Science.gov

Sample records for conifers

  1. Rooting of conifer propagules

    Treesearch

    R.L. Mott

    1977-01-01

    An outline of the general problems involved with the propagation of elite conifer clones by rooted cuttings is drawn from published reports. New approaches for resolving these problems can come from studies of clone production through tissue culture methods. Probable extension of tissue culture techniques will permit the establishment of clones from adult, proven trees...

  2. Snow catch by conifer crowns

    Treesearch

    Donald R. Satterlund; Harold F. Haupt

    1967-01-01

    Study of interception storage of snow by two species of sapling conifers in northern Idaho revealed that cumulative snow catch follows the classical law of autocatakinetic growth, or [equation - see PDF] where I, is interception storage, e is the interception storage capacity of the tree, e is the base of the natural logarithm, k is a constant expressing the rate of...

  3. Scleroderris Canker of Northern Conifers

    Treesearch

    Darroll D. Skilling; James T. O' Brien; James A. Bell

    1979-01-01

    Scleroderris canker, caused by the fungus Gremmeniella abietina-Scleroderris lagerbergii (Lagerb.) Morelet, has caused extensive mortality in conifer plantations and forest nurseries in the northeast and north central United States and eastern Canada. Two strains of the fungus are known in North America. The Lake States strain, present throughout northeastern North...

  4. Mistletoes of North American conifers

    Treesearch

    Brian W. Geils; Jose Cibrian-Tovar; Benjamin Moody

    2002-01-01

    Mistletoes of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae are the most important vascular plant parasites of conifers in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Species of the genera Psittacanthus, Phoradendron, and Arceuthobium cause the greatest economic and ecological impacts. These shrubby, aerial parasites...

  5. The hydraulic architecture of conifers

    Treesearch

    Uwe G Hacke; Barbara Lachenbruch; Jarmila Pittermann; Stefan Mayr; Jean-Christophe Domec; Paul J. Schulte

    2015-01-01

    Conifers survive in diverse and sometimes extreme environments (Fig. 2.1a–f). Piñon-juniper communities are found in semi-arid environments, receiving ca. 400 mm of yearly precipitation (Linton et al. 1998), which is less than half the average precipitations received by other coniferous tree species worldwide. Picea mariana and Larix laricina grow in boreal peatlands...

  6. Annosus Root Rot in Eastern Conifers

    Treesearch

    Kathryn Robbins

    1984-01-01

    The fungus Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. (= Fomes annosus (Fr.) Karst.) causes a root and butt rot of conifers in many temperate parts of the world. The decay, called annosus root rot, often kills infected conifers; infected trees that survive grow more slowly and are susceptible to windthrow and bark beetle attack.

  7. Annosus Root disease of Western Conifers (FIDL)

    Treesearch

    Craig L. Schmitt; John R. Parmeter; John T. Kliejunas

    2000-01-01

    Annosus root disease is found on all western conifer species but is of most concern on true firs, hemlocks, and pines. Incense cedar, coast redwood and sequoia are sometimes infected in California. Western juniper is infected throughout its range. Annosus is common and causes extensive decay in old-growth western and mountain hemlock stands. Many mixed conifer stands...

  8. Ecophysiological controls of conifer distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, F.I.

    1995-07-01

    The boreal forest covers the most extensive worldwide area of conifer-dominated vegetation, with a total global area of about 12 million km{sup 2}. This large area is very species poor; in North America there are only nine widespread and dominant species of trees, of which six are conifers-Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Abies balsamea, Larix laricina, Pinus contorta, and Pinus banksiana. The remaining three angiosperms are Betula papyrifera, Populus tremuloides, and Populus balsamifera. In Fennoscandia and the former Soviet Union, 14 species dominate the boreal forest, 10 of which are conifers-Abies sibirica, Larix gmelinii, Larix sibirica, Larix sukaczewii, Picea abies, Picea ajanensis, Picea obovata, Pinus pumila, Pinus sibifica, and Pinus sylvestris. The dominant angiosperm trees are Betula pendula, Betula pubescens, Chosenia arbutifolia, and Populus tremula. Such species paucity detracts from realizing the remarkable capacity of these species to endure the harshest forest climates of the world. Both the short-term geological history and the current climate are major causes of the species paucity in the boreal forest. In general, the boreal forest has been present in its current distribution only since the Holocene era. In most cases, the dominant species of the boreal forest completed their postglacial expansion to their current distributions only over the past 2000 years. So the ecology of the forest is very young, in comparison with forests in warmer climates. It might be expected that over subsequent millennia, with no climatic change, there could be a slow influx of new species to the boreal zone; however, the extreme climatic, edaphic, and disturbance characteristics of the area are likely to set insurmountable limits on this influx of diversity.

  9. Defense Mechanisms of Conifers 1

    PubMed Central

    Lewinsohn, Efraim; Gijzen, Mark; Savage, Thomas J.; Croteau, Rodney

    1991-01-01

    Cell-free extracts from Pinus ponderosa Lawson (ponderosa pine) and Pinus sylvestris L. (Scotch pine) wood exhibited high levels of monoterpene synthase (cyclase) activity, whereas bark extracts of these species contained no detectable activity, and they inhibited cyclase activity when added to extracts from wood, unless polyvinylpyrrolidone was included in the preparation. The molecular mass of the polyvinylpyrrolidone added was of little consequence; however, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (a cross-linked insoluble form of the polymer) was ineffective in protecting enzyme activity. Based on these observations, methods were developed for the efficient extraction and assay of monoterpene cyclase activity from conifer stem (wood and bark) tissue. The level of monoterpene cyclase activity for a given conifer species was shown to correlate closely with the monoterpene content of the oleoresin and with the degree of anatomical complexity of the specialized resin-secreting structures. Cyclase activity and monoterpene content were lowest in the stems of species containing only isolated resin cells, such as western red cedar (Thuja plicata D. Don). Increasing levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were observed in advancing from species with multicellular resin blisters (true firs [Abies]) to those with organized resin passages, such as western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.), Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens Engelm.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco). The highest levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were noted in Pinus species that contain the most highly developed resin duct systems. The relationship between biosynthetic capacity, as measured by cyclase activity, monoterpene content, and the degree of organization of the secretory structures for a given species, may reflect the total number of specialized resin-producing cells per unit mass of stem tissue. PMID:16668182

  10. Biomass in conifer plantations of northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Lewis F. Ohmann

    1984-01-01

    Provides biomass (pounds/acre) estimates for vegetative strata and herb-low shrub species for 53 conifer plantations in Northeastern Minnesota. The estimates are analyzed by plantation age and silvicultural practices used to establish and release the plantations.

  11. Conifer DBMagic: A database housing multiple de novo transcriptome assemblies for twelve diverse conifer species

    Treesearch

    W. Walter Lorenz; Savavanaraj Ayyampalayam; John M. Bordeaux; Glenn T. Howe; Kathleen D. Jermstad; David B. Neale; Deborah L. Rogers; Jeffrey F.D. Dean

    2012-01-01

    Conifers comprise an ancient and widespread plant lineage of enormous commercial and ecological value. However, compared to model woody angiosperms, such as Populus and Eucalyptus, our understanding of conifers remains quite limited at a genomic level. Large genome sizes (10,000-40,000 Mbp) and large amounts of repetitive DNA...

  12. Defense Mechanisms of Conifers 1

    PubMed Central

    Lewinsohn, Efraim; Gijzen, Mark; Croteau, Rodney

    1991-01-01

    Levels of monoterpene cyclase activity were determined in extracts from wounded and unwounded saplings of 10 conifer species to assess whether oleoresin biosynthesis is induced by stem wounding. Species of Abies and Picea, with low to moderate levels of constitutive monoterpene cyclase activity, exhibited a five- to 15-fold increase in cyclase activity 7 days after wounding relative to unwounded controls. In contrast, species of genera such as Pinus, with high levels of constitutive cyclase activity, did not significantly respond to wounding by alteration in the level of cyclase activity. The highest fold increase in monoterpene cyclase activity was consistently observed in Abies grandis, and the time-course of induction of activity following stem wounding in this species demonstrated a threefold increase at 2 days relative to unwounded controls, rising to a maximum increase in the response at 9 days (greater than 10-fold) followed by an apparent decline. The wound response was localized, and both bark (phloem) and wood (xylem) tissues displayed increased cyclase activity at the wound site. The magnitude of the increase in cyclase activity was dependent on the severity of the wound. PMID:16668184

  13. Conifer-Derived Monoterpenes and Forest Walking

    PubMed Central

    Sumitomo, Kazuhiro; Akutsu, Hiroaki; Fukuyama, Syusei; Minoshima, Akiho; Kukita, Shin; Yamamura, Yuji; Sato, Yoshiaki; Hayasaka, Taiki; Osanai, Shinobu; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Conifer and broadleaf trees emit volatile organic compounds in the summer. The major components of these emissions are volatile monoterpenes. Using solid phase microextraction fiber as the adsorbant, monoterpenes were successfully detected and identified in forest air samples. Gas chromatography/mass chromatogram of monoterpenes in the atmosphere of a conifer forest and that of serum from subjects who were walking in a forest were found to be similar each other. The amounts of α-pinene in the subjects became several folds higher after forest walking. The results indicate that monoterpenes in the atmosphere of conifer forests are transferred to and accumulate in subjects by inhalation while they are exposed to this type of environment. PMID:26819913

  14. Enzymes of Glyoxylate in Conifers 12

    PubMed Central

    Firenzuoli, A. M.; Vanni, P.; Mastronuzzi, E.; Zanobini, A.; Baccari, V.

    1968-01-01

    The high level of lipids in seeds of some species of conifers suggested that the glyoxylate cycle might have a role in conifer seed metabolism. Six species (Pinus pinea, Pinus pinaster, Pinus canariensis, Pinus strobus, Abies alba, and Cupressus sempervirens) were investigated for their lipid content and malate synthase and isocitrate lyase level. The fatty acid composition of the triglyceride fraction was also investigated. The correlation between lipid content of germinating seed with the presence of the cycle was confirmed. The enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle were not detected in Cupressus sempervirens where the lipid content is very low. PMID:16656892

  15. Montane conifer fuel dynamics, Yosemite National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Moore, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    Litter and woody fuel accumulation rates over 7 years for 7 montane Sierra Nevada conifer species, including giant sequoia, ponderosa pine, sugar pine, Jeffrey pine, incense-cedar and white fir. Data are from four sites per size class per species with four size classes each. Nonspatial, georeferenced.

  16. Silvics of North America: Volume 1. Conifers

    Treesearch

    Russell M Burns; Barbara H. Honkala; [Technical coordinators

    1990-01-01

    The silvical characteristics of about 200 forest tree species and varieties are described. Most are native to the 50 United States and Puerto Rico, but a few are introduced and naturalized. Information on habitat, life history, and genetics is given for 15 genera, 63 species, and 20 varieties of conifers and for 58 genera, 128 species, and 6 varieties of hardwoods....

  17. Black Stain Root Disease of Conifers (FIDL)

    Treesearch

    Paul F. Hessburg; Donald J. Goheen; Robert V. Bega

    1995-01-01

    The black stain fungus?Leptographium wageneri (Kendrick) Wingfield*?infects and kills several species of western conifers. The fungus colonizes water-conducting tissues of the host's roots, root collars, and lower stems, ultimately blocking the movement of water to foliage. Severely infected trees exhibit wilting symptoms characteristic of vascular wilt diseases...

  18. Indicators of cull in western Oregon conifers.

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Aho

    1982-01-01

    Descriptions and color photographs of important fungal sporophores (conks), other indicators of cull (wounds), and associated decays in western Oregon conifers are provided to aid timber markers, cruisers, and scalers in identifying them. Cull factors are given for the indicators by tree species.

  19. Towards decoding the conifer giga-genome.

    PubMed

    Mackay, John; Dean, Jeffrey F D; Plomion, Christophe; Peterson, Daniel G; Cánovas, Francisco M; Pavy, Nathalie; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Savolainen, Outi; Guevara, M Ángeles; Fluch, Silvia; Vinceti, Barbara; Abarca, Dolores; Díaz-Sala, Carmen; Cervera, María-Teresa

    2012-12-01

    Several new initiatives have been launched recently to sequence conifer genomes including pines, spruces and Douglas-fir. Owing to the very large genome sizes ranging from 18 to 35 gigabases, sequencing even a single conifer genome had been considered unattainable until the recent throughput increases and cost reductions afforded by next generation sequencers. The purpose of this review is to describe the context for these new initiatives. A knowledge foundation has been acquired in several conifers of commercial and ecological interest through large-scale cDNA analyses, construction of genetic maps and gene mapping studies aiming to link phenotype and genotype. Exploratory sequencing in pines and spruces have pointed out some of the unique properties of these giga-genomes and suggested strategies that may be needed to extract value from their sequencing. The hope is that recent and pending developments in sequencing technology will contribute to rapidly filling the knowledge vacuum surrounding their structure, contents and evolution. Researchers are also making plans to use comparative analyses that will help to turn the data into a valuable resource for enhancing and protecting the world's conifer forests.

  20. Genetics and the physiological ecology of conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Mitton, J.B.

    1995-07-01

    Natural selection acts on the diversity of genotypes, adapting populations to their specific environments and driving evolution in response to changes in climate. Genetically based differences in physiology and demography adapt species to alternate environments and produce, along with historical accidents, the present distribution of species. The sorting of conifer species by elevation is so marked that conifers help to define plant communities arranged in elevational bands in the Rocky Mountains. For these reasons, a genetic perspective is necessary to appreciate the evolution of ecophysiological patterns in the coniferous forests of the Rocky Mountains. The fascinating natural history and the economic importance of western conifers have stimulated numerous studies of their ecology, ecological genetics, and geographic variation. These studies yield some generalizations, and present some puzzling contradictions. This chapter focuses on the genetic variability associated with the physiological differences among genotypes in Rocky Mountain conifers. Variation among genotypes in survival, growth, and resistance to herbivores is used to illustrate genetically based differences in physiology, and to suggest the mechanistic studies needed to understand the relationships between genetic and physiological variation.

  1. Rapid analysis of abietanes in conifers

    Treesearch

    P.J. Kersten; B.J. Kopper; K.F. Raffa; B.L. Illman

    2006-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids are major constituents of conifer oleoresin and play important roles in tree defense against insects and microbial pathogens. The tricyclic C-20 carboxylic acids are generally classified into two groups, the abietanes and the pimaranes. The abietanes have conjugated double bonds and exhibit characteristic UV spectra. Here, we report the analysis...

  2. Diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Agriculture handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Scharpf, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    The handbook provides basic information needed to identify the common diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Hosts, distribution, disease cycles, and identifying characteristics are described for more than 150 diseases, including cankers, diebacks, galls, rusts, needle diseases, root diseases, mistletoes, and rots. Diseases in which abiotic factors are involved are also described. For some groups of diseases, a descriptive key to field identification is included.

  3. Comparison of terrestrial invertebrate biomass and richness in young mixed red alder-conifer, young conifer, and old conifer stands of southeast Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Mark E. Schultz; Toni L. De Santo

    2008-01-01

    Coniferous stands that regenerate following clearcutting in southeast Alaska can be characterized by the amount of soil disturbance during logging. There are indications that red alder in mixed stands mitigates some of the negative effects of clearcutting. We compared invertebrate biomass in four stands each of (1) young conifers, (2) young mixed alder and conifer, and...

  4. Hygroscopic motions of fossil conifer cones

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, Simon; Nestle, Nikolaus; Šandor, Andrea; Reible, Bruno; Masselter, Tom; Bruchmann, Bernd; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Conifer cones represent natural, woody compliant structures which move their scales as passive responses to changes in environmental humidity. Here we report on water-driven opening and closing motions in coalified conifer cones from the Eemian Interglacial (approx. 126,000–113,000 years BP) and from the Middle Miocene (approx. 16.5 to 11.5 million years BP). These cones represent by far the oldest documented evidence of plant parts showing full functionality of such passive hydraulically actuated motion. The functional resilience of these structures is far beyond the biological purpose of seed dispersal and protection and is because of a low level of mineralization of the fossils. Our analysis emphasizes the functional-morphological integrity of these biological compliant mechanisms which, in addition to their biological fascination, are potentially also role models for resilient and maintenance-free biomimetic applications (e.g., adaptive and autonomously moving structures including passive hydraulic actuators). PMID:28074936

  5. Hygroscopic motions of fossil conifer cones.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Nestle, Nikolaus; Šandor, Andrea; Reible, Bruno; Masselter, Tom; Bruchmann, Bernd; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-11

    Conifer cones represent natural, woody compliant structures which move their scales as passive responses to changes in environmental humidity. Here we report on water-driven opening and closing motions in coalified conifer cones from the Eemian Interglacial (approx. 126,000-113,000 years BP) and from the Middle Miocene (approx. 16.5 to 11.5 million years BP). These cones represent by far the oldest documented evidence of plant parts showing full functionality of such passive hydraulically actuated motion. The functional resilience of these structures is far beyond the biological purpose of seed dispersal and protection and is because of a low level of mineralization of the fossils. Our analysis emphasizes the functional-morphological integrity of these biological compliant mechanisms which, in addition to their biological fascination, are potentially also role models for resilient and maintenance-free biomimetic applications (e.g., adaptive and autonomously moving structures including passive hydraulic actuators).

  6. Hygroscopic motions of fossil conifer cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, Simon; Nestle, Nikolaus; Šandor, Andrea; Reible, Bruno; Masselter, Tom; Bruchmann, Bernd; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Conifer cones represent natural, woody compliant structures which move their scales as passive responses to changes in environmental humidity. Here we report on water-driven opening and closing motions in coalified conifer cones from the Eemian Interglacial (approx. 126,000-113,000 years BP) and from the Middle Miocene (approx. 16.5 to 11.5 million years BP). These cones represent by far the oldest documented evidence of plant parts showing full functionality of such passive hydraulically actuated motion. The functional resilience of these structures is far beyond the biological purpose of seed dispersal and protection and is because of a low level of mineralization of the fossils. Our analysis emphasizes the functional-morphological integrity of these biological compliant mechanisms which, in addition to their biological fascination, are potentially also role models for resilient and maintenance-free biomimetic applications (e.g., adaptive and autonomously moving structures including passive hydraulic actuators).

  7. Fuel bed characteristics of Sierra Nevada conifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Benedict, J.M.; Sydoriak, W.M.

    1998-01-01

    A study of fuels in Sierra Nevada conifer forests showed that fuel bed depth and fuel bed weight significantly varied by tree species and developmental stage of the overstory. Specific values for depth and weight of woody, litter, and duff fuels are reported. There was a significant positive relationship between fuel bed depth and weight. Estimates of woody fuel weight using the planar intercept method were significantly related to sampled values. These relationships can be used to estimate fuel weights in the field.

  8. Sugar export limits size of conifer needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademaker, Hanna; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.; Bohr, Tomas; Jensen, Kaare H.

    2017-04-01

    Plant leaf size varies by more than three orders of magnitude, from a few millimeters to over one meter. Conifer leaves, however, are relatively short and the majority of needles are no longer than 6 cm. The reason for the strong confinement of the trait-space is unknown. We show that sugars produced near the tip of long needles cannot be exported efficiently, because the pressure required to drive vascular flow would exceed the greatest available pressure (the osmotic pressure). This basic constraint leads to the formation of an inactive region of stagnant fluid near the needle tip, which does not contribute to sugar flow. Remarkably, we find that the size of the active part does not scale with needle length. We predict a single maximum needle size of 5 cm, in accord with data from 519 conifer species. This could help rationalize the recent observation that conifers have significantly smaller leaves than angiosperms, and provide a biophysical explanation for this intriguing difference between the two largest groups of plants.

  9. Management strategies for bark beetles in conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Christopher Fettig; Jacek  Hilszczański

    2015-01-01

    Several species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) are capable of causing significant amounts of tree mortality in conifer forests throughout much of the world.  In most cases, these events are part of the ecology of conifer forests and positively influence many ecological processes, but the economic and social implications can be...

  10. Carbon allocation and accumulation in conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Gower, S.T.; Isebrands, J.G.; Sheriff, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Forests cover approximately 33% of the land surface of the earth, yet they are responsible for 65% of the annual carbon (C) accumulated by all terrestrial biomes. In general, total C content and net primary production rates are greater for forests than for other biomes, but C budgets differ greatly among forests. Despite several decades of research on forest C budgets, there is still an incomplete understanding of the factors controlling C allocation. Yet, if we are to understand how changing global events such as land use, climate change, atmospheric N deposition, ozone, and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} affect the global C budget, a mechanistic understanding of C assimilation, partitioning, and allocation is necessary. The objective of this chapter is to review the major factors that influence C allocation and accumulation in conifer trees and forests. In keeping with the theme of this book, we will focus primarily on evergreen conifers. However, even among evergreen conifers, leaf, canopy, and stand-level C and nutrient allocation patterns differ, often as a function of leaf development and longevity. The terminology related to C allocation literature is often inconsistent, confusing and inadequate for understanding and integrating past and current research. For example, terms often used synonymously to describe C flow or movement include translocation, transport, distribution, allocation, partitioning, apportionment, and biomass allocation. A common terminology is needed because different terms have different meanings to readers. In this paper we use C allocation, partitioning, and accumulation according to the definitions of Dickson and Isebrands (1993). Partitioning is the process of C flow into and among different chemical, storage, and transport pools. Allocation is the distribution of C to different plant parts within the plant (i.e., source to sink). Accumulation is the end product of the process of C allocation.

  11. Conifer health classification for Colorado, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Christopher J.; Noble, Suzanne M.; Blauer, Steven L.; Friesen, Beverly A.; Curry, Stacy E.; Bauer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Colorado has undergone substantial changes in forests due to urbanization, wildfires, insect-caused tree mortality, and other human and environmental factors. The U.S. Geological Survey Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center evaluated and developed a methodology for applying remotely-sensed imagery for assessing conifer health in Colorado. Two classes were identified for the purposes of this study: healthy and unhealthy (for example, an area the size of a 30- x 30-m pixel with 20 percent or greater visibly dead trees was defined as ?unhealthy?). Medium-resolution Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper imagery were collected. The normalized, reflectance-converted, cloud-filled Landsat scenes were merged to form a statewide image mosaic, and a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Renormalized Difference Infrared Index (RDII) were derived. A supervised maximum likelihood classification was done using the Landsat multispectral bands, the NDVI, the RDII, and 30-m U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset (NED). The classification was constrained to pixels identified in the updated landcover dataset as coniferous or mixed coniferous/deciduous vegetation. The statewide results were merged with a separate health assessment of Grand County, Colo., produced in late 2008. Sampling and validation was done by collecting field data and high-resolution imagery. The 86 percent overall classification accuracy attained in this study suggests that the data and methods used successfully characterized conifer conditions within Colorado. Although forest conditions for Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) are easily characterized, classification uncertainty exists between healthy/unhealthy Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa), Pi?on (Pinus edulis), and Juniper (Juniperus sp.) vegetation. Some underestimation of conifer mortality in Summit County is likely, where recent (2008) cloud-free imagery was unavailable. These classification uncertainties are primarily due to the spatial and

  12. Gondwanan conifer clones imperilled by bushfire

    PubMed Central

    Worth, James R. P.; Sakaguchi, Shota; Rann, Karl D.; Bowman, Clarence J. W.; Ito, Motomi; Jordan, Gregory J.; Bowman, David M. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Global increases in fire frequency driven by anthropogenic greenhouse emissions and land use change could threaten unique and ancient species by creeping into long-term fire refugia. The perhumid and mountainous western half of Tasmania is a globally important refugium for palaeo-endemic, fire intolerant lineages, especially conifers. Reproductive strategy will be crucial to the resilience of these organisms under warmer, dryer and more fire prone climates. This study analysed clonal versus sexual reproduction in old growth plots dominated by the palaeo-endemic conifer Athrotaxis cupressoides (Cupressaceae), a species that lacks any traits to tolerate frequent landscape fire. Across most of the seven plots the amount of sexually derived individuals was lower than clonally derived with, on average, 60% of all stems belonging to the same multi-locus lineage (MLL) (i.e. were clonal). Some MLLs were large spanning over 10 s of metres and consisted of up to 62 stems. The high mortality after fire and the rarity of sexual regeneration means that the range of this fire-intolerant species is likely to contract under enhanced fire regimes and has a limited capacity to disperse via seed to available fire refugia in the landscape. PMID:27666536

  13. Response mechanisms of conifers to air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Matyssek, R.; Reich, P.; Oren, R.; Winner, W.E.

    1995-07-01

    Conifers are known to respond to SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, NO{sub x} and acid deposition. Of these pollutants, O{sub 3} is likely the most widespread and phytotoxic compound, and therefore of great interest to individuals concerned with forest resources Direct biological responses have a toxicological effects on metabolism which can then scale to effects on tree growth and forest ecology, including processes of competition and succession. Air pollution can cause reductions in photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, which are the physiological parameters most rigorously studied for conifers. Some effects air pollutants can have on plants are influenced by the presence of co-occurring environmental stresses. For example, drought usually reduces vulnerability of plants to air pollution. In addition, air pollution sensitivity may differ among species and with plant/leaf age. Plants may make short-term physiological adjustments to compensate for air pollution or may evolve resistance to air pollution through the processes of selection. Models are necessary to understand how physiological processes, growth processes, and ecological processes are affected by air pollutants. The process of defining the ecological risk that air pollutants pose for coniferous forests requires approaches that exploit existing databases, environmental monitoring of air pollutants and forest resources, experiments with well-defined air pollution treatments and environmental control/monitoring, modeling, predicting air pollution-caused changes in productivity and ecological processes over time and space, and integration of social values.

  14. Plant hormones and ecophysiology of conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    Over the past 30 years, there have been very substantial fluctuations in the interests of plant scientists in the involvement of plant growth regulators in the control of physiology, growth, and development of plants. In the years following the identification of the five major classes of growth regulators and identification of other groups of compounds of somewhat more restricted interest, an enormous number of papers reported the effects of hormones applied externally to a very wide range of plants. During this period, it became very fashionable to compare effects of hormones with the effects of the environment on developmental and physiological phenomena and to suggest a regulatory role for the hormone(s) in the processes under consideration. Ross et al. (1983) have published a very comprehensive survey of the effects of growth regulators applied externally to conifers, and even 10 years later, it is difficult to improve on what they have done. Nevertheless, in the light of recent changes in our understanding of how growth regulators may work, it is necessary to reexamine this field and ask what we really know about the involvement of growth regulators in the ecophysiology of conifers.

  15. AmeriFlux US-Vcm Valles Caldera Mixed Conifer

    SciTech Connect

    Litvak, Marcy

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Vcm Valles Caldera Mixed Conifer. Site Description - The Valles Caldera Mixed Conifer site is located in the 1200 km2 Jemez River basin in north-central New Mexico. Common to elevations ranging from 3040 to 2740 m in the region, the mixed conifer stand, within the entirety of the tower footprint in all directions, provides an excellent setting for studying the seasonal interaction between snow and vegetation.

  16. Leaf area dynamics of conifer forests

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H.; Oren, R.; Whitehead, D.; Kaufmann, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Estimating the surface area of foliage supported by a coniferous forest canopy is critical for modeling its biological properties. Leaf area represents the surface area available for the interception of energy, the absorption of carbon dioxide, and the diffusion of water from the leaf to the atmosphere. The concept of leaf area is pertinent to the physiological and ecological dynamics of conifers at a wide range of spatial scales, from individual leaves to entire biomes. In fact, the leaf area of vegetation at a global level can be thought of as a carbon-absorbing, water-emitting membrane of variable thickness, which can have an important influence on the dynamics and chemistry of the Earth`s atmosphere over both the short and the long term. Unless otherwise specified, references to leaf area herein refer to projected leaf area, i.e., the vertical projection of needles placed on a flat plane. Total leaf surface area is generally from 2.0 to 3.14 times that of projected leaf area for conifers. It has recently been suggested that hemisurface leaf area, i.e., one-half of the total surface area of a leaf, a more useful basis for expressing leaf area than is projected area. This chapter is concerned with the dynamics of coniferous forest leaf area at different spatial and temporal scales. In the first part, we consider various hypotheses related to the control of leaf area development, ranging from simple allometric relations with tree size to more complex mechanistic models that consider the movement of water and nutrients to tree canopies. In the second part, we consider various aspects of leaf area dynamics at varying spatial and temporal scales, including responses to perturbation, seasonal dynamics, genetic variation in crown architecture, the responses to silvicultural treatments, the causes and consequences of senescence, and the direct measurement of coniferous leaf area at large spatial scales using remote sensing.

  17. Conifer Decline and Mortality in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, V.; Im, S.; Ranson, K.

    2015-12-01

    "Dark needle conifer" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica and Picea obovata) decline and mortality increase were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed causes and scale of Siberian pine and fir mortality in Altai-Sayan and Baikal Lake Regions and West Siberian Plane based on in situdata and remote sensing (QuickBird, Landsat, GRACE). Geographically, mortality began on the margins of the DNC range (i.e., within the forest-steppe and conifer-broadleaf ecotones) and on terrain features with maximal water stress risk (narrow-shaped hilltops, convex steep south facing slopes, shallow well-drained soils). Within ridges, mortality occurred mainly along mountain passes, where stands faced drying winds. Regularly mortality was observed to decrease with elevation increase with the exception of Baikal Lake Mountains, where it was minimal near the lake shore and increased with elevation (up to about 1000 m a.s.l.). Siberian pine and fir mortality followed a drying trend with consecutive droughts since the 1980s. Dendrochronology analysis showed that mortality was correlated with vapor pressure deficit increase, drought index, soil moisture decrease and occurrence of late frosts. In Baikal region Siberian pine mortality correlated with Baikal watershed meteorological variables. An impact of previous year climate conditions on the current growth was found (r2 = 0.6). Thus, water-stressed trees became sensitive to bark beetles and fungi impact (including Polygraphus proximus and Heterobasidion annosum). At present, an increase in mortality is observed within the majority of DNC range. Results obtained also showed a primary role of water stress in that phenomenon with a secondary role of bark beetles and fungi attacks. In future climate with increased drought severity and frequency Siberian pine and fir will partly disappear from its current range, and will be substituted by drought-tolerant species (e.g., Pinus silvestris, Larix sibirica).

  18. Source-sink-storage relationships of conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Luxmoore, R.J.; Oren, R.; Sheriff, D.W.; Thomas, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Irradiance, air temperature, saturation vapor pressure deficit, and soil temperature vary in association with Earth`s daily rotation, inducing significant hourly changes in the rates of plant physiological processes. These processes include carbon fixation in photosynthesis, sucrose translocation, and carbon utilization in growth, storage, and respiration. The sensitivity of these physiological processes to environmental factors such as temperature, soil water availability, and nutrient supply reveals differences that must be viewed as an interactive whole in order to comprehend whole-plant responses to the environment. Integrative frameworks for relationships between plant physiological processes are needed to provide syntheses of plant growth and development. Source-sink-storage relationships, addressed in this chapter, provide one framework for synthesis of whole-plant responses to external environmental variables. To address this issue, some examples of carbon assimilation and utilization responses of five conifer species to environmental factors from a range of field environments are first summarized. Next, the interactions between sources, sinks, and storages of carbon are examined at the leaf and tree scales, and finally, the review evaluates the proposition that processes involved with carbon utilization (sink activity) are more sensitive to the supply of water and nutrients (particularly nitrogen) than are the processes of carbon gain (source activity) and carbon storage. The terms {open_quotes}sink{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}source{close_quotes} refer to carbon utilization and carbon gain, respectively. The relative roles of stored carbon reserves and of current photosynthate in meeting sink demand are addressed. Discussions focus on source-sink-storage relationships within the diurnal, wetting-drying, and annual cycles of conifer growth and development, and some discussion of life cycle aspects is also presented.

  19. Tall shrub layer biomass in conifer plantations in northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Lewis F. Ohmann

    1982-01-01

    Provides estimates of biomass (pounds/acre) for tall shrub species in 53 conifer plantations in northeastern Minnesota. The estimates are analyzed by plantation age and silvicultural practices used to establish and release the plantations.

  20. Silviculture of mixed conifer forests in eastern Oregon and Washington.

    Treesearch

    K.W. Seidel; P.H. Cochran

    1981-01-01

    The silviculture of mixed conifer forests in eastern Oregon and Washington is described. Topics discussed include ecological setting, damaging agents, silviculture, and management. The relevant literature is presented, along with unpublished research, experience, and observations. Research needs are also proposed.

  1. Radiometric measurements of gap probability in conifer tree canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Bryan J.; Strahler, Alan H.; Li, Xiaowen; Liang, Shunlin; Clarke, Keith C.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of gap probability were made for some moderate-sized, open-grown conifers of varying species. Results of the radiometric analysis show that the gap probability, which is taken as the mean of the binomial, fits well a negative exponential function of a path length. The conifer shadow, then, is an object of almost uniform darkness with some bright holes or gaps that are found near the shadow's edge and rapidly disappear toward the shadows center.

  2. The genetics of drought tolerance in conifers.

    PubMed

    Moran, Emily; Lauder, Jeffrey; Musser, Cameron; Stathos, Angela; Shu, Mengjun

    2017-09-12

    1 I. 1 II. 2 III. 4 IV. 5 V. 9 VI. 10 VII. 12 References 12 SUMMARY: As temperatures warm and precipitation patterns shift as a result of climate change, interest in the identification of tree genotypes that will thrive under more arid conditions has grown. In this review, we discuss the multiple definitions of 'drought tolerance' and the biological processes involved in drought responses. We describe the three major approaches taken in the study of genetic variation in drought responses, the advantages and shortcomings of each, and what each of these approaches has revealed about the genetic basis of adaptation to drought in conifers. Finally, we discuss how a greater knowledge of the genetics of drought tolerance may aid forest management, and provide recommendations for how future studies may overcome the limitations of past approaches. In particular, we urge a more direct focus on survival, growth and the traits that directly predict them (rather than on proxies, such as water use efficiency), combining research approaches with complementary strengths and weaknesses, and the inclusion of a wider range of taxa and life stages. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E; Sessa, Emily B; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W; Rieseberg, Loren H; Barker, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity.

  4. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E.; Sessa, Emily B.; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Barker, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity. PMID:26702445

  5. Hemisphere-scale differences in conifer evolutionary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Rai, Hardeep S; Crane, Peter R; Donoghue, Michael J; Mathews, Sarah

    2012-10-02

    Fundamental differences in the distribution of oceans and landmasses in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres potentially impact patterns of biological diversity in the two areas. The evolutionary history of conifers provides an opportunity to explore these dynamics, because the majority of extant conifer species belong to lineages that have been broadly confined to the Northern or Southern Hemisphere during the Cenozoic. Incorporating genetic information with a critical review of fossil evidence, we developed an age-calibrated phylogeny sampling ∼80% of living conifer species. Most extant conifer species diverged recently during the Neogene within clades that generally were established during the later Mesozoic, but lineages that diversified mainly in the Southern Hemisphere show a significantly older distribution of divergence ages than their counterparts in the Northern Hemisphere. Our tree topology and divergence times also are best fit by diversification models in which Northern Hemisphere conifer lineages have higher rates of species turnover than Southern Hemisphere lineages. The abundance of recent divergences in northern clades may reflect complex patterns of migration and range shifts during climatic cycles over the later Neogene leading to elevated rates of speciation and extinction, whereas the scattered persistence of mild, wetter habitats in the Southern Hemisphere may have favored the survival of older lineages.

  6. Review of Current Information Regarding the Phytosanitary Risks of Phytophthora ramorum and North American Conifers

    Treesearch

    Brenda Callan; Shane Sela; Eric Allen

    2008-01-01

    On March 3, 2007 the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) sponsored a ?Risks to Conifers? discussion panel to review the state of scientific knowledge regarding Phytophthora ramorum Werres, De Cock & Man in 't Veld and conifers and the potential for the pathogen to be transported with conifer forest products moving in...

  7. Utilization of treated conifer wood chips by Pleurotus (Fr.) P. Karst. species for cultivating mushrooms

    Treesearch

    Suki C. Croan

    2003-01-01

    Mushroom-producing white-rot basidiomycetes can grow rapidly and produce heavy mycelial growth on treated conifer wastes with extractive-degrading fungi. This study evaluates the treatment of scaled-up conifer wood chips with Ophiostoma piliferum (Cartapip 97). Treated conifer chips were used as substrates for cultivating mushroom-producing basidiomycetes of various...

  8. Prediction of periodic basal area increment for young-growth mixed conifers in sierra Nevada

    Treesearch

    Leroy K. Dolph

    1988-01-01

    Mixed-conifer forests are the largest vegetation type in California, covering more than 13 million acres (Barbour and Major 1977). This type, the Sierra Nevada Mixed Conifer (Society of American Foresters Forest cover type 243, Tappeiner 1980) dominates mid-elevations of the Sierra Nevada's western slopes. The extent of the mixed-conifer type and the amount of...

  9. A density management diagram for even-aged Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer stands

    Treesearch

    James N. Long; John D. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a density management diagram (DMD) for even-aged mixed-conifer stands in the Sierra Nevada Mountains using forest inventory and analysis (FIA) data. Analysis plots were drawn from FIA plots in California, southern Oregon, and western Nevada which included those conifer species associated with the mixed-conifer forest type. A total of 204 plots met the...

  10. Stand dynamics of mixed red alder-conifer forests of southeast Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Deal; Paul E. Hennon; Ewa H. Orlikowska; David V. D' Amore

    2004-01-01

    Stand structure and dynamics were evaluated in mixed red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) - conifer forests of southeast Alaska. We assessed stand development, tree density, total basal area, diameter distribution of live and dead trees, height distribution of live trees, and mean diameter of all and largest conifers in 40-year-old red alder - conifer...

  11. Cambium Destruction in Conifers Caused by Pinewood Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Ronald F.

    1986-01-01

    Percentage and rate of mortality in 2-4-year-old conifers depended upon the numbers of pinewood nematodes Bursaphelenchus xylophilus inoculated into their stems. In addition, percentage of conifer mortality was greater for spring inoculations when cambial activity was greater than for late summer and fall inoculations. Gross and histological examination of stems revealed destruction of the cambial layer, including fusiform and ray intitials and their derivatives. These data suggest that cambial and ray destruction causes tree death through blockage of tracheids by gas, oleoresin, or metabolites from dying ray tissues. PMID:19294198

  12. Resource physiology of conifers: Acquisition, allocation, and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.K.; Hinckley, T.M.

    1995-03-01

    This book focuses on a synthetic view of the resource physiology of conifer trees with an emphasis on developing a perspective that can integrate across the biological hierarchy. This objective is in concert with more scientific goals of maintaining biological diversity and the sustainability of forest systems. The preservation of coniferous forest ecosystems is a major concern today. This volume deals with the topics of resource acquisition, allocation, and utilization in conifers. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. A Simple Computer Application for the Identification of Conifer Genera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, Steven R.; Chmielewski, Jerry G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards prescribe that an understanding of the importance of classifying organisms be one component of a student's educational experience in the life sciences. The use of a classification scheme to identify organisms is one way of addressing this goal. We describe Conifer ID, a computer application that assists…

  14. Conifers have a unique small RNA silencing signature

    PubMed Central

    Dolgosheina, Elena V.; Morin, Ryan D.; Aksay, Gozde; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R.; Mattsson, Jim; Unrau, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Plants produce small RNAs to negatively regulate genes, viral nucleic acids, and repetitive elements at either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level in a process that is referred to as RNA silencing. While RNA silencing has been extensively studied across the different phyla of the animal kingdom (e.g., mouse, fly, worm), similar studies in the plant kingdom have focused primarily on angiosperms, thus limiting evolutionary studies of RNA silencing in plants. Here we report on an unexpected phylogenetic difference in the size distribution of small RNAs among the vascular plants. By extracting total RNA from freshly growing shoot tissue, we conducted a survey of small RNAs in 24 vascular plant species. We find that conifers, which radiated from the other seed-bearing plants ∼260 million years ago, fail to produce significant amounts of 24-nucleotide (nt) RNAs that are known to guide DNA methylation and heterochromatin formation in angiosperms. Instead, they synthesize a diverse population of small RNAs that are exactly 21-nt long. This finding was confirmed by high-throughput sequencing of the small RNA sequences from a conifer, Pinus contorta. A conifer EST search revealed the presence of a novel Dicer-like (DCL) family, which may be responsible for the observed change in small RNA expression. No evidence for DCL3, an enzyme that matures 24-nt RNAs in angiosperms, was found. We hypothesize that the diverse class of 21-nt RNAs found in conifers may help to maintain organization of their unusually large genomes. PMID:18566193

  15. The Transcriptomics of Secondary Growth and Wood Formation in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana; Paiva, Jorge; Louzada, José; Lima-Brito, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, forestry scientists have adapted genomics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to the search for candidate genes related to the transcriptomics of secondary growth and wood formation in several tree species. Gymnosperms, in particular, the conifers, are ecologically and economically important, namely, for the production of wood and other forestry end products. Until very recently, no whole genome sequencing of a conifer genome was available. Due to the gradual improvement of the NGS technologies and inherent bioinformatics tools, two draft assemblies of the whole genomes sequence of Picea abies and Picea glauca arose in the current year. These draft genome assemblies will bring new insights about the structure, content, and evolution of the conifer genomes. Furthermore, new directions in the forestry, breeding and research of conifers will be discussed in the following. The identification of genes associated with the xylem transcriptome and the knowledge of their regulatory mechanisms will provide less time-consuming breeding cycles and a high accuracy for the selection of traits related to wood production and quality. PMID:24288610

  16. Cone size is related to branching architecture in conifers.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Crane, Peter R; Donoghue, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between branch diameter and leaf size has been widely used to understand how vegetative resources are allocated in plants. Branching architecture influences reproductive allocation as well, but fewer studies have explored this relationship at broad phylogenetic or ecological scales. In this study, we tested whether pollen-producing and seed-producing cone size scales with branch diameter in conifers, a diverse and globally distributed lineage of nonflowering seed plants. Branch diameter and cone size were analyzed using multiple regression models and evolutionary models of trait evolution for a data set of 293 extant conifer species within an explicit phylogenetic framework. Branch diameter is a strong predictor of cone size across conifer species, particularly for pollen cones and dry seed cones. However, these relationships are complex in detail because leaf morphology and seed dispersal biology influence the specific ways in which they are expressed. The ubiquity and strength of these scaling relationships across conifers suggest that reproductive and vegetative morphologies are coupled in the group, and it is therefore difficult to disentangle the evolution of cone size from the evolution of branching architecture.

  17. The transcriptomics of secondary growth and wood formation in conifers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Paiva, Jorge; Louzada, José; Lima-Brito, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, forestry scientists have adapted genomics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to the search for candidate genes related to the transcriptomics of secondary growth and wood formation in several tree species. Gymnosperms, in particular, the conifers, are ecologically and economically important, namely, for the production of wood and other forestry end products. Until very recently, no whole genome sequencing of a conifer genome was available. Due to the gradual improvement of the NGS technologies and inherent bioinformatics tools, two draft assemblies of the whole genomes sequence of Picea abies and Picea glauca arose in the current year. These draft genome assemblies will bring new insights about the structure, content, and evolution of the conifer genomes. Furthermore, new directions in the forestry, breeding and research of conifers will be discussed in the following. The identification of genes associated with the xylem transcriptome and the knowledge of their regulatory mechanisms will provide less time-consuming breeding cycles and a high accuracy for the selection of traits related to wood production and quality.

  18. A comparison of conifers planted on the Hemlock Experimental Forest.

    Treesearch

    Norman P. Worthington

    1955-01-01

    Test plantings have been made on the Hemlock Experimental Forest in cooperation with the St. Regis Paper Company to test suitability of several native conifers for planting on heavy bracken and brush-covered Site II areas typical of the western Olympic Peninsula. In the spring of 1950, 2,500 Douglas-fir seedlings from the Forest Industries Tree Nursery at Nisqually...

  19. Soil moisture and groundwater recharge under a mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1978-01-01

    The depletion of soil moisture within the surface 7 m by a mixed conifer forest in the Sierra Nevada was measured by the neutron method every 2 weeks during 5 consecutive summers. Soil moisture recharge was measured periodically during the intervening winters. Groundwater fluctuations within the surface 17 m were continuously recorded during the same period.

  20. Conversion of conifer wastes into edible and medicinal mushrooms.

    Treesearch

    Suki C. Croan

    2004-01-01

    Mushroom-producing white-rot fungi can be used to convert woodwaste into gourmet and medicinal mushrooms. White-rot fungi do not always readily colonize on conifer wood because of its extractives content. This study evaluated the resinous extractive content of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and an unknown species of southern yellow pine...

  1. Biorhythms in conifer seed germination during extended storage

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; N.I. Marnonov

    1989-01-01

    A proportion of sound seeds of conifer species do not germinate during certain periods of the year, even when conditions are favorable. Mamonov et al. (1986) report that the non-germinating seeds have apparently undergone physiological changes that affected germination. This phenomenon may be due to seasonal periodicity, or biorhythms. As early as the mid-1930'...

  2. Microsatellite DNA as shared genetic markers among conifer species

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt; G.G. Vendramin; C.D. Nelson; P. Marquardt

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 21 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci in Pinus strobus L. and 6 in Pinus radiata D. Don. were evaluated to determine whether SSR marker amplification could be achieved in 10 other conifer species. Eighty percent of SSR primer pairs for (AC)n loci that were polymorphic in P. ...

  3. Wood density and growth of some conifers introduced to Hawaii.

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1963-01-01

    The specific gravity of the wood of 14 conifers grown in Hawaii was measured by means of increment cores. Most species were growing in environments quite different from their native habitats. The specific gravity and growth characteristics under several site conditions were compared. Described in some detail are Norfolk-Island-pine, slash pine, Jeffrey pine, jelecote...

  4. Susceptibility of conifer shoots to infection by Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    G.A. Chastagner; E.M. Hansen; K.L. Riley; W. Sutton

    2006-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum is the pathogen that causes sudden oak death, which was first detected on tanoak in Marin County, California in 1995. The identification of several conifers as hosts of P. ramorum and the increased spread of this pathogen via shipment of ornamental nursery stock has the potential to severely impact the...

  5. Will Garry oak respond to release from overtopping conifers

    Treesearch

    Constance A. Harrington; Christel C. Kern

    2002-01-01

    Garry oak (Quercus garryana) woodlands provide unique habitat for many Pacific Northwest species but these habitats are rapidly disappearing as species composition shifts to conifer or land use changes to urban or agricultural. Many oak trees from former savannas or oak woodlands on Fort Lewis Military Reservation (near Tacoma, WA, USA) are currently...

  6. Root cold hardiness and native distribution of subalpine conifers

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; Thomas M. Hinckley; Geoffrey McNaughton; Barbara A. Smit

    1992-01-01

    Root and needle cold hardiness were compared in seedlings of subalpine conifers to determine if differences existed among species originating from either cold continental climates or mild maritime climates. Abies amabilis (Dougl.) Carr. and Tsuga mertensiana (Bong.) Carr. are exclusively distributed in maritime environments,...

  7. Effect of conifer encroachment into aspen stands on understory biomass

    Treesearch

    B. R. Stam; J. C. Malechek; D. L. Bartos; J. E. Browns; E. B. Godfrey

    2008-01-01

    Conifers (Picea and Abies spp.) have replaced aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) over much of aspen's historic range in the western United States. We measured the impact of this change upon the production of understory vegetation potentially useful as forage for livestock and wildlife on two southern Utah...

  8. Microsatellite DNA as shared genetic markers among conifer species

    Treesearch

    C.S. Echt; G.G. Vendramin; C. D. Nelson; Paula E. Marquardt

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 21 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci in Pinus strobus L, and 6 in Pinus radiata D. Don were evaluated to determine whether SSR marker amplification could be achieved in 1O other conifer species. Eighty percent of SSR primer pairs for (AC) loci that were polymorphic in P. ...

  9. Precommercial thinning in a northern conifer stand: 18-year results

    Treesearch

    John C. Brissette; Robert M., Jr. Frank; Timothy L. Stone; Thomas A. Skratt

    1999-01-01

    Four levels of precommercial thinning were applied with and without fertilization in a young, even-aged stand of northern conifers in east-central Maine. After 18 years, precommercial thinning resulted in longer and wider crowns and greater survival, growth, and yield of selected crop trees compared to untreated controls. Growth and yield were greater with uniform...

  10. Board foot volumes of young growth mixed conifer timber

    Treesearch

    W. L. Jackson

    1961-01-01

    Board foot volumes have been determined for ponderosa pine, sugar pine, white fir, and Douglas-fir in 90-year-old mixed-conifer stands on the Challenge Experimental Forest, near Oroville, California. Productivity is high—site index 140 feet at 100 years. Following the technique described by Boe, the scaled volumes of felled trees were plotted on logarithmic...

  11. Ethanol accumulation in drought-stressed conifer seedlings

    Treesearch

    Daniel K. Manter; Rick G. Kelsey

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on ethanol production and accumulation in tissues from seedlings of three conifers (Douglas-fir, lodgepole pine, and ponderosa pine) with increasing degrees of tolerance to drought stress. Significant ethanol accumulation was only observed in their aerial tissues when severely stressed (water potential

  12. A Simple Computer Application for the Identification of Conifer Genera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, Steven R.; Chmielewski, Jerry G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards prescribe that an understanding of the importance of classifying organisms be one component of a student's educational experience in the life sciences. The use of a classification scheme to identify organisms is one way of addressing this goal. We describe Conifer ID, a computer application that assists…

  13. Occurrence and dominance of six Pacific Northwest conifer species

    Treesearch

    Todd A. Schroeder; Andreas Hamann; Tongli Wang; Nicholas C. Coops

    2010-01-01

    This study develops near range-wide predictive distribution maps for six important conifer species (Pseudotsuga menziesii, Tsuga heterophylla, Pinus contorta, Thuja plicata, Larix occidentalis, and Picea glauca) using forest inventory data collected across the United States and Canada. Species model accuracies are compared with range size using a rank scoring system. A...

  14. Management of Westside Washington Conifer Stands Infected with Heterobasidion annosum

    Treesearch

    Elvira Young

    1989-01-01

    Timber stands in western Washington are managed for many purposes. Such stands yield commodity and noncommodity outputs, such as recreation, wildlife, visual resources, or watershed benefits, and often from the same stands. Annosus root disease is widespread in many mixed conifer stands within the western hemlock, mountain hemlock, and Pacific silver fir zones west of...

  15. Experimental herbicidal control of Dwarfmistletoe on some California conifers

    Treesearch

    Clarence R. Quick

    1964-01-01

    Dwarfmistletoes (Arceuthobium spp. ) parasitize and damage most native conifers of California. The study of chemical control for dwarfmistletoe on pines and true firs was resumed in 1959. Over the past 5 years, 246 tests on 2, 516 trees of five species have been started, Many phenoxy herbicides and some other materials were applied as sprays in fuel...

  16. Branching habit and the allocation of reproductive resources in conifers

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Andrew B.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Correlated relationships between branch thickness, branch density, and twig and leaf size have been used extensively to study the evolution of plant canopy architecture, but fewer studies have explored the impact of these relationships on the allocation of reproductive resources. This study quantifies pollen cone production in conifers, which have similar basic reproductive biology but vary dramatically in branching habit, in order to test how differences in branch diameter influence pollen cone size and the density with which they are deployed in the canopy. Methods Measurements of canopy branch density, the number of cones per branch and cone size were used to estimate the amount of pollen cone tissues produced by 16 species in three major conifer clades. The number of pollen grains produced was also estimated using direct counts from individual pollen cones. Key Results The total amount of pollen cone tissues in the conifer canopy varied little among species and clades, although vegetative traits such as branch thickness, branch density and pollen cone size varied over several orders of magnitude. However, branching habit controls the way these tissues are deployed: taxa with small branches produce small pollen cones at a high density, while taxa with large branches produce large cones relatively sparsely. Conclusions Conifers appear to invest similar amounts of energy in pollen production independent of branching habit. However, similar associations between branch thickness, branch density and pollen cone size are seen across conifers, including members of living and extinct groups not directly studied here. This suggests that reproductive features relating to pollen cone size are in large part a function of the evolution of vegetative morphology and branching habit. PMID:22782240

  17. Analysis of conifer forest regeneration using Landsat Thematic Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorella, Maria; Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data were used to evaluate young conifer stands in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Regression and correlation analyses were used to describe the relationships between TM band values and age of young Douglas-fir stands (2 to 35 years old). Spectral data from well regenerated Douglas-fir stands were compared to those of poorly regenerated conifer stands. TM bands 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 were inversely correlated with the age (r greater than or equal to -0.80) of well regenerated Douglas-fir stands. Overall, the 'structural index' (TM 4/5 ratio) had the highest correlation to age of Douglas-fir stands (r = 0.96). Poorly regenerated stands were spectrally distinct from well regenerated Douglas-fir stands after the stands reached an age of approximately 15 years.

  18. Low-frequency creep in CoNiFe films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.; Chow, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    Domain wall motion excited by slow rise-time, bipolar, hard-axis pulses in vacuum deposited CoNiFe films from 1500 to 2000 A thick is studied. The results are consistent with those of comparable NiFe films. Furthermore, the wall coercivity is found to be the most significant sample property correlated to the low-frequency creep properties of all the samples.

  19. Northeastern conifer research: Multiple species and multiple values

    Treesearch

    Laura S. Kenefic; John C. Brissette; Richard W. Judd

    2014-01-01

    The northern conifer, or spruce-fir, forest of the northeastern USA and adjacent Canada has had a defining influence on the economy and culture of the region. The same can be said of the USDA Forest Service’s research in this forest, which began more than 100 years ago. Forest Service research has evolved since that time in response to changes in the needs and...

  20. Low-frequency creep in CoNiFe films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.; Chow, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    Domain wall motion excited by slow rise-time, bipolar, hard-axis pulses in vacuum deposited CoNiFe films from 1500 to 2000 A thick is studied. The results are consistent with those of comparable NiFe films. Furthermore, the wall coercivity is found to be the most significant sample property correlated to the low-frequency creep properties of all the samples.

  1. L-Band Radiometer Measurements of Conifer Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.; LeVine, D.; Chauhan, N.; deMatthaeis, P.; Bidwell, S.; Haken, M.

    2000-01-01

    Airborne radiometer measurements have been made at L-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study radiometric response to biomass and soil moisture. The horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer, ESTAR, has been deployed abroad a NASA-P3 aircraft which is based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The instrument has been mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and images data in the cross track direction. Aircraft and surface measurements were made in July, August and November of 1999 over relatively homogeneous conifer stands of varying biomass. The surface measurements included soil moisture measurements in several stands. The soil moisture was low during the July flight and highest in November after heavy rains had occurred. The microwave images clearly distinguished between the different forest stands. Stand age, obtained from International Paper Corporation which owns the stands, showed a strong correlation between brightness temperature and stand age. This agrees with previous simulation studies of conifer forests which show that the brightness temperature increases with increasing stand biomass. Research is continuing to seek a quantitative correlation between the observed brightness temperature of the stands and their biomass and surface soil moisture.

  2. Geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance modeling of a conifer forest canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Strahler, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    A geometric-optical forest canopy model that treats conifers as cones casting shadows on a contrasting background explains the major anisotropies in bidirectional reflectance measurements of a conifer forest canopy. The model uses parallel-ray geometry to describe the illumination and viewing of conifers as three-dimensional cones. Both computer simulation and analytical closed-form expressions are implemented. The results show a good qualitative agreement with the directional reflectance measurements of the conifer stand, indicating that the three-dimensional nature of the canopy is a key factor in determining its directional reflectance.

  3. Molecular characterization of Fusarium oxysporum and fusarium commune isolates from a conifer nursery

    Treesearch

    Jane E. Stewart; Mee-Sook Kim; Robert L. James; R. Kasten Dumroese; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium species can cause severe root disease and damping-off in conifer nurseries. Fusarium inoculum is commonly found in most container and bareroot nurseries on healthy and diseased seedlings, in nursery soils, and on conifer seeds. Isolates of Fusarium spp. can differ in virulence; however, virulence and...

  4. Resource-dependent growth models for Sierran mixed-conifer saplings

    Treesearch

    S.W. Bigelow; M.P. North; W.R. Horwath

    2009-01-01

    Thinning to reduce wildfire hazard is a common management practice in frequent-fire forests of the American west, but it is uncertain whether projects will help regenerate fire-resistant, shade-intolerant pines. We studied naturally established saplings of six conifer species in mixed-conifer forest in northern California, USA to...

  5. Herbicide and conifer options for reforesting upper slopes in the Cascade Range.

    Treesearch

    Edward J. Dimock

    1981-01-01

    Nine herbicides were compared for aiding establishment of four conifer species on upper-slope forest sites dominated by sedge and beargrass. Both glyphosate and a mixture of atrazine + dalapon produced substantial and consistent gains in survival of all four conifers after 3 years.

  6. Tree mortality in drought-stressed mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests, Arizona, USA

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2011-01-01

    We monitored tree mortality in northern Arizona (USA) mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) forests from 1997 to 2007, a period of severe drought in this area. Mortality was pervasive, occurring on 100 and 98% of 53 mixed-conifer and 60 ponderosa pine plots (1-ha each), respectively. Most mortality was attributable to a suite of forest...

  7. Changes in plant communities after planting and release of conifer seedlings: Early findings

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald; Gary O. Fiddler

    2001-01-01

    Plant diversity, density, and development data from an extensive research program in conifer plantations in northern California suggest changes in plant community composition after site preparation and many kinds of release. Based on 17 studies, the average number of species per study area after 10 years was 25 with composition of 1 conifer, 1 hardwood, 8 shrubs, 12...

  8. Mapping the extent and distribution of conifer cover increase in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem

    Treesearch

    Scott L. Powell; Andrew J. Hansen; Warren B. Cohen

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantity the extent and distribution of conifer cover increase in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) between 1985 and 1999. In many locations across the GYE, conifer forests have increased in density and expanded into grasslands and shrub lands, but the actual extent of change is unknown. Accurate quantification is critical for...

  9. Understory plant diversity in riparian alder-conifer stands after logging in southeast Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Deal

    1997-01-01

    Stand structure, tree height growth, and understory plant diversity were assessed in five mixed alder-conifer stands after logging in southeast Alaska. Tree species composition ranged from 7- to 91-percent alder, and basal area ranged from 30 to 55 m2/ha. The alder exhibited rapid early height growth, but recent growth has slowed considerably. Some conifers have...

  10. First-year postfire and postharvest soil temperatures in aspen and conifer stands

    Treesearch

    Michael C. Amacher; Amber D. Johnson; Debra E. Kutterer; Dale L. Bartos

    2001-01-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) stands are in decline throughout the Interior Western United States because of fire suppression, overbrowsing by domestic livestock and native ungulates, and forest succession. We measured summertime soil temperatures in stable aspen, decadent aspen, and mixed aspen/conifer stands; a mixed aspen/conifer clearcut;...

  11. Analysis of conifer mortality in Colorado using Forest Inventory and Analysis's annual forest inventory

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Aerial detection surveys indicate that widespread conifer mortality has been steadily increasing in Colorado, particularly since 2002. The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) annual inventory system began in Colorado in 2002, which coincided with the onset of elevated conifer mortality rates. The current mortality event coupled with collection of 6 years of annual...

  12. Terpenoid resin distribution in conifer needles with implications for red tree vole, Arborimus longicaudus, foraging

    Treesearch

    Rick G. Kelsey; Eric D. Forsman; James K. Swingle

    2009-01-01

    Tree voles are dietary specialists, feeding almost exclusively on conifer needles and bark. They reduce their exposure to conifer chemical defenses by physically removing resin ducts from many needles before ingesting the remaining tissue. The portion of needle removed differs among tree species, depending on the location of the resin ducts. To evaluate the amount of...

  13. A white spruce gene catalog for conifer genome analyses.

    PubMed

    Rigault, Philippe; Boyle, Brian; Lepage, Pierre; Cooke, Janice E K; Bousquet, Jean; MacKay, John J

    2011-09-01

    Several angiosperm plant genomes, including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), and grapevine (Vitis vinifera), have been sequenced, but the lack of reference genomes in gymnosperm phyla reduces our understanding of plant evolution and restricts the potential impacts of genomics research. A gene catalog was developed for the conifer tree Picea glauca (white spruce) through large-scale expressed sequence tag sequencing and full-length cDNA sequencing to facilitate genome characterizations, comparative genomics, and gene mapping. The resource incorporates new and publicly available sequences into 27,720 cDNA clusters, 23,589 of which are represented by full-length insert cDNAs. Expressed sequence tags, mate-pair cDNA clone analysis, and custom sequencing were integrated through an iterative process to improve the accuracy of clustering outcomes. The entire catalog spans 30 Mb of unique transcribed sequence. We estimated that the P. glauca nuclear genome contains up to 32,520 transcribed genes owing to incomplete, partially sequenced, and unsampled transcripts and that its transcriptome could span up to 47 Mb. These estimates are in the same range as the Arabidopsis and rice transcriptomes. Next-generation methods confirmed and enhanced the catalog by providing deeper coverage for rare transcripts, by extending many incomplete clusters, and by augmenting the overall transcriptome coverage to 38 Mb of unique sequence. Genomic sample sequencing at 8.5% of the 19.8-Gb P. glauca genome identified 1,495 clusters representing highly repeated sequences among the cDNA clusters. With a conifer transcriptome in full view, functional and protein domain annotations clearly highlighted the divergences between conifers and angiosperms, likely reflecting their respective evolutionary paths.

  14. Ultrasonic emissions from conifer xylem exposed to repeated freezing.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Stefan; Zublasing, Verena

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic emission measurements enable the analysis of xylem cavitation induced by drought and freeze-thaw events. Several studies have indicated that ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) in conifers occur upon freezing and not upon thawing, although classical theory has postulated gas bubble formation during freezing and cavitation during thawing. We analyzed the pattern and quality of freeze-thaw-induced UAE in seven conifers (Abies alba, Larix decidua, Juniperus communis, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus mugo, Pinus sylvestris). Axes samples dehydrated to different water potentials were exposed to repeated frost cycles. The number, amplitude and energy of UAE signals were registered and related to water potential, temperature course and wood characteristics (wood density, tracheid diameter). For P. abies, ultrasonic emission analysis was also performed on bark samples, xylem samples without bark, as well as on stems of young potted trees. In all conifers, UAE were registered in water-stressed samples but not in saturated or dehydrated samples. No signals were emitted by the bark of P. abies. Ultrasonic activity occurred only upon freezing, and identical patterns were observed in axes samples and stems of potted P. abies trees. A weak positive relationship between tracheid diameter and UAE energy was observed, indicating wide tracheids to emit signals with higher energy. The classical bubble formation hypothesis cannot sufficiently explain the occurrence of UAE during freezing and upon repeated temperature cycles, as demonstrated in this study. We suggest that the low water potential of ice induces air-seeding near the ice-water interface, and consequently, causes UAE.

  15. Tipping point of a conifer forest ecosystem under severe drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kaicheng; Yi, Chuixiang; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Blanford, William J.; Wei, Suhua; Wu, Hao; Ling, Du; Li, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    Drought-induced tree mortality has recently received considerable attention. Questions have arisen over the necessary intensity and duration thresholds of droughts that are sufficient to trigger rapid forest declines. The values of such tipping points leading to forest declines due to drought are presently unknown. In this study, we have evaluated the potential relationship between the level of tree growth and concurrent drought conditions with data of the tree growth-related ring width index (RWI) of the two dominant conifer species (Pinus edulis and Pinus ponderosa) in the Southwestern United States (SWUS) and the meteorological drought-related standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI). In this effort, we determined the binned averages of RWI and the 11 month SPEI within the month of July within each bin of 30 of RWI in the range of 0-3000. We found a significant correlation between the binned averages of RWI and SPEI at the regional-scale under dryer conditions. The tipping point of forest declines to drought is predicted by the regression model as SPEItp = -1.64 and RWItp = 0, that is, persistence of the water deficit (11 month) with intensity of -1.64 leading to negligible growth for the conifer species. When climate conditions are wetter, the correlation between the binned averages of RWI and SPEI is weaker which we believe is most likely due to soil water and atmospheric moisture levels no longer being the dominant factor limiting tree growth. We also illustrate a potential application of the derived tipping point (SPEItp = -1.64) through an examination of the 2002 extreme drought event in the SWUS conifer forest regions. Distinguished differences in remote-sensing based NDVI anomalies were found between the two regions partitioned by the derived tipping point.

  16. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Fungal Endophytes of Conifers.

    PubMed

    Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B

    2015-10-01

    This is a review of bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from conifer-associated endophytic fungi from 1990-2014. This includes compounds with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity towards human cancer cell lines, and activity against either plant pathogens or plant insect pests. Compounds that were originally reported without associated activity were included if other studies ascribed activity to these compounds. Compounds were not included if they were exclusively phytotoxic or if they were isolated from active extracts but were not determined to be the active component of that extract.

  17. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Fungal Endophytes of Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Stierle, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from conifer-associated endophytic fungi from 1990–2014. This includes compounds with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative or cytotoxic activity towards human cancer cell lines, and activity against plant pathogens or plant insect pests. Compounds that were originally reported without associated activity were included if other studies ascribed activity to these compounds. Compounds were not included if they were exclusively phytotoxic or if they were isolated from active extracts but were not determined to be the active component of that extract. PMID:26669101

  18. Simulated and empiric wind pollination patterns of conifer ovulate cones

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel analyses of conifer ovulate cones indicate that the total geometry of the cone enhances the probability of pollen entrapment. Aerodynamic characteristics of cone scale-bract complexes are such that suspended pollen is directed toward the micropyles of attached ovules. Within the taxa examined, there appears to be a preferential entrapment by ovulate cones of pollen of the same species. The data are interpreted as evidence for an aerodynamic reciprocity between wind-suspended pollen and the structure of ovulate cones which increases the frequency of pollination and the potential for fertilization. Images PMID:16593147

  19. Seasonal and age-related variation in the needle quality of five conifer species.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Paul E

    1990-12-01

    Age changes of foliage resource quality (water, nitrogen, fibre, phenolics and toughness) were studied in five species of conifer (Pinus sylvestris L.), Picea abies (L.) Karsten, Tsuga heterophylla (Rafinesque) Sargent (all Pinaceae), Chamaecyparis lawsonian (Murray) Parlatore and Thuja plicata D. Don (both Cupressaceae) over a 2-year period in an English forest.Mature foliage of Pinus sylvestris was characterized by higher levels of nitrogen, fibre and toughness, and lower phenolics, and that of Tsuga heterophylla by higher levels of phenolics, and lower fibre and toughness levels, than the mature needles of the other species studied. Immature needles had higher levels of water and nitrogen, and lower levels of fibre and toughness, than older needles. Immature needles of Picea abies and Tsuga heterophylla had a high concentration of phenolics, which decreased with needle maturity. By mid-August, the levels of most of the foliar constituents in current-year needles had stabilized at levels maintained for the next year. Sampling revealed a fall in the concentration of phenolics, fibre and water in mature needles between March and June. Possible reasons for this seasonal trend are discussed. The levels of conifer foliar constituents were compared with levels recorded in broadleaf trees. Conifers had greater concentrations of all measured foliar constituents, but, with the exception of the six fold greater toughness of conifer needles, the differences between broadleaves and conifers were less than those between the immature and mature conifer needles. Previous studies have related the abundance of Lepidoptera on conifers to hostplant taxonomic relationships. However, the foliar constituents measured in this study were poor predictors of taxonomic relationships between the conifers. It is suggested that the abundance of Lepidoptera on conifers is not determined by levels of general foliar constituents and the role of other hostplant factors in shaping lepidopteran

  20. Explaining the distribution of breeding and dispersal syndromes in conifers.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Crane, Peter R; Donoghue, Michael J

    2013-11-07

    The evolution of plants exhibiting different sexes, or dioecy, is correlated with a number of ecological and life-history traits such as woody growth form and animal-dispersed seeds, but the underlying causes of these associations are unclear. Previous work in seed plants has suggested that the evolution of fleshy cones or seeds may favour dioecy. In this study, we use a well-sampled molecular phylogeny of conifers to show that although dioecy and fleshiness strongly co-occur at the species level, this relationship has not resulted from numerous separate origins of this trait combination or from differential rates of diversification. Instead, we suggest that two character combinations-the ancestral dry-monoecious condition and the derived fleshy-dioecious condition-have persisted in conifers longer than other combinations over evolutionary time. The persistence of these trait combinations appears to reflect differences in the rate of successful transition into and out of these character states over time, as well as the geographical restriction of species with rare combinations and their consequent vulnerability to extinction. In general, we argue that such persistence explanations should be considered alongside 'key innovation' hypotheses in explaining the phylogenetic distribution of traits.

  1. Explaining the distribution of breeding and dispersal syndromes in conifers

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Andrew B.; Beaulieu, Jeremy M.; Crane, Peter R.; Donoghue, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of plants exhibiting different sexes, or dioecy, is correlated with a number of ecological and life-history traits such as woody growth form and animal-dispersed seeds, but the underlying causes of these associations are unclear. Previous work in seed plants has suggested that the evolution of fleshy cones or seeds may favour dioecy. In this study, we use a well-sampled molecular phylogeny of conifers to show that although dioecy and fleshiness strongly co-occur at the species level, this relationship has not resulted from numerous separate origins of this trait combination or from differential rates of diversification. Instead, we suggest that two character combinations—the ancestral dry-monoecious condition and the derived fleshy-dioecious condition—have persisted in conifers longer than other combinations over evolutionary time. The persistence of these trait combinations appears to reflect differences in the rate of successful transition into and out of these character states over time, as well as the geographical restriction of species with rare combinations and their consequent vulnerability to extinction. In general, we argue that such persistence explanations should be considered alongside ‘key innovation’ hypotheses in explaining the phylogenetic distribution of traits. PMID:24026822

  2. Geometric-optical modeling of a conifer forest canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Strahler, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    A geometric-optical model of a conifer forest canopy was constructed to describe the variance of a remotely-sensed image of a forest stand. The model is driven by interpixel variance generated from three sources: (1) the number of crowns in the pixel; (2) the size of the individual crowns; and (3) the overlapping of crowns and shadows. The illumination of a tree and its shadow is described as a cone using parallel-ray geometry. The model can also be inverted to provide estimates of the size, shape and spacing of the trees using remotely-sensed imagery and a minimum of ground measurements. The results of field tests using 10-meter and 80-meter multispectral imagery of two test conifer stands in northeastern California are presented. It is shown that the model produces reasonable estimates for the geometric parameters of the stand and appears to be sufficiently robust for application to other geometric shapes corresponding to different types of vegetation.

  3. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers.

    PubMed

    Legault, Jean; Girard-Lalancette, Karl; Dufour, Dominic; Pichette, André

    2013-07-11

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50), were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol), which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity.

  4. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Legault, Jean; Girard-Lalancette, Karl; Dufour, Dominic; Pichette, André

    2013-01-01

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50), were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol), which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity. PMID:26784337

  5. Integration and macroevolutionary patterns in the pollination biology of conifers.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Crane, Peter R; Knopf, Patrick; Donoghue, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Integration influences patterns of trait evolution, but the relationship between these patterns and the degree of trait integration is not well understood. To explore this further, we study a specialized pollination mechanism in conifers whose traits are linked through function but not development. This mechanism depends on interactions among three characters: pollen that is buoyant, ovules that face downward at pollination, and the production of a liquid droplet that buoyant grains float through to enter the ovule. We use a well-sampled phylogeny of conifers to test correlated evolution among these characters and specific sequences of character change. Using likelihood models of character evolution, we find that pollen morphology and ovule characters evolve in a concerted manner, where the flotation mechanism breaks down irreversibly following changes in orientation or drop production. The breakdown of this functional constraint, which may be facilitated by the lack of developmental integration among the constituent traits, is associated with increased trait variation and more diverse pollination strategies. Although this functional "release" increases diversity in some ways, the irreversible way in which the flotation mechanism is lost may eventually result in its complete disappearance from seed plant reproductive biology.

  6. Corrosion properties of electroplated CoNiFe films

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Yamada, K.; Ohashi, K.; Yasue, Y.; Sogawa, Y.; Osaka, T.

    1999-08-01

    Electroplated CoNiFe films with a saturation flux density as high as 2.1 T are potentially useful in high-density magnetic recording heads. The authors found that films electroplated at a high current density (15 mA/cm{sup 2}) from a bath without saccharin have a sufficient anodic pitting-corrosion potential ({minus}65 mV). The authors also found that the pitting-corrosion potential of films electroplated under a low current density (5 mA/cm{sup 2}) from saccharin-free baths have anodic pitting-corrosion potentials of less than {minus}300 mV. However, the corrosion resistance improved after annealing at temperatures above 100 C. The crystal-grain boundaries in the as-plated film that electroplated under a low current density from saccharin-free baths are not clear (i.e., that the phase is amorphous). But the crystal grain boundaries in the annealed film are clear. Films electroplated from baths containing saccharin also have anodic pitting-corrosion potentials of less than {minus}300 mV. Their corrosion resistance did not improve when they were annealed at 250 C. The deterioration of the corrosion resistance is attributed to the defects that increase the face-centered cubic (111) lattice constant. One of the most important characteristics of a highly corrosion-resistant CoNiFe film is fine crystal structure with very few defects.

  7. Kinetics of tracheid development explain conifer tree-ring structure.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Frank, David; Fonti, Patrick; Fournier, Meriem

    2014-09-01

    Conifer tree rings are generally composed of large, thin-walled cells of light earlywood followed by narrow, thick-walled cells of dense latewood. Yet, how wood formation processes and the associated kinetics create this typical pattern remains poorly understood. We monitored tree-ring formation weekly over 3 yr in 45 trees of three conifer species in France. Data were used to model cell development kinetics, and to attribute the relative importance of the duration and rate of cell enlargement and cell wall deposition on tree-ring structure. Cell enlargement duration contributed to 75% of changes in cell diameter along the tree rings. Remarkably, the amount of wall material per cell was quite constant along the rings. Consequently, and in contrast with widespread belief, changes in cell wall thickness were not principally attributed to the duration and rate of wall deposition (33%), but rather to the changes in cell size (67%). Cell enlargement duration, as the main driver of cell size and wall thickness, contributed to 56% of wood density variation along the rings. This mechanistic framework now forms the basis for unraveling how environmental stresses trigger deviations (e.g. false rings) from the normal tree-ring structure.

  8. Sequenced genomes and rapidly emerging technologies pave the way for conifer evolutionary developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Uddenberg, Daniel; Akhter, Shirin; Ramachandran, Prashanth; Sundström, Jens F.; Carlsbecker, Annelie

    2015-01-01

    Conifers, Ginkgo, cycads and gnetophytes comprise the four groups of extant gymnosperms holding a unique position of sharing common ancestry with the angiosperms. Comparative studies of gymnosperms and angiosperms are the key to a better understanding of ancient seed plant morphologies, how they have shifted over evolution to shape modern day species, and how the genes governing these morphologies have evolved. However, conifers and other gymnosperms have been notoriously difficult to study due to their long generation times, inaccessibility to genetic experimentation and unavailable genome sequences. Now, with three draft genomes from spruces and pines, rapid advances in next generation sequencing methods for genome wide expression analyses, and enhanced methods for genetic transformation, we are much better equipped to address a number of key evolutionary questions relating to seed plant evolution. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in conifer developmental biology relevant to evo-devo questions. We discuss how genome sequence data and novel techniques might allow us to explore genetic variation and naturally occurring conifer mutants, approaches to reduce long generation times to allow for genetic studies in conifers, and other potential upcoming research avenues utilizing current and emergent techniques. Results from developmental studies of conifers and other gymnosperms in comparison to those in angiosperms will provide information to trace core molecular developmental control tool kits of ancestral seed plants, but foremost they will greatly improve our understanding of the biology of conifers and other gymnosperms in their own right. PMID:26579190

  9. Sequenced genomes and rapidly emerging technologies pave the way for conifer evolutionary developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Uddenberg, Daniel; Akhter, Shirin; Ramachandran, Prashanth; Sundström, Jens F; Carlsbecker, Annelie

    2015-01-01

    Conifers, Ginkgo, cycads and gnetophytes comprise the four groups of extant gymnosperms holding a unique position of sharing common ancestry with the angiosperms. Comparative studies of gymnosperms and angiosperms are the key to a better understanding of ancient seed plant morphologies, how they have shifted over evolution to shape modern day species, and how the genes governing these morphologies have evolved. However, conifers and other gymnosperms have been notoriously difficult to study due to their long generation times, inaccessibility to genetic experimentation and unavailable genome sequences. Now, with three draft genomes from spruces and pines, rapid advances in next generation sequencing methods for genome wide expression analyses, and enhanced methods for genetic transformation, we are much better equipped to address a number of key evolutionary questions relating to seed plant evolution. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in conifer developmental biology relevant to evo-devo questions. We discuss how genome sequence data and novel techniques might allow us to explore genetic variation and naturally occurring conifer mutants, approaches to reduce long generation times to allow for genetic studies in conifers, and other potential upcoming research avenues utilizing current and emergent techniques. Results from developmental studies of conifers and other gymnosperms in comparison to those in angiosperms will provide information to trace core molecular developmental control tool kits of ancestral seed plants, but foremost they will greatly improve our understanding of the biology of conifers and other gymnosperms in their own right.

  10. Low Elevation Riparian Environments: Warm-Climate Refugia for Conifers in the Great Basin, USA?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, C.; Charlet, D. A.; Westfall, R. D.; Delany, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Great Basin, USA, contains hundreds of small to large mountain ranges. Many reach alpine elevations, which are separated from each other by low-elevation basins currently inhospitable to conifer growth. Many of these ranges support montane and subalpine conifer species that have affinities to the Sierra Nevada or Rocky Mountains, and from which these conifers migrated during cool periods of the Pleistocene. Under Holocene climates, the Great Basin geography became a terrestrial island-archipelago, wherein conifer populations are isolated among ranges, and inter-range migration is highly limited. During warm intervals of the Holocene, conifers would be expected to have migrated upslope following favorable conditions, and extirpation would be assumed to result from continued warming. Independent patterns, repeating across multiple species' distributions, however, suggest that refugia were present in these ranges during warm periods, and that low elevation environments below the current main distributions acted as climatic refugia. We hypothesize that cool, narrow, and north-aspect ravines, which during cool climates support persistent or seasonal creeks and deciduous riparian communities, become available as conifer habitat when warming climates desiccate creeks and deplete riparian species. We further speculate that cold-air drainage, reduced solar insolation, lower wind exposure, and higher water tables in these topographic positions support populations of montane and subalpine conifers even during warm climate intervals when high elevations are unfavorable for conifer persistence. On return to cool climates, low elevation refugia become sources for recolonizing higher slopes, and/or continue to persist as relictual populations. We present several lines of evidence supporting this hypothesis, and speculate that low-elevation, extramarginal riparian environments might act as climate refugia for Great Basin conifers in the future as well.

  11. Cyclic voltammetric study of Co-Ni-Fe alloys electrodeposition in sulfate medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hanafi, I.; Daud, A. R.; Radiman, S.

    2013-11-27

    Electrochemical technique has been used to study the electrodeposition of cobalt, nickel, iron and Co-Ni-Fe alloy on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate. To obtain the nucleation mechanism, cyclic voltammetry is used to characterize the Co-Ni-Fe system. The scanning rate effect on the deposition process was investigated. Deposition of single metal occurs at potential values more positive than that estimated stability potential. Based on the cyclic voltammetry results, the electrodeposition of cobalt, nickel, iron and Co-Ni-Fe alloy clearly show that the process of diffusion occurs is controlled by the typical nucleation mechanism.

  12. In-vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Some Iranian Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Afsharzadeh, Maryam; Naderinasab, Mahboobe; Tayarani Najaran, Zahra; Barzin, Mohammad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Male and female leaves and fruits of eleven different taxons of Iranian conifers (Cupressus sempervirens var. horizontalis, C. sempervirens var. sempervirens, C. sempervirens cv. Cereifeormis, Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica, J. excelsa subsp. excelsa, J. excelsa subsp. polycarpos, J. foetidissima, J. oblonga, J. sabina, Platycladus orientalis and Taxus baccata) were collected from different localities of Iran, dried and extracted with methanol. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The extracts were screened qualitatively using four different methods, the disc diffusion, hole plate, cylinder agar diffusion and agar dilution methods, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of each extract were determined by the agar dilution method. The best result was obtained by means of hole plate method in qualitative determination of antimicrobial activities of extracts and the greatest activity was found against S. aureus in all tested methods. PMID:24250573

  13. In-vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Some Iranian Conifers.

    PubMed

    Afsharzadeh, Maryam; Naderinasab, Mahboobe; Tayarani Najaran, Zahra; Barzin, Mohammad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Male and female leaves and fruits of eleven different taxons of Iranian conifers (Cupressus sempervirens var. horizontalis, C. sempervirens var. sempervirens, C. sempervirens cv. Cereifeormis, Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica, J. excelsa subsp. excelsa, J. excelsa subsp. polycarpos, J. foetidissima, J. oblonga, J. sabina, Platycladus orientalis and Taxus baccata) were collected from different localities of Iran, dried and extracted with methanol. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The extracts were screened qualitatively using four different methods, the disc diffusion, hole plate, cylinder agar diffusion and agar dilution methods, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of each extract were determined by the agar dilution method. The best result was obtained by means of hole plate method in qualitative determination of antimicrobial activities of extracts and the greatest activity was found against S. aureus in all tested methods.

  14. Evidence of intense chromosomal shuffling during conifer evolution.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Marina; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Ehrenmann, François; Murat, Florent; Moriguchi, Yoshinari; Uchiyama, Kentaro; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Lagraulet, Hélène; de Maria, Nuria; Cabezas, José-Antonio; Cervera, Maria-Teresa; Gion, Jean Marc; Salse, Jérôme; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-09-23

    While recent advances have been gained on genome evolution in angiosperm lineages, virtually nothing is known about karyotype evolution in the other group of seed plants, the gymnosperms. Here we used high density gene-based linkage mapping to compare the karyotype structure of two families of conifers (the most abundant group of gymnosperms) separated around 290 million years ago: Pinaceae and Cupressaceae. We propose for the first time a model based on the fusion of 20 ancestral chromosomal blocks that may have shaped the modern karyotpes of Pinaceae (with n=12) and Cupressaceae (with n=11). The considerable difference in modern genome organization between these two lineages contrasts strongly with the remarkable level of synteny already reported within the Pinaceae. It also suggests a convergent evolutionary mechanism of chromosomal block shuffling that has shaped the genomes of the spermatophytes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Evidence of Intense Chromosomal Shuffling during Conifer Evolution

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel, Marina; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Ehrenmann, François; Murat, Florent; Moriguchi, Yoshinari; Uchiyama, Kentaro; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Lagraulet, Hélène; de Maria, Nuria; Cabezas, José-Antonio; Cervera, María-Teresa; Gion, Jean Marc; Salse, Jérôme; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Although recent advances have been gained on genome evolution in angiosperm lineages, virtually nothing is known about karyotype evolution in the other group of seed plants, the gymnosperms. Here, we used high-density gene-based linkage mapping to compare the karyotype structure of two families of conifers (the most abundant group of gymnosperms) separated around 290 Ma: Pinaceae and Cupressaceae. We propose for the first time a model based on the fusion of 20 ancestral chromosomal blocks that may have shaped the modern karyotpes of Pinaceae (with n = 12) and Cupressaceae (with n = 11). The considerable difference in modern genome organization between these two lineages contrasts strongly with the remarkable level of synteny already reported within the Pinaceae. It also suggests a convergent evolutionary mechanism of chromosomal block shuffling that has shaped the genomes of the spermatophytes. PMID:26400405

  16. DNA Barcoding the Native Flowering Plants and Conifers of Wales

    PubMed Central

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C. G.; Ford, Col R.; Trinder, Sarah A.; Long, Charlotte; Moore, Chris W.; Satterthwaite, Danielle; Davies, Helena; Allainguillaume, Joel; Ronca, Sandra; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Garbett, Hannah; Walker, Kevin; Wilkinson, Mike J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first national DNA barcode resource that covers the native flowering plants and conifers for the nation of Wales (1143 species). Using the plant DNA barcode markers rbcL and matK, we have assembled 97.7% coverage for rbcL, 90.2% for matK, and a dual-locus barcode for 89.7% of the native Welsh flora. We have sampled multiple individuals for each species, resulting in 3304 rbcL and 2419 matK sequences. The majority of our samples (85%) are from DNA extracted from herbarium specimens. Recoverability of DNA barcodes is lower using herbarium specimens, compared to freshly collected material, mostly due to lower amplification success, but this is balanced by the increased efficiency of sampling species that have already been collected, identified, and verified by taxonomic experts. The effectiveness of the DNA barcodes for identification (level of discrimination) is assessed using four approaches: the presence of a barcode gap (using pairwise and multiple alignments), formation of monophyletic groups using Neighbour-Joining trees, and sequence similarity in BLASTn searches. These approaches yield similar results, providing relative discrimination levels of 69.4 to 74.9% of all species and 98.6 to 99.8% of genera using both markers. Species discrimination can be further improved using spatially explicit sampling. Mean species discrimination using barcode gap analysis (with a multiple alignment) is 81.6% within 10×10 km squares and 93.3% for 2×2 km squares. Our database of DNA barcodes for Welsh native flowering plants and conifers represents the most complete coverage of any national flora, and offers a valuable platform for a wide range of applications that require accurate species identification. PMID:22701588

  17. Uniform versus asymmetric shading mediates crown recession in conifers.

    PubMed

    Schoonmaker, Amanda L; Lieffers, Victor J; Landhäusser, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca). We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1), complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2) light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4-1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3) heavy asymmetric shading as in (2) except with greater light reduction and (4) control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality--mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown.

  18. DNA barcoding the native flowering plants and conifers of Wales.

    PubMed

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Ford, Col R; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte; Moore, Chris W; Satterthwaite, Danielle; Davies, Helena; Allainguillaume, Joel; Ronca, Sandra; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Garbett, Hannah; Walker, Kevin; Wilkinson, Mike J

    2012-01-01

    We present the first national DNA barcode resource that covers the native flowering plants and conifers for the nation of Wales (1143 species). Using the plant DNA barcode markers rbcL and matK, we have assembled 97.7% coverage for rbcL, 90.2% for matK, and a dual-locus barcode for 89.7% of the native Welsh flora. We have sampled multiple individuals for each species, resulting in 3304 rbcL and 2419 matK sequences. The majority of our samples (85%) are from DNA extracted from herbarium specimens. Recoverability of DNA barcodes is lower using herbarium specimens, compared to freshly collected material, mostly due to lower amplification success, but this is balanced by the increased efficiency of sampling species that have already been collected, identified, and verified by taxonomic experts. The effectiveness of the DNA barcodes for identification (level of discrimination) is assessed using four approaches: the presence of a barcode gap (using pairwise and multiple alignments), formation of monophyletic groups using Neighbour-Joining trees, and sequence similarity in BLASTn searches. These approaches yield similar results, providing relative discrimination levels of 69.4 to 74.9% of all species and 98.6 to 99.8% of genera using both markers. Species discrimination can be further improved using spatially explicit sampling. Mean species discrimination using barcode gap analysis (with a multiple alignment) is 81.6% within 10×10 km squares and 93.3% for 2×2 km squares. Our database of DNA barcodes for Welsh native flowering plants and conifers represents the most complete coverage of any national flora, and offers a valuable platform for a wide range of applications that require accurate species identification.

  19. Uniform versus Asymmetric Shading Mediates Crown Recession in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Schoonmaker, Amanda L.; Lieffers, Victor J.; Landhäusser, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca). We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1), complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2) light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4–1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3) heavy asymmetric shading as in (2) except with greater light reduction and (4) control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality – mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown. PMID:25136823

  20. Biomass in conifer plantations of northeastern Minnesota. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmann, L.F.

    1985-10-01

    The report provides biomass estimates for vegetative strata and herb-low shrub species for 53 conifer plantations in NE Minnesota. The estimates are analyzed by plantation age and silvicultural practices used to establish and release the plantations.

  1. Morphological and functional stasis in mycorrhizal root nodules as exhibited by a Triassic conifer

    PubMed Central

    Schwendemann, Andrew B.; Decombeix, Anne-Laure; Taylor, Thomas N.; Krings, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mycorrhizal root nodules occur in the conifer families Araucariaceae, Podocarpaceae, and Sciadopityaceae. Although the fossil record of these families can be traced back into the early Mesozoic, the oldest fossil evidence of root nodules previously came from the Cretaceous. Here we report on cellularly preserved root nodules of the early conifer Notophytum from Middle Triassic permineralized peat of Antarctica. These fossil root nodules contain fungal arbuscules, hyphal coils, and vesicles in their cortex. Numerous glomoid-type spores are found in the peat matrix surrounding the nodules. This discovery indicates that mutualistic associations between conifer root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi date back to at least the early Mesozoic, the period during which most of the modern conifer families first appeared. Notophytum root nodules predate the next known appearance of this association by 100 million years, indicating that this specialized form of mycorrhizal symbiosis has ancient origins. PMID:21808011

  2. Morphological and functional stasis in mycorrhizal root nodules as exhibited by a Triassic conifer.

    PubMed

    Schwendemann, Andrew B; Decombeix, Anne-Laure; Taylor, Thomas N; Taylor, Edith L; Krings, Michael

    2011-08-16

    Mycorrhizal root nodules occur in the conifer families Araucariaceae, Podocarpaceae, and Sciadopityaceae. Although the fossil record of these families can be traced back into the early Mesozoic, the oldest fossil evidence of root nodules previously came from the Cretaceous. Here we report on cellularly preserved root nodules of the early conifer Notophytum from Middle Triassic permineralized peat of Antarctica. These fossil root nodules contain fungal arbuscules, hyphal coils, and vesicles in their cortex. Numerous glomoid-type spores are found in the peat matrix surrounding the nodules. This discovery indicates that mutualistic associations between conifer root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi date back to at least the early Mesozoic, the period during which most of the modern conifer families first appeared. Notophytum root nodules predate the next known appearance of this association by 100 million years, indicating that this specialized form of mycorrhizal symbiosis has ancient origins.

  3. A multiproxy environmental investigation of Holocene wood from a submerged conifer forest in Lake Huron, USA

    Treesearch

    R. Douglas Hunter; Irina P. Panyushkina; Steven W. Leavitt; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; John Zawiskie

    2006-01-01

    Remains of a Holocene drowned forest in southern Lake Huron discovered in 12.5 m of water (164 m above sea level), 4.5 km east of Lexington, Michigan USA (Sanilac site), provided wood to investigate environment and lake history using several proxies. Macrofossil evidence indicates a forest comprised primarily of conifers equivalent to the modern “rich conifer swamp”...

  4. Evolutionary assembly of the conifer fauna: distinguishing ancient from recent associations in bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, A S; Normark, B B; Farrell, B D

    2000-12-07

    Several shifts from ancestral conifer feeding to angiosperm feeding have been implicated in the unparalleled diversification of beetle species. The single largest angiosperm-feeding beetle clade occurs in the weevils, and comprises the family Curculionidae and relatives. Most authorities confidently place the bark beetles (Scolytidae) within this radiation of angiosperm feeders. However, some clues indicate that the association between conifers and some scolytids, particularly in the tribe Tomicini, is a very ancient one. For instance, several fragments of Gondwanaland (South America, New Caledonia, Australia and New Guinea) harbour endemic Tomicini specialized on members of the formerly widespread and abundant conifer family Araucariaceae. As a first step towards resolving this seeming paradox, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the beetle family Scolytidae with particularly intensive sampling of conifer-feeding Tomicini and allies. We sequenced and analysed elongation factor 1alpha and nuclear rDNAs 18S and 28S for 45 taxa, using members of the weevil family Cossoninae as an out-group. Our results indicate that conifer feeding is the ancestral host association of scolytids, and that the most basal lineages of scolytids feed on Aramucaria. If scolytids are indeed nested within a great angiosperm-feeding clade, as many authorities have held, then a reversion to conifer feeding in ancestral scolytids appears to have occurred in the Mesozoic, when Araucaria still formed a major component of the woody flora.

  5. Better living through conifer removal: A demographic analysis of sage-grouse vital rates

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christian A.; Tack, Jason D.; Maestas, Jeremy D.; Naugle, David E.; Forbes, James T.; Reese, Kerry P.

    2017-01-01

    Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) obligate wildlife species such as the imperiled greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) face numerous threats including altered ecosystem processes that have led to conifer expansion into shrub-steppe. Conifer removal is accelerating despite a lack of empirical evidence on grouse population response. Using a before-after-control-impact design at the landscape scale, we evaluated effects of conifer removal on two important demographic parameters, annual survival of females and nest survival, by monitoring 219 female sage-grouse and 225 nests in the northern Great Basin from 2010 to 2014. Estimates from the best treatment models showed positive trends in the treatment area relative to the control area resulting in an increase of 6.6% annual female survival and 18.8% nest survival relative to the control area by 2014. Using stochastic simulations of our estimates and published demographics, we estimated a 25% increase in the population growth rate in the treatment area relative to the control area. This is the first study to link sage-grouse demographics with conifer removal and supports recommendations to actively manage conifer expansion for sage-grouse conservation. Sage-grouse have become a primary catalyst for conservation funding to address conifer expansion in the West, and these findings have important implications for other ecosystem services being generated on the wings of species conservation. PMID:28333995

  6. Ungulate exclusion, conifer thinning and mule deer forage in northeastern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, David W.; Sorensen, Grant E.; Taylor, Chase A.; Cox, Robert D.; Gipson, Philip S.; Cain, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The southwestern United States has experienced expansion of conifer species (Juniperus spp. and Pinus ponderosa) into areas of semi-arid grassland over the past century. The expansion of conifers can limit palatable forage and reduce grass and forb communities. Conifer species are sometimes thinned through hydraulic mulching or selective cutting. We assessed the effects of these treatments on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) habitat in northeastern New Mexico to determine if conifer thinning improved cover of preferred forage species for mule deer in areas with and without ungulates. We measured plant cover and occurrence of preferred forage species in the summers of 2011 and 2012. An ongoing regional drought probably reduced vegetation response, with preferred forage species and herbaceous cover responding to conifer thinning or ungulate exclusion immediately following treatment, but not the following year. In 2011, areas that received thinning treatments had a higher abundance of preferred forage when compared to sites with no treatment. Grass coverage exhibited an immediate response in 2011, with ungulate exclosures containing 8% more coverage than areas without exclosures. The results suggest that conifer thinning and ungulate exclusion may elicit a positive response, however in the presence of drought; the positive effects are only short-term.

  7. Better living through conifer removal: A demographic analysis of sage-grouse vital rates.

    PubMed

    Severson, John P; Hagen, Christian A; Tack, Jason D; Maestas, Jeremy D; Naugle, David E; Forbes, James T; Reese, Kerry P

    2017-01-01

    Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) obligate wildlife species such as the imperiled greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) face numerous threats including altered ecosystem processes that have led to conifer expansion into shrub-steppe. Conifer removal is accelerating despite a lack of empirical evidence on grouse population response. Using a before-after-control-impact design at the landscape scale, we evaluated effects of conifer removal on two important demographic parameters, annual survival of females and nest survival, by monitoring 219 female sage-grouse and 225 nests in the northern Great Basin from 2010 to 2014. Estimates from the best treatment models showed positive trends in the treatment area relative to the control area resulting in an increase of 6.6% annual female survival and 18.8% nest survival relative to the control area by 2014. Using stochastic simulations of our estimates and published demographics, we estimated a 25% increase in the population growth rate in the treatment area relative to the control area. This is the first study to link sage-grouse demographics with conifer removal and supports recommendations to actively manage conifer expansion for sage-grouse conservation. Sage-grouse have become a primary catalyst for conservation funding to address conifer expansion in the West, and these findings have important implications for other ecosystem services being generated on the wings of species conservation.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of conifers inferred from partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Stefanoviac, S; Jager, M; Deutsch, J; Broutin, J; Masselot, M

    1998-05-01

    The conifers, which traditionally comprise seven families, are the largest and most diverse group of living gymnosperms. Efforts to systematize this diversity without a cladistic phylogenetic framework have often resulted in the segregation of certain genera and/or families from the conifers. In order to understand better the relationships between the families, we performed cladistic analyses using a new data set obtained from 28S rRNA gene sequences. These analyses strongly support the monophyly of conifers including Taxaceae. Within the conifers, the Pinaceae are the first to diverge, being the sister group of the rest of conifers. A recently discovered Australian genus Wollemia is confirmed to be a natural member of the Araucariaceae. The Taxaceae are nested within the conifer clade, being the most closely related to the Cephalotaxaceae. The Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae together form a monophyletic group. Sciadopitys should be considered as constituting a separate family. These relationships are consistent with previous cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular (18S rRNA, rbcL) data. Furthermore, the well-supported clade linking the Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae, which has not been previously reported, suggests that the common ancestor of these families, both having the greatest diversity in the Southern Hemisphere, inhabited Gondwanaland.

  9. Detection of aspen/conifer forest mixes from multitemporal LANDSAT digital data. [Bear River Range, Rocky Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merola, J. A.; Jaynes, R. A.; Harniss, R. O.

    1983-01-01

    Aspen, conifer and mixed aspen/conifer forests were mapped for a 15-quadrangle study area in the Utah-Idaho Bear River Range using LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) data. The digital MSS data were utilized to devise quantitative indices which correlate with apparently stable and seral aspen forests. The extent to which a two-date LANDSAT MSS analysis may permit the delineation of different categories of aspen/conifer forest mix was explored. Multitemporal analyses of MSS data led to the identification of early, early to mid, mid to late, and late seral stages of aspen/conifer forest mixing.

  10. Quantifying carbon budgets of conifer Mediterranean forest ecosystems, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Evrendilek, Fatih; Berberoglu, Suha; Taskinsu-Meydan, Sibel; Yilmaz, Erhan

    2006-08-01

    Aboveground biomass, aboveground litterfall, and leaf litter decomposition of five indigenous tree stands (pure stands of Pinus brutia, Pinus nigra, Cedrus libani, Juniperus excelsa, and a mixed stand of Abies cilicica, P. nigra, and C. libani) were measured in an eastern Mediterranean evergreen needleleaf forest of Turkey. Measurements were converted to regional scale estimates of carbon (C) stocks and fluxes of forest ecosystems, based on general non-site-specific allometric relationships. Mean C stock of the conifer forests was estimated as 97.8 +/- 79 Mg C ha(-1) consisting of 83.0 +/- 67 Mg C ha(-1) in the aboveground and 14.8 +/- 12 Mg C ha(-1) in the belowground biomass. The forest stands had mean soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON) stocks of 172.0 +/- 25.7 Mg C ha(-1) and 9.2 +/- 1.2 Mg N ha(-1), respectively. Mean total monthly litterfall was 376.2 +/- 191.3 kg C ha(-1), ranging from 641 +/- 385 kg C ha(-1) for Pinus brutia to 286 +/- 82 kg C ha(-1) for Cedrus libani. Decomposition rate constants (k) for pine needles were 0.0016 for Cedrus libani, 0.0009 for Pinus nigra, 0.0006 for the mixed stand, and 0.0005 day(-1) for Pinus brutia and Juniperus excelsa. Estimation of components of the C budgets revealed that the forest ecosystems were net C sinks, with a mean sequestration rate of 2.0 +/- 1.1 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) ranging from 3.2 +/- 2 Mg C ha(-1) for Pinus brutia to 1.6 +/- 0.6 Mg C ha(-1) for Cedrus libani. Mean net ecosystem productivity (NEP) resulted in sequestration of 98.4 +/- 54.1 Gg CO2 yr(-1) from the atmosphere when extrapolated for the entire study area of 134.2 km2 (Gg = 10(9) g). The quantitative C data from the study revealed the significance of the conifer Mediterranean forests as C sinks.

  11. Vigor loss in conifers due to dwarf mistletoe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. P.; French, D. W.; Latham, R. P.; Nelson, C. A.

    1970-01-01

    Practical remote sensing techniques were developed for detecting and evaluating vigor loss in forest conifers due to dwarf mistletoe. Eastern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum) infection of black spruce (Picea mariana) was investigated. A tower-tramway system, 100 feet high, was erected over an infected stand in northeast Minnesota in June and multiband/multidate photography was initiated in July and is continuing. Four 70mm film-filter combinations were used in a multicamera unit: Plus-X/Wratten 58, Plus-X/Wratten 25A, Aero Infrared/Wratten 89B, and Ektachrome Infrared/Wratten 12. The stand of mistletoe-infected black spruce under the tramway was photographed three times per day (0900, 1200 and 1500 local sun time) at approximately 10 day intervals. An extensive test site, several square miles in area, was selected in north-central Minnesota for the purpose of testing photographic specifications developed on the tramway test site. One aerial photographic flight at a variety of altitudes was accomplished over the extensive test site in August. Data analyses are not available at this time.

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Leaves and Fruits of Iranian Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Emami, S. A.; Asili, J.; Mohagheghi, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Cupressus semipervirens var. horizontalis, Cupressus semipervirens var. semipervirens, Cupressus semipervirens cv. Cereifeormis, Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica, Juniperus excelsa subsp. excelsa, Juniperus excelsa subsp. polycarpos, Juniperus foetidissima, Juniperus oblonga, Juniperus sabina, Platycladus orientalis and Taxus baccata are Iranian conifers. The antioxidant activity of leaves and fruits of these 11 different taxons were evaluated. The leaves of both male and female, and fruits of these plants were collected from different areas of the country. Methanol extract of leaves and fruits of these taxons were prepared. Antioxidant activity of each extracts was measured using two different tests of the ferric thiocyanate method and thiobarbituric acid. Results indicated that the methanol extracts of leaves, of male and female, and fruits of all these species (27 samples) possessed antioxidant activity when tested with both methods. The antioxidant activity was then compared with those of α-tocopherol (a natural antioxidant) and butylated hydroxytoluene (a synthetic antioxidant). Methanol extract of fruits of C. semipervirens cv. Cereifeormis showed the highest antioxidant activity while the methanol extract of leaves of C. semipervirens var. semipervirens possessed the lowest antioxidant activity. However, our finding showed that most of the tested extracts were showing strong antioxidant activity even higher than α-tocopherol. PMID:17965761

  13. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Fate of Phenylalanine in Conifers.

    PubMed

    Pascual, María B; El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando N; Cañas, Rafael A; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development, and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions, and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined.

  14. Complete tylosis formation in a latest Permian conifer stem

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhuo; Wang, Jun; Rößler, Ronny; Kerp, Hans; Wei, Hai-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Our knowledge of tylosis formation is mainly based on observations of extant plants; however, its developmental and functional significance are less well understood in fossil plants. This study, for the first time, describes a complete tylosis formation in a fossil woody conifer and discusses its ecophysiological implications. Methods The permineralized stem of Shenoxylon mirabile was collected from the upper Permian (Changhsingian) Sunjiagou Formation of Shitanjing coalfield, northern China. Samples from different portions of the stem were prepared by using the standard thin-sectioning technique and studied in transmitted light. Key Results The outgrowth of ray parenchyma cells protruded into adjacent tracheids through pits initially forming small pyriform or balloon-shaped structures, which became globular or slightly elongated when they reached their maximum size. The tracheid luminae were gradually occluded by densely spaced tyloses. The host tracheids are arranged in distinct concentric zones representing different growth phases of tylosis formation within a single growth ring. Conclusions The extensive development of tyloses from the innermost heartwood (metaxylem) tracheids to the outermost sapwood tracheids suggests that the plant was highly vulnerable and reacted strongly to environmental stress. Based on the evidence available, the tyloses were probably not produced in response to wound reaction or pathogenic infection, since evidence of wood traumatic events or fungal invasion are not recognizable. Rather, they may represent an ecophysiological response to the constant environmental stimuli. PMID:23532049

  15. Effects of acid fog and ozone on conifers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; McCool, P.M.; Musselman, R.C.

    1989-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acidic fog (pH 2.0, 3.0, or 4.0) on the physiological, biochemical, and growth responses of two coniferous tree species (Pinus ponderosa and Abies concolor), and determined if exposure to acidic fog predisposed the tree seedlings to the phytotoxic effects of ozone (O{sub 3}). Results provide evidence that the growth and metabolic responses of two coniferous tree species could be altered by multiple applications of acidic fog, and by exposure to ambient O{sub 3}. In general, the alterations were slight to modest, which may be attributed to the low degree of stress severity, and the slow rate of tree growth. The findings indicate that exposure to acidic fog followed by O{sub 3} does not cause detectable changes in conifer seedling growth within a single-growing season. Nevertheless, it is clear that acidic fog and O{sub 3} cause temporal alterations in seedling physiology and biochemistry.

  16. The Earliest Evidence of Holometabolan Insect Pupation in Conifer Wood

    PubMed Central

    Tapanila, Leif; Roberts, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The pre-Jurassic record of terrestrial wood borings is poorly resolved, despite body fossil evidence of insect diversification among xylophilic clades starting in the late Paleozoic. Detailed analysis of borings in petrified wood provides direct evidence of wood utilization by invertebrate animals, which typically comprises feeding behaviors. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a U-shaped boring in petrified wood from the Late Triassic Chinle Formation of southern Utah that demonstrates a strong linkage between insect ontogeny and conifer wood resources. Xylokrypta durossi new ichnogenus and ichnospecies is a large excavation in wood that is backfilled with partially digested xylem, creating a secluded chamber. The tracemaker exited the chamber by way of a small vertical shaft. This sequence of behaviors is most consistent with the entrance of a larva followed by pupal quiescence and adult emergence — hallmarks of holometabolous insect ontogeny. Among the known body fossil record of Triassic insects, cupedid beetles (Coleoptera: Archostemata) are deemed the most plausible tracemakers of Xylokrypta, based on their body size and modern xylobiotic lifestyle. Conclusions/Significance This oldest record of pupation in fossil wood provides an alternative interpretation to borings once regarded as evidence for Triassic bees. Instead Xylokrypta suggests that early archostematan beetles were leaders in exploiting wood substrates well before modern clades of xylophages arose in the late Mesozoic. PMID:22355387

  17. Modeling acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature in evergreen conifer forests.

    PubMed

    Gea-Izquierdo, Guillermo; Mäkelä, Annikki; Margolis, Hank; Bergeron, Yves; Black, T Andrew; Dunn, Allison; Hadley, Julian; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Falk, Matthias; Wharton, Sonia; Monson, Russell; Hollinger, David Y; Laurila, Tuomas; Aurela, Mika; McCaughey, Harry; Bourque, Charles; Vesala, Timo; Berninger, Frank

    2010-10-01

    • In this study, we used a canopy photosynthesis model which describes changes in photosynthetic capacity with slow temperature-dependent acclimations. • A flux-partitioning algorithm was applied to fit the photosynthesis model to net ecosystem exchange data for 12 evergreen coniferous forests from northern temperate and boreal regions. • The model accounted for much of the variation in photosynthetic production, with modeling efficiencies (mean > 67%) similar to those of more complex models. The parameter describing the rate of acclimation was larger at the northern sites, leading to a slower acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature. The response of the rates of photosynthesis to air temperature in spring was delayed up to several days at the coldest sites. Overall photosynthesis acclimation processes were slower at colder, northern locations than at warmer, more southern, and more maritime sites. • Consequently, slow changes in photosynthetic capacity were essential to explaining variations of photosynthesis for colder boreal forests (i.e. where acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature was slower), whereas the importance of these processes was minor in warmer conifer evergreen forests.

  18. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Fate of Phenylalanine in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, María B.; El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando N.; Cañas, Rafael A.; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2016-01-01

    The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development, and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions, and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined. PMID:27468292

  19. Effects of conifers and elk browsing on quaking aspen forests in the central Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaye, Margot W.; Binkley, Dan; Stohlgren, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Elk browsing and conifer species mixing with aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) present current challenges to aspen forest management in the western United States. We evaluated the effects of conifers and elk browsing on quaking aspen stands in and near Rocky Mountain National Park using tree rings to reconstruct patterns of aspen establishment, growth, and mortality over the past 120 years. High conifer encroachment and elk browse were both associated with decreased aspen recruitment, with mean recruitment dropping over 30% from pure aspen to mixed stands and over 50% from low-browse to high-browse stands. Maximum aspen recruitment was lower in mixed stands than in pure stands with the same tree basal area. High levels of elk browsing were also associated with a 30% decrease in stand-level growth of aspen. Neither high conifer abundance nor elk browse affected the growth of individual trees or aspen mortality. Aspen establishment was negatively influenced by conifers and elk browsing; however, aspen growth and mortality appeared to be resilient to these two external influences. Overall, these results suggest that long-term preservation of aspen forests could be achieved by enhancing aspen recruitment.

  20. Hydraulic acclimation to shading in boreal conifers of varying shade tolerance.

    PubMed

    Schoonmaker, Amanda L; Hacke, Uwe G; Landhäusser, Simon M; Lieffers, Victor J; Tyree, Melvin T

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how shading affects the hydraulic and wood-anatomical characteristics of four boreal conifers (Pinus banksiana, Pinus contorta, Picea glauca and Picea mariana) that differ in shade tolerance. Plants were grown in an open field and under a deciduous-dominated overstory for 6 years. Sapwood- and leaf-area specific conductivity, vulnerability curves, and anatomical measurements (light and scanning electron microscopy) were made on leading shoots from six to nine trees of each treatment combination. There was no difference in sapwood-area specific conductivity between open-grown and understory conifers, although two of four species had larger tracheid diameters in the open. Shaded conifers appeared to compensate for small diameter tracheids by changes in pit membrane structure. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that understory conifers had thinner margo strands, greater maximum pore size in the margo, and more torus extensions. All of these trends may contribute to inadequate sealing of the torus. This is supported by the fact that all species showed increased vulnerability to cavitation when grown in the understory. Although evaporative demand in an understory environment is low, a rapid change into fully exposed conditions could be detrimental for shaded conifers.

  1. Mediterranean climate effects. I. Conifer water use across a Sierra Nevada ecotone.

    PubMed

    Royce, E B; Barbour, M G

    2001-05-01

    Xylem water potential of the midelevation conifers Pinus jeffreyi, Pinus lambertiana, Abies concolor, and Calocedrus decurrens, the higher elevation Pinus monticola and Abies magnifica, and co-occurring evergreen angiosperm shrubs, together with soil moisture under these plants, were monitored at three sites on the Kern Plateau in the southernmost Sierra Nevada Range of California. Site locations spanned the ecotone between the mid- and upper montane forests at elevations of 2230-2820 m. Measurements were made through a low-snowfall year and a heavy-snowfall year.In the Mediterranean climate of the Sierra Nevada, the heavy winter snowpack persists into late spring, after precipitation has effectively stopped. We found the subsequent depletion of soil moisture due to plant water uptake to result in predawn xylem water potentials for conifers more negative by 0.6-1.4 MPa than those for shrubs or inferred soil potentials. Shrubs generally depleted soil moisture more rapidly and ultimately extracted a greater fraction of the available soil moisture than did the conifers. This depletion of soil moisture by shrubs, particularly Arctostaphylos patula, may limit conifer growth and regeneration by prematurely terminating growth on the shallow soils studied. The conifers all generally showed similar patterns of soil moisture use, except that A. magnifica extracted moisture more rapidly early in the season.

  2. An improved protocol for intact chloroplasts and cpDNA isolation in conifers.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Rogalski, Marcelo; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Performing chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) isolation is considered a major challenge among different plant groups, especially conifers. Isolating chloroplasts in conifers by such conventional methods as sucrose gradient and high salt has not been successful. So far, plastid genome sequencing protocols for conifer species have been based mainly on long-range PCR, which is known to be time-consuming and difficult to implement. We developed a protocol for cpDNA isolation using three different conifer families: Araucaria angustifolia and Araucaria bidwilli (Araucariaceae), Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) and Pinus patula (Pinaceae). The present protocol is based on high salt isolation buffer followed by saline Percoll gradient. Combining these two strategies allowed enhanced chloroplast isolation, along with decreased contamination caused by polysaccharides, polyphenols, proteins, and nuclear DNA in cpDNA. Microscopy images confirmed the presence of intact chloroplasts in high abundance. This method was applied to cpDNA isolation and subsequent sequencing by Illumina MiSeq (2×250 bp), using only 50 ng of cpDNA. Reference-guided chloroplast genome mapping showed that high average coverage was achieved for all evaluated species: 24.63 for A. angustifolia, 135.97 for A. bidwilli, 1196.10 for P. lambertii, and 64.68 for P. patula. Results show that this improved protocol is suitable for enhanced quality and yield of chloroplasts and cpDNA isolation from conifers, providing a useful tool for studies that require isolated chloroplasts and/or whole cpDNA sequences.

  3. Conifer genomics and adaptation: at the crossroads of genetic diversity and genome function.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Julien; Verta, Jukka-Pekka; MacKay, John J

    2016-01-01

    Conifers have been understudied at the genomic level despite their worldwide ecological and economic importance but the situation is rapidly changing with the development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. With NGS, genomics research has simultaneously gained in speed, magnitude and scope. In just a few years, genomes of 20-24 gigabases have been sequenced for several conifers, with several others expected in the near future. Biological insights have resulted from recent sequencing initiatives as well as genetic mapping, gene expression profiling and gene discovery research over nearly two decades. We review the knowledge arising from conifer genomics research emphasizing genome evolution and the genomic basis of adaptation, and outline emerging questions and knowledge gaps. We discuss future directions in three areas with potential inputs from NGS technologies: the evolutionary impacts of adaptation in conifers based on the adaptation-by-speciation model; the contributions of genetic variability of gene expression in adaptation; and the development of a broader understanding of genetic diversity and its impacts on genome function. These research directions promise to sustain research aimed at addressing the emerging challenges of adaptation that face conifer trees. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Structure-function constraints of tracheid-based xylem: a comparison of conifers and ferns.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Limm, Emily; Rico, Christopher; Christman, Mairgareth A

    2011-10-01

    The ferns comprise one of the most ancient tracheophytic plant lineages, and occupy habitats ranging from tundra to deserts and the equatorial tropics. Like their nearest relatives the conifers, modern ferns possess tracheid-based xylem but the structure-function relationships of fern xylem are poorly understood. Here, we sampled the fronds (megaphylls) of 16 species across the fern phylogeny, and examined the relationships among hydraulic transport, drought-induced cavitation resistance, the xylem anatomy of the stipe, and the gas-exchange response of the pinnae. For comparison, the results are presented alongside a similar suite of conifer data. Fern xylem is as resistant to cavitation as conifer xylem, but exhibits none of the hydraulic or structural trade-offs associated with resistance to cavitation. On a conduit diameter basis, fern xylem can exhibit greater hydraulic efficiency than conifer and angiosperm xylem. In ferns, wide and long tracheids compensate in part for the lack of secondary xylem and allow ferns to exhibit transport rates on a par with those of conifers. We suspect that it is the arrangement of the primary xylem, in addition to the intrinsic traits of the conduits themselves, that may help explain the broad range of cavitation resistance in ferns.

  5. A comparison of spectral reflectance properties at the needle, branch, and canopy level for selected conifer species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Darrel L.

    1991-01-01

    Radiative transfer data were collected for three conifer species and a northern hardwood species. The data indicate that conifer forests are more absorptive than broadleaved, deciduous hardwood forests. In particular, spruce species have an enhanced capability of absorbing incoming solar radiation in the optical wavelength region.

  6. Twenty-five years of managing vegetation in conifer plantations in northern and central California: results, application, principles, and challenges

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald; Gary O. Fiddler

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1970s, the outlook for conifer seedlings in new plantations in the Western United States was dismal&too many were dying or growing below the potential of the site. This situation was untenable, and a large study aimed at increasing the survival and growth of planted conifer seedlings was implemented. This was the National Administrative Study on...

  7. Upland log volumes and conifer establishment patterns in two northern, upland old-growth redwood forests, a brief synopsis

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Porter; John O. Sawyer

    2007-01-01

    We characterized the volume, weight and top surface area of naturally fallen logs in an old-growth redwood forest, and quantified conifer recruit densities on these logs and on the surrounding forest floor. We report significantly greater conifer recruit densities on log substrates as compared to the forest floor. Log substrate availability was calculated on a per...

  8. Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Brian Oakley; Jiquan Chen; Heather Erickson; Andrew Gray; Antonio Izzo; Dale Johnson; Siyan Ma; Jim Marra; Marc Meyer; Kathryn Purcell; Tom Rambo; Dave Rizzo; Brent Roath; Tim. Schowalter

    2002-01-01

    Detailed analysis of mixed-conifer and red fir forests were made from extensive, large vegetation sampling, systematically conducted throughout the Teakettle Experimental Forest. Mixed conifer is characterized by distinct patch conditions of closed-canopy tree clusters, persistent gaps and shrub thickets. This heterogeneous spatial structure provides contrasting...

  9. Patterns of conifer tree regeneration following an autumn wildfire event in the western Oregon Cascade Range, USA.

    Treesearch

    Andrew J. Larson; Jerry F. Franklin

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of fire severity and environmental conditions on conifer tree regeneration 11 years after an autumn wildfire in the western Oregon Cascade Range. Conifer tree seedlings, including those of Pseudotsuga menziesii, established promptly and at high densities following fire, in contrast to long establishment periods documented...

  10. Genes, enzymes and chemicals of terpenoid diversity in the constitutive and induced defence of conifers against insects and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Insects select their hosts, but trees cannot select which herbivores will feed upon them. Thus, as long-lived stationary organisms, conifers must resist the onslaught of varying and multiple attackers over their lifetime. Arguably, the greatest threats to conifers are herbivorous insects and their associated pathogens. Insects such as bark beetles, stem- and wood-boring insects, shoot-feeding weevils, and foliage-feeding budworms and sawflies are among the most devastating pests of conifer forests. Conifer trees produce a great diversity of compounds, such as an enormous array of terpenoids and phenolics, that may impart resistance to a variety of herbivores and microorganisms. Insects have evolved to specialize in resistance to these chemicals -- choosing, feeding upon, and colonizing hosts they perceive to be best suited to reproduction. This review focuses on the plant-insect interactions mediated by conifer-produced terpenoids. To understand the role of terpenoids in conifer-insect interactions, we must understand how conifers produce the wide diversity of terpenoids, as well as understand how these specific compounds affect insect behaviour and physiology. This review examines what chemicals are produced, the genes and proteins involved in their biosynthesis, how they work, and how they are regulated. It also examines how insects and their associated pathogens interact with, elicit, and are affected by conifer-produced terpenoids.

  11. A dendrochronology based fire history of Jeffry pine-mixed conifer forests in the Sierra San Pedro Martir, Mexico

    Treesearch

    Scott L. Stephens; Carl N. Skinner; Samantha J. Gill

    2003-01-01

    Conifer forests in northwestern Mexico have not experienced systematic fire suppression or logging, making them unique in western North America. Fire regimes of Pinus jeffreyi Grev. & Balf. mixed conifer forests in the Sierra San Pedro Martir, Baja California, Mexico, were determined by identifying 105 fire dates from 1034 fire scars in 105 specimens. Fires were...

  12. Conifer-Ceanothus interactions influence tree growth before and after shrub removal in a forest plantation in the western Cascade Mountains, USA.

    Treesearch

    Heather E. Erickson; Constance A. Harrington

    2006-01-01

    Ceanothus velutinous is often considered to be an aggressive competitor with young conifers in the western United States. Using a conifer (noble fir, Pacific silver fir, Douglas-fir, and western hemlock) plantation in western WA where Ceanothus had become established, we assessed how conifer-shrub crown interactions affected...

  13. Conifer woods from the Salamanca Formation (early Paleocene), Central Patagonia, Argentina: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Daniela P.; Brea, Mariana; Raigemborn, M. Sol; Matheos, Sergio D.

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of the present work is to describe the first conifer assemblage of a mixed forest from the Danian Salamanca Formation at the Estancia Las Violetas locality (San Jorge Basin, Central Patagonia, Argentina), based on detailed descriptions of secondary xylem. Also, sedimentological description of the Estancia Las Violetas outcrops are made in order to understand the paleoenvironmental conditions under which paleocommunities developed. Six conifer woods are described and assigned to one Podocarpoxylon Gothan and three Cupressinoxylon Göppert species (including a new species). This is the first record of Patagonia forest where the conifer assemblage is dominated by Cupressinoxylon, associated with Podocarpaceae and palms (recorded as fruits), conforming a mixed forest with a floristic composition similar to present-day New Caledonia forests. Las Violetas fossil forest represent a parautochtonous community developed in a forested coastal setting, a tide-dominated estuary, at ∼51-50° S paleolatitudes of South America during the early-middle Danian.

  14. Simulation of growth of Adirondack conifers in relation to global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.; Raynal, D.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Several conifer species grown in plantations in the southeastern Adirondack mountains of New York were chosen to model tree growth. In the models, annual xylem growth was decomposed into several components that reflect various intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Growth signals indicative of climatic effects were used to construct response functions using both multivariate analysis and Kalman filter methods. Two models were used to simulate tree growth response to future CO[sub 2]-induced climate change projected by GCMs. The comparable results of both models indicate that different conifer species have individualistic growth responses to future climatic change. The response behaviors of trees are affected greatly by local stand conditions. The results suggest possible changes in future growth and distributions of naturally occurring conifers in this region.

  15. Infrared radiation from hot cones on cool conifers attracts seed-feeding insects

    PubMed Central

    Takács, Stephen; Bottomley, Hannah; Andreller, Iisak; Zaradnik, Tracy; Schwarz, Joseph; Bennett, Robb; Strong, Ward; Gries, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Foraging animals use diverse cues to locate resources. Common foraging cues have visual, auditory, olfactory, tactile or gustatory characteristics. Here, we show a foraging herbivore using infrared (IR) radiation from living plants as a host-finding cue. We present data revealing that (i) conifer cones are warmer and emit more near-, mid- and long-range IR radiation than needles, (ii) cone-feeding western conifer seed bugs, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera: Coreidae), possess IR receptive organs and orient towards experimental IR cues, and (iii) occlusion of the insects' IR receptors impairs IR perception. The conifers' cost of attracting cone-feeding insects may be offset by occasional mast seeding resulting in cone crops too large to be effectively exploited by herbivores. PMID:18945664

  16. Detection of aspen/conifer forest mixes from multitemporal Landsat digital data. [Utah-Idaho Bear River Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merola, J. A.; Jaynes, R. A.; Harniss, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Aspen, conifer and mixed aspen/conifer forests were mapped for a 15-quadrangle study area in the Utah-Idaho Bear River Range using Landsat multispectral scanner data. Digital classification and statistical analysis of Landsat data allowed the identification of six groups of signatures which reflect different types of aspen/conifer forest mixing. Photo interpretations of the print symbols suggest that such classes are indicative of mid to late seral aspen forests. Digital print map overlayes and acreage calculations were prepared for the study area quadrangles. Further field verification is needed to acquire additional information about the nature of the forests. Single data Landsat analysis should be a cost effective means to index aspen forests which are at least in the mid seral phase of conifer invasion. Since aspen canopies tend to obscure understory conifers for early seral forests, a second data analysis, using data taken when aspens are leafless, could provide information about early seral aspen forests.

  17. Detection of aspen-conifer forest mixes from LANDSAT digital data. [Utah-Idaho Bear River Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaynes, R. A.; Merola, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Aspen, conifer and mixed aspen/conifer forests were mapped for a 15-quadrangle study area in the Utah-Idaho Bear River Range using LANDSAT multispectral scanner data. Digital classification and statistical analysis of LANDSAT data allowed the identification of six groups of signatures which reflect different types of aspen/conifer forest mixing. Photo interpretations of the print symbols suggest that such classes are indicative of mid to late seral aspen forests. Digital print map overlays and acreage calculations were prepared for the study area quadrangles. Further field verification is needed to acquire additional information about the nature of the forests. Single date LANDSAT analysis should be a cost effective means to index aspen forests which are at least in the mid seral phase of conifer invasion. Since aspen canopies tend to obscure understory conifers for early seral forests, a second date analysis, using data taken when aspens are leafless, could provide information about early seral aspen forests.

  18. Detection of aspen/conifer forest mixes from multitemporal Landsat digital data. [Utah-Idaho Bear River Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merola, J. A.; Jaynes, R. A.; Harniss, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Aspen, conifer and mixed aspen/conifer forests were mapped for a 15-quadrangle study area in the Utah-Idaho Bear River Range using Landsat multispectral scanner data. Digital classification and statistical analysis of Landsat data allowed the identification of six groups of signatures which reflect different types of aspen/conifer forest mixing. Photo interpretations of the print symbols suggest that such classes are indicative of mid to late seral aspen forests. Digital print map overlayes and acreage calculations were prepared for the study area quadrangles. Further field verification is needed to acquire additional information about the nature of the forests. Single data Landsat analysis should be a cost effective means to index aspen forests which are at least in the mid seral phase of conifer invasion. Since aspen canopies tend to obscure understory conifers for early seral forests, a second data analysis, using data taken when aspens are leafless, could provide information about early seral aspen forests.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of extractable conifer heartwood compounds toward Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kelsey, Rick G; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts from heartwood of seven western conifer trees and individual volatile compounds in the extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora ramorum. Extracts from incense and western redcedar exhibited the strongest activity, followed by yellow-cedar, western juniper, and Port-Orford-cedar with moderate activity, and no activity for Douglas-fir and redwood extracts. Chemical composition of the extracts varied both qualitatively and quantitatively among the species with a total of 37 compounds identified by mass spectrometry. Of the 13 individual heartwood compounds bioassayed, three showed strong activity with a Log(10) EC(50) less than or equal to 1.0 ppm (hinokitiol, thymoquinone, and nootkatin), three expressed moderate activity ranging from 1.0-2.0 ppm (nootkatol, carvacrol, and valencene-11,12-diol), four compounds had weak activity at 2.0-3.0 ppm [alpha-terpineol, valencene-13-ol, (+)-beta-cedrene, (-)-thujopsene], and three had no activity [(+)-cedrol, delta-cadinene, and methyl carvacrol]. All of the most active compounds contained a free hydroxyl group, except thymoquinone. The importance of a free hydroxyl was demonstrated by the tremendous difference in activity between carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) 1.81 +/- 0.08 ppm) and methyl carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) >3.0 ppm). A field trial in California, showed that heartwood chips from redcedar placed on the forest floor for 4 months under Umbellularia californica (California bay laurel) with symptoms of P. ramorum leaf blight significantly limited the accumulation of P. ramorum DNA in the litter layer, compared with heartwood chips from redwood.

  20. Estimating terpene and terpenoid emissions from conifer oleoresin composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2015-07-01

    The following algorithm, which is based on the thermodynamics of nonelectrolyte partitioning, was developed to predict emission rates of terpenes and terpenoids from specific storage sites in conifers: Ei =xoriγoripi∘ where Ei is the emission rate (μg C gdw-1 h-1) and pi∘ is the vapor pressure (mm Hg) of the pure liquid terpene or terpenoid, respectively, and xori and γori are the mole fraction and activity coefficient (on a Raoult's law convention), respectively, of the terpene and terpenoid in the oleoresin. Activity coefficients are calculated with Hansen solubility parameters that account for dispersive, polar, and H-bonding interactions of the solutes with the oleoresin matrix. Estimates of pi∘ at 25 °C and molar enthalpies of vaporization are made with the SIMPOL.1 method and are used to estimate pi∘ at environmentally relevant temperatures. Estimated mixing ratios of terpenes and terpenols were comparatively higher above resin-acid- and monoterpene-rich oleoresins, respectively. The results indicated a greater affinity of terpenes and terpenols for the non-functionalized and carboxylic acid containing matrix through dispersive and H-bonding interactions, which are expressed in the emission algorithm by the activity coefficient. The correlation between measured emission rates of terpenes and terpenoids for Pinus strobus and emission rates predicted with the algorithm were very good (R = 0.95). Standard errors for the range and average of monoterpene emission rates were ±6 - ±86% and ±54%, respectively, and were similar in magnitude to reported standard deviations of monoterpene composition of foliar oils (±38 - ±51% and ±67%, respectively).

  1. Three centuries of managing introduced conifers in South Africa: Benefits, impacts, changing perceptions and conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    van Wilgen, Brian W; Richardson, David M

    2012-09-15

    Alien conifers, mainly pines, have been planted in South Africa for a range of purposes for over 300 years. Formal plantations cover 660,000 ha of the country, and invasive stands of varying density occur on a further 2.9 million ha. These trees have brought many benefits but have also caused unintended problems. The management of alien conifers has evolved in response to emerging problems such as excessive water use by plantations of conifers, changing values and markets, and the realities of a new ecological order brought about by invasive alien conifers. This paper reviews the history of conifer introductions to South Africa, the benefits and impacts with which they are associated, and the ongoing and evolving research that has been conducted to inform their management. The South African approach has included taking courageous steps to address the problem of highly invasive species that are also an important commercial crop. These interventions have not, however, had the desired effect of both retaining benefits from formal plantations while simultaneously reversing the trend of growing impacts associated with self-sown invasive stands. We suggest that different approaches need to be considered, including the systematic phasing out of commercial forestry in zones where it delivers low returns, and the introduction of more effective, focussed and integrated, region-specific approaches to the management of invasive stands of conifers. These steps would deliver much improved economic outcomes by protecting valuable ecosystem services, but will require political commitment to policies that could be unpopular in certain sectors of society. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The problem of conifer species migration lag in the Pacific Northwest region since the last glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Scott A.

    2013-10-01

    Multiproxy evidence indicates that warmer-than-present summers became established in Eastern Beringia as early as 14,000-13,000 years ago, but the dispersal of spruces, pines, cedars and hemlocks across the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of southern Alaska did not begin until at least 1500 years afterwards, and took many thousands of years to be completed. There are many potential reasons for this slow spread of PNW conifers towards their modern range limits. The absence of mycorrhizae in the soils of southern Alaska may have slowed conifer establishment. The availability of soil moisture was another limiting factor. With the exception of Pinus contorta, the other PNW conifers become established most readily from seeds that fall on moist, shaded substrates, thus they are not good pioneering species. Competition with alder and birch played an important role, especially along Prince William Sound and the Kenai Peninsula. Alder or alder and birch dominated these regions until the mid- to late Holocene. The other key element for most PNW conifer species is the precipitation regime. The hemlocks, cedars and Sitka spruce are not drought-hardy. So although the PNW temperature regime may have been warm enough in early postglacial times to support the growth of PNW conifers, it was probably too dry for them to successfully become established in new regions. The conflation of these environmental factors limits our present understanding of the problem, but the recent trend of multi-proxy analysis in Quaternary paleoecology will certainly sharpen our reconstructions. Such proxies as conifer needle stomata and insect fossil remains hold significant promise.

  3. Earliest conifers of North America: upland and/or paleoclimatic indicators?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.; Darrah, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    The oldest conifer compressions and permineralized remains from North America, which are assignable to Walchia Sternberg, are found in strata of Westphalian C and D ages in the central Colorado trough of Colorado, the Nemaha highlands of Oklahoma, and the central Appalachian basin. These early conifer occurrences are consistent with dry conditions in Colorado and less dry or wet-dry, better drained, more oxidizing upland conditions in the central Appalachian basin, possibly tectonically controlled, which may have been a prelude to a widespread climatic change in Stephanian or Permian time in North America. -Authors

  4. Soil Moisture Patterns on Conifer and Aspen Hillslopes in an Alpine Catchment of Northern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A.; Kasahara, T.

    2007-12-01

    Conifer invasion has been considered a significant factor explaining the decline in the extent of aspen cover in Utah. A consequence of this change in vegetation type may be lower water yield from mountain headwater catchments in the region. In this study, soil moisture patterns and snow accumulation were compared between conifer and aspen dominated hillslopes to understand the differences in (1) the timing of surface water inputs from snow melt and (2) how the wetting front of these inputs travels through the soil profile vertically and laterally. Nested soil moisture probes were installed in the summer of 2006 on two hillslopes adjacent to a stream in a headwater catchment of the Ogden River basin. One transect of eight nests lies perpendicular to the stream in an aspen dominated stand and another in a conifer stand. Nests consist of three probes at 5, 20 and 100cm or as deep as we could install the probe (45 to 110cm). Peak snow water equivalent was measured along each of the transects at a 4m interval. Snow surveys revealed similar average snow water equivalents between aspen and conifer stands but a greater variability of snow pack in the conifer stand. Soil profiles under the two vegetation types were found to vary greatly with aspen having a deeper profile with a higher clay content and conifer having a shallow and extremely rocky profile. Hourly volumetric soil water contents showed that water inputs from fall precipitation did not penetrate to the deeper layers of the soil profiles (60 to 100cm) in either vegetation type. At 20cm depth, fall precipitation increased saturation to 30% in the conifer profiles and 60%, twice as much, in the aspen. These levels of saturation were sustained throughout the winter months after which peak soil moisture in the spring showed all depths reaching 90% or greater saturation in both vegetation types. Spring snow melt water saturated the entire profile and sensors at all depths reacted to melt water inputs. Peak soil

  5. Chernobyl Doses. Volume 2. Conifer Stress near Chernobyl Derived from Landsat Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 AD-A259 085 S.... IiilII|IlH~l D.A-TR-92-3,,.v2 Chernobyl Doses Volume 2-Conifer Stress Near... Chernobyl Derived from Landsat Imagery Gene E. McClellan Terrence H. Hemmer Ronald N. DeWitt Pacific-Sierra Research Corporation 12340 Santa Monica Boulevard...870929 - 920228 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Chernobyl Doses C - DNA 001-87-C-0104 Volume 2- Conifer Stress Near Chernobyl Derived from

  6. Assessing Conifer Ray Parenchyma for Ecological Studies: Pitfalls and Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    von Arx, Georg; Arzac, Alberto; Olano, José M.; Fonti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    provided the least accurate PERPAR estimates. This evaluation of ray parenchyma in conifers and the presented guidelines regarding data accuracy as a function of measured wood surface and number of samples represent an important methodological reference for ray quantification, which will ultimately improve the understanding of the fundamental role of ray parenchyma tissue for the performance and survival of trees growing in stressed environments. PMID:26635842

  7. Stem demography and postfire recruitment of a resprouting serotinous conifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Keeley, Melanie B.; Bond, William J.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of resprouts and seedling recruitment to post-fire regeneration of the South African fynbos conifer Widdringtonia nodiflora was compared eight months after wildfires in 1990. Stems on all trees were killed by fire but resprouting success was > 90 % at all but one site. A demographic study of burned skeletons revealed that prior to these fires, nearly all plants were multi-stemmed (4–9 stems/plant) and multi-aged, indicating continuous sprout production between fires. All stems were killed by these 1990 fires and at most sites > 90 % of the stems were burned to ground level. All diameter stems were susceptible to such incineration as, at most sites, there was no difference in average diameter of stems burned to ground level and those left standing. Individual genets usually had all ramets incinerated to ground level or all ramets charred, but intact, suggesting certain micro-sites burned hotter, whereas other sites were somewhat protected. Although not true of the 1990 fires, there was evidence that occasionallyWiddring-tonia stems may survive fire. At one site, four of the 16 plants sampled had a burned stem twice as old as the oldest burned stem on the other 12 plants at the site, suggesting some stems had survived the previous fire (ca. 1970) and this conclusion was supported by fire-scars on these four stems that dated to ca. 1970. Based on the highly significant correlation between stem diameter and cone density left standing after the 1990 fires, we calculated that for most sites > 80 % of the initial cone crop was incinerated by fire. This is important because we observed a strong relationship between size of the canopy cone crop surviving fire and post-fire seedling recruitment. Under these conditions we hypothesize that sprouting confers a selective advantage to genets when fires cause heavy losses of seed. The infrequent occurrence of sprouting in theCupressaceae suggests the hypothesis that resprouting is an apomorphic or derived trait

  8. Diagenesis of conifer needles in a coastal marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, John I.; Weliky, K.

    1989-10-01

    (C/V) of the deepest sedimentary fir/hemlock needles to 20% of the original value and almost tripled the carbon-normalized yield of total vanillyl plus cinnamyl phenols (Λ). The net result of these compositional variations was to make the lignin component of the buried conifer needles resemble lignin in gymnosperm wood, thereby leading to underestimates of needle input and mass.

  9. Assessing Conifer Ray Parenchyma for Ecological Studies: Pitfalls and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Georg; Arzac, Alberto; Olano, José M; Fonti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    provided the least accurate PERPAR estimates. This evaluation of ray parenchyma in conifers and the presented guidelines regarding data accuracy as a function of measured wood surface and number of samples represent an important methodological reference for ray quantification, which will ultimately improve the understanding of the fundamental role of ray parenchyma tissue for the performance and survival of trees growing in stressed environments.

  10. Nitrogen mineralization in aspen/conifer soils after a natural fire

    Treesearch

    Michael C. Amacher; Dale L. Bartos; Tracy Christopherson; Amber D. Johnson; Debra E. Kutterer

    2001-01-01

    We measured the effects of the 1996 Pole Creek fire, Fishlake National Forest, Utah, on available soil N and net N mineralization for three summers after the fire using an ion exchange membrane (IEM) soil core incubation method. Fire in mixed aspen/conifer increased the amount of available NH4, and a subsequent net increase in soil nitrification was observed. Release...

  11. Characteristics of snags containing excavated cavities in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2004-01-01

    Snags provide an important resource for a rich assemblage of cavity-nesting birds in the southwestern United States. To expand our knowledge of snag use by cavity-nesting birds in this region, we documented characteristics of snags with and without excavated cavities in mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) forest in north...

  12. Effect of ozone exposure on seasonal gas exchange of five western conifers

    Treesearch

    Nancy E. Grulke; Paul R. Miller; Theodor D. Leininger

    1998-01-01

    Five species of western conifers (Pinus ponderosa, Abies concolor, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Abies lasiocarpa, and Picea engelmannii) were exposed, in two standard open-top exposure chambers per treatment, to charcoal-filtered air and a simulated diurnal ozone exposure profile (120 d sum of 136 ppm-h) to test their relative...

  13. Aboveground and belowground mammalian herbivores regulate the demography of deciduous woody species in conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Bryan A. Endress; Bridgett J. Naylor; Burak K. Pekin; Michael J. Wisdom

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian herbivory can have profound impacts on plant population and community dynamics. However, our understanding of specific herbivore effects remains limited, even in regions with high densities of domestic and wild herbivores, such as the semiarid conifer forests of western North America. We conducted a seven-year manipulative experiment to evaluate the effects...

  14. A New Model for Scaling from Leaf Lifespan to Conifer Forest Structure and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, C. P.; Beerling, D. J.

    2002-12-01

    Generic relationships between the lifespan, physiology and biochemistry of leaves have recently been quantified for the first time in contrasting biomes and functional groups. These relationships have important consequences for ecosystem biogeochemical cycles, and therefore offer the potential for simulating large-scale forest properties on the basis of leaf lifespan. We have used the scaling mechanisms involved to develop the University of Sheffield Conifer Model (USCM), a tool for simulating conifer carbon, nitrogen, and water fluxes using data on leaf lifespan, climate and soils as inputs. Simulations of net primary production and partitioning, leaf area index, evapotranspiration, nitrogen uptake and land surface energy partitioning show close agreement with observations from sites across a wide climatic gradient. This indicates the generic utility of our model for modern forests, and adequate representation of the key processes involved in forest function. The new development of a technique for estimating leaf lifespan from the anatomical properties of fossil woods provides a secure basis for extrapolating model simulations to conifer forests of the geological past. Future simulations with our model will therefore examine conifer forest feedbacks on paleoclimate during warm intervals in the Mesozoic and early Tertiary.

  15. The enigma of effective path length for (18) O enrichment in leaf water of conifers.

    PubMed

    Roden, John; Kahmen, Ansgar; Buchmann, Nina; Siegwolf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The Péclet correction is often used to predict leaf evaporative enrichment and requires an estimate of effective path length (L). Studies to estimate L in conifer needles have produced unexpected patterns based on Péclet theory and leaf anatomy. We exposed seedlings of six conifer species to different vapour pressure deficits (VPD) in controlled climate chambers to produce steady-state leaf water enrichment (in (18) O). We measured leaf gas exchange, stable oxygen isotopic composition (δ(18) O) of input and plant waters as well as leaf anatomical characteristics. Variation in bulk needle water δ(18) O was strongly related to VPD. Conifer needles had large amounts of water within the vascular strand that was potentially unenriched (up to 40%). Both standard Craig-Gordon and Péclet models failed to accurately predict conifer leaf water δ(18) O without taking into consideration the unenriched water in the vascular strand and variable L. Although L was linearly related to mesophyll thickness, large within-species variation prevented the development of generalizations that could allow a broader use of the Péclet effect in predictive models. Our results point to the importance of within needle water pools and isolating mechanisms that need further investigation in order to integrate Péclet corrections with 'two compartment' leaf water concepts.

  16. Effect of Sugar Maple Root Exudate on Seedlings of Northern Conifer Species

    Treesearch

    Carl H. Tubbs

    1976-01-01

    It has been shows that a root exudate of sugar maple reduces the growth of yellow birch. A laboratory test indicated that the growth of northern conifers is also reduced in sugar maple root exudate. Allelopathy may play an important role in survival of species on sites where sugar maple is abundant.

  17. Above- and below-ground effects of aspen clonal regeneration and succession to conifers

    Treesearch

    Wayne D. Shepperd; Dale L. Bartos; Stephen A. Mata

    2001-01-01

    Above- and below-ground characteristics were measured and compared for six sets of paired trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones on the Fishlake National Forest in central Utah. Three self-regenerating clones were compared with three non-regenerating clones and three pure aspen stands were compared with three mixed aspen-conifer stands. Regenerating clones...

  18. Cold in the common garden: comparative low-temperature tolerance of boreal and temperate conifer foliage

    Treesearch

    G. Richard Strimbeck; Trygve D. Kjellsen; Paul G. Schaberg; Paula F. Murakami

    2007-01-01

    Because they maintain green foliage throughout the winter season, evergreen conifers may face special physiological challenges in a warming world. We assessed the midwinter low-temperature (LT) tolerance of foliage from eight temperate and boreal species in each of the genera Abies, Picea, and Pinus growing in an arboretum in...

  19. Soil fertility affects elemental distribution in needles of the conifer Araucaria angustifolia: A microanalytical study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Araucaria angustifolia is a conifer species found in South American subtropical forests that comprises less than 3% of the native vegetation. Thus, little is known concerning the accumulation of nutritional elements in its needles. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energ...

  20. Long-term effects of fire severity on oak–conifer dynamics in the southern Cascades

    Treesearch

    Matthew I. Cocking; J. Morgan Varner; Eric E. Knapp

    2014-01-01

    We studied vegetation composition and structure in a mixed conifer–oak ecosystem across a range of fire severity 10 years following wildfire. Sample plots centered on focal California black oaks (Quercus kelloggii) were established to evaluate oak and neighboring tree and shrub recovery across a gradient of fire severity in the southern Cascade...

  1. A structurally based analytic model of growth and biomass dynamics in single species stands of conifers

    Treesearch

    Robin J. Tausch

    2015-01-01

    A theoretically based analytic model of plant growth in single species conifer communities based on the species fully occupying a site and fully using the site resources is introduced. Model derivations result in a single equation simultaneously describes changes over both, different site conditions (or resources available), and over time for each variable for each...

  2. Conifer seedling survival under closed-canopy and manzanita patches in the Sierra Nevada

    Treesearch

    A. Plamboeck; M. North; T. Dawson

    2008-01-01

    After a century of fire suppression, prescribed fire and mechanical thinning are widely used to restore mixed-conifer forests in California’s Sierra Nevada, yet after these treatments, trees sometimes fail to regenerate on many sites, for several possible reasons. Notably, competition between shrubs and tree seedlings for scarce water during prolonged summer dry...

  3. Compatible management of red alder-conifer ecosystems in southeastern Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Mark S. Wipfli; Robert L. Deal; Paul E. Hennon; Adelaide C. Johnson; Richard T. Edwards; Toni L. De Santo; Takashi Gomi; Ewa H. Orlikowska; Mason D. Bryant; Mark E. Schultz; Christian LeSage; Ryan Kimbirauskus; David V. D' Amore

    2003-01-01

    Forest clearcutting has been the primary timber management practice in forests of southeastern Alaska since commercial timber harvesting began in the 1950s, and the dense, even-aged conifer stands that subsequently developed have broad and undesirable consequences for some nontimber resources-most notably, fish and wildlife. Because a few earlier reports suggested that...

  4. Stand conditions associated with tree regeneration in sierran mixed-conifer forests.

    Treesearch

    Andrew N. Gray; Harold S.J. Zald; Ruth A. Kern; Malcolm. North

    2005-01-01

    Fire suppression has significantly increased canopy cover, litter depth, and stem density in many western forests, altering microsite conditions that affect tree seedling establishment. We conducted studies in a mixed-conifer forest in the Sierra Nevada, California, to determine relationships between established understory trees and microsite quality, and to examine...

  5. Nomenclature of nearctic conifer-feeding choristoneura (Lepidoptera: tortricidae): historical review and present status.

    Treesearch

    Jerry A. Powell

    1980-01-01

    There have been 18 species-group names proposed for Nearctic conifer-feeding moths in the genus Choristoneura. Of these, houstonana (Grote) and its synonym, retana (Walsingham), apply to Cupressaceae-feeding populations now assigned to Cudonigera Obraztsov & Powell. The remaining...

  6. Accuracy and suitability of selected sampling methods within conifer dominated riparian zones

    Treesearch

    Theresa Marquardt; Hailemariam Temesgen; Paul D. Anderson

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen sampling alternatives were examined for their performance to quantify selected attributes of overstory conifers in riparian areas of western Oregon. Each alternative was examined at eight headwater forest locations based on 0.52 ha square stem maps. The alternatives were evaluated for selected stand attributes (tree per hectare, basal area per hectare, and...

  7. Fine Root Dynamics and Forest Production Across a Calcium Gradient in Northern Hardwood and Conifer Ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Byung Bae Park; Ruth D. Yanai; Timothy J. Fahey; Scott W. Bailey; Thomas G. Siccama; James B. Shanley; Natalie L. Cleavitt

    2008-01-01

    Losses of soil base cations due to acid rain have been implicated in declines of red spruce and sugar maple in the northeastern USA. We studied fine root and aboveground biomass and production in five northern hardwood and three conifer stands differing in soil Ca status at Sleepers River, VT; Hubbard Brook, NH; and Cone Pond, NH. Neither aboveground biomass and...

  8. An experimental burn to restore a moth-killed boreal conifer forest, Krasnoyarsk Region, Russia

    Treesearch

    E.N. Valendik; J.C. Brissette; Ye. K. Kisilyakhov; R.J. Lasko; S.V. Verkhovets; S.T. Eubanks; I.V. Kosov; A. Yu. Lantukh

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical treatment and prescribed fire were used to restore a mixed conifer stand (Picea-Abies-Pinus) following mortality from an outbreak of Siberian moth (Dendrolimus superans sibiricus). Moth-killed stands often become dominated by Calamagrostis, a sod-forming grass. The large amount of woody debris and the sod hinder coniferous seedling establishment and...

  9. Vegetation recovery in slash-pile scars following conifer removal in a grassland-restoration experiment

    Treesearch

    Charles B. Halpern; Joseph A. Antos; Liam M. Beckman

    2014-01-01

    A principal challenge to restoring tree-invaded grasslands is the removal of woody biomass. Burning of slash piles to reduce woody residues from forest restoration practices generates intense, prolonged heating, with adverse effects on soils and vegetation. In this study, we examined vegetation responses to pile burning following tree removal from conifer-invaded...

  10. Impact of conifer forest litter on microwave emission at L-band

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study reports on the utilization of microwave modeling, together with ground truth and L-bank (1.4 GHz) brightness temperatures to investigate the characteristics of conifer forest floor. The microwave data were acquired over natural Virginia pine forest in Maryland by ComRAD, a ground-based mi...

  11. Influence of elevation and site productivity on conifer distributions across Alaskan temperate rainforests

    Treesearch

    John P. Caouette; Ashley E. Steel; Paul E. Hennon; Pat G. Cunningham; Cathy A. Pohl; Barbara A. Schrader

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of landscape factors on the distribution and life stage stability of coastal tree species near the northern limit of their ranges. Using data from 1465 forest inventory plots, we estimated probability of occurrence and basal area of six common conifer species across three broad latitudinal regions of coastal Alaska. By also comparing...

  12. A fuel treatment reduces fire severity and increases suppression efficiency in a mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Jason J. Moghaddas; Larry Craggs

    2007-01-01

    Fuel treatments are being implemented on public and private lands across the western United States. Although scientists and managers have an understanding of how fuel treatments can modify potential fire behaviour under modelled conditions, there is limited information on how treatments perform under real wildfire conditions in Sierran mixed conifer forests. The Bell...

  13. Physical characteristics of shrub and conifer fuels for fire behavior models

    Treesearch

    Jonathan R. Gallacher; Thomas H. Fletcher; Victoria Lansinger; Sydney Hansen; Taylor Ellsworth; David R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties and dimensions of foliage are necessary inputs for some fire spread models. Currently, almost no data exist on these plant characteristics to fill this need. In this report, we measured the physical properties and dimensions of the foliage from 10 live shrub and conifer fuels throughout a 1-year period. We developed models to predict relative...

  14. A remotely sensed pigment index reveals photosynthetic phenology in evergreen conifers

    Treesearch

    John A. Gamon; K. Fred Huemmrich; Christopher Y. S. Wong; Ingo Ensminger; Steven Garrity; David Y. Hollinger; Asko Noormets; Josep Peñuelas

    2016-01-01

    In evergreen conifers, where the foliage amount changes little with season, accurate detection of the underlying “photosynthetic phenology” from satellite remote sensing has been difficult, presenting challenges for global models of ecosystem carbon uptake. Here, we report a close correspondence between seasonally changing foliar pigment levels, expressed as...

  15. Sensitive species of snakes, frogs, and salamanders in southern California conifer forest areas: status and management

    Treesearch

    Glenn R. Stewart; Mark R. Jennings; Robert H. Jr. Goodman

    2005-01-01

    At least 35 species of amphibians and reptiles occur regularly in the conifer forest areas of southern California. Twelve of them have some or all of their populations identified as experiencing some degree of threat. Among the snakes, frogs, and salamanders that we believe need particular attention are the southern rubber boa (Charina bottae umbratica...

  16. Photo series for quantifying forest residues in the: sierra mixed conifer type, sierra true fir type.

    Treesearch

    W.G. Maxwell; F.R. Ward

    1979-01-01

    Five series of photographs display different forest residue loading levels, by size classes, for areas of like timber type (Sierra mixed conifer and Sierra true fir) and cutting objective. Information with each photo includes measured weights, volumes and other residue data, information about the timber stand and harvest actions, and assessment of fire behavior and...

  17. Modeling snag dynamics in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2007-01-01

    Snags (standing dead trees) are important components of forested habitats that contribute to ecological decay and recycling processes as well as providing habitat for many life forms. As such, snags are of special interest to land managers, but information on dynamics of snag populations is lacking. We modeled trends in snag populations in mixed-conifer and ponderosa...

  18. Germination, survival and early growth of conifer seedlings in two habitat types.

    Treesearch

    Don. Minore

    1986-01-01

    Conifer seeds were sown in clearcut Abies amabilis/Achlys triphylla and Abies amabilis/Vaccinium membranaceum/Xerophyllum tenax habitat types in the McKenzie River basin in Oregon to determine ratios of seeds to established seedlings. Protection from animal...

  19. Diagnosis of Annosus Root Disease in Mixed Conifer Forests in the Northwestern United States

    Treesearch

    Craig L. Schmitt

    1989-01-01

    Recognizing annosus root disease affecting conifers in northwestern United States forests is discussed. Field diagnosis can bemade by observing characteristic stand patterns, wood stain and decay, ectotrophic mycelium, and sporophores. Most seriously affected trees include hemlocks, grand fir, white fir and Pacific silver fir. Ponderosa pine and other true firs may...

  20. Resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred North American conifers

    Treesearch

    Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Elaine K. Sutherland; Kevin T. Smith; Donald A. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic resin ducts form in xylem and phloem tissue of conifers in response to abiotic wounding, fungal invasion, and insect attack. Little is known about resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred trees. The aim of this study is to quantify changes in traits of both axial and radial resin ducts, along with those of associated epithelial cells and...

  1. Structure, specificity, and evolution of insect guilds related to cones of conifers in Western Europe

    Treesearch

    Alain Roques

    1991-01-01

    Patchy and ephemeral resources, such as the cones of conifers, can be very useful in the study of plant-insect relationships. Studies of such relationships in forest entomology are typically complicated by the spatial and temporal characteristics of the host plants, which occur over vast areas and have lifespans of decades or even centuries. The reproductive structures...

  2. Response of conifer-encroached shrublands in the Great Basin to prescribed fire and mechanical treatments

    Treesearch

    Richard F. Miller; Jaime Ratchford; Bruce A. Roundy; Robin J. Tausch; April Hulet; Jeanne Chambers

    2014-01-01

    In response to the recent expansion of pinon and juniper woodlands into sagebrush-steppe communities in the northern Great Basin region, numerous conifer-removal projects have been implemented, primarily to release understory vegetation at sites having a wide range of environmental conditions. Responses to these treatments have varied from successful restoration of...

  3. Understanding patterns and regulatory pathways in conifer ontogeny: the role of the Penobscot Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Michael E. Day; Michael S. Greenwood; Katherine Spencer; Stephanie L. Adams

    2014-01-01

    Multi-cohort stands maintained by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service on the Penobscot Experimental Forest (PEF) have played a central role in research into the mechanisms that regulate ontogenetic trends in forest conifers as they control effects due to population, climatic, and edaphic factors. These long-term silvicultural studies have permitted...

  4. Microsite controls on tree seedling establishment in conifer forest canopy gaps

    Treesearch

    Andrew N. Gray; Thomas A. Spies

    1997-01-01

    Tree seedling establishment and growth were studied in experimental canopy gaps to assess the effect of heterogeneity of regeneration microsites within and among gaps in mature conifer forests. Seedlings were studied for two years in closed-canopy areas and in recently created gaps ranging in size from 40 to 2000 m2 in four stands of mature (90-...

  5. Seasonal variation in surface fuel moisture between unthinned and thinned mixed conifer forest, northern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Becky L. Estes; Eric E. Knapp; Carl N. Skinner; Fabian C. C. Uzoh

    2012-01-01

    Reducing stand density is often used as a tool for mitigating the risk of high-intensity crown fires. However, concern has been expressed that opening stands might lead to greater drying of surface fuels, contributing to increased fire risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether woody fuel moisture differed between unthinned and thinned mixed-conifer...

  6. Regeneration in mixed conifer and Douglas-fir shelterwood cuttings in the Cascade Range of Washington.

    Treesearch

    K.W. Seidel

    1983-01-01

    A survey of shelterwood cuttings in mixed conifer and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests in the Cascade Range in Washington showed that, on the average, shelterwood units were adequately-stocked with a mixture of advance, natural postharvest, and planted reproduction of a number of species. Shelterwood cuttings in the...

  7. Mixed-conifer forests of central Oregon: Effects of logging and fire exclusion vary with environment

    Treesearch

    Andrew G. Merschel; Thomas A. Spies; Emily K. Heyerdahl

    2014-01-01

    Twentieth-century land management has altered the structure and composition of mixed-conifer forests and decreased their resilience to fire, drought, and insects in many parts of the Interior West. These forests occur across a wide range of environmental settings and historical disturbance regimes, so their response to land management is likely to vary across...

  8. Prescribing Control in Mixed Conifer Stands Affected by Annosus Root Disease

    Treesearch

    Gary Petersen

    1989-01-01

    Tree mortality caused by root diseases constitutes a major drain on Forest productivity of mixed-conifer stands. Factors such as changes in species composition, selective harvesting, unfavorable economic climate, and optimizing of short-term benefits have contributed to current stand conditions. Computer simulation models, such as the "RRMOD Computerized Root...

  9. Height development of shade-tolerant conifer saplings in multiaged Acadian forest stands

    Treesearch

    Andrew R. Moores; Robert S. Seymour; Laura S. Kenefic

    2007-01-01

    Understory growth dynamics of northern conifer species were studied in four stands managed under multiaged silvicultural systems in eastern Maine. Height growth of Picea rubens Sarg., Abies balsamea (L.) Mill., and Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr. saplings between 0.5 and 6.0 m in height was related to the proportion...

  10. Canopy damage to conifer plantations within a large mixed-severity wildfire varies with stand age

    Treesearch

    Jonathan R. Thompson; Thomas A. Spies; Keith A. Olsen

    2011-01-01

    The 2002 Biscuit Fire burned at mixed-severities encompassing over 200,000 ha of publicly owned forestland, including more than 8300 ha of conifer plantations. We used pre- and post-fire digital aerial photography to examine how the level of canopy damage varied within these plantations in relation to topography, weather, vegetation-cover, and management history, with...

  11. Animal damage to conifers on national forests in the Pacific Northwest region.

    Treesearch

    Glenn L. Crouch

    1969-01-01

    Animal damage to conifers is a timely topic in the Pacific Northwest. Foresters in this Region are increasingly concerned and perplexed by damage caused by animals to natural and planted seedlings and larger growing stock. Nearly every animal inhabiting for st land is believed to injure seedlings and small trees to some degree. Mice girdle small trees, and bears girdle...

  12. Postfire survival and flushing in three Sierra Nevada conifers with high initial crown scorch

    Treesearch

    C. Hanson; M. North

    2009-01-01

    With growing debate over the impacts of post-fire salvage logging in conifer forests of the western USA, managers need accurate assessments of tree survival when significant proportions of the crown have been scorched. The accuracy of fire severity measurements will be affected if trees that initially appear to be fire-killed prove to be viable after longer observation...

  13. Truffle abundance in riparian and upland mixed-conifer forest of California's southern Sierra Nevada

    Treesearch

    Marc D. Meyer; Malcolm P. North

    2005-01-01

    We compared the abundance, diversity, and composition of truffles in riparian and upland areas within a mixed-conifer forest of the Sierra Nevada of California. We sampled for truffles in a single watershed over two seasons (spring and summer) and 4 years to determine whether truffles were more abundant and diverse in riparian than upland sites in old-growth, mixed-...

  14. Air pollution impacts in the mixed conifer forests of southern California

    Treesearch

    Patrick J. Temple; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Mark E. Fenn; Mark A. Poth

    2005-01-01

    Air pollution, principally in the form of photochemical ozone and deposition of nitrogen compounds, has significantly affected mixed conifer forests in the mountains of southern California. Foliar injury, premature needle abscission, crown thinning, and reduced growth and vigor have been well documented, particularly for ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa...

  15. Allozyme differentiation of intersterility groups of Heterobasidion annosum isolated from conifers in the western United States

    Treesearch

    W.J. Otrosina; T.E. Chase; F.W. Cobb

    1992-01-01

    Allozyme analysis was conducted on 64 isolates from basidiocarps of Heterobasidion annosum. The isolates belonged to the "S" and "P" intersterility groups and were collected from five conifer species found in the western United States. Ten allozyme loci distributed among eight enzyme systems were examined. Intersterility groups differed at nine...

  16. Density of large snags and logs in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Benjamin J. Bird; L. Scott Baggett; Jeffrey S. Jenness

    2015-01-01

    Large snags and logs provide important biological legacies and resources for native wildlife, yet data on populations of large snags and logs and factors influencing those populations are sparse. We monitored populations of large snags and logs in mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in northern Arizona from 1997 through 2012. We modeled density...

  17. Specific and sensitive detection of the conifer pathogen Gremmeniella abietina by nested PCR

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing-Yin; Hansson, Per; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2005-01-01

    Background Gremmeniella abietina (Lagerb.) Morelet is an ascomycete fungus that causes stem canker and shoot dieback in many conifer species. The fungus is widespread and causes severe damage to forest plantations in Europe, North America and Asia. To facilitate early diagnosis and improve measures to control the spread of the disease, rapid, specific and sensitive detection methods for G. abietina in conifer hosts are needed. Results We designed two pairs of specific primers for G. abietina based on the 18S rDNA sequence variation pattern. These primers were validated against a wide range of fungi and 14 potential conifer hosts. Based on these specific primers, two nested PCR systems were developed. The first system employed universal fungal primers to enrich the fungal DNA targets in the first round, followed by a second round selective amplification of the pathogen. The other system employed G. abietina-specific primers in both PCR steps. Both approaches can detect the presence of G. abietina in composite samples with high sensitivity, as little as 7.5 fg G. abietina DNA in the host genomic background. Conclusion The methods described here are rapid and can be applied directly to a wide range of conifer species, without the need for fungal isolation and cultivation. Therefore, it represents a promising alternative to disease inspection in forest nurseries, plantations and quarantine control facilities. PMID:16280082

  18. Quantifying the abundance of co-occurring conifers along Inland Northwest (USA) climate gradients

    Treesearch

    Gerald E. Rehfeldt; Dennis E. Ferguson; Nicholas L. Crookston

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence and abundance of conifers along climate gradients in the Inland Northwest (USA) was assessed using data from 5082 field plots, 81% of which were forested. Analyses using the Random Forests classification tree revealed that the sequential distribution of species along an altitudinal gradient could be predicted with reasonable accuracy from a single...

  19. A Mixed-Effects Heterogeneous Negative Binomial Model for Postfire Conifer Regeneration in Northeastern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Justin S. Crotteau; Martin W. Ritchie; J. Morgan. Varner

    2014-01-01

    Many western USA fire regimes are typified by mixed-severity fire, which compounds the variability inherent to natural regeneration densities in associated forests. Tree regeneration data are often discrete and nonnegative; accordingly, we fit a series of Poisson and negative binomial variation models to conifer seedling counts across four distinct burn severities and...

  20. Regeneration in mixed conifer shelterwood cuttings in the Cascade Range of eastern Oregon.

    Treesearch

    K.W. Seidel

    1979-01-01

    A survey of shelterwood cuttings in mixed conifer forests in the eastern Oregon Cascade Range showed that, on the average, shelterwood units were well stocked with a mixture of advance, natural subsequent, and planted reproduction of a number of species. Because of slow invasion by understory vegetation, frequent heavy seed crops, and adequate density of the overstory...

  1. Semiochemical sabotage: behavioral chemicals for protection of western conifers from bark beetles

    Treesearch

    Nancy. E. Gillette; A. Steve Munson

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and elucidation of volatile behavioral chemicals used by bark beetles to locate hosts and mates has revealed a rich potential for humans to sabotage beetle host-finding and reproduction. Here, we present a description of currently available semiochemical methods for use in monitoring and controlling bark beetle pests in western conifer forests. Delivery...

  2. Influence of light and soil moisture on Sierran mixed-conifer understory communities.

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Brian Oakley; Rob Fiegener; Andrew Gray; Michael. Barbour

    2005-01-01

    Sierra Nevada forests have high understory species richness yet we do not know which site factors influence herb and shrub distribution or abundance. We examined the understory of an old-growth mixed-conifer Sierran forest and its distribution in relation to microsite conditions. The forest has high species richness (98 species sampled), most of which are herbs with...

  3. Soil nitrogen mineralization in a clearcutting chronosequence in a northern California conifer forest

    Treesearch

    D. W. Frazier; J. G. McColl; R. F. Powers

    1990-01-01

    Soil ammonification, nitrification, and N mobility were studied for 1 yr in three Sierra Nevada (USA) mixed-conifer stands to examine the long-term influence of timber harvesting on soil N dynamics. Clearcutting had a persistent effect on soil N mineralization, detectable by in situ incubation but not by conventional low-tension lysimetry. Mineralization rates were...

  4. Terrain and vegetation structural influences on local avian species richness in two mixed-conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Jody C. Vogeler; Andrew T. Hudak; Lee A. Vierling; Jeffrey Evans; Patricia Green; Kerri T. Vierling

    2014-01-01

    Using remotely-sensed metrics to identify regions containing high animal diversity and/or specific animal species or guilds can help prioritize forest management and conservation objectives across actively managed landscapes. We predicted avian species richness in two mixed conifer forests, Moscow Mountain and Slate Creek, containing different management contexts and...

  5. Towner State Nursery weed control program for field-grown conifer nursery stock

    Treesearch

    Roy LaFramboise

    2002-01-01

    The Towner State Nursery is owned and operated by the North Dakota Forest Service. The nursery is 160 acres in size and is located in north-central North Dakota. The Towner Nursery specializes in the production of conifer seedlings, transplants, and greenhouse-grown container stock for conservation tree plantings. Transplants constitute 80% of the stock produced. The...

  6. Effectiveness of fungicides in protecting conifers and rhododendrons from Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Gary A. Chastagner; Annie DeBauw; Kathy Riley; Norm Dart

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of 19 fungicides in protecting noble fir, grand fir, and Rhododendron x ?Nova Zembla? foliage from P. ramorum was tested. The tops of conifer seedlings with newly emerging shoots and mature rhododendron leaves were collected from treated plants 7 days after drench applications or 1 day after foliar applications....

  7. Silviculture of southwestern mixed conifers and aspen: the status of our knowledge

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones

    1974-01-01

    Describes the status of our knowledge about mixed conifer silviculture in the interior Southwest. Ecological background is reviewed first, followed by description of silvicultural methods. Relevant literature is discussed, along with observations, experience, and results of unpublished research. Contains unpublished input by subject-matter specialists and southwestern...

  8. Shelterwood cutting in a young-growth, mixed-conifer stand in north central California

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald

    1976-01-01

    A two-stage shelterwood cutting, at 12 trees per acre, with site preparation, enhanced seedfall, regeneration, and residual growth at the Challenge Experimental Forest, north central California. Shelterwood trees produced 9.2 times more seed than trees in the control. Ponderosa pine regeneration numbered about 3700 seedlings per acre (9139 per ha) and tolerant conifers...

  9. Soil respiration response to prescribed burning and thinning in mixed-conifer and hardwood forests

    Treesearch

    Amy Concilio; Siyan Ma; Qinglin Li; James LeMoine; Jiquan Chen; Malcolm North; Daryl Moorhead; Randy Jensen

    2005-01-01

    The effects of management on soil carbon efflux in different ecosystems are still largely unknown yet crucial to both our understanding and management of global carbon flux. To compare the effects of common forest management practices on soil carbon cycling, we measured soil respiration rate (SRR) in a mixed-conifer and hardwood forest that had undergone various...

  10. Postfire seed rain of black spruce, a semiserotinous conifer, in forests of interior Alaska

    Treesearch

    Jill Johnstone; Leslie Boby; Emily Tissier; Michelle Mack; Dave Verbyla; Xanthe. Walker

    2009-01-01

    The availability of viable seed can act as an important constraint on plant regeneration following disturbance. This study presents data on seed quantity and quality for black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), a semiserotinous conifer that dominates large areas of North American boreal forest. We sampled seed rain and viability for 2 years...

  11. Cacodylic acid for precommercial thinning in mixed-conifer stands shows erratic results.

    Treesearch

    William W. Oliver

    1970-01-01

    In a small-scale test, a silvicide consisting of cacodylic acid was injected during the growing season at dosages recommended by the manufacturer. The treatment did not thin adequately two of three mixed-conifer stands. Ponderosa pine and lower crown classes seemed more susceptible to the silvicide than Douglas-fir and upper crown classes. No flashback was recognized....

  12. Coarse woody debris assay in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2010-01-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) provides important ecosystem services in forests and affects fire behavior, yet information on amounts and types of CWD typically is limited. To provide such information, we sampled logs and stumps in mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in north-central Arizona. Spatial variability was prominent for all CWD parameters....

  13. Lessons learned in historical mapping of conifer and oak in the North Coast

    Treesearch

    Melissa V. Eitzel; Maggi Kelly; Lenya N. Quinn-Davidson

    2015-01-01

    Conifer encroachment into oak woodlands is becoming a pressing concern for oak conservation, particularly in California's north coast. We use Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) with historical aerial imagery from 1948 and recent high-spatial-resolution images from 2009 to explore the potential for mapping encroachment using remote sensing. We find that pre-...

  14. Accuracy of a high-resolution lidar terrain model under a conifer forest canopy

    Treesearch

    S.E. Reutebuch; R.J. McGaughey; H.-E. Andersen; W.W. Carson

    2003-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning systems can provide terrain elevation data for open areas with a vertical accuracy of 15 cm. In this study, a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) was produced from high-density lidar data. Vegetation in the 500-ha mountainous study area varied from bare ground to dense 70-year-old conifer forest. Conventional ground survey methods were...

  15. Reality check: Shedding new light on the restoration needs of mixed-conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Marie Oliver; Thomas Spies; Andrew. Merschel

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, scientific understanding of the history and ecology of the Pacific Northwest's mixed-conifer forests east of the Cascade Range was minimal. As a result, forest managers have had limited ability to restore the health of publicly owned forests that show signs of acute stress caused by insects, disease, grazing, logging, and wildfire. A...

  16. Geographic variation in mixed-conifer forest fire regimes in California

    Treesearch

    Beaty R. Matthew; Taylor Alan H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent research from California on geographic variability in mixed conifer(MC) forest fire regimes. MC forests are typically described as having experienced primarilyfrequent, low to moderate severity burns prior to fire suppression that created a mosaic ofvegetation patches with variable structure. Research...

  17. The sage-grouse habitat mortgage: effective conifer management in space and time

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of conservation-reliant species can be complicated by the need to manage ecosystem processes that operate at extended temporal horizons. One such process is the role of fire in regulating abundance of expanding conifers that disrupt sage-grouse habitat in the northern Great Basin of the ...

  18. Long-term demographic trends in a fire-suppressed mixed-conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Carrie R. Levine; Flora Krivak-Tetley; Natalie S. van Doorn; Jolie-Anne S. Ansley; John J. Battles

    2016-01-01

    In the western United States, forests are experiencing novel environmental conditions related to a changing climate and a suppression of the historical fire regime. Mixed-conifer forests, considered resilient to disturbance due to their heterogeneity in structure and composition, appear to be shifting to a more homogeneous state, but the timescale of these shifts is...

  19. Forest restoration and fuels reduction in ponderosa pine and dry mixed conifer in the Southwest

    Treesearch

    Marlin Johnson

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Most people agree that ponderosa pine and dry mixed conifer stands need to be thinned and burned to move the stands to within a normal range of variability. Unfortunately, people are in disagreement beyond that point. To some, restoration and fuels reduction means restoring stands to more open, pre-European (pre-1880) conditions...

  20. Establishment and growth of native hardwood and conifer seedlings underplanted in thinned Douglas-fir stands.

    Treesearch

    Kathleen G. Maas-Hebner; William H. Emmingham; David L. Larson; Samuel S. Chan

    2005-01-01

    Five conifers and two hardwoods native to the Pacific Northwest were planted under four overstory densities of 30-year-old plantations of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Oregon Coast Range, USA. Stand treatments were unthinned (547 trees ha-1), narrow thin (252 trees ha-1),...

  1. In situ gene conservation of six conifers in western Washington and Oregon.

    Treesearch

    S.R. Lipow; K. Vance-Borland; J.B. St. Clair; J.A. Henderson; C. McCain

    2007-01-01

    A gap analysis was conducted to evaluate the extent to which genetic resources are conserved in situ in protected areas for six species of conifers in the Pacific Northwest. The gap analysis involved producing a geographic information system (GIS) detailing the location of protected areas and the distribution and abundance of tree species, as inferred from data on...

  2. Comparing algorithms for estimating foliar biomass of conifers in the Pacific Northwest

    Treesearch

    Crystal L. Raymond; Donald. McKenzie

    2013-01-01

    Accurate estimates of foliar biomass (FB) are important for quantifying carbon storage in forest ecosystems, but FB is not always reported in regional or national inventories. Foliar biomass also drives key ecological processes in ecosystem models. Published algorithms for estimating FB in conifer species of the Pacific Northwest can yield signifi cantly different...

  3. An Improved Protocol for Intact Chloroplasts and cpDNA Isolation in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Rogalski, Marcelo; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Performing chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) isolation is considered a major challenge among different plant groups, especially conifers. Isolating chloroplasts in conifers by such conventional methods as sucrose gradient and high salt has not been successful. So far, plastid genome sequencing protocols for conifer species have been based mainly on long-range PCR, which is known to be time-consuming and difficult to implement. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a protocol for cpDNA isolation using three different conifer families: Araucaria angustifolia and Araucaria bidwilli (Araucariaceae), Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) and Pinus patula (Pinaceae). The present protocol is based on high salt isolation buffer followed by saline Percoll gradient. Combining these two strategies allowed enhanced chloroplast isolation, along with decreased contamination caused by polysaccharides, polyphenols, proteins, and nuclear DNA in cpDNA. Microscopy images confirmed the presence of intact chloroplasts in high abundance. This method was applied to cpDNA isolation and subsequent sequencing by Illumina MiSeq (2×250 bp), using only 50 ng of cpDNA. Reference-guided chloroplast genome mapping showed that high average coverage was achieved for all evaluated species: 24.63 for A. angustifolia, 135.97 for A. bidwilli, 1196.10 for P. lambertii, and 64.68 for P. patula. Conclusion Results show that this improved protocol is suitable for enhanced quality and yield of chloroplasts and cpDNA isolation from conifers, providing a useful tool for studies that require isolated chloroplasts and/or whole cpDNA sequences. PMID:24392157

  4. Protocol: A high-throughput DNA extraction system suitable for conifers

    PubMed Central

    Bashalkhanov, Stanislav; Rajora, Om P

    2008-01-01

    Background High throughput DNA isolation from plants is a major bottleneck for most studies requiring large sample sizes. A variety of protocols have been developed for DNA isolation from plants. However, many species, including conifers, have high contents of secondary metabolites that interfere with the extraction process or the subsequent analysis steps. Here, we describe a procedure for high-throughput DNA isolation from conifers. Results We have developed a high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for conifers using an automated liquid handler and modifying the Qiagen MagAttract Plant Kit protocol. The modifications involve change to the buffer system and improving the protocol so that it almost doubles the number of samples processed per kit, which significantly reduces the overall costs. We describe two versions of the protocol: one for medium-throughput (MTP) and another for high-throughput (HTP) DNA isolation. The HTP version works from start to end in the industry-standard 96-well format, while the MTP version provides higher DNA yields per sample processed. We have successfully used the protocol for DNA extraction and genotyping of thousands of individuals of several spruce and a pine species. Conclusion A high-throughput system for DNA extraction from conifer needles and seeds has been developed and validated. The quality of the isolated DNA was comparable with that obtained from two commonly used methods: the silica-spin column and the classic CTAB protocol. Our protocol provides a fully automatable and cost effective solution for processing large numbers of conifer samples. PMID:18673554

  5. Seedlings of temperate rainforest conifer and angiosperm trees differ in leaf area display

    PubMed Central

    Lusk, Christopher H.; Pérez-Millaqueo, Manuel M.; Saldaña, Alfredo; Burns, Bruce R.; Laughlin, Daniel C.; Falster, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The contemporary relegation of conifers mainly to cold or infertile sites has been ascribed to low competitive ability, as a result of the hydraulic inefficiency of tracheids and their seedlings' initial dependence on small foliage areas. Here it is hypothesized that, in temperate rainforests, the larger leaves of angiosperms also reduce self-shading and thus enable display of larger effective foliage areas than the numerous small leaves of conifers. Methods This hypothesis was tested using 3-D modelling of plant architecture and structural equation modelling to compare self-shading and light interception potential of seedlings of six conifers and 12 angiosperm trees from temperate rainforests. The ratio of displayed leaf area to plant mass (LARd) was used to indicate plant light interception potential: LARd is the product of specific leaf area, leaf mass fraction, self-shading and leaf angle. Results Angiosperm seedlings self-shaded less than conifers, mainly because of differences in leaf number (more than leaf size), and on average their LARd was about twice that of conifers. Although specific leaf area was the most pervasive influence on LARd, differences in self-shading also significantly influenced LARd of large seedlings. Conclusions The ability to deploy foliage in relatively few, large leaves is advantageous in minimizing self-shading and enhancing seedling light interception potential per unit of plant biomass. This study adds significantly to evidence that vegetative traits may be at least as important as reproductive innovations in explaining the success of angiosperms in productive environments where vegetation is structured by light competition. PMID:22585929

  6. Targeted isolation, sequence assembly and characterization of two white spruce (Picea glauca) BAC clones for terpenoid synthase and cytochrome P450 genes involved in conifer defence reveal insights into a conifer genome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Conifers are a large group of gymnosperm trees which are separated from the angiosperms by more than 300 million years of independent evolution. Conifer genomes are extremely large and contain considerable amounts of repetitive DNA. Currently, conifer sequence resources exist predominantly as expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and full-length (FL)cDNAs. There is no genome sequence available for a conifer or any other gymnosperm. Conifer defence-related genes often group into large families with closely related members. The goals of this study are to assess the feasibility of targeted isolation and sequence assembly of conifer BAC clones containing specific genes from two large gene families, and to characterize large segments of genomic DNA sequence for the first time from a conifer. Results We used a PCR-based approach to identify BAC clones for two target genes, a terpene synthase (3-carene synthase; 3CAR) and a cytochrome P450 (CYP720B4) from a non-arrayed genomic BAC library of white spruce (Picea glauca). Shotgun genomic fragments isolated from the BAC clones were sequenced to a depth of 15.6- and 16.0-fold coverage, respectively. Assembly and manual curation yielded sequence scaffolds of 172 kbp (3CAR) and 94 kbp (CYP720B4) long. Inspection of the genomic sequences revealed the intron-exon structures, the putative promoter regions and putative cis-regulatory elements of these genes. Sequences related to transposable elements (TEs), high complexity repeats and simple repeats were prevalent and comprised approximately 40% of the sequenced genomic DNA. An in silico simulation of the effect of sequencing depth on the quality of the sequence assembly provides direction for future efforts of conifer genome sequencing. Conclusion We report the first targeted cloning, sequencing, assembly, and annotation of large segments of genomic DNA from a conifer. We demonstrate that genomic BAC clones for individual members of multi-member gene families can be isolated

  7. Targeted isolation, sequence assembly and characterization of two white spruce (Picea glauca) BAC clones for terpenoid synthase and cytochrome P450 genes involved in conifer defence reveal insights into a conifer genome.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, Björn; Hall, Dawn; Yuen, Mack; Oddy, Claire; Hamberger, Britta; Keeling, Christopher I; Ritland, Carol; Ritland, Kermit; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2009-08-06

    Conifers are a large group of gymnosperm trees which are separated from the angiosperms by more than 300 million years of independent evolution. Conifer genomes are extremely large and contain considerable amounts of repetitive DNA. Currently, conifer sequence resources exist predominantly as expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and full-length (FL)cDNAs. There is no genome sequence available for a conifer or any other gymnosperm. Conifer defence-related genes often group into large families with closely related members. The goals of this study are to assess the feasibility of targeted isolation and sequence assembly of conifer BAC clones containing specific genes from two large gene families, and to characterize large segments of genomic DNA sequence for the first time from a conifer. We used a PCR-based approach to identify BAC clones for two target genes, a terpene synthase (3-carene synthase; 3CAR) and a cytochrome P450 (CYP720B4) from a non-arrayed genomic BAC library of white spruce (Picea glauca). Shotgun genomic fragments isolated from the BAC clones were sequenced to a depth of 15.6- and 16.0-fold coverage, respectively. Assembly and manual curation yielded sequence scaffolds of 172 kbp (3CAR) and 94 kbp (CYP720B4) long. Inspection of the genomic sequences revealed the intron-exon structures, the putative promoter regions and putative cis-regulatory elements of these genes. Sequences related to transposable elements (TEs), high complexity repeats and simple repeats were prevalent and comprised approximately 40% of the sequenced genomic DNA. An in silico simulation of the effect of sequencing depth on the quality of the sequence assembly provides direction for future efforts of conifer genome sequencing. We report the first targeted cloning, sequencing, assembly, and annotation of large segments of genomic DNA from a conifer. We demonstrate that genomic BAC clones for individual members of multi-member gene families can be isolated in a gene-specific fashion. The

  8. IDENTIFICATION AND EMISSION FACTORS OF MOLECULAR TRACERS IN ORGANIC AEROSOLS FROM BIOMASS BURNING PART 1. TEMPERATE CLIMATE CONIFERS. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Smoke particulate matter from conifers subjected to controlled burning, both under smoldering and flaming conditions, was sampled by high volume air filtration on precleaned quartz fiber filters. The filtered particles were extracted with dichloromethane and the crude extracts...

  9. Management options for mitigating Nitrogen (N) losses from N-saturated mixed-conifer forests in California

    Treesearch

    Benjamin S. Gimeno; Fengming Yuan; Mark E. Fenn; Thomas Meixner

    2009-01-01

    Mixed-conifer forests of southern California are exposed to nitrogen (N) deposition levels that impair carbon (C) and N cycling, enhance forest flammability, increase the risk of fire occurrence and air pollution emissions in fire, and increase nitrate...

  10. IDENTIFICATION AND EMISSION FACTORS OF MOLECULAR TRACERS IN ORGANIC AEROSOLS FROM BIOMASS BURNING PART 1. TEMPERATE CLIMATE CONIFERS. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Smoke particulate matter from conifers subjected to controlled burning, both under smoldering and flaming conditions, was sampled by high volume air filtration on precleaned quartz fiber filters. The filtered particles were extracted with dichloromethane and the crude extracts...

  11. Leaf wax composition and carbon isotopes vary among major conifer groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Leslie, Andrew B.; Wing, Scott L.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf waxes (e.g. n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids) and their carbon isotopes (δ13C) are commonly used to track past changes in the carbon cycle, water availability, and plant ecophysiology. Previous studies indicated that conifers have lower n-alkane concentrations than angiosperms and that 13C fractionation during n-alkane synthesis (εn-alkane) is smaller than in angiosperms. These prior studies, however, sampled a limited phylogenetic and geographic subset of conifers, leaving out many important subtropical and Southern Hemisphere groups that were once widespread and common components of fossil assemblages. To expand on previous work, we collected 43 conifer species (and Ginkgo biloba) from the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley, sampling all extant conifer families and almost two-thirds of extant genera. We find that Pinaceae, including many North American species used in previous studies, have very low or no n-alkanes. However, other conifer groups have significant concentrations of n-alkanes, especially Southern Hemisphere Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae (monkey puzzles, Norfolk Island pines, and yellowwoods), and many species of Cupressaceae (junipers and relatives). Within the Cupressaceae, we find total n-alkane concentrations are high in subfamilies Cupressoideae and Callitroideae, but significantly lower in the early diverging taxodioid lineages (including bald cypress and redwood). Individual n-alkane chain lengths have a weak phylogenetic signal, except for n-C29 alkane, but when combined using average chain length (ACL), a strong phylogenetic signal emerges. The strong phylogenetic signal in ACL, observed in the context of a common growth environment for all plants we sampled, suggests that ACL is strongly influenced by factors other than climate. An analysis of εn-alkane indicates a strong phylogenetic signal in which the smallest biosynthetic fractionation occurs in Pinaceae and the largest in Taxaceae (yews and relatives). The

  12. Hydraulic safety margins and embolism reversal in stems and leaves: why are conifers and angiosperms so different?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Daniel M; McCulloh, Katherine A; Woodruff, David R; Meinzer, Frederick C

    2012-10-01

    Angiosperm and coniferous tree species utilize a continuum of hydraulic strategies. Hydraulic safety margins (defined as differences between naturally occurring xylem pressures and pressures that would cause hydraulic dysfunction, or differences between pressures resulting in loss of hydraulic function in adjacent organs (e.g., stems vs. leaves) tend to be much greater in conifers than angiosperms and serve to prevent stem embolism. However, conifers tend to experience embolism more frequently in leaves and roots than angiosperms. Embolism repair is thought to occur by active transport of sugars into empty conduits followed by passive water movement. The most likely source of sugar for refilling is from nonstructural carbohydrate depolymerization in nearby parenchyma cells. Compared to angiosperms, conifers tend to have little parenchyma or nonstructural carbohydrates in their wood. The ability to rapidly repair embolisms may rely on having nearby parenchyma cells, which could explain the need for greater safety margins in conifer wood as compared to angiosperms. The frequent embolisms that occur in the distal portions of conifers are readily repaired, perhaps due to the abundant parenchyma in leaves and roots, and these distal tissues may act as hydraulic circuit breakers that prevent tension-induced embolisms in the attached stems. Frequent embolisms in conifer leaves may also be due to weaker stomatal response to changes in ambient humidity. Although there is a continuum of hydraulic strategies among woody plants, there appear to be two distinct 'behaviors' at the extremes: (1) embolism prevention and (2) embolism occurrence and subsequent repair.

  13. A remotely sensed pigment index reveals photosynthetic phenology in evergreen conifers.

    PubMed

    Gamon, John A; Huemmrich, K Fred; Wong, Christopher Y S; Ensminger, Ingo; Garrity, Steven; Hollinger, David Y; Noormets, Asko; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-11-15

    In evergreen conifers, where the foliage amount changes little with season, accurate detection of the underlying "photosynthetic phenology" from satellite remote sensing has been difficult, presenting challenges for global models of ecosystem carbon uptake. Here, we report a close correspondence between seasonally changing foliar pigment levels, expressed as chlorophyll/carotenoid ratios, and evergreen photosynthetic activity, leading to a "chlorophyll/carotenoid index" (CCI) that tracks evergreen photosynthesis at multiple spatial scales. When calculated from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite sensor, the CCI closely follows the seasonal patterns of daily gross primary productivity of evergreen conifer stands measured by eddy covariance. This discovery provides a way of monitoring evergreen photosynthetic activity from optical remote sensing, and indicates an important regulatory role for carotenoid pigments in evergreen photosynthesis. Improved methods of monitoring photosynthesis from space can improve our understanding of the global carbon budget in a warming world of changing vegetation phenology.

  14. Anti-insect secondary metabolites from fungal endophytes of conifer trees.

    PubMed

    Sumarah, Mark W; Miller, J David

    2009-11-01

    Choristoneura fumiferana is the most economically-important insect pest in eastern North America. Historically, strategies to control epidemics have relied on chemical pesticides that are no longer approved for use. The presence of fungal endophytes in cool area grass species and their role in reducing the impact of herbivorous insects is well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that foliar endophytes of conifers also produce anti-insect toxins. Field and nursery studies testing trees infected with the rugulosin producing endophyte Phialocephala scopiformis reduced the growth and development of C. fumiferana. The study of foliar endophytes from a variety of conifers including: Picea mariana, P. rubens and P. glauca as well as Abies balsamea and Larix laricina for the discovery of other anti-insect toxins are discussed. These endophytes are horizontally transmitted thus they are not present in nursery seedlings. Inoculating seedlings with toxigenic endophyte strains has been demonstrated to be effective in providing the tree with tolerance to herbivorous insects.

  15. A comparative field study of growth and survival of Sierran conifer seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    This study is a comparison of seedling growth and survival of seven species of conifers that make up the mid-elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest--Abies concolor, Abies magnifica, Calocedrus decurrens, Pinus jeffreyi, Pinus lambertiana, Pinus ponderosa, and Sequoiadendron giganteum. The field experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that seedling demography is affected by the study species` relatively shade and drought tolerances. Six discrete treatments were created in the first experiment by using three elevations (1,600 m, 1,900, m, and 2,200 m) and two natural light levels (closed canopy shade and open gap sun) at each elevation. One or two-year old seedlings were planted in the ground in replicate plots in each treatment and followed for two growing seasons. Four responses were analyzed--survival, height growth, diameter growth, and mass growth (total mass as well as root mass and shoot mass separately).

  16. Seed plant phylogeny: gnetophytes are derived conifers and a sister group to Pinaceae.

    PubMed

    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Xia, Junnan; Drouin, Guy

    2006-07-01

    The phylogenetic position of gnetophytes has long been controversial. We sequenced parts of the genes coding for the largest subunit of nuclear RNA polymerase I, II, and III and combined these sequences with those of four chloroplast genes, two mitochondrial genes, and 18S rRNA genes to address this issue. Both maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony analyses of the sites not affected by high substitution levels strongly support a phylogeny where gymnosperms and angiosperms are monophyletic, where cycads are at the base of gymnosperm tree and are followed by ginkgos, and where gnetophytes are grouped within conifers as the sister group of pines. The evolution of several morphological and molecular characters of gnetophytes and conifers will therefore need to be reinterpreted.

  17. A remotely sensed pigment index reveals photosynthetic phenology in evergreen conifers

    PubMed Central

    Huemmrich, K. Fred; Ensminger, Ingo; Garrity, Steven; Noormets, Asko; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In evergreen conifers, where the foliage amount changes little with season, accurate detection of the underlying “photosynthetic phenology” from satellite remote sensing has been difficult, presenting challenges for global models of ecosystem carbon uptake. Here, we report a close correspondence between seasonally changing foliar pigment levels, expressed as chlorophyll/carotenoid ratios, and evergreen photosynthetic activity, leading to a “chlorophyll/carotenoid index” (CCI) that tracks evergreen photosynthesis at multiple spatial scales. When calculated from NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite sensor, the CCI closely follows the seasonal patterns of daily gross primary productivity of evergreen conifer stands measured by eddy covariance. This discovery provides a way of monitoring evergreen photosynthetic activity from optical remote sensing, and indicates an important regulatory role for carotenoid pigments in evergreen photosynthesis. Improved methods of monitoring photosynthesis from space can improve our understanding of the global carbon budget in a warming world of changing vegetation phenology. PMID:27803333

  18. Nutrient leaching from conifer needles in relation to foliar apoplast cation-exchange capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.P.; van Broekhuizen, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Limited evidence to date suggests that acidic precipitation promotes leaching of nutrient cations from conifer foliage. In order to evaluate the relative contribution of the apoplast cation exchange complex and symplast nutrient pools to the leached ions, the magnitude of potential foliar leaching in response to acidic precipitation was compared to foliar apoplast cation exchange capacity (CEC) for two conifer tree species (Pseudotsuga menziesii and Picea engelmanii). Leaching increased with decreasing pH and increasing time of immersion. At pH 2.1 and 3.1, equivalents of H+ depleted from the acidic solutions approximated equivalent of cations gained by the solutions. Maximum amounts leached were less than 40 micro equiv/g dry weight of needles for all ions combined. Measured foliar apoplast CEC for these species was approximately 120 micro equiv/g dry weight of needles. These relative magnitudes indicated that the apoplast provided the leached ions.

  19. Canopy structure of tropical and sub-tropical rain forests in relation to conifer dominance analysed with a portable LIDAR system.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Shin-ichiro; Akutsu, Kosuke; Onoda, Yusuke

    2013-12-01

    Globally, conifer dominance is restricted to nutient-poor habitats in colder, drier or waterlogged environments, probably due to competition with angiosperms. Analysis of canopy structure is important for understanding the mechanism of plant coexistence in relation to competition for light. Most conifers are shade intolerant, and often have narrow, deep, conical crowns. In this study it is predicted that conifer-admixed forests have less distinct upper canopies and more undulating canopy surfaces than angiosperm-dominated forests. By using a ground-based, portable light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system, canopy structure was quantified for old-growth evergreen rainforests with varying dominance of conifers along altitudinal gradients (200-3100 m a.s.l.) on tropical and sub-tropical mountains (Mount Kinabalu, Malaysian Borneo and Yakushima Island, Japan) that have different conifer floras. Conifers dominated at higher elevations on both mountains (Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae on Kinabalu and Cupressaceae and Pinaceae on Yakushima), but conifer dominance also varied with soil/substrate conditions on Kinabalu. Conifer dominance was associated with the existence of large-diameter conifers. Forests with higher conifer dominance showed a canopy height profile (CHP) more skewed towards the understorey on both Kinabalu and Yakushima. In contrast, angiosperm-dominated forests had a CHP skewed towards upper canopy, except for lowland dipterocarp forests and a sub-alpine scrub dominated by small-leaved Leptospermum recurvum (Myrtaceae) on Kinabalu. Forests with a less dense upper canopy had more undulating outer canopy surfaces. Mixed conifer-angiosperm forests on Yakushima and dipterocarp forests on Kinabalu showed similar canopy structures. The results generally supported the prediction, suggesting that lower growth of angiosperm trees (except L. recurvum on Kinabalu) in cold and nutrient-poor environments results in a sparser upper canopy, which allows shade

  20. A Water Budget Approach to Study the Hydrologic Response of Mountain Meadow Restoration Following Conifer Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Oosbree, G. F.; Surfleet, C. G.; Jasbinsek, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain meadows are important ecological habitats that have degraded in quality and distribution due to fire suppression and poor land use practices in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Conifer encroachment in mountain meadows has accelerated and is one of the reasons for the decline of meadow habitat. To date there are few studies which quantify the hydrologic response of meadow restoration due to vegetation or conifer removal. This study is using a before after control intervention (BACI) study design to determine the hydrologic response of restoration to a historic meadow encroached by conifers (study meadow). A water budget approach has been developed to quantify the hydrology of the control and study meadow before and after restoration. Measurements of groundwater depth and soil moisture are currently being taken on the control and study meadows. A total of 14 Odyssey water level capacitance instruments were installed to a 1.5 meter depth and 14 soil moisture instruments were installed to a 30 cm depth using a spatially balanced random sampling approach. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) was used to determine soil moisture and depth to groundwater across forest-meadow ecotones present on the meadows. Additionally, ERI was used to extrapolate point measurements of groundwater depth and soil moisture across the study and control areas. The weekly water budget indicates differences between the control meadow and study meadow in the first year prior to conifer removal. The ERI indicated differences in sub surface geology, soil moisture, and groundwater depth both between the control and study meadows and along the forest-meadow ecotones. ERI was demonstrated to improve the spatial extrapolation of soil moisture and groundwater point measurements.

  1. The heterogeneous levels of linkage disequilibrium in white spruce genes and comparative analysis with other conifers

    PubMed Central

    Pavy, N; Namroud, M-C; Gagnon, F; Isabel, N; Bousquet, J

    2012-01-01

    In plants, knowledge about linkage disequilibrium (LD) is relevant for the design of efficient single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays in relation to their use in population and association genomics studies. Previous studies of conifer genes have shown LD to decay rapidly within gene limits, but exceptions have been reported. To evaluate the extent of heterogeneity of LD among conifer genes and its potential causes, we examined LD in 105 genes of white spruce (Picea glauca) by sequencing a panel of 48 haploid megagametophytes from natural populations and further compared it with LD in other conifer species. The average pairwise r2 value was 0.19 (s.d.=0.19), and LD dropped quickly with a half-decay being reached at a distance of 65 nucleotides between sites. However, LD was significantly heterogeneous among genes. A first group of 29 genes had stronger LD (mean r2=0.28), and a second group of 38 genes had weaker LD (mean r2=0.12). While a strong relationship was found with the recombination rate, there was no obvious relationship between LD and functional classification. The level of nucleotide diversity, which was highly heterogeneous across genes, was also not significantly correlated with LD. A search for selection signatures highlighted significant deviations from the standard neutral model, which could be mostly attributed to recent demographic changes. Little evidence was seen for hitchhiking and clear relationships with LD. When compared among conifer species, on average, levels of LD were similar in genes from white spruce, Norway spruce and Scots pine, whereas loblolly pine and Douglas fir genes exhibited a significantly higher LD. PMID:21897435

  2. The heterogeneous levels of linkage disequilibrium in white spruce genes and comparative analysis with other conifers.

    PubMed

    Pavy, N; Namroud, M-C; Gagnon, F; Isabel, N; Bousquet, J

    2012-03-01

    In plants, knowledge about linkage disequilibrium (LD) is relevant for the design of efficient single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays in relation to their use in population and association genomics studies. Previous studies of conifer genes have shown LD to decay rapidly within gene limits, but exceptions have been reported. To evaluate the extent of heterogeneity of LD among conifer genes and its potential causes, we examined LD in 105 genes of white spruce (Picea glauca) by sequencing a panel of 48 haploid megagametophytes from natural populations and further compared it with LD in other conifer species. The average pairwise r(2) value was 0.19 (s.d.=0.19), and LD dropped quickly with a half-decay being reached at a distance of 65 nucleotides between sites. However, LD was significantly heterogeneous among genes. A first group of 29 genes had stronger LD (mean r(2)=0.28), and a second group of 38 genes had weaker LD (mean r(2)=0.12). While a strong relationship was found with the recombination rate, there was no obvious relationship between LD and functional classification. The level of nucleotide diversity, which was highly heterogeneous across genes, was also not significantly correlated with LD. A search for selection signatures highlighted significant deviations from the standard neutral model, which could be mostly attributed to recent demographic changes. Little evidence was seen for hitchhiking and clear relationships with LD. When compared among conifer species, on average, levels of LD were similar in genes from white spruce, Norway spruce and Scots pine, whereas loblolly pine and Douglas fir genes exhibited a significantly higher LD.

  3. Influence of fire and El Niño on tree recruitment by Sierran mixed conifer

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Matthew Hurteau; Robert Fiegener; Michael Barbour

    2005-01-01

    The influence of fire and climate events on age structure of different species was examined in old-growth mixed conifer in the southern Sierra Nevada. Within a 48-ha stem-mapped sample area, after a mechanical thinning, all stumps were examined for fire scars and 526 stumps were cut to ground level and aged. Before 1865, which was the last widespread fire event, the...

  4. Fine root dynamics and forest production across a calcium gradient in northern hardwood and conifer ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, B.B.; Yanai, R.D.; Fahey, T.J.; Bailey, S.W.; Siccama, T.G.; Shanley, J.B.; Cleavitt, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Losses of soil base cations due to acid rain have been implicated in declines of red spruce and sugar maple in the northeastern USA. We studied fine root and aboveground biomass and production in five northern hardwood and three conifer stands differing in soil Ca status at Sleepers River, VT; Hubbard Brook, NH; and Cone Pond, NH. Neither aboveground biomass and production nor belowground biomass were related to soil Ca or Ca:Al ratios across this gradient. Hardwood stands had 37% higher aboveground biomass (P = 0.03) and 44% higher leaf litter production (P < 0.01) than the conifer stands, on average. Fine root biomass (<2 mm in diameter) in the upper 35 cm of the soil, including the forest floor, was very similar in hardwoods and conifers (5.92 and 5.93 Mg ha-1). The turnover coefficient (TC) of fine roots smaller than 1 mm ranged from 0.62 to 1.86 y-1 and increased significantly with soil exchangeable Ca (P = 0.03). As a result, calculated fine root production was clearly higher in sites with higher soil Ca (P = 0.02). Fine root production (biomass times turnover) ranged from 1.2 to 3.7 Mg ha-1 y-1 for hardwood stands and from 0.9 to 2.3 Mg ha-1 y -1 for conifer stands. The relationship we observed between soil Ca availability and root production suggests that cation depletion might lead to reduced carbon allocation to roots in these ecosystems. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Agroforestry: Conifers. (Latest citations from the Cab Abstracts database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of lands forested with conifers for crop and livestock production. Citations cover the grazing of livestock and the production of crops, including tomatoes, soybeans, lespedeza, wheat, rape, taro, cotton, cabbages, ginger, watermelons, and strawberries. Livestock discussed include cattle, sheep, geese, and horses. Economic analyses and economic models are presented. (Contains a minimum of 147 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. CalPro: a spreadsheet program for the management of California mixed-conifer stands.

    Treesearch

    Jingjing Liang; Joseph Buongiorno; Robert A. Monserud

    2004-01-01

    CalPro is an add-in program developed to work with Microsoft Excel to simulate the growth and management of uneven-aged mixed-conifer stands in California. Its built-in growth model was calibrated from 177 uneven-aged plots on industry and other private lands. Stands are described by the number of trees per acre in each of nineteen 2-inch diameter classes in...

  7. Prevalence of allergic sensitization to conifer pollen in a high cypress exposure area

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Ortega, Javier; López-Matas, María Ángeles; Alonso, María Dolores; Feliú, Angélica; Ruiz-Hornillos, Javier; González, Emma; Moya, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sensitization to Pinales (Cupressaceae and Pinaceae) has increased dramatically in recent years. The prevalence of sensitization in different geographic areas is related to exposure to specific pollens. Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of allergy to different conifer pollens, describe the characteristics of patients with such allergy, and identify the involved allergens. Methods: Patients were recruited at five hospitals near Madrid. Extracts from conifer pollen were prepared and used in skin-prick testing. Wheal sizes were recorded, and serum samples obtained from patients with positive reactions to Cupressus arizonica and/or Pinus pinea. The specific immunoglobulin E value to C. arizonica and Cup a 1 was determined. Individual immunoblots for each patient and with a pool of sera were performed. Allergenic proteins were sequenced by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Of 499 individuals included in the study, 17 (14%) had positive skin-prick test results to some conifer pollen extracts. Sixty-four patients had positive results to C. arizonica (prevalence 12.8%) and 11 had positive results to P. pinea (2.2%). All the patients had respiratory symptoms (61.4% during the C. arizonica pollination period), and 62.9% had asthma. Approximately 86% of the patients had positive specific immunoglobulin E results to C. arizonica and 92.3% had positive results to Cup a 1. Fourteen different bands were recognized by immunoblot; the most frequent bands were those detected at 43, 18, 16, and 14 kDa. All sequenced proteins corresponded to Cup a 1. Conclusion: Allergy to conifer pollen could be considered a relevant cause of respiratory allergy in central Spain. Asthma was more frequent than in other studies. We only identified Cup a 1 as involved in sensitization.

  8. Drought effects on conifers in the Pacific Northwest, 1958-59.

    Treesearch

    T.W. Childs

    1960-01-01

    The summer of 1958 was unusuaIly hot in most of Oregon and Washington, and that of 1959 was unusually dry except in western Washington. Killing of young conifers, similar to that in northern Idaho, was common in a few localities in northwestern Washington by the end of the 1958 growing season, but did not continue in 1959 and was not seen elsewhere. Various other...

  9. Introduction to the special issue on Sierran mixed-conifer research

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Jiquan Chen

    2005-01-01

    Like much of the western United States, California’s forest has been severely altered by a century of fire suppression. The Sierra Nevada’s largest forest type, mixed conifer, which is primary habitat for more vertebrate species than any other Californian forest community, historically burned every 12–17 years. In 1894, John Muir wrote "The inviting openness of...

  10. Tracheid diameter is the key trait determining the extent of freezing-induced embolism in conifers.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Sperry, John

    2003-09-01

    We tested the hypotheses that freezing-induced embolism is related to conduit diameter, and that conifers and angiosperms with conduits of equivalent diameter will exhibit similar losses of hydraulic conductivity in response to freezing. We surveyed the freeze-thaw response of conifers with a broad range of tracheid diameters by subjecting wood segments (root, stem and trunk wood) to a freeze-thaw cycle at -0.5 MPa in a centrifuge. Embolism increased as mean tracheid diameter exceeded 30 microm. Tracheids with a critical diameter greater than 43 microm were calculated to embolize in response to freezing and thawing at a xylem pressure of -0.5 MPa. To confirm that freezing-induced embolism is a function of conduit air content, we air-saturated stems of Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt. (mean conduit diameter 13.7 +/- 0.7 microm) by pressurizing them 1 to 60 times above atmospheric pressure, prior to freezing and thawing. The air saturation method simulated the effect of increased tracheid size because the degree of super-saturation is proportional to a tracheid volume holding an equivalent amount of dissolved air at ambient pressure. Embolism increased when the dissolved air content was equivalent to a mean tracheid diameter of 30 microm at ambient air pressure. Our centrifuge and air-saturation data show that conifers are as vulnerable to freeze-thaw embolism as angiosperms with equal conduit diameter. We suggest that the hydraulic conductivity of conifer wood is maximized by increasing tracheid diameters in locations where freezing is rare. Conversely, the narrowing of tracheid diameters protects against freezing-induced embolism in cold climates.

  11. Conifer tissue culture and how it may impact the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, D.C.; Einspahr, D.W.

    1983-11-01

    This is a report on the state-of-the-art of tissue culture of conifers. Developments in organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis are looked at. This technology is expected to help the pulp and paper industry in achieving its goal of maximum productivity in two principal ways: (a) by providing rapid and efficient in vitro propagation methods for elite trees, and (b) by providing a technology for producing desired hybrids via somatic cell genetics and hybridization.

  12. Mesophyll conductance and leaf carbon isotope composition of two high elevation conifers along an altitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Beverly, D.; Cook, C.; Ewers, B.; Williams, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon isotope ratio values (δ13C) of conifer leaf material generally increases with elevation, potentially reflecting decreases in the leaf internal to ambient CO2 concentration ratio (Ci/Ca) during photosynthesis. Reduced stomatal conductance or increased carboxylation capacity with increasing elevation could account for these patterns. But some studies reported conifers δ13C increased with altitude consistently, but Ci/Ca did not significantly decrease and leaf nitrogen content remained constant with increasing of altitude in Central Rockies. Variation in leaf mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion, which influences leaf δ13C independently of effects related to stomatal conductance and carboxylation demand, might reconcile these conflicting observations. Leaf mass per unit area (LMA) increases with altitude and often correlates with δ13C and mesophyll conductance. Therefore, we hypothesized that increases in δ13C of conifers with altitude are controlled mainly by changes in mesophyll conductance. To test this hypothesis, leaf δ13C, photosynthetic capacity, leaf nitrogen content, LMA, and mesophyll conductance were determined on leaves of two dominant conifers (Pinus contorta and Picea engelmannii) along a 90-km transect in SE Wyoming at altitudes ranging from 2400 to 3200 m above sea level. Mesophyll conductance was determined by on-line 13C discrimination using isotope laser spectroscopy. We expected to observe relatively small differences in stomatal conductance and decreases in mesophyll conductance from lower and higher altitude sites. Such a pattern would have important implications for how differences in leaf δ13C values across altitude are interpreted in relation to forest water use and productivity from scaling of leaf-level water-use efficiency.

  13. The impact of catchment conifer plantation forestry on the hydrochemistry of peatland lakes.

    PubMed

    Drinan, T J; Graham, C T; O'Halloran, J; Harrison, S S C

    2013-01-15

    The hydrochemistry of 26 small blanket bog lakes was examined to assess the impact of conifer plantation forestry on lake water chemistry. Lakes were selected from three distinct catchment land use categories: i) unplanted blanket bog only present in the catchment, ii) mature (closed-canopy) conifer plantation forests only present in the catchment and iii) catchments containing mature conifer plantation forests with recently clearfelled areas. All three catchment land uses were replicated across two geologies: sedimentary (sandstone) and igneous (granite). Lakes with afforested catchments across both geologies had elevated concentrations of phosphorus (P), nitrogen (N), total dissolved organic carbon (TDOC), aluminium (Al) and iron (Fe), with the highest concentrations of each parameter recorded from lakes with catchment clearfelling. Dissolved oxygen was also significantly reduced in the afforested lakes, particularly the clearfell lakes. Analysis of runoff from a nearby recently clearfelled site revealed high biological and chemical oxygen demands, consistent with at least part of the elevated concentrations of TDOC emanating from clearfelled sites having higher biochemical lability. Inorganic fertilisers applied at the start of the forest cycle, the decay of the underlying peat soil and accumulated surface tree litter, and leachate from felled trees are the likely sources of the elevated concentrations of plant nutrients, TDOC, heavy metals and major ions, with excessive peat soil disturbance during clearfelling likely exacerbating the runoff into lakes. Our study has demonstrated a clear, deleterious impact of conifer plantations on the water quality draining from blanket bog catchments, with major implications for the management of afforested peatlands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Conifer stored resources and resistance to a fungus associated with the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Eleanor C; Krokene, Paal

    2013-01-01

    Bark beetles and associated fungi are among the greatest natural threats to conifers worldwide. Conifers have potent defenses, but resistance to beetles and fungal pathogens may be reduced if tree stored resources are consumed by fungi rather than used for tree defense. Here, we assessed the relationship between tree stored resources and resistance to Ceratocystis polonica, a phytopathogenic fungus vectored by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. We measured phloem and sapwood nitrogen, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), and lipids before and after trees were attacked by I. typographus (vectoring C. polonica) or artificially inoculated with C. polonica alone. Tree resistance was assessed by measuring phloem lesions and the proportion of necrotic phloem around the tree's circumference following attack or inoculation. While initial resource concentrations were unrelated to tree resistance to C. polonica, over time, phloem NSC and sapwood lipids declined in the trees inoculated with C. polonica. Greater resource declines correlated with less resistant trees (trees with larger lesions or more necrotic phloem), suggesting that resource depletion may be caused by fungal consumption rather than tree resistance. Ips typographus may then benefit indirectly from reduced tree defenses caused by fungal resource uptake. Our research on tree stored resources represents a novel way of understanding bark beetle-fungal-conifer interactions.

  15. Electrodeposited Nanolaminated CoNiFe Cores for Ultracompact DC-DC Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Kim, M; Herrault, F; Park, JY; Allen, MG

    2015-09-01

    Laminated metallic alloy cores (i.e., alternating layers of thin film metallic alloy and insulating material) of appropriate lamination thickness enable suppression of eddy current losses at high frequencies. Magnetic cores comprised of many such laminations yield substantial overall magnetic volume, thereby enabling high-power operation. Previously, we reported nanolaminated permalloy (Ni-80 Fe-20) cores based on a sequential electrodeposition technique, demonstrating negligible eddy current losses at peak flux densities up to 0.5 T and operating at megahertz frequencies. This paper demonstrates improved performance of nanolaminated cores comprising tens to hundreds of layers of 300-500-nm-thick CoNiFe films that exhibit superior magnetic properties (e.g., higher saturation flux density and lower coercivity) than permalloy. Nanolaminated CoNiFe cores can be operated up to a peak flux density of 0.9 T, demonstrating improved power handling capacity and exhibiting 30% reduced volumetric core loss, attributed to lowered hysteresis losses compared to the nanolaminated permalloy core of the same geometry. Operating these cores in a buck dc-dc power converter at a switching frequency of 1 MHz, the nanolaminated CoNiFe cores achieved a conversion efficiency exceeding 90% at output power levels up to 7 W, compared to an achieved permalloy core conversion efficiency below 86% at 6 W.

  16. The photochemical reflectance index provides an optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation in evergreen conifers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher Y S; Gamon, John A

    2015-04-01

    In evergreens, the seasonal down-regulation and reactivation of photosynthesis is largely invisible and difficult to assess with remote sensing. This invisible phenology may be changing as a result of climate change. To better understand the mechanism and timing of these hidden physiological transitions, we explored several assays and optical indicators of spring photosynthetic activation in conifers exposed to a boreal climate. The photochemical reflectance index (PRI), chlorophyll fluorescence, and leaf pigments for evergreen conifer seedlings were monitored over 1 yr of a boreal climate with the addition of gas exchange during the spring. PRI, electron transport rate, pigment levels, light-use efficiency and photosynthesis all exhibited striking seasonal changes, with varying kinetics and strengths of correlation, which were used to evaluate the mechanisms and timing of spring activation. PRI and pigment pools were closely timed with photosynthetic reactivation measured by gas exchange. The PRI provided a clear optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation that was detectable at leaf and stand scales in conifers. We propose that PRI might provide a useful metric of effective growing season length amenable to remote sensing and could improve remote-sensing-driven models of carbon uptake in evergreen ecosystems.

  17. An Ancient Transkingdom Horizontal Transfer of Penelope-Like Retroelements from Arthropods to Conifers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuan; Faridi, Nurul; Casola, Claudio

    2016-05-02

    Comparative genomics analyses empowered by the wealth of sequenced genomes have revealed numerous instances of horizontal DNA transfers between distantly related species. In eukaryotes, repetitive DNA sequences known as transposable elements (TEs) are especially prone to move across species boundaries. Such horizontal transposon transfers, or HTTs, are relatively common within major eukaryotic kingdoms, including animals, plants, and fungi, while rarely occurring across these kingdoms. Here, we describe the first case of HTT from animals to plants, involving TEs known as Penelope-like elements, or PLEs, a group of retrotransposons closely related to eukaryotic telomerases. Using a combination of in situ hybridization on chromosomes, polymerase chain reaction experiments, and computational analyses we show that the predominant PLE lineage, EN(+)PLEs, is highly diversified in loblolly pine and other conifers, but appears to be absent in other gymnosperms. Phylogenetic analyses of both protein and DNA sequences reveal that conifers EN(+)PLEs, or Dryads, form a monophyletic group clustering within a clade of primarily arthropod elements. Additionally, no EN(+)PLEs were detected in 1,928 genome assemblies from 1,029 nonmetazoan and nonconifer genomes from 14 major eukaryotic lineages. These findings indicate that Dryads emerged following an ancient horizontal transfer of EN(+)PLEs from arthropods to a common ancestor of conifers approximately 340 Ma. This represents one of the oldest known interspecific transmissions of TEs, and the most conspicuous case of DNA transfer between animals and plants.

  18. Chloroplast genomes of two conifers lack a large inverted repeat and are extensively rearranged.

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, S H; Palmer, J D; Howe, G T; Doerksen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes of Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] and radiata (Monterey) pine [Pinus radiata D. Don], two conifers from the widespread Pinaceae, were mapped and their genomes were compared to other land plants. Douglas-fir and radiata pine lack the large (20-25 kilobases) inverted repeat that characterizes most land plants. To our knowledge, this is only the second recorded loss of this ancient and highly conserved inverted repeat among all lineages of land plants thus far examined. Loss of the repeat largely accounts for the small size of the conifer genome, 120 kilobase, versus 140-160 kilobases in most land plants. Douglas-fir possesses a major inversion of 40-50 kilobases relative to radiata pine and nonconiferous plants. Nucleotide sequence differentiation between Douglas-fir and radiata pine was estimated to be 3.8%. Both conifer genomes possess a number of rearrangements relative to Osmunda, a fern, Ginkgo, a gymnosperm, and Petunia, an angiosperm. Among land plants, structural changes of this degree have occurred primarily within tribes of the legume family (Fabaceae) that have also lost the inverted repeat. These results support the hypothesis that the presence of the large inverted repeat stabilizes the chloroplast genome against major structural rearrangements. PMID:2836862

  19. New Insights into the Mechanisms of Water-Stress-Induced Cavitation in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Cochard, Hervé; Hölttä, Teemu; Herbette, Stéphane; Delzon, Sylvain; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Cavitation resistance is a key parameter to understand tree drought tolerance but little is known about the mechanisms of air entry into xylem conduits. For conifers three mechanisms have been proposed: (1) a rupture of pit margo microfibrils, (2) a displacement of the pit torus from its normal sealing position over the pit aperture, and (3) a rupture of an air-water menisci in a pore of the pit margo. In this article, we report experimental results on three coniferous species suggesting additional mechanisms. First, when xylem segments were injected with a fluid at a pressure sufficient to aspirate pit tori and well above the pressure for cavitation induction we failed to detect the increase in sample conductance that should have been caused by torus displacement from blocking the pit aperture or by membrane rupture. Second, by injecting xylem samples with different surfactant solutions, we found a linear relation between sample vulnerability to cavitation and fluid surface tension. This suggests that cavitation in conifers could also be provoked by the capillary failure of an air-water meniscus in coherence with the prediction of Young-Laplace's equation. Within the bordered pit membrane, the exact position of this capillary seeding is unknown. The possible Achilles' heel could be the seal between tori and pit walls or holes in the torus. The mechanism of water-stress-induced cavitation in conifers could then be relatively similar to the one currently proposed for angiosperms. PMID:19641033

  20. Stomatal frequency adjustment of four conifer species to historical changes in atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Kouwenberg, Lenny L R; McElwain, Jennifer C; Kürschner, Wolfram M; Wagner, Friederike; Beerling, David J; Mayle, Francis E; Visscher, Henk

    2003-04-01

    The species-specific inverse relation between atmospheric CO(2) concentration and stomatal frequency for many woody angiosperm species is being used increasingly with fossil leaves to reconstruct past atmospheric CO(2) levels. To extend our limited knowledge of the responsiveness of conifer needles to CO(2) fluctuations, the stomatal frequency response of four native North American conifer species (Tsuga heterophylla, Picea glauca, Picea mariana, and Larix laricina) to a range of historical CO(2) mixing ratios (290 to 370 ppmV) was analyzed. Because of the specific mode of leaf development and the subsequent stomatal patterning in conifer needles, the stomatal index of these species was not affected by CO(2). In contrast, a new measure of stomatal frequency, based on the number of stomata per millimeter of needle length, decreased significantly with increasing CO(2). For Tsuga heterophylla, the stomatal frequency response to CO(2) changes in the last century is validated through assessment of the influence of other biological and environmental variables. Because of their sensitive response to CO(2), combined with a high preservation capacity, fossil needles of Tsuga heterophylla, Picea glauca, P. mariana, and Larix laricina have great potential for detecting and quantifying past atmospheric CO(2) fluctuations.

  1. An Ancient Transkingdom Horizontal Transfer of Penelope-Like Retroelements from Arthropods to Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xuan; Faridi, Nurul; Casola, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics analyses empowered by the wealth of sequenced genomes have revealed numerous instances of horizontal DNA transfers between distantly related species. In eukaryotes, repetitive DNA sequences known as transposable elements (TEs) are especially prone to move across species boundaries. Such horizontal transposon transfers, or HTTs, are relatively common within major eukaryotic kingdoms, including animals, plants, and fungi, while rarely occurring across these kingdoms. Here, we describe the first case of HTT from animals to plants, involving TEs known as Penelope-like elements, or PLEs, a group of retrotransposons closely related to eukaryotic telomerases. Using a combination of in situ hybridization on chromosomes, polymerase chain reaction experiments, and computational analyses we show that the predominant PLE lineage, EN(+)PLEs, is highly diversified in loblolly pine and other conifers, but appears to be absent in other gymnosperms. Phylogenetic analyses of both protein and DNA sequences reveal that conifers EN(+)PLEs, or Dryads, form a monophyletic group clustering within a clade of primarily arthropod elements. Additionally, no EN(+)PLEs were detected in 1,928 genome assemblies from 1,029 nonmetazoan and nonconifer genomes from 14 major eukaryotic lineages. These findings indicate that Dryads emerged following an ancient horizontal transfer of EN(+)PLEs from arthropods to a common ancestor of conifers approximately 340 Ma. This represents one of the oldest known interspecific transmissions of TEs, and the most conspicuous case of DNA transfer between animals and plants. PMID:27190138

  2. A comparative study of modern and fossil cone scales and seeds of conifers: A geochemical approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artur, Stankiewicz B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Kruge, M.A.; Van Bergen, P. F.; Sadowska, A.

    1997-01-01

    Modern cone scales and seeds of Pinus strobus and Sequoia sempervirens, and their fossil (Upper Miocene, c. 6 Mar) counterparts Pinus leitzii and Sequoia langsdorfi have been studied using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), electron-microprobe and scanning electron microscopy. Microscopic observations revealed only minor microbial activity and high-quality structural preservation of the fossil material. The pyrolysates of both modern genera showed the presence of ligno-cellulose characteristic of conifers. However, the abundance of (alkylated)phenols and 1,2-benzenediols in modern S. sempervirens suggests the presence of non-hydrolysable tannins or abundant polyphenolic moieties not previously reported in modern conifers. The marked differences between the pyrolysis products of both modern genera are suggested to be of chemosystematic significance. The fossil samples also contained ligno-cellulose which exhibited only partial degradation, primarily of the carbohydrate constituents. Comparison between the fossil cone scale and seed pyrolysates indicated that the ligno-cellulose complex present in the seeds is chemically more resistant than that in the cone scales. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the pyrolysis data allowed for the determination of the discriminant functions used to assess the extent of degradation and the chemosystematic differences between both genera and between cone scales and seeds. Elemental composition (C, O, S), obtained using electron-microprobe, corroborated the pyrolysis results. Overall, the combination of chemical, microscopic and statistical methods allowed for a detailed characterization and chemosystematic interpretations of modern and fossil conifer cone scales and seeds.

  3. Biogeography of Pleistocene conifer species from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Dane M.; Miller, Ian M.; Jackson, Stephen T.

    2014-11-01

    Pleistocene biogeography of conifer species is poorly known in much of western North America. We conducted morphological studies on 201 conifer cones and cone fragments recovered from Pleistocene sediments at the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site (2705 m) near Snowmass Village, Colorado. The basin, formed ~ 155-130 ka, contains fossil-bearing lacustrine, palustrine, and colluvial sediments spanning approximately 85 ka. Using a suite of morphological characters, particularly cone-scale bracts, we differentiated species of Abies, Picea, and Pseudotsuga. All fossil Abies specimens were assignable based on bract morphology to Abies concolor, which is currently absent from central Colorado (nearest populations are 160 km southwest of the site). A. concolor occurs only in sediments of MIS 5d and 5c. Pseudotsuga menziesii and Picea engelmannii cones occurred in sediments corresponding to MIS 5e, 5d, 5c, and 5a. A fourth conifer species, occurring in sediments of MIS 5e, 5d, 5c, and 5a, is difficult to assign to any extant species. Bract morphology is similar to Picea pungens, which grows near the site today, but scale morphology is unlike P. pungens. These fossils may represent ancestral P. pungens, an extinct variant, or an extinct sister species.

  4. Water sorption-desorption in conifer cuticles: The role of lignin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J.; Domínguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio

    2001-07-01

    Current information on the type and amount of biopolymers present in the epidermis of conifer species is still insufficient. This work presents the detailed morphology and chemical composition of Araucaria bidwillii cuticle after selective treatments to remove the different types of biopolymers. After removal of the waxes, cutin and polar hydrolyzable components, a lignin-like fraction, which makes up 25% of the initial cuticle weight, was identified by GC-MS and infrared spectroscopy. The isolated lignin is of G type, mainly formed by guaiacyl units. This composition indicates that the conifer cuticle investigated here has similar composition to other conifer-isolated cuticles. Water sorption and desorption by the isolated cuticle and the different cuticle fractions, including lignin, were studied. The analysis of the isotherms, following distinct physicochemical models, gave useful information on the structural and physiological role of the different biopolymers present in the cuticle. Lignin fraction showed both a high water sorption and capability of retaining it in comparision to other cuticle components. Hysteresis effect on water sorption-desorption cycle and water cluster formations has also been studied, and their physiological role discussed.

  5. Biomolecules preserved in ca. 168 million year old fossil conifer wood.

    PubMed

    Marynowski, Leszek; Otto, Angelika; Zatoń, Michał; Philippe, Marc; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2007-03-01

    Biomarkers are widely known to occur in the fossil record, but the unaltered biomolecules are rarely reported from sediments older than Paleogene. Polar terpenoids, the natural products most resistant to degradation processes, were reported mainly from the Tertiary conifers, and the oldest known are Cretaceous in age. In this paper, we report the occurrence of relatively high concentrations of ferruginol derivatives and other polar diterpenoids, as well as their diagenetic products, in a conifer wood Protopodocarpoxylon from the Middle Jurassic of Poland. Thus, the natural product terpenoids reported in this paper are definitely the oldest polar biomolecules detected in geological samples. The extracted phenolic abietanes like ferruginol and its derivatives (6,7-dehydroferruginol, sugiol, 11,14-dioxopisiferic acid) are produced only by distinct conifer families (Cupressaceae s. l., Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae), to which Protopodocarpoxylon could belong based on anatomical characteristics. Therefore, the natural product terpenoids are of great advantage in systematics of fossil plant remains older than Paleogene and lacking suitable anatomical preservation.

  6. Biomolecules preserved in ca. 168 million year old fossil conifer wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowski, Leszek; Otto, Angelika; Zatoń, Michał; Philippe, Marc; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2007-03-01

    Biomarkers are widely known to occur in the fossil record, but the unaltered biomolecules are rarely reported from sediments older than Paleogene. Polar terpenoids, the natural products most resistant to degradation processes, were reported mainly from the Tertiary conifers, and the oldest known are Cretaceous in age. In this paper, we report the occurrence of relatively high concentrations of ferruginol derivatives and other polar diterpenoids, as well as their diagenetic products, in a conifer wood Protopodocarpoxylon from the Middle Jurassic of Poland. Thus, the natural product terpenoids reported in this paper are definitely the oldest polar biomolecules detected in geological samples. The extracted phenolic abietanes like ferruginol and its derivatives (6,7-dehydroferruginol, sugiol, 11,14-dioxopisiferic acid) are produced only by distinct conifer families (Cupressaceae s. l., Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae), to which Protopodocarpoxylon could belong based on anatomical characteristics. Therefore, the natural product terpenoids are of great advantage in systematics of fossil plant remains older than Paleogene and lacking suitable anatomical preservation.

  7. The Paleocene Eocene carbon isotope excursion in higher plant organic matter: Differential fractionation of angiosperms and conifers in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, Stefan; Woltering, Martijn; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Sluijs, Appy; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2007-06-01

    A study of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene (P-E) sediments deposited on the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean reveals relatively high abundances of terrestrial biomarkers. These include dehydroabietane and simonellite derived from conifers (gymnosperms) and a tetra-aromatic triterpenoid derived from angiosperms. The relative percentage of the angiosperm biomarker of the summed angiosperm + conifer biomarkers was increased at the end of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), different when observed with pollen counts which showed a relative decrease in angiosperm pollen. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of these biomarkers shows that the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) during the PETM amounts to 3‰ for both conifer biomarkers, dehydroabietane and simonellite, comparable to the magnitude of the CIE inferred from marine carbonates, but significantly lower than the 4.5‰ of the terrestrial C 29n-alkane [M. Pagani, N. Pedentchouk, M. Huber, A. Sluijs, S. Schouten, H. Brinkhuis, J.S. Sinninghe Damsté, G.R. Dickens, and the IODP Expedition 302 Expedition Scientists (2006), Arctic's hydrology during global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. Nature, 442, 671-675.], which is a compound sourced by both conifers and angiosperms. Conspicuously, the angiosperm-sourced aromatic triterpane shows a much larger CIE of 6‰ and suggests that angiosperms increased in their carbon isotopic fractionation during the PETM. Our results thus indicate that the 4.5‰ C 29n-alkane CIE reported previously represents the average CIE of conifers and angiosperms at this site and suggest that the large and variable CIE observed in terrestrial records may be partly explained by the variable contributions of conifers and angiosperms. The differential response in isotopic fractionation of angiosperms and conifers points to different physiological responses of these vegetation types to the rise in temperature, humidity, and greenhouse gases during the PETM.

  8. Oviposition strategies of conifer seed chalcids in relation to host phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouault, Gaëlle; Turgeon, Jean; Candau, Jean-Noël; Roques, Alain; Aderkas, Patrick

    2004-10-01

    Insects are considered the most important predators of seed cones, the female reproductive structures of conifers, prior to seed dispersal. Slightly more than 100 genera of insects are known to parasitize conifer seed cones. The most diverse (i.e., number of species) of these genera is Megastigmus (Hymenoptera: Torymidae), which comprises many important seed pests of native and exotic conifers. Seed chalcids, Megastigmus spp., lay eggs inside the developing ovules of host conifers and, until recently, oviposition was believed to occur only in fertilized ovules. Ovule development begins just after pollination, but stops if cells are not fertilized. The morphological stage of cone development at the time of oviposition by seed chalcids has been established for many species; however, knowledge of ovule development at that time has been documented for only one species, M. spermotrophus. Megastigmus spermotrophus oviposits in Douglas-fir ovules after pollination but before fertilization. Unlike the unfertilized ovules, those containing a M. spermotrophus larva continue to develop, whether fertilized or not, stressing the need to broaden our understanding of the insect plant interactions for this entire genus. To achieve this task, we reviewed the scientific literature and assembled information pertaining to the timing of oviposition and to the pollination and fertilization periods of their respective host(s). More specifically, we were searching for circumstantial evidence that other species of Megastigmus associated with conifers could behave (i.e., oviposit before ovule fertilization) and impact on female gametophyte (i.e., prevent abortion) like M. spermotrophus. The evidence from our compilation suggests that seed chalcids infesting Pinaceae may also oviposit before ovule fertilization, just like M. spermotrophus, whereas those infesting Cupressaceae seemingly oviposit after ovule fertilization. Based on this evidence, we hypothesize that all species of Megastigmus

  9. Some conifer clades contribute substantial amounts of leaf waxes to sedimentary archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Wing, S. L.; Leslie, A. B.; Freeman, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Leaf waxes (i.e. n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids) and their carbon isotopes (δ13C) are commonly used to track past changes in the carbon cycle or plant ecophysiology. Previous studies indicated that conifer n-alkane concentrations are lower than in angiosperms and that 13C fractionation during n-alkane synthesis (ɛlipid) is smaller than in angiosperms. These prior studies, however, sampled a limited phylogenetic and geographic subset of conifers, leaving out many important subtropical and Southern Hemisphere groups that were once widespread and common components of fossil assemblages. To expand on previous work, we collected 44 conifer species from the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley, capturing all extant conifer families and most extant genera. By collecting all specimens at a common site we attempted to minimize the confounding effects of climate, allowing phylogenetic patterns in the δ13C of leaf waxes to be expressed more strongly. We find that Pinaceae, including many North American species used in previous studies, have very low or no n-alkanes. However, other conifer groups have significant concentrations of n-alkanes, especially the Araucariaceae (Norfolk Island pines), Podocarpaceae (common in the Southern Hemisphere), and many species of Cupressaceae (junipers and relatives). Within the Cupressaceae, we find total n-alkane concentrations are high in subfamilies Cupressoideae and Callitroideae, but significantly lower in the early diverging taxodioid lineages (including bald cypress and redwood). Individual n-alkane chain lengths have a weak phylogenetic signal, except for n-C29 alkane, but when combined using average chain length (ACL), a strong phylogenetic signal emerges. The strong phylogenetic signal in ACL reinforces that it is strongly influenced by factors other than climate. An analysis of ɛlipid indicates a strong phylogenetic signal in which the smallest biosynthetic fractionation occurs in Pinaceae and the largest in

  10. Model-based conifer crown surface reconstruction from multi-ocular high-resolution aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei

    2000-12-01

    Tree crown parameters such as width, height, shape and crown closure are desirable in forestry and ecological studies, but they are time-consuming and labor intensive to measure in the field. The stereoscopic capability of high-resolution aerial imagery provides a way to crown surface reconstruction. Existing photogrammetric algorithms designed to map terrain surfaces, however, cannot adequately extract crown surfaces, especially for steep conifer crowns. Considering crown surface reconstruction in a broader context of tree characterization from aerial images, we develop a rigorous perspective tree image formation model to bridge image-based tree extraction and crown surface reconstruction, and an integrated model-based approach to conifer crown surface reconstruction. Based on the fact that most conifer crowns are in a solid geometric form, conifer crowns are modeled as a generalized hemi-ellipsoid. Both the automatic and semi-automatic approaches are investigated to optimal tree model development from multi-ocular images. The semi-automatic 3D tree interpreter developed in this thesis is able to efficiently extract reliable tree parameters and tree models in complicated tree stands. This thesis starts with a sophisticated stereo matching algorithm, and incorporates tree models to guide stereo matching. The following critical problems are addressed in the model-based surface reconstruction process: (1) the problem of surface model composition from tree models, (2) the occlusion problem in disparity prediction from tree models, (3) the problem of integrating the predicted disparities into image matching, (4) the tree model edge effect reduction on the disparity map, (5) the occlusion problem in orthophoto production, and (6) the foreshortening problem in image matching, which is very serious for conifer crown surfaces. Solutions to the above problems are necessary for successful crown surface reconstruction. The model-based approach was applied to recover the

  11. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to

  12. The enigma of effective pathlength for 18O enrichment in leaf water of conifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, J. S.; Kahmen, A.; Buchmann, N. C.; Siegwolf, R. T.

    2013-12-01

    The stable isotopes of oxygen (δ18O) in tree ring cellulose provide valuable proxy information about past environments and climate. Mechanistic models have been used to clarify the important drivers of isotope fractionation and help interpret δ18O variation in tree rings. A critical component to these models is an estimate of leaf water enrichment. However, standard models seldom accurately predict 18O enrichment in conifer needles and Péclet corrections often require effective pathlengths (L) that seem unreasonable from the perspective of needle morphology (>0.5 m). To analyze the potential role of path length on the Péclet effect in conifers we carried out experiments in controlled environment chambers. We exposed seedlings of six species of conifer (Abies alba, Larix decidua, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, P. sylvestris, Taxus bacata), that differ in needle morphology, to four different vapor pressure deficits (VPD), in order to modify transpiration rates (E) and leaf water 18O enrichment. Environmental and δ18O data (leaf, stem and chamber water vapor) were collected to parameterize leaf water models. Cross-sections of needles were sampled for an analysis of needle anatomy. Conifer needles have a single strand of vascular tissue making pathlength determinations through anatomical assessments possible. The six species differed in mesophyll distance (measured from endodermis to epidermis) and cell number, with Pinus and Picea species having the shortest distance and Abies and Taxus the longest (flat needle morphology). Other anatomical measures (transfusion distance, cell size etc.) did not differ significantly. A suberized strip was apparent in the endodermis of all species except Taxus and Abies. Conifer needles have a large proportion (from 0.2 to 0.4) of needle cross-sectional area in vascular tissues that may not be subject to evaporative enrichment. As expected, leaf water δ18O and E responded strongly to VPD and standard models (Craig

  13. Headwater riparian invertebrate communities associated with red alder and conifer wood and leaf litter in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeSage, C.M.; Merritt, R.W.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    We examined how management of young upland forests in southeastern Alaska affect riparian invertebrate taxa richness, density, and biomass, in turn, potentially influencing food abundance for fish and wildlife. Southeastern Alaska forests are dominated by coniferous trees including Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), with mixed stands of red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn.). Red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) is hypothesized to influence the productivity of young-growth conifer forests and through forest management may provide increased riparian invertebrate abundance. To compare and contrast invertebrate densities between coniferous and alder riparian habitats, leaf litter and wood debris (early and late decay classes) samples were collected along eleven headwater streams on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, during the summers of 2000 and 2001. Members of Acarina and Collembola were the most abundant taxa collected in leaf litter with alder litter having significantly higher mean taxa richness than conifer litter. Members of Acarina were the most abundant group collected on wood debris and alder wood had significantly higher mean taxa richness and biomass than conifer wood. Alder wood debris in more advanced decay stages had the highest mean taxa richness and biomass, compared to other wood types, while conifer late decay wood debris had the highest densities of invertebrates. The inclusion of alder in young-growth conifer forests can benefit forest ecosystems by enhancing taxa richness and biomass of riparian forest invertebrates. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Soil Moisture Patterns Between Conifer and Aspen Hillslopes in Northern Utah in Low and Average Precipitation Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A.; Kasahara, T.

    2008-12-01

    The study watershed, located in Northern Utah, receives most of its precipitation as snow. On forested hillslopes, spring snowmelt and resultant soil moisture patterns often differ between deciduous aspen and conifer stands. In this study, hydrologic connectivity between hillslopes and stream was studied by measuring soil moisture profiles along a transect and surface soil moisture distribution in 10 m by 20 m grids, in two consecutive water years with low and average winter precipitation. Average snow water equivalents were similar between aspen and conifer stands but a greater variability of snow pack was found in the conifer stand in both years. Melt water input saturated soil profiles in both aspen and conifer stands, but the saturation of soils at 50cm to100cm depth was observed earlier on the aspen hillslope, which this trend was more pronounced in the relatively wet year. Grid measurements indicated that soil moisture in the conifer hillslope never exhibited spatial organization in the top 13 cm soil, while the aspen hillslope showed organization on a scale of 7 to 19 m, indicating potential lateral flow in shallow soil layers.

  15. The evolutionary split of Pinaceae from other conifers: evidence from an intron loss and a multigene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Gugerli, F; Sperisen, C; Büchler, U; Brunner, I; Brodbeck, S; Palmer, J D; Qiu, Y L

    2001-11-01

    The second intron in the mitochondrial gene nad1 was surveyed using PCR, DNA sequencing, or Southern hybridization in 323 species (313 genera, 212 families) of seed plants. The intron was absent in all 22 species (22 genera, 8 families) of non-Pinaceae conifers studied, in Welwitschia mirabilis, and in seven angiosperms. Whereas absence of the intron in seven angiosperms and Welwitschia is likely due to seven independent losses when evaluated against the recently published multigene phylogenies, the lack of the intron in all non-Pinaceae conifers can be best explained by a single loss. These data suggest that the non-Pinaceae conifers represent a monophyletic group. We also conducted a phylogenetic analysis of seed plants using a combined data set of the partial exon and intron sequences of nad1 generated from this study and published sequences of mitochondrial cox1 and small subunit (SSU) rDNA, chloroplast rbcL, and nuclear 18S rDNA. The results supported the split of conifers into two groups: Pinaceae and non-Pinaceae conifers. The Gnetales were sister to Pinaceae, in agreement with the conclusion from other recent molecular phylogenetic studies that refute the anthophyte hypothesis.

  16. The ecology and management of moist mixed-conifer forests in eastern Oregon and Washington: a synthesis of the relevant biophysical science and implications for future land management

    Treesearch

    Peter Stine; Paul Hessburg; Thomas Spies; Marc Kramer; Christopher J. Fettig; Andrew Hansen; John Lehmkuhl; Kevin O' Hara; Karl Polivka; Peter Singleton; Susan Charnley; Andrew Merschel; Rachel. White

    2014-01-01

    Land managers in the Pacific Northwest have reported a need for updated scientific information on the ecology and management of mixed-conifer forests east of the Cascade Range in Oregon and Washington. Of particular concern are the moist mixed-conifer forests, which have become drought-stressed and vulnerable to high-severity fire after decades of human disturbances...

  17. Coarse-scale population structure of pathogenic Armillaria species in a mixed-conifer forest in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon.

    Treesearch

    B.A. Ferguson; T.A. Dreisbach; C.G. Parks; G.M. Filip; C.L. Schmitt

    2003-01-01

    The coarse-scale population structure of pathogenic Armillaria (Fr.) Staude species was determined on approximately 16 100 ha Of relatively dry, mixed-conifer forest in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon. Sampling of recently dead or live, symptomatic conifers produced 112 isolates of Armillaria from six tree species.

  18. Nitric acid dry deposition to conifer forests: Niwot Ridge spruce-fir-pine study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sievering, H.; Kelly, T.; McConville, G.; Seibold, C.; Turnipseed, A.

    2001-01-01

    The dry deposition velocity of nitric acid, Vd(HNO3), over a 12-m (mean height) spruce-fir forest at Niwot Ridge, Colorado was estimated during 13 daytime periods using the flux-gradient approach. Turbulence intensity at this site is high (mean u* of 0.65ms-1 with u of 2.9ms-1) and contributed to the large observed Vd(HNO3). The overriding contributor is identified to be the small aerodynamic needle width of the conifer trees. Two cases had inflated Vd(HNO3) due to height-differentiated nitric acid loss to soil-derived particle surfaces. Not considering these cases, the mean Vd(HNO3) was 7.6cms-1. The mean laminar boundary layer resistance (Rb) was found to be 7.8sm-1 (of similar magnitude to that of the aerodynamic resistance, 8.5sm-1). The data-determined Rb is bracketed by two theoretical estimates of the mean Rb, 5.9 and 8.6sm-1, that include consideration of the small canopy length scale (aerodynamic needle width), 1mm or less, at this conifer forest. However, the poor correlation of data-determined Rb values with both sets of theoretical estimates indicates that measurement error needs to be reduced and/or improved formulations of theoretical Rb values are in order. The large observed Vd(HNO3) at this conifer forest site is attributed to high turbulence intensity, and, especially, to small aerodynamic needle width. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. A White Spruce Gene Catalog for Conifer Genome Analyses1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rigault, Philippe; Boyle, Brian; Lepage, Pierre; Cooke, Janice E.K.; Bousquet, Jean; MacKay, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Several angiosperm plant genomes, including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), and grapevine (Vitis vinifera), have been sequenced, but the lack of reference genomes in gymnosperm phyla reduces our understanding of plant evolution and restricts the potential impacts of genomics research. A gene catalog was developed for the conifer tree Picea glauca (white spruce) through large-scale expressed sequence tag sequencing and full-length cDNA sequencing to facilitate genome characterizations, comparative genomics, and gene mapping. The resource incorporates new and publicly available sequences into 27,720 cDNA clusters, 23,589 of which are represented by full-length insert cDNAs. Expressed sequence tags, mate-pair cDNA clone analysis, and custom sequencing were integrated through an iterative process to improve the accuracy of clustering outcomes. The entire catalog spans 30 Mb of unique transcribed sequence. We estimated that the P. glauca nuclear genome contains up to 32,520 transcribed genes owing to incomplete, partially sequenced, and unsampled transcripts and that its transcriptome could span up to 47 Mb. These estimates are in the same range as the Arabidopsis and rice transcriptomes. Next-generation methods confirmed and enhanced the catalog by providing deeper coverage for rare transcripts, by extending many incomplete clusters, and by augmenting the overall transcriptome coverage to 38 Mb of unique sequence. Genomic sample sequencing at 8.5% of the 19.8-Gb P. glauca genome identified 1,495 clusters representing highly repeated sequences among the cDNA clusters. With a conifer transcriptome in full view, functional and protein domain annotations clearly highlighted the divergences between conifers and angiosperms, likely reflecting their respective evolutionary paths. PMID:21730200

  20. Wildlife species associated with non-coniferous vegetation in Pacific Northwest conifer forests: A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Non-coniferous vegetation, including herbs, shrubs, and broad-leaved trees, makes a vital contribution to ecosystem function and diversity in Pacific Northwest conifer forests. However, forest management has largely been indifferent or detrimental to shrubs and trees that have low commercial value, in spite of a paradigm shift towards more holistic management in recent decades. Forest management practices that are detrimental to broad-leaved trees and shrubs are likely to decrease habitat diversity for wildlife, but the number of species that may be affected has not previously been enumerated. I reviewed life history accounts for forest-dwelling vertebrate wildlife species and derived a list of 78 species in Oregon and Washington that are associated with non-coniferous vegetation. The diversity of direct and indirect food resources provided was the primary functional basis for associations of most species with non-coniferous vegetation. Thus, a diversity of herbs and broad-leaved trees and shrubs provides the foundation for food webs that contribute to diversity at multiple trophic levels in Pacific Northwest conifer forests. Given the number of species associated with non-coniferous vegetation in conifer-dominated forests, maintaining habitats that support diverse plant communities, particularly broad-leaved trees and shrubs, will be an important component of management strategies intended to foster biodiversity. Silvicultural practices such as modified planting densities, and pre-commercial and commercial thinning, can be used to control stand density in order to favor the development of understory herbs, shrubs, and a diversity of tree species within managed stands. Allowing shrubs and hardwood trees to develop and persist in early seral stands by curtailing vegetation control also would benefit many species associated with non-coniferous vegetation.

  1. Conifer density within lake catchments predicts fish mercury concentrations in remote subalpine lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herring, Garth; Johnson, Branden L.; Graw, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Remote high-elevation lakes represent unique environments for evaluating the bioaccumulation of atmospherically deposited mercury through freshwater food webs, as well as for evaluating the relative importance of mercury loading versus landscape influences on mercury bioaccumulation. The increase in mercury deposition to these systems over the past century, coupled with their limited exposure to direct anthropogenic disturbance make them useful indicators for estimating how changes in mercury emissions may propagate to changes in Hg bioaccumulation and ecological risk. We evaluated mercury concentrations in resident fish from 28 high-elevation, sub-alpine lakes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Fish total mercury (THg) concentrations ranged from 4 to 438 ng/g wet weight, with a geometric mean concentration (±standard error) of 43 ± 2 ng/g ww. Fish THg concentrations were negatively correlated with relative condition factor, indicating that faster growing fish that are in better condition have lower THg concentrations. Across the 28 study lakes, mean THg concentrations of resident salmonid fishes varied as much as 18-fold among lakes. We used a hierarchal statistical approach to evaluate the relative importance of physiological, limnological, and catchment drivers of fish Hg concentrations. Our top statistical model explained 87% of the variability in fish THg concentrations among lakes with four key landscape and limnological variables: catchment conifer density (basal area of conifers within a lake's catchment), lake surface area, aqueous dissolved sulfate, and dissolved organic carbon. Conifer density within a lake's catchment was the most important variable explaining fish THg concentrations across lakes, with THg concentrations differing by more than 400 percent across the forest density spectrum. These results illustrate the importance of landscape characteristics in controlling mercury bioaccumulation in fish.

  2. Tree squirrel habitat selection and predispersal seed predation in a declining subalpine conifer.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Shawn T; Fiedler, Carl E

    2010-03-01

    Differential responses by species to modern perturbations in forest ecosystems may have undesirable impacts on plant-animal interactions. If such disruptions cause declines in a plant species without corresponding declines in a primary seed predator, the effects on the plant could be exacerbated. We examined one such interaction between Pinus albicaulis (whitebark pine), a bird-dispersed, subalpine forest species experiencing severe population declines in the northern part of its range, and Tamiasciurus hudsonicus (red squirrel), an efficient conifer seed predator, at 20 sites in two distinct ecosystems. Hypotheses about squirrel habitat preferences were tested to determine how changes in forest conditions influence habitat use and subsequent levels of predispersal cone predation. We performed habitat selection modeling and variable ranking based on Akaike's information criterion; compared the level and variance of habitat use between two forest types (P. albicaulis dominant and mixed conifer); and modeled the relationship between P. albicaulis relative abundance and predispersal cone predation. T. hudsonicus did not demonstrate strong habitat preference for P. albicaulis, and thus, declines in the pine were not met with proportional declines in squirrel habitat use. P. albicaulis habitat variables were the least important in squirrel habitat selection. Squirrel habitat use was lower and varied more in P. albicaulis-dominant forests, and predispersal cone predation decreased linearly with increasing P. albicaulis relative abundance. In Northern Rocky Mountain sites, where P. albicaulis mortality was higher and abundance lower, squirrel predation was greater than in Central Rocky Mountain sites. In ecosystems with reduced P. albicaulis abundance, altered interactions between the squirrel and pine may lead to a lower proportion of P. albicaulis contributing to population recruitment because of reduced seed availability. Reducing the abundance of competing conifers

  3. Conifer density within lake catchments predicts fish mercury concentrations in remote subalpine lakes.

    PubMed

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Herring, Garth; Johnson, Branden; Graw, Rick

    2016-05-01

    Remote high-elevation lakes represent unique environments for evaluating the bioaccumulation of atmospherically deposited mercury through freshwater food webs, as well as for evaluating the relative importance of mercury loading versus landscape influences on mercury bioaccumulation. The increase in mercury deposition to these systems over the past century, coupled with their limited exposure to direct anthropogenic disturbance make them useful indicators for estimating how changes in mercury emissions may propagate to changes in Hg bioaccumulation and ecological risk. We evaluated mercury concentrations in resident fish from 28 high-elevation, sub-alpine lakes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Fish total mercury (THg) concentrations ranged from 4 to 438 ng/g wet weight, with a geometric mean concentration (±standard error) of 43 ± 2 ng/g ww. Fish THg concentrations were negatively correlated with relative condition factor, indicating that faster growing fish that are in better condition have lower THg concentrations. Across the 28 study lakes, mean THg concentrations of resident salmonid fishes varied as much as 18-fold among lakes. We used a hierarchal statistical approach to evaluate the relative importance of physiological, limnological, and catchment drivers of fish Hg concentrations. Our top statistical model explained 87% of the variability in fish THg concentrations among lakes with four key landscape and limnological variables: catchment conifer density (basal area of conifers within a lake's catchment), lake surface area, aqueous dissolved sulfate, and dissolved organic carbon. Conifer density within a lake's catchment was the most important variable explaining fish THg concentrations across lakes, with THg concentrations differing by more than 400 percent across the forest density spectrum. These results illustrate the importance of landscape characteristics in controlling mercury bioaccumulation in fish.

  4. Mapping and monitoring conifer mortality using remote sensing in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Macomber, S.A.; Woodcock, C.E. )

    1994-12-01

    A prolonged drought in the western US has resulted in alarming levels of mortality in conifer forests. Satellite remote sensing holds the potential for mapping and monitoring the effects of such environmental changes over large geographic areas in a timely manner. Results from the application of a forest canopy reflectance model using multitemporal Landsat TM imagery and field measurements, indicate conifer mortality can be effectively mapped and inventoried. The test area for this project is the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit in the Sierra Nevada of California. The Landsat TM images are from the summers of 1988 and 1991. The Li-Strahler canopy model estimates several forest stand parameters, including tree size and canopy cover for each conifer stand, from reflectance values in satellite imagery. The difference in cover estimates between the dates forms the basis for stratifying stands into mortality classes, which are used as both themes in a map and the basis of the field sampling design. Field measurements from 61 stands collected in the summer of 1992 indicate 15% of the original timber volume in the true fir zone died between 1988 and 1992. The resulting low standard error of 11% for this estimate indicates the utility of these mortality classes for detecting areas of high mortality. Also, the patterns in the estimated mean timber volume loss for each class follow the expected trends. The results of this project are immediately useful for fire hazard management, by providing both estimates of the degree of overall mortality and maps showing its location. They also indicate current remote sensing technology may be useful for monitoring the changes in vegetation that are expected to result from climate change.

  5. Dwarf mistletoe-host interactions in mixed-conifer forests in the sierra nevada.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patricia E; Rizzo, David M

    2002-06-01

    ABSTRACT We determined the spatial pattern of dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium spp.) associated with two different conifer hosts, white fir (Abies concolor) and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi), in forests around the Lake Tahoe Basin and at the Teakettle Experimental Forest, both located in the Sierra Nevada. We also examined a number of host variables and bark beetle incidence to determine how these factors might be involved in the Arceuthobium-conifer interaction. There was no significant relationship between dwarf mistletoe-infected trees and associated bark beetles. We found the highest incidence of dwarf mistletoe on Jeffrey pine in Lake Tahoe (87%), followed by dwarf mistletoe on white fir in Lake Tahoe (30%), with the lowest incidence on white fir at Teakettle (27%). Dwarf mistletoe incidence on white fir in our Lake Tahoe grid was not correlated to density but the dwarf mistletoe rating (DMR) was positively correlated to host size. At the Teakettle Forest, dwarf mistletoe incidence on white fir was not correlated with host density but the DMR was correlated with host size. Dwarf mistletoe incidence and DMR on Jeffrey pine were correlated with host density. Individuals, of both conifer species, in all diameter size classes were susceptible to dwarf mistletoe, with the lowest infection rate in the seedling-10-cm-diameter class. Arceuthobium on white fir in Lake Tahoe showed spatial dependence to a range of 20 m. However, Arceuthobium on Jeffrey pine in Lake Tahoe and on white fir at Teakettle showed no clear pattern of spatial structuring. The degree of infection and stand history appear to be important in the spatial dynamics of Arceuthobium spp.

  6. Spatial structure of periodicity in the conifer tree radial increment in the Republic of Komi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspopov, O. M.; Lopatin, E. V.; Kolström, T.; Dergachev, V. A.; Dmitriev, P. B.; Kahle, H.-P.; Spiecker, H.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral analysis of tree ring data sets of Siberian spruce ( Picea obovata) and Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) was carried out to study the effects of climatic factors on the conifer tree radial growth in the territory of the Komi Republic. Analyses were performed for different natural subzones in the Komi Republic: the forest-tundra transition zone and the northern, middle, and southern taiga. The results show that several groups of periodicities can be found in the tree radial growth. One from groups of periodicities is related to internal processes in the atmosphere-ocean system; the other is related to the fluctuations in solar activity.

  7. Quantifying thermal constraints on carbon and water fluxes in a mixed-conifer sky island ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Z.; Minor, R. L.; Potts, D. L.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Western North American forests represent a potential, yet uncertain, sink for atmospheric carbon. Revealing how predicted climatic conditions of warmer temperatures and longer inter-storm periods of moisture stress might influence the carbon status of these forests requires a fuller understanding of plant functional responses to abiotic stress. While data related to snow dominated montane ecosystems has become more readily available to parameterize ecosystem function models, there is a paucity of data available for Madrean sky island mixed-conifer forests, which receive about one third of their precipitation from the North American Monsoon. Thus, we quantified ecophysiological responses to moisture and temperature stress in a Madrean mixed-conifer forest near Tucson, Arizona, within the footprint of the Mt. Bigelow Eddy Covariance Tower. In measuring a series of key parameters indicative of carbon and water fluxes within the dominant species across pre-monsoon and monsoon conditions, we were able to develop a broader understanding of what abiotic drivers are most restrictive to plant performance in this ecosystem. Within Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas Fir), and Pinus strobiformis (Southwestern White Pine) we quantified: (i) the optimal temperature (Topt) for maximum photosynthesis (Amax), (ii) the range of temperatures over which photosynthesis was at least 50% of Amax (Ω50), and (iii) each conifer's water use efficiency (WUE) to relate to the balance between carbon uptake and water loss in this high elevation semiarid ecosystem. Our findings support the prediction that photosynthesis decreases under high temperatures (>30°C) among the three species we measured, regardless of soil moisture status. However, monsoon moisture reduced sensitivity to temperature extremes and fluctuations (Ω50), which substantially magnified total photosynthetic productivity. In particular, wet conditions enhanced Amax the most dramatically for P

  8. Diversity and seasonal variation of endophytic fungi isolated from three conifers in mt. Taehwa, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Kyun; Eo, Ju-Kyeong; Eom, Ahn-Heum

    2013-06-01

    The needled leaves of three conifer species were collected in Mt. Taehwa during different seasons of the year. Total 59 isolates and 19 species of endophytic fungi were isolated from the leaves and identified using morphological and molecular characteristics. As a result, Shannon index was different in its host plant; Larix kaempferi had a highest value of species diversity. According to the sampling season, 9 species of 19 species were isolated during fall season. The results suggest that the existing of host plant and sampling season are major factors of distribution of endophytic fungi.

  9. The species of Cortinarius, section Bovini, associated with conifers in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Tuula; Kytövuori, Ilkka; Liimatainen, Kare; Lindström, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Cortinarius bovinus and morphologically similar conifer-associated species were studied using material mainly from northern Europe. To stabilize the nomenclature, relevant types were examined. Phylogenetic relationships and species limits were investigated with rDNA ITS and nuclear rpb2 sequences as well as morphological data. We recognize seven species: C. bovinus (neotypified) and six new species, C. anisochrous, C. bovinaster, C. bovinatus, C. fuscobovinus, C. fuscobovinaster and C. oulankaënsis. Their taxonomy, ecology, distribution and relationships are discussed, and a key to species is provided. Based on our phylogeny and morphological data the species were placed in section Bovini.

  10. Diversity and Seasonal Variation of Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Three Conifers in Mt. Taehwa, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Kyun; Eo, Ju-Kyeong

    2013-01-01

    The needled leaves of three conifer species were collected in Mt. Taehwa during different seasons of the year. Total 59 isolates and 19 species of endophytic fungi were isolated from the leaves and identified using morphological and molecular characteristics. As a result, Shannon index was different in its host plant; Larix kaempferi had a highest value of species diversity. According to the sampling season, 9 species of 19 species were isolated during fall season. The results suggest that the existing of host plant and sampling season are major factors of distribution of endophytic fungi. PMID:23874130

  11. Development of nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers for the endangered conifer Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S.; L’Huillier, Laurent; Kurata, Seikan; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Isagi, Yuji; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Ito, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae), an endangered conifer species in New Caledonia. Methods and Results: Using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) of an RNA-Seq library, 15 polymorphic nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed. When evaluated with 48 individuals, these markers showed genetic variations ranging from two to 15 alleles and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0 to 0.881. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity and structure of remaining wild populations and improving the genetic status of ex situ populations. PMID:26312198

  12. Molecular Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium commune Isolates from a Conifer Nursery.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jane E; Kim, Mee-Sook; James, Robert L; Dumroese, R Kasten; Klopfenstein, Ned B

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium species can cause severe root disease and damping-off in conifer nurseries. Fusarium inoculum is commonly found in most container and bareroot nurseries on healthy and diseased seedlings, in nursery soils, and on conifer seeds. Isolates of Fusarium spp. can differ in virulence; however, virulence and colony morphology are not correlated. Forty-one isolates of Fusarium spp., morphologically indistinguishable from F. oxysporum, were collected from nursery samples (soils, healthy seedlings, and diseased seedlings). These isolates were characterized by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and DNA sequencing of nuclear rDNA (internal transcribed spacer including 5.8S rDNA), mitochon-drial rDNA (small subunit [mtSSU]), and nuclear translation elongation factor 1-alpha. Each isolate had a unique AFLP phenotype. Out of 121 loci, 111 (92%) were polymorphic; 30 alleles were unique to only highly virulent isolates and 33 alleles were unique to only isolates nonpathogenic on conifers. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses of DNA sequences from all three regions and the combined data set showed that all highly virulent isolates clearly separated into a common clade that contained F. commune, which was recently distinguished from its sister taxon, F. oxysporum. Interestingly, all but one of the nonpathogenic isolates grouped into a common clade and were genetically similar to F. oxysporum. The AFLP cladograms had similar topologies when compared with the DNA-based phylograms. Although all tested isolates were morphologically indistinguishable from F. oxysporum based on currently available monographs, some morphological traits can be plastic and unreliable for identification of Fusarium spp. We consider the highly virulent isolates to be F. commune based on strong genetic evidence. To our knowledge, this is the first reported evidence that shows F. commune is a cause of Fusarium disease (root rot and dampingoff) on Douglas-fir seedlings. Furthermore

  13. Frost drought in conifers at the alpine timberline: xylem dysfunction and adaptations.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Stefan; Hacke, Uwe; Schmid, Peter; Schwienbacher, Franziska; Gruber, Andreas

    2006-12-01

    Drought stress can cause xylem embolism in trees when the water potential (psi) in the xylem falls below specific vulnerability thresholds. At the alpine timberline, frost drought is known to cause excessive winter embolism unless xylem vulnerability or transpiration is sufficiently reduced to avoid critical psi. We compared annual courses of psi and embolism in Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus mugo, Larix decidua, and Juniperus communis growing at the timberline vs. low altitude. In addition, vulnerability properties and related anatomical parameters as well as wood density (D(t)) and wall reinforcement (wall thickness related to conduit diameter) were studied. This allowed an estimate of stress intensities as well as a detection of adaptations that reduce embolism formation. At the alpine timberline, psi was lowest during winter with corresponding embolism rates of up to 100% in three of the conifers studied. Only Pinus cembra and Larix decidua avoided winter embolism due to moderate psi. Minor embolism was observed at low altitude where the water potentials of all species remained within a narrow range throughout the year. Within species, differences in psi50 (psi at 50% loss of conductivity) at high vs. low altitude were less than 1 MPa. In Picea abies and Pinus cembra, psi50 was more negative at the timberline while, in the other conifer species, psi50 was more negative at low altitude. Juniperus communis exhibited the lowest (-6.4 +/- 0.04 MPa; mean +/- SE) and Pinus mugo the highest psi50 (-3.34 +/- 0.03 MPa). In some cases, D(t) and tracheid wall reinforcement were higher than in previously established relationships of these parameters with psi50, possibly because of mechanical demands associated with the specific growing conditions. Conifers growing at the alpine timberline were exposed to higher drought stress intensities than individuals at low altitude. Frost drought during winter caused high embolism rates which were probably amplified by freeze

  14. Measuring near infrared spectral reflectance changes from water stressed conifer stands with AIS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, George; Running, Steven W.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-2 (AIS-2) data was acquired over two paired conifer stands for the purpose of detecting differences in spectral reflectance between stressed and natural canopies. Water stress was induced in a stand of Norway spruce and white pine by severing the sapwood near the ground. Water stress during the AIS flights was evaluated through shoot water potential and relative water content measurements. Preliminary analysis with raw AIS-2 data using SPAM indicates that there were small, inconsistent differences in absolute spectral reflectance in the near infrared 0.97 to 1.3 micron between the stressed and natural canopies.

  15. Stable Water Use Efficiency under Climate Change of Three Sympatric Conifer Species at the Alpine Treeline

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Gerhard; Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Leo, Marco; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten Erhard Edgar

    2016-01-01

    The ability of treeline associated conifers in the Central Alps to cope with recent climate warming and increasing CO2 concentration is still poorly understood. We determined tree ring stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of Pinus cembra, Picea abies, and Larix decidua trees from 1975 to 2010. Stable isotope ratios were compared with leaf level gas exchange measurements carried out in situ between 1979 and 2007. Results indicate that tree ring derived intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) of P. cembra, P. abies and L. decidua remained constant during the last 36 years despite climate warming and rising atmospheric CO2. Temporal patterns in Δ13C and Δ18O mirrored leaf level gas exchange assessments, suggesting parallel increases of CO2-fixation and stomatal conductance of treeline conifer species. As at the study site soil water availability was not a limiting factor iWUE remained largely stable throughout the study period. The stability in iWUE was accompanied by an increase in basal area increment (BAI) suggesting that treeline trees benefit from both recent climate warming and CO2 fertilization. Finally, our results suggest that iWUE may not change species composition at treeline in the Austrian Alps due to similar ecophysiological responses to climatic changes of the three sympatric study species. PMID:27375653

  16. The hydraulic conductivity of the xylem in conifer needles (Picea abies and Pinus mugo).

    PubMed

    Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Mayr, Stefan

    2011-08-01

    Main resistances of the plant water transport system are situated in leaves. In contrast to angiosperm leaves, knowledge of conifer needle hydraulics and of the partitioning of resistances within needles is poor. A new technique was developed which enabled flow-meter measurements through needles embedded in paraffin and thus quantification of the specific hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) of the needle xylem. In Picea abies, xylem K(s) of needle and axes as well as in needles of different age were compared. In Pinus mugo, resistance partitioning within needles was estimated by measurements of xylem K(s) and leaf conductance (K(leaf), measured via 'rehydration kinetics'). Mean K(s) in P. abies needles was 3.5×10(-4) m(2) s(-1) MPa(-1) with a decrease in older needles, and over all similar to K(s) of corresponding axes xylem. In needles of P. mugo, K(s) was 0.9×10(-4) m(2) s(-1) MPa(-1), and 24% of total needle resistance was situated in the xylem. The results indicate species-specific differences in the hydraulic efficiency of conifer needle xylem. The vascular section of the water transport system is a minor but relevant resistance in needles.

  17. Long-term effects of fire severity on oak-conifer dynamics in the southern Cascades.

    PubMed

    Cocking, Matthew I; Varner, J Morgan; Knapp, Eric E

    2014-01-01

    We studied vegetation composition and structure in a mixed conifer-oak ecosystem across a range of fire severity 10 years following wildfire. Sample plots centered on focal California black oaks (Quercus kelloggii) were established to evaluate oak and neighboring tree and shrub recovery across a gradient of fire severity in the southern Cascade Range, USA. Shrub and oak resprouting was strongest around focal oaks where conifer mortality was greatest. Linear modeling revealed negative relationships between California black oak sprout height or basal area and residual overstory tree survival, primarily white fir (Abies concolor). The two dominant competing species, California black oak and white fir, showed opposite responses to fire severity. Sprouting California black oak and associated shrubs dominated in severely burned areas, while surviving, non-sprouting white fir maintained dominance by its height advantage and shading effects in areas that burned with low fire severity. Our results indicate that high-severity fire promotes persistence and restoration of ecosystems containing resprouting species, such as California black oak, that are increasingly rare due to widespread fire exclusion in landscapes that historically experienced more frequent fire. We present a conceptual model based on our results and supported by a synthesis of postfire resprouting dynamics literature. Our results and conceptual model help illuminate long-term postfire vegetation responses and the potential ability of fire to catalyze formation of alternate vegetation community structures that may not be apparent in studies that evaluate postfire effects at shorter time-since-fire intervals or at coarser scales.

  18. Specialised emission pattern of leaf trace in a late Permian (253 million-years old) conifer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Bo; Feng, Zhuo; Yang, Ji-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Xuan; Shen, Jia-Jia; He, Xiao-Yuan

    2015-07-22

    Leaf traces are important structures in higher plants that connect leaves and the stem vascular system. The anatomy and emission pattern of leaf traces are well studied in extant vascular plants, but remain poorly understood in fossil lineages. We quantitatively analysed the leaf traces in the late Permian conifer Ningxiaites specialis from Northwest China based on serial sections through pith, primary and secondary xylems. A complete leaf traces emission pattern of a conifer is presented for the first time from the late Palaeozoic. Three to five monarch leaf traces are grouped in clusters, arranged in a helical phyllotaxis. The leaf traces in each cluster can be divided into upper, middle and lower portions, and initiate at the pith periphery and cross the wood horizontally. The upper leaf trace increases its diameter during the first growth increment and then diminishes completely, which indicates leaf abscission at the end of the first year. The middle trace immediately bifurcates once or twice to form two or three vascular bundles. The lower trace persists as a single bundle during its entire length. The intricate leaf trace dynamics indicates this fossil plant had a novel evolutionary habit by promoting photosynthetic capability for the matured plant.

  19. Syringyl lignin production in conifers: Proof of concept in a Pine tracheary element system.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Armin; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Phillips, Lorelle; Flint, Heather; Geddes, Barbara; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, John

    2015-05-12

    Conifers (softwoods) naturally lack syringyl units in their lignins, rendering lignocellulosic materials from such species more difficult to process than syringyl-rich hardwood species. Using a transformable Pinus radiata tracheary element (TE) system as an experimental platform, we investigated whether metabolic engineering can be used to create syringyl lignin in conifers. Pyrolysis-GC/MS and 2D-NMR analysis of P. radiata TE cultures transformed to express ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) from Liquidambar styraciflua confirmed the production and incorporation of sinapyl alcohol into the lignin polymer. Transformation with F5H was sufficient for the production of syringyl lignin in TEs, but cotransformation with COMT improved its formation. In addition, lower levels of the pathway intermediate 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol were evidenced in cotransformation experiments, indicating that the introduction of the COMT overcame the inefficiency of the native pine methyltransferases for supporting sinapyl alcohol production.Our results provide the proof of concept that it is possible to generate a lignin polymer that contains syringyl units in softwood species such as P. radiata, suggesting that it might be possible to retain the outstanding fiber properties of softwoods while imbuing them with the lignin characteristics of hardwoods that are more favorable for industrial processing.

  20. Lake sedimentary DNA accurately records 20(th) Century introductions of exotic conifers in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Per; Edwards, Mary E; Gielly, Ludovic; Langdon, Catherine T; Croudace, Ian W; Merkel, Marie Kristine Føreid; Fonville, Thierry; Alsos, Inger Greve

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentary DNA (sedDNA) has recently emerged as a new proxy for reconstructing past vegetation, but its taphonomy, source area and representation biases need better assessment. We investigated how sedDNA in recent sediments of two small Scottish lakes reflects a major vegetation change, using well-documented 20(th) Century plantations of exotic conifers as an experimental system. We used next-generation sequencing to barcode sedDNA retrieved from subrecent lake sediments. For comparison, pollen was analysed from the same samples. The sedDNA record contains 73 taxa (mainly genus or species), all but one of which are present in the study area. Pollen and sedDNA shared 35% of taxa, which partly reflects a difference in source area. More aquatic taxa were recorded in sedDNA, whereas taxa assumed to be of regional rather than local origin were recorded only as pollen. The chronology of the sediments and planting records are well aligned, and sedDNA of exotic conifers appears in high quantities with the establishment of plantations around the lakes. SedDNA recorded other changes in local vegetation that accompanied afforestation. There were no signs of DNA leaching in the sediments or DNA originating from pollen.

  1. Expression Divergence Is Correlated with Sequence Evolution but Not Positive Selection in Conifers.

    PubMed

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Yeaman, Sam; Nurkowski, Kristin A; Rieseberg, Loren H; Aitken, Sally N

    2016-06-01

    The evolutionary and genomic determinants of sequence evolution in conifers are poorly understood, and previous studies have found only limited evidence for positive selection. Using RNAseq data, we compared gene expression profiles to patterns of divergence and polymorphism in 44 seedlings of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and 39 seedlings of interior spruce (Picea glauca × engelmannii) to elucidate the evolutionary forces that shape their genomes and their plastic responses to abiotic stress. We found that rapidly diverging genes tend to have greater expression divergence, lower expression levels, reduced levels of synonymous site diversity, and longer proteins than slowly diverging genes. Similar patterns were identified for the untranslated regions, but with some exceptions. We found evidence that genes with low expression levels had a larger fraction of nearly neutral sites, suggesting a primary role for negative selection in determining the association between evolutionary rate and expression level. There was limited evidence for differences in the rate of positive selection among genes with divergent versus conserved expression profiles and some evidence supporting relaxed selection in genes diverging in expression between the species. Finally, we identified a small number of genes that showed evidence of site-specific positive selection using divergence data alone. However, estimates of the proportion of sites fixed by positive selection (α) were in the range of other plant species with large effective population sizes suggesting relatively high rates of adaptive divergence among conifers.

  2. Three causes of variation in the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) in evergreen conifers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher Y S; Gamon, John A

    2015-04-01

    The photochemical reflectance index (PRI) reflects diurnal xanthophyll cycle activity and is also influenced by seasonally changing carotenoid : Chl pigment ratios. Both changing pigment pools and xanthophyll cycle activity contribute to photoprotection in evergreen conifers exposed to boreal winters, but they operate over different timescales, and their relative contribution to the PRI signal has often been unclear. To clarify these responses and their contribution to the PRI signal, leaf PRI, pigment composition, temperature and irradiance were monitored over 2 yr for two evergreen conifers (Pinus contorta and Pinus ponderosa) in a boreal climate. PRI was affected by three distinct processes operating over different timescales and exhibiting contrasting spectral responses. Over the 2 yr study period, the greatest change in PRI resulted from seasonally changing carotenoid : Chl pigment ratios, followed by a previously unreported shifting leaf albedo during periods of deep cold. Remarkably, the smallest change was attributable to the xanthophyll cycle. To properly distinguish these three effects, interpretation of PRI must consider temporal context, physiological responses to evolving environmental conditions, and spectral response. Consideration of the separate mechanisms affecting PRI over different timescales could greatly improve efforts to monitor changing photosynthetic activity using optical remote sensing.

  3. Acid mist and ozone effects on the leaf chemistry of two western conifer species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Temple, Patrick J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of ozone and acid-mist exposures on the leaf chemistry of Jeffrey pine and giant sequoia seedlings grown in filtered-air greenhouses were investigated. Acid-mist treatments (pH 4.1, 3.4, 2.7, or 2.0) were administered for 3 h, and ozone exposures (0, 0.10, and 0.20 microliter/liter), which followed acid-mist treatments, for 4 h, each for three days a week for six to nine weeks. It was found that seedlings were more susceptible to acid-mist and acid mist/ozone combinations, than to ozone alone. Acid mist treatment resulted in higher levels of nitrogen and sulfur (both present in acid mist) as well as Na. Leaves of giant sequoia exhibited increased K and decreased Mn, while Jeffrey pine showed increases in Fe and Mn. In sequoia leaves, concentrations of Ca, Mg, and Ba decreased. Acid treatment also reduced chlorophyll b concentrations in both conifer species. Extensive changes induced by acid mist are consistent with earlier observations of changes in spectral reflectance of conifer seedlings observed after three weeks of fumigation.

  4. Syringyl lignin production in conifers: Proof of concept in a Pine tracheary element system

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Armin; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Phillips, Lorelle; Flint, Heather; Geddes, Barbara; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, John

    2015-01-01

    Conifers (softwoods) naturally lack syringyl units in their lignins, rendering lignocellulosic materials from such species more difficult to process than syringyl-rich hardwood species. Using a transformable Pinus radiata tracheary element (TE) system as an experimental platform, we investigated whether metabolic engineering can be used to create syringyl lignin in conifers. Pyrolysis-GC/MS and 2D-NMR analysis of P. radiata TE cultures transformed to express ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) from Liquidambar styraciflua confirmed the production and incorporation of sinapyl alcohol into the lignin polymer. Transformation with F5H was sufficient for the production of syringyl lignin in TEs, but cotransformation with COMT improved its formation. In addition, lower levels of the pathway intermediate 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol were evidenced in cotransformation experiments, indicating that the introduction of the COMT overcame the inefficiency of the native pine methyltransferases for supporting sinapyl alcohol production.Our results provide the proof of concept that it is possible to generate a lignin polymer that contains syringyl units in softwood species such as P. radiata, suggesting that it might be possible to retain the outstanding fiber properties of softwoods while imbuing them with the lignin characteristics of hardwoods that are more favorable for industrial processing. PMID:25902506

  5. Analysis of freeze-thaw embolism in conifers. The interaction between cavitation pressure and tracheid size.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Sperry, John S

    2006-01-01

    Ice formation in the xylem sap produces air bubbles that under negative xylem pressures may expand and cause embolism in the xylem conduits. We used the centrifuge method to evaluate the relationship between freeze-thaw embolism and conduit diameter across a range of xylem pressures (Px) in the conifers Pinus contorta and Juniperus scopulorum. Vulnerability curves showing loss of conductivity (embolism) with Px down to -8 MPa were generated with versus without superimposing a freeze-thaw treatment. In both species, the freeze-thaw plus water-stress treatment caused more embolism than water stress alone. We estimated the critical conduit diameter (Df) above which a tracheid will embolize due to freezing and thawing and found that it decreased from 35 microm at a Px of -0.5 MPa to 6 microm at -8 MPa. Further analysis showed that the proportionality between diameter of the air bubble nucleating the cavitation and the diameter of the conduit (kL) declined with increasingly negative Px. This suggests that the bubbles causing cavitation are smaller in proportion to tracheid diameter in narrow tracheids than in wider ones. A possible reason for this is that the rate of dissolving increases with bubble pressure, which is inversely proportional to bubble diameter (La Place's law). Hence, smaller bubbles shrink faster than bigger ones. Last, we used the empirical relationship between Px and Df to model the freeze-thaw response in conifer species.

  6. Spectral changes in conifers subjected to air pollution and water stress: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of leaf anatomy, moisture and pigment content, and number of leaf layers on spectral reflectance in healthy, pollution-stressed, and water-stressed conifer needles were examined experimentally. Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron gigantea) were exposed to ozone and acid mist treatments in fumigation chambers; red pine (Pinus resinosa) needles were artificially dried. Infrared reflectance from stacked needles rose with free water loss. In an air-drying experiment, cell volume reductions induced by loss of turgor caused near-infrared reflectance (TM band 4) to drop after most free water was lost. Under acid mist fumigation, stunting of tissue development similarly reduced band 4 reflectance. Both artificial drying and pollutant fumigation caused a blue shift of the red edge of spectral reflectance curves in conifers, attributable to chlorophyll denaturation. Thematic mapper band ratio 4/3 fell and 5/4 rose with increasing pollution stress on artificial drying. Loss of water by air-drying, freeze-drying, or oven-drying enhanced spectral features, due in part to greater scattering and reduced water absorption. Grinding of the leaf tissue further enhanced the spectral features by increasing reflecting surfaces and path length. In a leaf-stacking experiment, an asymptote in visible and infrared reflectance was reached at 7-8 needle layers of red pine.

  7. Temperature effects on nitrogen form uptake by seedling roots of three contrasting conifers.

    PubMed

    Boczulak, S A; Hawkins, B J; Roy, R

    2014-05-01

    Plant species may show a preference for uptake of particular nitrogen (N) forms, but little is known about how N form preference is influenced by soil temperature. Potential future changes in soil N form availability and plant N form preference in warmer soils might shift competitive interactions among forest tree species. We compared the N uptake and growth of three conifer species from contrasting environments grown at rhizosphere temperatures of 10, 16 or 20 °C and supplied with ammonium (NH4 (+)) or nitrate (NO3 (-)) or a mix of arginine and alanine. Short-term N uptake was assessed using ion-selective microelectrodes and application of (15)N, and long-term uptake was assessed by plant N status. Species exhibited preferences for particular N forms, and these preferences related to the N form most available in native soils. Specifically, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) showed a preference for nitrate (a N form commonly found in warmer areas), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) preferred ammonium (a N form abundant in cold soils) and Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.) showed a preference for ammonium and organic N (organic N is often abundant in cold soils). Relative N form preference, as indicated by plant growth, changed with temperature in some species, indicating that these species could acclimate to changing rhizosphere temperatures. Understanding how conifers utilize available soil nutrients at different temperatures can help to predict species' future performance as soil temperatures rise.

  8. Fire and mice: seed predation moderates fire's influence on conifer recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Rafał; Pearson, Dean E; Ortega, Yvette K; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2010-04-01

    In fire-adapted ecosystems, fire is presumed to be the dominant ecological force, and little is known about how consumer interactions influence forest regeneration. Here, we investigated seed predation by deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and its effects on recruitment of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings in unburned and recently burned fire-adapted montane forests in west-central Montana, USA. Deer mice were almost twice as abundant in burned than unburned stands. Deer mouse removal of seeds from petri dishes was two times higher in burned than in unburned stands, and seed removal levels were 8% higher for ponderosa pine than for the smaller Douglas-fir seeds. In seed-addition experiments, emergence of seedlings in deer mouse-exclusion cages was almost six times higher in burned compared to unburned forest. In both burned and unburned forest, emergence was lower for ponderosa pine than for Douglas-fir. Seedling survival to establishment did not differ between conifer species but was considerably higher in burned than in unburned forest. However, effects of seed predation on recruitment prevailed over fire effects: in cages allowing access by deer mice, emergence and establishment were extremely rare for both conifer species in both burned and unburned forest. This research suggests that consumer interactions can substantially influence recruitment even in fire-adapted forest ecosystems.

  9. Xylem parenchyma cell walls lack a gravitropic response in conifer compression wood.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Lloyd A; Nanayakkara, B; Radotić, K; Djikanovic-Golubović, D; Mitrović, A; Bogdanović Pristov, J; Simonović Radosavljević, J; Kalauzi, A

    2015-12-01

    Cell wall fluorescence and immunocytochemistry demonstrate that xylem parenchyma cell walls do not show changes in structure and composition related to gravitropic response comparable to those of tracheids, even when they have lignified secondary cell walls. Tracheid cell walls in compression wood have altered composition and structure which generates the strain responsible for correction of stem lean as part of the gravitropic response of woody plants. Xylem parenchyma cell walls vary among conifer species and can be lignified secondary walls (spruce) or unlignified primary walls (pine). It can be expected that xylem parenchyma with lignified secondary cell walls might show features of compression wood comparable to those of tracheids that have a similar type of cell wall. A comparison of xylem parenchyma cell walls in normal and compression wood in species with lignified and non-lignified parenchyma cell walls provides a unique opportunity to understand the process of reaction wood formation in conifers. Using both UV/visible fluorescence microscopy of cell wall fluorophores and immunocytochemistry of galactan and mannan epitopes, we demonstrate that xylem parenchyma cell walls do not show the changes in composition and structure typical of compression wood tracheids. Adjacent cells of different types but with similar cell wall structure can undergo cell wall developmental changes related to support or defence functions independent of their neighbours. Tracheids are sensitive to gravitropic signals while xylem parenchyma cells are not.

  10. Causes and consequences of variation in conifer leaf life-span

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, P.B.; Koike, T.; Gower, S.T.; Schoettle, A.W.

    1995-07-01

    Species with mutually supporting traits, such as high N{sub mass}, SLA, and A{sub mass}, and short leaf life-span, tend to inhabit either generally resource-rich environments or spatial and/or temporal microhabitats that are resource-rich in otherwise more limited habitats (e.g., {open_quotes}precipitation{close_quotes} ephemerals in warm deserts or spring ephemerals in the understory of temperate deciduous forests). In contrast, species with long leaf life-span often support foliage with low SLA, N{sub mass}, and A{sub mass}, and often grow in low-temperature limited, dry, and/or nutrient-poor environments. The contrast between evergreen and deciduous species, and the implications that emerge from such comparisons, can be considered a paradigm of modern ecological theory. However, based on the results of Reich et al. (1992) and Gower et al. (1993), coniferous species with foliage that persists for 9-10 years are likely to assimilate and allocate carbon and nutrients differently than other evergreen conifers that retain foliage for 2-3 years. Thus, attempts to contrast ecophysiological or ecosystem characteristics of evergreen versus deciduous life forms may be misleading, and pronounced differences among evergreen conifers may be ignored. Clearly, the deciduous-evergreen contrast, although useful in several ways, should be viewed from the broader perspective of a gradient in leaf life-span.

  11. Specialised emission pattern of leaf trace in a late Permian (253 million-years old) conifer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Bo; Feng, Zhuo; Yang, Ji-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Xuan; Shen, Jia-Jia; He, Xiao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Leaf traces are important structures in higher plants that connect leaves and the stem vascular system. The anatomy and emission pattern of leaf traces are well studied in extant vascular plants, but remain poorly understood in fossil lineages. We quantitatively analysed the leaf traces in the late Permian conifer Ningxiaites specialis from Northwest China based on serial sections through pith, primary and secondary xylems. A complete leaf traces emission pattern of a conifer is presented for the first time from the late Palaeozoic. Three to five monarch leaf traces are grouped in clusters, arranged in a helical phyllotaxis. The leaf traces in each cluster can be divided into upper, middle and lower portions, and initiate at the pith periphery and cross the wood horizontally. The upper leaf trace increases its diameter during the first growth increment and then diminishes completely, which indicates leaf abscission at the end of the first year. The middle trace immediately bifurcates once or twice to form two or three vascular bundles. The lower trace persists as a single bundle during its entire length. The intricate leaf trace dynamics indicates this fossil plant had a novel evolutionary habit by promoting photosynthetic capability for the matured plant. PMID:26198410

  12. Leaf hydraulic capacity in ferns, conifers and angiosperms: impacts on photosynthetic maxima.

    PubMed

    Brodribb, Tim J; Holbrook, N Michele; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Palma, Beatriz

    2005-03-01

    * The hydraulic plumbing of vascular plant leaves varies considerably between major plant groups both in the spatial organization of veins, as well as their anatomical structure. * Five conifers, three ferns and 12 angiosperm trees were selected from tropical and temperate forests to investigate whether the profound differences in foliar morphology of these groups lead to correspondingly profound differences in leaf hydraulic efficiency. * We found that angiosperm leaves spanned a range of leaf hydraulic conductance from 3.9 to 36 mmol m2 s-1 MPa-1, whereas ferns (5.9-11.4 mmol m-2 s-1 MPa-1) and conifers (1.6-9.0 mmol m-2 s-1 MPa-1) were uniformly less conductive to liquid water. Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) correlated strongly with stomatal conductance indicating an internal leaf-level regulation of liquid and vapour conductances. Photosynthetic capacity also increased with Kleaf, however, it became saturated at values of Kleaf over 20 mmol m-2 s-1 MPa-1. * The data suggest that vessels in the leaves of the angiosperms studied provide them with the flexibility to produce highly conductive leaves with correspondingly high photosynthetic capacities relative to tracheid-bearing species.

  13. Spectral changes in conifers subjected to air pollution and water stress: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of leaf anatomy, moisture and pigment content, and number of leaf layers on spectral reflectance in healthy, pollution-stressed, and water-stressed conifer needles were examined experimentally. Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron gigantea) were exposed to ozone and acid mist treatments in fumigation chambers; red pine (Pinus resinosa) needles were artificially dried. Infrared reflectance from stacked needles rose with free water loss. In an air-drying experiment, cell volume reductions induced by loss of turgor caused near-infrared reflectance (TM band 4) to drop after most free water was lost. Under acid mist fumigation, stunting of tissue development similarly reduced band 4 reflectance. Both artificial drying and pollutant fumigation caused a blue shift of the red edge of spectral reflectance curves in conifers, attributable to chlorophyll denaturation. Thematic mapper band ratio 4/3 fell and 5/4 rose with increasing pollution stress on artificial drying. Loss of water by air-drying, freeze-drying, or oven-drying enhanced spectral features, due in part to greater scattering and reduced water absorption. Grinding of the leaf tissue further enhanced the spectral features by increasing reflecting surfaces and path length. In a leaf-stacking experiment, an asymptote in visible and infrared reflectance was reached at 7-8 needle layers of red pine.

  14. Stable Water Use Efficiency under Climate Change of Three Sympatric Conifer Species at the Alpine Treeline.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Gerhard; Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Leo, Marco; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten Erhard Edgar

    2016-01-01

    The ability of treeline associated conifers in the Central Alps to cope with recent climate warming and increasing CO2 concentration is still poorly understood. We determined tree ring stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of Pinus cembra, Picea abies, and Larix decidua trees from 1975 to 2010. Stable isotope ratios were compared with leaf level gas exchange measurements carried out in situ between 1979 and 2007. Results indicate that tree ring derived intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) of P. cembra, P. abies and L. decidua remained constant during the last 36 years despite climate warming and rising atmospheric CO2. Temporal patterns in Δ(13)C and Δ(18)O mirrored leaf level gas exchange assessments, suggesting parallel increases of CO2-fixation and stomatal conductance of treeline conifer species. As at the study site soil water availability was not a limiting factor iWUE remained largely stable throughout the study period. The stability in iWUE was accompanied by an increase in basal area increment (BAI) suggesting that treeline trees benefit from both recent climate warming and CO2 fertilization. Finally, our results suggest that iWUE may not change species composition at treeline in the Austrian Alps due to similar ecophysiological responses to climatic changes of the three sympatric study species.

  15. Conifer species adapt to low-rainfall climates by following one of two divergent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, Timothy J.; McAdam, Scott A.M.; Jordan, Gregory J.; Martins, Samuel C.V.

    2014-01-01

    Water stress is one of the primary selective forces in plant evolution. There are characters often cited as adaptations to water stress, but links between the function of these traits and adaptation to drying climates are tenuous. Here we combine distributional, climatic, and physiological evidence from 42 species of conifers to show that the evolution of drought resistance follows two distinct pathways, both involving the coordinated evolution of tissues regulating water supply (xylem) and water loss (stomatal pores) in leaves. Only species with very efficient stomatal closure, and hence low minimum rates of water loss, inhabit dry habitats, but species diverged in their apparent mechanism for maintaining closed stomata during drought. An ancestral mechanism found in Pinaceae and Araucariaceae species relies on high levels of the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) to close stomata during water stress. A second mechanism, found in the majority of Cupressaceae species, uses leaf desiccation rather than high ABA levels to close stomata during sustained water stress. Species in the latter group were characterized by xylem tissues with extreme resistance to embolism but low levels of foliar ABA after 30 d without water. The combination of low levels of ABA under stress with cavitation-resistant xylem enables these species to prolong stomatal opening during drought, potentially extending their photosynthetic activity between rainfall events. Our data demonstrate a surprising simplicity in the way conifers evolved to cope with water shortage, indicating a critical interaction between xylem and stomatal tissues during the process of evolution to dry climates. PMID:25246559

  16. Climate-induced mortality of "dark needle conifer" in Siberian taiga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav; Im, Sergei; Petrov, Ilya

    2017-04-01

    Within Siberia fir (Abies sibirica) and Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) (so called "dark needle conifers", DNC) mortality increased in the southern part of the DNC range. Siberian pine and fir showed decreased radial growth increment within southern Siberia since the 1980s with increasing mortality recorded since the year 2000. Tree ring width was strongly correlated with vapor pressure deficit, aridity and root zone moisture. Water stress from droughts made trees more susceptible to insect attacks causing mortality in about 10% of DNC stands in southern Siberia. Biogeographically, tree mortality was located within the DNC - forest-steppes transition. Tree mortality was significantly correlated with drought and soil moisture anomalies. Within the interior of the DNC range mortality occurred within relief features with high water stress risk (i.e., steep convex south facing slopes with shallow well-drained soils). In general, DNC mortality in Siberia was induced by increased aridity and severe drought (inciting factors) in synergy with biotic attacks (contributing factor). In particular, bark beetle Polygraphus proximus made a strong input on the fir mortality. In future climate scenarios with predicted increase in aridity DNC could be eliminated from the southern part of its current range and will be replaced by drought-resistant conifers and broadleaf species (e.g., Larix sibirica, Pinus sylvestris, and Betula pubescence).

  17. Leaf evolution in Southern Hemisphere conifers tracks the angiosperm ecological radiation.

    PubMed

    Biffin, Ed; Brodribb, Timothy J; Hill, Robert S; Thomas, Philip; Lowe, Andrew J

    2012-01-22

    The angiosperm radiation has been linked to sharp declines in gymnosperm diversity and the virtual elimination of conifers from the tropics. The conifer family Podocarpaceae stands as an exception with highest species diversity in wet equatorial forests. It has been hypothesized that efficient light harvesting by the highly flattened leaves of several podocarp genera facilitates persistence with canopy-forming angiosperms, and the angiosperm ecological radiation may have preferentially favoured the diversification of these lineages. To test these ideas, we develop a molecular phylogeny for Podocarpaceae using Bayesian-relaxed clock methods incorporating fossil time constraints. We find several independent origins of flattened foliage types, and that these lineages have diversified predominantly through the Cenozoic and therefore among canopy-forming angiosperms. The onset of sustained foliage flattening podocarp diversification is coincident with a declining diversification rate of scale/needle-leaved lineages and also with ecological and climatic transformations linked to angiosperm foliar evolution. We demonstrate that climatic range evolution is contingent on the underlying state for leaf morphology. Taken together, our findings imply that as angiosperms came to dominate most terrestrial ecosystems, competitive interactions at the foliar level have profoundly shaped podocarp geography and as a consequence, rates of lineage diversification.

  18. Transient hybridization, not homoploid hybrid speciation, between ancient and deeply divergent conifers.

    PubMed

    Worth, James R P; Larcombe, Matthew J; Sakaguchi, Shota; Marthick, James R; Bowman, David M J S; Ito, Motomi; Jordan, Gregory J

    2016-02-01

    Homoploid hybrid speciation is receiving growing attention due the increasing recognition of its role in speciation. We investigate if individuals intermediate in morphology between the two species of the conifer genus Athrotaxis represent a homoploid hybrid species, A. laxifolia, or are spontaneous F1 hybrids. A total of 1055 individuals of Athrotaxis cupressoides and A. selaginoides, morphologically intermediate individuals, and two putative hybrid swarms were sampled across the range of the genus and genotyped with 13 microsatellites. We used simulations to test the power of our data to identify the pure species, F1s, F2s, and backcross generations. We found that Athrotaxis cupressoides and A. selaginoides are likely the most divergent congeneric conifers known, but the intermediates are F1 hybrids, sharing one allele each from A. cupressoides and A. selaginoides at six loci with completely species specific alleles. The hybrid swarms contain wide genetic variation with stronger affinities to the locally dominant species, A. selaginoides and A. selaginoides backcrosses outnumbering A. cupressoides backcrosses. In addition, we observed evidence for isolated advanced generation backcrosses within the range of the pure species. We conclude that, even though they can be large and long-lived, Athrotaxis hybrid swarms are on a trajectory of decline and will eventually be reabsorbed by the parental species. However, this process may take millennia and fossil evidence suggests that such events have occurred repeatedly since the early Quaternary. Given this timeline, our study highlights the many obstacles to homoploid hybrid speciation. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  19. Control of resin production in Araucaria angustifolia, an ancient South American conifer.

    PubMed

    Perotti, J C; da Silva Rodrigues-Corrêa, K C; Fett-Neto, A G

    2015-07-01

    Araucaria angustifolia is an ancient slow-growing conifer that characterises parts of the Southern Atlantic Forest biome, currently listed as a critically endangered species. The species also produces bark resin, although the factors controlling its resinosis are largely unknown. To better understand this defence-related process, we examined the resin exudation response of A. angustifolia upon treatment with well-known chemical stimulators used in fast-growing conifers producing both bark and wood resin, such as Pinus elliottii. The initial hypothesis was that A. angustifolia would display significant differences in the regulation of resinosis. The effect of Ethrel(®) (ET - ethylene precursor), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), sulphuric acid (SuA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP - nitric oxide donor) on resin yield and composition in young plants of A. angustifolia was examined. In at least one of the concentrations tested, and frequently in more than one, an aqueous glycerol solution applied on fresh wound sites of the stem with one or more of the adjuvants examined promoted an increase in resin yield, as well as monoterpene concentration (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and limonene). Higher yields and longer exudation periods were observed with JA and ET, another feature shared with Pinus resinosis. The results suggest that resinosis control is similar in Araucaria and Pinus. In addition, A. angustifolia resin may be a relevant source of valuable terpene chemicals, whose production may be increased by using stimulating pastes containing the identified adjuvants.

  20. Syringyl lignin production in conifers: Proof of concept in a Pine tracheary element system

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Armin; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Phillips, Lorelle; ...

    2015-04-20

    Conifers (softwoods) naturally lack syringyl units in their lignins, rendering lignocellulosic materials from such species more difficult to process than syringyl-rich hardwood species. Using a transformable Pinus radiata tracheary element (TE) system as an experimental platform, we investigated whether metabolic engineering can be used to create syringyl lignin in conifers. Pyrolysis-GC/MS and 2D-NMR analysis of P. radiata TE cultures transformed to express ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) from Liquidambar styraciflua confirmed the production and incorporation of sinapyl alcohol into the lignin polymer. Transformation with F5H was sufficient for the production of syringyl lignin in TEs, but cotransformationmore » with COMT improved its formation. In addition, lower levels of the pathway intermediate 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol were evidenced in cotransformation experiments, indicating that the introduction of the COMT overcame the inefficiency of the native pine methyltransferases for supporting sinapyl alcohol production. In conclusion, our results provide the proof of concept that it is possible to generate a lignin polymer that contains syringyl units in softwood species such as P. radiata, suggesting that it might be possible to retain the outstanding fiber properties of softwoods while imbuing them with the lignin characteristics of hardwoods that are more favorable for industrial processing.« less

  1. Leaf evolution in Southern Hemisphere conifers tracks the angiosperm ecological radiation

    PubMed Central

    Biffin, Ed; Brodribb, Timothy J.; Hill, Robert S.; Thomas, Philip; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The angiosperm radiation has been linked to sharp declines in gymnosperm diversity and the virtual elimination of conifers from the tropics. The conifer family Podocarpaceae stands as an exception with highest species diversity in wet equatorial forests. It has been hypothesized that efficient light harvesting by the highly flattened leaves of several podocarp genera facilitates persistence with canopy-forming angiosperms, and the angiosperm ecological radiation may have preferentially favoured the diversification of these lineages. To test these ideas, we develop a molecular phylogeny for Podocarpaceae using Bayesian-relaxed clock methods incorporating fossil time constraints. We find several independent origins of flattened foliage types, and that these lineages have diversified predominantly through the Cenozoic and therefore among canopy-forming angiosperms. The onset of sustained foliage flattening podocarp diversification is coincident with a declining diversification rate of scale/needle-leaved lineages and also with ecological and climatic transformations linked to angiosperm foliar evolution. We demonstrate that climatic range evolution is contingent on the underlying state for leaf morphology. Taken together, our findings imply that as angiosperms came to dominate most terrestrial ecosystems, competitive interactions at the foliar level have profoundly shaped podocarp geography and as a consequence, rates of lineage diversification. PMID:21653584

  2. Effectiveness of the DNA barcoding approach for closely related conifers discrimination: A case study of the Pinus mugo complex.

    PubMed

    Celiński, Konrad; Kijak, Hanna; Wojnicka-Półtorak, Aleksandra; Buczkowska-Chmielewska, Katarzyna; Sokołowska, Joanna; Chudzińska, Ewa

    DNA barcoding is a standard and efficient method, frequently used for identification, discrimination and discovery of new species. Although this approach is very useful for classifying the world's biodiversity, little is known about its usefulness in barcoding at lower taxonomic level and its discrimination rate for closely related species, like conifers. In this study, we compared the genetic variation of eight chloroplast DNA barcode regions (matK, rbcL, trnH-psbA, trnL-trnF, rpl20-rps18, trnV, ycf1, ycf2) in 17 conifers - three closely related pines from Pinus mugo complex and 14 more distant conifers representing two genera and four sections of the Pinaceae family. The discrimination rate for a single and for multiple DNA barcode regions analyzed in this study was estimated using the Tree-Building and PWG-Distance methods. The usefulness of the DNA barcoding approach for analyzing and resolving taxonomic inconsistency among closely related and more phylogenetically distant conifers was evaluated and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting post-fire tree mortality for 12 western US conifers using the First-Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM)

    Treesearch

    Sharon Hood; Duncan Lutes

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of fire-caused tree mortality is critical for making sound land management decisions such as developing burning prescriptions and post-fire management guidelines. To improve efforts to predict post-fire tree mortality, we developed 3-year post-fire mortality models for 12 Western conifer species - white fir (Abies concolor [Gord. &...

  4. Interim definitions for old growth Douglas-fir and mixed-conifer forests in the Pacific Northwest and California.

    Treesearch

    J.F. Franklin; F. Hall; W. Laudenslayer; C. Maser; J. Nunan; J. Poppino; C.J. Ralph; T. Spies

    1986-01-01

    Interim definitions of old-growth forests are provided to guide efforts in land-management planning until comprehensive definitions based on research that is currently underway can be formulated. The basic criteria for identifying old-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and mixed-conifer forests in western Washington and...

  5. A process-based model of conifer forest structure and function with special emphasis on leaf lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Colin P.; Beerling, David J.

    2002-12-01

    We describe the University of Sheffield Conifer Model (USCM), a process-based approach for simulating conifer forest carbon, nitrogen, and water fluxes by up-scaling widely applicable relationships between leaf lifespan and function. The USCM is designed to predict and analyze the biogeochemistry and biophysics of conifer forests that dominated the ice-free high-latitude regions under the high pCO2 "greenhouse" world 290-50 Myr ago. It will be of use in future research investigating controls on the contrasting distribution of ancient evergreen and deciduous forests between hemispheres, and their differential feedbacks on polar climate through the exchange of energy and materials with the atmosphere. Emphasis is placed on leaf lifespan because this trait can be determined from the anatomical characteristics of fossil conifer woods and influences a range of ecosystem processes. Extensive testing of simulated net primary production and partitioning, leaf area index, evapotranspiration, nitrogen uptake, and land surface energy partitioning showed close agreement with observations from sites across a wide climatic gradient. This indicates the generic utility of our model, and adequate representation of the key processes involved in forest function using only information on leaf lifespan, climate, and soils.

  6. Highly rearranged and size-variable chloroplast genomes in conifers II clade (cupressophytes): evolution towards shorter intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2014-04-01

    Although conifers are of immense ecological and economic value, bioengineering of their chloroplasts remains undeveloped. Understanding the chloroplast genomic organization of conifers can facilitate their bioengineering. Members of the conifer II clade (or cupressophytes) are highly diverse in both morphologic features and chloroplast genomic organization. We compared six cupressophyte chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) that represent four of the five cupressophyte families, including three genomes that are first reported here (Agathis dammara, Calocedrus formosana and Nageia nagi). The six cupressophyte cpDNAs have lost a pair of large inverted repeats (IRs) and vary greatly in size, organization and tRNA copies. We demonstrate that cupressophyte cpDNAs have evolved towards reduced size, largely due to shrunken intergenic spacers. In cupressophytes, cpDNA rearrangements are capable of extending intergenic spacers, and synonymous mutations are negatively associated with the size and frequency of rearrangements. The variable cpDNA sizes of cupressophytes may have been shaped by mutational burden and genomic rearrangements. On the basis of cpDNA organization, our analyses revealed that in gymnosperms, cpDNA rearrangements are phylogenetically informative, which supports the 'gnepines' clade. In addition, removal of a specific IR influences the minimal rearrangements required for the gnepines and cupressophyte clades, whereby Pinaceae favours the removal of IRB but cupressophytes exclusion of IRA. This result strongly suggests that different IR copies have been lost from conifers I and II. Our data help understand the complexity and evolution of cupressophyte cpDNAs.

  7. Seed plant phylogeny inferred from all three plant genomes: Monophyly of extant gymnosperms and origin of Gnetales from conifers

    PubMed Central

    Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Parkinson, Christopher L.; Cheng, Yuchang; Vincent, Thomas M.; Palmer, Jeffrey D.

    2000-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among the five groups of extant seed plants are presently quite unclear. For example, morphological studies consistently identify the Gnetales as the extant sister group to angiosperms (the so-called “anthophyte” hypothesis), whereas a number of molecular studies recover gymnosperm monophyly, and few agree with the morphology-based placement of Gnetales. To better resolve these and other unsettled issues, we have generated a new molecular data set of mitochondrial small subunit rRNA sequences, and have analyzed these data together with comparable data sets for the nuclear small subunit rRNA gene and the chloroplast rbcL gene. All nuclear analyses strongly ally Gnetales with a monophyletic conifers, whereas all mitochondrial analyses and those chloroplast analyses that take into account saturation of third-codon position transitions actually place Gnetales within conifers, as the sister group to the Pinaceae. Combined analyses of all three genes strongly support this latter relationship, which to our knowledge has never been suggested before. The combined analyses also strongly support monophyly of extant gymnosperms, with cycads identified as the basal-most group of gymnosperms, Ginkgo as the next basal, and all conifers except for Pinaceae as sister to the Gnetales + Pinaceae clade. According to these findings, the Gnetales may be viewed as extremely divergent conifers, and the many morphological similarities between angiosperms and Gnetales (e.g., double fertilization and flower-like reproductive structures) arose independently. PMID:10760277

  8. Widespread inbreeding and unexpected geographic patterns of genetic variation in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), an imperiled North American conifer

    Treesearch

    Kevin M. Potter; Robert M. Jetton; William S. Dvorak; Valerie D. Hipkins; Rusty Rhea; W. Andrew Whittier

    2012-01-01

    Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis [L.] Carr.) is an ecologically important tree species experiencing severe mortality across much of its eastern North American distribution, caused by infestation of the exotic hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand). To guide gene conservation strategies for this imperiled conifer, we conducted a range-wide genetic variation...

  9. Dynamics of low-temperature acclimation in temperate and boreal conifer foliage in a mild winter climate

    Treesearch

    G. Richard Strimbeck; Trygve D. Kjellsen; Paul G. Schaberg; Paula F. Murakami

    2008-01-01

    To provide baseline data for physiological studies of extreme low-temperature (LT) tolerance in boreal conifers, we profiled LT stress responses, liquid nitrogen (LN2)-quench tolerance, and sugar concentrations in foliage of boreal-temperate species pairs in the genera Abies, Picea and Pinus, growing in an...

  10. Post-fire management regimes affect carbon sequestration and storage in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth M. Powers; John D. Marshall; Jianwei Zhang; Liang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Forests mitigate climate change by sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere and accumulating it in biomass storage pools. However, in dry conifer forests, fire occasionally returns large quantities of CO2 to the atmosphere. Both the total amount of carbon stored and its susceptibility to loss may be altered by post-fire land...

  11. Contrasting spatial patterns in active-fire and fire-suppressed Mediterranean climate old-growth mixed conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Danny L. Fry; Scott L. Stephens; Brandon M. Collins; Malcolm North; Ernesto Franco-Vizcaino; Samantha J. Gill

    2014-01-01

    In Mediterranean environments in western North America, historic fire regimes in frequent-fire conifer forests are highly variable both temporally and spatially. This complexity influenced forest structure and spatial patterns, but some of this diversity has been lost due to anthropogenic disruption of ecosystem processes, including fire. Information from reference...

  12. Patterns of mortality in an old-growth mixed-conifer forest of the Southern Sierra Nevada, California

    Treesearch

    Thomas F. Smith; David M. Rizzo; Malcolm North

    2005-01-01

    Mortality patterns in an old-growth, mixed-conifer forest, in the absence of wildfire, were investigated at the Teakettle Experimental Forest from 2000 to 2002. We tested the hypothesis that after a century of fire suppression, pathogen- and insect-associated mortality (between episodic droughts) would be significantly greater on ingrowth trees (i.e., smaller-diameter...

  13. Eriosomatine aphids (Hemiptera, Aphididae, Eriosomatinae) associated with moss and roots of conifer and willow in forests of the Pacific Northwest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apterous adult morphs of eriosomatine aphids (Hemiptera, Aphididae, Eriosomatinae) associated with moss and/or roots of conifer or willow in forests of the Pacific Northwest including Alaska are described, illustrated, and keyed. In total, seven species (Clydesmithia canadensis Danielsson, Melaphis ...

  14. Comparative trends in log populations in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests following severe drought

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2017-01-01

    Logs provide an important form of coarse woody debris in forest systems, contributing to numerous ecological processes and affecting wildlife habitat and fuel complexes. Despite this, little information is available on the dynamics of log populations in southwestern ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and especially mixed-conifer forests. A recent episode of elevated tree...

  15. Extraction and estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate crystals in the foliage of conifer and hardwood trees

    Treesearch

    Rakesh Minocha; Bradley Chamberlain; Stephanie Long; Swathi A. Turlapati; Gloria. Quigley

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a method for the extraction and indirect estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the foliage of trees. Foliar tissue was collected from a single tree of each species (five conifers and five hardwoods) for comparison of extractions in different solvents using 10 replicates per species from the same pool of...

  16. Predicting surface fuel models and fuel metrics using lidar and CIR imagery in a dense mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Marek K. Jakubowksi; Qinghua Guo; Brandon Collins; Scott Stephens; Maggi. Kelly

    2013-01-01

    We compared the ability of several classification and regression algorithms to predict forest stand structure metrics and standard surface fuel models. Our study area spans a dense, topographically complex Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest. We used clustering, regression trees, and support vector machine algorithms to analyze high density (average 9 pulses/m

  17. Effects of thinning, residue mastication, and prescribed fire on soil and nutrient budgets in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of thinning followed by residue mastication (THIN), prescribed fire (BURN), and thinning plus residue mastication plus burning (T+B) on nutrient budgets and resin-based (plant root simulator [PRS] probe) measurements of soil nutrient availability in a mixed-conifer forest were measured. ...

  18. Soil nutrients and microbial activity after early and late season prescribed burns in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Sarah T. Hamman; Ingrid C. Burke; Eric E. Knapp

    2008-01-01

    Restoring the natural fire regime to forested systems that have experienced fire exclusion throughout the past century can be a challenge due to the heavy fuel loading conditions. Fire is being re-introduced to mixed conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada through both early season and late season prescribed burns, even though most fires historically occurred in the late...

  19. Incidence and effects of endemic populations of forest pests in young mixed-conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada

    Treesearch

    Carroll B. Williams; David L. Azuma; George T. Ferrell

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 3.200 trees in young mixed-conifer stands were examined for pest activity and human-caused or mechanical injuries, and approximately 25 percent of these trees were randomly selected for stem analyses. The examination of trees felled for stem analyses showed that 409 (47 percent) were free of pests and 466 (53 percent) had one or more pest categories....

  20. Water dynamics in conifer logs in early stages of decay in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.A

    Treesearch

    Jay M. Sexton; Mark E. Harmon

    2009-01-01

    Water dynamics in decaying conifer logs of four species (Abies amabilis [Pacific silver fir], Pseudotsuga menziesii [Douglas-fir], Thuja plicata [western red cedar], and Tsuga heterophylla [western hemlock]) were studied in the Coast Range of Oregon. Measurements were made of...

  1. Changes in snag populations in northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests, 1997-2002

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2005-01-01

    Snags (standing dead trees) are important components of forests that contribute to ecological processes and provide habitat for many life forms. We monitored dynamics of snag populations on 1-ha plots in southwestern mixed-conifer (n = 53 plots) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, n = 60 plots) forests in north-central Arizona from 1997 to 2002. Of...

  2. Trends in snag populations in drought-stressed mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests (1997-2007)

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2012-01-01

    Snags provide important biological legacies, resources for numerous species of native wildlife, and contribute to decay dynamics and ecological processes in forested ecosystems. We monitored trends in snag populations from 1997 to 2007 in drought-stressed mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) forests, northern Arizona. Median snag density...

  3. Modeling climate and fuel reduction impacts on mixed-conifer forest carbon stocks in the Sierra Nevada, California

    Treesearch

    Matthew D. Hurteau; Timothy A. Robards; Donald Stevens; David Saah; Malcolm North; George W. Koch

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the impacts of changing climatic conditions on forest growth is integral to estimating future forest carbon balance. We used a growth-and-yield model, modified for climate sensitivity, to quantify the effects of altered climate on mixed-conifer forest growth in the Lake Tahoe Basin, California. Estimates of forest growth and live tree carbon stocks were...

  4. Population isolation results in unexpectedly high differentiation in Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana), an imperiled southern Appalachian endemic conifer

    Treesearch

    Kevin M. Potter; Angelia Rose Campbell; Sedley A. Josserand; C. Dana Nelson; Robert M. Jetton

    2017-01-01

    Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Engelm.) is a rare conifer species that exists in small, isolated populations within a limited area of the Southern Appalachian Mountains of the USA. As such, it represents an opportunity to assess whether population size and isolation can affect the genetic diversity and differentiation of a species capable of longdistance gene flow...

  5. Variation in seed size is structured by dispersal syndrome and cone morphology in conifers and other nonflowering seed plants.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Mathews, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    Seed size varies tremendously in plants and its evolution is influenced by multiple ecological and biological factors that are difficult to disentangle. In this study, we focus on understanding the role of seed dispersal by animals in the evolution of seed size in conifers, the most diverse extant nonflowering seed plant group. Relationships among seed size, dispersal syndrome, climate and cone morphology were analyzed across conifers using quantitative models of character evolution and phylogenetic regression techniques. Dispersal syndrome is a more consistent predictor of seed size within major extant conifer clades than climate. Seeds are generally larger in animal-dispersed than wind-dispersed species, and particular cone morphologies are consistently associated with specific ranges in seed size. Seed size and cone morphology evolve in a correlated manner in many animal-dispersed conifers, following a trade-off that minimizes the total size of the dispersal unit. These relationships are also present in other nonflowering seed plant groups, and have been important in the evolution of seeds and cones at least over the Cenozoic and perhaps over much of the later Mesozoic. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. A fuel treatment reduces potential fire severity and increases suppression efficiency in a Sierran mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Jason J. Moghaddas

    2006-01-01

    Fuel treatments are being widely implemented on public and private lands across the western U.S. While scientists and managers have an understanding of how fuel treatments can modify potential fire behavior under modeled conditions, there is limited information on how treatments perform under real wildfire conditions in Sierran mixed conifer forests. The Bell Fire...

  7. Variability in vegetation and surface fuels across mixed-conifer-dominated landscapes with over 40 years of natural fire

    Treesearch

    Brandon M. Collins; Jamie M. Lydersen; Danny L. Fry; Katherine Wilkin; Tadashi Moody; Scott L. Stephens

    2016-01-01

    Studies of historical fire and vegetation conditions in dry conifer forests have demonstrated a high degree of heterogeneity across landscapes. However, there is a limit to the amount of inference that can be drawn from historical fire reconstructions. Contemporary "reference" landscapes may be able to provide information that is not available from historical...

  8. A comprehensive guide to fuel management practices for dry mixed conifer forests in the northwestern United States: Prescribed fire

    Treesearch

    Theresa B. Jain; Mike A. Battaglia; Han-Sup Han; Russell T. Graham; Christopher R. Keyes; Jeremy S. Fried; Jonathan E. Sandquist

    2014-01-01

    Fire has had a profound historical role in shaping dry mixed conifer forests in the western United States. However, the uncertainty and complexity of prescribed fires raises the question “Is fire always the best option for treating fuels?” The decision to use prescribed fire is dependent upon several factors.

  9. A Catskill Flora and Economic Botany, II: Coniferales. The Conifers. Bulletin No. 441, New York State Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Karl L.

    This section of the Catskill Flora provides an overview to three families within the Coniferales: the Taxaceae, Pinaceae, and Cupressaceae. Included are keys to the local species of conifers, description of each species, nomenclatural data, botanical illustrations, and a brief discussion of each species which often mentions medical and food uses…

  10. Evaluating potential trade-offs among fuel treatment strategies in mixed-conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada

    Treesearch

    Jens T. Stevens; Brandon M. Collins; Jonathan W. Long; Malcolm P. North; Susan J. Prichard; Leland W. Tarnay; Angela M. White

    2016-01-01

    Fuel treatments in fire-suppressed mixed-conifer forests are designed to moderate potential wildfire behavior and effects. However, the objectives for modifying potential fire effects can vary widely, from improving fire suppression efforts and protecting infrastructure, to reintroducing low-severity fire, to restoring and maintaining variable forest structure and...

  11. Trends in snag populations in Northern Arizona mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests, 1997-2012

    Treesearch

    J. L. Ganey; S. C. Vojta

    2014-01-01

    We monitored snag populations in drought-stressed mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests, northern Arizona, at 5-yr intervals from 1997-2012. Snag density increased from 1997-2007 in both forest types, with accelerated change due to drought-related tree mortality during the period 2002-2007. Snag density declined non-significantly from 2007-2012,...

  12. Mapped DNA probes from Ioblolly pine can be used for restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping in other conifers

    Treesearch

    M.R. Ahuja; M.E. Devey; A.T. Groover; K.D. Jermstad; D.B Neale

    1994-01-01

    A high-density genetic map based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) is being constructed for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Consequently, a large number of DNA probes from loblolly pine are potentially available for use in other species. We have used some of these DNA probes to detect RFLPs in 12 conifers and an angiosperm....

  13. Testing of a heterologous, wound- and insect-inducible promoter for functional genomics studies in conifer defense.

    PubMed

    Godard, Kimberley-Ann; Byun-McKay, Ashley; Levasseur, Caroline; Plant, Aine; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale sequencing of conifer cDNAs and targeted molecular cloning have identified many putative conifer defense genes. Expression of many of these genes is induced in response to biotic stress and some may be expressed only in a few specialized tissues or cells. Proven functional genomics approaches to test these genes involve expression of proteins in Escherichia coli or yeast for biochemical characterization or constitutive over-expression in transformed plants. Plant transformation to test functions of insect-, wound- or pathogen-induced conifer defense genes would benefit from the use of an inducible expression system. We describe here the development of a heterologous, wound- and insect-inducible gene expression system for conifers using the potato proteinase inhibitor II (pinII)-promoter. Using pinII::GUS and pinII::(E)-alpha-bisabolene synthase expression constructs we demonstrate localized induced gene expression in white spruce seedlings (Picea glauca). Testing of these constructs in Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco illustrates the additional potential of the pinII-promoter to be used in tests of gene function that involve cell-specific and systemic induction.

  14. Ectomycorrhizal sporophore distributions in a southeastern Appalachian mixed hardwood/conifer forest with thickets of Rhododendron maximum

    Treesearch

    John F. Walker; Orson R. Jr. Miller

    2002-01-01

    Sporophore abundance of putatively ectomycorrhizal fungi was compared in a mature mixed hardwood/conifer forest inside of (1) versus outside of (2) Rhododendron maximum thickets (RmT). Experimental blocks (1/4 ha) were established inside of (3) and outside of (3) RmT at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in Macon County, North Carolina, USA. Litter...

  15. Improved white spruce (Picea glauca) genome assemblies and annotation of large gene families of conifer terpenoid and phenolic defense metabolism.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Keeling, Christopher I; Yuen, Macaire Man Saint; Raymond, Anthony; Taylor, Greg A; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Mohamadi, Hamid; Paulino, Daniel; Chiu, Readman; Jackman, Shaun D; Robertson, Gordon; Yang, Chen; Boyle, Brian; Hoffmann, Margarete; Weigel, Detlef; Nelson, David R; Ritland, Carol; Isabel, Nathalie; Jaquish, Barry; Yanchuk, Alvin; Bousquet, Jean; Jones, Steven J M; MacKay, John; Birol, Inanc; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    White spruce (Picea glauca), a gymnosperm tree, has been established as one of the models for conifer genomics. We describe the draft genome assemblies of two white spruce genotypes, PG29 and WS77111, innovative tools for the assembly of very large genomes, and the conifer genomics resources developed in this process. The two white spruce genotypes originate from distant geographic regions of western (PG29) and eastern (WS77111) North America, and represent elite trees in two Canadian tree-breeding programs. We present an update (V3 and V4) for a previously reported PG29 V2 draft genome assembly and introduce a second white spruce genome assembly for genotype WS77111. Assemblies of the PG29 and WS77111 genomes confirm the reconstructed white spruce genome size in the 20 Gbp range, and show broad synteny. Using the PG29 V3 assembly and additional white spruce genomics and transcriptomics resources, we performed MAKER-P annotation and meticulous expert annotation of very large gene families of conifer defense metabolism, the terpene synthases and cytochrome P450s. We also comprehensively annotated the white spruce mevalonate, methylerythritol phosphate and phenylpropanoid pathways. These analyses highlighted the large extent of gene and pseudogene duplications in a conifer genome, in particular for genes of secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism, and the potential for gain and loss of function for defense and adaptation.

  16. Estimation and application of a growth and yield model for uneven-aged mixed conifer stands in California.

    Treesearch

    Jingjing Liang; J. Buongiorno; R.A. Monserud

    2005-01-01

    A growth model for uneven-aged mixed-conifer stands in California was developed with data from 205 permanent plots. The model predicts the number of softwood and hardwood trees in nineteen diameter classes, based on equations for diameter growth rates, mortality arid recruitment. The model gave unbiased predictions of the expected number of trees by diameter class and...

  17. Science You Can Use Bulletin: Revisiting disturbance: A new guide for keeping dry mixed conifer forests healthy through fuel management

    Treesearch

    Sue Miller; Theresa Jain; Mike A. Battaglia; Han-Sup Han; Russell T. Graham; Christopher R. Keyes; Jeremy S. Fried; Jonathan E. Sandquist

    2014-01-01

    Planning for hazardous fuels reduction can be challenging, given that land managers must balance multiple resource objectives. To help managers with planning and implementing fuel treatments, the Rocky Mountain Research Station, with support from the Joint Fire Science Program, has published A Comprehensive Guide to Fuel Management Practices for Dry Mixed Conifer...

  18. Fire performance in traditional silvicultural and fire and fire surrogate treatments in Sierran mixed-conifer forests: a brief summary

    Treesearch

    Jason J. Moghaddas; Scott L. Stephens

    2007-01-01

    Mixed conifer forests cover 7.9 million acres of California’s total land base. Forest structure in these forests has been influenced by harvest practices and silvicultural systems implemented since the beginning of the California Gold Rush in 1849. Today, the role of fire in coniferous forests, both in shaping past stand structure and its ability to shape future...

  19. Automated estimation of individual conifer tree height and crown diameter via Two-dimensional spatial wavelet analysis of lidar data

    Treesearch

    Michael J. Falkowski; Alistair M.S. Smith; Andrew T. Hudak; Paul E. Gessler; Lee A. Vierling; Nicholas L. Crookston

    2006-01-01

    We describe and evaluate a new analysis technique, spatial wavelet analysis (SWA), to automatically estimate the location, height, and crown diameter of individual trees within mixed conifer open canopy stands from light detection and ranging (lidar) data. Two-dimensional Mexican hat wavelets, over a range of likely tree crown diameters, were convolved with lidar...

  20. A comprehensive guide to fuel management practices for dry mixed conifer forests in the northwestern United States

    Treesearch

    Theresa B. Jain; Mike A. Battaglia; Han-Sup Han; Russell T. Graham; Christopher R. Keyes; Jeremy S. Fried; Jonathan E. Sandquist

    2012-01-01

    This guide describes the benefits, opportunities, and trade-offs concerning fuel treatments in the dry mixed conifer forests of northern California and the Klamath Mountains, Pacific Northwest Interior, northern and central Rocky Mountains, and Utah. Multiple interacting disturbances and diverse physical settings have created a forest mosaic with historically low- to...

  1. Silviculture affects composition, growth, and yield in mixed northern conifers: 40-year results from the Penobscot Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Sendak; John C. Brissette; Robert M. Frank

    2003-01-01

    This long-term experiment in Maine, U.S.A., was designed to provide information on the best silvicultural practices for managing stands of mixed northern conifers in northeastern U.S.A. We evaluated growth and yield and changes in species composition, quality, and structure during the first 40 years of the experiment. Replicated treatments include the selection system...

  2. Broadband, red-edge information from satellites improves early stress detection in a New Mexico conifer woodland

    Treesearch

    Jan U.H. Eitel; Lee A. Vierling; Marcy E. Litvak; Dan S. Long; Urs Schulthess; Alan A. Ager; Dan J. Krofcheck; Leo Stoscheck

    2011-01-01

    Multiple plant stresses can affect the health, esthetic condition, and timber harvest value of conifer forests. To monitor spatial and temporal dynamic forest stress conditions, timely, accurate, and cost-effective information is needed that could be provided by remote sensing. Recently, satellite imagery has become available via the RapidEye satellite constellation to...

  3. Biophysical controls on soil respiration in the dominant patch types of an old-growth, mixed-conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Siyan Ma; Jiquan Chen; John R. Butnor; Malcolm North; Eugénie S. Euskirchen; Brian Oakley

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about biophysical controls on soil respiration in California's Sierra Nevada old-growth, mixed-conifer forests. Using portable and automated soil respiration sampling units, we measured soil respiration rate (SRR) in three dominant patch types: closed canopy (CC), ceanothus-dominated patches (CECO), and open canopy (OC). SRR varied significantly...

  4. Patterns of conifer regeneration following high severity wildfire in ponderosa pine - dominated forests of the Colorado Front Range

    Treesearch

    Marin E. Chambers; Paula J. Fornwalt; Sparkle L. Malone; Michael Battaglia

    2016-01-01

    Many recent wildfires in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) - dominated forests of the western United States have burned more severely than historical ones, generating concern about forest resilience. This concern stems from uncertainty about the ability of ponderosa pine and other co-occurring conifers to regenerate in areas where no...

  5. Red alder-conifer stands in Alaska: An example of mixed species management to enhance structural and biological complexity

    Treesearch

    Robert Deal; Ewa Orlikowska; David D’Amore; Paul Hennon

    2017-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in managing forests to improve biodiversity, enhance ecosystem services and assure long-term sustainability of forest resources. An increasingly important goal of forest management is to increase stand diversity and improve wildlife and aquatic habitat. Well-planned silvicultural systems containing a mixture of broadleaf-conifer species have...

  6. Recommendations for snag retention in southwestern mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests: History and current status

    Treesearch

    Joseph L. Ganey

    2016-01-01

    Snags provide habitat for numerous species of wildlife. Several authors have provided recommendations for snag retention in southwestern mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. Most recommendations were presented in terms of minimum snag density and/or size. I summarized the history of recommendations for snag retention in these forest...

  7. A Catskill Flora and Economic Botany, II: Coniferales. The Conifers. Bulletin No. 441, New York State Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Karl L.

    This section of the Catskill Flora provides an overview to three families within the Coniferales: the Taxaceae, Pinaceae, and Cupressaceae. Included are keys to the local species of conifers, description of each species, nomenclatural data, botanical illustrations, and a brief discussion of each species which often mentions medical and food uses…

  8. Decoupled mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA population structure reveals Holocene collapse and population isolation in a threatened Mexican-endemic conifer.

    Treesearch

    Juan P. Jaramillo-Correa; Jean Beaulieu; F. Thomas Ledig; Jean. Bousqueter

    2006-01-01

    Chihuahua spruce (Picea chihuahuana Martínez) is a montane subtropical conifer endemic to the Sierra Madre Occidental in northwestern México. Range-wide variation was investigated using maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) and paternally inherited chloroplast (cpDNA) DNA markers. Among the 16 mtDNA regions analysed, only...

  9. Plasticity in physiological traits in conifers: implications for response to climate change in the western U.S

    Treesearch

    NE Grulke

    2010-01-01

    Population variation in ecophysiological traits of four co-occurring montane conifers was measured on a large latitudinal gradient to quantitatively assess their potential for response to environmental change. White fir (Abies concolor) had the highest variability, gross photosynthetic rate (Pg), and foliar carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content. Despite low water use...

  10. Stand Structure and Composition 32 Years after Precommercial Thinning Treatments in a Mixed Northern Conifer Stand in Central Maine

    Treesearch

    Aaron R. Weiskittel; Laura S. Kenefic; Rongxia Li; John Brissette

    2011-01-01

    The effects of four precommercial thinning (PCT) treatments on an even-aged northern conifer stand in Maine were investigated by examining stand structure and composition 32 years after treatment. Replicated treatments applied in 1976 included: (1) control (no PCT), (2) row thinning (rowthin; 5-ft-wide row removal with 3-ft-wide residual strips), (3) row thinning with...

  11. Population isolation results in low genetic variation and high differentiation in Carolina hemlock (tsuga caroliniana), an imperiled southern Appalachian conifer

    Treesearch

    Kevin M. Potter; Lia Campbell; Sedley A. Josserand; C. Dana Nelson; Robert M. Jetton

    2017-01-01

    Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana) is a rare conifer species that grows in small, isolated populations in the southern Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia. The species is additionally imperiled by the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), an invasive insect that can...

  12. Evaluation of sampling methods to quantify abundance of hardwoods and snags within conifer-dominated riparian zones

    Treesearch

    Theresa Marquardt; Hailemariam Temesgen; Paul D. Anderson; Bianca. Eskelson

    2012-01-01

    Six sampling alternatives were examined for their ability to quantify selected attributes of snags and hardwoods in conifer-dominated riparian areas of managed headwater forests in western Oregon. Each alternative was simulated 500 times at eight headwater forest locations based on a 0.52-ha square stem map. The alternatives were evaluated based on how well they...

  13. Phylogeny of seed plants based on all three genomic compartments: Extant gymnosperms are monophyletic and Gnetales' closest relatives are conifers

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, L. Michelle; Coat, Gwénaële; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts to resolve Darwin's “abominable mystery”—the origin of angiosperms—have led to the conclusion that Gnetales and various fossil groups are sister to angiosperms, forming the “anthophytes.” Morphological homologies, however, are difficult to interpret, and molecular data have not provided clear resolution of relationships among major groups of seed plants. We introduce two sequence data sets from slowly evolving mitochondrial genes, cox1 and atpA, which unambiguously reject the anthophyte hypothesis, favoring instead a close relationship between Gnetales and conifers. Parsimony- and likelihood-based analyses of plastid rbcL and nuclear 18S rDNA alone and with cox1 and atpA also strongly support a gnetophyte–conifer grouping. Surprisingly, three of four genes (all but nuclear rDNA) and combined three-genome analyses also suggest or strongly support Gnetales as derived conifers, sister to Pinaceae. Analyses with outgroups screened to avoid long branches consistently identify all gymnosperms as a monophyletic sister group to angiosperms. Combined three- and four-gene rooted analyses resolve the branching order for the remaining major groups—cycads separate from other gymnosperms first, followed by Ginkgo and then (Gnetales + Pinaceae) sister to a monophyletic group with all other conifer families. The molecular phylogeny strongly conflicts with current interpretations of seed plant morphology, and implies that many similarities between gnetophytes and angiosperms, such as “flower-like” reproductive structures and double fertilization, were independently derived, whereas other characters could emerge as synapomorphies for an expanded conifer group including Gnetales. An initial angiosperm–gymnosperm split implies a long stem lineage preceding the explosive Mesozoic radiation of flowering plants and suggests that angiosperm origins and homologies should be sought among extinct seed plant groups. PMID:10760278

  14. A low diversity, seasonal tropical landscape dominated by conifers and peltasperms: Early Permian Abo Formation, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Chaney, D.S.; Nelson, W.J.; Lucas, S.G.; Looy, C.V.; Quick, K.; Jun, W.

    2007-01-01

    Walchian conifers (Walchia piniformis Sternberg, 1825) and peltasperms similar to Supaia thinnfeldioides White and cf. Supaia anomala White dominate floodplain deposits of a narrow stratigraphic interval of the middle Abo Formation, Lower Permian of central New Mexico. The plant fossils occur in thinly bedded units up to two meters thick, consisting of coarse siltstone to very fine sandstone with clay partings. Bedding is primarily tabular, thin, and bears rare ripple marks and trough cross beds. Bedding surfaces display mud cracks, raindrop imprints, horizontal and vertical burrows of invertebrates, and footprints of terrestrial vertebrates. These features indicate intermittent and generally unchannelized stream flow, with repeated exposure to air. Channels appear to have cannibalized one another on a slowly subsiding coastal plain. Conifers are dominant at three collecting sites and at three others Supaia dominates. Although each of these genera occurs in assemblages dominated by the other, there are no truly co-dominant assemblages. This pattern suggests alternative explanations. Landscapes could have consisted of a small-scale vegetational patchwork dominated almost monospecifically in any one patch, meaning that these plants could have coexisted across the landscape. On the other hand, conifer and supaioid dominance could have been temporally distinct, occurring during different episodes of sedimentation; although in the field there are no noticeable sedimentological differences between conifer-dominated and Supaia-dominated channel deposits, they may represent slightly different climatic regimes. The considerable morphological differences between conifers and Supaia suggest that the floristic patterns are not a taphonomic effect of the loss of a significant part of the original biodiversity. In general, the climate under which this vegetation developed appears to have been relatively warm and arid, based on the geology (pervasive red color [oxidation

  15. Chemosystematics and diagenesis of terpenoids in fossil conifer species and sediment from the Eocene Zeitz formation, Saxony, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Angelika; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2001-10-01

    The biomarker contents of three fossil conifer species (Athrotaxis couttsiae, Taxodium balticum, Pinus palaeostrobus) and the clay sediment from the Eocene Zeitz formation, Germany, have been analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Triterpenoids of the oleanane, ursane and lupane series and aliphatic wax lipids are the major compounds in the total extracts of the sediment indicating a major angiosperm input. In contrast, diterpenoids (abietanes, phenolic abietanes, pimaranes, isopimaranes, kauranes, phyllocladanes, totaranes) and lignin degradation products are predominant in the conifer fossil extracts. Polar diterpenoids (ferruginol and derivatives, dehydroabietic acid) are preserved as major compounds in the conifers, accompained by saturated and aromatic diterpenoid products. The extracts of the fossil conifer species show characteristic biomarker patterns and contain terpenoids of chemosystematic value. The terpenoid composition of the fossil conifers is similar to that of related modern species. Phenolic abietanes (ferruginol, 6,7-dehydroferruginol, hydroxyferruginols, sugiol) which are known from modern species of the Cupressaceae and Podocarpaceae are the major terpenoids in shoots of Athrotaxis couttsiae and a cone of Taxodium balticum (both Cupressaceae). Sesquiterpenoids characteristic for Cupressaceae (cuparene, α-cedrene) are also present in Athrotaxis. Abietane-type acids (dehydroabietic acid, abietic acid) and saturated abietanes [fichtelite, 13α(H)-fichtelite] predominate in the extracts of a Pinus palaeostrobus cone and phenolic abietanes are not detectable. A diagenetic pathway for the degradation of abietic acid is proposed based on the presence of abietane-type acids and a series of their presumed degradation products in the Pinus cone. The formation of diagenetic products from the phenolic abietanes is also discussed.

  16. Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-Band and C-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made at L-band and C-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-band radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-band radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-band radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave

  17. Holocene vegetation and fire regimes in subalpine and mixed conifer forests, southern Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Scott; Allen, C.D.; Toney, J.L.; Jass, R.B.; Bair, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the present forest structure of western North America hinges on our ability to determine antecedent forest conditions. Sedimentary records from lakes and bogs in the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado and New Mexico provide information on the relationships between climate and vegetation change, and fire history since deglaciation. We present a new pollen record from Hunters Lake (Colorado) as an example of a high-elevation vegetation history from the southern Rockies. We then present a series of six sedimentary records from ???2600 to 3500-m elevation, including sites presently at the alpine?subalpine boundary, within the Picea engelmannii?Abies lasiocarpa forest and within the mixed conifer forest, to determine the history of fire in high-elevation forests there. High Artemisia and low but increasing percentages of Picea and Pinus suggest vegetation prior to 13 500 calendar years before present (cal yr BP) was tundra or steppe, with open spruce woodland to ???11 900 cal yr BP. Subalpine forest (Picea engelmannii, Abies lasiocarpa) existed around the lake for the remainder of the Holocene. At lower elevations, Pinus ponderosa and/or contorta expanded 11 900 to 10 200 cal yr BP; mixed conifer forest expanded ???8600 to 4700 cal yr BP; and Pinus edulis expanded after ???4700 cal yr BP. Sediments from lake sites near the alpine?subalpine transition contained five times less charcoal than those entirely within subalpine forests, and 40 times less than bog sites within mixed conifer forest. Higher fire episode frequencies occurred between ???12 000 and 9000 cal yr BP (associated with the initiation or expansion of south-west monsoon and abundant lightning, and significant biomass during vegetation turnover) and at ???2000?1000 cal yr BP (related to periodic droughts during the long-term trend towards wetter conditions and greater biomass). Fire episode frequencies for subalpine?alpine transition and subalpine sites were on average 5 to 10 fire

  18. Epiphytic lichen diversity on dead and dying conifers under different levels of atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus

    2005-05-01

    Based on literature data, epiphytic lichen abundance was comparably studied in montane woodlands on healthy versus dead or dying conifers of Europe and North America in areas with different levels of atmospheric pollution. Study sites comprised Picea abies forests in the Harz Mountains and in the northern Alps, Germany, Picea rubens-Abies balsamea forests on Whiteface Mountain, Adirondacks, New York, U.S.A. and Picea engelmannii-Abies lasiocarpa forests in the Salish Mountains, Montana, U.S.A. Detrended correspondence analysis showed that epiphytic lichen vegetation differed more between healthy and dead or dying trees at high- versus low-polluted sites. This is attributed to greater differences in chemical habitat conditions between trees of different vitality in highly polluted areas. Based on these results, a hypothetical model of relative importance of site factors for small-scale variation of epiphytic lichen abundance versus atmospheric pollutant load is discussed.

  19. The conifer biomarkers dehydroabietic and abietic acids are widespread in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Maria Sofia; Rego, Adriana; Ramos, Vitor; Afonso, Tiago B.; Freitas, Sara; Preto, Marco; Lopes, Viviana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Magalhães, Catarina; Leão, Pedro N.

    2016-01-01

    Terpenes, a large family of natural products with important applications, are commonly associated with plants and fungi. The diterpenoids dehydroabietic and abietic acids are defense metabolites abundant in resin, and are used as biomarkers for conifer plants. We report here for the first time that the two diterpenoid acids are produced by members of several genera of cyanobacteria. Dehydroabietic acid was isolated from two cyanobacterial strains and its identity was confirmed spectroscopically. One or both of the diterpenoids were detected in the cells of phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria belonging to four cyanobacterial ‘botanical orders’, from marine, estuarine and inland environments. Dehydroabietic acid was additionally found in culture supernatants. We investigated the natural role of the two resin acids in cyanobacteria using ecologically-relevant bioassays and found that the compounds inhibited the growth of a small coccoid cyanobacterium. The unexpected discovery of dehydroabietic and abietic acids in a wide range of cyanobacteria has implications for their use as plant biomarkers. PMID:26996104

  20. Locational comparison of essential oils from selected conifers of Himachal Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shruti; Bhatt, Vinod; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Sharma, Upendra

    2017-01-18

    Nine samples of essential oil from needles of three conifers of Pinacea family namely Abies pindrow, Picea smithiana and Cedrus deodara collected from three different locations of Himachal Pradesh (India) were evaluated using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 31, 17 and 13 compounds were identified from essential oil of A. pindrow, P. smithiana and C. deodara, respectively. Among the characterised components, monoterpenoid hydrocarbons were predominated. α-Pinene, β-pinene, β-merycene, limonene and camphene were characterised as major components. Oil of C. deodara has significant effect of location on its oil composition. Principle component analysis on gas chromatographic data reveals variation in chemical composition which may be attributed to altitude and environmental conditions.

  1. Assessing the anticipated growth response of northern conifer populations to a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedlar, John H.; McKenney, Daniel W.

    2017-03-01

    The growth response of trees to ongoing climate change has important implications for future forest dynamics, accurate carbon accounting, and sustainable forest management. We used data from black spruce (Picea mariana) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) provenance trials, along with published data for three other northern conifers, to identify a consistent growth response to climate warming in which cold-origin populations are expected to benefit and warm-origin populations are expected to decline. Specifically, populations from across the geographic range of a species appear to grow well at temperatures characteristic of the southern portion of the range, indicating significant potential for a positive growth response to climate warming in cold-origin populations. Few studies have quantified and compared this pattern across multiple species using provenance data. We present a forest regeneration strategy that incorporates these anticipated growth responses to promote populations that are both local to the planting site and expected to grow well under climate change.

  2. Highly Laminated Soft Magnetic Electroplated CoNiFe Thick Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Kim, M; Herrault, F; Park, J; Allen, MG

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of highly laminated (similar to 40 layers), thick (similar to 40 mu m) films of magnetically soft cobalt-nickel-iron are presented. Thick film fabrication is based on automated sequential electrodeposition of alternating CoNiFe and copper layers, followed by selective copper removal. The film, comprised tens of 1 mu m thick laminations, exhibits saturation flux density of 1.8 T and coercivity of approximately 1.3 Oe. High-frequency film characterization took place in a 36-turn test inductor, which demonstrated constant inductance of 1.6 mu H up to 10 MHz, indicating suppressed eddy-current loss. Quality factor exceeding 40 at 1 MHz, surpassing the performance of similarly fabricated Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) films.

  3. The conifer biomarkers dehydroabietic and abietic acids are widespread in Cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Maria Sofia; Rego, Adriana; Ramos, Vitor; Afonso, Tiago B.; Freitas, Sara; Preto, Marco; Lopes, Viviana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Magalhães, Catarina; Leão, Pedro N.

    2016-03-01

    Terpenes, a large family of natural products with important applications, are commonly associated with plants and fungi. The diterpenoids dehydroabietic and abietic acids are defense metabolites abundant in resin, and are used as biomarkers for conifer plants. We report here for the first time that the two diterpenoid acids are produced by members of several genera of cyanobacteria. Dehydroabietic acid was isolated from two cyanobacterial strains and its identity was confirmed spectroscopically. One or both of the diterpenoids were detected in the cells of phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria belonging to four cyanobacterial ‘botanical orders’, from marine, estuarine and inland environments. Dehydroabietic acid was additionally found in culture supernatants. We investigated the natural role of the two resin acids in cyanobacteria using ecologically-relevant bioassays and found that the compounds inhibited the growth of a small coccoid cyanobacterium. The unexpected discovery of dehydroabietic and abietic acids in a wide range of cyanobacteria has implications for their use as plant biomarkers.

  4. The Western Conifer Seed Bug (Hemiptera: Coreidae) Has the Potential to Bite Humans.

    PubMed

    Hornok, Sándor; Kontschán, Jeno

    2017-03-10

    Among true bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera), only hematophagous species (families Reduviidae, Cimicidae) have high veterinary and medical significance. In addition, several predatory and plant-feeding bug species, which also have piercing-sucking mouthparts, are known to occasionally bite humans. The majority of such examples are known from the New World. Here, we report the first case concerning the human-biting potential of the western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Hemiptera: Coreidae). This is a phytophagous bug species, which has become widespread in North America, and has also been introduced into Europe where it shows a rapidly expanding geographical range. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Essential Oils Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Six Conifers Harvested in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Layal; Khoury, Madona; Stien, Didier; Ouaini, Naïm; Eparvier, Véronique; El Beyrouthy, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils (EOs) of six conifers harvested in Lebanon, Abies cilicica, Cupressus sempervirens, Juniperus excelsa, Juniperus oxycedrus, Cedrus libani and Cupressus macrocarpa gold crest, were investigated. The EOs were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus and characterized by GC and GC/MS analyses. A principal components analysis based on Pearson correlation between essential oils chemical analyses was also conducted. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of these essentials oils were determined against a range of bacteria and fungi responsible for cutaneous infections in human, using the broth microdilution technique. The EOs showed the most interesting bioactivity on the dermatophytes species (MIC values 32 - 64 μg/ml). Each of the major compounds of C. macrocarpa as well as an artificial reconstructed EO were tested on Trichophyton rubrum showing a contribution of the minor components to the overall activity.

  6. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in Pinus armandii (Pinaceae), an endemic conifer species to China1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wan-Lin; Wang, Ruo-Nan; Yan, Xiao-Hao; Niu, Chuan; Gong, Lin-Lin; Li, Zhong-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Pinus armandii (Pinaceae) is an important conifer tree species in central and southwestern China, and it plays a key role in the local forest ecosystems. To investigate its population genetics and design effective conservation strategies, we characterized 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers for this species. Methods and Results: Eighteen novel polymorphic and 16 monomorphic microsatellite loci of P. armandii were isolated using Illumina MiSeq technology. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to five. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.061 to 0.609 with an average of 0.384, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.063 to 0.947 with an average of 0.436. Seventeen loci could be successfully transferred to five related Pinus species (P. koraiensis, P. griffithii, P. sibirica, P. pumila, and P. bungeana). Conclusions: These novel microsatellites could potentially be used to investigate the population genetics of P. armandii and related species. PMID:27785387

  7. Carbohydrate-mediated responses during zygotic and early somatic embryogenesis in the endangered conifer, Araucaria angustifolia

    PubMed Central

    Elbl, Paula; De Souza, Amanda P.; Jardim, Vinicius; de Oliveira, Leandro F.; Macedo, Amanda F.; dos Santos, André L. W.; Buckeridge, Marcos S.; Floh, Eny I. S.

    2017-01-01

    Three zygotic developmental stages and two somatic Araucaria angustifolia cell lines with contrasting embryogenic potential were analyzed to identify the carbohydrate-mediated responses associated with embryo formation. Using a comparison between zygotic and somatic embryogenesis systems, the non-structural carbohydrate content, cell wall sugar composition and expression of genes involved in sugar sensing were analyzed, and a network analysis was used to identify coordinated features during embryogenesis. We observed that carbohydrate-mediated responses occur mainly during the early stages of zygotic embryo formation, and that during seed development there are coordinated changes that affect the development of the different structures (embryo and megagametophyte). Furthermore, sucrose and starch accumulation were associated with the responsiveness of the cell lines. This study sheds light on how carbohydrate metabolism is influenced during zygotic and somatic embryogenesis in the endangered conifer species, A. angustifolia. PMID:28678868

  8. Assessing the anticipated growth response of northern conifer populations to a warming climate

    PubMed Central

    Pedlar, John H.; McKenney, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    The growth response of trees to ongoing climate change has important implications for future forest dynamics, accurate carbon accounting, and sustainable forest management. We used data from black spruce (Picea mariana) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) provenance trials, along with published data for three other northern conifers, to identify a consistent growth response to climate warming in which cold-origin populations are expected to benefit and warm-origin populations are expected to decline. Specifically, populations from across the geographic range of a species appear to grow well at temperatures characteristic of the southern portion of the range, indicating significant potential for a positive growth response to climate warming in cold-origin populations. Few studies have quantified and compared this pattern across multiple species using provenance data. We present a forest regeneration strategy that incorporates these anticipated growth responses to promote populations that are both local to the planting site and expected to grow well under climate change. PMID:28266577

  9. Assessing the anticipated growth response of northern conifer populations to a warming climate.

    PubMed

    Pedlar, John H; McKenney, Daniel W

    2017-03-07

    The growth response of trees to ongoing climate change has important implications for future forest dynamics, accurate carbon accounting, and sustainable forest management. We used data from black spruce (Picea mariana) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) provenance trials, along with published data for three other northern conifers, to identify a consistent growth response to climate warming in which cold-origin populations are expected to benefit and warm-origin populations are expected to decline. Specifically, populations from across the geographic range of a species appear to grow well at temperatures characteristic of the southern portion of the range, indicating significant potential for a positive growth response to climate warming in cold-origin populations. Few studies have quantified and compared this pattern across multiple species using provenance data. We present a forest regeneration strategy that incorporates these anticipated growth responses to promote populations that are both local to the planting site and expected to grow well under climate change.

  10. [Responses of subtropical conifer plantation to future climate change: a simulation study].

    PubMed

    Mi, Na; Yu, Gui-Rui; Wen, Xue-Fa; Sun, Xiao-Min; Wang, Shu-Sen

    2008-09-01

    The responses of subtropical conifer plantation to climate change scenarios were investigated in Qianyanzhou by the process-based physiological-ecological model EALCO (ecological assimilation of land and climate observation). The results showed that CO2 concentration had the greatest effects on the carbon and water fluxes of the plantation, followed by temperature, and precipitation. CO2 concentration was the main driving factor for the gross photosynthesis productivity of this plantation ecosystem, and temperature and CO2 concentration were the key environmental factors controlling the ecosystem respiration. Increasing temperature accelerated the respiration of aboveground part dramatically, while increasing CO2 concentration had greater effects on soil respiration. The evapotranspiration was enhanced by increasing temperature, but reduced by increasing CO2 concentration. Under the future climate changing scenario (the year 2100), the net primary productivity of this plantation ecosystem would be increased by 22%, suggesting that this ecosystem is still capable of sequestrating carbon.

  11. The conifer biomarkers dehydroabietic and abietic acids are widespread in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Sofia; Rego, Adriana; Ramos, Vitor; Afonso, Tiago B; Freitas, Sara; Preto, Marco; Lopes, Viviana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Magalhães, Catarina; Leão, Pedro N

    2016-03-21

    Terpenes, a large family of natural products with important applications, are commonly associated with plants and fungi. The diterpenoids dehydroabietic and abietic acids are defense metabolites abundant in resin, and are used as biomarkers for conifer plants. We report here for the first time that the two diterpenoid acids are produced by members of several genera of cyanobacteria. Dehydroabietic acid was isolated from two cyanobacterial strains and its identity was confirmed spectroscopically. One or both of the diterpenoids were detected in the cells of phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria belonging to four cyanobacterial 'botanical orders', from marine, estuarine and inland environments. Dehydroabietic acid was additionally found in culture supernatants. We investigated the natural role of the two resin acids in cyanobacteria using ecologically-relevant bioassays and found that the compounds inhibited the growth of a small coccoid cyanobacterium. The unexpected discovery of dehydroabietic and abietic acids in a wide range of cyanobacteria has implications for their use as plant biomarkers.

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Leaves and Fruits of Cultivated Conifers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Sayed Ahmad; Shahani, Ali; Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of antioxidants is a means of reducing rancidity of fats and oils in food stuffs. The commercial synthetic antioxidants in food industry have been suspected to cause negative health effects. Therefore as alternatives, there is a strong need in finding new effective and safe antioxidants from natural sources to prevent deterioration of foods, drugs and cosmetics. Objectives In order to investigate the antioxidant activity from natural sources as alternatives of commercial antioxidants, the antioxidant activity of the extracts of leaves and fruits of six different species of Iranian common conifers: Cupressus arizonica, Pinus halepensis, Pinus nigra, Pinus brutia var. elderica, Pinus wallichiana and Cedrus deodara were investigated in the current study. Materials and Methods The leaves and fruits of these plants were collected from different areas of the country. Methanol extracts of leaves and fruits of Iranian common conifers (six species) were prepared. Antioxidant activity of the samples was measured using ferric thiocyante (FTC) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) tests. Results The results of the study, using the two methods, showed that all methanol extracts of leaves and fruits of the six species possessed antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of the samples was compared with the antioxidant activities of butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT), as a synthetic antioxidant and α-tocopherol as a natural antioxidant. Methanol extractions of Pinus spp. leaves and fruits showed the highest antioxidant activity (quite higher than α- tocopherol). Among the extracts examined, the leaves of P. halpensis methanol extract showed the lowest activity. Conclusions At this stage it can be concluded that methanol extracts of these plants can be considered as strong antioxidant agents. However more investigation is necessary in order to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the components separate from each extracted sample using several different antioxidant methods

  13. Hydraulic Failure Defines the Recovery and Point of Death in Water-Stressed Conifers[OA

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, Tim J.; Cochard, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    This study combines existing hydraulic principles with recently developed methods for probing leaf hydraulic function to determine whether xylem physiology can explain the dynamic response of gas exchange both during drought and in the recovery phase after rewatering. Four conifer species from wet and dry forests were exposed to a range of water stresses by withholding water and then rewatering to observe the recovery process. During both phases midday transpiration and leaf water potential (Ψleaf) were monitored. Stomatal responses to Ψleaf were established for each species and these relationships used to evaluate whether the recovery of gas exchange after drought was limited by postembolism hydraulic repair in leaves. Furthermore, the timing of gas-exchange recovery was used to determine the maximum survivable water stress for each species and this index compared with data for both leaf and stem vulnerability to water-stress-induced dysfunction measured for each species. Recovery of gas exchange after water stress took between 1 and >100 d and during this period all species showed strong 1:1 conformity to a combined hydraulic-stomatal limitation model (r2 = 0.70 across all plants). Gas-exchange recovery time showed two distinct phases, a rapid overnight recovery in plants stressed to <50% loss of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) and a highly Ψleaf-dependent phase in plants stressed to >50% loss of Kleaf. Maximum recoverable water stress (Ψmin) corresponded to a 95% loss of Kleaf. Thus, we conclude that xylem hydraulics represents a direct limit to the drought tolerance of these conifer species. PMID:19011001

  14. Bat Response to Differing Fire Severity in Mixed-Conifer Forest California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Heady, Paul A.; Hayes, John P.; Frick, Winifred F.

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife response to natural disturbances such as fire is of conservation concern to managers, policy makers, and scientists, yet information is scant beyond a few well-studied groups (e.g., birds, small mammals). We examined the effects of wildfire severity on bats, a taxon of high conservation concern, at both the stand (<1 ha) and landscape scale in response to the 2002 McNally fire in the Sierra Nevada region of California, USA. One year after fire, we conducted surveys of echolocation activity at 14 survey locations, stratified in riparian and upland habitat, in mixed-conifer forest habitats spanning three levels of burn severity: unburned, moderate, and high. Bat activity in burned areas was either equivalent or higher than in unburned stands for all six phonic groups measured, with four groups having significantly greater activity in at least one burn severity level. Evidence of differentiation between fire severities was observed with some Myotis species having higher levels of activity in stands of high-severity burn. Larger-bodied bats, typically adapted to more open habitat, showed no response to fire. We found differential use of riparian and upland habitats among the phonic groups, yet no interaction of habitat type by fire severity was found. Extent of high-severity fire damage in the landscape had no effect on activity of bats in unburned sites suggesting no landscape effect of fire on foraging site selection and emphasizing stand-scale conditions driving bat activity. Results from this fire in mixed-conifer forests of California suggest that bats are resilient to landscape-scale fire and that some species are preferentially selecting burned areas for foraging, perhaps facilitated by reduced clutter and increased post-fire availability of prey and roosts. PMID:23483936

  15. Calcium gradients in conifer pollen tubes; dynamic properties differ from those seen in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Mark D; Cardenas, Luis; Bhatt, Aadra P; Justus, Charles D; Phillips, Monique S; Holdaway-Clarke, Terena L; Hepler, Peter K

    2005-10-01

    Pollen tubes are an established model system for examining polarized cell growth. The focus here is on pollen tubes of the conifer Norway spruce (Picea abies, Pinaceae); examining the relationship between cytosolic free Ca2+, tip elongation, and intracellular motility. Conifer pollen tubes show important differences from their angiosperm counterparts; they grow more slowly and their organelles move in an unusual fountain pattern, as opposed to reverse fountain, in the tip. Ratiometric ion imaging of growing pollen tubes, microinjected with fura-2-dextran, reveals a tip-focused [Ca2+]i gradient extending from 450 nM at the extreme apex to 225 nM at the base of the tip clear zone. Injection of 5,5' dibromo-BAPTA does not dissipate the apical gradient, but stops cell elongation and uniquely causes rapid, transient increases of apical free Ca2+. The [Ca2+]i gradient is, however, dissipated by reversible perfusion of extracellular caffeine. When the basal cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration falls below 150 nM, again a large increase in apical [Ca2+]i occurs. An external source of calcium is not required for germination but significantly enhances elongation. However, both germination and elongation are significantly inhibited by the inclusion of calcium channels blockers, including lanthanum, gadolinium, or verapamil. Modulation of intracellular calcium also affects organelle position and motility. Extracellular perfusion of lanthanides reversibly depletes the apical [Ca2+]i gradient, altering organelle positioning in the tip. Later, during recovery from lanthanide perfusion, organelle motility switches direction to a reverse fountain. When taken together these data show a unique interplay in Picea abies pollen tubes between intracellular calcium and the motile processes controlling cellular organization.

  16. Seasonal photosynthetic activity in evergreen conifer leaves monitored with spectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. Y.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Boreal evergreen conifers must maintain photosynthetic systems in environments where temperatures vary greatly across seasons from high temperatures in the summer to freezing levels in the winter. This involves seasonal downregulation and photoprotection during periods of extreme temperatures. To better understand this downregulation, seasonal dynamics of photosynthesis of lodgepole (Pinus contorta D.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa D.) were monitored in Edmonton, Canada over two years. Spectral reflectance at the leaf and stand scales was measured weekly and the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), often used as a proxy for chlorophyll and carotenoid pigment levels and photosynthetic light-use efficiency (LUE), was used to track the seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic activity. Additional physiological measurements included leaf pigment content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and gas exchange. All the metrics indicate large seasonal changes in photosynthetic activity, with a sharp transition from winter downregulation to active photosynthesis in the spring and a more gradual fall transition into winter. The PRI was a good indicator of several other variables including seasonally changing photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic LUE, and pigment pool sizes. Over the two-year cycle, PRI was primarily driven by changes in constitutive (chlorophyll:carotenoid) pigment levels correlated with seasonal photosynthetic activity, with a much smaller variation caused by diurnal changes in xanthophyll cycle activity (conversion between violaxanthin & zeaxanthin). Leaf and canopy scale PRI measurements exhibited parallel responses during the winter-spring transition. Together, our findings indicate that evergreen conifers photosynthetic system possesses a remarkable degree of resilience in response to large temperature changes across seasons, and that optical remote sensing can be used to observe the seasonal effects on photosynthesis and

  17. Impact of Conifer Forest Litter on Microwave Emission at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Cosh, Michael H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the utilization of microwave modeling, together with ground truth, and L-band (1.4-GHz) brightness temperatures to investigate the passive microwave characteristics of a conifer forest floor. The microwave data were acquired over a natural Virginia Pine forest in Maryland by a ground-based microwave active/passive instrument system in 2008/2009. Ground measurements of the tree biophysical parameters and forest floor characteristics were obtained during the field campaign. The test site consisted of medium-sized evergreen conifers with an average height of 12 m and average diameters at breast height of 12.6 cm. The site is a typical pine forest site in that there is a surface layer of loose debris/needles and an organic transition layer above the mineral soil. In an effort to characterize and model the impact of the surface litter layer, an experiment was conducted on a day with wet soil conditions, which involved removal of the surface litter layer from one half of the test site while keeping the other half undisturbed. The observations showed detectable decrease in emissivity for both polarizations after the surface litter layer was removed. A first-order radiative transfer model of the forest stands including the multilayer nature of the forest floor in conjunction with the ground truth data are used to compute forest emission. The model calculations reproduced the major features of the experimental data over the entire duration, which included the effects of surface litter and ground moisture content on overall emission. Both theory and experimental results confirm that the litter layer increases the observed canopy brightness temperature and obscure the soil emission.

  18. Do ray cells provide a pathway for radial water movement in the stems of conifer trees?

    PubMed

    Barnard, David M; Lachenbruch, Barbara; McCulloh, Katherine A; Kitin, Peter; Meinzer, Frederick C

    2013-02-01

    The pathway of radial water movement in tree stems presents an unknown with respect to whole-tree hydraulics. Radial profiles have shown substantial axial sap flow in deeper layers of sapwood (that may lack direct connection to transpiring leaves), which suggests the existence of a radial pathway for water movement. Rays in tree stems include ray tracheids and/or ray parenchyma cells and may offer such a pathway for radial water transport. This study investigated relationships between radial hydraulic conductivity (k(s-rad)) and ray anatomical and stem morphological characteristics in the stems of three conifer species whose distributions span a natural aridity gradient across the Cascade Mountain range in Oregon, United States. The k(s-rad) was measured with a high-pressure flow meter. Ray tracheid and ray parenchyma characteristics and water transport properties were visualized using autofluorescence or confocal microscopy. The k(s-rad) did not vary predictably with sapwood depth among species and populations. Dye tracer did not infiltrate ray tracheids, and infiltration into ray parenchyma was limited. Regression analyses revealed inconsistent relationships between k(s-rad) and selected anatomical or growth characteristics when ecotypes were analyzed individually and weak relationships between k(s-rad) and these characteristics when data were pooled by tree species. The lack of significant relationships between k(s-rad) and the ray and stem morphologies we studied, combined with the absence of dye tracer in ray tracheid and limited movement of dye into ray parenchyma suggests that rays may not facilitate radial water transport in the three conifer species studied.

  19. Toward meaningful snag-management guidelines for postfire salvage logging in North American conifer forests.

    PubMed

    Hutto, Richard L

    2006-08-01

    The bird species in western North America that are most restricted to, and therefore most dependent on, severely burned conifer forests during the first years following afire event depend heavily on the abundant standing snags for perch sites, nest sites, and food resources. Thus, it is critical to develop and apply appropriate snag-management guidelines to implement postfire timber harvest operations in the same locations. Unfortunately, existing guidelines designed for green-tree forests cannot be applied to postfire salvage sales because the snag needs of snag-dependent species in burned forests are not at all similar to the snag needs of snag-dependent species in green-tree forests. Birds in burned forests have very different snag-retention needs from those cavity-nesting bird species that have served as the focus for the development of existing snag-management guidelines. Specifically, many postfire specialists use standing dead trees not only for nesting purposes but for feeding purposes as well. Woodpeckers, in particular specialize on wood-boring beetle larvae that are superabundant in fire-killed trees for several years following severe fire. Species such as the Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) are nearly restricted in their habitat distribution to severely burned forests. Moreover existing postfire salvage-logging studies reveal that most postfire specialist species are completely absent from burned forests that have been (even partially) salvage logged. I call for the long-overdue development and use of more meaningful snag-retention guidelines for postfire specialists, and I note that the biology of the most fire-dependent bird species suggests that even a cursory attempt to meet their snag needs would preclude postfire salvage logging in those severely burned conifer forests wherein the maintenance of biological diversity is deemed important.

  20. Bat response to differing fire severity in mixed-conifer forest California, USA.

    PubMed

    Buchalski, Michael R; Fontaine, Joseph B; Heady, Paul A; Hayes, John P; Frick, Winifred F

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife response to natural disturbances such as fire is of conservation concern to managers, policy makers, and scientists, yet information is scant beyond a few well-studied groups (e.g., birds, small mammals). We examined the effects of wildfire severity on bats, a taxon of high conservation concern, at both the stand (<1 ha) and landscape scale in response to the 2002 McNally fire in the Sierra Nevada region of California, USA. One year after fire, we conducted surveys of echolocation activity at 14 survey locations, stratified in riparian and upland habitat, in mixed-conifer forest habitats spanning three levels of burn severity: unburned, moderate, and high. Bat activity in burned areas was either equivalent or higher than in unburned stands for all six phonic groups measured, with four groups having significantly greater activity in at least one burn severity level. Evidence of differentiation between fire severities was observed with some Myotis species having higher levels of activity in stands of high-severity burn. Larger-bodied bats, typically adapted to more open habitat, showed no response to fire. We found differential use of riparian and upland habitats among the phonic groups, yet no interaction of habitat type by fire severity was found. Extent of high-severity fire damage in the landscape had no effect on activity of bats in unburned sites suggesting no landscape effect of fire on foraging site selection and emphasizing stand-scale conditions driving bat activity. Results from this fire in mixed-conifer forests of California suggest that bats are resilient to landscape-scale fire and that some species are preferentially selecting burned areas for foraging, perhaps facilitated by reduced clutter and increased post-fire availability of prey and roosts.

  1. A homeobox gene with potential developmental control function in the meristem of the conifer Picea abies

    PubMed Central

    Sundås-Larsson, A.; Svenson, M.; Liao, H.; Engström, P.

    1998-01-01

    Many homeobox genes control essential developmental processes in animals and plants. In this report, we describe the first cDNA corresponding to a homeobox gene isolated from a gymnosperm, the HBK1 gene from the conifer Picea abies (L.) Karst (Norway spruce). The sequence shows distinct similarities specifically to the KNOX (knotted-like homeobox) class of homeobox genes known from different angiosperm plants. The deduced amino acid sequence of HBK1 is strikingly similar within the homeodomain (84% identical) to the maize gene Knotted1 (Kn1), which acts to regulate cell differentiation in the shoot meristem. This similarity suggested that the phylogenetic association of HBK1 with the KNOX genes might be coupled to a conservation of gene function. In support of this suggestion, we have found HBK1 to be expressed in the apical meristem in the central population of nondifferentiated stem cells, but not in organ primordia developing at the flanks of the meristem. This pattern of expression is similar to that of Kn1 in the maize meristem. We show further that HBK1, when expressed ectopically in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, causes aberrations in leaf development that are similar to the effects of ectopic expression of angiosperm KNOX genes on Arabidopsis development. Taken together, these data suggest that HBK1 has a role, similar to the KNOX genes in angiosperms, in the control of cellular differentiation in the apical meristem of spruce. The data also indicate that KNOX-gene regulation of vegetative development is an ancient feature of seed plants that was present in the last common ancestor of conifers and angiosperms. PMID:9844025

  2. Patterns of mortality in a montane mixed-conifer forest in San Diego County, California.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Mary Pyott; Stow, Douglas A; An, Li

    2017-07-17

    We examine spatial patterns of conifer tree mortality and their changes over time for the montane mixed-conifer forests of San Diego County. These forest areas have recently experienced extensive tree mortality due to multiple factors. A spatial contextual image processing approach was utilized with high spatial resolution digital airborne imagery to map dead trees for the years 1997, 2000, 2002, and 2005 for three study areas: Palomar, Volcan, and Laguna mountains. Plot-based fieldwork was conducted to further assess mortality patterns. Mean mortality remained static from 1997 to 2002 (4, 2.2, and 4.2 trees ha(-1) for Palomar, Volcan, and Laguna) and then increased by 2005 to 10.3, 9.7 and 5.2 trees ha(-1) , respectively. The increase in mortality between 2002 and 2005 represents the temporal pattern of a discrete disturbance event, attributable to the 2002-2003 drought. Dead trees are significantly clustered for all dates, based on spatial cluster analysis, indicating that they form distinct groups, as opposed to spatially random single dead trees. Other tests indicate no directional shift or spread of mortality over time, but rather an increase in density. While general temporal and spatial mortality processes are uniform across all study areas, the plot-based species and quantity distribution of mortality, and diameter distributions of dead versus living trees, vary by study area. The results of this study improve our understanding of stand- to landscape-level forest structure and dynamics, particularly by examining them from the multiple perspectives of field and remotely sensed data. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Cenozoic climate change shaped the evolutionary ecophysiology of the Cupressaceae conifers

    PubMed Central

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Stuart, Stephanie A.; Dawson, Todd E.; Moreau, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The Cupressaceae clade has the broadest diversity in habitat and morphology of any conifer family. This clade is characterized by highly divergent physiological strategies, with deciduous swamp-adapted genera-like Taxodium at one extreme, and evergreen desert genera-like Cupressus at the other. The size disparity within the Cupressaceae is equally impressive, with members ranging from 5-m-tall juniper shrubs to 100-m-tall redwood trees. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that despite this variation, these taxa all share a single common ancestor; by extension, they also share a common ancestral habitat. Here, we use a common-garden approach to compare xylem and leaf-level physiology in this family. We then apply comparative phylogenetic methods to infer how Cenozoic climatic change shaped the morphological and physiological differences between modern-day members of the Cupressaceae. Our data show that drought-resistant crown clades (the Cupressoid and Callitroid clades) most likely evolved from drought-intolerant Mesozoic ancestors, and that this pattern is consistent with proposed shifts in post-Eocene paleoclimates. We also provide evidence that within the Cupressaceae, the evolution of drought-resistant xylem is coupled to increased carbon investment in xylem tissue, reduced xylem transport efficiency, and at the leaf level, reduced photosynthetic capacity. Phylogenetically based analyses suggest that the ancestors of the Cupressaceae were dependent upon moist habitats, and that drought-resistant physiology developed along with increasing habitat aridity from the Oligocene onward. We conclude that the modern biogeography of the Cupressaceae conifers was shaped in large part by their capacity to adapt to drought. PMID:22628565

  4. Cenozoic climate change shaped the evolutionary ecophysiology of the Cupressaceae conifers.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Stuart, Stephanie A; Dawson, Todd E; Moreau, Astrid

    2012-06-12

    The Cupressaceae clade has the broadest diversity in habitat and morphology of any conifer family. This clade is characterized by highly divergent physiological strategies, with deciduous swamp-adapted genera-like Taxodium at one extreme, and evergreen desert genera-like Cupressus at the other. The size disparity within the Cupressaceae is equally impressive, with members ranging from 5-m-tall juniper shrubs to 100-m-tall redwood trees. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that despite this variation, these taxa all share a single common ancestor; by extension, they also share a common ancestral habitat. Here, we use a common-garden approach to compare xylem and leaf-level physiology in this family. We then apply comparative phylogenetic methods to infer how Cenozoic climatic change shaped the morphological and physiological differences between modern-day members of the Cupressaceae. Our data show that drought-resistant crown clades (the Cupressoid and Callitroid clades) most likely evolved from drought-intolerant Mesozoic ancestors, and that this pattern is consistent with proposed shifts in post-Eocene paleoclimates. We also provide evidence that within the Cupressaceae, the evolution of drought-resistant xylem is coupled to increased carbon investment in xylem tissue, reduced xylem transport efficiency, and at the leaf level, reduced photosynthetic capacity. Phylogenetically based analyses suggest that the ancestors of the Cupressaceae were dependent upon moist habitats, and that drought-resistant physiology developed along with increasing habitat aridity from the Oligocene onward. We conclude that the modern biogeography of the Cupressaceae conifers was shaped in large part by their capacity to adapt to drought.

  5. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Characterization for the Widespread and Stress-Tolerant Conifer Platycladus orientalis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xian-Ge; Liu, Hui; Jin, YuQing; Sun, Yan-Qiang; Li, Yue; Zhao, Wei; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Mao, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Platycladus orientalis, of the family Cupressaceae, is a widespread conifer throughout China and is extensively used for ecological reforestation, horticulture, and in medicine. Transcriptome assemblies are required for this ecologically important conifer for understanding genes underpinning adaptation and complex traits for breeding programs. To enrich the species' genomic resources, a de novo transcriptome sequencing was performed using Illumina paired-end sequencing. In total, 104,073,506 high quality sequence reads (approximately 10.3 Gbp) were obtained, which were assembled into 228,948 transcripts and 148,867 unigenes that were longer than 200 nt. Quality assessment using CEGMA showed that the transcriptomes obtained were mostly complete for highly conserved core eukaryotic genes. Based on similarity searches with known proteins, 62,938 (42.28% of all unigenes), 42,158 (28.32%), and 23,179 (15.57%) had homologs in the Nr, GO, and KOG databases, 25,625 (17.21%) unigenes were mapped to 322 pathways by BLASTX comparison against the KEGG database and 1,941 unigenes involved in environmental signaling and stress response were identified. We also identified 43 putative terpene synthase (TPS) functional genes loci and compared them with TPSs from other species. Additionally, 5,296 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified in 4,715 unigenes, which were assigned to 142 motif types. This is the first report of a complete transcriptome analysis of P. orientalis. These resources provide a foundation for further studies of adaptation mechanisms and molecular-based breeding programs.

  6. Two tropical conifers show strong growth and water-use efficiency responses to altered CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Dalling, James W; Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Aranda, Jorge; Garcia, Milton; Virgo, Aurelio; Cheesman, Alexander W; Baresch, Andres; Jaramillo, Carlos; Turner, Benjamin L

    2016-11-01

    Conifers dominated wet lowland tropical forests 100 million years ago (MYA). With a few exceptions in the Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae, conifers are now absent from this biome. This shift to angiosperm dominance also coincided with a large decline in atmospheric CO2 concentration (ca). We compared growth and physiological performance of two lowland tropical angiosperms and conifers at ca levels representing pre-industrial (280 ppm), ambient (400 ppm) and Eocene (800 ppm) conditions to explore how differences in ca affect the growth and water-use efficiency (WUE) of seedlings from these groups. Two conifers (Araucaria heterophylla and Podocarpus guatemalensis) and two angiosperm trees (Tabebuia rosea and Chrysophyllum cainito) were grown in climate-controlled glasshouses in Panama. Growth, photosynthetic rates, nutrient uptake, and nutrient use and water-use efficiencies were measured. Podocarpus seedlings showed a stronger (66 %) increase in relative growth rate with increasing ca relative to Araucaria (19 %) and the angiosperms (no growth enhancement). The response of Podocarpus is consistent with expectations for species with conservative growth traits and low mesophyll diffusion conductance. While previous work has shown limited stomatal response of conifers to ca, we found that the two conifers had significantly greater increases in leaf and whole-plant WUE than the angiosperms, reflecting increased photosynthetic rate and reduced stomatal conductance. Foliar nitrogen isotope ratios (δ(15)N) and soil nitrate concentrations indicated a preference in Podocarpus for ammonium over nitrate, which may impact nitrogen uptake relative to nitrate assimilators under high ca SIGNIFICANCE: Podocarps colonized tropical forests after angiosperms achieved dominance and are now restricted to infertile soils. Although limited to a single species, our data suggest that higher ca may have been favourable for podocarp colonization of tropical South America 60

  7. Remote sensing of fire severity: linking post-fire reflectance data with physiological responses in two western conifer species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, A. M.; Smith, A. M.; Kolden, C.; Apostol, K. G.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Fire is a common disturbance in forested ecosystems in the western U.S. and can be responsible for long-term impacts on vegetation and soil. An improved understanding of how ecosystems recover after fire is necessary so that land managers can plan for and mitigate the effects of these disturbances. Although several studies have attempted to link fire intensity with severity, direct links between spectral indices of severity and key physiological changes in vegetation are not well understood. We conducted an assessment of how two western conifer species respond to four fire radiative energy treatments, with spectra acquired pre- and up to a month post-burn. After transforming the spectral data into Landsat 8 equivalent reflectance, burn severity indices commonly used in the remote sensing community were compared to concurrent physiological measurements including gas exchange and photosynthetic rate. Preliminary results indicate significant relationships between several fire severity indices and physiological responses measured in the conifer seedlings.

  8. Forecasting effects of SO/sub 2/ pollution on growth and succession in a western conifer forest

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, J.R.; Axelrod, M.C.; Bingham, G.E.

    1980-06-18

    A simulator has been developed for the mixed conifer forest type of the Sierra Nevada, California to forecast the effects of SO/sub 2/ on forest growth and succession. The model simulates recruitment, growth, and death of each tree and is based on a northeastern USA simulator with extensive modifications. These modifications include the introduction of fire ecology, temporal seed crop patterns unique to the Sierra, and water stress. Pollutant stress is modeled as an effect on tree growth. The model simulates the shift from the ponderosa pine dominated forest type to the white fir dominated mixed conifer type as elevation increases from 5000 to 6000 ft. It also simulates the fire-suppression of white fir and the fire-climax of ponderosa pine. For a 10% growth reduction of ponderosa pine from pollutant stress and with growth reductions in other species as determined by their relative sensitivities, standing crops of ponderosa pine were reduced and white fir increased.

  9. Regeneration patterns of a long-lived dominant conifer and the effects of logging in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Alexandre F.; Forgiarini, Cristiane; Longhi, Solon Jonas; Brena, Doádi Antônio

    2008-09-01

    The regeneration ecology of the long-lived conifer Araucaria angustifolia was studied in São Francisco de Paula, southern Brazil. We evaluated the expectations that: (i) size distribution of populations of Araucaria angustifolia, a large conifer that dominates southern Brazil's mixed forests, is left-skewed in old-growth forests but right-skewed in logged forests, indicating chronic recruitment failure in the first kind of habitat as well as a recruitment pulse in the second; (ii) seedlings and juveniles are found under more open-canopy microsites than would be expected by chance; and (iii) reproductive females would be aggregated at the coarse spatial scales in which past massive recruitment events are expected to have occurred, and young plants would be spatially associated with females due to the prevalence of vertebrate and large-bird seed dispersers. Data were collected in the threatened mixed conifer-hardwood forests in southern Brazil in ten 1-ha plots and one 0.25-ha plot that was hit by a small tornado in 2003. Five of these plots corresponded to unlogged old-growth forests, three to forests where A. angustifolia was selectively logged ca. 60 years ago and two to forests selectively logged ca. 20 years ago. For the first time, ontogenetic life stages of this important conifer are identified and described. The first and second expectations were fulfilled, and the third was partially fulfilled, since seedlings and juveniles were hardly ever associated with reproductive females. These results confirm the generalization of the current conceptual model of emergent long-lived pioneer regeneration to Araucaria angustifolia and associate its regeneration niche to the occupation of large-scale disturbances with long return times.

  10. Height-diameter relationships for conifer species on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest. Forest Service research note (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Dolph, K.L.; Mori, S.R.; Oliver, W.W.

    1995-03-01

    An equation is presented for predicting total height as a function of diameter outside bark at breast height for conifer species of the eastside pine type on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest in northeastern California. Weighted nonlinear regression was used to estimate the equation coefficients. The equation, along with the species-specific regression coefficients, provides a reliable basis for estimating missing heights on inventory and growth plots.

  11. Black-backed woodpecker habitat suitability mapping using conifer snag basal area estimated from airborne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Planes, Á.; Garcia, M.; Siegel, R.; Koltunov, A.; Ramirez, C.; Ustin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Occupancy and habitat suitability models for snag-dependent wildlife species are commonly defined as a function of snag basal area. Although critical for predicting or assessing habitat suitability, spatially distributed estimates of snag basal area are not generally available across landscapes at spatial scales relevant for conservation planning. This study evaluates the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) to 1) identify individual conifer snags and map their basal area across a recently burned forest, and 2) map habitat suitability for a wildlife species known to be dependent on snag basal area, specifically the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus). This study focuses on the Rim Fire, a megafire that took place in 2013 in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, creating large patches of medium- and high-severity burned forest. We use forest inventory plots, single-tree ALS-derived metrics and Gaussian processes classification and regression to identify conifer snags and estimate their stem diameter and basal area. Then, we use the results to map habitat suitability for the black-backed woodpecker using thresholds for conifer basal area from a previously published habitat suitability model. Local maxima detection and watershed segmentation algorithms resulted in 75% detection of trees with stem diameter larger than 30 cm. Snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 91.8 % and conifer snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 84.8 %. Finally, Gaussian process regression reliably estimated stem diameter (R2 = 0.8) using height and crown area. This work provides a fast and efficient methodology to characterize the extent of a burned forest at the tree level and a critical tool for early wildlife assessment in post-fire forest management and biodiversity conservation.

  12. Studies on the structure of the plant wax nonacosan-10-ol, the main component of epicuticular wax conifers.

    PubMed

    Matas, Antonio J; Sanz, María José; Heredia, Antonio

    2003-11-01

    The main component presents in the epicuticular waxes of needles of Pinus halepensis and the most of conifers, the secondary alcohol nonacosan-10-ol, has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results obtained from these physical techniques permitted to establish a definitive structural model of the molecular arrangement of this wax, basically in good agreement with the model formulated by other authors from theoretical formulations. Biological implications of the proposed structure have been also formulated.

  13. Fire-return intervals in mixed-conifer forests of the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project area

    Treesearch

    Catherine Phillips

    2002-01-01

    Fire-return intervals were studied on six 1.4-ha plots in a 2,070-ha study area in the Dinkey Creek watershed. Stumps in mixed-conifer forest were examined for fire scars created from 1771 to 1994, with 1873 chosen as the end of the pre-Euro-American settlement period because the rate of fire events decreased on most plots after about that year. Mean intervals from...

  14. Fire-scar formation in Jeffrey pine - mixed conifer forests in the Sierra San Pedro Martir, Mexico

    Treesearch

    Scott L. Stephens; Danny L. Fry; Brandon M. Collins; Carl N. Skinner; Ernesto Franco-Vizcaino; Travis J. Freed

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the probability of fire-scar formation. In this study, we examined all mixed conifer trees for fire-scar formation in a 16 ha watershed that burned as part of a 2003 wildfire in Sierra San Pedro Ma´rtir National Park (SSPM), Mexico. In addition, we examine the probability of fire-scar formation in relation to the previous fire interval in forests...

  15. The gut microbiota of the pine weevil is similar across Europe and resembles that of other conifer-feeding beetles.

    PubMed

    Berasategui, Aileen; Axelsson, Karolin; Nordlander, Göran; Schmidt, Axel; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Terenius, Olle; Kaltenpoth, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The pine weevil (Hylobius abietis, Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an important pest of conifer seedlings in Europe. Despite its economic importance, little is known about the composition of its gut microbial community and the role it plays in mediating the weevil's ability to utilize conifers as a food source. Here, we characterized the gut bacterial communities of different populations of H. abietis across Europe and compared them to those of other beetles that occupy similar ecological niches. We demonstrate that the microbial community of H. abietis is similar at higher taxonomic levels (family and genus) across locations in Europe, with Wolbachia as the dominant microbe, followed by Enterobacteria and Firmicutes. Despite this similarity, we observed consistent differences between countries and locations, but not sexes. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that the gut bacterial community of the pine weevil is very similar to that of bark beetles that also exploit conifers as a food source. The Enterobacteriaceae symbionts of both host taxa are especially closely related phylogenetically. Conversely, the microbiota of H. abietis is distinct from that of closely related weevils feeding on nonconifer food sources, suggesting that the microbial community of the pine weevil is determined by the environment and may be relevant to host ecology. Furthermore, several H. abietis-associated members of the Enterobacteriaceae family are known to contain genes involved in terpenoid degradation. As such, we hypothesize that the gut microbial community is important for the utilization of conifer seedlings as a food source, either through the detoxification of plant secondary metabolites or through the supplementation of essential nutrients.

  16. Damage and mortality assessment of redwood and mixed conifer forest types in Santa Cruz County following wildfire

    Treesearch

    Steve R. Auten; Nadia. Hamey

    2012-01-01

    On August 12, 2009, the Lockheed Fire ignited the west slope of the Santa Cruz Mountains burning approximately 7,819 acres. A mixture of vegetation types were in the path of the fire, including approximately 2,420 acres of redwood forest and 1,951 acres of mixed conifer forest types representative of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Foresters and land managers were left with...

  17. Climate in the Great Lakes Region between 14,000 and 4000 years ago from isotopic composition of conifer wood

    Treesearch

    Steven W. Leavitt; Irina P. Panyushkina; Todd Lange; Alex Wiedenhoeft; Li Cheng; R. Douglas Hunter; John Hughes; Frank Pranschke; Allan F. Schneider; Joseph Moran; Ron Stieglitz

    2006-01-01

    The isotopic composition of ancient wood has the potential to provide information about past environments. We analyzed the ä13C, ä18O, and ä2H of cellulose of conifer trees from several cross-sections at each of 9 sites around the Great Lakes region ranging from ~4000 to 14,000 cal BP. Isotopic values of Picea, Pinus, and Thuja species seem inter-changeable for ä18O...

  18. Local adaptation to temperature and precipitation in naturally fragmented populations of Cephalotaxus oliveri, an endangered conifer endemic to China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Zhen; Xia, Fan; Su, Yingjuan

    2016-01-01

    Cephalotaxus oliveri is an endangered tertiary relict conifer endemic to China. The species survives in a wide range from west to east with heterogeneous climatic conditions. Precipitation and temperature are main restrictive factors for distribution of C. oliveri. In order to comprehend the mechanism of adaptive evolution to climate variation, we employed ISSR markers to detect adaptive evolution loci, to identify the association between variation in temperature and precipitation and adaptive loci, and to investigate the genetic structure for 22 C. oliveri natural populations. In total, 14 outlier loci were identified, of which five were associated with temperature and precipitation. Among outlier loci, linkage disequilibrium (LD) was high (42.86%), which also provided strong evidence for selection. In addition, C. oliveri possessed high genetic variation (93.31%) and population differentiation, which may provide raw material to evolution and accelerate local adaptation, respectively. Ecological niche modeling showed that global warming will cause a shift for populations of C. oliveri from south to north with a shrinkage of southern areas. Our results contribute to understand the potential response of conifers to climatic changes, and provide new insights for conifer resource management and conservation strategies. PMID:27113970

  19. The Ty1-copia LTR retroelement family PARTC is highly conserved in conifers over 200 MY of evolution.

    PubMed

    Zuccolo, Andrea; Scofield, Douglas G; De Paoli, Emanuele; Morgante, Michele

    2015-08-15

    Long Terminal Repeat retroelements (LTR-RTs) are a major component of many plant genomes. Although well studied and described in angiosperms, their features and dynamics are poorly understood in gymnosperms. Representative complete copies of a Ty1-copia element isolate in Picea abies and named PARTC were identified in six other conifer species (Picea glauca, Pinus sylvestris, Pinus taeda, Abies sibirica, Taxus baccata and Juniperus communis) covering more than 200 million years of evolution. Here we characterized the structure of this element, assessed its abundance across conifers, studied the modes and timing of its amplification, and evaluated the degree of conservation of its extant copies at nucleotide level over distant species. We demonstrated that the element is ancient, abundant, widespread and its paralogous copies are present in the genera Picea, Pinus and Abies as an LTR-RT family. The amplification leading to the extant copies of PARTC occurred over long evolutionary times spanning 10s of MY and mostly took place after the speciation of the conifers analyzed. The level of conservation of PARTC is striking and may be explained by low substitution rates and limited removal mechanisms for LTR-RTs. These PARTC features and dynamics are representative of a more general scenario for LTR-RTs in gymnosperms quite different from that characterizing the vast majority of LTR-RT elements in angiosperms.

  20. MADS-box genes reveal that gnetophytes are more closely related to conifers than to flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Kai-Uwe; Becker, Annette; Münster, Thomas; Kim, Jan T.; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    1999-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of the angiosperms (flowering plants sensu stricto) is still enigmatic. Answers to the question of angiosperm origins are intimately connected to the identification of their sister group among extinct and extant taxa. Most phylogenetic analyses based on morphological data agree that among the groups of extant seed plants, the gnetophytes are the sister group of the angiosperms. According to this view, angiosperms and gnetophytes are the only extant members of a clade called “anthophytes” to emphasize their shared possession of flower-like reproductive structures. However, most phylogeny reconstructions based on molecular data so far did not support an anthophyte clade, but also could not clarify the case because support for alternative groupings has been weak or controversial. We have isolated 13 different homologs of MADS-type floral homeotic genes from the gnetophyte Gnetum gnemon. Five of these genes fall into monophyletic gene clades also comprising putatively orthologous genes from flowering plants and conifers, among them orthologs of floral homeotic B and C function genes. Within these clades the Gnetum genes always form distinct subclades together with the respective conifer genes, to the exclusion of the angiosperm genes. This provides strong molecular evidence for a sister-group relationship between gnetophytes and conifers, which is in contradiction to widely accepted interpretations of morphological data for almost a century. Our phylogeny reconstructions and the outcome of expression studies suggest that complex features such as flower-like reproductive structures and double-fertilization arose independently in gnetophytes and angiosperms. PMID:10377416

  1. Predicting Potential Habitat of Conifer and Broad-leaved Tree Using Environmental Variables and Seed Dispersal Ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, H. K.; Lee, D. K.; Mo, Y.; Kim, H. G.

    2016-12-01

    Research into predicting potential species distribution within forests is ongoing in relation to forest management. Conifer and broad-leaved tree, two main distinctive components in forests which are important concerning the management of forest, are used to predict potential forest distribution. Regarding prediction of potential tree species habitat distribution, environmental variables are commonly used to determine conditions that species can inhabit. However, seed dispersal ability was not used in species distribution model because it reflects succession process which is difficult to use.In this research, in addition to environmental variables, distance value was used to represent seed dispersal ability to predict tree distribution. Research was done in Namsan (Mt.) Sangju-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, where few tree species exist according to detailed vegetation map, as a case study. To analyze the suitable environmental conditions and dispersal ability of conifer and broad-leaved trees, past distribution changing patterns were used. Past forest distribution maps (1984, 1995, 2005 and 2014) were used which was classified by Landsat images. Using these results, potential habitats of conifer and broad-leaved trees were predicted for 2024 and 2034. Furthermore, to quantify the uncertainty of prediction, monte carlo simulation was proceeded. As a result, it was possible to predict potential habitats using environmental variables and seed dispersal ability. Moreover, the dispersal ability turned out to be an important variable to predict change of potential habitat.

  2. Inter-tracheid pitting and the hydraulic efficiency of conifer wood: the role of tracheid allometry and cavitation protection.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Sperry, John S; Hacke, Uwe G; Wheeler, James K; Sikkema, Elzard H

    2006-09-01

    Plant xylem must balance efficient delivery of water to the canopy against protection from air entry into the conduits via air-seeding. We investigated the relationship between tracheid allometry, end wall pitting, safety from air-seeding, and the hydraulic efficiency of conifer wood in order to better understand the trade-offs between effective transport and protection against air entry. Root and stem wood were sampled from conifers belonging to the Pinaceae, Cupressaceae, Podocarpaceae, and Araucariaceae. Hydraulic resistivity of tracheids decreased with increasing tracheid diameter and width, with 64 ± 4% residing in the end wall pitting regardless of tracheid size or phylogenetic affinity. This end-wall percentage was consistent with a near-optimal scaling between tracheid diameter and length that minimized flow resistance for a given tracheid length. There was no evidence that tracheid size and hydraulic efficiency were constrained by the role of the pits in protecting against cavitation by air-seeding. An increase in pit area resistance with safety from cavitation was observed only for species of the northern hemisphere (Pinaceae and Cupressaceae), but this variable was independent of tracheid size, and the increase in pit resistance did not significantly influence tracheid resistance. In contrast to recent work on angiosperm vessels, protection against air-seeding in conifer tracheids appears to be uncoupled from conduit size and conducting efficiency.

  3. Cell size and wall dimensions drive distinct variability of earlywood and latewood density in Northern Hemisphere conifers.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Jesper; Seftigen, Kristina; Schweingruber, Fritz; Fonti, Patrick; von Arx, Georg; Bryukhanova, Marina V; Cuny, Henri E; Carrer, Marco; Castagneri, Daniele; Frank, David C

    2017-06-21

    Interannual variability of wood density - an important plant functional trait and environmental proxy - in conifers is poorly understood. We therefore explored the anatomical basis of density. We hypothesized that earlywood density is determined by tracheid size and latewood density by wall dimensions, reflecting their different functional tasks. To determine general patterns of variability, density parameters from 27 species and 349 sites across the Northern Hemisphere were correlated to tree-ring width parameters and local climate. We performed the same analyses with density and width derived from anatomical data comprising two species and eight sites. The contributions of tracheid size and wall dimensions to density were disentangled with sensitivity analyses. Notably, correlations between density and width shifted from negative to positive moving from earlywood to latewood. Temperature responses of density varied intraseasonally in strength and sign. The sensitivity analyses revealed tracheid size as the main determinant of earlywood density, while wall dimensions become more influential for latewood density. Our novel approach of integrating detailed anatomical data with large-scale tree-ring data allowed us to contribute to an improved understanding of interannual variations of conifer growth and to illustrate how conifers balance investments in the competing xylem functions of hydraulics and mechanical support. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Molecular Aspects of Conifer Zygotic and Somatic Embryo Development: A Review of Genome-Wide Approaches and Recent Insights.

    PubMed

    Trontin, Jean-François; Klimaszewska, Krystyna; Morel, Alexandre; Hargreaves, Catherine; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide profiling (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) is providing unprecedented opportunities to unravel the complexity of coordinated gene expression during embryo development in trees, especially conifer species harboring "giga-genome." This knowledge should be critical for the efficient delivery of improved varieties through seeds and/or somatic embryos in fluctuating markets and to cope with climate change. We reviewed "omics" as well as targeted gene expression studies during both somatic and zygotic embryo development in conifers and tentatively puzzled over the critical processes and genes involved at the specific developmental and transition stages. Current limitations to the interpretation of these large datasets are going to be lifted through the ongoing development of comprehensive genome resources in conifers. Nevertheless omics already confirmed that master regulators (e.g., transcription and epigenetic factors) play central roles. As in model angiosperms, the molecular regulation from early to late embryogenesis may mainly arise from spatiotemporal modulation of auxin-, gibberellin-, and abscisic acid-mediated responses. Omics also showed the potential for the development of tools to assess the progress of embryo development or to build genotype-independent, predictive models of embryogenesis-specific characteristics.

  5. A broadleaf species enhances an autotoxic conifers growth through belowground chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi-Chao; Kong, Chui-Hua; Chen, Long-Chi; Wang, Peng; Wang, Si-Long

    2016-09-01

    Plants may affect the performance of neighboring plants either positively or negatively through interspecific and intraspecific interactions. Productivity of mixed-species systems is ultimately the net result of positive and negative interactions among the component species. Despite increasing knowledge of positive interactions occurring in mixed-species tree systems, relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying such interactions. Based on data from 25-year-old experimental stands in situ and a series of controlled experiments, we test the hypothesis that a broadleaf, non-N fixing species, Michelia macclurei, facilitates the performance of an autotoxic conifer Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) through belowground chemical interactions. Chinese fir roots released the allelochemical cyclic dipeptide (6-hydroxy-1,3-dimethyl-8-nonadecyl-[1,4]-diazocane- 2,5-diketone) into the soil environment, resulting in self-growth inhibition, and deterioration of soil microorganisms that improve P availability. However, when grown with M. macclurei the growth of Chinese fir was consistently enhanced. In particular, Chinese fir enhanced root growth and distribution in deep soil layers. When compared with monocultures of Chinese fir, the presence of M. macclurei reduced release and increased degradation of cyclic dipeptide in the soil, resulting in a shift from self-inhibition to chemical facilitation. This association also improved the soil microbial community by increasing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and induced the production of Chinese fir roots. We conclude that interspecific interactions are less negative than intraspecific ones between non-N fixing broadleaf and autotoxic conifer species. The impacts are generated by reducing allelochemical levels, enhancing belowground mutualisms, improving soil properties, and changing root distributions as well as the net effects of all the processes within the soil. In particular, allelochemical context alters the

  6. Improvements of palaeochemotaxonomy as a palaeofloristic proxy using artificial maturation of extant conifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Hautevelle, Y.; Michels, R.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous studies of the molecular composition of terrestrial plants show that many organic compounds have a chemotaxonomic value. This means that these biomolecules are synthesized by a restricted number of taxa and can be used as specific biomarkers. Some of these biomolecules, like terpenoids, are poorly altered and preserved in sediments where they are then transformed into geomolecules. Thus, the distribution of vascular plant biomarkers preserved in sedimentary rocks could serve as proxy for terrestrial palaeoflora assessment. Furthermore, as flora association may reflect climatic conditions, vascular plant biomarkers may also serve as palaeoclimatic proxies. Botanical palaeochemotaxonomy presents some specific attributes compared to palaeobotany and palynology in the reconstruction of palaeofloristic and palaeoclimatic evolutions through geological time : 1) plant biomarkers are more widespread in the stratigraphic record than well preserved plant macrofossils, 2) on the contrary to palynomorphs they can be directly linked to specific plant taxa, 3) biomarkers are readily analyzed by usual organic geochemistry procedures. However, our knowledge in botanical palaeochemotaxonomy, allowing to link geomolecular markers to botanical taxa, is still incomplete. Difficulties are related to 1) extrapolation of information from extant plants to their fossil counterparts, 2) the scarcity of well preserved and identifiable fossils. In order to help fill these gaps, we use an experimental method based on artificial maturation of extant plants by confined pyrolysis (*Hautevelle et al. 2006). This technique allows to simulate conversion of biomolecules into diagenetized compounds. The objective of this study is to clarify the molecular signature of fossil conifer families. 69 species belonging to seven families of extant conifers (Araucariaceae, Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Podocarpaceae, Sciadopityaceae, Taxaceae and Taxodiaceae) were pyrolyzed. Extractable organic matter is

  7. Hydraulic compensation in northern Rocky Mountain conifers: does successional position and life history matter?

    PubMed

    Sala, Anna

    2006-08-01

    As trees grow tall and the resistance of the hydraulic pathway increases, water supply to foliage may decrease forcing stomata to close and CO2 uptake to decline. Several structural (e.g. biomass allocation) and physiological adjustments, however, may partially or fully compensate for such hydraulic constraints and prevent limitations on CO2 uptake and growth. The degree to which trees compensate for hydraulic constraints as they grow tall may depend on the costs and benefits associated with hydraulic compensation according to their ecology and life history. Because later successional Rocky Mountain conifers are more shade tolerant, optimization of CO2 uptake as trees grow tall and shade increases may confer greater benefits than in earlier successional species. If so, higher compensation for hydraulic constraints is expected in later successional species relative to co-occurring earlier successional species. I have examined height-related changes of crown stomatal conductance on a leaf area basis (G(LA)) and leaf to sapwood ratios (A(L):A(S)) for five conifer species in the northern Rocky Mountains. Species were arranged in pairs, each pair consisting of an early and late successional species. For high elevations I used, respectively, whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa); for mid-elevations, western larch (Larix occidentalis) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii); for lower elevations, ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir. A(L):A(S) either decreased (subalpine fir, ponderosa pine), remained constant (Douglas-fir, western larch) or increased (whitebark pine) with tree height. As hypothesized, earlier successional species (ponderosa pine, whitebark pine and western larch) exhibited significantly stronger decreases of G(LA) with tree height relative to their later successional pairs (Douglas-fir and subalpine fir), which fully compensated for height-related hydraulic constraints on G(LA). A life history approach that

  8. Quantifying cambial activity of high-elevation conifers in the Great Basin, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaco, E.; Biondi, F.; Rossi, S.; Deslauriers, A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the physiological mechanisms that control the formation of tree rings provides the necessary biological basis for developing dendroclimatic reconstructions and dendroecological histories. Studies of wood formation in the Great Basin are now being conducted in connection with the Nevada Climate-ecohydrological Assessment Network (NevCAN), a recently established transect of valley-to-mountaintop instrumented stations in the Snake and Sheep Ranges of the Great Basin. Automated sensors record meteorological, soil, and vegetational variables at these sites, providing unique opportunities for ecosystem science, and are being used to investigate the ecological implications of xylogenesis. We present here an initial study based on microcores collected during summer 2013 from mountain and subalpine conifers (including Great Basin bristlecone pine, Pinus longaeva) growing on the west slope of Mt. Washington. Samples were taken from the mountain west (SM; 2810 m elevation) and the subalpine west (SS, 3355 m elevation) NevCAN sites on June 16th and 27th, 2013. The SS site was further subdivided in a high (SSH) and a low (SSL) group of trees, separated by about 10 m in elevation. Microscopic analyses showed the effect of elevation on cambial activity, as annual ring formation was more advanced at the lower (mountain) site compared to the higher (subalpine) one. At all sites cambium size showed little variations between the two sampling dates. The number of xylem cells in the radial enlargement phase decreased between the two sampling dates at the mountain site but increased at the subalpine site, confirming a delayed formation of wood at the higher elevations. Despite relatively high within-site variability, a general trend of increasing number of cells in the lignification phase was found at all sites. Mature cells were present only at the mountain site on June 27th. Spatial differences in the xylem formation process emerged at the species level and, within

  9. Old Growth Conifer Watersheds in the Western Cascades, Oregon: Sentinels of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    In the Pacific Northwest, where the majority of precipitation falls during the winter, mountain snowpacks provide an important source of streamflow during the dry summer months when water demands are frequently highest. Increasing temperatures associated with climate change are expected to result in a decline in winter snowpacks in western North America, earlier snowmelt, and subsequently a shift in the timing of streamflows, with an increasing fraction of streamflows occurring earlier in the water year and drier conditions during the summer. Long-term records from headwater watersheds in old growth conifer forest at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest (HJ Andrews), Oregon, provide the opportunity to examine changes in climate, vegetation, and streamflow. Continuous streamflow records have been collected since 1953, 1964, and 1969 from three small (8.5-60 ha) watersheds (WS2, WS8, and WS9). Over the 40- to 50-year period of study, late winter to early summer monthly average minimum temperatures have increased by 1-2°C, and spring snow water equivalent at a nearby Snotel site has declined, but monthly precipitation has remained unchanged. Spring runoff ratios have declined in by amounts equivalent to 0.59-2.45 mm day-1 at WS2, WS8, and WS9, which are comparable to estimated rates of stand-level transpiration from trees in these watersheds. However, winter runoff ratios have not changed significantly at either WS2 or WS9, and have actually decreased at WS8 by 2.43 mm day-1 over the period of record. Furthermore, summer runoff ratios have not changed significantly at either WS8 or WS9, and have increased at WS2 by 0.34 mm day-1 over the period of record. These findings suggest that warming temperatures have resulted in a reduction in spring snowpacks and an earlier onset of evapotranspiration in the spring when soil moisture is abundant, but physiological responses of these conifer forests to water stress and water surplus may mitigate or exceed the expression of a

  10. Interactions of tissue and fertilizer nitrogen on decomposition dynamics of lignin-rich conifer litter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    High tissue nitrogen (N) accelerates decomposition of high-quality leaf litter in the early phases of mass loss, but the influence of initial tissue N variation on the decomposition of lignin-rich litter is less resolved. Because environmental changes such as atmospheric N deposition and elevated CO2 can alter tissue N levels within species more rapidly than they alter the species composition of ecosystems, it is important to consider how within-species variation in tissue N may shape litter decomposition and associated N dynamics. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii ) is a widespread lignin-rich conifer that dominates forests of high carbon (C) storage across western North America, and displays wide variation in tissue and litter N that reflects landscape variation in soil N. We collected eight unique Douglas-fir litter sources that spanned a two-fold range in initial N concentrations (0.67–1.31%) with a narrow range of lignin (29–35%), and examined relationships between initial litter chemistry, decomposition, and N dynamics in both ambient and N fertilized plots at four sites over 3 yr. High initial litter N slowed decomposition rates in both early (0.67 yr) and late (3 yr) stages in unfertilized plots. Applications of N fertilizer to litters accelerated early-stage decomposition, but slowed late-stage decomposition, and most strongly affected low-N litters, which equalized decomposition rates across litters regardless of initial N concentrations. Decomposition of N-fertilized litters correlated positively with initial litter manganese (Mn) concentrations, with litter Mn variation reflecting faster turnover of canopy foliage in high N sites, producing younger litterfall with high N and low Mn. Although both internal and external N inhibited decomposition at 3 yr, most litters exhibited net N immobilization, with strongest immobilization in low-N litter and in N-fertilized plots. Our observation for lignin-rich litter that high initial N can slow decomposition

  11. Parallel δ 13C and Conifer Physiognomic Trends Across the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteside, J. H.; Olsen, P. E.; Sambrotto, R. N.; Cornet, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction event ( ˜200 Ma) had a profound effect on biotic evolution, and herein we describe trends in cheirolepidaceous conifer leaf physiognomy from the Pangean tropics (present northeastern USA) that at least broadly parallel a negative δ 13C excursion recorded in the same strata. The physiognomic changes appear at an abrupt (<10 ky) negative carbon isotope excursion (1) synchronous with a previously described palynological extinction level, fern spike, and Ir anomaly (2), and continue through a prolonged negative excursion, lasting 900 ky (through all three CAMP basaltic extrusive events), encompassing most of the Hettangian age. The physiognomic changes seen in the cheirolepidaceous conifer leafy shoot forms Brachyphyllum and Pagiophyllum through the δ 13C excursions include primarily the development of microphyllous leaves with thickened cuticle and sunken papillate stomata (3). These floral modifications are consistent with intense thermal stress plausibly due to very high atmospheric CO2 concentrations and corroborate McElwain's (4) thermal damage hypothesis for the Triassic-Jurassic transition that was originally based on different plant taxa from the higher Pangean latitudes in present Greenland and Sweden. Subsequently, a 2- to 5-fold increase in the area of leafy shoots in strata of latest Hettangian age suggest a return to lower thermal stress levels perhaps due to lower CO2, despite the fact that eastern North America continued to drift into more arid latitudes. The floral physiognomic changes associated with the negative δ 13C excursion and likely very elevated CO2 levels is in many ways a microcosm of the Mesozoic in which the dominance of cheiroleps apparently overlaps with the highest CO2 levels of the Mesozoic (5). References. (1) Whiteside JH, Olsen PE, Sambrotto RN. 2003. Geol. Soc. Amer. Abst. Prog. (in press). (2) Olsen PE et al., Science 296:1305-1307 (3) Cornet B. 1989. in Olsen PE, Schlische RW, Gore PJW

  12. Effects of fire and harvest on soil respiration in a mixed-conifer forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, S.; Fry, D.; Stephens, S.

    2012-12-01

    Forest ecosystems, and in particular forest soils, constitute a major reservoir of global terrestrial carbon and soil respiration is the largest carbon loss from these ecosystems. Disturbances can affect soil respiration, causing physical and chemical changes in soil characteristics, adding both, above and belowground necromass, and changing microclimatic conditions. This could signify an important and long term carbon loss, even higher than the carbon directly removed by the harvest or during fire. These losses need to be included when quantifying the net carbon balance of forests. We measured the impacts of prescribed fire and clear-cut tree harvest on soil respiration in a mixed-conifer forest in the central Sierra Nevada. The prescribed fire treatment was implemented in 2002 and again in 2009. Four areas were clear-cut harvested in 2010. In half of these units the soils were mechanically ripped to reduce soil compaction, a common practice in the Sierra Nevada industrial forest lands. Soil respiration was measured using two different techniques: the chamber method and the gradient method. Soil respiration was affected by treatments in two different ways. First, treatments changed soil temperature and soil water content, the main abiotic factors controlling soil respiration. The clear cut and the prescribed fire treatments created higher maximum soil temperature and more available soil water content, environmental conditions favorable to soil respiration. However, the loss of trees and thus fine roots, and the decrease of soil litter and organic layers, because of their combustion or removal, had a negative effect on soil respiration that was stronger than the positive effect due to more favorable post disturbance environmental conditions. Soil respiration rates remained steady 1-2 years after treatments and no increase or spikes of soil respiration were measured after treatments. Continuous measurements of CO2 concentrations at different soil depths improved our

  13. Slow but not low: genomic comparisons reveal slower evolutionary rate and higher dN/dS in conifers compared to angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics can inform us about the processes of mutation and selection across diverse taxa. Among seed plants, gymnosperms have been lacking in genomic comparisons. Recent EST and full-length cDNA collections for two conifers, Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), together with full genome sequences for two angiosperms, Arabidopsis thaliana and poplar (Populus trichocarpa), offer an opportunity to infer the evolutionary processes underlying thousands of orthologous protein-coding genes in gymnosperms compared with an angiosperm orthologue set. Results Based upon pairwise comparisons of 3,723 spruce and pine orthologues, we found an average synonymous genetic distance (dS) of 0.191, and an average dN/dS ratio of 0.314. Using a fossil-established divergence time of 140 million years between spruce and pine, we extrapolated a nucleotide substitution rate of 0.68 × 10-9 synonymous substitutions per site per year. When compared to angiosperms, this indicates a dramatically slower rate of nucleotide substitution rates in conifers: on average 15-fold. Coincidentally, we found a three-fold higher dN/dS for the spruce-pine lineage compared to the poplar-Arabidopsis lineage. This joint occurrence of a slower evolutionary rate in conifers with higher dN/dS, and possibly positive selection, showcases the uniqueness of conifer genome evolution. Conclusions Our results are in line with documented reduced nucleotide diversity, conservative genome evolution and low rates of diversification in conifers on the one hand and numerous examples of local adaptation in conifers on the other hand. We propose that reduced levels of nucleotide mutation in large and long-lived conifer trees, coupled with large effective population size, were the main factors leading to slow substitution rates but retention of beneficial mutations. PMID:22264329

  14. Slow but not low: genomic comparisons reveal slower evolutionary rate and higher dN/dS in conifers compared to angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Ritland, Carol; Bohlmann, Jörg; Ritland, Kermit

    2012-01-20

    Comparative genomics can inform us about the processes of mutation and selection across diverse taxa. Among seed plants, gymnosperms have been lacking in genomic comparisons. Recent EST and full-length cDNA collections for two conifers, Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), together with full genome sequences for two angiosperms, Arabidopsis thaliana and poplar (Populus trichocarpa), offer an opportunity to infer the evolutionary processes underlying thousands of orthologous protein-coding genes in gymnosperms compared with an angiosperm orthologue set. Based upon pairwise comparisons of 3,723 spruce and pine orthologues, we found an average synonymous genetic distance (dS) of 0.191, and an average dN/dS ratio of 0.314. Using a fossil-established divergence time of 140 million years between spruce and pine, we extrapolated a nucleotide substitution rate of 0.68 × 10(-9) synonymous substitutions per site per year. When compared to angiosperms, this indicates a dramatically slower rate of nucleotide substitution rates in conifers: on average 15-fold. Coincidentally, we found a three-fold higher dN/dS for the spruce-pine lineage compared to the poplar-Arabidopsis lineage. This joint occurrence of a slower evolutionary rate in conifers with higher dN/dS, and possibly positive selection, showcases the uniqueness of conifer genome evolution. Our results are in line with documented reduced nucleotide diversity, conservative genome evolution and low rates of diversification in conifers on the one hand and numerous examples of local adaptation in conifers on the other hand. We propose that reduced levels of nucleotide mutation in large and long-lived conifer trees, coupled with large effective population size, were the main factors leading to slow substitution rates but retention of beneficial mutations.

  15. Associations of Conifer-Infesting Bark Beetles and Fungi in Fennoscandia.

    PubMed

    Linnakoski, Riikka; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Niemelä, Pekka; Wingfield, Michael J

    2012-02-15

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytinae) have a widespread association with fungi, especially with ophiostomatoid fungi (Ascomycota) that cause blue staining of wood, and in some cases, serious tree diseases. In Fennoscandia, most studies of these fungi have focused on economically important bark beetle species and this is likely to have led to a biased view of the fungal biodiversity in the region. Recently, the associations between fungi and bark beetles in Fennoscandia have been shown to be more diverse than previously thought. Furthermore, they form complex and dynamic associations that are only now beginning to emerge. This review examines the current knowledge of the rather poorly known interactions between bark beetles, fungi and their conifer host trees in Fennoscandia. The diversity of ophiostomatoid species is discussed and the possible factors that influence the assemblages of fungal associates are considered for all species that are known to occur in the region. For many ophiostomatoid species found in Fennoscandia, little or nothing is known regarding their pathogenicity, particularly if they were to be transferred to new environments. We, therefore, draw attention to the possible threats of timber trade and climate change-induced invasions of new habitats by bark beetles and the fungi that can be moved along with them.

  16. Contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity for four conifers of Alpine European forests

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Elena; Eckert, Andrew J; Liechty, John D; Wegrzyn, Jill L; La Porta, Nicola; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Neale, David B

    2012-01-01

    A candidate gene approach was used to identify levels of nucleotide diversity and to identify genes departing from neutral expectations in coniferous species of the Alpine European forest. Twelve samples were collected from four species that dominate montane and subalpine forests throughout Europe: Abies alba Mill, Larix decidua Mill, Pinus cembra L., and Pinus mugo Turra. A total of 800 genes, originally resequenced in Pinus taeda L., were resequenced across 12 independent trees for each of the four species. Genes were assigned to two categories, candidate and control, defined through homology-based searches to Arabidopsis. Estimates of nucleotide diversity per site varied greatly between polymorphic candidate genes (range: 0.0004–0.1295) and among species (range: 0.0024–0.0082), but were within the previously established ranges for conifers. Tests of neutrality using stringent significance thresholds, performed under the standard neutral model, revealed one to seven outlier loci for each species. Some of these outliers encode proteins that are involved with plant stress responses and form the basis for further evolutionary enquiries. PMID:23144662

  17. Bark heat resistance of small trees in Californian mixed conifer forests: Testing some model assumptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Schwartz, Mark

    2003-01-01

    An essential component to models of fire-caused tree mortality is an assessment of cambial damage. Cambial heat resistance has been traditionally measured in large overstory trees with thick bark, although small trees have thinner bark and thus are more sensitive to fire. We undertook this study to determine if current models of bark heat transfer are applicable to small trees (<20 cm diameter at breast height (dbh)). We performed this work in situ on four common species in the mixed conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, California.The allometric relationship between bole diameter and bark thickness for each species was linear, even for very small trees (5 cm dbh). Heating experiments demonstrated that bark thickness was the primary determinant of cambial heat resistance. We found only slight, but statistically significant, among species differences in bark thermal properties. Our most significant finding was that small trees were more resistant to heating than expected from commonly used models of bark heat transfer. Our results may differ from those of existing models because we found smaller trees to have a greater proportion of inner bark, which appears to have superior insulating properties compared to outer bark. From a management perspective, growth projections suggest that a 50-year fire-free interval may allow some fire intolerant species to achieve at least some degree of cambial heat resistance in the Sierra Nevada.

  18. Mega-fire Recovery in Dry Conifer Forests of the Interior West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, S. L.; Fornwalt, P.; Chambers, M. E.; Battaglia, M.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfire is a complex landscape process with great uncertainty in whether trends in size and severity are shifting trajectories for ecosystem recovery that are outside of the historical range of variability. Considering that wildfire size and severity is likely to increase into the future with a drier climate, it is important that we understand wildfire effects and ecosystem recovery. To evaluate how ecosystems recover from wildfire we measured spatial patterns in regeneration and mapped tree refugia within mega-fire perimeters (Hayman, Jasper, Bobcat, and Grizzly Gulch) in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) dominated forest. On average, high severity fire effects accounted for > 15% of burned area and increased with fire size. Areas with high severity fire effects contained 1 - 15% tree refugia cover, compared to 37 - 70% observed in low severity areas . Large high severity patches with low coverage of tree refugia, were more frequent in larger fires and regeneration distances required to initiate forest recovery far exceeded 1.5 canopy height or 200 m, distances where the vast majority of regeneration is likely to arise. Using a recovery model driven by distance, we estimate recovery times between 300 to > 1000 years for these mega-fires. In Western dry conifer forests, large patches of stand replacing fire are likely to lead to uneven aged forest and very long recovery times.

  19. Determination of the molecular signature of fossil conifers by experimental palaeochemotaxonomy - Part 1: The Araucariaceae family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Hautevelle, Y.; Michels, R.

    2013-03-01

    Twelve species of the conifer family Araucariaceae, including Araucaria (6 species), Agathis (3 species) and Wollemia (1 species) genera, were submitted to artificial maturation by confined pyrolysis. The aim of these experiments is to transform the biomolecules synthesized by these species into their homologous geomolecules in laboratory conditions. Determination of the diagenetic molecular signatures of Araucariaceae through experimentation on extant representatives allows us to complete our knowledge in botanical palaeochemotaxonomy. Such knowledge is relevant to palaeoenvironmental, environmental and archaeology purposes. All artificially diagenetic species of Araucariaceae are firstly characterized by a predominance of saturated tetracyclic diterpenoids including ent-beyerane, phyllocladanes and ent-kauranes. Moreover, Araucaria genus shows a high relative abundance of bicyclic sesquiterpenoids, particularly the cadalane-type compounds accompanied by those of eudesmane and bisabolane types as well as chamazulene and pentamethyl-dihydroindenes. Diterpenoids are of labdane, isopimarane and abietane types (essentially derived from abietanoic acids) as well as isohexyl alkylaromatic hydrocarbons. Compared to the tetracyclic diterpenoids, these compounds show a relatively lower abundance, reaching trace levels in the case of saturated abietanes. Distributions of sesquiterpenoids and diterpenoids of Agathis show some similarities to that of Araucaria, with the exception of one species, in which the tetracyclic compounds are absent and the abietane type (essentially derived from abietanoic acids) predominant. High similarities between the Wollemia and Araucaria genera are observed. Both are characterized by some high relative abundance of tetracyclic compounds with no predominance of other specific diterpenoids.

  20. Abscisic acid mediates a divergence in the drought response of two conifers.

    PubMed

    Brodribb, Timothy J; McAdam, Scott A M

    2013-07-01

    During water stress, stomatal closure occurs as water tension and levels of abscisic acid (ABA) increase in the leaf, but the interaction between these two drivers of stomatal aperture is poorly understood. We investigate the dynamics of water potential, ABA, and stomatal conductance during the imposition of water stress on two drought-tolerant conifer species with contrasting stomatal behavior. Rapid rehydration of excised shoots was used as a means of differentiating the direct influences of ABA and water potential on stomatal closure. Pinus radiata (Pinaceae) was found to exhibit ABA-driven stomatal closure during water stress, resulting in strongly isohydric regulation of water loss. By contrast, stomatal closure in Callitris rhomboidea (Cupressaceae) was initiated by elevated foliar ABA, but sustained water stress saw a marked decline in ABA levels and a shift to water potential-driven stomatal closure. The transition from ABA to water potential as the primary driver of stomatal aperture allowed C. rhomboidea to rapidly recover gas exchange after water-stressed plants were rewatered, and was associated with a strongly anisohydric regulation of water loss. These two contrasting mechanisms of stomatal regulation function in combination with xylem vulnerability to produce highly divergent strategies of water management. Species-specific ABA dynamics are proposed as a central component of drought survival and ecology.

  1. Capturing spiral radial growth of conifers using the superellipse to model tree-ring geometric shape.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pei-Jian; Huang, Jian-Guo; Hui, Cang; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D; Tardif, Jacques C; Zhai, Li-Hong; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Li, Bai-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Tree-rings are often assumed to approximate a circular shape when estimating forest productivity and carbon dynamics. However, tree rings are rarely, if ever, circular, thereby possibly resulting in under- or over-estimation in forest productivity and carbon sequestration. Given the crucial role played by tree ring data in assessing forest productivity and carbon storage within a context of global change, it is particularly important that mathematical models adequately render cross-sectional area increment derived from tree rings. We modeled the geometric shape of tree rings using the superellipse equation and checked its validation based on the theoretical simulation and six actual cross sections collected from three conifers. We found that the superellipse better describes the geometric shape of tree rings than the circle commonly used. We showed that a spiral growth trend exists on the radial section over time, which might be closely related to spiral grain along the longitudinal axis. The superellipse generally had higher accuracy than the circle in predicting the basal area increment, resulting in an improved estimate for the basal area. The superellipse may allow better assessing forest productivity and carbon storage in terrestrial forest ecosystems.

  2. Importance of Aerodynamic Resistance to Water Use Efficiency in Three Conifers under Field Conditions 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William K.

    1980-01-01

    The quantitative importance of aerodynamic resistance to H2O vapor and CO2 exchange was determined for shoots from saplings of three conifers (Abies lasiocarpa [Hook] Nutt., Pinus contorta Dougl., Juniperus communis L.) under natural conditions in the field. A combination of relatively low stomatal resistances (<300 seconds per centimeter) and low wind speeds (<30 centimeters per second) led to substantial contributions of the aerodynamic resistance (Rwva) to water use efficiency (WUE = photosynthesis/transpiration) for all three species. For A. lasiocarpa, transpiration was calculated to be 44% less and photosynthesis 17% less due to the presence of Rwva, which led to a predicted increase in WUE of 57% compared to the calculated WUE when Rwva was assumed negligible. Similar increases in WUE were computed for P. contorta (48%) with somewhat smaller values for J. communis (34%). These results are discussed in terms of the estimated importance of Rwva on water and photosynthetic relations of plants that have relatively low stomatal resistances and grow in microhabitats with low winds. PMID:16661128

  3. Influence of Shoot Structure on Light Interception and Photosynthesis in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Gregory A.; Smith, William K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of shoot structure on net photosynthesis was evaluated under field conditions for the central Rocky Mountain (United States) conifers Picea engelmannii (Parry ex Engelm.), Abies lasiocarpa ([Hook] Nutt.), and Pinus contorta (Engelm.). In all species, the greater number of needles per unit stem length on sun shoots correlated with a smaller silhouette leaf area to total leaf area ratio (STAR). Decreased STAR was due primarily to greater needle inclination toward the vertical, plus some needle mutual shading. However, photosynthesis expressed on a total leaf area basis did not decrease in sun shoots (lower STAR) but remained nearly constant at approximately 3 micromoles per square meter per second over a wide range of STAR (0.1 to 0.3). Relatively low light saturation levels of 200 to 1400 microeinsteins per square meter per second and diffuse light to 350 microeinsteins per meter per second maintained photosynthetic flux densities in inclined and/or shaded needles at levels comparable to those in unshaded needles oriented perpendicular to the solar beam. As a result, net CO2 uptake per unit stem length increased as much as 2-fold in sun shoots (low STAR) in direct proportion to increasing needle density. PMID:16664525

  4. Capturing spiral radial growth of conifers using the superellipse to model tree-ring geometric shape

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pei-Jian; Huang, Jian-Guo; Hui, Cang; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Tardif, Jacques C.; Zhai, Li-Hong; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Li, Bai-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Tree-rings are often assumed to approximate a circular shape when estimating forest productivity and carbon dynamics. However, tree rings are rarely, if ever, circular, thereby possibly resulting in under- or over-estimation in forest productivity and carbon sequestration. Given the crucial role played by tree ring data in assessing forest productivity and carbon storage within a context of global change, it is particularly important that mathematical models adequately render cross-sectional area increment derived from tree rings. We modeled the geometric shape of tree rings using the superellipse equation and checked its validation based on the theoretical simulation and six actual cross sections collected from three conifers. We found that the superellipse better describes the geometric shape of tree rings than the circle commonly used. We showed that a spiral growth trend exists on the radial section over time, which might be closely related to spiral grain along the longitudinal axis. The superellipse generally had higher accuracy than the circle in predicting the basal area increment, resulting in an improved estimate for the basal area. The superellipse may allow better assessing forest productivity and carbon storage in terrestrial forest ecosystems. PMID:26528316

  5. Histology and cell wall biochemistry of stone cells in the physical defence of conifers against insects.

    PubMed

    Whitehill, Justin G A; Henderson, Hannah; Schuetz, Mathias; Skyba, Oleksandr; Yuen, Macaire Man Saint; King, John; Samuels, A Lacey; Mansfield, Shawn D; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    Conifers possess an array of physical and chemical defences against stem-boring insects. Stone cells provide a physical defence associated with resistance against bark beetles and weevils. In Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), abundance of stone cells in the cortex of apical shoots is positively correlated with resistance to white pine weevil (Pissodes strobi). We identified histological, biochemical and molecular differences in the stone cell phenotype of weevil resistant (R) or susceptible (S) Sitka spruce genotypes. R trees displayed significantly higher quantities of cortical stone cells near the apical shoot node, the primary site for weevil feeding. Lignin, cellulose, xylan and mannan were the most abundant components of stone cell secondary walls, respectively. Lignin composition of stone cells isolated from R trees contained a higher percentage of G-lignin compared with S trees. Transcript profiling revealed higher transcript abundance in the R genotype of coumarate 3-hydroxylase, a key monolignol biosynthetic gene. Developing stone cells in current year apical shoots incorporated fluorescent-tagged monolignol into the secondary cell wall, while mature stone cells of previous year apical shoots did not. Stone cell development is an ephemeral process, and fortification of shoot tips in R trees is an effective strategy against insect feeding.

  6. Terpene chemodiversity of relict conifers Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii, and Pinus peuce, endemic to Balkan.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Biljana; Ristić, Mihailo; Tešević, Vele; Marin, Petar D; Bojović, Srdjan

    2011-12-01

    Terpenes are often used as ecological and chemotaxonomic markers of plant species, as well as for estimation of geographic variability. Essential oils of relic and Balkan endemic/subendemic conifers, Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii, and P. peuce, in central part of Balkan Peninsula (Serbia and Montenegro), on the level of terpene classes and common terpene compounds were investigated. In finding terpene combinations, which could show the best diversity between species and their natural populations, several statistical methods were applied. Apart from the content of different terpene classes (P. omorika has the most abundant O-containing monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes; P. heldreichii and P. peuce have the largest abundance of sesquiterpene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, resp.), the species are clearly separated according to terpene profile with 22 common compounds. But, divergences in their populations were established only in combination of several compounds (specific for each species), and they were found to be the results of geomorphologic, climatic, and genetic factors. We found similarities between investigated species and some taxa from literature with respect to terpene composition, possibly due to hybridization and phylogenetic relations. Obtained results are also important regarding to chemotaxonomy, biogeography, phylogeny, and evolution of these taxa.

  7. Optimization of the genotyping-by-sequencing strategy for population genomic analysis in conifers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jin; Wang, Baosheng; Pei, Zhi-Yong; Zhao, Wei; Gao, Jie; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2015-07-01

    Flexibility and low cost make genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) an ideal tool for population genomic studies of nonmodel species. However, to utilize the potential of the method fully, many parameters affecting library quality and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery require optimization, especially for conifer genomes with a high repetitive DNA content. In this study, we explored strategies for effective GBS analysis in pine species. We constructed GBS libraries using HpaII, PstI and EcoRI-MseI digestions with different multiplexing levels and examined the effect of restriction enzymes on library complexity and the impact of sequencing depth and size selection of restriction fragments on sequence coverage bias. We tested and compared UNEAK, Stacks and GATK pipelines for the GBS data, and then developed a reference-free SNP calling strategy for haploid pine genomes. Our GBS procedure proved to be effective in SNP discovery, producing 7000-11 000 and 14 751 SNPs within and among three pine species, respectively, from a PstI library. This investigation provides guidance for the design and analysis of GBS experiments, particularly for organisms for which genomic information is lacking.

  8. Abscisic Acid Mediates a Divergence in the Drought Response of Two Conifers1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, Timothy J.; McAdam, Scott A.M.

    2013-01-01

    During water stress, stomatal closure occurs as water tension and levels of abscisic acid (ABA) increase in the leaf, but the interaction between these two drivers of stomatal aperture is poorly understood. We investigate the dynamics of water potential, ABA, and stomatal conductance during the imposition of water stress on two drought-tolerant conifer species with contrasting stomatal behavior. Rapid rehydration of excised shoots was used as a means of differentiating the direct influences of ABA and water potential on stomatal closure. Pinus radiata (Pinaceae) was found to exhibit ABA-driven stomatal closure during water stress, resulting in strongly isohydric regulation of water loss. By contrast, stomatal closure in Callitris rhomboidea (Cupressaceae) was initiated by elevated foliar ABA, but sustained water stress saw a marked decline in ABA levels and a shift to water potential-driven stomatal closure. The transition from ABA to water potential as the primary driver of stomatal aperture allowed C. rhomboidea to rapidly recover gas exchange after water-stressed plants were rewatered, and was associated with a strongly anisohydric regulation of water loss. These two contrasting mechanisms of stomatal regulation function in combination with xylem vulnerability to produce highly divergent strategies of water management. Species-specific ABA dynamics are proposed as a central component of drought survival and ecology. PMID:23709665

  9. Drought sensitivity of three co-occurring conifers within a dry inner Alpine environment.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Roman; Oberhuber, Walter

    2013-02-01

    We applied dendroclimatological techniques to determine long-term stationarity of climate-growth relationships and recent growth trends of three widespread coniferous tree species of the central Austrian Alps, which grow intermixed at dry-mesic sites within a dry inner Alpine environment (750 m asl). Time series of annual increments were developed from > 120 mature trees of Picea abies, Larix decidua and Pinus sylvestris. Calculation of response functions for the period 1911 - 2009 revealed significant differences among species in response to climate variables. While precipitation in May - June favoured radial growth of Picea abies and Larix decidua, Pinus sylvestris growth mainly depended on April - May precipitation. P. abies growth was most sensitive to May - June temperature (inverse relationship). Moving response function coefficients indicated increasing drought sensitivity of all species in recent decades, which is related to a decline in soil moisture availability due to increasing stand density and tree size and higher evapotranspiration rates in a warmer climate. While recent trend in basal area increment (BAI) of L. decidua distinctly declined implying high vulnerability to drought stress, moderately shade-tolerant P. abies showed steadily increasing BAI and quite constant BAI was maintained in drought adapted P. sylvestris, although at lowest level of all species. We conclude that synergistic effects of stand dynamics and climate warming increased drought sensitivity, which changed competitive strength of co-occurring conifers due to differences in inherent adaptive capacity.

  10. Remote sensing aided procedure for conifer growth modeling in the northeastern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. G.; Khorram, S.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use remotely-sensed data with ground-acquired data for preparing inputs to a mathematical model for generation of a potential conifer growth map of a wildland area. The study area, jointly selected by the resource managers of the U.S. Forest Service at the Plumas National Forest and researchers, covers approximately 500 sq km in the northeastern scrapment of Sierra Nevada. The approach involved a computerized databank based on both remotely-sensed and ground-acquired data. The remotely-sensed data included Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data, NOAA-5 Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) data and U-2 Color infrared photography. The ground data included U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps, Defense Mapping Agency (DMA)/USGS digital terrain data, soil maps, and vegetation data. The results included a series of maps for the final product as well as the intermediate products. The intermediate products were potential evapotranspiration, aspect, and soil plant available water.

  11. Mitochondrial Genome Recombination in the Zone of Contact Between Two Hybridizing Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Correa, Juan P.; Bousquet, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Variation in mitochondrial DNA was surveyed at four gene loci in and around the zone of contact between two naturally hybridizing conifers, black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (P. rubens) in northeastern North America. Most of the mtDNA diversity of these species was found in populations next to or into the zone of contact, where some individuals bore rare mitotypes intermediate between the common mitotypes observed in the allopatric areas of each species. Sequence analysis and tests for mtDNA recombination point to this phenomenon, rather than to recurrent mutation, as the most tenable hypothesis for the origin of these rare mitotypes. From the 10 mitotypes observed, at least 4 would be the product of recombination between 4 of the 5 putative ancestral mitotypes. Tests for cytonuclear disequilibrium and geographical structure of the putative recombinant mitotypes suggest that mtDNA recombination is not frequent and relatively recent on the geological time scale. mtDNA recombination would have been promoted by transient heteroplasmy due to leakage of paternal mtDNA since the Holocene secondary contact between the two species. PMID:16118197

  12. Mixed conifer forest mortality and establishment before and after prescribed fire in Sequoia National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mutch, L.S.; Parsons, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Pre-and post-burn tree mortality rates, size structure, basal area, and ingrowth were determined for four 1.0 ha mixed conifer forest stands in the Log Creek and Tharp's Creek watersheds of Sequoia National Park. Mean annual mortality between 1986 and 1990 was 0.8% for both watersheds. In the fall of 1990, the Tharp's Creek watershed was treated with a prescribed burn. Between 1991 and 1995, mean annual mortality was 1.4% in the unburned Log Creek watershed and 17.2% in the burned Tharp's Creek watershed. A drought from 1987 to 1992 likely contributed to the mortality increase in the Log Creek watershed. The high mortality in the Tharp's Creek watershed was primarily related to crown scorch from the 1990 fire and was modeled with logistic regression for white fir (Abies concolor [Gord. and Glend.]) and sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana [Dougl.]). From 1989 to 1994, basal area declined an average of 5% per year in the burned Tharp's Creek watershed, compared to average annual increases of less than 1% per year in the unburned Log Creek watershed and in the Tharp's watershed prior to burning. Post-burn size structure was dramatically changed in the Tharp's Creek stands: 75% of trees ???50 cm and 25% of trees >50 cm were killed by the fire.

  13. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Nathan G.; Williams, A.P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.J.; Mackay, D.S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Allen, Craig D.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J.D.; Breshears, D.D.; Rauscher, Sara A.; Koven, C.

    2016-01-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests1, 2and their associated climatic feedbacks3, 4. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain5, 6 in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April–August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted ≥50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  14. NorWood: a gene expression resource for evo-devo studies of conifer wood development.

    PubMed

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Sundell, David; Nilsson, Ove; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; Street, Nathaniel R; Tuominen, Hannele

    2017-02-10

    The secondary xylem of conifers is composed mainly of tracheids that differ anatomically and chemically from angiosperm xylem cells. There is currently no high-spatial-resolution data available profiling gene expression during wood formation for any coniferous species, which limits insight into tracheid development. RNA-sequencing data from replicated, high-spatial-resolution section series throughout the cambial and woody tissues of Picea abies were used to generate the NorWood.conGenIE.org web resource, which facilitates exploration of the associated gene expression profiles and co-expression networks. Integration within PlantGenIE.org enabled a comparative regulomics analysis, revealing divergent co-expression networks between P. abies and the two angiosperm species Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus tremula for the secondary cell wall (SCW) master regulator NAC Class IIB transcription factors. The SCW cellulose synthase genes (CesAs) were located in the neighbourhoods of the NAC factors in A. thaliana and P. tremula, but not in P. abies. The NorWood co-expression network enabled identification of potential SCW CesA regulators in P. abies. The NorWood web resource represents a powerful community tool for generating evo-devo insights into the divergence of wood formation between angiosperms and gymnosperms and for advancing understanding of the regulation of wood development in P. abies.

  15. A broad survey of hydraulic and mechanical safety in the xylem of conifers

    PubMed Central

    Bouche, Pauline S.; Larter, Maximilien; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Burlett, Régis; Gasson, Peter; Jansen, Steven; Delzon, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Drought-induced forest dieback has been widely reported over the last decades, and the evidence for a direct causal link between survival and hydraulic failure (xylem cavitation) is now well known. Because vulnerability to cavitation is intimately linked to the anatomy of the xylem, the main objective of this study was to better understand the xylem anatomical properties associated with cavitation resistance. An extensive data set of cavitation resistance traits and xylem anatomical properties was developed for 115 conifer species, with special attention given to the micro-morphology of bordered pits. The ratio of torus to pit aperture diameter, so-called torus overlap, increased with increasing cavitation resistance, while the flexibility of the margo does not seem to play a role, suggesting that air-seeding is located at the seal between the aspirated torus and pit aperture. Moreover, punctured tori were reported in various Pinaceae species. Species resistant to cavitation had thicker tracheid walls, while their lumen diameter (conduit size) was only slightly reduced, minimizing the impact on hydraulic conductance. The results also demonstrated (i) the existence of an indirect trade-off between hydraulic safety and mechanical strength; and (ii) a consistency between species distribution and xylem anatomy: species with a wide torus overlap and high valve effects are found in arid environments such as the Mediterranean region. PMID:24916072

  16. Scaling of phloem structure and optimality of photoassimilate transport in conifer needles.

    PubMed

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Liesche, Johannes; Jensen, Kaare H; Holbrook, N Michele; Schulz, Alexander; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-02-22

    The phloem vascular system facilitates transport of energy-rich sugar and signalling molecules in plants, thus permitting long-range communication within the organism and growth of non-photosynthesizing organs such as roots and fruits. The flow is driven by osmotic pressure, generated by differences in sugar concentration between distal parts of the plant. The phloem is an intricate distribution system, and many questions about its regulation and structural diversity remain unanswered. Here, we investigate the phloem structure in the simplest possible geometry: a linear leaf, found, for example, in the needles of conifer trees. We measure the phloem structure in four tree species representing a diverse set of habitats and needle sizes, from 1 (Picea omorika) to 35 cm (Pinus palustris). We show that the phloem shares common traits across these four species and find that the size of its conductive elements obeys a power law. We present a minimal model that accounts for these common traits and takes into account the transport strategy and natural constraints. This minimal model predicts a power law phloem distribution consistent with transport energy minimization, suggesting that energetics are more important than translocation speed at the leaf level.

  17. Scaling of phloem structure and optimality of sugar transport in conifer needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Liesche, Johannes; Holbrook, N. Michele; Schulz, Alexander; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-11-01

    The phloem vascular system facilitates transport of energy-rich sugar and signalling molecules in plants, thus permitting long-range communication within the organism and growth of non-photosynthesizing organs such as roots and fruits. The flow is driven by osmotic pressure, generated by differences in sugar concentration between distal parts of the plant. The phloem is an intricate distribution system, and many questions about its regulation and structural diversity remain unanswered. Here, we investigate the phloem structure in the simplest possible geometry: a linear leaf, found, for example, in the needles of conifer trees. We measure the phloem structure in four tree species representing a diverse set of habitats and needle sizes, from 1 cm (Picea omorika) to 35 cm (Pinus palustris). We show that the phloem shares common traits across these four species and find that the size of its conductive elements obeys a power law. We present a minimal model that accounts for these common traits and takes into account the transport strategy and natural constraints. This minimal model predicts a power law phloem distribution consistent with transport energy minimization, suggesting that energetics are more important than translocation speed at the leaf level.

  18. A broad survey of hydraulic and mechanical safety in the xylem of conifers.

    PubMed

    Bouche, Pauline S; Larter, Maximilien; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Burlett, Régis; Gasson, Peter; Jansen, Steven; Delzon, Sylvain

    2014-08-01

    Drought-induced forest dieback has been widely reported over the last decades, and the evidence for a direct causal link between survival and hydraulic failure (xylem cavitation) is now well known. Because vulnerability to cavitation is intimately linked to the anatomy of the xylem, the main objective of this study was to better understand the xylem anatomical properties associated with cavitation resistance. An extensive data set of cavitation resistance traits and xylem anatomical properties was developed for 115 conifer species, with special attention given to the micro-morphology of bordered pits. The ratio of torus to pit aperture diameter, so-called torus overlap, increased with increasing cavitation resistance, while the flexibility of the margo does not seem to play a role, suggesting that air-seeding is located at the seal between the aspirated torus and pit aperture. Moreover, punctured tori were reported in various Pinaceae species. Species resistant to cavitation had thicker tracheid walls, while their lumen diameter (conduit size) was only slightly reduced, minimizing the impact on hydraulic conductance. The results also demonstrated (i) the existence of an indirect trade-off between hydraulic safety and mechanical strength; and (ii) a consistency between species distribution and xylem anatomy: species with a wide torus overlap and high valve effects are found in arid environments such as the Mediterranean region.

  19. Uptake of water via branches helps timberline conifers refill embolized xylem in late winter.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Stefan; Schmid, Peter; Laur, Joan; Rosner, Sabine; Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Dämon, Birgit; Hacke, Uwe G

    2014-04-01

    Xylem embolism is a limiting factor for woody species worldwide. Conifers at the alpine timberline are exposed to drought and freeze-thaw stress during winter, which induce potentially lethal embolism. Previous studies indicated that timberline trees survive by xylem refilling. In this study on Picea abies, refilling was monitored during winter and spring seasons and analyzed in the laboratory and in situ experiments, based on hydraulic, anatomical, and histochemical methods. Refilling started in late winter, when the soil was frozen and soil water not available for the trees. Xylem embolism caused up to 86.2% ± 3.1% loss of conductivity and was correlated with the ratio of closed pits. Refilling of xylem as well as recovery in shoot conductance started in February and corresponded with starch accumulation in secondary phloem and in the mesophyll of needles, where we also observed increasing aquaporin densities in the phloem and endodermis. This indicates that active, cellular processes play a role for refilling even under winter conditions. As demonstrated by our experiments, water for refilling was thereby taken up via the branches, likely by foliar water uptake. Our results suggest that refilling is based on water shifts to embolized tracheids via intact xylem, phloem, and parenchyma, whereby aquaporins reduce resistances along the symplastic pathway and aspirated pits facilitate isolation of refilling tracheids. Refilling must be taken into account as a key process in plant hydraulics and in estimating future effects of climate change on forests and alpine tree ecosystems.

  20. Effects of conifer release with glyphosate on summer forage abundance for deer in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vreeland, J.K.; Servello, F.A.; Griffith, B.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of conifer release with glyphosate on summer forage availability for large herbivores in northern forests have received relatively little study. We determined effects of glyphosate treatment of clearcuts on abundance of summer foods for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) at 1 and 7-10 years posttreatment. We measured the abundance (percent cover in a 0- to 1.8-m height stratum) of five forage classes for deer (leaves of deciduous trees, leaves of deciduous shrubs, forbs, grasses, ferns) on 12 clearcuts (six treated, six untreated) to determine 1-year effects and on 10 clearcuts (five treated, five untreated) to determine 7- to 10-year effects. Abundance of leaves of deciduous trees was greater on untreated sites (38 versus 11%) at 1 year posttreatment, but the difference was less (18 versus 12%) at 7-10 years posttreatment (age x treatment interaction, P = 0.005). Leaves of deciduous shrubs exhibited a similar pattern. Abundance of forbs was similar (13-14%) at 1 year posttreatment but greater on treated sites (29 versus 15%) at 7-10 years posttreatment (P = 0.03). Grasses and ferns were less abundant than other forage classes. Overall, glyphosate application initially decreased the abundance of leaves of deciduous trees and shrubs used as food in summer, but the longer term positive effects on forb abundance may result in little net change in overall habitat value.

  1. Incised channel fills containing conifers indicate that seasonally dry vegetation dominated Pennsylvanian tropical lowlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falcon-Lang, H. J.; Nelson, W.J.; Elrick, S.; Looy, C.V.; Ames, P.R.; DiMichele, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    The idea that the Pennsylvanian tropical lowlands were temporally dominated by rainforest (i.e., the Coal Forest) is deeply ingrained in the literature. Here we challenge two centuries of research by suggesting that this concept is based on a taphonomic artifact, and that seasonally dry vegetation dominated instead. This controversial finding arises from the discovery of a new middle Pennsylvanian (Moscovian) fossil plant assemblage in southeast Illinois, United States. The assemblage, which contains xerophytic walchian conifers, occurs in channels incised into a calcic Vertisol below the Baker Coal. These plants grew on seasonally dry tropical lowlands inferred to have developed during a glacial phase. This xerophytic flora differs markedly from that of the typical clubmoss-dominated Coal Forest developed during deglaciation events. Although preserved only very rarely, we argue that such xerophytic floras were temporally as dominant, and perhaps more dominant, than the iconic Coal Forests, which are overrepresented in the fossil record due to taphonomic megabias. These findings require the iconography of Pennsylvanian tropical lowlands to be redrawn. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  2. Intraspecific variation in the use of water sources by the circum-Mediterranean conifer Pinus halepensis.

    PubMed

    Voltas, Jordi; Lucabaugh, Devon; Chambel, Maria Regina; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2015-12-01

    The relevance of interspecific variation in the use of plant water sources has been recognized in drought-prone environments. By contrast, the characterization of intraspecific differences in water uptake patterns remains elusive, although preferential access to particular soil layers may be an important adaptive response for species along aridity gradients. Stable water isotopes were analysed in soil and xylem samples of 56 populations of the drought-avoidant conifer Pinus halepensis grown in a common garden test. We found that most populations reverted to deep soil layers as the main plant water source during seasonal summer droughts. More specifically, we detected a clear geographical differentiation among populations in water uptake patterns even under relatively mild drought conditions (early autumn), with populations originating from more arid regions taking up more water from deep soil layers. However, the preferential access to deep soil water was largely independent of aboveground growth. Our findings highlight the high plasticity and adaptive relevance of the differential access to soil water pools among Aleppo pine populations. The observed ecotypic patterns point to the adaptive relevance of resource investment in deep roots as a strategy towards securing a source of water in dry environments for P. halepensis.

  3. Patterns of polymorphism resulting from long-range colonization in the Mediterranean conifer Aleppo pine.

    PubMed

    Grivet, Delphine; Sebastiani, Federico; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Vendramin, Giovanni G

    2009-12-01

    *The evolutionary outcomes of range expansion/contraction depend on the biological system considered and the interactions among the evolutionary forces in place. In this study, we examined the demographic history and the local polymorphism patterns of candidate genes linked to drought tolerance of a widespread Mediterranean conifer (Pinus halepensis). *To that end, we used cpSSRs and coalescence modelling of nuclear genes to infer the demographic history of natural populations covering the species range. Ten drought-response candidate genes were then examined for their patterns of polymorphism and tested for selection considering plausible demographic scenarios. *Our results revealed a marked loss of genetic diversity from the relictual Greek population towards the western range of the species, as well as molecular signatures of intense bottlenecks. Moreover, we found an excess of derived polymorphisms in several genes sampled in the western part of the range - a potential result of the action of natural selection on populations confronted with new environments following long-range colonization. *Wide-range expansions-contractions of forest trees are accompanied by strong selective pressures, resulting in distinct evolutionary units. This knowledge is of crucial importance for the conservation and management of forests in the face of climate change.

  4. Evidence for foliar endophytic nitrogen fixation in a widely distributed subalpine conifer.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Andrew B; Kueppers, Lara M; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Carper, Dana L; Vandehey, Nick; O'Neil, James; Frank, A Carolin

    2016-04-01

    Coniferous forest nitrogen (N) budgets indicate unknown sources of N. A consistent association between limber pine (Pinus flexilis) and potential N2 -fixing acetic acid bacteria (AAB) indicates that native foliar endophytes may supply subalpine forests with N. To assess whether the P. flexilis-AAB association is consistent across years, we re-sampled P. flexilis twigs at Niwot Ridge, CO and characterized needle endophyte communities via 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing. To investigate whether endophytes have access to foliar N2 , we incubated twigs with (13) N2 -enriched air and imaged radioisotope distribution in needles, the first experiment of its kind using (13) N. We used the acetylene reduction assay to test for nitrogenase activity within P. flexilis twigs four times from June to September. We found evidence for N2 fixation in P. flexilis foliage. N2 diffused readily into needles and nitrogenase activity was positive across sampling dates. We estimate that this association could provide 6.8-13.6 μg N m(-2)  d(-1) to P. flexilis stands. AAB dominated the P. flexilis needle endophyte community. We propose that foliar endophytes represent a low-cost, evolutionarily stable N2 -fixing strategy for long-lived conifers. This novel source of biological N2 fixation has fundamental implications for understanding forest N budgets.

  5. Genetic evaluation of the breeding population of a valuable reforestation conifer Platycladus orientalis (Cupressaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuqing; Ma, Yongpeng; Wang, Shun; Hu, Xian-Ge; Huang, Li-Sha; Li, Yue; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Mao, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Platycladus orientalis, a widespread conifer with long lifespan and significant adaptability. It is much used in reforestation in north China and commonly planted in central Asia. With the increasing demand for plantation forest in central to north China, breeding programs are progressively established for this species. Efficient use of breeding resources requires good understanding of the genetic value of the founder breeding materials. This study investigated the distribution of genetic variation in 192 elite trees collected for the breeding program for the central range of the species. We developed first set of 27 polymorphic EST-derived SSR loci for the species from transcriptome/genome data. After examination of amplification quality, 10 loci were used to evaluate the genetic variation in the breeding population. We found moderate genetic diversity (average He = 0.348) and low population differentiation (Fst = 0.011). Extensive admixture and no significant geographic population structure characterized this set of collections. Our analyses of the diversity and population structure are important steps toward a long-term sustainable deployment of the species and provide valuable genetic information for conservation and breeding applications. PMID:27721449

  6. The dynamic pipeline: hydraulic capacitance and xylem hydraulic safety in four tall conifer species.

    PubMed

    McCulloh, Katherine A; Johnson, Daniel M; Meinzer, Frederick C; Woodruff, David R

    2014-05-01

    Recent work has suggested that plants differ in their relative reliance on structural avoidance of embolism versus maintenance of the xylem water column through dynamic traits such as capacitance, but we still know little about how and why species differ along this continuum. It is even less clear how or if different parts of a plant vary along this spectrum. Here we examined how traits such as hydraulic conductivity or conductance, xylem vulnerability curves, and capacitance differ in trunks, large- and small-diameter branches, and foliated shoots of four species of co-occurring conifers. We found striking similarities among species in most traits, but large differences among plant parts. Vulnerability to embolism was high in shoots, low in small- and large-diameter branches, and high again in the trunks. Safety margins, defined as the pressure causing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity or conductance minus the midday water potential, were large in small-diameter branches, small in trunks and negative in shoots. Sapwood capacitance increased with stem diameter, and was correlated with stem vulnerability, wood density and latewood proportion. Capacitive release of water is a dynamic aspect of plant hydraulics that is integral to maintenance of long-distance water transport.

  7. Negligible influence of spatial autocorrelation in the assessment of fire effects in a mixed conifer forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, P.J.; Schwilk, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Fire is an important feature of many forest ecosystems, although the quantification of its effects is compromised by the large scale at which fire occurs and its inherent unpredictability. A recurring problem is the use of subsamples collected within individual burns, potentially resulting in spatially autocorrelated data. Using subsamples from six different fires (and three unburned control areas) we show little evidence for strong spatial autocorrelation either before or after burning for eight measures of forest conditions (both fuels and vegetation). Additionally, including a term for spatially autocorrelated errors provided little improvement for simple linear models contrasting the effects of early versus late season burning. While the effects of spatial autocorrelation should always be examined, it may not always greatly influence assessments of fire effects. If high patch scale variability is common in Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests, even following more than a century of fire exclusion, treatments designed to encourage further heterogeneity in forest conditions prior to the reintroduction of fire will likely be unnecessary.

  8. Evaluation of secretome of highly efficient lignocellulolytic Penicillium sp. Dal 5 isolated from rhizosphere of conifers.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rohit; Kaur, Baljit; Singh, Surender; Di Falco, Macros; Tsang, Adrian; Chadha, B S

    2016-09-01

    Penicillium sp. (Dal 5) isolated from rhizosphere of conifers from Dalhousie (Himachal Pradesh, India) was found to be an efficient cellulolytic strain. The culture under shake flask on CWR (cellulose, wheat bran and rice straw) medium produced appreciably higher levels of endoglucanase (35.69U/ml), β-glucosidase (4.20U/ml), cellobiohydrolase (2.86U/ml), FPase (1.2U/ml) and xylanase (115U/ml) compared to other Penicillium strains reported in literature. The mass spectroscopy analysis of Penicillium sp. Dal 5 secretome identified 108 proteins constituting an array of CAZymes including glycosyl hydrolases (GH) belonging to 24 different families, polysaccharide lyases (PL), carbohydrate esterases (CE), lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMO) in addition to swollenin and a variety of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM) indicating an elaborate genetic potential of this strain for hydrolysis of lignocellulosics. Further, the culture extract was evaluated for hydrolysis of alkali treated rice straw, wheat straw, bagasse and corn cob at 10% substrate loading rate.

  9. Chemical compositions of essential oils of five introduced conifers in Corsica.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriel; Garcia, Adrien; Gibernau, Marc; Bighelli, Ange; Tomi, Félix

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this survey was to determine the chemical composition of essential oils (EO) of five conifers acclimated in Corsica by GC(RI), GC-MS and (13)C NMR. L. decidua needle and wood EOs contained as majors components: α- and β-pinenes, germacrene D (needles) and bornyl acetate (wood). The EOs of needles, wood and cones of P. menziesii were characterised by β- and α-pinenes, terpinen-4-ol, sabinene, terpinolene (needles and wood), Δ-3-carene (wood) and limonene (cones). Needles and wood EOs of P. ponderosa contained as major components: β- and α-pinenes, Δ-3-carene (wood) and estragole (needles). S. giganteum EOs of foliage and wood were rather similar and dominated by α-pinene, and safrole. The EOs of leaf, wood and cones from C. japonica were very similar, and exhibited α-pinene, sabinene, β-elemol and kaurene as major constituents. It appeared that EO compositions of some species were different from reported literature data.

  10. Recent growth of conifer species of western North America: Assessing spatial patterns of radial growth trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.; Hessl, Amy E.; Peterson, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    We explored spatial patterns of low-frequency variability in radial tree growth among western North American conifer species and identified predictors of the variability in these patterns. Using 185 sites from the International Tree-Ring Data Bank, each of which contained 10a??60 raw ring-width series, we rebuilt two chronologies for each site, using two conservative methods designed to retain any low-frequency variability associated with recent environmental change. We used factor analysis to identify regional low-frequency patterns in site chronologies and estimated the slope of the growth trend since 1850 at each site from a combination of linear regression and time-series techniques. This slope was the response variable in a regression-tree model to predict the effects of environmental gradients and species-level differences on growth trends. Growth patterns at 27 sites from the American Southwest were consistent with quasi-periodic patterns of drought. Either 12 or 32 of the 185 sites demonstrated patterns of increasing growth between 1850 and 1980 A.D., depending on the standardization technique used. Pronounced growth increases were associated with high-elevation sites (above 3000 m) and high-latitude sites in maritime climates. Future research focused on these high-elevation and high-latitude sites should address the precise mechanisms responsible for increased 20th century growth.

  11. Fluid mechanics of osmotic pipe flows and limitations on the lengths of conifer needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Tomas; Rademaker, Hanna; Jensen, Kaare; Zwieniecki, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    Plant leaves produce sugars, which are exported osmotically through the sieve tubes of the leaf. Leaf sizes vary by more than 3 orders of magnitude, from a few millimeters to over one meter. Conifer leaves (needles), however, are relatively short and the majority of needles are no longer than 6 cm. The reason for this limitation is unknown, but we argue that it can be explained by the linear venation pattern and the narrow sieve tubes, combined with the osmotic flow mechanism. Thus sugars produced near the tip of long needles cannot be exported efficiently, because the pressure required to drive vascular flow would exceed the greatest available pressure (the osmotic pressure). This basic constraint leads to the formation of an inactive region of stagnant fluid near the needle tip, which does not contribute to sugar flow. The active region, emerging from the base of the needle, has the length Leff =r 3 / 2 16 ηLp 1 / 2 , where r is the conduit radius, η is the sap viscosity, and Lp is the cell membrane permeability. It is independent of the needle length and corresponds well with maximal needle lengths observed in nature.

  12. Reclamation of mined organic soils in northern Minnesota to selected conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, M.D.C.

    1983-01-01

    In a greenhouse experiment designed to evaluate the capacity of residual organic soils from mined peatland sites to support commercially valuable conifers under various fertilization regimes, the six month height growth and dry weight production of Scotch pine, black, white, and Norway spruce was dependent upon the nature and properties of the residual organic soils to be reclaimed, the species selected to revegetate these sites, the type and amount of fertilizer treatments applied, and interactions between these factors. On a highly acid, nutrient poor Fibrist, only Scotch pine seedlings exhibited adequate growth, but their performance appeared to be limited by natural and fertilizer induced soil acidity. On a Ca rich, near neutral Hemist, Scotch pine growth was adequate and unaffected by fertilization. However, spruce growth was vigorous only under a fertilizer treatment containing micronutrients plus a high rate of NPK. Although there is little doubt that residual organic soils from mined peatland sites can be used for forest production, there are important differences between sites requiring that each be considered individually before reclamation procedures are initiated.

  13. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.; Williams, A. P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.; Mackay, D. S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, J. C.; Allen, C. D.; Fisher, R. A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Rauscher, S. A.; Koven, C.

    2016-03-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April-August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted >=50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  14. Snowmelt timing, phenology, and growing season length in conifer forests of Crater Lake National Park, USA.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Donal S; Kellermann, Jherime L; Wayne, Chris

    2017-09-30

    Anthropogenic climate change is having significant impacts on montane and high-elevation areas globally. Warmer winter temperatures are driving reduced snowpack in the western USA with broad potential impacts on ecosystem dynamics of particular concern for protected areas. Vegetation phenology is a sensitive indicator of ecological response to climate change and is associated with snowmelt timing. Human monitoring of climate impacts can be resource prohibitive for land management agencies, whereas remotely sensed phenology observations are freely available at a range of spatiotemporal scales. Little work has been done in regions dominated by evergreen conifer cover, which represents many mountain regions at temperate latitudes. We used moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to assess the influence of snowmelt timing and elevation on five phenology metrics (green up, maximum greenness, senescence, dormancy, and growing season length) within Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA from 2001 to 2012. Earlier annual mean snowmelt timing was significantly correlated with earlier onset of green up at the landscape scale. Snowmelt timing and elevation have significant explanatory power for phenology, though with high variability. Elevation has a moderate control on early season indicators such as snowmelt timing and green up and less on late-season variables such as senescence and growing season length. PCA results show that early season indicators and late season indicators vary independently. These results have important implications for ecosystem dynamics, management, and conservation, particularly of species such as whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) in alpine and subalpine areas.

  15. Drought sensitivity of three co-occurring conifers within a dry inner Alpine environment

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Roman; Oberhuber, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We applied dendroclimatological techniques to determine long-term stationarity of climate-growth relationships and recent growth trends of three widespread coniferous tree species of the central Austrian Alps, which grow intermixed at dry-mesic sites within a dry inner Alpine environment (750 m asl). Time series of annual increments were developed from > 120 mature trees of Picea abies, Larix decidua and Pinus sylvestris. Calculation of response functions for the period 1911 – 2009 revealed significant differences among species in response to climate variables. While precipitation in May – June favoured radial growth of Picea abies and Larix decidua, Pinus sylvestris growth mainly depended on April – May precipitation. P. abies growth was most sensitive to May – June temperature (inverse relationship). Moving response function coefficients indicated increasing drought sensitivity of all species in recent decades, which is related to a decline in soil moisture availability due to increasing stand density and tree size and higher evapotranspiration rates in a warmer climate. While recent trend in basal area increment (BAI) of L. decidua distinctly declined implying high vulnerability to drought stress, moderately shade-tolerant P. abies showed steadily increasing BAI and quite constant BAI was maintained in drought adapted P. sylvestris, although at lowest level of all species. We conclude that synergistic effects of stand dynamics and climate warming increased drought sensitivity, which changed competitive strength of co-occurring conifers due to differences in inherent adaptive capacity. PMID:23976821

  16. Evaluations of plastic mesh tubes for protecting conifer seedling from pocket gophers in three western states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engeman, Richard M.; Anthony, Richard M.; Barnes, Victor G.; Krupa, Heather W.; Evans, James

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of plastic mesh tubes for protecting conifer seedlings from pocket gopher damage was evaluated on three national forest lands in three states. In each area, cohorts of 640 protected seedlings and 640 unprotected seedlings (3,840 total) were individually monitored for damage, survival, and growth twice each summer for 5 yr after planting. Substantial differences were found between protected and unprotected seedlings for time until occurrence of damage, survival time, proportion damaged and proportion surviving, as well as differences in growth. Over the three forest study sites, the proportion of unprotected seedlings damaged ranged from 60-89%, whereas the proportion of protected seedlings damaged after 5 yr ranged from 18-27%. The proportion of unprotected seedlings that died of gopher damage over 5 yr ranged from 46-64%, versus 1-19% for protected seedlings. Height growth was 25% greater for protected seedlings. Even when only undamaged seedlings were considered, protected seedlings exhibited superior height growth, possibly due to a more favorable microclimate provided by the tubes. These results were reflected in the higher and more uniform stocking rates for protected seedlings.

  17. Genetic evaluation of the breeding population of a valuable reforestation conifer Platycladus orientalis (Cupressaceae).

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuqing; Ma, Yongpeng; Wang, Shun; Hu, Xian-Ge; Huang, Li-Sha; Li, Yue; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Mao, Jian-Feng

    2016-10-10

    Platycladus orientalis, a widespread conifer with long lifespan and significant adaptability. It is much used in reforestation in north China and commonly planted in central Asia. With the increasing demand for plantation forest in central to north China, breeding programs are progressively established for this species. Efficient use of breeding resources requires good understanding of the genetic value of the founder breeding materials. This study investigated the distribution of genetic variation in 192 elite trees collected for the breeding program for the central range of the species. We developed first set of 27 polymorphic EST-derived SSR loci for the species from transcriptome/genome data. After examination of amplification quality, 10 loci were used to evaluate the genetic variation in the breeding population. We found moderate genetic diversity (average He = 0.348) and low population differentiation (Fst = 0.011). Extensive admixture and no significant geographic population structure characterized this set of collections. Our analyses of the diversity and population structure are important steps toward a long-term sustainable deployment of the species and provide valuable genetic information for conservation and breeding applications.

  18. The effect of elevation, light and water availability on the growth of Sierran conifer seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, R.A.; Dale, V.H.; Beauchamp, J.J. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1994-06-01

    The composition of many plant communities will be altered with global change, and this will depend on individual species' abilities to reproduce and to survive under new climate conditions. Two experiments are underday to test the hypothesis that seedling demography is affected by the relative drought and shade tolerances of seven co-occurring species of Sierran conifers. The first experiment is being conducted at three sites in Sequoia National Park, California, elevations 1600 m, 1900 m and 2200 m. At each site, closed canopy [open quotes]shade[close quotes] plots and open canopy [open quotes]gap[close quotes] plots are being used. Seedling growth of each species is compared between light levels and elevations. The second experiment also measures seedling growth in low and high levels, but with four levels of water availability at one elevation (1900 m). Microenvironmental monitoring (soil and air temperature, relative humidity, radiation, and soil moisture) by surrounding mature trees are also being measured in order to develop a mechanistic model of seedling growth and survival.

  19. Climate controls on anomalously high productivity in the mixed conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, A. E.; Goulden, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Mediterranean climate of California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains supports a dense conifer forest that contains some of the largest trees in the world. Well-established ecological relationships, such as the Miami Model, predict relatively low NPPs for these forests (~250 g/m2/yr to 1300 g/m2/yr) due to winter cold limitation and summer drought. However, the observed rates of NPPs are quite high (up to 2000 g/m2/yr), raising the question of what environmental conditions and plant adaptations promote such a high NPP. We hypothesize that the trees in these forests are neither as cold-limited nor water-limited as surface weather station data suggest. Eddy covariance observations at the top of a 55 m tall micrometeorological tower located at 2050 m elevation indicate daytime CO2 uptake continues year round, and is not limited by winter cold or summer drought. Comparisons of temperature measurements on the tower with operational balloon soundings indicate that tree canopies are often in the free troposphere, which buffers the temperatures they experience and moderates winter cold limitation and summer evapotranspiration.

  20. Scaling of phloem structure and optimality of photoassimilate transport in conifer needles

    PubMed Central

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Liesche, Johannes; Jensen, Kaare H.; Holbrook, N. Michele; Schulz, Alexander; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    The phloem vascular system facilitates transport of energy-rich sugar and signalling molecules in plants, thus permitting long-range communication within the organism and growth of non-photosynthesizing organs such as roots and fruits. The flow is driven by osmotic pressure, generated by differences in sugar concentration between distal parts of the plant. The phloem is an intricate distribution system, and many questions about its regulation and structural diversity remain unanswered. Here, we investigate the phloem structure in the simplest possible geometry: a linear leaf, found, for example, in the needles of conifer trees. We measure the phloem structure in four tree species representing a diverse set of habitats and needle sizes, from 1 (Picea omorika) to 35 cm (Pinus palustris). We show that the phloem shares common traits across these four species and find that the size of its conductive elements obeys a power law. We present a minimal model that accounts for these common traits and takes into account the transport strategy and natural constraints. This minimal model predicts a power law phloem distribution consistent with transport energy minimization, suggesting that energetics are more important than translocation speed at the leaf level. PMID:25567645