly (>or= 1 microM) delayed the increase in parasitemia in vitro. Most importantly, amitriptyline treatment (1 mM in drinking water) resulted in a significant delay of parasitemia and death of infected mice. However, upon infection, ceramide formation was stimulated in both, acid sphingomyelinase knockout mice (Smpd1(-/-)) and their wild type littermates (Smpd1(+/+)). Parasitemia following P. berghei infection was significantly lower in Smpd1(-/-) than in Smpd1(+/+) mice but did not significantly extend the life span of infected animals. In conclusion, mammalian and parasite sphingomyelinase contribute to ceramide formation during malaria, whereby the parasite sphingomyelinase ultimately determines the course of the infection. Amitriptyline presumably blocks both sphingomyelinases and, thus

  5. Parasitological and immunological aspects of early Ascaris spp. infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro Henrique; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Ana Clara; Silva, Flaviane Nunes; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Dhom-Lemos, Lucas de Carvalho; Barbosa, Fernando Sérgio; Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Gaze, Soraya; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2013-08-01

    Studies related to the immunobiological aspects of an Ascaris spp. infection are still scarce, especially those that aim to elucidate the early events of the immune response. In this study, we demonstrated a novel standardized method for early experimental Ascaris infection, providing additional information about the infectivity of eggs embryonated in vitro as well as the influence of host age on development of the infection. Finally, we characterised the immunopathology of early infection, focusing on the tissue and systemic cytokine profiles and the histopathology of infection in the lungs of BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that the highest egg infectivity occurred on the 100th and 200th days of in vitro embryonation and that 8 week-old BALB/c mice were more susceptible to infection than 16 week-old mice. Ascaris-infected mice showed an early, significant level of IL-5 production in the lungs 4 days p.i., followed by an increase in the level of neutrophils in the inflammatory infiltrate at 8 days p.i, which was correlated with the peak of larval migration in the tissue and a significant level of IL-6 production. The inflammatory infiltrate in the lungs was gradually replaced by mononuclear cells and eosinophils on the 10th and 12th days p.i., respectively, and an increase in TNF levels was observed. The downmodulation of systemic TCD4(+) cell numbers might suggest that T cell hyporesponsiveness was induced by the Ascaris spp. larvae, contributing to safeguarding parasite survival during larval migration. Taken together, the novel aspects of Ascaris infection presented here enabled a better understanding of the immunopathological events during larval migration, providing insight for further studies focused on immunisation and immunoprophylatic assays.

  6. Mice lacking the gamma interferon receptor have an impaired granulomatous reaction to Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, S A; Oliveira, V R; Silva, A M; Alves, J B; Goes, A M; Reis, L F

    1997-01-01

    The egg-induced granulomatous reaction in Schistosoma mansoni-infected individuals develops within the portal system of the liver and is the major pathological finding in schistosomiasis. We have infected mice lacking the gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) receptor with S. mansoni larvae and studied the development of hepatic granulomas in these mutant mice in comparison to that in control wild-type mice. In the absence of IFN-gamma activity, a dramatic reduction in the size and architecture of the granuloma was observed. Granulomas from mutant mice were smaller than those from the control group and showed a significant reduction in the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells. Moreover, they appear to prematurely progress to the chronic phase of the reaction at a time when the control group still has acute inflammation. Our data suggests a pivotal role for IFN-gamma in the early events of the granulomatous reaction in vivo. PMID:9234812

  7. Treatment of trypanosome-infected mice with exogenous interferon, interferon inducers, or antibody to interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that mice resistant to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (the B10.BR/SgSnJ strain) produces, upon infection by this parasite, two peaks of serum interferon (IFN), while the susceptible mice (C3HeB/FeJ) produces no IFN. In the present study, survival times were compared for B10.BR/SgSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and CBA/J (an intermediately resistant strain) mice that were injected, prior to infection with the parasite, with either of the following three preparations (1) IFN-gamma, (2) an antibody to IFN-gamma and (3) polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (to induce IFN-alpha/beta). No effect on the survival times of mice by any of these preparations could be demonstrated, contrary to some previous reports.

  8. Exacerbation of allergic inflammation in mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles prior to viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Ilona; Sheridan, Patricia A; Zhang, Wenli; Brighton, Luisa E; Chason, Kelly D; Hua, Xiaoyang; Tilley, Stephen L

    2009-01-01

    Background Viral infections and exposure to oxidant air pollutants are two of the most important inducers of asthma exacerbation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to diesel exhaust increases the susceptibility to influenza virus infections both in epithelial cells in vitro and in mice in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether in the setting of allergic asthma, exposure to oxidant air pollutants enhances the susceptibility to respiratory virus infections, which in turn leads to increased virus-induced exacerbation of asthma. Ovalbumin-sensitized (OVA) male C57BL/6 mice were instilled with diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or saline and 24 hours later infected with influenza A/PR/8. Animals were sacrificed 24 hours post-infection and analyzed for markers of lung injury, allergic inflammation, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Results Exposure to DEP or infection with influenza alone had no significant effects on markers of injury or allergic inflammation. However, OVA-sensitized mice that were exposed to DEP and subsequently infected with influenza showed increased levels of eosinophils in lung lavage and tissue. In addition Th2-type cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, and markers of eosinophil chemotaxis, such as CCL11 and CCR3, were increased in OVA-sensitized mice exposed to DEP prior to infection with influenza. These mice also showed increased levels of IL-1α, but not IL-10, RANTES, and MCP-1 in lung homogenates. Conclusion These data suggest that in the setting of allergic asthma, exposure to diesel exhaust could enhance virus-induced exacerbation of allergic inflammation. PMID:19682371

  9. Pathogenesis of experimental Ebola Zaire virus infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gibb, T R; Bray, M; Geisbert, T W; Steele, K E; Kell, W M; Davis, K J; Jaax, N K

    2001-11-01

    Guinea-pigs and non-human primates have traditionally been used as animal models for studying Ebola Zaire virus (EBO-Z) infections. The virus was also recently adapted to the stage of lethal virulence in BALB/c mice. This murine model is now in use for testing antiviral medications and vaccines. However, the pathological features of EBO-Z infection in mice have not yet been fully described. To identify sites of viral replication and characterize sequential morphological changes in BALB/c mice, adult female mice were infected with mouse-adapted EBO-Z and killed in groups each day for 5 days post-infection. Tissues were examined by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and in-situ hybridization. As in guinea-pigs and non-human primates, cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system were the earliest targets of infection. Viral replication was observed by day 2 in macrophages in lymph nodes and spleen. By the time of onset of illness and weight loss (day 3), the infection had spread to hepatocytes and adrenal cortical cells, and to macrophages and fibroblast-like cells in many organs. Severe lymphocytolysis was observed in the spleen, lymph nodes and thymus. There was minimal infection of endothelial cells. All of these changes resembled those observed in EBO-Z-infected guinea-pigs and non-human primates. In contrast to the other animal models, however, there was little fibrin deposition in the late stage of disease. The availability of immunodeficient, "gene-knockout" and transgenic mice will make the mouse model particularly useful for studying the early steps of Ebola pathogenesis. Copyright Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  10. Clearance of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Onunkwo, Charles C; Hahn, Beth L; Sohnle, Peter G

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcal skin infections are quite common in human patients. These infections often clear spontaneously, but may also progress locally and/or disseminate to cause serious and sometimes fatal deep infections. The present studies were undertaken to examine the clearance phase of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in a mouse model system. Previous work in this system has shown that staphylococci applied to the skin rapidly disseminate to the spleen and kidney. In the present experiments the bacteria were found to persist at the skin infection site at a time (8 days after inoculation) when they had disappeared from the spleen and kidney. Examination of the infected skin at earlier times revealed rapid (within 6 h) invasion into the stratum corneum, stratum Malpighii, and dermis, but subsequent redistribution of bacteria (at 1-2 days) to more superficial sites, particularly crusts located just above the skin surface. The crusts seen in these infections were of two distinct types, which were termed type 1 and type 2. Type 1 crusts appeared first, consisted of bacteria, inflammatory cells, and debris, and developed over an intact epidermis. Type 2 crusts arose from the process of dermal necrosis previously reported to take place at 2 days in this model system. In the latter situation the bacteria were not really cleared from the epidermis and dermis; rather those layers were transformed into a superficial crust that contained the bacteria. Deep hair follicle infections in the dermis were found in these infections, but they did not persist and did not seem to be a reservoir for organisms in the dermis. Resolution of these experimental infections appeared to involve redistribution of invading bacteria to more superficial locations in crusts above the skin surface, marked proliferation of the epidermis, loss of the bacteria-laden crusts from the skin, and eventual healing of the cutaneous damage.

  11. Inefficiency of C3H/HeN Mice to Control Chlamydial Lung Infection Correlates with Downregulation of Neutrophil Activation During the Late Stage of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaofei; Bu, Xiaokun; Zhang, Naihong; Li, Xiaoxia; Huang, Huanjun; Bai, Hong; Yang, Xi

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that massive infiltration of neutrophils in C3H/HeN (C3H) mice could not efficiently control Chlamydia muridarum (Cm) infection and might contribute to the high susceptibility of these mice to lung infection. To further define the nature of neutrophil responses in C3H mice during chlamydial infection, we examine the expression of adhesion molecules and CD11b related to neutrophils infiltration and activation, respectively, following intranasal Cm infection. The results showed that the expression of selectins (E-selectin, P-selectin and L-selectin), and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the lung of C3H mice increased more significantly than in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, the more resistant strain. These results correlated well with the massive neutrophils infiltration in C3H mice. In contrast, CD11b expression on peripheral blood and lung neutrophils in C3H mice exhibited a significant reduction compared with B6 mice during the late phage of infection (day 14). These findings suggest that the high-level expression of adhesion molecules in C3H mice may enhance neutrophils recruitment to the lung, but the decline of CD11b expression on neutrophils may attenuate neutrophil function. Therefore, CD11b down-regulation on neutrophils may contribute to the failure of C3H mice to control chlamydial lung infection. PMID:19728926

  12. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  13. Interferon-Gamma Release Assay: An Effective Tool to Detect Early Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing; El-Ashram, Saeed; Liu, Hongbin; Sun, Ximeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection before the formation of tissue cysts is vital for treatment, as drugs available for toxoplasmosis cannot kill bradyzoites contained in the cysts. However, current methods, such as antibody-based ELISA, are ineffective for detection of early infection. Here, we developed an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), measuring the IFN-γ released by T lymphocytes stimulated by Toxoplasma antigen peptides in vitro, for the detection of T. gondii infection in mice. Splenocytes isolated from infected mice were stimulated by peptides derived from dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 and rhoptry protein ROP7, and released IFN-γ was measured by ELISA. Results showed that both acute and chronic infection could be detected by IGRA. More importantly, IGRA detected infection as early as the third day post infection; while serum IgM and IgG were detected 9 days and 13 days post infection, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that an IGRA-positive and ELISA-negative sample revealed an early infection, indicating the combination of IGRA and ELISA can be employed for the early diagnosis of T. gondii infection in human beings, cats and livestock.

  14. Reactivation of M. tuberculosis infection in trans-membrane tumour necrosis factor mice.

    PubMed

    Dambuza, Ivy; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Randall, Philippa; Sebesho, Boipelo; Fick, Lizette; Quesniaux, Valerie J F; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2011-01-01

    Of those individuals who are infected with M. tuberculosis, 90% do not develop active disease and represents a large reservoir of M. tuberculosis with the potential for reactivation of infection. Sustained TNF expression is required for containment of persistent infection and TNF neutralization leads to tuberculosis reactivation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of soluble TNF (solTNF) and transmembrane TNF (Tm-TNF) in immune responses generated against reactivating tuberculosis. In a chemotherapy induced tuberculosis reactivation model, mice were challenged by aerosol inhalation infection with low dose M. tuberculosis for three weeks to establish infection followed chemotherapeutic treatment for six weeks, after which therapy was terminated and tuberculosis reactivation investigated. We demonstrate that complete absence of TNF results in host susceptibility to M. tuberculosis reactivation in the presence of established mycobacteria-specific adaptive immunity with mice displaying unrestricted bacilli growth and diffused granuloma structures compared to WT control mice. Interestingly, bacterial re-emergence is contained in Tm-TNF mice during the initial phases of tuberculosis reactivation, indicating that Tm-TNF sustains immune pressure as in WT mice. However, Tm-TNF mice show susceptibility to long term M. tuberculosis reactivation associated with uncontrolled influx of leukocytes in the lungs and reduced IL-12p70, IFNγ and IL-10, enlarged granuloma structures, and failure to contain mycobacterial replication relative to WT mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that both solTNF and Tm-TNF are required for maintaining immune pressure to contain reactivating M. tuberculosis bacilli even after mycobacteria-specific immunity has been established.

  15. Reactivation of M. tuberculosis Infection in Trans-Membrane Tumour Necrosis Factor Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dambuza, Ivy; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Randall, Philippa; Sebesho, Boipelo; Fick, Lizette; Quesniaux, Valerie J. F.; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2011-01-01

    Of those individuals who are infected with M. tuberculosis, 90% do not develop active disease and represents a large reservoir of M. tuberculosis with the potential for reactivation of infection. Sustained TNF expression is required for containment of persistent infection and TNF neutralization leads to tuberculosis reactivation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of soluble TNF (solTNF) and transmembrane TNF (Tm-TNF) in immune responses generated against reactivating tuberculosis. In a chemotherapy induced tuberculosis reactivation model, mice were challenged by aerosol inhalation infection with low dose M. tuberculosis for three weeks to establish infection followed chemotherapeutic treatment for six weeks, after which therapy was terminated and tuberculosis reactivation investigated. We demonstrate that complete absence of TNF results in host susceptibility to M. tuberculosis reactivation in the presence of established mycobacteria-specific adaptive immunity with mice displaying unrestricted bacilli growth and diffused granuloma structures compared to WT control mice. Interestingly, bacterial re-emergence is contained in Tm-TNF mice during the initial phases of tuberculosis reactivation, indicating that Tm-TNF sustains immune pressure as in WT mice. However, Tm-TNF mice show susceptibility to long term M. tuberculosis reactivation associated with uncontrolled influx of leukocytes in the lungs and reduced IL-12p70, IFNγ and IL-10, enlarged granuloma structures, and failure to contain mycobacterial replication relative to WT mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that both solTNF and Tm-TNF are required for maintaining immune pressure to contain reactivating M. tuberculosis bacilli even after mycobacteria-specific immunity has been established. PMID:22132068

  16. Influence of infection by Toxoplasma gondii on purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Casali, Emerson A; Silveira, Stephanie S; Moritz, Cesar E J; Camillo, Giovana; Flores, Mariana M; Fighera, Rafael; Thomé, Gustavo R; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Rue, Mario De La; Vogel, Fernanda S F; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice (BALB/c) experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii. In experiment I (n=24) the mice were infected with RH strain of T. gondii, while in experiment II (n=36) they were infected with strain ME-49 of T. gondii. Our results showed that, for RH strain (acute phase), an increase in both periods in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine (only on day 6 PI) and uric acid (only on day 6 PI). By the other hand, the RH strain led, on days 4 and 6 PI, to a reduction in the concentration of inosine. ME-49, a cystogenic strain, showed some differences in acute and chronic phase, since on day 6 PI the levels of ATP and ADP were increased, while on day 30 these same nucleotides were reduced. On day 60 PI, ME-49 induced a reduction in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, inosine and xanthine, while uric acid was increased. A decrease of E-ADA activity was observed in brain on days 4 and 6 PI (RH), and 30 PI (ME-49); however on day 60 PI E-ADA activity was increased for infection by ME-49 strain. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that infection with T. gondii changes the purine levels and the activity of E-ADA in brain, which may be associated with neurological signs commonly observed in this disease.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  18. Experimental diabetes in mice infected with Coxsackie viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharov, E.F.; Shorin, Yu.P.; Solodovnikova, I.A.; Kazaryan, L.S.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Pal'chikova, N.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors compare the effect of Coxsackie B4 and A13 viruses on the pancreas of strains of mice sensitive and resistant to diabetes, using subdiabetogenic doses of alloxan in the second case. The biochemical investigation included determination of immunoreactive insulin in the blood serum by radioimmunoassay. Biochemical changes were seen such as lowered glucose tolerance and disturbance of immunoreactive insulin synthesis.

  19. Ultra-low Dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Aerosol Creates Partial Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Divey; Hopkins, Gregory W.; Seay, Sarah A.; Chen, Ching-Ju; Perley, Casey C.; Click, Eva M.; Frothingham, Richard

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A murine low-dose (LD) aerosol model is commonly used to test tuberculosis vaccines. Doses of 50-400 CFU (24-hour lung CFU) infect 100% of exposed mice. The LD model measures progression from infection to disease based on organ CFU at defined time points. To mimic natural exposure, we exposed mice to an ultra-low dose (ULD) aerosol. We estimated the presented dose by sampling the aerosol. Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv aerosol at 1.0, 1.1, 1.6, 5.4, and 11 CFU presented dose, infecting 27%, 36%, 36%, 100%, and 95% of mice, respectively. These data are compatible with a stochastic infection event (Poisson distribution, weighted R2= 0.97) or with a dose-response relationship (sigmoid distribution, weighted R2= 0.97). Based on the later assumption, the ID50 was 1.6 CFU presented dose (95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 2.1). We compared organ CFU after ULD and LD aerosols (5.4 vs. 395 CFU presented dose). Lung burden was 30-fold lower in the ULD model at 4 weeks (3.4 vs. 4.8 logs, p<0.001) and 18 weeks (≤3.6 vs. 5.0 logs, p=0.01). Mice exposed to ULD aerosols as compared to LD aerosols had greater within-group CFU variability. Exposure to ULD aerosols leads to infection in a subset of mice, and to persistently low organ CFU. The ULD aerosol model may resemble human pulmonary tuberculosis more closely than the standard LD model, and may be used to identify host or bacterial factors that modulate the initial infection event. PMID:22197183

  20. Prevention of indigenous infection of mice with Escherichia coli by nonspecific immunostimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, K; Yokokura, T; Mitsuyama, M; Yoshikai, Y; Nomoto, K

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that the lethal toxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in specific-pathogen-free mice is due to an intestinal infection with indigenous Escherichia coli induced by the drug (K. Nomoto, T. Yokokura, Y. Yoshikai, M. Mitsuyama, and K. Nomoto, Can J. Microbiol. 37:244-247, 1991). In the present study we demonstrate that nonspecific immunostimulation is effective in the protection of mice from the lethal indigenous infection induced by 5-FU. Intravenous or subcutaneous injection of a preparation of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei YIT 9018, a potent nonspecific immunostimulant, into BALB/c mice reduced the lethal toxicity of 5-FU at doses ranging from 338 to 800 mg/kg of body weight if YIT 9018 was injected 7 to 40 days before administration of 5-FU. Systemic infection with E. coli developed in all of the 5-FU-treated control mice 7 days or more after administration of 5-FU in large doses and was accompanied by overgrowth of the bacteria in the intestinal tract. Pretreatment of mice with YIT 9018 resulted in a decreased occurrence of systemic infection with E. coli to levels of 0 to 20% and no significant changes in the population levels of E. coli in the intestinal tract during the 14 days after administration of 5-FU. The levels of leukopenia in the spleen and peripheral blood were lower, and recovery of granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and femur began earlier in the treated animals than in the 5-FU-treated controls. Intravenous transfusion of syngeneic normal bone marrow cells or spleen cells into the mice at an early period after administration of 5-FU diminished markedly the occurrence of the lethal indigenous infection, suggestion that an earlier recovery from chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression is important in the mechanisms of protection of the host from the infection. PMID:1605602

  1. Development of a murine model for aerosolized ebolavirus infection using a panel of recombinant inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Abdeltawab, Nourtan F; Bloomfield, Holly A; Chance, Taylor B; Nichols, Donald K; Harrison, Paige E; Kotb, Malak; Nalca, Aysegul

    2012-12-03

    Countering aerosolized filovirus infection is a major priority of biodefense research. Aerosol models of filovirus infection have been developed in knock-out mice, guinea pigs and non-human primates; however, filovirus infection of immunocompetent mice by the aerosol route has not been reported. A murine model of aerosolized filovirus infection in mice should be useful for screening vaccine candidates and therapies. In this study, various strains of wild-type and immunocompromised mice were exposed to aerosolized wild-type (WT) or mouse-adapted (MA) Ebola virus (EBOV). Upon exposure to aerosolized WT-EBOV, BALB/c, C57BL/6 (B6), and DBA/2 (D2) mice were unaffected, but 100% of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and 90% of signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat1) knock-out (KO) mice became moribund between 7-9 days post-exposure (dpe). Exposure to MA-EBOV caused 15% body weight loss in BALB/c, but all mice recovered. In contrast, 10-30% lethality was observed in B6 and D2 mice exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and 100% of SCID, Stat1KO, interferon (IFN)-γ KO and Perforin KO mice became moribund between 7-14 dpe. In order to identify wild-type, inbred, mouse strains in which exposure to aerosolized MA-EBOV is uniformly lethal, 60 BXD (C57BL/6 crossed with DBA2) recombinant inbred (RI) and advanced RI (ARI) mouse strains were exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and monitored for disease severity. A complete spectrum of disease severity was observed. All BXD strains lost weight but many recovered. However, infection was uniformly lethal within 7 to 12 days post-exposure in five BXD strains. Aerosol exposure of these five BXD strains to 10-fold less MA-EBOV resulted in lethality ranging from 0% in two strains to 90-100% lethality in two strains. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from BXD strains that became moribund and were euthanized at the lower dose of MA-EBOV, showed liver damage in all mice as well as lung lesions in two of the three strains. The two

  2. Role of Antibody Response in Recovery from K-Papovavirus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtarian, Foroozan; Shah, Keerti V.

    1980-01-01

    Intraperitoneal inoculation of mouse K papovavirus into infant (2 to 4 days old) Swiss albino mice produced a high-titered viremia which persisted until death due to pneumonitis on day 9 postinfection. Lungs and livers of these mice had virus-specific immunofluorescence and histological lesions. K-virus antibody was undetectable. Three- to four-week-old mice, although as susceptible to infection as infant mice, remained healthy and developed a much lower-titered viremia, a transient lung infection, and K-virus antibody on 4 to 5 days postinfection. Three- to four-week-old mice treated with cyclophosphamide developed a high-titered viremia with death 10 to 17 days postinfection and no detectable antibodies. A single intraperitoneal inoculation of K-virus antibody at 5 h or 1 day postinfection completely protected the infant Swiss albino mice. Partial protection was achieved when antibody was transferred on days 2, 3, and 4 postinoculation. Transfer of antibody to cytoxan-treated Swiss albino mice on days 3 and 6 postinfection completely portected them against K-virus-induced lesions and mortality. Transfer of normal adult BALB/c splenocytes to syngeneic infant mice before K-virus infection did not protect from death but increased survival time. Transfer of 4- to 12-day K-virus-primed adult splenocytes before infection gave a nearly 100% protection. When given before infection, the protection afforded by T-cell-enriched and B-cell-enriched adult primed splenocytes was 0 and 100%, respectively. Transfer of primed B cells on day 1 post-inoculation completely protected the infant mice. This protection decreased to 86, 57, and 56% when the primed B cells were transferred on days 2, 3, and 4 post-inoculation, respectively. These data suggest that the antibody response is of critical importance in the recovery of mice from K-virus infection. Antibody probably acts by aborting viremia, thereby preventing extensive seeding of lungs with virus. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 2 PMID

  3. [Effect of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Female Mice on Dopamine Level in the Brain of the Male Offspring].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong-hua; Zhu, Hu-ping; Xu, Jin-jun; Zhang, Ying; Mao, Ai-min; Yang, Jing; Fan, Feng; Xu, Yong-liang; Zhao, Zhong-xing; Tao, Jian-ping

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effect of Toxoplasma gondii infection in female mice on dopamine level in the brain of male offspring. Thirty-six ICR female mice were randomly divided into control group and infection group, 18 mice in each group. Each mouse in infection group was orally infected with 10 cysts of T. gondii Prugniaud strain. On the 90th day after infection, the infected female mice were mated with normal male ICR mice at 1:1 ratio. On the 20th day of pregnancy, 2 mice in each group were delivered for fetal mice by cesarean section, and the brain of male fetal mice (n = 6) in each group were collected. On the 14th and 63rd day after birth, 6 male offspring mice in each group were sacrificed, and the brain were collected. Dopamine levels in the cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and striatum were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Three mice in infection group died during the experiment, and 6 out of 15 female mice mated successfully. The number of fetal mice and F1 generation mice in infection group was 12 (male: 7) and 21 (male: 15), respectively. All the mice in control group mated successfully. The number of fetal mice and F1 generation mice was 23 (male: 12) and 179 (male: 92), respectively. The dopamine level in the cerebellum of fetal mice of infection group and control group was (413.25 ± 21.78) ng/g and (346.30 ± 51.83) ng/g, respectively (P < 0.01). No significant difference was found in dopamine content in the cortex between the two groups (P > 0.05). Compared with the control group, on the 14th day and 63rd day after birth, the dopamine content in cortical areas [(462.50 ± 24.80) ng/g and (1215.77 ± 113.64) ng/g], cerebellum area [(271.55 ± 26.19) ng/g and (1328.82 ± 39.62) ng/g], hippocampus area [(225.78 ± 24.17) ng/g and (1322.70 ± 58.34) ng/g], and striatum area [(455.23 ± 61.53) ng/g and (991.32 ± 54.31) ng/g] of the male offspring in infection group were significantly higher than that

  4. Infection mechanism of biofilm-forming Staphylococcus aureus on indwelling foreign materials in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Taro; Jimi, Shiro; Oyama, Takuto; Nakano, Yuki; Hamamoto, Kouichi; Mamishin, Kanako; Yahiro, Tomoko; Hara, Shuuji; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Indwelling foreign-body infections are a critical medical problem, especially in immunocompromised patients. To examine the pathogenicity of biofilm-forming bacteria settling on foreign materials, mice implanted with plastic discs were infected with Staphylococcus aureus. After opening a wide subcutaneous pocket on the dorsal side of mice with or without temporal leukocytopenia, a plastic sheet was placed in the left subcutaneous space; subsequently, bacteria in a planktonic state were dispersed over the subcutaneous space. Bacterial numbers were examined 7 days after inoculation. In subcutaneous tissue on the right, S. aureus was found only in leukocytopenic mice. Meanwhile, bacteria were detected on the plastic and neighbouring tissue in both leukocytopenic and normal mice; however, colony-forming analysis indicated that leukocytopenic mice possessed significantly more bacteria. Tissue reaction against bacteria was pathologically examined. Invading S. aureus induced severe inflammation. In transient leukocytopenic mice, bacterial microcolonies formed on the plastic as well as in the developed necrotic tissue - both of which were shielded from inflammatory cell infiltration - result in bacteraemia. These results indicate that biofilm-forming S. aureus settling on indwelling foreign material are tolerant against host immunity and assault neighbouring tissue, which may lead to chronic wound infection.

  5. Plasmodium berghei: influence of infection on the oxidant and antioxidants levels in pregnant BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Lalita; Kaur, Jagdeep; Rishi, Praveen; Shukla, Geeta

    2012-06-01

    Malarial infection during pregnancy has been associated with maternal anemia and death, abortion, still-birth and is a major cause of low birth weight, an important risk factor for infant morbidity and mortality in endemic areas. The present study was designed to delineate the oxidative stress in various organs (liver, spleen, kidney, brain and placenta) of pregnant Plasmodium berghei infected BALB/c mice. It was observed that pregnant-infected mice had higher parasitaemia than nonpregnant-infected mice. Most notably, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a measure of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were significantly higher in the liver, spleen, kidney and brain of pregnant-infected mice compared with pregnant mice. Although MDA levels were significantly higher, GSH and SOD levels remained unaltered in the placenta of pregnant-infected mice compared with pregnant mice. Furthermore, catalase activity was significantly lower in all the organs of pregnant-infected mice compared with pregnant mice. Histopathological observations in the organs clearly show the cellular and morphological alterations that may be occurring due to increased lipid peroxidation. Taken together, the data suggest that the increased severity of malarial infection during pregnancy may be due to accentuated oxidative stress.

  6. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  7. Granzyme A- and B-cluster deficiency delays acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B M; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F; Bos, Albert P

    2010-01-15

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating proapoptotic caspase activity and proinflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A- and B-cluster single- and double-knockout mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3, and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A- and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury.

  8. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the neuropathological changes associated with prion disease.

  9. Protective immunity against Leishmania major induced by Leishmania tropica infection of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh-Niknam, Hamid; Kiaei, Simin Sadat; Iravani, Davood

    2011-02-01

    Leishmania (L.) tropica is a causative agent of human cutaneous and viscerotropic leishmaniasis. Immune response to L. tropica in humans and experimental animals are not well understood. We previously established that L. tropica infection induces partial protective immunity against subsequent challenge infection with Leishmania major in BALB/c mice. Aim of the present study was to study immunologic mechanisms of protective immunity induced by L. tropica infection, as a live parasite vaccine, in BALB/c mouse model. Mice were infected by L. tropica, and after establishment of the infection, they were challenged by L. major. Our findings shows that L. tropica infection resulted in protection against L. major challenge in BALB/c mice and this protective immunity is associated with: (1) a DTH response, (2) higher IFN-γ and lower IL-10 response at one week post-challenge, (3) lower percentage of CD4(+) lymphocyte at one month post-challenge, and (4) the source of IFN-γ and IL-10 were mainly CD4(-) lymphocyte up to one month post-challenge suggesting that CD4(-) lymphocytes may be responsible for protection induced by L. tropica infection in the studied intervals.

  10. Inactivated and live, attenuated influenza vaccines protect mice against influenza:Streptococcus pyogenes super-infections

    PubMed Central

    Chaussee, Michael S.; Sandbulte, Heather R.; Schuneman, Margaret J.; DePaula, Frank P.; Addengast, Leslie A.; Schlenker, Evelyn H.; Huber, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality associated with influenza virus super-infections is frequently due to secondary bacterial complications. To date, super-infections with Streptococcus pyogenes have been studied less extensively than those associated with S. pneumoniae. This is significant because a vaccine for S. pyogenes is not clinically available, leaving vaccination against influenza virus as our only means for preventing these super-infections. In this study, we directly compared immunity induced by two types of influenza vaccine, either inactivated influenza virus (IIV) or live, attenuated influenza virus (LAIV), for the ability to prevent super-infections. Our data demonstrate that both IIV and LAIV vaccines induce similar levels of serum antibodies, and that LAIV alone induces IgA expression at mucosal surfaces. Upon super-infection, both vaccines have the ability to limit the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines within the lung, including IFN-γ which has been shown to contribute to mortality in previous models of super-infection. Limiting expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines within the lungs subsequently limits recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils to pulmonary surfaces, and ultimately protects both IIV- and LAIV-vaccinated mice from mortality. Despite their overall survival, both IIV- and LAIV-vaccinated mice demonstrated levels of bacteria within the lung tissue to levels that are similar to those seen in unvaccinated mice. Thus, influenza virus:bacteria super-infections can be limited by vaccine-induced immunity against influenza virus, but the ability to prevent morbidity is not complete. PMID:21440037

  11. ENHANCED RESISTANCE TO STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION INDUCED IN MICE BY CELL WALL MUCOPEPTIDE

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Jiri; Prendergast, Thomas J.; Karakawa, Walter W.; Harmon, Charles K.; Krause, Richard M.

    1965-01-01

    The streptococcal cell wall mucopeptide when injected into mice either intraperitoneally or intravenously enhances the resitance to subsequent challenge with virulent Group A streptococci. Rabbits which are injected intravenously with solubilized mucopeptide develop a fever response which has a resemblance to that achieved with endotoxin. Mice which survive 6 to 7 weeks after challenge with virulent Group A streptococci yield at autopsy search Group A streptococci serologically identical to the challenge organisms. A preparative dose of cell walls injected into mice prior to challenge diminished this late recovery of streptococci. Group A-variant streptococci were recovered from mice which survived challenge and carried the organisms for several weeks. Filterable bacterial forms, which grew on L form media, were recovered from infected mice. The serologic type of the L forms was identical to that of the challenge organisms. PMID:5853074

  12. Serodiagnosis of Mice Minute Virus and Mouse Parvovirus Infections in Mice by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with Baculovirus-Expressed Recombinant VP2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Robert S.; Besselsen, David G.; Steffen, Earl K.; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L.; Franklin, Craig L.; Riley, Lela K.

    2002-01-01

    Mice minute virus (MMV) and mouse parvovirus (MPV) type 1 are the two parvoviruses known to naturally infect laboratory mice and are among the most prevalent infectious agents found in contemporary laboratory mouse colonies. Serologic assays are commonly used to diagnose MMV and MPV infections in laboratory mice; however, highly accurate, high-throughput serologic assays for the detection of MMV- and MPV-infected mice are needed. To this end, the major capsid viral protein (VP2) genes of MMV and MPV were cloned and MMV recombinant VP2 (rVP2) and MPV rVP2 proteins were expressed by using a baculovirus system. MMV rVP2 and MPV rVP2 spontaneously formed virus-like particles that were morphologically similar to empty parvovirus capsids. These proteins were used as antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to detect anti-MMV or anti-MPV antibodies in the sera of infected mice. Sera from mice experimentally infected with MMV (n = 43) or MPV (n = 35) and sera from uninfected mice (n = 30) were used to evaluate the ELISAs. The MMV ELISA was 100% sensitive and 100% specific in detecting MMV-infected mice, and the MPV ELISA was 100% sensitive and 98.6% specific in detecting MPV-infected mice. Both assays outperformed a parvovirus ELISA that uses a recombinant nonstructural protein (NS1) of MMV as antigen. The MMV rVP2 and MPV rVP2 proteins provide a ready source of easily produced antigen, and the ELISAs developed provide highly accurate, high-throughput assays for the serodiagnosis of MMV and MPV infections in laboratory mice. PMID:12204954

  13. Activity of clarithromycin or rifampin alone or in combination against experimental Rhodococcus equi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Burton, Alexandra J; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hondalus, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of mice with the combination of clarithromycin with rifampin resulted in a significantly lower number of Rhodococcus equi CFU in the organs of mice than treatment with either drug alone or placebo. There was no significant difference in the number of R. equi CFU between mice treated with clarithromycin monotherapy, rifampin monotherapy, or placebo. The combination of clarithromycin with rifampin conferred a clear advantage over either drug as monotherapy in this model of chronic R. equi infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Plasmodium falciparum-infected mice: more than a tour de force.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alicia; Pérignon, Jean Louis; Morosan, Serban; Mazier, Dominique; Benito, Agustin

    2007-06-01

    Up until recently, the relevance of Plasmodium falciparum-infected humanized mice for malaria studies has been questioned because of the low percentage of mice in which the parasite develops. Advances in the generation of new immunodeficient mouse strains combined with the use of protocols that modulate the innate immune defenses of mice have facilitated the harvesting of exoerythrocytic and intraerythrocytic stages of the parasite. These results renew the hope of working with P. falciparum in a laboratory animal and indicate that the next challenge (i.e. a complete parasite cycle in the same mouse, including transmission to mosquito) could be reached in the future.

  15. [The protector effect of ribosomal preparations against experimental influenza infection in mice].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted on the protective effect of some ribosomal preparations, isolated from chorionic-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos, infected or not with parainfluenza (Sendai) or influenza (AoPR8) virus, in mice experimentally inoculated with influenza virus strain AoPR8 adapted to the mouse. Results showed that the tested preparation, containing ribosomes and polysomes isolated from chorio-allantoic membranes of Sendai virus inoculated chicken embryos, ensure the mice complete protection against AoPR8 virus, if administrated before the control infection.

  16. The importance of interferon-gamma in an early infection of Chlamydia psittaci in mice.

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, M C; Maley, S W; Entrican, G; Buxton, D

    1994-01-01

    Athymic mice (nu/nu) and their hairy littermates (nu/+) were infected experimentally with Chlamydia psittaci and the role of endogenous interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on the resolution of the infection was studied. The pathological changes produced in the spleen, liver and lung were exacerbated by administration of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to IFN-gamma and an increased number of viable chlamydiae were recovered from the tissues of both nu/+ and nu/nu mice treated in this way. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8039814

  17. Innate immunity against Legionella pneumophila during pulmonary infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bonggoo; Park, Gayoung; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Seon Ah; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an etiological agent of the severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease (LD). This gram-negative bacterium is thought to replicate naturally in various freshwater amoebae, but also replicates in human alveolar macrophages. Inside host cells, legionella induce the production of non-endosomal replicative phagosomes by injecting effector proteins into the cytosol. Innate immune responses are first line defenses against legionella during early phases of infection, and distinguish between legionella and host cells using germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors , NOD-like receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors, which sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns that are absent in host cells. During pulmonary legionella infections, various inflammatory cells such as macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer (NK) cells, large mononuclear cells, B cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are recruited into infected lungs, and predominantly occupy interstitial areas to control legionella. During pulmonary legionella infections, the interplay between distinct cytokines and chemokines also modulates innate host responses to clear legionella from the lungs. Recognition by NK cell receptors triggers effector functions including secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and leads to lysis of target cells. Crosstalk between NK cells and dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages provides a major first-line defense against legionella infection, whereas activation of T and B cells resolves the infection and mounts legionella-specific memory in the host.

  18. Systemic responses of BALB/c mice to Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Lei, Hehua; Wu, Junfang; Li, Jia V; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2014-10-03

    Salmonella typhimurium is a bacterial pathogen that poses a great threat to humans and animals. In order to discover hosts' responses to S. typhimurium infection, we collected and analyzed biofluids and organ tissues from mice which had ingested S. typhimurium. We employed (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis and immunological techniques. The results indicate that infection leads to a severe impact on mice spleen and ileum, which are characterized by splenomegaly and edematous villi, respectively. We found that increased levels of itaconic acid were correlated with the presence of splenomegaly during infection and may play an important role in Salmonella-containing vacuole acidification. In addition, metabonomic analyses of urine displayed the development of salmonellosis in mice, which is characterized by dynamic changes in energy metabolism. Furthermore, we found that the presence of S. typhimurium activated an anti-oxidative response in infected mice. We also observed changes in the gut microbial co-metabolites (hippurate, TMAO, TMA, methylamine). This investigation sheds much needed light on the host-pathogen interactions of S. typhimurium, providing further information to deepen our understanding of the long co-evolution process between hosts and infective bacteria.

  19. The hepatoprotective activity of blue green algae in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Azza H; Osman, Gamalat Y; Salem, Tarek A; Elmalawany, Alshimaa M

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of a natural product, blue green algae (BGA) (100 mg/kg BW), alone or combined with praziquantel PZQ (250 mg/kg BW) on granulomatous inflammation, liver histopathology, some biochemical and immunological parameters in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Results showed that the diameter and number of egg granuloma were significantly reduced after treatment of S. mansoni-infected mice with BGA, PZQ and their combination. The histopathological alterations observed in the liver of S. mansoni-infected mice were remarkably inhibited after BGA treatments. BGA decreased the activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as the level of total protein (TP) while the level of albumin was increased. Treatment of infected mice with BGA, PZQ as well as their combination led to significant elevation in the activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as compared with control group. Combination of BGA and PZQ resulted in significant reduction in the level of intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) when compared to those of the S. mansoni-infected group. Overall, BGA significantly inhibited the liver damage accompanied with schistosomiasis, exhibited a potent antioxidant and immunoprotective activities. This study suggests that BGA can be considered as promising for development a complementary and/or alternative medicine against schistosomiasis.

  20. Efficacy of Gold Nanoparticles against Nephrotoxicity Induced by Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dkhil, Mohamed A; Khalil, Mona F; Bauomy, Amira A; Diab, Marwa Sm; Al-Quraishy, Saleh

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the ameliorative effects of gold nanoparticles (gold NP) on the renal tissue damage in Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni)-infected mice was investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used for the characterization of NP. The gold NP at concentrations of 250, 500, and 1000 μg/kg body weight were inoculated into S. mansoni-infected mice. The parasite caused alterations in the histological architecture. Furthermore, it induced a significant reduction in the renal glutathione levels; however, the levels of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde were significantly elevated. The parasite also managed to downregulate KIM-1, NGAL, MCP-1, and TGF-β mRNA expression in infected animals. Notably, gold NP treatment in mice reduced the extent of histological impairment and renal oxidative damage. Gold NP were able to regulate gene expression impaired by S. Mansoni infection. The curative effect of gold NP against renal toxicity in S. mansoni-infected mice is associated with their role as free radical scavengers. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a model of Saint Louis encephalitis infection and disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rafael Elias; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca P F; Gomes, Giovanni F; Cramer, Allysson; Rachid, Milene A; Souza, Danielle G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2017-03-22

    Flaviviruses are a genre of closely related viral pathogens which emerged in the last decades in Brazil and in the world. Saint (St.) Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a neglected flavivirus that can cause a severe neurological disease that may lead to death or sequelae. St. Louis encephalitis pathogenesis is poorly understood, which hinders the development of specific treatment or vaccine. To address this problem, we developed a model of SLEV infection in mice to study mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of severe disease. The model consists in the intracranial inoculation of the SLEV strain BeH 355964, a strain isolated from a symptomatic human patient in Brazil, in adult immunocompetent mice. Inoculated mice presented SLEV replication in the brain, accompanied by tissue damage, disease signs, and mortality approximately 7 days post infection. Infection was characterized by the production of proinflammatory cytokines and interferons and by leukocyte recruitment to the brain, composed mainly by neutrophils and lymphocytes. In vitro experiments indicated that SLEV is able to replicate in both neurons and glia and caused neuronal death and cytokine production, respectively. Altogether, intracranial SLEV infection leads to meningoencephalitis in mice, recapitulating several aspects of St. Louis encephalitis in humans. Our study indicates that the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation is a major component of SLEV-induced disease. This model may be useful to identify mechanisms of disease pathogenesis or resistance to SLEV infection.

  2. Susceptibility of BALB/c-nu/nu mice and BALB/c mice to equine herpesvirus 9 infection.

    PubMed

    El-Nahass, E; El-Dakhly, K M; El-Habashi, N; Anwar, S I; Sakai, H; Hirata, A; Okada, A; Abo-Sakaya, R; Fukushi, H; Yanai, T

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to clarify the timing and infectivity of equine herpesvirus 9 (EHV-9) infection in BALB/c-nu/nu mice and their immunocompetent counterpart (BALB/c). Following intranasal inoculation with 10(5) PFU of EHV-9, specimens from 8 mice per group were collected at different times postinoculation (PI) and assessed using histopathology, immunohistochemistry for viral antigen, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for ORF30 gene expression. In BALB/c-nu/nu mice, EHV-9 antigen was abundant in olfactory epithelia of all inoculated animals, and in the olfactory bulb of 1 animal. In contrast, only 1 BALB/c mouse per time point had rhinitis, with mild to moderate immunopositivity starting from 12 to 48 h PI, followed by a gradual virus clearance at 72 h PI. Statistically, significant differences were noted in the immunohistochemistry reactions between the 2 mouse strains, indicating that BALB/c-nu/nu is more susceptible to infection. Relative expression levels of ORF30 gene in olfactory epithelia were significantly different between the 2 groups, with the exception of 12 h PI, when BALB/c-nu/nu animals showed dramatic increases in ORF30 gene expression level until 48 h PI, followed by a decline in expression level until the end of experiment. In contrast, the expression level in brains showed no differences between mouse strain except at 96 h PI. In both strains, the highest messenger RNA expression was detected at 48 h PI, followed by a decline in BALB/c mice, proving a rapid clearance of virus in BALB/c and a gradual slowing down of the increased expression levels in BALB/c-nu/nu.

  3. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Mice Induces Chronic Lung Inflammation, iBALT Formation, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jupelli, Madhulika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chiba, Norika; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Jones, Heather D.; Peterson, Ellena; Chen, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5×105 CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs). Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis. PMID:24204830

  4. Alterations in metabolic pathways in stomach of mice infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Nishiumi, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    Numerous studies of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) have been performed, but few studies have evaluated the effects of H. pylori infections using metabolome analysis, which involves the comprehensive study of low molecular weight metabolites. In this study, the metabolites in the stomach tissue of mice that had been infected with H. pylori SS1 for 1, 3, or 6 months were analyzed, and then evaluations of various metabolic pathways were performed to gain novel understandings of H. pylori infections. As a result, it was found that the glycolytic pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the choline pathway tended to be upregulated at 1 month after the H. pylori SS1 infection. The urea cycle tended to be downregulated at 6 months after the infection. High levels of some amino acids were observed in the stomach tissue of the H. pylori SS1-infected mice at 1 month after the infection, whereas low levels of many amino acids were detected at 3 and 6 months after the infection. These results suggest that H. pylori infection causes various metabolic alterations at lesional sites, and these alterations might be linked to the crosstalk between H. pylori and the host leading to transition of disease conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations.

  6. Increased susceptibility to Salmonella infection in signal regulatory protein α-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Xi; Atif, Shaikh M; Schmiel, Shirdi E; Lee, Seung-Joo; McSorley, Stephen J

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have shed light on the connection between elevated erythropoetin production/spleen erythropoiesis and increased susceptibility to Salmonella infection. In this article, we provide another mouse model, the SIRPα-deficient (Sirpα⁻/⁻) mouse, that manifests increased erythropoiesis as well as heightened susceptibility to Salmonella infection. Sirpα⁻/⁻ mice succumbed to systemic infection with attenuated Salmonella, possessing significantly higher bacterial loads in both the spleen and the liver. Moreover, Salmonella-specific Ab production and Ag-specific CD4 T cells were reduced in Sirpα⁻/⁻ mice compared with wild-type controls. To further characterize the potential mechanism underlying SIRPα-dependent Ag-specific CD4 T cell priming, we demonstrate that lack of SIRPα expression on dendritic cells results in less efficient Ag processing and presentation in vitro. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an indispensable role of SIRPα for protective immunity to Salmonella infection.

  7. Striatal pathology underlies prion infection-mediated hyperactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gunapala, Keith M; Chang, Daniel; Hsu, Cynthia T; Manaye, Kebreten; Drenan, Ryan M; Switzer, Robert C; Steele, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    Although prion diseases are most commonly modeled using the laboratory mouse, the diversity of prion strains, behavioral testing and neuropathological assessments hamper our collective understanding of mouse models of prion disease. Here we compared several commonly used murine strains of prions in C57BL/6J female mice in a detailed home cage behavior detection system and a systematic study of pathological markers and neurotransmitter systems. We observed that mice inoculated with RML or 139A prions develop a severe hyperactivity phenotype in the home cage. A detailed assessment of pathology markers, such as microglial marker IBA1, astroglial marker GFAP and degeneration staining indicate early striatal pathology in mice inoculated with RML or 139A but not in those inoculated with 22L prions. An assessment of neuromodulatory systems including serotonin, dopamine, noradrenalin and acetylcholine showed surprisingly little decline in neuronal cell bodies or their innervations of regions controlling locomotor behavior, except for a small decrease in dopaminergic innervations of the dorsal striatum. These results implicate the dorsal striatum in mediating the major behavioral phenotype of 139A and RML prions. Further, they suggest that measurements of activity may be a sensitive manner in which to diagnose murine prion disease. With respect to neuropathology, our results indicate that pathological stains as opposed to neurotransmitter markers are much more informative and sensitive as markers of prion disease in mouse models.

  8. Long-term selenium deficiency increases the pathogenicity of a Citrobacter rodentium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allen D; Cheung, Lumei; Botero, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a mouse pathogen that causes infectious colitis and shares characteristics with human enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) Escherichia coli, including the ability to cause attaching and effacing lesions in the colon and serves as a useful model to study the pathogenicity of these bacteria. In this study, mice were fed a selenium-deficient diet for 5 or 20 weeks and then infected with C. rodentium. Colonization of the colon by C. rodentium was similar in mice fed adequate or selenium-deficient diets, but total bacterial colonization of the spleen was elevated in mice fed selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks. Infection-induced changes to the colon included inflammatory cell infiltration, gross changes in crypt architecture, and ulceration and denuding of the epithelial layer that were greatest in mice fed a selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks. Expression of pro-inflammatory genes was significantly higher 12-days post-infection in mice fed the selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks compared to mice fed a selenium-adequate diet or selenium-deficient diet for 5 weeks. Diarrhea was prevalent in mice fed the selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks but not 5 weeks, and this was associated with decreased expression of solute carrier family 26a3 and carbonic anhydrase IV, genes involved in ion transport. These results indicated that selenium played an important role in resistance to the pathological effects of a C. rodentium infection, and therefore, selenium status may be important in the expression of human disease caused by common food-borne bacteria.

  9. Statins are ineffective at reducing neuroinflammation or prolonging survival in scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James A; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James F; Chesebro, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammation is a prominent component of several neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, tauopathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and prion diseases. In such conditions, the ability to decrease neuroinflammation by drug therapy may influence disease progression. Statins have been used to treat hyperlipidemia as well as reduce neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in various tissues. In previous studies, treatment of scrapie-infected mice with the type 1 statins, simvastatin or pravastatin, showed a small beneficial effect on survival time. In the current study, to increase the effectiveness of statin therapy, we treated infected mice with atorvastatin, a type 2 statin that has improved pharmacokinetics over many type 1 statins. Treatments with either simvastatin or pravastatin were tested for comparison. We evaluated scrapie-infected mice for protease-resistant PrP (PrPres) accumulation, gliosis, neuroinflammation and time until advanced clinical disease requiring euthanasia. All three statin treatments reduced total serum cholesterol ≥40 % in mice. However, gliosis and PrPres deposition were similar in statin-treated and untreated infected mice. Time to euthanasia due to advanced clinical signs was not changed in statin-treated mice relative to untreated mice, a finding at odds with previous reports. Expression of 84 inflammatory genes involved in neuroinflammation was also quantitated. Seven genes were reduced by pravastatin, and one gene was reduced by atorvastatin. In contrast, simvastatin therapy did not reduce any of the tested genes, but did slightly increase the expression of Ccl2 and Cxcl13. Our studies indicate that none of the three statins tested were effective in reducing scrapie-induced neuroinflammation or neuropathogenesis.

  10. Characterization of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptide production in mice protected against pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Karen L; Hole, Camaron R; Yano, Junko; Fidel, Paul L; Wormley, Floyd L

    2014-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant cause of fungal meningitis in patients with impaired T cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Experimental pulmonary infection with a C. neoformans strain engineered to produce IFN-γ, H99γ, results in the induction of Th1-type CMI, resolution of the acute infection, and protection against challenge with WT Cryptococcus. Given that individuals with suppressed CMI are highly susceptible to pulmonary C. neoformans infection, we sought to determine whether antimicrobial peptides were produced in mice inoculated with H99γ. Thus, we measured levels of antimicrobial peptides lipocalin-2, S100A8, S100A9, calprotectin (S100A8/A9 heterodimer), serum amyloid A-3 (SAA3), and their putative receptors Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in mice during primary and recall responses against C. neoformans infection. Results showed increased levels of IL-17A and IL-22, cytokines known to modulate antimicrobial peptide production. We also observed increased levels of lipocalin-2, S100A8, S100A9 and SAA3 as well as TLR4(+) and RAGE(+) macrophages and dendritic cells in mice inoculated with H99γ compared with WT H99. Similar results were observed in the lungs of H99γ-immunized, compared with heat-killed C. neoformans-immunized, mice following challenge with WT yeast. However, IL-22-deficient mice inoculated with H99γ demonstrated antimicrobial peptide production and no change in survival rates compared with WT mice. These studies demonstrate that protection against cryptococcosis is associated with increased production of antimicrobial peptides in the lungs of protected mice that are not solely in response to IL-17A and IL-22 production and may be coincidental rather than functional.

  11. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  12. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  13. Plasmodium berghei infection ameliorates atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Kishi, C; Amano, H; Suzue, K; Ishikawa, O

    2014-10-01

    Atopic diseases are more prevalent in industrialized countries than in developing countries. In addition, significant differences in the prevalence of allergic diseases are observed between rural and urban areas within the same country. This difference in prevalence has been attributed to what is called the 'hygiene hypothesis'. Although parasitic infections are known to protect against allergic reactions, the mechanism is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not malarial infections can inhibit atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in a mouse model of AD. We used NC/Nga mice which are a model for AD. The NC/Nga mice were intraperitoneally infected with 1 × 10(5) Plasmoduim berghei (Pb) XAT-infected erythrocytes. Malarial infections ameliorated AD-like skin lesions in the NC/Nga mice. This improvement was blocked by the administration of anti-asialo GM1 antibodies, which are anti-natural killer (NK) cells. Additionally, adoptive transfer of NK cells markedly improved AD-like skin lesions in conventional NC/Nga mice; these suggest that the novel protective mechanism associated with malaria parasitic infections is at least, in part, dependent on NK cells. We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that malarial infections ameliorated AD-like skin lesions in a mouse model of AD. Our study could explain in part the mechanism of the 'hygiene hypothesis', which states that parasitic infections can inhibit the development of allergic diseases. © 2014 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mice lacking functional STAT1 are highly susceptible to lethal infection with Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jeanon N; Miller, Milagros; de la Torre, Juan C; Smith, Jennifer K; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Fair, Joseph N; Wauquier, Nadia; Grant, Donald S; Bockarie, Bayon; Bente, Dennis; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-10-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a potentially lethal human disease that is caused by the arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Annually, around 300,000 infections with up to 10,000 deaths occur in regions of Lassa fever endemicity in West Africa. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking a functional STAT1 pathway are highly susceptible to infection with LASV and develop lethal disease with pathology similar to that reported in humans.

  15. Systemic and mucosal immune reactivity upon Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Koc, Arzu; Bargen, Imke; Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Roderfeld, Martin; Tschuschner, Annette; Rath, Timo; Gerlach, Gerald F; Hornef, Mathias; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried; Roeb, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the cause of Johne's disease, an inflammatory bowel disorder of ruminants. Due to the similar pathology, MAP was also suggested to cause Crohn's disease (CD). Despite of intensive research, this question is still not settled, possibly due to the lack of versatile mouse models. The aim of this study was to identify basic immunologic mechanisms in response to MAP infection. Immune compromised C57BL/6 Rag2-/- mice were infected with MAP intraperitoneally. Such chronically infected mice were then reconstituted with CD4+ and CD8+ T cells 28 days after infection. A systemic inflammatory response, detected as enlargement of the spleen and granuloma formation in the liver, was observed in mice infected and reconstituted with CD4+ T cells. Whereby inflammation in infected and CD4+CD45RB(hi) T cell reconstituted animals was always higher than in the other groups. Reconstitution of infected animals with CD8+ T cells did not result in any inflammatory signs. Interestingly, various markers of inflammation were strongly up-regulated in the colon of infected mice reconstituted with CD4+CD45RB(lo/int) T cells. We propose, the usual non-colitogenic CD4+CD45RB(lo/int) T cells were converted into inflammatory T cells by the interaction with MAP. However, the power of such cells might be not sufficient for a fully established inflammatory response in the colon. Nevertheless, our model system appears to mirror aspects of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like CD and Johne's diseases. Thus, it will provide an experimental platform on which further knowledge on IBD and the involvement of MAP in the induction of CD could be acquired.

  16. Systemic and Mucosal Immune Reactivity upon Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Roderfeld, Martin; Tschuschner, Annette; Rath, Timo; Gerlach, Gerald F.; Hornef, Mathias; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried; Roeb, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the cause of Johne's disease, an inflammatory bowel disorder of ruminants. Due to the similar pathology, MAP was also suggested to cause Crohn's disease (CD). Despite of intensive research, this question is still not settled, possibly due to the lack of versatile mouse models. The aim of this study was to identify basic immunologic mechanisms in response to MAP infection. Immune compromised C57BL/6 Rag2−/− mice were infected with MAP intraperitoneally. Such chronically infected mice were then reconstituted with CD4+ and CD8+ T cells 28 days after infection. A systemic inflammatory response, detected as enlargement of the spleen and granuloma formation in the liver, was observed in mice infected and reconstituted with CD4+ T cells. Whereby inflammation in infected and CD4+CD45RBhi T cell reconstituted animals was always higher than in the other groups. Reconstitution of infected animals with CD8+ T cells did not result in any inflammatory signs. Interestingly, various markers of inflammation were strongly up-regulated in the colon of infected mice reconstituted with CD4+CD45RBlo/int T cells. We propose, the usual non-colitogenic CD4+CD45RBlo/int T cells were converted into inflammatory T cells by the interaction with MAP. However, the power of such cells might be not sufficient for a fully established inflammatory response in the colon. Nevertheless, our model system appears to mirror aspects of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like CD and Johne's diseases. Thus, it will provide an experimental platform on which further knowledge on IBD and the involvement of MAP in the induction of CD could be acquired. PMID:24728142

  17. Primary Babesia rodhaini infection followed by recovery confers protective immunity against B. rodhaini reinfection and Babesia microti challenge infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanbo; Efstratiou, Artemis; Adjou Moumouni, Paul Franck; Liu, Mingming; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Guo, Huanping; Gao, Yang; Cao, Shinuo; Zhou, Mo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective immunity against challenge infections with Babesia rodhaini and Babesia microti in the mice recovered from B. rodhaini infection. Six groups with 5 test mice in each group were used in this study, and were intraperitoneally immunized with alive and dead B. rodhaini. The challenge infections with B. rodhaini or B. microti were performed using different time courses. Our results showed that the mice recovered from primary B. rodhaini infection exhibited low parasitemia and no mortalities after the challenge infections, whereas mock mice which had received no primary infection showed a rapid increase of parasitemia and died within 7 days after the challenge with B. rodhaini. Mice immunized with dead B. rodhaini were not protected against either B. rodhaini or B. microti challenge infections, although high titers of antibody response were induced. These results indicate that only mice immunized with alive B. rodhaini could acquire protective immunity against B. rodhaini or B. microti challenge infection. Moreover, the test mice produced high levels of antibody response and low levels of cytokines (INF-γ, IL-4, IL-12, IL-10) against B. rodhaini or B. microti after challenge infection. Mock mice, however, showed rapid increases of these cytokines, which means disordered cytokines secretion occurred during the acute stage of challenge infection. The above results proved that mice immunized with alive B. rodhaini could acquire protective immunity against B. rodhaini and B. microti infections.

  18. Efficacy of delayed treatment with ST-246 given orally against systemic orthopoxvirus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Quenelle, Debra C; Buller, R M L; Parker, Scott; Keith, Kathy A; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert; Kern, Earl R

    2007-02-01

    ST-246 was evaluated for activity against cowpox virus (CV), vaccinia virus (VV), and ectromelia virus (ECTV) and had an in vitro 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 0.48 microM against CV, 0.05 microM against VV, and 0.07 microM against ECTV. The selectivity indices were >208 and >2,000 for CV and VV, respectively. The in vitro antiviral activity of ST-246 was significantly greater than that of cidofovir, which had an EC50 of 41.1 microM against CV and 29.2 microM against VV, with selectivity indices of >7 and >10, respectively. ST-246 administered once daily by oral gavage to mice infected intranasally with CV beginning 4 h or delayed until 72 h postinoculation was highly effective when given for a 14-day duration using 100, 30, or 10 mg/kg of body weight. When 100 mg/kg of ST-246 was administered to VV-infected mice, a duration of 5 days was sufficient to significantly reduce mortality even when treatment was delayed 24 h postinoculation. Viral replication in liver, spleen, and kidney, but not lung, of CV- or VV-infected mice was reduced by ST-246 compared to levels for vehicle-treated mice. When 100 mg/kg of ST-246 was given once daily to mice infected by the intranasal route with ECTV, treatment for 10 days prevented mortality even when treatment was delayed up to 72 h after viral inoculation. Viral replication in target organs of ECTV-infected mice was also reduced.

  19. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Danielle N.; Bahous, Renata H.; Best, Ana F.; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host’s immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs. PMID:26599510

  20. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Danielle N; Bahous, Renata H; Best, Ana F; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host's immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs.

  1. Transport of isometamidium (Samorin) by drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, I A; Mounsey, A; Holmes, P H

    1992-06-01

    The uptake kinetics of a 14C-labelled trypanocidal compound isometamidium chloride (Samorin, RMB Animal Health Ltd, UK) was measured in drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Trypanosoma congolense. It was established that drug uptake was significantly more rapid and quantitatively greater in drug-sensitive parasites. There was clear evidence that drug uptake in both the resistant and sensitive trypanosomes was by a specific, receptor-mediated process. This specific drug transport was energy-dependent, being sensitive to metabolic inhibition with SHAM/glycerol. Significant differences in drug transport were observed which could be correlated with resistance to isometamidium. The optimal pH for drug accumulation was lowered in the resistant trypanosomes; this finding, along with an observed change in specificity for the related compound homidium bromide, suggested that the specific receptor for isometamidium is altered in the resistant trypanosomes, possibly resulting in a reduction in drug uptake. In addition to these alterations in drug uptake, efflux of isometamidium also appears to occur in the resistant trypanosomes. Both a reduction in incubation temperature and metabolic inhibition increased the level of trypanosome-associated isometamidium in the resistant parasites. This was in contrast to observations using drug-sensitive parasites. Furthermore, the addition of calcium flux-modulating agents to the incubation medium also resulted in an increase in accumulation by the resistant parasites.

  2. Lack of commensal flora in H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice reduces gastritis and delays intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Jennifer L.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Taylor, Nancy S.; Mobley, Melissa; Potter, Amanda; Varro, Andrea; Eibach, Daniel; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Transgenic, insulin–gastrin (INS–GAS) mice have high circulating levels of gastrin. On a FVB/N background, these mice develop spontaneous atrophic gastritis and gastrointestinal intraepithelial neoplasia (GIN) with 80% prevalence 6 months after Helicobacter pylori infection. GIN is associated with gastric atrophy and achlorhydria, predisposing mice to non-helicobacter microbiota overgrowth. We determined if germ-free INS–GAS mice spontaneously develop GIN and if H. pylori accelerates GIN in gnotobiotic INS–GAS mice. Methods We compared gastric lesions and levels of mRNA, serum inflammatory mediators, antibodies, and gastrin among germ-free and H. pylori-monoinfected INS-GAS mice. Microbiota composition of specific pathogen-free (SPF) INS-GAS mice was quantified by pyro-sequencing. Results Germ-free INS-GAS mice had mild hypergastrinemia but did not develop significant gastric lesions until they were 9 months old; they did not develop GIN through 13 months. H. pylori monoassociation caused progressive gastritis, epithelial defects, oxyntic gland atrophy, marked foveolar hyperplasia and dysplasia, and strong serum and tissue proinflammatory immune responses (particularly in male mice) between 5 and 11 months post infection (P<0.05, compared with germ-free controls). Only 2 of 26 female, whereas 8 of 18 male, H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice developed low- to high-grade GIN by 11 months post infection. Stomachs of H. pylori-infected SPF male mice had significant reductions in Bacteroidetes and significant increases in Firmicutes. Conclusions Gastric lesions take 13 months longer to develop in germ-free INS–GAS mice than male SPF INS-GAS mice. H. pylori-monoassociation accelerated gastritis and GIN but caused less-severe gastric lesions and delayed onset of GIN compared to H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice with complex gastric microbiota. Changes of gastric microbiota composition might promote GIN in the achlorhydric stomachs of SPF mice. PMID

  3. Gene Expression-Based Classifiers Identify Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Derek D.; Zhang, Yurong; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Langley, Raymond J.; Glickman, Seth W.; Cairns, Charles B.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Otero, Ronny M.; Veldman, Tim; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lucas, Joseph; Woods, Christopher W.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Fowler, Vance G.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a spectrum of human infection. Diagnostic delays and uncertainty lead to treatment delays and inappropriate antibiotic use. A growing literature suggests the host’s inflammatory response to the pathogen represents a potential tool to improve upon current diagnostics. The hypothesis of this study is that the host responds differently to S. aureus than to E. coli infection in a quantifiable way, providing a new diagnostic avenue. This study uses Bayesian sparse factor modeling and penalized binary regression to define peripheral blood gene-expression classifiers of murine and human S. aureus infection. The murine-derived classifier distinguished S. aureus infection from healthy controls and Escherichia coli-infected mice across a range of conditions (mouse and bacterial strain, time post infection) and was validated in outbred mice (AUC>0.97). A S. aureus classifier derived from a cohort of 94 human subjects distinguished S. aureus blood stream infection (BSI) from healthy subjects (AUC 0.99) and E. coli BSI (AUC 0.84). Murine and human responses to S. aureus infection share common biological pathways, allowing the murine model to classify S. aureus BSI in humans (AUC 0.84). Both murine and human S. aureus classifiers were validated in an independent human cohort (AUC 0.95 and 0.92, respectively). The approach described here lends insight into the conserved and disparate pathways utilized by mice and humans in response to these infections. Furthermore, this study advances our understanding of S. aureus infection; the host response to it; and identifies new diagnostic and therapeutic avenues. PMID:23326304

  4. Aged mice display an altered pulmonary host response to Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) infections

    PubMed Central

    CA, Mares; SS, Ojeda; Q, Li; EG, Morris; JJ, Coalson; JM, Teale

    2012-01-01

    Aging is a complex phenomenon that has been shown to affect many organ systems including the innate and adaptive immune systems. The current study was designed to examine the potential effect of immunosenescence on the pulmonary immune response using a Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) inhalation infection model. F. tularensis is a gram-negative intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia.In this study both young (8-12 week old) and aged (20-24 month old) mice were infected intranasally with LVS. Lung tissues from young and aged mice were used to assess pathology, recruitment of immune cell types and cytokine expression levels at various times post infection. Bacterial burdens were also assessed. Interestingly, the lungs of aged animals harbored fewer organisms at early time points of infection (day 1, day 3) compared with their younger counterparts. In addition, only aged animals displayed small perivascular aggregates at these early time points that appeared mostly mononuclear in nature. However, the kinetics of infiltrating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and increased cytokine levels measured in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were delayed in infected aged animals relative to young infected animals with neutrophils appearing at day 5 post infection (PI) in the aged animals as opposed to day 3 PI in the young infected animals. Also evident were alterations in the ratios of mononuclear to PMNs at distinct post infection times. The above evidence indicates that aged mice elicit an altered immune response in the lung to respiratory Francisella tularensis LVS infections compared to their younger counterparts. PMID:19825409

  5. Dexamethasone inhibits brain apoptosis in mice with eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Lee, Bi-Yao; Yen, Chuan-Min; Wann, Shue-Ren; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Chen, Yao-Shen

    2015-04-02

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is the major cause of eosinophilic meningitis worldwide. Rats serve as the definitive host of the nematode, but humans can be infected incidentally, leading to eosinophilic meningitis. A previous BALB/c animal study has demonstrated increased apoptotic proteins and decreased anti-apoptotic proteins in mice infected with A. cantonensis. Steroids may be an effective treatment option for eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis, but the involved mechanism is unclear. This study hypothesized that the beneficial effects of steroids on eosinophilic meningitis are mediated by decreased apoptosis. In a BALB/c animal model, mice were orally infected with 50 A. cantonensis L3 via an oro-gastric tube and were sacrificed every week for 3 consecutive weeks after infection or until the end of the study. Dexamethasone was injected intra-peritoneally from the 7(th) day post-infection until the end of the 21-day study. Evans blue method was used to measure changes in the blood brain barrier, while western blotting, immuno-histochemistry, and TUNEL assay were used to analyze brain homogenates expression of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins. There were increased amounts of Evans blue, apoptotic proteins (caspase-3, -8, and -9 and cytochrome C), and decreased anti-apoptotic proteins (bcl-2) after 2-3 weeks of infection. Dexamethasone administration significantly decreased Evans blue extravasations and apoptotic protein expressions. Apoptosis of mice brain homogenates can be repressed by dexamethasone treatment.

  6. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  7. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P.; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect. PMID:26060995

  8. Early detection of Trichinella spiralis DNA in the feces of experimentally infected mice by using PCR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Lin; Ren, Hua Nan; Shi, Ya Li; Hu, Chen Xi; Song, Yan Yan; Duan, Jiang Yang; Zhang, Hui Ping; Du, Xin Rui; Liu, Ruo Dan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to detect Trichinella spiralis DNA in mouse feces during the early stages of infection using PCR. The target gene fragment, a 1.6kb repetitive sequence of T. spiralis genome, was amplified by PCR from feces of mice infected with 100 or 300 larvae at 3-24h post infection (hpi) and 2-28dpi. The sensitivity of PCR was 0.016 larvae in feces. The primers used were highly specific for T. spiralis. No cross-reactivity was observed with the DNA of other intestinal helminths. T. spiralis DNA was detected in 100% (12/12) of feces of mice infected with 100 or 300 larvae as early as 3hpi, with the peak detection lasting to 12-24hpi, and then fluctuating before declining gradually. By 28dpi, the detection rate of T. spiralis DNA in feces of the two groups of infected mice decreased to 8.33% and 25%, respectively. PCR detection of T. spiralis DNA in feces is simple and specific; it might be useful for the early diagnosis of Trichinella infection.

  9. Increased susceptibility to Trichuris muris infection and exacerbation of colitis in Mdr1a-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Ekta K; Else, Kathryn J; Rogan, Michael T; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of Trichuris muris (T. muris) infection in a mouse model of genetic susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease, Mdr1a-/-. METHODS: Mdr1a-/- mice were housed under specific pathogen free conditions to slow the development of colitis and compared to congenic FVB controls. Mice were infected with approximately 200 embryonated ova from T. muris and assessed for worm burden and histological and functional markers of gut inflammation on day 19 post infection. RESULTS: Mdr1a-/- mice exhibited a marked increase in susceptibility to T. muris infection with a 10-fold increase in colonic worm count by day 19 pi compared to FVB controls. Prior to infection, Mdr1a-/- exhibited low-level mucosal inflammation with evidence of an enhanced Th1 environment. T. muris infection accelerated the progression of colitis in Mdr1a-/- as evidenced by marked increases in several indicators including histological damage score, mucosal CD4+ T-cell and DC infiltration and dramatically increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. CONCLUSION: These data provide further evidence of the complex interaction between T. muris and an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-susceptible host which may have relevance to the application of helminth therapy in the treatment of human IBD. PMID:24587657

  10. Increased susceptibility to Trichuris muris infection and exacerbation of colitis in Mdr1a-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ekta K; Else, Kathryn J; Rogan, Michael T; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2014-02-21

    To investigate the influence of Trichuris muris (T. muris) infection in a mouse model of genetic susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease, Mdr1a-/-. Mdr1a-/- mice were housed under specific pathogen free conditions to slow the development of colitis and compared to congenic FVB controls. Mice were infected with approximately 200 embryonated ova from T. muris and assessed for worm burden and histological and functional markers of gut inflammation on day 19 post infection. Mdr1a-/- mice exhibited a marked increase in susceptibility to T. muris infection with a 10-fold increase in colonic worm count by day 19 pi compared to FVB controls. Prior to infection, Mdr1a-/- exhibited low-level mucosal inflammation with evidence of an enhanced Th1 environment. T. muris infection accelerated the progression of colitis in Mdr1a-/- as evidenced by marked increases in several indicators including histological damage score, mucosal CD⁺ T-cell and DC infiltration and dramatically increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data provide further evidence of the complex interaction between T. muris and an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-susceptible host which may have relevance to the application of helminth therapy in the treatment of human IBD.

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections Enhance Cigarette Smoke Induced COPD in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Taggart, Clifford C.; Weldon, Sinead; Geraghty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) infections are a frequent cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, which are a major factor in disease progression and mortality. RSV is able to evade antiviral defenses to persist in the lungs of COPD patients. Though RSV infection has been identified in COPD, its contribution to cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammation and lung tissue destruction has not been established. Here we examine the long-term effects of cigarette smoke exposure, in combination with monthly RSV infections, on pulmonary inflammation, protease production and remodeling in mice. RSV exposures enhanced the influx of macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes to the airways of cigarette smoke exposed C57BL/6J mice. This infiltration of cells was most pronounced around the vasculature and bronchial airways. By itself, RSV caused significant airspace enlargement and fibrosis in mice and these effects were accentuated with concomitant smoke exposure. Combined stimulation with both smoke and RSV synergistically induced cytokine (IL-1α, IL-17, IFN-γ, KC, IL-13, CXCL9, RANTES, MIF and GM-CSF) and protease (MMP-2, -8, -12, -13, -16 and cathepsins E, S, W and Z) expression. In addition, RSV exposure caused marked apoptosis within the airways of infected mice, which was augmented by cigarette smoke exposure. RSV and smoke exposure also reduced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and protein tyrosine phosphates (PTP1B) expression and activity. This is significant as these phosphatases counter smoke-induced inflammation and protease expression. Together, these findings show for the first time that recurrent RSV infection markedly enhances inflammation, apoptosis and tissue destruction in smoke-exposed mice. Indeed, these results indicate that preventing RSV transmission and infection has the potential to significantly impact on COPD severity and progression. PMID:24587397

  12. Toltrazuril treatment of congenitally acquired Neospora caninum infection in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Strohbusch, M; Müller, N; Hemphill, A; Krebber, R; Greif, G; Gottstein, B

    2009-06-01

    C57BL/6 mice were infected with Neospora caninum tachyzoites during pregnancy, yielding a transplacental infection of developing fetuses. Subsequently, congenitally infected newborn mice were treated either once or three times with toltrazuril (or placebo) at a concentration of 31.25 mg compound per kg body weight. Both toltrazuril and placebo treatment had no negative effect on newborns, as noninfected treated pups developed normally without differences in mortality and morbidity to matching nontreated control animals. Already one application of toltrazuril was significantly (p < 0.01) able to delay the outbreak of neosporosis in newborn mice, when compared to placebo-treated infected controls. We found significantly higher proportion of surviving newborns in one-time-toltrazuril-treated and three-time-toltrazuril-treated groups (34% and 54%, respectively) when compared to one-time-placebo-treated and three-time-placebo-treated groups (14% and 30%, respectively). There was no significant difference (p = 0.2) in the proportion of surviving pups between one-time-toltrazuril and three-time-toltrazuril treatment. However, the number of diseased and Neospora-positive pups (46% and 47%, respectively) was markedly reduced after three-time-toltrazuril treatment compared to all other groups. Three-time-treatment also resulted in the highest antibody (IgG, IgG2a) response. Pharmacokinetic analyses using individual serum samples revealed that, although toltrazuril was absorbed and metabolized to toltrazuril sulfone by newborn mice, medicated animals exhibited an unexpected rapid turn-over (half-life time) of the compound. Toltrazuril and the metabolite were also found in brain tissues, indicating that passage of the blood-brain barrier occurred. In conclusion, we could show that three times treatment with toltrazuril had a high impact on the course of infection in congenitally N. caninum-infected newborn mice.

  13. Diphenyl Diselenide Reduces Oxidative Stress and Toxicity Caused by HSV-2 Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Gláubia; Jardim, Natália Silva; Sari, Marcel Henrique Marcondes; Flores, Eduardo F; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex viruses can cause uncommon systemic complications as acute liver failure (ALT) or urinary tract dysfunctions. Diphenyl diselenide, (PhSe)2 , a classical studied organic selenium compound, has a novel antiviral action against HSV-2 infection and well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate if (PhSe)2 reduces oxidative stress and systemic toxicity caused by HSV-2 infection in mice. Adult BALB/c mice were pre-treated with (PhSe)2 (5 mg kg(-1) /day, intragastric, i.g.) during 5 days; at day 6 mice were infected with HSV-2 (10 μl-10(5) PFU/mL(-1) ) and post-treated with (PhSe)2 for more 5 days. At day 11, they were killed and samples of liver and kidney were obtained to determine: reactive species (RS); malondialdehyde (MDA), and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels; the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). The activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA), Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase (liver and kidney); alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and the levels of urea (plasma) were determined as markers of hepatic and renal toxicity. The results revealed that (PhSe)2 treatment was effective against the increase of renal and hepatic oxidative stress in infected mice and also normalized hepatic and renal ADA activity. It recovered the activity of Na(+) /K(+) - and was not effective against the increase in urea levels in infected mice. Different from (PhSe)2 , acyclovir (positive control), caused an increase in ADA activity and a decrease in hepatic CAT activity. Considering the interest of alternative therapies to treat HSV-2 infections and secondary complications, (PhSe)2 become a notable candidate. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1028-1037, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martinez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Balmer, Vreni; Winzer, Pablo; Ritler, Dominic; Hostettler, Isabel; Arranz-Solís, David; Ortega-Mora, Luis; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM). However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3–5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg) either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy. PMID:25941626

  15. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martinez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Balmer, Vreni; Winzer, Pablo; Ritler, Dominic; Hostettler, Isabel; Arranz-Solís, David; Ortega-Mora, Luis; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM). However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3-5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg) either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy.

  16. Targeted photodynamic therapy of established soft-tissue infections in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2004-06-01

    The worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance necessitates the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We have previously described the first use of PDT to treat excisional wound infections by Gram-negative bacteria in living mice. However these infected wound models used a short time after infection (30 min) before PDT. We now report on the use of PDT to treat an established soft-tissue infection in mice. We used Staphylococcus aureus stably transformed with a Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxABCDE) that was genetically modified to be functional in Gram-positive bacteria. These engineered bacteria emitted bioluminescence allowing the progress of the infection to be monitored in both space and time with a lowlight imaging charged couple device (CCD) camera. One million cells were injected into one or both thigh muscles of mice that had previously been rendered neutropenic by cyclophosphamide administration. Twenty-four hours later the bacteria had multiplied more than one hundred-fold, and poly-L-lysine chlorin(e6) conjugate or free chlorin(e6) was injected into one area of infected muscle and imaged with the CCD camera. Thirty-minutes later red light from a diode laser was delivered as a surface spot or by interstitial fiber into the infection. There was a lightdose dependent loss of bioluminescence (to < 5% of that seen in control infections) not seen in untreated or light alone treated infections, but in some cases the infection recurred. Conjugate alone led to a lesser reduction in bioluminescence. Infections treated with free chlorin(e6) responded less and the infection subsequently increased over the succeeding days, probably due to PDT-mediated tissue damage. PDT-treated infected legs healed better than legs with untreated infections. This data shows that PDT may have

  17. Generation of a central nervous system catheter-associated infection in mice with Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Jessica N

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are valuable tools for investigating the in vivo pathogenesis of Staphylococcus epidermidis infections. Here, we present the procedure for generating a central nervous system catheter-associated infection in a mouse, to model the central nervous system shunt infections that frequently complicate the treatment of hydrocephalus in humans. This model uses stereotactic guidance to place silicone catheters, pre-coated with S. epidermidis, into the lateral ventricles of mice. This results in a catheter-associated infection in the brain, with concomitant illness and inflammation. This animal model is a valuable tool for evaluating the pathogenesis of bacterial infection in the central nervous system, the immune response to these infections and potential treatment options.

  18. Chronic Trichuris muris infection causes neoplastic change in the intestine and exacerbates tumour formation in APC min/+ mice.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Kelly S; Cliffe, Laura J; Bancroft, Alison J; Forman, Simon P; Thompson, Seona; Booth, Cath; Grencis, Richard K

    2017-06-01

    Incidences of infection-related cancers are on the rise in developing countries where the prevalence of intestinal nematode worm infections are also high. Trichuris muris (T. muris) is a murine gut-dwelling nematode that is the direct model for human T. trichiura, one of the major soil-transmitted helminth infections of humans. In order to assess whether chronic infection with T. muris does indeed influence the development of cancer hallmarks, both wild type mice and colon cancer model (APC min/+) mice were infected with this parasite. Parasite infection in wild type mice led to the development of neoplastic change similar to that seen in mice that had been treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane. Additionally, both chronic and acute infection in the APCmin/+ mice led to an enhanced tumour development that was distinct to the site of infection suggesting systemic control. By blocking the parasite induced T regulatory response in these mice, the increase in the number of tumours following infection was abrogated. Thus T. muris infection alone causes an increase in gut pathologies that are known to be markers of cancer but also increases the incidence of tumour formation in a colon cancer model. The influence of parasitic worm infection on the development of cancer may therefore be significant.

  19. Marrow-dependent cells depleted by 89Sr mediate genetic resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Ryshke, R; Bennett, M

    1980-06-01

    Adult mice resistant to infection with 10(6) plaque-forming units of a virulent strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 were treated with 89Sr to abrogate marrow-dependent cell functions. Treated mice were found to be much more susceptible to the herpes simplex virus type 1 infection than untreated mice. The virus persisted in the visceral tissues of 89Sr-treated mice for 3 or more days postinfection but not in those of untreated mice. The virus also spread to the spinal cords of treated but not untreated mice. A marrow-dependent cell appeared to mediate resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 by controlling the infection early after inoculation and not allowing the infection spread to the central nervous system.

  20. Interplay between vesicoureteric reflux and kidney infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Samantha E; Watt, Christine L; Murawski, Inga J; Gupta, Indra R; Abraham, Soman N

    2013-07-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a common congenital defect of the urinary tract that is usually discovered after a child develops a urinary tract infection. It is associated with reflux nephropathy, a renal lesion characterized by the presence of chronic tubulointersitial inflammation and fibrosis. Most patients are diagnosed with reflux nephropathy after one or more febrile urinary tract infections, suggesting a potential role for infection in its development. We have recently shown that the C3H mouse has a 100% incidence of VUR. Here, we evaluate the roles of VUR and uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in the C3H mouse. We find that VUR in combination with sustained kidney infection is crucial to the development of reflux nephropathy, whereas sterile reflux alone fails to induce reflux nephropathy. A single bout of kidney infection without reflux fails to induce reflux nephropathy. The host immune response to infection was examined in two refluxing C3H substrains, HeN and HeJ. HeJ mice, which have a defect in innate immunity and bacterial clearance, demonstrate more significant renal inflammation and reflux nephropathy compared with HeN mice. These studies demonstrate the crucial synergy between VUR, sustained kidney infection and the host immune response in the development of reflux nephropathy in a mouse model of VUR.

  1. Cholinergic signaling plasticity maintains viscerosensory responses during Aspiculuris tetraptera infection in mice small intestine.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Hernández, Egina C; Barajas-López, Carlos; Martínez-Salazar, Elizabeth A; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C; Miranda-Morales, Marcela

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal parasites alter gastrointestinal (GI) functions like the cholinergic function. Aspiculuris tetraptera is a pinworm frequently observed in laboratory facilities, which infests the mice cecum and proximal colon. However, little is known about the impact of this infection on the GI sensitivity. Here, we investigated possible changes in spontaneous mesenteric nerve activity and on the mechanosensitivity function of worm-free regions of naturally infected mice with A. tetraptera. Infection increased the basal firing of mesenteric afferent nerves in jejunum. Our findings indicate that nicotinic but not muscarinic receptors, similarly affect spontaneous nerve firing in control and infected animals; these axons are mainly vagal. No difference between groups was observed on spontaneous activity after nicotinic receptor inhibition. However, and contrary to the control group, during infection, the muscarinic signaling was shown to be elevated during mechanosensory experiments. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that alterations induced by infection of the basal afferent activity were independent of the cholinergic function but changes in mechanosensitivity were mediated by muscarinic, but not nicotinic, receptors and specifically by high threshold nerve fibers (activated above 20mmHg), known to play a role in nociception. These plastic changes within the muscarinic signaling would function as a compensatory mechanism to maintain a full mechanosensory response and the excitability of nociceptors during infection. These changes indicate that pinworm colonic infection can target other tissues away from the colon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii infection blocks the development of allergic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Fenoy, I; Giovannoni, M; Batalla, E; Martin, V; Frank, F M; Piazzon, I; Goldman, A

    2009-01-01

    There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofaecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. Infection with T. gondii induces a strong cell-mediated immunity with a highly polarized T helper type 1 (Th1) response in early stages of infection. Using a well-known murine model of allergic lung inflammation, we sought to investigate whether T. gondii infection could modulate the susceptibility to develop respiratory allergies. Both acute and chronic infection with T. gondii before allergic sensitization resulted in a diminished allergic inflammation, as shown by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, mononuclear and eosinophil cell infiltration around airways and vessels and goblet cell hyperplasia. Low allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG1 and high levels of allergen-specific IgG2a serum antibodies were detected. A decreased interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 production by lymph node cells was observed, while no antigen-specific interferon-γ increase was detected. Higher levels of the regulatory cytokine IL-10 were found in BAL from infected mice. These results show that both acute and chronic parasite infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Our results support the hypothesis that T. gondii infection contributes to protection against allergy in humans. PMID:19032550

  3. Global Metabolomic Profiling of Mice Brains following Experimental Infection with the Cyst-Forming Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikha, Hany M.; Liu, Guang-Xue; Suo, Xun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its host has been largely studied. However, molecular changes at the metabolic level in the host central nervous system and pathogenesis-associated metabolites during brain infection are largely unexplored. We used a global metabolomics strategy to identify differentially regulated metabolites and affected metabolic pathways in BALB/c mice during infection with T. gondii Pru strain at 7, 14 and 21 days post-infection (DPI). The non-targeted Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics analysis detected approximately 2,755 retention time-exact mass pairs, of which more than 60 had significantly differential profiles at different stages of infection. These include amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and vitamins. The biological significance of these metabolites is discussed. Principal Component Analysis and Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis showed the metabolites’ profile to change over time with the most significant changes occurring at 14 DPI. Correlated metabolic pathway imbalances were observed in carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, energetic metabolism and fatty acid oxidation. Eight metabolites correlated with the physical recovery from infection-caused illness were identified. These findings indicate that global metabolomics adopted in this study is a sensitive approach for detecting metabolic alterations in T. gondii-infected mice and generated a comparative metabolic profile of brain tissue distinguishing infected from non-infected host. PMID:26431205

  4. Toxoplasma gondii infection blocks the development of allergic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, I; Giovannoni, M; Batalla, E; Martin, V; Frank, F M; Piazzon, I; Goldman, A

    2009-02-01

    There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofaecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. Infection with T. gondii induces a strong cell-mediated immunity with a highly polarized T helper type 1 (Th1) response in early stages of infection. Using a well-known murine model of allergic lung inflammation, we sought to investigate whether T. gondii infection could modulate the susceptibility to develop respiratory allergies. Both acute and chronic infection with T. gondii before allergic sensitization resulted in a diminished allergic inflammation, as shown by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, mononuclear and eosinophil cell infiltration around airways and vessels and goblet cell hyperplasia. Low allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG1 and high levels of allergen-specific IgG2a serum antibodies were detected. A decreased interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 production by lymph node cells was observed, while no antigen-specific interferon-gamma increase was detected. Higher levels of the regulatory cytokine IL-10 were found in BAL from infected mice. These results show that both acute and chronic parasite infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Our results support the hypothesis that T. gondii infection contributes to protection against allergy in humans.

  5. Heterologous Infection of Pregnant Mice Induces Low Birth Weight and Modifies Offspring Susceptibility to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ankur; Conteh, Solomon; Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy malaria (PM) is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, and can arise due to relapse, recrudescence or a re-infection with heterologous parasites. We have used the Plasmodium chabaudi model of pregnancy malaria in C57BL/6 mice to examine recrudescence and heterologous infection using CB and AS parasite strains. After an initial course of patent parasitemia and first recrudescence, CB but not AS parasites were observed to recrudesce again in most animals that became pregnant. Pregnancy exacerbated heterologous CB infection of AS-experienced mice, leading to mortality and impaired post-natal growth of pups. Parasites were detected in placental blood without evidence of sequestration, unlike P. falciparum but similar to other malaria species that infect pregnant women. Inflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in pregnant females during malaria, and associated with intensity of infection and with poor outcomes. Pups born to dams during heterologous infection were more resistant to malaria infections at 6–7 weeks of age, compared to pups born to malaria-experienced but uninfected dams or to malaria-naïve dams. In summary, our mouse model reproduces several features of human PM, including recrudescences, heterologous infections, poor pregnancy outcomes associated with inflammatory cytokines, and modulation of offspring susceptibility to malaria. This model should be further studied to explore mechanisms underlying PM pathogenesis. PMID:27467392

  6. Host resistance of CD18 knockout mice against systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common beta2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P < 0.01). Quantitative organ culture showed that numbers of Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1beta and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense.

  7. Host resistance of CD18 knockout mice against systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common beta2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P < 0.01). Quantitative organ culture showed that numbers of Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1beta and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense.

  8. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  9. Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Induces Susceptibility to EAE in Resistant BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Jelena; Popovic, Branka; Milovanovic, Marija; Kvestak, Daria; Arsenijevic, Aleksandar; Stojanovic, Bojana; Tanaskovic, Irena; Krmpotic, Astrid; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Jonjic, Stipan; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, BALB/c mice are relatively resistant to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) after challenge with MOG35-55 peptide. Here, we provide the first evidence that infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in adulthood abrogates this resistance. Infected BALB/c mice developed clinical and histological signs similar to those seen in susceptible C57BL/6 mice. In addition to CD4(+) cells, large proportion of cells in the infiltrate of diseased BALB/c mice was CD8(+), similar with findings in multiple sclerosis. CD8(+) cells that responded to ex vivo restimulation with MOG35-55 were not specific for viral epitopes pp89 and m164. MCMV infection favors proinflammatory type of dendritic cells (CD86(+)CD40(+)CD11c(+)) in the peripheral lymph organs, M1 type of microglia in central nervous system, and increases development of Th1/Th17 encephalitogenic cells. This study indicates that MCMV may enhance autoimmune neuropathology and abrogate inherent resistance to EAE in mouse strain by enhancing proinflammatory phenotype of antigen-presenting cells, Th1/Th17, and CD8 response to MOG35-55.

  10. Immunosuppressive and antiparasitic effects of cyclosporin A on Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, K; Nakamura, F; Abe, M; Okamoto, K

    1998-04-01

    The effect of cyclosporin A, which is known to act both as immunosuppressant and as an antiparasitic drug in many host-parasite systems, was examined in a mouse-Hymenolepis nana system. When BDF1 mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) every 48 h from 11 days p.i. with eggs, expulsion of the adult worms from the intestines of mice was prevented completely until at least 30 days p.i. Worm burden, dry weight and the number of gravid proglottids were not significantly reduced. By contrast, in untreated mice most of the worms were eliminated by 19 days p.i. The drug also completely abolished acquired resistance to a challenge infection with eggs when mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) around the time of challenge infection (Days -2, -1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to challenge). Such immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporin A on worm expulsion and protective immunity to reinfection were similar to those of another immunosuppressant, cyclophosphamide. As for the antiparasitic action of cyclosporin A against H. nana, a smaller number of cysticercoids developed from eggs in mice given cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) for 5 days beginning 1 day before infection, than in untreated controls.

  11. Exacerbation of autoimmune neuro-inflammation in mice cured from blood-stage Plasmodium berghei infection.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Rodolfo; Bombeiro, André Luis; Issayama, Luidy Kazuo; Rapôso, Catarina; Lopes, Stefanie Costa Pinto; da Costa, Thiago Alves; Di Gangi, Rosária; Ferreira, Isadora Tassinari; Longhini, Ana Leda Figueiredo; Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; da Cruz Höfling, Maria Alice; Costa, Fábio Trindade Maranhão; Verinaud, Liana

    2014-01-01

    The thymus plays an important role shaping the T cell repertoire in the periphery, partly, through the elimination of inflammatory auto-reactive cells. It has been shown that, during Plasmodium berghei infection, the thymus is rendered atrophic by the premature egress of CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) T cells to the periphery. To investigate whether autoimmune diseases are affected after Plasmodium berghei NK65 infection, we immunized C57BL/6 mice, which was previously infected with P. berghei NK65 and treated with chloroquine (CQ), with MOG35-55 peptide and the clinical course of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) was evaluated. Our results showed that NK65+CQ+EAE mice developed a more severe disease than control EAE mice. The same pattern of disease severity was observed in MOG35-55-immunized mice after adoptive transfer of P. berghei-elicited splenic DP-T cells. The higher frequency of IL-17+- and IFN-γ+-producing DP lymphocytes in the Central Nervous System of these mice suggests that immature lymphocytes contribute to disease worsening. To our knowledge, this is the first study to integrate the possible relationship between malaria and multiple sclerosis through the contribution of the thymus. Notwithstanding, further studies must be conducted to assert the relevance of malaria-induced thymic atrophy in the susceptibility and clinical course of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases.

  12. Dietary Chitosan Supplementation Increases Microbial Diversity and Attenuates the Severity of Citrobacter rodentium Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbing; Xiong, Xia; Tan, Bie; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Fang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice were tested in order to investigate the effects of dietary chitosan (COS) supplements on intestinal microflora and resistance to Citrobacter rodentium infection. The findings reveal that, after consuming a 300 mg/kg COS diet for 14 days, microflora became more diverse as a result of the supplement. Mice receiving COS exhibited an increase in the percentage of Bacteroidetes phylum and a decrease in the percentage of Firmicutes phylum. After Citrobacter rodentium infection, the histopathology scores indicated that COS feeding resulted in less severe colitis. IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly lower in colon from COS-feeding mice than those in the control group. Furthermore, mice in COS group were also found to experience inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the colonic tissue. Overall, the findings revealed that adding 300 mg/kg COS to the diet changed the composition of the intestinal microflora of mice, resulting in suppressed NF-κB activation and less production of TNF-α and IL-6; and these changes led to better control of inflammation and resolution of infection with C. rodentium. PMID:27761062

  13. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  14. Spontaneous generation of prion infectivity in fatal familial insomnia knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Walker S; Borkowski, Andrew W; Faas, Henryk; Steele, Andrew D; King, Oliver D; Watson, Nicki; Jasanoff, Alan; Lindquist, Susan

    2009-08-27

    A crucial tenet of the prion hypothesis is that misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) induced by mutations associated with familial prion disease is, in an otherwise normal mammalian brain, sufficient to generate the infectious agent. Yet this has never been demonstrated. We engineered knockin mice to express a PrP mutation associated with a distinct human prion disease, fatal familial insomnia (FFI). An additional substitution created a strong transmission barrier against pre-existing prions. The mice spontaneously developed a disease distinct from that of other mouse prion models and highly reminiscent of FFI. Unique pathology was transmitted from FFI mice to mice expressing wild-type PrP sharing the same transmission barrier. FFI mice were highly resistant to infection by pre-existing prions, confirming infectivity did not arise from contaminating agents. Thus, a single amino acid change in PrP is sufficient to induce a distinct neurodegenerative disease and the spontaneous generation of prion infectivity.

  15. Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Induces Susceptibility to EAE in Resistant BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Jelena; Popovic, Branka; Milovanovic, Marija; Kvestak, Daria; Arsenijevic, Aleksandar; Stojanovic, Bojana; Tanaskovic, Irena; Krmpotic, Astrid; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Jonjic, Stipan; Lukic, Miodrag L.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, BALB/c mice are relatively resistant to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) after challenge with MOG35–55 peptide. Here, we provide the first evidence that infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in adulthood abrogates this resistance. Infected BALB/c mice developed clinical and histological signs similar to those seen in susceptible C57BL/6 mice. In addition to CD4+ cells, large proportion of cells in the infiltrate of diseased BALB/c mice was CD8+, similar with findings in multiple sclerosis. CD8+ cells that responded to ex vivo restimulation with MOG35–55 were not specific for viral epitopes pp89 and m164. MCMV infection favors proinflammatory type of dendritic cells (CD86+CD40+CD11c+) in the peripheral lymph organs, M1 type of microglia in central nervous system, and increases development of Th1/Th17 encephalitogenic cells. This study indicates that MCMV may enhance autoimmune neuropathology and abrogate inherent resistance to EAE in mouse strain by enhancing proinflammatory phenotype of antigen-presenting cells, Th1/Th17, and CD8 response to MOG35–55. PMID:28289417

  16. Interactions between mefloquine and the anti-fibrotic drug silymarin on Schistosoma mansoni infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Reem O A

    2016-11-01

    The present study tests the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of silymarin alone or combined with mefloquine on acute schistosomiasis by evaluating parasitological, histopathological, biochemical and immunological parameters. Male CDI Swiss mice were divided into seven groups, which included healthy controls, mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni or treated with silymarin (140 mg/kg body weight) or mefloquine (400 mg/kg body weight), or mice treated with a combination of both drugs and uninfected mice simply treated with mefloquine or silymarin alone. All mouse groups were sacrificed 8 weeks post-infection (pi) and/or post-treatment. Those infected mice treated with both silymarin and mefloquine showed a significant decrease (P <  0.001) in worm burden, immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM), liver function enzymes and granuloma diameter, with complete eradication of immature and mature eggs. In conclusion, treatment with silymarin combined with mefloquine in murine schistosomiasis was able to reduce granulomatous reactions and hepatic fibrosis. Hence, this combination is a new strategy to be studied as an efficient tool in the treatment of schistosomal liver fibrosis.

  17. Spontaneous generation of prion infectivity in fatal familial insomnia knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Walker S.; Borkowski, Andrew; Faas, Henryk; Steele, Andrew; King, Oliver D.; Watson, Nicki; Jasanoff, Alan; Lindquist, Susan

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY A crucial tenet of the prion hypothesis is that misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) induced by mutations associated with familial prion disease is, in an otherwise normal mammalian brain, sufficient to generate the infectious agent. Yet this has never been demonstrated. We engineered knock-in mice to express a PrP mutation associated with a distinct human prion disease, fatal familial insomnia (FFI). An additional substitution created a strong transmission barrier against pre-existing prions. The mice spontaneously developed a disease distinct from that of other mouse prion models and highly reminiscent of FFI. Unique pathology was transmitted from FFI mice to mice expressing wild-type PrP sharing the same transmission barrier. FFI mice were highly resistant to infection by pre-existing prions, confirming infectivity did not arise from contaminating agents. Thus a single amino acid change in PrP is sufficient to induce a distinct neurodegenerative disease and the spontaneous generation of prion infectivity. PMID:19709627

  18. Course of induced infection by Eimeria krijgsmannni in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuina; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Tsujio, Masashi; Mizuno, Masanobu; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Masatani, Tatsunori; Matsui, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the utility of Eimeria krijgsmanni as a novel mouse eimerian parasite for elucidating the biological diversity. The parasite showed notable infectivity to mice with various levels of immune status and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents including coccidiostat. However, the detailed lifecycle of E. krijgsmanni had not yet been determined and this information was lacking in discussion of previous findings. In the present study, we clarified the morphological characteristics of E. krijgsmanni and its lifecycle in normal mice, and examined the effects in immunodeficient mice and lifecycle stage for challenge infections after the primary inoculation. In immunocompetent mice, the lifecycle consisted of four asexual stages and the sexual sages followed by formation of oocysts during the prepatent periods. Interestingly, the second-generation meronts were detected in all observation periods after the disappearance of the othe