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Sample records for connexin26 null mice

  1. Timed conditional null of connexin26 in mice reveals temporary requirements of connexin26 in key cochlear developmental events before the onset of hearing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Tang, Wenxue; Kim, Yeunjung; Lin, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Gjb2 gene, which encodes a gap junction protein connexin26 (Cx26), are the most prevalent form of hereditary deafness in humans and represent about half of non-syndromic congenital deafness cases in many ethnic populations. Cochlear potassium (K+) recycling in mature cochlea is required for normal hearing. It is thought that gap junctions are essential for K+ recycling and that Gjb2 mutations cause Gjb2-associated deafness by disrupting K+ recycling in mature cochlea. Here we present evidence showing that Gjb2 is required for normal development of the neonatal organ of Corti prior to the onset of the hearing in mice. In the conditional Gjb2 null (cCx26 null) mice, ribbon synapses in inner hair cells remained poorly developed, the afferent type I fibers failed to finish the refinement process to form convergent innervation to individual inner hair cells. The spontaneous depolarizing activities in the supporting cells, which normally diminish in the wild type cochleae after postnatal day 8 (P8), remained strong in the cochlea after P8 in the mutant mice. Furthermore, the deafness phenotype was readily generated only if the Cx26 expression in the organ of Corti was significantly reduced before P6. Similar amount of Cx26 reduction in more mature cochleae had a much weaker effect in damaging the hearing sensitivity. Our findings indicated that Cx26 plays essential roles in the maturation process of the organ of Corti prior to the establishment of high K+ in the endolymph and the onset of hearing. These results suggest that successful treatment of Cx26 deafness requires early intervention before the cochlea fully matures.

  2. Connexin 26 null mice exhibit spiral ganglion degeneration that can be blocked by BDNF gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Yohei; Beyer, Lisa A.; Swiderski, Donald L.; O’Neal, Aubrey L.; Prieskorn, Diane M.; Shivatzki, Shaked; Avraham, Karen B.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) are the most common genetic cause of deafness, leading to congenital bilateral non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Here we report the generation of a mouse model for a connexin 26 (C×26) mutation, in which cre-Sox10 drives excision of the C×26 gene from non-sensory cells flanking the auditory epithelium. We determined that these conditional knockout mice, designated Gjb2-CKO, have a severe hearing loss. Immunocytochemistry of the auditory epithelium confirmed absence of C×26 in the non-sensory cells. Histology of the organ of Corti and the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) performed at ages 1, 3, or 6 months revealed that in Gjb2-CKO mice, the organ of Corti began to degenerate in the basal cochlear turn at an early stage, and the degeneration rapidly spread to the apex. In addition, the density of SGNs in Rosenthal’s canal decreased rapidly along a gradient from the base of the cochlea to the apex, where some SGNs survived until at least 6 months of age. Surviving neurons often clustered together and formed clumps of cells in the canal. We then assessed the influence of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene therapy on the SGNs of Gjb2-CKO mice by inoculating Adenovirus BDNF (Ad.BDNF) into the base of the cochlea via the scala tympani or scala media. We determined that over-expression of BDNF beginning around 1 month of age resulted in a significant rescue of neurons in Rosenthal’s canal of the cochlear basal turn but not in the middle or apical portions. This data may be used to design therapies for enhancing the SGN physiological status in all GJB2 patients and to a sub-group of GJB2 patients where the hearing loss progresses due to ongoing degeneration of the auditory nerve, thereby improving the outcome of cochlear implant therapy in these ears. PMID:24333301

  3. Replacement of connexin43 by connexin26 in transgenic mice leads to dysfunctional reproductive organs and slowed ventricular conduction in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Winterhager, Elke; Pielensticker, Nicole; Freyer, Jennifer; Ghanem, Alexander; Schrickel, Jan W; Kim, Jung-Sun; Behr, Rüdiger; Grümmer, Ruth; Maass, Karen; Urschel, Stephanie; Lewalter, Thorsten; Tiemann, Klaus; Simoni, Manuela; Willecke, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Background In order to further distinguish unique from general functions of connexin43, we have generated mice in which the coding region of connexin43 was replaced by that of connexin26. Results Heterozygous mothers showed impaired mammary gland development responsible for decreased lactation and early postnatal death of the pups which could be partially rescued by wild type foster mothers. Only about 17% of the homozygous connexin43 knock-in connexin26 mice instead of 25% expected according to Mendelian inheritance, were born and only 6% survived to day 21 post partum and longer. Neonatal and adult connexin43 knock-in connexin26 mice exhibited slowed ventricular conduction in their hearts, i.e. similar but delayed electrophysiological abnormalities as connexin43 deficient mice. Furthermore, connexin43 knock-in connexin26 male and female mice were infertile and exhibited hypotrophic gonads. In testes, tubuli seminiferi were developed and spermatogonia as well as some primary spermatocytes were present, but further differentiated stages of spermatogenesis were absent. Ovaries of female connexin43 knock-in connexin26 mice revealed only few follicles and the maturation of follicles was completely impaired. Conclusion The impaired gametogenesis of homozygous males and females can explain their infertility. PMID:17408477

  4. Virally expressed connexin26 restores gap junction function in the cochlea of conditional Gjb2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q; Wang, Y; Chang, Q; Wang, J; Gong, S; Li, H; Lin, X

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2, which codes for the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin26 (Cx26), are the most common causes of human nonsyndromic hereditary deafness. We inoculated modified adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors into the scala media of early postnatal conditional Gjb2 knockout mice to drive exogenous Cx26 expression. We found extensive virally expressed Cx26 in cells lining the scala media, and intercellular GJ network was re-established in the organ of Corti of mutant mouse cochlea. Widespread ectopic Cx26 expression neither formed ectopic GJs nor affected normal hearing thresholds in wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting that autonomous cellular mechanisms regulate proper membrane trafficking of exogenously expressed Cx26 and govern the functional manifestation of them. Functional recovery of GJ-mediated coupling among the supporting cells was observed. We found that both cell death in the organ of Corti and degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea of mutant mice were substantially reduced, although auditory brainstem responses did not show significant hearing improvement. This is the first report demonstrating that virally mediated gene therapy restored extensive GJ intercellular network among cochlear non-sensory cells in vivo. Such a treatment performed at early postnatal stages resulted in a partial rescue of disease phenotypes in the cochlea of the mutant mice.

  5. Reduced Connexin26 in the Mature Cochlea Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xing-Xing; Chen, Sen; Xie, Le; Ji, Yu-Zi; Wu, Xia; Wang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Qi; Yu, Jin-Tao; Sun, Yu; Lin, Xi; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Connexin26 (Cx26, encoded by GJB2) mutations are the most common cause of non-syndromic deafness. GJB2 is thought to be involved in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). However, the role of Cx26 in NIHL is still obscure. To explore the association between Cx26 and NIHL, we established a Cx26 knockdown (KD) mouse model by conditional knockdown of Cx26 at postnatal day 18 (P18), and then we observed the auditory threshold and morphologic changes in these mice with or without noise exposure. The Cx26 KD mice did not exhibit substantial hearing loss and hair cell degeneration, while the Cx26 KD mice with acoustic trauma experienced higher hearing loss than simple noise exposure siblings and nearly had no recovery. Additionally, extensive outer hair cell loss and more severe destruction of the basal organ of Corti were observed in Cx26 KD mice after noise exposure. These data indicate that reduced Cx26 expression in the mature mouse cochlea may increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss and facilitate the cell degeneration in the organ of Corti. PMID:26927086

  6. Deformation of the Outer Hair Cells and the Accumulation of Caveolin-2 in Connexin 26 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Takashi; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Fujimoto, Ayumi; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Nishikawa, Atena; Aoki, Toru; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kamiya, Kazusaku

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in GJB2, which encodes connexin 26 (Cx26), a cochlear gap junction protein, represent a major cause of pre-lingual, non-syndromic deafness. The degeneration of the organ of Corti observed in Cx26 mutant—associated deafness is thought to be a secondary pathology of hearing loss. Here we focused on abnormal development of the organ of Corti followed by degeneration including outer hair cell (OHC) loss. Methods We investigated the crucial factors involved in late-onset degeneration and loss of OHC by ultrastructural observation, immunohistochemistry and protein analysis in our Cx26-deficient mice (Cx26f/fP0Cre). Results In ultrastructural observations of Cx26f/fP0Cre mice, OHCs changed shape irregularly, and several folds or notches were observed in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the mutant OHCs had a flat surface compared with the characteristic wavy surface structure of OHCs of normal mice. Protein analysis revealed an increased protein level of caveolin-2 (CAV2) in Cx26f/fP0Cre mouse cochlea. In immunohistochemistry, a remarkable accumulation of CAV2 was observed in Cx26f/fP0Cre mice. In particular, this accumulation of CAV2 was mainly observed around OHCs, and furthermore this accumulation was observed around the shrunken site of OHCs with an abnormal hourglass-like shape. Conclusions The deformation of OHCs and the accumulation of CAV2 in the organ of Corti may play a crucial role in the progression of, or secondary OHC loss in, GJB2-associated deafness. Investigation of these molecular pathways, including those involving CAV2, may contribute to the elucidation of a new pathogenic mechanism of GJB2-associated deafness and identify effective targets for new therapies. PMID:26492081

  7. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ligen; Sun, Yuxiang

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Old GHS-R null mice exhibit a healthy phenotype-lean and insulin sensitive. Interestingly, the GHS-R null mice have increased energy expenditure, yet exhibit no difference in food intake or locomotor activity compared to wild-type mice. We have found that GHS-R is expressed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of old mice. Ablation of GHS-R attenuates age-associated decline in thermogenesis, exhibiting a higher core body temperature. Indeed, the BAT of old GHS-R null mice reveals enhanced thermogenic capacity, which is consistent with the gene expression profile of increases in glucose/lipid uptake, lipogenesis, and lipolysis in BAT. The data collectively suggest that ghrelin/GHS-R signaling has important roles in thermogenesis. The recent discovery that BAT also regulates energy homeostasis in adult humans makes the BAT a new antiobesity target. Understanding the roles and molecular mechanisms of ghrelin/GHS-R in thermogenesis is of great significance. GHS-R antagonists might be a novel means of combating obesity by shifting adiposity balance from obesogenesis to thermogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Restoration of connexin26 protein level in the cochlea completely rescues hearing in a mouse model of human connexin30-linked deafness.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shoeb; Tang, Wenxue; Chang, Qing; Qu, Yan; Hibshman, Jill; Li, Yuhua; Söhl, Goran; Willecke, Klaus; Chen, Ping; Lin, Xi

    2007-01-23

    Mutations in genes coding for connexin26 (Cx26) and/or Cx30 are linked to approximately half of all cases of human autosomal nonsyndromic prelingual deafness. Cx26 and Cx30 are the two major Cx isoforms found in the cochlea, and they coassemble to form hybrid (heteromeric and heterotypic) gap junctions (GJs). This molecular arrangement implies that homomeric GJs would remain in the cochlea if one of the coassembly partners were mutated resulting in null expression. We generated mice in which extra copies of the Cx26 gene were transgenically expressed from a modified bacterial artificial chromosome in a Cx30-/- background. In the absence of the Cx30 gene, Cx26 expressed from extra alleles completely restored hearing sensitivity and prevented hair cell death in deaf Cx30-/- mice. The results indicated that hybrid GJs consisting of Cx26 and Cx30 were not essential for normal hearing in mice and suggested that up-regulation of Cx26 or slowing down its protein degradation might be a therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat deafness caused by Cx30 mutations.

  9. Connexin26 regulates assembly and maintenance of cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex for normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary deafness affects about 1 in 2000 children and GJB2 gene mutation is most frequent cause for this disease in the world. GJB2 encodes connexin26 (Cx26), a component in cochlear gap junction. Recently, we found macromolecular change of gap junction plaques with two different types of Cx26 mutation as major classification of clinical case, one is a model of dominant negative type, Cx26R75W+ and the other is conditional gene deficient mouse, Cx26f/fP0Cre as a model for insufficiency of gap junction protein [6]. Gap junction composed mainly of Cx26 and Cx30 in wild type mice formed large planar gap junction plaques (GJP). In contrast, Cx26R75W+ and Cx26f/fP0Cre showed fragmented small round GJPs around the cell border. In Cx26f/fP0Cre, some of the cells with Cx26 expression due to their cellular mosaicism showed normal large GJP with Cx26 and Cx30 only at the cell junction site between two Cx26 positive cells. These indicate that bilateral Cx26 expressions from both adjacent cells are essential for the formation of the cochlear linear GJP, and it is not compensated by other cochlear Connexins such as Connexin30. In the present study, we demonstrated a new molecular pathology in most common hereditary deafness with different types of Connexin26 mutations, and this machinery can be a new target for drag design of hereditary deafness.

  10. Connexin 26 facilitates gastrointestinal bacterial infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Charlotte; Kelsell, David P; Marchès, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli, including enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), represents the most common cause of diarrhoea worldwide and is therefore a serious public health burden. Treatment for gastrointestinal pathogens is hindered by the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistance, leading to the requirement for the development of new therapies. A variety of mechanisms act in combination to mediate gastrointestinal-bacterial-associated diarrhoea development. For example, EPEC infection of enterocytes induces attaching and effacing lesion formation and the disruption of tight junctions. An alternative enteric pathogen, Shigella flexneri, manipulates the expression of Connexin 26 (Cx26), a gap junction protein. S. flexneri can open Cx26 hemichannels allowing the release of ATP, whereas HeLa cells expressing mutant gap-junction-associated Cx26 are less susceptible to cellular invasion by S. flexneri than cells expressing wild-type (WT) Cx26. We have investigated further the link between Cx26 expression and gastrointestinal infection by using EPEC and S. flexneri as in vitro models of infection. In this study, a significant reduction in EPEC adherence was observed in cells expressing mutant Cx26 compared with WT Cx26. Furthermore, a significant reduction in both cellular invasion by S. flexneri and adherence by EPEC was demonstrated in human intestinal cell lines following treatment with Cx26 short interfering RNA. These in vitro results suggest that the loss of functional Cx26 expression provides improved protection against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. Thus, Cx26 represents a potential therapeutic target for gastrointestinal bacterial infection.

  11. Functional hemichannels formed by human connexin 26 expressed in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Mariana C; Krishnan, Srinivasan; Cortes, D Marien; Retamal, Mauricio A; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A; Cuello, Luis G

    2015-03-18

    Gap-junction channels (GJCs) communicate the cytoplasm of adjacent cells and are formed by head-to-head association of two hemichannels (HCs), one from each of the neighbouring cells. GJCs mediate electrical and chemical communication between cells, whereas undocked HCs participate in paracrine signalling because of their permeability to molecules such as ATP. Sustained opening of HCs under pathological conditions results in water and solute fluxes that cannot be compensated by membrane transport and therefore lead to cell damage. Mutations of Cx26 (connexin 26) are the most frequent cause of genetic deafness and it is therefore important to understand the structure-function relationship of wild-type and deafness-associated mutants. Currently available connexin HC expression systems severely limit the pace of structural studies and there is no simple high-throughput HC functional assay. The Escherichia coli-based expression system presented in the present study yields milligram amounts of purified Cx26 HCs suitable for functional and structural studies. We also show evidence of functional activity of recombinant Cx26 HCs in intact bacteria using a new growth complementation assay. The E. coli-based expression system has high potential for structural studies and high-throughput functional screening of HCs.

  12. Functional hemichannels formed by human connexin 26 expressed in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Mariana C.; Krishnan, Srinivasan; Cortes, D. Marien; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A.; Cuello, Luis G.

    2015-01-01

    Gap-junction channels (GJCs) communicate the cytoplasm of adjacent cells and are formed by head-to-head association of two hemichannels (HCs), one from each of the neighbouring cells. GJCs mediate electrical and chemical communication between cells, whereas undocked HCs participate in paracrine signalling because of their permeability to molecules such as ATP. Sustained opening of HCs under pathological conditions results in water and solute fluxes that cannot be compensated by membrane transport and therefore lead to cell damage. Mutations of Cx26 (connexin 26) are the most frequent cause of genetic deafness and it is therefore important to understand the structure–function relationship of wild-type and deafness-associated mutants. Currently available connexin HC expression systems severely limit the pace of structural studies and there is no simple high-throughput HC functional assay. The Escherichia coli-based expression system presented in the present study yields milligram amounts of purified Cx26 HCs suitable for functional and structural studies. We also show evidence of functional activity of recombinant Cx26 HCs in intact bacteria using a new growth complementation assay. The E. coli-based expression system has high potential for structural studies and high-throughput functional screening of HCs. PMID:25585383

  13. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A; Hill, Tracy L; Welch, Ian D; Beier, Frank

    2016-07-26

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα's potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear.

  14. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shirine E.; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A.; Hill, Tracy L.; Welch, Ian D.; Beier, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα’s potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear. PMID:27457421

  15. Overexpression of connexin26 in the basal keratinocytes reduces sensitivity to tumor promoter TPA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ramirez, Angel; Budunova, Irina

    2010-07-01

    Connexin 26 is important in keratinocyte proliferation, differentiation and skin pathologies. Cx26 is barely expressed in normal adult epidermis, but its expression is induced during wound healing, psoriasis, and skin hyperplasia stimulated by tumor promoters. In hyperplastic proliferating epidermis, Cx26 is co-expressed with Cx43 typical for basal and suprabasal keratinocytes. As Cx26 and Cx43 can not form permeable gap junctions, their co-expression may alter the gap junctional communication between keratinocytes and induce proliferation. To test the effect of persistent co-expression of Cx26 and Cx43 in epidermis, we generated transgenic mice using keratin5 promoter to target Cx26 to basal Cx43-positive keratinocytes. We evaluated the effect of ectopic Cx26 on keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in normal and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated skin. The ectopic Cx26 expression in epidermis did not significantly affect skin development, keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation in newborn and adult skin. Unexpectedly, the proliferative effect of tumor promoter TPA was strongly decreased in epidermis of K5.Cx26 transgenics. This correlated with significant down-regulation of TPA-induced activity of protein kinase C (PKC) in K5.Cx26 mice.

  16. Screening of Connexin 26 in Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Danielle; Silva, Daniela da; Lopez, Priscila; Mantovani, Jair Cortez

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The first locus for nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss is on chromosome 13q11–22. The 35delG mutation is present in 80% of cases in which GJB2 is involved, which makes the study of this mutation very important. The viability and benefits of screening for mutations in the connexin 26 gene are now beginning to change the diagnostic evaluation and identification of the etiology of hearing loss. Objective To investigate the occurrence of the 35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and their first degree relatives. Methods This transversal study included 72 patients from the local hospital. The patients were divided into three groups: group A, sensorineural hearing loss (n = 58); group B, first-degree relatives of group A with sensorineural hearing loss (n = 09); and group C, first-degree relatives of patients from group A without hearing loss (n = 05). All patients had audiological evaluation and genetic testing of the 35delG mutation. Results The 35delG mutation was found in four heterozygous mutations (three of them found in the same family). The other heterozygous mutation was found in a female patient with bilateral, moderate, prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss. A single homozygous mutation was found in a male patient, with severe sensorineural hearing loss in his right ear and profound hearing loss in the left ear. Conclusions The 35delG mutation was found in 7% of the cases. The test is easy to perform and inexpensive, but it is necessary to investigate other genes related to hearing loss. PMID:25992148

  17. Computational Studies of Molecular Permeation through Connexin26 Channels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yun; Rossi, Angelo R; Harris, Andrew L

    2016-02-02

    A signal property of connexin channels is the ability to mediate selective diffusive movement of molecules through plasma membrane(s), but the energetics and determinants of molecular movement through these channels have yet to be understood. Different connexin channels have distinct molecular selectivities that cannot be explained simply on the basis of size or charge of the permeants. To gain insight into the forces and interactions that underlie selective molecular permeation, we investigated the energetics of two uncharged derivatized sugars, one permeable and one impermeable, through a validated connexin26 (Cx26) channel structural model, using molecular dynamics and associated analytic tools. The system is a Cx26 channel equilibrated in explicit membrane/solvent, shown by Brownian dynamics to reproduce key conductance characteristics of the native channel. The results are consistent with the known difference in permeability to each molecule. The energetic barriers extend through most of the pore length, rather than being highly localized as in ion-specific channels. There is little evidence for binding within the pore. Force decomposition reveals how, for each tested molecule, interactions with water and the Cx26 protein vary over the length of the pore and reveals a significant contribution from hydrogen bonding and interaction with K(+). The flexibility of the pore width varies along its length, and the tested molecules have differential effects on pore width as they pass through. Potential sites of interaction within the pore are defined for each molecule. The results suggest that for the tested molecules, differences in hydrogen bonding and entropic factors arising from permeant flexibility substantially contribute to the energetics of permeation. This work highlights factors involved in selective molecular permeation that differ from those that define selectivity among atomic ions.

  18. Assembly of the cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex requires connexin 26.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Yum, Sabrina W; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Muraki, Miho; Ogawa, Kana; Karasawa, Keiko; Miwa, Asuka; Guo, Xueshui; Gotoh, Satoru; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Yamanaka, Hitomi; Ito-Kawashima, Shioko; Iizuka, Takashi; Sakurai, Takashi; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary deafness affects approximately 1 in 2,000 children. Mutations in the gene encoding the cochlear gap junction protein connexin 26 (CX26) cause prelingual, nonsyndromic deafness and are responsible for as many as 50% of hereditary deafness cases in certain populations. Connexin-associated deafness is thought to be the result of defective development of auditory sensory epithelium due to connexion dysfunction. Surprisingly, CX26 deficiency is not compensated for by the closely related connexin CX30, which is abundantly expressed in the same cochlear cells. Here, using two mouse models of CX26-associated deafness, we demonstrate that disruption of the CX26-dependent gap junction plaque (GJP) is the earliest observable change during embryonic development of mice with connexin-associated deafness. Loss of CX26 resulted in a drastic reduction in the GJP area and protein level and was associated with excessive endocytosis with increased expression of caveolin 1 and caveolin 2. Furthermore, expression of deafness-associated CX26 and CX30 in cell culture resulted in visible disruption of GJPs and loss of function. Our results demonstrate that deafness-associated mutations in CX26 induce the macromolecular degradation of large gap junction complexes accompanied by an increase in caveolar structures.

  19. Angiogenesis in Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Gaoyuan; Fehrenbach, Melane L.; Williams, James T.; Finklestein, Jeffrey M.; Zhu, Jing-Xu; DeLisser, Horace M.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 has been previously implicated in endothelial cell migration; additionally, anti-PECAM-1 antibodies have been shown to inhibit in vivo angiogenesis. Studies were therefore performed with PECAM-1-null mice to further define the involvement of PECAM-1 in blood vessel formation. Vascularization of subcutaneous Matrigel implants as well as tumor angiogenesis were both inhibited in PECAM-1-null mice. Reciprocal bone marrow transplants that involved both wild-type and PECAM-1-deficient mice revealed that the impaired angiogenic response resulted from a loss of endothelial, but not leukocyte, PECAM-1. In vitro wound migration and single-cell motility by PECAM-1-null endothelial cells were also compromised. In addition, filopodia formation, a feature of motile cells, was inhibited in PECAM-1-null endothelial cells as well as in human endothelial cells treated with either anti-PECAM-1 antibody or PECAM-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of PECAM-1 promoted filopodia formation and increased the protein expression levels of Cdc42, a Rho GTPase that is known to promote the formation of filopodia. In the developing retinal vasculature, numerous, long filamentous filopodia, emanating from endothelial cells at the tips of angiogenic sprouts, were observed in wild-type animals, but to a lesser extent in the PECAM-1-null mice. Together, these data further establish the involvement of endothelial PECAM-1 in angiogenesis and suggest that, in vivo, PECAM-1 may stimulate endothelial cell motility by promoting the formation of filopodia. PMID:19574426

  20. sirt1-null mice develop an autoimmune-like condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, Jedon; Boily, Gino; Bazinet, Stephanie; Saliba, Sarah; He Xiaohong; Jardine, Karen; Kennedy, Christopher; Staines, William; Rousseaux, Colin; Mueller, Rudi; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-10-01

    The sirt1 gene encodes a protein deacetylase with a broad spectrum of reported substrates. Mice carrying null alleles for sirt1 are viable on outbred genetic backgrounds so we have examined them in detail to identify the biological processes that are dependent on SIRT1. Sera from adult sirt1-null mice contain antibodies that react with nuclear antigens and immune complexes become deposited in the livers and kidneys of these animals. Some of the sirt1-null animals develop a disease resembling diabetes insipidus when they approach 2 years of age although the relationship to the autoimmunity remains unclear. We interpret these observations as consistent with a role for SIRT1 in sustaining normal immune function and in this way delaying the onset of autoimmune disease.

  1. Connexins, hearing and deafness: clinical aspects of mutations in the connexin 26 gene.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P P; Van De Water, T R

    2000-04-01

    Congenital deafness is a very frequent disorder occurring in approximately I in 1000 live births. Mutations in GJB2 encoding for gap junction protein connexin-26 (Cx26) have been established as the basis of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss and proposed in some rare cases of autosomal dominant form of deafness. Connexin are gap-junction proteins which constitute a major system of intercellular communication important in the exchange of electrolytes, second messengers and metabolites. In the inner ear, connexin 26 expression was demonstrated in the stria vascularis, basement membrane, limbus and the spiral prominence of the human cochlea. The loss of connexin 26 in the gap junction complex would expect to disrupt the recycling of potassium from the synapses at the base of hair cells through the supporting cells and fibroblasts of potassium ions back to the high potassium containing endolymph of the cochlear duct and therefore would result in a local intoxication of the Corti s organ by potassium, leading to the hearing loss. The discovery of the genes responsible of hearing loss in particular the identification of mutations in the gene coding for connexin 26 allows to hope some tremendous help in genetic counseling. The possible implication of the mutation of the connexin gene in the pathophysiology of some progressive adult deafness opens new prospects in the fine diagnostic of the ear diseases and eventually may lead to new therapeutic strategies applied to the cochlea.

  2. Defective intestinal amino acid absorption in Ace2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Singer, Dustin; Camargo, Simone M R; Ramadan, Tamara; Schäfer, Matthias; Mariotta, Luca; Herzog, Brigitte; Huggel, Katja; Wolfer, David; Werner, Sabine; Penninger, Josef M; Verrey, François

    2012-09-15

    Mutations in the main intestinal and kidney luminal neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (Slc6a19) lead to Hartnup disorder, a condition that is characterized by neutral aminoaciduria and in some cases pellagra-like symptoms. These latter symptoms caused by low-niacin are thought to result from defective intestinal absorption of its precursor L-tryptophan. Since Ace2 is necessary for intestinal B(0)AT1 expression, we tested the impact of intestinal B(0)AT1 absence in ace2 null mice. Their weight gain following weaning was decreased, and Na(+)-dependent uptake of B(0)AT1 substrates measured in everted intestinal rings was defective. Additionally, high-affinity Na(+)-dependent transport of L-proline, presumably via SIT1 (Slc6a20), was absent, whereas glucose uptake via SGLT1 (Slc5a1) was not affected. Measurements of small intestine luminal amino acid content following gavage showed that more L-tryptophan than other B(0)AT1 substrates reach the ileum in wild-type mice, which is in line with its known lower apparent affinity. In ace2 null mice, the absorption defect was confirmed by a severalfold increase of L-tryptophan and of other neutral amino acids reaching the ileum lumen. Furthermore, plasma and muscle levels of glycine and L-tryptophan were significantly decreased in ace2 null mice, with other neutral amino acids displaying a similar trend. A low-protein/low-niacin diet challenge led to differential changes in plasma amino acid levels in both wild-type and ace2 null mice, but only in ace2 null mice to a stop in weight gain. Despite the combination of low-niacin with a low-protein diet, plasma niacin concentrations remained normal in ace2 null mice and no pellagra symptoms, such as photosensitive skin rash or ataxia, were observed. In summary, mice lacking Ace2-dependent intestinal amino acid transport display no total niacin deficiency nor clear pellagra symptoms, even under a low-protein and low-niacin diet, despite gross amino acid homeostasis alterations.

  3. Expression of connexins 26 and 43 in canine hyperplastic and neoplastic mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Torres, L N; Matera, J M; Vasconcellos, C H; Avanzo, J L; Hernandez-Blazquez, F J; Dagli, M L Z

    2005-09-01

    Gap junctions are the only communicating junctions found in animal tissues and are composed of proteins known as connexins. Alterations in connexin expression have been associated with oncogenesis; reported studies in rodent and human mammary glands, which normally express connexins 26 and 43, confirm these alterations in malignancies. Mammary neoplasms represent the second most frequent neoplasm in dogs, and since there are no reports on the study of connexins in canine mammary glands, the present study investigated the expression of connexins 26 and 43 in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic mammary glands of this species, to verify if altered patterns of connexin staining are related to higher cell proliferation and malignant phenotypes. A total of 4 normal, 8 hyperplastic mammary glands, 9 benign, and 51 malignant mammary gland neoplasms were submitted for the immunostaining of connexins 26 and 43, E-cadherin, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Normal, hyperplastic, and benign neoplastic mammary glands showed a punctate pattern for connexin 26 and 43 staining and an intercellular E-cadherin staining. Malignant neoplasms, especially the most aggressive cases with high cell proliferation rates, presented either fewer gap junction spots on the cell membranes or increased cytoplasmic immunostaining. Malignant tumors also expressed a less intense immunostaining of E-cadherin; the expression of this adhesion molecule is important for the transportation of connexins to cell membranes and in forming communicating gap junctions. Deficient expression of E-cadherin could be related to the aberrant connexin localization and may contribute to the malignant phenotype. In conclusion, the expression and distribution of connexins and E-cadherin are inversely correlated to cell proliferation in malignant mammary neoplasms of dogs and may well be related to their more aggressive histologic type and biologic behavior.

  4. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup −/−}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup −/−} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup −/−} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  5. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Soenjaya, Y; Foster, B L; Nociti, F H; Ao, M; Holdsworth, D W; Hunter, G K; Somerman, M J; Goldberg, H A

    2015-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp(-/-)) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp(-/-) mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp(-/-) and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro-computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp(-/-) mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp(-/-) mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp(-/-) mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp(-/-) mice. Bsp(-/-) incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the

  6. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  7. Neuropathy in Human and Mice with PMP22 null

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario Andre; Katona, Istvan; Zhang, Xuebao; Roper, Helen P.; Carr, Louise; Macdonald, Fiona; Brueton, Louise; Blake, Julian; Suter, Ueli; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Haploinsufficiency of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). However, the biological functions of PMP22 in humans are largely unexplored due to the absence of patients with PMP22 null mutations. Design, Setting and Participants We have evaluated a 7-year-old boy with PMP22 null. Findings were compared with those from nerves of Pmp22 null mice. Results Motor and sensory deficits in the proband were non-length dependent. Weakness was found in cranial muscles, but not in the limbs. Large fiber sensory modalities were profoundly abnormal, which started prior to the maturation of myelin. This is in line with the temporal pattern of PMP22 expression predominantly in cranial motor neurons and DRG during embryonic development, becoming undetectable in adulthood. Moreover, there were conspicuous maturation defects of myelinating Schwann cells that were more significant in motor nerve fibers than in sensory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PMP22 is important for the normal function of neurons that express PMP22 during early development, such as cranial motor neurons and spinal sensory neurons. Moreover, PMP22 deficiency differentially affects myelination between motor and sensory nerves, which may have contributed to the unique clinical phenotype in the patient with absence of PMP22. PMID:21670407

  8. The connexin26 S17F mouse mutant represents a model for the human hereditary keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Melanie; Auth, Tanja; Gehrt, Anna; Bosen, Felicitas; Körber, Inken; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias; Willecke, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene coding for connexin26 (Cx26) can cause a variety of deafness and hereditary hyperproliferative skin disorders in humans. In this study, we investigated the Cx26S17F mutation in mice, which had been identified to cause the keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome in humans. The KID syndrome is characterized by keratitis and chronic progressive corneal neovascularization, skin hyperplasia, sensorineural hearing loss and increased carcinogenic potential. We have generated a conditional mouse mutant, in which the floxed wild-type Cx26-coding DNA can be deleted and the Cx26S17F mutation is expressed under control of the endogenous Cx26 promoter. Homozygous mutants are not viable, whereas the surviving heterozygous mice show hyperplasia of tail and foot epidermis, wounded tails and annular tail restrictions, and are smaller than their wild-type littermates. Analyses of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) indicate an ∼35 dB increased hearing threshold in these mice, which is likely due to the reduction of the endocochlear potential by 20-40%. Our results indicate that the Cx26S17F protein, which does not form functional gap junction channels or hemichannels, alters epidermal proliferation and differentiation in the heterozygous state. In the inner ear, reduced intercellular coupling by heteromeric channels composed of Cx26S17F and Cx30 could contribute to hearing impairment in heterozygous mice, while remaining wild-type Cx26 may be sufficient to stabilize Cx30 and partially maintain cochlear homeostasis. The phenotype of heterozygous mice resembles many of the symptoms of the human KID syndrome. Thus, these mice represent an appropriate model to further investigate the disease mechanism.

  9. Development of pheochromocytoma in ceramide synthase 2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jae; Brenner, Ori; Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Saada, Ann; Merrill, Alfred H; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H

    2015-08-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) and paraganglioma are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the adrenal medulla and sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia, for which mutations in ∼15 disease-associated genes have been identified. We now document the role of an additional gene in mice, the ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) gene. CerS2, one of six mammalian CerS, synthesizes ceramides with very-long (C22-C24) chains. The CerS2 null mouse has been well characterized and displays lesions in several organs including the liver, lung and the brain. We now demonstrate that changes in the sphingolipid acyl chain profile of the adrenal gland lead to the generation of adrenal medullary tumors. Histological analyses revealed that about half of the CerS2 null mice developed PCC by ∼13 months, and the rest showed signs of medullary hyperplasia. Norepinephrine and normetanephrine levels in the urine were elevated at 7 months of age consistent with the morphological abnormalities found at later ages. Accumulation of ceroid in the X-zone was observed as early as 2 months of age and as a consequence, older mice displayed elevated levels of lysosomal cathepsins, reduced proteasome activity and reduced activity of mitochondrial complex IV by 6 months of age. Together, these findings implicate an additional pathway that can lead to PCC formation, which involves alterations in the sphingolipid acyl chain length. Analysis of the role of sphingolipids in PCC may lead to further understanding of the mechanism by which PCC develops, and might implicate the sphingolipid pathway as a possible novel therapeutic target for this rare tumor.

  10. Renal NHE expression and activity in neonatal NHE3- and NHE8-null mice.

    PubMed

    Pirojsakul, Kwanchai; Gattineni, Jyothsna; Dwarakanath, Vangipuram; Baum, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE)3 is the predominant NHE on the brush-border membrane of the proximal tubule in adult animals. NHE8 has been localized to the brush-border membrane of proximal tubules and is more highly expressed in neonates than in adult animals. However, the relative role of NHE8 in neonatal renal acidification is unclear. The present study examined if there was a compensatory increase in NHE3 in NHE8-null neonatal mice and whether there was a compensatory increase in NHE8 in NHE3-null neonatal mice. In addition, we examined whether wild-type, NHE3-null, and NHE8-null mice had an increase in NHE activity in response to metabolic acidosis. We found that at baseline, there was comparable renal NHE3 mRNA, total protein, and brush-border membrane protein abundance as in neonatal control and NHE8-null mice. There was comparable renal NHE8 mRNA, total protein, and brush-border membrane protein abundance in NHE3-null neonatal and control mice. Both NHE3- and NHE8-null mice had a comparable but lower rate of NHE activity than control mice. We next imposed metabolic acidosis in wild-type, NHE3-null, and NHE8-null mice. Acidemic NHE8-null mice had an increase in brush-border membrane vesicle NHE3 protein abundance and NHE activity compared with vehicle-treated mice. Likewise, NHE3-null mice had an increase in NHE8 brush-border membrane protein abundance and NHE activity in response to metabolic acidosis. In conclusion, both NHE3 and NHE8 likely play a role in neonatal acidification.

  11. Connexin43 null mice reveal that astrocytes express multiple connexins.

    PubMed

    Dermietzel, R; Gao, Y; Scemes, E; Vieira, D; Urban, M; Kremer, M; Bennett, M V; Spray, D C

    2000-04-01

    The gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) is the primary component of intercellular channels in cardiac tissue and in astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells in the brain. Mice in which the gene for Cx43 is deleted by homologous recombination die at birth, due to profound hypertrophy of the ventricular outflow tract and stenosis of the pulmonary artery. Despite this significant cardiovascular abnormality, brains of connexin43 null [Cx43 (-/-)] animals are shown to be macroscopically normal and to display a pattern of cortical lamination that is not detectably different from wildtype siblings. Presence of Cx40 and Cx45 in brains and astrocytes cultured from both Cx43 (-/-) mice and wildtype littermates was confirmed by RT-PCR, Northern blot analyses and by immunostaining; Cx46 was detected by RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses. Presence of Cx26 in astrocyte cultures was indicated by RT-PCR and by Western blot analysis, although we were unable to resolve whether it was contributed by contaminating cells; Cx30 mRNA was detected by Northern blot in long term (2 weeks) but not fresh cultures of astrocytes. These studies thus reveal that astrocyte gap junctions may be formed of multiple connexins. Presumably, the metabolic and ionic coupling provided by these diverse gap junction types may functionally compensate for the absence of the major astrocyte gap junction protein in Cx43 (-/-) mice, providing whatever intercellular signaling is necessary for brain development and cortical lamination.

  12. Muscular dystrophy in PTFR/cavin-1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shi-Ying; Pilch, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    ice and humans lacking the caveolae component polymerase I transcription release factor (PTRF, also known as cavin-1) exhibit lipo- and muscular dystrophy. Here we describe the molecular features underlying the muscle phenotype for PTRF/cavin-1 null mice. These animals had a decreased ability to exercise, and exhibited muscle hypertrophy with increased muscle fiber size and muscle mass due, in part, to constitutive activation of the Akt pathway. Their muscles were fibrotic and exhibited impaired membrane integrity accompanied by an apparent compensatory activation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex along with elevated expression of proteins involved in muscle repair function. Ptrf deletion also caused decreased mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption, and altered myofiber composition. Thus, in addition to compromised adipocyte-related physiology, the absence of PTRF/cavin-1 in mice caused a unique form of muscular dystrophy with a phenotype similar or identical to that seen in humans lacking this protein. Further understanding of this muscular dystrophy model will provide information relevant to the human situation and guidance for potential therapies. PMID:28289716

  13. Reduced arsenic clearance and increased toxicity in aquaglyceroporin-9-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Carbrey, Jennifer M.; Song, Linhua; Zhou, Yao; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Rojek, Aleksandra; Wang, Yiding; Liu, Yangjian; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.; Nielsen, Søren; Rosen, Barry P.; Agre, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Expressed in liver, aquaglyceroporin-9 (AQP9) is permeated by glycerol, arsenite, and other small, neutral solutes. To evaluate a possible protective role, AQP9-null mice were evaluated for in vivo arsenic toxicity. After injection with NaAsO2, AQP9-null mice suffer reduced survival rates (LD50, 12 mg/kg) compared with WT mice (LD50, 15 mg/kg). The highest tissue level of arsenic is in heart, with AQP9-null mice accumulating 10–20 times more arsenic than WT mice. Within hours after NaAsO2 injection, AQP9-null mice sustain profound bradycardia, despite normal serum electrolytes. Increased arsenic levels are also present in liver, lung, spleen, and testis of AQP9-null mice. Arsenic levels in the feces and urine of AQP9-null mice are only ≈10% of the WT levels, and reduced clearance of multiple arsenic species by the AQP9-null mice suggests that AQP9 is involved in the export of multiple forms of arsenic. Immunohistochemical staining of liver sections revealed that AQP9 is most abundant in basolateral membrane of hepatocytes adjacent to the sinusoids. AQP9 is not detected in heart or kidney by PCR or immunohistochemistry. We propose that AQP9 provides a route for excretion of arsenic by the liver, thereby providing partial protection of the whole animal from arsenic toxicity. PMID:19805235

  14. [Cochlear implantation in a child with congenital sensorineural deafness due to 35 DELG mutation in GJB2 (connexin 26) gene].

    PubMed

    Teriutin, F M; Barashkov, N A; Dzhemileva, L U; Posukh, O L; Fedotova, E E; Gurinova, E E; Fedorova, S A; Tavartkiladze, G A; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the first case of cochlear implantation performed in this country in a child with congenital non-syndromic sensorineural loss of hearing having hereditary etiology and attributable to autosomal-recessive 35 delG mutation in locus DFNB1 (13q.11-q12) of GJB2 (connexin 26) gene.

  15. Connexin 26 gene therapy of human bladder cancer: induction of growth suppression, apoptosis, and synergy with Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Grossman, H B

    2001-12-10

    The connexin 26 (Cx26) gene encodes a protein involved in gap junctional intercellular communication and is a putative tumor suppressor. We constructed a Cx26 adenovirus vector (Ad-Cx26) and used it to infect human bladder cancer cell lines UM-UC-3, UM-UC-6, UM-UC-14, and T24. Infection with Ad-Cx26 suppressed the growth of these cell lines in vitro and prevented tumor formation in vivo. Cell cycle accumulation or arrest at the G(1) phase was noted in UM-UC-3 cells and at the G(2)/M phase in UM-UC-6, UM-UC-14, and T24 cells. Apoptosis was noted in UM-UC-3, UM-UC-6, and UM-UC-14 cells both in vitro and in vivo. These effects were not seen with control adenovirus (Ad-CTR) or mock infection. Ad-Cx26 did not significantly alter the growth of the immortalized normal human bladder cell line SV-HUC. Direct injection of Ad-Cx26 into established UM-UC-3 and UM-UC-14 tumors in nude mice resulted in Cx26 expression, apoptosis, and significantly decreased growth compared with Ad-CTR treated tumors. Delayed resumption of tumor growth was associated with loss of Cx26 expression. Combination therapy with Ad-Cx26 and cisplatin resulted in decreased growth in vitro compared with either agent alone. We explored combination therapy with Ad-Cx26 and cisplatin to improve the in vivo efficacy of Cx26 gene therapy. In vivo therapy with Ad-Cx26 and cisplatin resulted in long-term suppression of tumor growth. These data demonstrate that combining gene and chemotherapy can result in dramatic synergy in vivo.

  16. Chronic administration of atypical antipsychotics improves behavioral and synaptic defects of STOP null mice

    PubMed Central

    Delotterie, David; Ruiz, Geoffrey; Brocard, Jacques; Schweitzer, Annie; Roucard, Corinne; Roche, Yann; Suaud-Chagny, Marie-Françoise; Bressand, Karine; Andrieux, Annie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that schizophrenia is associated with alterations in the synaptic connectivity involving cytoskeletal proteins. The microtubule-associated protein STOP (Stable Tubule Only Polypeptide) plays a key-role in neuronal architecture and synaptic plasticity and it has been demonstrated that STOP gene deletion in mice leads to a phenotype mimicking aspects of positive and negative symptoms and cognitive deficits classically observed in schizophrenic patients. In STOP-null mice, behavioral defects are associated with synaptic plasticity abnormalities including defects in long-term potentiation. In these mice, long-term administration of typical antipsychotics has been shown to partially alleviate behavioral defects but, as in humans, such a treatment was poorly active on deficits related to negative symptoms and cognitive impairments. Here, we assessed the effects of risperidone and clozapine, two atypical antipsychotics, on STOP-null mice behavior and synaptic plasticity. Long-term administration of either drug results in alleviation of behavioral alterations mimicking some negative symptoms and partial amelioration of some cognitive defects in STOP-null mice. Interestingly, clozapine treatment also improves synaptic plasticity of the STOP- null animals by restoring long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. All together, the pharmacological reactivity of STOP-null mice to antipsychotics evokes the pharmacological response of humans to such drugs. Totally, our study suggests that STOP-null mice may provide a useful preclinical model to evaluate pharmacological properties of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:19936716

  17. Cardiac Characterization of sgca-Null Mice Using High Resolution Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Renault, Gilles; Guerchet, Nicolas; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Fougerousse, Françoise; Richard, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2D (LGMD2D) is an inherited myogenic disorder belonging to the group of muscular dystrophies. Sgca-null mouse is a knock-out model of LGMD2D. Little is known about cardiac phenotype characterization in this model at different ages. We conducted a prospective study to characterize cardiac sgca-null mice phenotype using high resolution Doppler echocardiography at different ages. Conventional echocardiography was performed on anesthetised mice using a Vevo 770 (Visualsonics) with 30 MHz cardiac probe. Wild Type (WT) and sgca-null mice were scanned at 13, 15 and 17 months. From M-mode, we measured interventricular septal (IVS) wall thickness, posterior wall (PW) thickness, and end-left ventricular diameter in systolic and diastolic. From the above parameters, we calculated left ventricular (LV) shortening fraction (SF), LV ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass. At age 13 months, PW diastolic thickness was increased in sgca-null mice (0.89±0.14 mm vs 0.73±0.2 mm; P=0.020) and LV mass was higher in sgca-null mice (LV mass 205.2 mg vs 143 mg; P=0.001). We found also dilation of the LV (LVEDD: 4.84 mm vs 4.29 mm; P=0.019) in sgca-null mice. At age 15 months, dilation of the LV (LVEDD: 4.86 mm vs 4 mm; P=0.05) with an increase of the LV mass (165.7 mg vs 127.12; P=0.03) are found in sgca-null mice. At age 17 months, we found a decrease of the PW thickening (17% vs 30%; P=0.036). This work provides echocardiographic insights for the assessment of pharmaceutical therapies in sgca-null mice.

  18. Cardiac Characterization of sgca-Null Mice Using High Resolution Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Renault, Gilles; Guerchet, Nicolas; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Fougerousse, Françoise; Richard, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2D (LGMD2D) is an inherited myogenic disorder belonging to the group of muscular dystrophies. Sgca-null mouse is a knock-out model of LGMD2D. Little is known about cardiac phenotype characterization in this model at different ages. We conducted a prospective study to characterize cardiac sgca-null mice phenotype using high resolution Doppler echocardiography at different ages. Conventional echocardiography was performed on anesthetised mice using a Vevo 770 (Visualsonics) with 30 MHz cardiac probe. Wild Type (WT) and sgca-null mice were scanned at 13, 15 and 17 months. From M-mode, we measured interventricular septal (IVS) wall thickness, posterior wall (PW) thickness, and end-left ventricular diameter in systolic and diastolic. From the above parameters, we calculated left ventricular (LV) shortening fraction (SF), LV ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass. At age 13 months, PW diastolic thickness was increased in sgca-null mice (0.89±0.14 mm vs 0.73±0.2 mm; P=0.020) and LV mass was higher in sgca-null mice (LV mass 205.2 mg vs 143 mg; P=0.001). We found also dilation of the LV (LVEDD: 4.84 mm vs 4.29 mm; P=0.019) in sgca-null mice. At age 15 months, dilation of the LV (LVEDD: 4.86 mm vs 4 mm; P=0.05) with an increase of the LV mass (165.7 mg vs 127.12; P=0.03) are found in sgca-null mice. At age 17 months, we found a decrease of the PW thickening (17% vs 30%; P=0.036). This work provides echocardiographic insights for the assessment of pharmaceutical therapies in sgca-null mice. PMID:24416486

  19. Hepatic effects of a methionine-choline-deficient diet in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Y.-J.Y.

    2009-01-15

    Retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXR{alpha} deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null (H-RXR{alpha}-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid {beta}-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXR{alpha}-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXR{alpha} in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury.

  20. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 null mice are sensitive to cholestatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Cheng, Xingguo; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1) is predominantly expressed in livers of mice and is thought to transport bile acids (BAs) from blood into liver. Because Oatp1a1 expression is markedly decreased in mice after bile duct ligation (BDL). We hypothesized that Oatp1a1-null mice would be protected against liver injury during BDL-induced cholestasis due largely to reduced hepatic uptake of BAs. To evaluate this hypothesis, BDL surgeries were performed in both male wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice. At 24 h after BDL, Oatp1a1-null mice showed higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels and more severe liver injury than WT mice, and all Oatp1a1-null mice died within 4 days after BDL, whereas all WT mice survived. At 24 h after BDL, surprisingly Oatp1a1-null mice had higher total BA concentrations in livers than WT mice, suggesting that loss of Oatp1a1 did not prevent BA accumulation in the liver. In addition, secondary BAs dramatically increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null BDL mice but not in WT BDL mice. Oatp1a1-null BDL mice had similar basolateral BA uptake (Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and Oatp1b2) and BA-efflux (multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]-3, Mrp4, and organic solute transporter α/β) transporters, as well as BA-synthetic enzyme (Cyp7a1) in livers as WT BDL mice. Hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner Cyp3a11, Cyp4a14, and Nqo1, which are target genes of farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and NF-E2-related factor 2, respectively, were increased in WT BDL mice but not in Oatp1a1-null BDL mice. These results demonstrate that loss of Oatp1a1 function exacerbates cholestatic liver injury in mice and suggest that Oatp1a1 plays a unique role in liver adaptive responses to obstructive cholestasis.

  1. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  2. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Trott, Josephine F.; Hovey, Russell C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Willis, Brandon J.; Khan, Imran H.; Ravindran, Resmi K.; Chan, Szeman R.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1tm1Rds homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment. PMID:26075897

  3. Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Neurosensory Deafness at DFNB1 Not Associated with the Compound-Heterozygous GJB2 (Connexin 26) Genotype M34T/167delT

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Andrew J.; Chowdhry, Aqeel A.; Kurima, Kiyoto; Hood, Linda J.; Keats, Bronya; Berlin, Charles I.; Morell, Robert J.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies of the gap-junction β-2 subunit gene GJB2 (connexin 26) have suggested that the 101T→C (M34T) nucleotide substitution may be a mutant allele responsible for recessive deafness DFNB1. This hypothesis was consistent with observations of negligible intercellular coupling and gap-junction assembly of the M34T allele product expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HeLa cells. The results of our current study of a family cosegregating the 167delT allele of GJB2 and severe DFNB1 deafness demonstrate that this phenotype did not cosegregate with the compound-heterozygous genotype M34T/167delT. Since 167delT is a null allele of GJB2, this result indicates that the in vivo activity of a single M34T allele is not sufficiently reduced to cause the typical deafness phenotype associated with DFNB1. This observation raises the possibility that other GJB2 missense substitutions may not be recessive mutations that cause severe deafness and emphasizes the importance of observing cosegregation with deafness in large families to confirm that these missense alleles are mutant DFNB1 alleles. PMID:10903123

  4. Gender- and region-specific alterations in bone metabolism in Scarb1-null female mice.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Corine; Martin-Falstrault, Louise; Brissette, Louise; Moreau, Robert

    2014-08-01

    A positive correlation between plasma levels of HDL and bone mass has been reported by epidemiological studies. As scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), the gene product of Scarb1, is known to regulate HDL metabolism, we recently characterized bone metabolism in Scarb1-null mice. These mice display high femoral bone mass associated with enhanced bone formation. As gender differences have been reported in HDL metabolism and SR-BI function, we investigated gender-specific bone alterations in Scarb1-null mice by microtomography and histology. We found 16% greater relative bone volume and 39% higher bone formation rate in the vertebrae from 2-month-old Scarb1-null females. No such alteration was seen in males, indicating gender- and region-specific differences in skeletal phenotype. Total and HDL-associated cholesterol levels, as well as ACTH plasma levels, were increased in both Scarb1-null genders, the latter being concurrent to impaired corticosterone response to fasting. Plasma levels of estradiol did not differ between null and WT females, suggesting that the estrogen metabolism alteration is not relevant to the higher vertebral bone mass in female Scarb1-null mice. Constitutively, high plasma levels of leptin along with 2.5-fold increase in its expression in white adipose tissue were measured in female Scarb1-null mice only. In vitro exposure of bone marrow stromal cells to ACTH and leptin promoted osteoblast differentiation as evidenced by increased gene expression of osterix and collagen type I alpha. Our results suggest that hyperleptinemia may account for the gender-specific high bone mass seen in the vertebrae of female Scarb1-null mice.

  5. Effects of space flight on the immunohistochemical demonstration of connexin 26 and connexin 43 in the postpartum uterus of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burden, H. W.; Zary, J.; Alberts, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of space flight in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration shuttle was studied in pregnant rats. Rats were launched on day 11 of gestation and recovered on day 20 of gestation. Pregnancy was allowed to proceed to term and rats delivered vaginally on days 22-23, although flight animals required more labour contractions to complete the delivery process. Pups were placed with foster dams and connexin 26 and 43 were examined in the uterus of flight animals approximately 3 h after delivery. Space flight did not affect uterine connexin 26, localized primarily in epithelial cells of the endometrium, but decreased connexin 43, the major gap junction protein in the myometrium. It is suggested that decreased connexin 43 alters synchronization and coordination of labour contractions, resulting in a requirement for more contractions to complete the delivery process.

  6. Effects of space flight on the immunohistochemical demonstration of connexin 26 and connexin 43 in the postpartum uterus of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burden, H. W.; Zary, J.; Alberts, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of space flight in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration shuttle was studied in pregnant rats. Rats were launched on day 11 of gestation and recovered on day 20 of gestation. Pregnancy was allowed to proceed to term and rats delivered vaginally on days 22-23, although flight animals required more labour contractions to complete the delivery process. Pups were placed with foster dams and connexin 26 and 43 were examined in the uterus of flight animals approximately 3 h after delivery. Space flight did not affect uterine connexin 26, localized primarily in epithelial cells of the endometrium, but decreased connexin 43, the major gap junction protein in the myometrium. It is suggested that decreased connexin 43 alters synchronization and coordination of labour contractions, resulting in a requirement for more contractions to complete the delivery process.

  7. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  8. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC)-Null Mice Exhibit More Uniform Outflow

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Swarup S.; Oh, Dong-Jin; Kang, Min Hyung; Ren, Ruiyi; Jin, Rui; Gong, Haiyan; Rhee, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular protein known to regulate extracellular matrix (ECM) in many tissues and is highly expressed in trabecular meshwork (TM). SPARC-null mice have a 15% to 20% decrease in intraocular pressure (IOP) compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We hypothesized that mouse aqueous outflow is segmental, and that transgenic deletion of SPARC causes a more uniform pattern that correlates with IOP and TM morphology. Methods. Eyes of C57BL6-SV129 WT and SPARC-null mice were injected with fluorescent microbeads, which were also passively exposed to freshly enucleated eyes. Confocal and electron microscopy were performed. Percentage effective filtration length (PEFL) was calculated as PEFL = FL/TL × 100%, where TL = total length and FL = filtration length. IOP was measured by rebound tonometry. Results. Passive microbead affinity for WT and SPARC-null ECM did not differ. Segmental flow was observed in the mouse eye. SPARC-null mice had a 23% decrease in IOP. PEFL increased in SPARC-null (70.61 ± 11.36%) versus WT mice (54.68 ± 9.95%, P < 0.005; n = 11 pairs), and PEFL and IOP were negatively correlated (R2 = 0.72, n = 10 pairs). Morphologically, TM of high-tracer regions had increased separation between beams compared to low-tracer regions. Collagen fibril diameter decreased in SPARC-null (28.272 nm) versus WT tissue (34.961 nm, P < 0.0005; n = 3 pairs). Conclusions. Aqueous outflow in mice is segmental. SPARC-null mice demonstrated a more uniform outflow pattern and decreased collagen fibril diameter. Areas of high flow had less compact juxtacanalicular connective tissue ECM, and IOP was inversely correlated with PEFL. Our data show a correlation between morphology, aqueous outflow, and IOP, indicating a modulatory role of SPARC in IOP regulation. PMID:23422826

  9. Focal adhesion kinase modulates radial glia-dependent neuronal migration through connexin-26.

    PubMed

    Valiente, Manuel; Ciceri, Gabriele; Rico, Beatriz; Marín, Oscar

    2011-08-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase and scaffold protein that regulates migration in many different cellular contexts but whose function in neuronal migration remains controversial. Here, we have analyzed the function of FAK in two populations of neurons with very distinct migratory behaviors: cortical interneurons, which migrate tangentially and independently of radial glia; and pyramidal cells, which undergo glial-dependent migration. We found that FAK is dispensable for glial-independent migration but is cell-autonomously required for the normal interaction of pyramidal cells with radial glial fibers. Loss of FAK function disrupts the normal morphology of migrating pyramidal cells, delays migration, and increases the tangential dispersion of neurons arising from the same radial unit. FAK mediates this process by regulating the assembly of Connexin-26 contact points in the membrane of migrating pyramidal cells. These results indicate that FAK plays a fundamental role in the dynamic regulation of Gap-mediated adhesions during glial-guided neuronal migration in the mouse.

  10. CO₂directly modulates connexin 26 by formation of carbamate bridges between subunits.

    PubMed

    Meigh, Louise; Greenhalgh, Sophie A; Rodgers, Thomas L; Cann, Martin J; Roper, David I; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-11-12

    Homeostatic regulation of the partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) is vital for life. Sensing of pH has been proposed as a sufficient proxy for determination of PCO2 and direct CO2-sensing largely discounted. Here we show that connexin 26 (Cx26) hemichannels, causally linked to respiratory chemosensitivity, are directly modulated by CO2. A 'carbamylation motif', present in CO2-sensitive connexins (Cx26, Cx30, Cx32) but absent from a CO2-insensitive connexin (Cx31), comprises Lys125 and four further amino acids that orient Lys125 towards Arg104 of the adjacent subunit of the connexin hexamer. Introducing the carbamylation motif into Cx31 created a mutant hemichannel (mCx31) that was opened by increases in PCO2. Mutation of the carbamylation motif in Cx26 and mCx31 destroyed CO2 sensitivity. Course-grained computational modelling of Cx26 demonstrated that the proposed carbamate bridge between Lys125 and Arg104 biases the hemichannel to the open state. Carbamylation of Cx26 introduces a new transduction principle for physiological sensing of CO2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01213.001.

  11. Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma and deafness resulting from genetic mutation of Connexin 26.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Yeol; In, Sung-Il; Kim, Hyon J; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Choung, Yun Hoon; Kim, You Chan

    2010-10-01

    Gap junctions, which mediate rapid intercellular communication, consist of connexins, small transmembrane proteins that belong to a large family of proteins found throughout the species. Mutations in the GJB2 gene, encoding Connexin 26, can cause nonsyndromic autosomal recessive or dominant hearing loss with or without skin manifestations. A 3-yr-old Korean female and her mother presented to our clinic with diffuse hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles (May 3, 2007). Skin biopsies from the soles of both patients demonstrated histopathological evidence of palmoplantar keratoderma. The patient and a number of her maternal family members also had congenital hearing loss. The combination of congenital hearing loss and palmoplantar keratoderma, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, led us to test for a mutation in the GJB2 gene in both patients. The results showed the R75W mutation of the GJB2 gene in both. In conclusion, the simultaneous occurrence of a GJB2 mutation in a mother and daughter suggests that R75W mutation cause autosomal dominant hearing loss presenting with palmoplantar keratoderma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a GJB2 mutation associated with syndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss and palmoplantar keratoderma in a Korean family.

  12. Rational design of new NO and redox sensitivity into connexin26 hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Meigh, Louise; Cook, Daniel; Zhang, Jie; Dale, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    CO2 directly opens hemichannels of connexin26 (Cx26) by carbamylating K125, thereby allowing salt bridge formation with R104 of the neighbouring subunit in the connexin hexamer. The formation of the inter-subunit carbamate bridges within the hexameric hemichannel traps it in the open state. Here, we use insights derived from this model to test whether the range of agonists capable of opening Cx26 can be extended by promoting the formation of analogous inter-subunit bridges via different mechanisms. The mutation K125C gives potential for nitrosylation on Cys125 and formation of an SNO bridge to R104 of the neighbouring subunit. Unlike wild-type Cx26 hemichannels, which are insensitive to NO and NO2 (-), hemichannels comprising Cx26(K125C) can be opened by NO2 (-) and NO donors. However, NO2 (-) was unable to modulate the doubly mutated (K125C, R104A) hemichannels, indicating that an inter-subunit bridge between C125 and R104 is required for the opening action of NO2 (-). In a further test, we introduced two mutations into Cx26, K125C and R104C, to allow disulfide bridge formation across the inter-subunit boundary. These doubly mutated hemichannels open in response to changes in intracellular redox potential.

  13. Rational design of new NO and redox sensitivity into connexin26 hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Meigh, Louise; Cook, Daniel; Zhang, Jie; Dale, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    CO2 directly opens hemichannels of connexin26 (Cx26) by carbamylating K125, thereby allowing salt bridge formation with R104 of the neighbouring subunit in the connexin hexamer. The formation of the inter-subunit carbamate bridges within the hexameric hemichannel traps it in the open state. Here, we use insights derived from this model to test whether the range of agonists capable of opening Cx26 can be extended by promoting the formation of analogous inter-subunit bridges via different mechanisms. The mutation K125C gives potential for nitrosylation on Cys125 and formation of an SNO bridge to R104 of the neighbouring subunit. Unlike wild-type Cx26 hemichannels, which are insensitive to NO and NO2−, hemichannels comprising Cx26K125C can be opened by NO2− and NO donors. However, NO2− was unable to modulate the doubly mutated (K125C, R104A) hemichannels, indicating that an inter-subunit bridge between C125 and R104 is required for the opening action of NO2−. In a further test, we introduced two mutations into Cx26, K125C and R104C, to allow disulfide bridge formation across the inter-subunit boundary. These doubly mutated hemichannels open in response to changes in intracellular redox potential. PMID:25673329

  14. A Deafness Associated Mutant Human Connexin 26 Improves The Epithelial Barrier In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Man, Y.K. Stella; Trolove, Caroline; Tattersall, Daniel; Thomas, Anna C.; Papakonstantinopoulou, Annie; Patel, Drashnika; Scott, Claire; Chong, Jiehan; Jagger, Daniel J.; O’Toole, Edel A.; Navsaria, Harshad; Curtis, Michael A.; Kelsell, David P.

    2010-01-01

    A large proportion of recessive non-syndromic hearing loss is due to mutations in the GJB2 gene encoding connexin 26 (Cx26), a component of a gap junction. Within different ethnic groups there are specific common recessive mutations each with a relatively high carrier frequency suggesting a possibility of heterozygous advantage. Carriers of the R143W GJB2 allele, the most prevalent in the African population, present with a thicker epidermis than non-carriers. In this study, we show (R143W)Cx26 expressing keratinocytes form a significantly thicker epidermis in an organotypic co-culture skin model. In addition, we show increased migration of cells expressing (R143W)Cx26 compared to (WT)Cx26 overexpressing cells. We also demonstrate that cells expressing (R143W)Cx26 are significantly less susceptible to cellular invasion by the enteric pathogen Shigella flexneri than (WT)Cx26 expressing cells. These in vitro studies suggest an advantageous effect of (R143W)Cx26 in epithelial cells. PMID:17581693

  15. Connexin 26 induces growth suppression, apoptosis and increased efficacy of doxorubicin in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motoyoshi; Grossman, H Barton

    2004-02-01

    Connexin 26 (Cx26) encodes a gap junction protein and is a putative tumor suppressor gene. We evaluated the effect of forced expression of Cx26 on three human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3, LNCap, and DU-145. The three cell lines were infected with a Cx26 adenovirus vector (Ad-Cx26) or a control vector or were mock infected. We tested cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, and the efficacy of combined treatment with doxorubicin. Ad-Cx26 infection suppressed the growth of all the cell lines compared with controls and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptosis. Ad-Cx26 decreased the expression of Bcl-2. LNCaP cell growth was dramatically suppressed by Ad-Cx26 alone. PC-3 and DU-145 had greater growth suppression with combined gene therapy and chemotherapy than with either Ad-Cx26 or doxorubicin alone. Forced expression of Cx26 suppresses the growth of prostate cancer cells and decreases the expression of Bcl-2. Combining Cx26 gene therapy with doxorubicin results in greater growth suppression.

  16. CO2 directly modulates connexin 26 by formation of carbamate bridges between subunits

    PubMed Central

    Meigh, Louise; Greenhalgh, Sophie A; Rodgers, Thomas L; Cann, Martin J; Roper, David I; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation of the partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) is vital for life. Sensing of pH has been proposed as a sufficient proxy for determination of PCO2 and direct CO2-sensing largely discounted. Here we show that connexin 26 (Cx26) hemichannels, causally linked to respiratory chemosensitivity, are directly modulated by CO2. A ‘carbamylation motif’, present in CO2-sensitive connexins (Cx26, Cx30, Cx32) but absent from a CO2-insensitive connexin (Cx31), comprises Lys125 and four further amino acids that orient Lys125 towards Arg104 of the adjacent subunit of the connexin hexamer. Introducing the carbamylation motif into Cx31 created a mutant hemichannel (mCx31) that was opened by increases in PCO2. Mutation of the carbamylation motif in Cx26 and mCx31 destroyed CO2 sensitivity. Course-grained computational modelling of Cx26 demonstrated that the proposed carbamate bridge between Lys125 and Arg104 biases the hemichannel to the open state. Carbamylation of Cx26 introduces a new transduction principle for physiological sensing of CO2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01213.001 PMID:24220509

  17. Divalent regulation and intersubunit interactions of human connexin26 (Cx26) hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Lopez, William; Liu, Yu; Harris, Andrew L; Contreras, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Control of plasma membrane connexin hemichannel opening is indispensable, and is achieved by physiological extracellular divalent ion concentrations. Here, we explore the differences between regulation by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) of human connexin26 (hCx26) hemichannels and the role of a specific interaction in regulation by Ca (2+). To effect hemichannel closure, the apparent affinity of Ca(2+) (0.33 mM) is higher than for Mg(2+) (1.8 mM). Hemichannel closure is accelerated by physiological Ca(2+) concentrations, but non-physiological concentrations of extracellular Mg(2+) are required for this effect. Our recent report provided evidence that extracellular Ca(2+) facilitates hCx26 hemichannel closing by disrupting a salt bridge interaction between positions D50 and K61 that stabilizes the open state. New evidence from mutant cycle analysis indicates that D50 also interacts with Q48. We find that the D50-Q48 interaction contributes to stabilization of the open state, but that it is relatively insensitive to disruption by extracellular Ca(2+) compared with the D50-K61 interaction.

  18. Increased Oxidative Stress Impairs Adipose Tissue Function in Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Naotaka; Gotoh, Tomomi; Watanabe, Ken; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Garan, Yohei; Taguchi, Ryo; Node, Koichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1) catalyzes the conversion of ceramide to sphingomyelin. Here, we found that SMS1 null mice showed lipodystrophic phenotype. Mutant mice showed up-regulation of plasma triglyceride concentrations accompanied by reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) as they aged. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was severely reduced in mutant mice. In vivo analysis indicated that fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in liver decreased in SMS1 null compared to wild-type mice. In vitro analysis using cultured cell revealed that SMS1 depletion reduced fatty acid uptake. Proteins extracted from WAT of mutant mice were severely modified by oxidative stress, and up-regulation of mRNAs related to apoptosis, redox adjustment, mitochondrial stress response and mitochondrial biogenesis was observed. ATP content of WAT was reduced in SMS1 null mice. Blue native gel analysis indicated that accumulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was reduced. These results suggest that WAT of SMS1 null mice is severely damaged by oxidative stress and barely functional. Indeed, mutant mice treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed partial recovery of lipodystrophic phenotypes together with normalized plasma triglyceride concentrations. Altogether, our data suggest that SMS1 is crucial to control oxidative stress in order to maintain WAT function. PMID:23593476

  19. Urinary metabolomics in Fxr-null mice reveals activated adaptive metabolic pathways upon bile acid challenge.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joo-Youn; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Kang, Dong Wook; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Luecke, Hans; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2010-05-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in synthesis, metabolism, and transport of bile acids and thus plays a major role in maintaining bile acid homeostasis. In this study, metabolomic responses were investigated in urine of wild-type and Fxr-null mice fed cholic acid, an FXR ligand, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Multivariate data analysis between wild-type and Fxr-null mice on a cholic acid diet revealed that the most increased ions were metabolites of p-cresol (4-methylphenol), corticosterone, and cholic acid in Fxr-null mice. The structural identities of the above metabolites were confirmed by chemical synthesis and by comparing retention time (RT) and/or tandem mass fragmentation patterns of the urinary metabolites with the authentic standards. Tauro-3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrol (3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrahydroxy-5beta-cholestan-26-oyltaurine), one of the most increased metabolites in Fxr-null mice on a CA diet, is a marker for efficient hydroxylation of toxic bile acids possibly through induction of Cyp3a11. A cholestatic model induced by lithocholic acid revealed that enhanced expression of Cyp3a11 is the major defense mechanism to detoxify cholestatic bile acids in Fxr-null mice. These results will be useful for identification of biomarkers for cholestasis and for determination of adaptive molecular mechanisms in cholestasis.

  20. Enhanced antinociceptive response to intracerebroventricular kyotorphin in Pept2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huidi; Hu, Yongjun; Keep, Richard F; Smith, David E

    2009-06-01

    L-Kyotorphin (L-KTP), an endogenous analgesic neuropeptide, is a substrate for aminopeptidases and a proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter, PEPT2. This study examined the CSF efflux, antinociceptive response, and hydrolysis kinetics in brain of L-KTP and its synthetic diastereomer D-kyotorphin (D-KTP) in wild-type and Pept2 null mice. CSF clearance of L-KTP was slower in Pept2 null mice than in wild-type animals, and this difference was reflected in greater L-KTP-induced analgesia in Pept2 null mice. Moreover, dose-response analyses showed that the ED50 of L-KTP in Pept2-deficient animals was one-fifth of the value observed in Pept2-competent animals (4 vs. 21 nmol for null vs. wild-type mice, respectively). In contrast, the ED50 of D-KTP was very similar between the two genotypes (9-10 nmol). Likewise, there was little difference between genotypes in slope factor or baseline effects of L-KTP and D-KTP. The enhanced antinociceptive response to L-KTP in Pept2 null mice could not be explained by differences in neuropeptide degradation as Vmax and Km values did not differ between genotypes. Our results demonstrate that PEPT2 can significantly impact the analgesic response to an endogenous neuropeptide by altering CSF (and presumably brain interstitial fluid) concentrations and that it may influence the disposition and response to exogenous peptide/mimetic substrates.

  1. Exogenous transforming growth factor beta1 replacement and fertility in male Tgfb1 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Leanne J; Ingman, Wendy V; Robker, Rebecca L; Robertson, Sarah A

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of Tgfb1 null mutant mice has demonstrated that the cytokine transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFB1) has essential non-redundant roles in fertility. The present study attempted to alleviate the infertility phenotype of Tgfb1 null mutant male mice by administration of exogenous TGFB1, either orally by colostrum feeding or subcutaneously by delivery of recombinant human latent TGFB1 (rhLTGFB1) via osmotic mini-pumps. Bovine colostrum and fresh unpasteurised bovine milk were found to be rich sources of TGFB1 and TGFB2; however, feeding Tgfb1 null mutant mice colostrum for 2 days failed to raise serum levels of TGFB1. Administration of rhLTGFB1 (approximately 150 microg in total) over 14 days to Tgfb1 null mutant mice resulted in detectable TGFB1 in serum; however, mean levels remained 10-fold less than in Tgfb1 heterozygous mice. After 7 days and 14 days of rhLTGFB1 administration, serum testosterone, spontaneous non-contact erections and mating behaviour were assessed. Despite the increased serum TGFB1, administration of rhLTGFB1 to Tgfb1 null mutant mice failed to improve these fertility parameters. It is concluded that sustained restoration of circulating latent TGFB1 to levels approaching the normal physiological range does not rescue the infertility phenotype caused by TGFB1 deficiency. Reproductive function in male Tgfb1 null mutant mice may not respond to systemic TGFB1 supplementation due to a requirement for local sources of TGFB1 at the site of action in the reproductive tract, or perturbed development during the neonatal period or puberty such that adult reproductive function is permanently impaired.

  2. Clock Genes Regulate the Circadian Expression of Piezo1, TRPV4, Connexin26, and VNUT in an Ex Vivo Mouse Bladder Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Tatsuya; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakamura, Yuki; Kira, Satoru; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Norifumi; Hirayama, Yuri; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Yoichi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Nakao, Atsuhito; Takeda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Objectives ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice is an experimental model mouse for nocturia (NOC). Using the bladder mucosa obtained from ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice, we investigated the gene expression rhythms of mechanosensory cation channels such as transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) and Piezo1, and main ATP release pathways including vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) and Connexin26(Cx26), in addition to clock genes. Materials and methods Eight- to twelve-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (WT) and age- and sex-matched C57BL/6 ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice, which were bred under 12-h light/dark conditions for 2 weeks, were used. Gene expression rhythms and transcriptional regulation mechanisms in clock genes, mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT were measured in the mouse bladder mucosa, collected every 4 hours from WT and ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice using quantitative RT-PCR, a Western blot analysis, and ChIP assays. Results WT mice showed circadian rhythms in clock genes as well as mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT. Their expression was low during the sleep phase. The results of ChIP assays showed Clock protein binding to the promotor regions and the transcriptional regulation of mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT. In contrast, all of these circadian expressions were disrupted in ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice. The gene expression of mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT was maintained at a higher level in spite of the sleep phase. Conclusions Mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT expressed with circadian rhythm in the mouse bladder mucosa. The disruption of circadian rhythms in these genes, induced by the abnormalities in clock genes, may be factors contributing to NOC because of hypersensitivity to bladder wall extension. PMID:28060940

  3. Dmp1 Null Mice Develop a Unique Osteoarthritis-like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Baozhi; Harris, Steph E; Feng, Jian Q

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hypophosphatemia rickets (including DMP1 mutations) develop severe osteoarthritis (OA), although the mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we first identified the expression of DMP1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and X-gal analysis of Dmp1-knockout-lacZ-knockin heterozygous mice. Next, we characterized the OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice from 7-week-old to one-year-old using multiple techniques, including X-ray, micro-CT, H&E staining, Goldner staining, scanning electronic microscopy, IHC assays, etc. We found a classical OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice such as articular cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation, and subchondral osteosclerosis. These Dmp1 null mice also developed unique pathological changes, including a biphasic change in their articular cartilage from the initial expansion of hypertrophic chondrocytes at the age of 1-month to a quick diminished articular cartilage layer at the age of 3-months. Further, these null mice displayed severe enlarged knees and poorly formed bone with an expanded osteoid area. To address whether DMP1 plays a direct role in the articular cartilage, we deleted Dmp1 specifically in hypertrophic chondrocytes by crossing the Dmp1-loxP mice with Col X Cre mice. Interestingly, these conditional knockout mice didn't display notable defects in either the articular cartilage or the growth plate. Because of the hypophosphatemia remained in the entire life span of the Dmp1 null mice, we also investigated whether a high phosphate diet would improve the OA-like phenotype. A 8-week treatment of a high phosphate diet significantly rescued the OA-like defect in Dmp1 null mice, supporting the critical role of phosphate homeostasis in maintaining the healthy joint morphology and function. Taken together, this study demonstrates a unique OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice, but a lack of the direct impact of DMP1 on chondrogenesis. Instead, the regulation of phosphate homeostasis

  4. Dmp1 Null Mice Develop a Unique Osteoarthritis-like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Baozhi; Harris, Steph E; Feng, Jian Q.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hypophosphatemia rickets (including DMP1 mutations) develop severe osteoarthritis (OA), although the mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we first identified the expression of DMP1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and X-gal analysis of Dmp1-knockout-lacZ-knockin heterozygous mice. Next, we characterized the OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice from 7-week-old to one-year-old using multiple techniques, including X-ray, micro-CT, H&E staining, Goldner staining, scanning electronic microscopy, IHC assays, etc. We found a classical OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice such as articular cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation, and subchondral osteosclerosis. These Dmp1 null mice also developed unique pathological changes, including a biphasic change in their articular cartilage from the initial expansion of hypertrophic chondrocytes at the age of 1-month to a quick diminished articular cartilage layer at the age of 3-months. Further, these null mice displayed severe enlarged knees and poorly formed bone with an expanded osteoid area. To address whether DMP1 plays a direct role in the articular cartilage, we deleted Dmp1 specifically in hypertrophic chondrocytes by crossing the Dmp1-loxP mice with Col X Cre mice. Interestingly, these conditional knockout mice didn't display notable defects in either the articular cartilage or the growth plate. Because of the hypophosphatemia remained in the entire life span of the Dmp1 null mice, we also investigated whether a high phosphate diet would improve the OA-like phenotype. A 8-week treatment of a high phosphate diet significantly rescued the OA-like defect in Dmp1 null mice, supporting the critical role of phosphate homeostasis in maintaining the healthy joint morphology and function. Taken together, this study demonstrates a unique OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice, but a lack of the direct impact of DMP1 on chondrogenesis. Instead, the regulation of phosphate homeostasis

  5. Nitrosative stress elicited by nNOSµ delocalization inhibits muscle force in dystrophin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Dejia; Yue, Yongping; Lai, Yi; Hakim, Chady H; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of force reduction is not completely understood in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a dystrophin-deficient lethal disease. Nitric oxide regulates muscle force. Interestingly, neuronal nitric oxide synthase µ (nNOSµ), a major source of muscle nitric oxide, is lost from the sarcolemma in DMD muscle. We hypothesize that nNOSµ delocalization contributes to force reduction in DMD. To test this hypothesis, we generated dystrophin/nNOSµ double knockout mice. Genetic elimination of nNOSµ significantly enhanced force in dystrophin-null mice. Pharmacological inhibition of nNOS yielded similar results. To further test our hypothesis, we studied δ-sarcoglycan-null mice, a model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. These mice had minimal sarcolemmal nNOSµ delocalization and muscle force was less compromised. Annihilation of nNOSµ did not improve their force either. To determine whether nNOSµ delocalization itself inhibited force, we corrected muscle disease in dystrophin-null mice with micro-dystrophins that either restored or did not restore sarcolemmal nNOSµ. Similar muscle force was obtained irrespective of nNOSµ localization. Additional studies suggest that nNOSµ delocalization selectively inhibits muscle force in dystrophin-null mice via nitrosative stress. In summary, we have demonstrated for the first time that nitrosative stress elicited by nNOSµ delocalization is an important mechanism underlying force loss in DMD.

  6. Kv1.1 null mice have enlarged hippocampus and ventral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Ann-Sophie; Westman, Eric; Wang, Fu-Hua; Khan, Firoj Hossain; Spenger, Christian; Lavebratt, Catharina

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in the Shaker-like voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1 are known to cause episodic ataxia type 1 and temporal lobe epilepsy. Mice that express a malfunctional, truncated Kv1.1 (BALB/cByJ-Kv1.1mceph/mceph) show a markedly enlarged hippocampus and ventral cortex in adulthood. Results To determine if mice lacking Kv1.1 also develop a brain enlargement similar to mceph/mceph, we transferred Kv1.1 null alleles to the BALB/cByJ background. Hippocampus and ventral cortex was then studied using in vivo 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and volume segmentation in adult Kv1.1 null mice, BALB/cByJ-Kv1.1mceph/mceph, BALB/cByJ-Kv1.1mceph/+, BALB.C3HeB -Kv1.1-/+ and wild type littermates. The Kv1.1 null brains had dramatically enlarged hippocampus and ventral cortex. Mice heterozygous for either the null allele or the mceph allele had normal-sized hippocampus and ventral cortex. Conclusion Total absence of Kv1.1 can induce excessive overgrowth of hippocampus and ventral cortex in mice with a BALB/cByJ background, while mice with one wild type Kv1.1 allele develop normal-sized brains. PMID:17250763

  7. Evolutionary adaptation of the sensitivity of connexin26 hemichannels to CO2.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, Elizabeth; Cook, Jonathan; Dale, Nicholas

    2017-02-08

    CO2 readily combines with H2O to form [Formula: see text] and H(+) Because an increase of only 100 nM in the concentration of H(+) (a decrease of 0.1 unit of pH) in blood can prove fatal, the regulated excretion of CO2 during breathing is an essential life-preserving process. In rodents and humans, this vital process is mediated in part via the direct sensing of CO2 via connexin26 (Cx26). CO2 binds to hemichannels of Cx26 causing them to open and allow release of the neurotransmitter ATP. If Cx26 were to be a universal and important CO2 sensor across all homeothermic animals, then a simple hypothesis would posit that it should exhibit evolutionary adaptation in animals with different homeostatic set points for the regulation of partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2). In humans and rats, PaCO2 is regulated around a set point of 40 mmHg. By contrast, birds are able to maintain cerebral blood flow and breathing at much lower levels of PaCO2 Fossorial mammals, such as the mole rat, live exclusively underground in burrows that are both hypoxic and hypercapnic and can thrive under very hypercapnic conditions. We have therefore compared the CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 from human, chicken, rat and mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber). We find that both the affinity and cooperativity of CO2 binding to Cx26 have been subjected to evolutionary adaption in a manner consistent with the homeostatic requirements of these four species. This is analogous to the evolutionary adaptation of haemoglobin to the needs of O2 transport across the animal kingdom and supports the hypothesis that Cx26 is an important and universal CO2 sensor in homeotherms.

  8. Understanding of the molecular evolution of deafness-associated pathogenic mutations of connexin 26.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin-Huan; Fan, Yi; Wei, Qin-Jun; Xing, Guang-Qian; Cao, Xin

    2014-12-01

    Connexins (Cxs) were first identified as subunit proteins of the intercellular membrane channels that cluster in the cell communication structures known as gap junctions. Mutations in the gap junction β2 (GJB2) gene encoding connexin 26 (Cx26) have been linked to sporadic and hereditary hearing loss. In some cases, the mechanisms through which these mutations lead to hearing loss have been partly elucidated using cell culture systems and animal models. The goal of this study was to re-assess the pathogenic roles of the GJB2 mutations by combining comparative evolutionary studies. We used Bayesian phylogenetic analyses to determine the relationships among 35 orthologs and to calculate the ancestral sequences of these orthologs. By aligning sequences from the 35 orthologs and their ancestors and categorizing amino acid sites by degree of conservation, we used comparative evolutionary methods to determine potential functionally important amino acid sites in Cx26 and to identify missense changes that are likely to affect function. We identified six conserved regions in Cx26, five of which are located in the Connexin_CCC, and another is in the connexin super family domain. Finally, we identified 51 missense changes that are likely to disrupt function, and the probability of these changes occurring at hydrophilic amino acid residues was twice that of occurring at hydrophobic residues in the trans-membrane regions of Cx26. Our findings, which were obtained by combining comparative evolutionary methods to predict Cx26 mutant function, are consistent with the pathogenic characteristics of Cx26 mutants. This study provides a new pathway for studying the role of aberrant Cx26 in hereditary hearing loss.

  9. Connexin 26 (GJB2) gene-related deafness and speech intelligibility after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Sinnathuray, Arasa Raj; Toner, Joseph G; Clarke-Lyttle, Joanne; Geddis, Andrea; Patterson, Christopher C; Hughes, Anne E

    2004-11-01

    Speech intelligibility in children after cochlear implantation may depend on their deafness cause, including connexin 26 (GJB2) gene-related deafness. There is significant variability in the degree of intelligibility, or clarity, of children's speech after cochlear implantation. GJB2 gene-related deafness may be a factor, as preliminary data suggest that pathologic changes do not affect the spiral ganglion cells, which are the neural elements stimulated by the implant, thus favoring better results. In an observational retrospective cohort study of pediatric cochlear implantees, 38 patients with nonsyndromic deafness of unknown cause and 1 with keratitisichthyosis-deafness syndrome underwent GJB2 mutation analysis using polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. The primary outcome measure assessed was Speech Intelligibility Rating score from postoperative Year 1 (n = 39) to Year 5 (n = 17). Educational setting was considered as a secondary outcome measure. Statistical analysis was double-blinded, with patients and assessors of outcome unaware of GJB2 status. Fourteen patients had GJB2-related deafness and 25 had GJB2-unrelated deafness. Comparisons at Year 3 (n = 31) revealed intelligible speech achieved by 9 of 11 with GJB2-related deafness, compared with only 6 of 20 with GJB2-unrelated deafness (p = 0.017). Ordinal logistic regression analysis on Speech Intelligibility Rating scores found statistically significantly better scores in children with GJB2-related deafness (p < 0.05) both before and after adjustment for confounding variables. A larger proportion with GJB2-related deafness also attended mainstream school (p = 0.01). In pediatric cochlear implantees, GJB2-related deafness is a predictor of good speech intelligibility.

  10. Biochemical requirements for inhibition of Connexin26-containing channels by natural and synthetic taurine analogs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Liang; Harris, Andrew L

    2004-09-10

    Previous work has shown that protonated taurine and aminosulfonate pH buffers, including HEPES, can directly and reversibly inhibit connexin channels that contain connexin26 (Cx26) (Bevans, C. G., and Harris, A. L. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 3711-3719). The structural requirements for this inhibition were explored by studies of the effects of structural analogs of taurine on the activity of Cx26-containing reconstituted hemichannels from native tissue. Several analogs inhibited the channels, with a range of relative affinities and efficacies. Each active compound contains a protonated amine separated from an ionized sulfonate or sulfinate moiety by several methylene groups. The inhibition is eliminated if the sulfonate/sulfinate moiety or the amine is not present. Compounds that contain a protonated amine but lack a sulfonate/sulfinate moiety do not inhibit but do competitively block the effect of the active compounds. Compounds that lack the protonated amine do not significantly inhibit or antagonize inhibition. The results suggest involvement of the protonated amine in binding and of the ionized sulfur-containing moiety in effecting the inhibition. The maximal effect of the inhibitory compounds is enhanced when a carboxyl group is linked to the alpha-carbon. Inhibition but not binding is stereospecific, with l-isomers being inhibitory and the corresponding d-isomers being inactive but able to antagonize inhibition by the l-isomers. Whereas not all connexins are sensitive to aminosulfonates, the well defined structural requirements described here argue strongly for a highly specific regulatory interaction with some connexins. The finding that cytoplasmic aminosulfonates inhibit connexin channels whereas other cytoplasmic compounds antagonize the inhibition suggests that gap junction channels are regulated by a complex interplay of cytoplasmic ligands.

  11. Evolutionary adaptation of the sensitivity of connexin26 hemichannels to CO2

    PubMed Central

    de Wolf, Elizabeth; Cook, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    CO2 readily combines with H2O to form and H+. Because an increase of only 100 nM in the concentration of H+ (a decrease of 0.1 unit of pH) in blood can prove fatal, the regulated excretion of CO2 during breathing is an essential life-preserving process. In rodents and humans, this vital process is mediated in part via the direct sensing of CO2 via connexin26 (Cx26). CO2 binds to hemichannels of Cx26 causing them to open and allow release of the neurotransmitter ATP. If Cx26 were to be a universal and important CO2 sensor across all homeothermic animals, then a simple hypothesis would posit that it should exhibit evolutionary adaptation in animals with different homeostatic set points for the regulation of partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2). In humans and rats, PaCO2 is regulated around a set point of 40 mmHg. By contrast, birds are able to maintain cerebral blood flow and breathing at much lower levels of PaCO2. Fossorial mammals, such as the mole rat, live exclusively underground in burrows that are both hypoxic and hypercapnic and can thrive under very hypercapnic conditions. We have therefore compared the CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 from human, chicken, rat and mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber). We find that both the affinity and cooperativity of CO2 binding to Cx26 have been subjected to evolutionary adaption in a manner consistent with the homeostatic requirements of these four species. This is analogous to the evolutionary adaptation of haemoglobin to the needs of O2 transport across the animal kingdom and supports the hypothesis that Cx26 is an important and universal CO2 sensor in homeotherms. PMID:28148750

  12. Stimulation of Sigma-1 Receptor Ameliorates Depressive-like Behaviors in CaMKIV Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yuzuru; Izumi, Hisanao; Zhang, Chen; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2015-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a molecular chaperone regulating calcium efflux from the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and impaired neurogenesis as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into newborn cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Here, we demonstrate that chronic stimulation of Sig-1R by treatment with the agonist SA4503 or the SSRI fluvoxamine for 14 days improves depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice. By contrast, treatment with paroxetine, which lacks affinity for Sig-1R, did not alter these behaviors. Reduced numbers of BrdU-positive cells and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein kinase B (Akt; Ser-473) phosphorylation seen in the DG of CaMKIV null mice were significantly rescued by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Interestingly, reduced ATP production observed in the DG of CaMKIV null mice was improved by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Such stimulation also improved hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and maintenance, which are impaired in the DG of CaMKIV null mice. LTP rescue was closely associated with both increases in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation and GluA1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation. Taken together, Sig-1R stimulation by SA4503 or fluvoxamine treatment increased hippocampal neurogenesis, which is closely associated with amelioration of depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice.

  13. Human Cancer Growth and Therapy In NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull (NSG) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Leonard D.; Goodwin, Neal; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Hosur, Vishnu; Lyons, Bonnie L.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the “nude” mouse over 40 years ago, investigators have attempted to model human tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. The field has advanced significantly over the ensuing years due to improvements in the murine recipient of human tumors. These improvements include the discovery of the scid mutation and development of targeted mutations in the recombination activating genes 1 and 2 (Rag1null, Rag2null) that severely cripple the adaptive immune response of the murine host. More recently, mice deficient in adaptive immunity have been crossed with mice bearing targeted mutations designed to weaken the innate immune system, ultimately leading to the development of immunodeficient mice bearing a targeted mutation in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain gene (IL2rγnull). The IL2rγnull mutation has been used to develop several immunodeficient strains of mice, including the NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) strain. Using NSG mice as human xenograft recipients, it is now possible to grow almost all types of primary human tumors in vivo, including most solid tumors and hematological malignancies that maintain characteristics of the primary tumor in the patient. Programs to optimize patient-specific therapy using patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor growth in NSG mice have been established at several institutions, including The Jackson Laboratory. Moreover, NSG mice can be engrafted with functional human immune systems permitting for the first time the potential to study primary human tumors in vivo in the presence of a human immune system. PMID:24987146

  14. Loss of FAS/FASL signaling does not reduce apoptosis in Sharpin null mice.

    PubMed

    Potter, Christopher S; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; HogenEsch, Harm; Sundberg, John P

    2017-01-17

    Mice with mutations in SHANK-associated RH domain interactor (Sharpin) develop a hypereosinophilic auto-inflammatory disease known as chronic proliferative dermatitis. Affected mice have increased apoptosis in the keratinocytes of the skin, esophagus, and forestomach driven by extrinsic TNF receptor mediated apoptotic signaling pathways. FAS receptor signaling is an extrinsic apoptotic signaling mechanism frequently involved in inflammatory skin diseases. Compound mutations in Sharpin and Fas or Fasl were created to determine if these death domain proteins influenced the cutaneous phenotype in Sharpin null mice. Both Sharpin/Fas and Sharpin/Fasl compound mutant mice developed an auto-inflammatory phenotype similar to that seen in Sharpin null mice indicating that initiation of apoptosis by FAS signaling is likely not involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduced infarct size in neuroglobin-null mice after experimental stroke in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuroglobin is considered to be a novel important pharmacological target in combating stroke and neurodegenerative disorders, although the mechanism by which this protection is accomplished remains an enigma. We hypothesized that if neuroglobin is directly involved in neuroprotection, then permanent cerebral ischemia would lead to larger infarct volumes in neuroglobin-null mice than in wild-type mice. Methods Using neuroglobin-null mice, we estimated the infarct volume 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion using Cavalieri’s Principle, and compared the infarct volume in neuroglobin-null and wild-type mice. Neuroglobin antibody staining was used to examine neuroglobin expression in the infarct area of wild-type mice. Results Infarct volumes 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were significantly smaller in neuroglobin-null mice than in wild-types (p < 0.01). Neuroglobin immunostaining of the penumbra area revealed no visible up-regulation of neuroglobin protein in ischemic wild-type mice when compared to uninjured wild-type mice. In uninjured wild-type mice, neuroglobin protein was seen throughout cortical layer II and sparsely in layer V. In contrast, no neuroglobin-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the aforementioned layers of the ischemia injured cortical area, or in the surrounding penumbra of ischemic wild-type mice. This suggests no selective sparing of neuroglobin expressing neurons in ischemia. Conclusions Neuroglobin-deficiency resulted in reduced tissue infarction, suggesting that, at least at endogenous expression levels, neuroglobin in itself is non-protective against ischemic injury. PMID:22901501

  16. Evidence of altered inhibition in layer V pyramidal neurons from neocortex of Kcna1-null mice.

    PubMed

    van Brederode, J F; Rho, J M; Cerne, R; Tempel, B L; Spain, W J

    2001-01-01

    Mice lacking the potassium channel subunit KCNA1 exhibit a severe epileptic phenotype beginning at an early postnatal age. The precise cellular physiological substrates for these seizures are unclear, as is the site of origin. Since KCNA1 mRNA in normal mice is expressed in the neocortex, we asked whether neurons in the neocortex of three to four week-old Kcna1-null mutants exhibit evidence of hyperexcitability. Layer V pyramidal neurons were directly visualized in brain slices with infrared differential-interference contrast microscopy and evaluated with cellular electrophysiological techniques. There were no significant differences in intrinsic membrane properties and action potential shape between Kcna1-null and wild-type mice, consistent with previous findings in hippocampal slice recordings. However, the frequency of spontaneous post-synaptic currents was significantly higher in Kcna1-null compared to wild-type mice. The frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents and miniature (action-potential-independent) inhibitory post-synaptic currents was also significantly higher in Kcna1-null compared to wild-type mice. However, the frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents was not different in these two groups of animals. Comparison of the amplitude and kinetics of miniature inhibitory and excitatory post-synaptic currents revealed differences in amplitude, rise time and half-width between Kcna1-null and wild-type mice. Our data indicate that the inhibitory drive onto layer V pyramidal neurons is increased in Kcna1 knockout mice, either directly through an increased spontaneous release of GABA from presynaptic terminals contacting layer V pyramidal neurons, or an enhanced excitatory synaptic input to inhibitory interneurons.

  17. Wound Healing Characteristics of ICAM-1 Null Mice Devoid of All Isoforms of ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Andre N.; Mushin, Oren P.; Lazar, David A.; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi J.; Yu, Ling; Gobin, Andre; Smith, C. Wayne; Olutoye, Oluyinka O.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) permits leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and transmigration during inflammation. Membrane-bound ICAM-1 knockout mice have been used to understand this molecule’s role in wound-healing, but expressed spliced isoforms of ICAM-1 may have impacted results. We aimed to characterize wound-healing in an ICAM-1 null model devoid of all ICAM-1 isoforms. Methods Full-thickness 8-mm wounds were created on C57/BL6 wild-type (n=24) and ICAM-1 null (n=24) mice. Wound area was calculated using daily photographs. Histologic samples were harvested on post-operative Days 1,3,7, and 14. Wound margins were evaluated for mRNA expression of 13 inflammatory cytokines. A separate group of wild-type and ICAM-1 null mice (n=24) received full-thickness incisions with tensiometry measured at Day 14. Separately, complete blood counts were measured in unwounded wild-type (n=4) and ICAM-1 null mice (n=4). Results Wound-closure was significantly delayed in ICAM-1 null mice through Day 7 by gross and histologic measurement. mRNA expression of VEGF-A was increased in ICAM-1 null mice on Day 3, although no increase in VEGF-A was observed in the wound bed by immunohistochemistry. ICAM-1 null wounds demonstrated higher stiffness upon Day 14 tensiometry compared to the wild-type (1880 ± 926 kPa vs. 478 ± 117 kPa;p<0.01), and had higher counts of white blood cells (10,009 vs. 5,720 cells/microliter,p<0.05), neutrophils (2,130 vs. 630 cells/microliter,p<0.01), and lymphocytes (7,130 vs. 4,740 cells/microliter, p<0.05). Conclusions ICAM-1 null mice demonstrate delayed wound-healing and decreased wound elasticity compared to wild-type controls. This lag, however, was less than observed in earlier membrane-bound ICAM-1 knockouts, suggesting that other ICAM-1 isoforms may promote delayed wound-healing. PMID:21872884

  18. Enhanced Autophagy in Polycystic Kidneys of AQP11 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yasuko; Watari, Mayumi; Saito, Tatsuya; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is an intracellular water channel expressed at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the proximal tubule. Its gene disruption in mice leads to intracellular vacuole formation at one week and the subsequent development of polycystic kidneys by three weeks. As the damaged proximal tubular cells with intracellular vacuoles form cysts later, we postulated that autophagy may play a role in the cyst formation and examined autophagy activity before and after cyst development in AQP11(−/−) kidneys. PCR analysis showed the increased expression of the transcript encoding LC3 (Map1lc3b) as well as other autophagy-related genes in AQP11(−/−) mice. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3 transgenic mice and AQP11(−/−) mice, we found that the number of GFP-LC3–positive puncta was increased in the proximal tubule of AQP11(−/−) mice before the cyst formation. Interestingly, they were also observed in the cyst-lining epithelial cell. Further PCR analyses revealed the enhanced expression of apoptosis-related and ER stress–related caspase genes before and after the cyst formation, which may cause the enhanced autophagy. These results suggest the involvement of autophagy in the development and maintenance of kidney cysts in AQP11(−/−) mice. PMID:27916883

  19. Enhanced Ca2+ transport and muscle relaxation in skeletal muscle from sarcolipin-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Tupling, A. Russell; Bombardier, Eric; Gupta, Subash C.; Hussain, Dawar; Vigna, Chris; Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe; Trivieri, Maria G.; Babu, Gopal J.; Backx, Peter H.; Periasamy, Muthu; MacLennan, David H.; Gramolini, Anthony O.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcolipin (SLN) inhibits sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps. To evaluate the physiological significance of SLN in skeletal muscle, we compared muscle contractility and SERCA activity between Sln-null and wild-type mice. SLN protein expression in wild-type mice was abundant in soleus and red gastrocnemius (RG), low in extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and absent from white gastrocnemius (WG). SERCA activity rates were increased in soleus and RG, but not in EDL or WG, from Sln-null muscles, compared with wild type. No differences were seen between wild-type and Sln-null EDL muscles in force-frequency curves or maximum rates of force development (+dF/dt). Maximum relaxation rates (−dF/dt) of EDL were higher in Sln-null than wild type across a range of submaximal stimulation frequencies, but not during a twitch or peak tetanic contraction. For soleus, no differences were seen between wild type and Sln-null in peak tetanic force or +dF/dt; however, force-frequency curves showed that peak force during a twitch and 10-Hz contraction was lower in Sln-null. Changes in the soleus force-frequency curve corresponded with faster rates of force relaxation at nearly all stimulation frequencies in Sln-null compared with wild type. Repeated tetanic stimulation of soleus caused increased (−dF/dt) in wild type, but not in Sln-null. No compensatory responses were detected in analysis of other Ca2+ regulatory proteins using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry or myosin heavy chain expression using immunofluorescence. These results show that 1) SLN regulates Ca2+-ATPase activity thereby regulating contractile kinetics in at least some skeletal muscles, 2) the functional significance of SLN is graded to the endogenous SLN expression level, and 3) SLN inhibitory effects on SERCA function are relieved in response to repeated contractions thus enhancing relaxation rates. PMID:21697544

  20. Lack of MAP Kinase Phosphatase-1 Protects ApoE-null Mice against Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianzhong; Chandrasekharan, Unni M.; Ashraf, Mohammad Z.; Long, Eric; Morton, Richard E.; Liu, Yusen; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Multiple protein kinases have been implicated in cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the role of their counterparts — the protein phosphatases. Objective To test the hypothesis that Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is actively involved in atherogenesis. Methods and Results Mice with homozygous deficiency in MKP-1 (MKP-1−/−) were bred with ApoE-deficient mice (ApoE−/−) and the three MKP-1 genotypes (MKP-1+/+ /ApoE−/−; MKP-1+/− /ApoE−/− and MKP-1−/− /ApoE−/−) were maintained on a normal chow diet for 16-week. The three groups of mice exhibited similar body weight and serum lipid profiles; however, both MKP-1+/− and MKP-1−/− mice had significantly less aortic root atherosclerotic lesion formation than MKP-1+/+ mice. Less en face lesion was observed in 8-month old MKP-1−/− mice. The reduction in atherosclerosis was accompanied by decreased plasma levels of IL-1α and TNFα, and preceded by increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. In addition, MKP-1-null mice had higher levels of plasma SDF-1α, which negatively correlated with atherosclerotic lesion size. Immuno-histochemical analysis revealed that MKP-1 expression was enriched in macrophage-rich areas versus smooth muscle cell regions of the atheroma. Furthermore, macrophages isolated from MKP-1-null mice showed dramatic defects in their spreading/migration and impairment in ERK, but not JNK and p38, pathway activation. In line with this, MKP-1-null atheroma exhibited less macrophage content. Finally, transplantation of MKP-1-intact bone marrow into MKP-1-null mice fully rescued the wild type atherosclerotic phenotype. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that chronic deficiency of MKP-1 leads to decreased atherosclerosis via mechanisms involving impaired macrophage migration and defective ERK signalling. PMID:20093631

  1. Cochlear outer hair cells in a dominant-negative connexin26 mutant mouse preserve non-linear capacitance in spite of impaired distortion product otoacoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Minekawa, A; Abe, T; Inoshita, A; Iizuka, T; Kakehata, S; Narui, Y; Koike, T; Kamiya, K; Okamura, H-O; Shinkawa, H; Ikeda, K

    2009-12-15

    Mutations in the connexin26 gene (GJB2) are the most common genetic cause of congenital bilateral non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Transgenic mice were established carrying human Cx26 with the R75W mutation that was identified in a deaf family with autosomal dominant negative inheritance [Kudo T et al. (2003) Hum Mol Genet 12:995-1004]. A dominant-negative Gjb2 R75W transgenic mouse model shows incomplete development of the cochlear supporting cells, resulting in profound deafness from birth [Inoshita A et al. (2008) Neuroscience 156:1039-1047]. The Cx26 defect in the Gjb2 R75W transgenic mouse is restricted to the supporting cells; it is unclear why the auditory response is severely disturbed in spite of the presence of outer hair cells (OHCs). The present study was designed to evaluate developmental changes in the in vivo and in vitro function of the OHC, and the fine structure of the OHC and adjacent supporting cells in the R75W transgenic mouse. No detectable distortion product otoacoustic emissions were observed at any frequencies in R75W transgenic mice throughout development. A characteristic phenotype observed in these mice was the absence of the tunnel of Corti, Nuel's space, and spaces surrounding the OHC; the OHC were compressed and squeezed by the surrounding supporting cells. On the other hand, the OHC developed normally. Structural features of the lateral wall, such as the membrane-bound subsurface cisterna beneath the plasma membrane, were intact. Prestin, the voltage-dependent motor protein, was observed by immunohistochemistry in the OHC basolateral membranes of both transgenic and non-transgenic mice. No significant differences in electromotility of isolated OHCs during development was observed between transgenic and control mice. The present study indicates that normal development of the supporting cells is indispensable for proper cellular function of the OHC.

  2. Growth defect in Grg5 null mice is associated with reduced Ihh signaling in growth plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Fang; Wang, You-Gan; Reginato, Anthony M; Plotkina, Sofiya; Gridley, Thomas; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2002-05-01

    Gene-targeted disruption of Grg5, a mouse homologue of Drosophila groucho (gro), results in postnatal growth retardation in mice. The growth defect, most striking in approximately half of the Grg5 null mice, occurs during the first 4-5 weeks of age, but most mice recover retarded growth later. We used the nonlinear mixed-effects model to fit the growth data of wild-type, heterozygous, and Grg5 null mice. On the basis of preliminary evidence suggesting an interaction between Grg5 and the transcription factor Cbfa1/Runx2, critical for skeletal development, we further investigated the skeleton in the mice. A long bone growth plate defect was identified, which included shorter zones of proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes and decreased trabecular bone formation. This decreased trabecular bone formation is likely caused by a reduced recruitment of osteoblasts into the growth plate region of Grg5 null mice. Like the growth defect, the growth plate and trabecular bone abnormality improved as the mice grew older. The growth plate defect was associated with reduced Indian hedgehog expression and signaling. We suggest that Grg5, a transcriptional coregulator, modulates the activities of transcription factors, such as Cbfa1/Runx2 in vivo to affect Ihh expression and the function of long bone growth plates.

  3. Connexin26 hemichannels with a mutation that causes KID syndrome in humans lack sensitivity to CO2.

    PubMed

    Meigh, Louise; Hussain, Naveed; Mulkey, Daniel K; Dale, Nicholas

    2014-11-25

    AbstractMutations in connexin26 (Cx26) underlie a range of serious human pathologies. Previously we have shown that Cx26 hemichannels are directly opened by CO2 (Meigh et al., 2013). However the effects of human disease-causing mutations on the CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 are entirely unknown. Here, we report the first connection between the CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 and human pathology, by demonstrating that Cx26 hemichannels with the mutation A88V, linked to Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome, are both CO2 insensitive and associated with disordered breathing in humans.

  4. Noggin null allele mice exhibit a microform of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Lana-Elola, Eva; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Takatalo, Maarit; Alakurtti, Kirsi; Veistinen, Lotta; Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Graf, Daniel; Rice, Ritva; Luyten, Frank P; Rice, David P

    2011-10-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a heterogeneous craniofacial and neural developmental anomaly characterized in its most severe form by the failure of the forebrain to divide. In humans, HPE is associated with disruption of Sonic hedgehog and Nodal signaling pathways, but the role of other signaling pathways has not yet been determined. In this study, we analyzed mice which, due to the lack of the Bmp antagonist Noggin, exhibit elevated Bmp signaling. Noggin(-/-) mice exhibited a solitary median maxillary incisor that developed from a single dental placode, early midfacial narrowing as well as abnormalities in the developing hyoid bone, pituitary gland and vomeronasal organ. In Noggin(-/-) mice, the expression domains of Shh, as well as the Shh target genes Ptch1 and Gli1, were reduced in the frontonasal region at key stages of early facial development. Using E10.5 facial cultures, we show that excessive BMP4 results in reduced Fgf8 and Ptch1 expression. These data suggest that increased Bmp signaling in Noggin(-/-) mice results in downregulation of the hedgehog pathway at a critical stage when the midline craniofacial structures are developing, which leads to a phenotype consistent with a microform of HPE.

  5. Generalized Degenerative Joint Disease in Osteoprotegerin (Opg) Null Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Bolon, B; Grisanti, M; Villasenor, K; Morony, S; Feige, U; Simonet, W S

    2015-09-01

    Bone structure is modulated by the interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANKL). Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for RANKL, modifies osteoclast-mediated bone resorption directly and spares articular cartilage indirectly in rodents with immune-mediated arthritis by preventing subchondral bone destruction. The OPG/RANKL balance also seems to be critical in maintaining joint integrity in osteoarthritis, a condition featuring articular bone and cartilage damage in the absence of profound inflammation. The current study explored the role of OPG in sparing articular cartilage by evaluating joint lesions in adult C57BL/6J mice lacking osteoprotegerin (Opg (-) (/-)). At 3, 5, 7, 9, and 12 months of age, both sexes of Opg (-) (/-) mice developed severe degenerative joint disease (DJD) characterized by progressive loss of cartilage matrix and eventually articular cartilage. Lesions developed earlier and more severely in Opg (-) (/-) mice relative to age-matched, wild-type (Opg (+) (/+)), or heterozygous (Opg (+) (/-)) littermates (P ≤ .05). The femorotibial joint was affected bilaterally at 3 months, while other key weight-bearing diarthrodial joints (eg, coxofemoral, scapulohumeral, humeroradioulnar) were affected later and unilaterally. Cortical bone in subchondral plates and long bone diaphyses of Opg (-) (/-) mice but not Opg (+/+) or Opg (+) (/-) animals was osteoporotic by 3 months of age (P ≤ .05); the extent of porosity was less than the degree of DJD. Closure of the physes in long bones (P ≤ .05) and cartilage retention in the femoral primary spongiosa (P ≤ .05) affected chiefly Opg (-) (/-) mice. These data suggest that OPG plays an essential direct role in maintaining cartilage integrity in the articular surfaces and physes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Deafness induced by Connexin 26 (GJB2) deficiency is not determined by endocochlear potential (EP) reduction but is associated with cochlear developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2014-05-23

    Connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are the major cause of hereditary deafness and are responsible for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mouse models show that Cx26 deficiency can cause congenital deafness with cochlear developmental disorders, hair cell degeneration, and the reduction of endocochlear potential (EP) and active cochlear amplification. However, the underlying deafness mechanism still remains undetermined. Our previous studies revealed that hair cell degeneration is not a primary cause of hearing loss. In this study we investigated the role of EP reduction in Cx26 deficiency-induced deafness. We found that the EP reduction is not associated with congenital deafness in Cx26 knockout (KO) mice. The threshold of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in Cx26 KO mice was even greater than 110 dB SPL, demonstrating complete hearing loss. However, the EP in Cx26 KO mice varied and not completely abolished. In some cases, the EP could still remain at higher levels (>70 mV). We further found that the deafness in Cx26 KO mice is associated with cochlear developmental disorders. Deletion of Cx26 in the cochlea before postnatal day 5 (P5) could cause congenital deafness. The cochlea had developmental disorders and the cochlear tunnel was not open. However, no congenital deafness was found when Cx26 was deleted after P5. The cochlea also displayed normal development and the cochlear tunnel was open normally. These data suggest that congenital deafness induced by Cx26 deficiency is not determined by EP reduction and may result from cochlear developmental disorders.

  7. maLPA1-null mice as an endophenotype of anxious depression.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fernández, R D; Pérez-Martín, M; Castilla-Ortega, E; Rosell Del Valle, C; García-Fernández, M I; Chun, J; Estivill-Torrús, G; Rodríguez de Fonseca, F; Santín, L J; Pedraza, C

    2017-04-04

    Anxious depression is a prevalent disease with devastating consequences and a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this mood disorder remain poorly characterized. The LPA1 receptor is one of the six characterized G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6) through which lysophosphatidic acid acts as an intracellular signalling molecule. The loss of this receptor induces anxiety and several behavioural and neurobiological changes that have been strongly associated with depression. In this study, we sought to investigate the involvement of the LPA1 receptor in mood. We first examined hedonic and despair-like behaviours in wild-type and maLPA1 receptor null mice. Owing to the behavioural response exhibited by the maLPA1-null mice, the panic-like reaction was assessed. In addition, c-Fos expression was evaluated as a measure of the functional activity, followed by interregional correlation matrices to establish the brain map of functional activation. maLPA1-null mice exhibited anhedonia, agitation and increased stress reactivity, behaviours that are strongly associated with the psychopathological endophenotype of depression with anxiety features. Furthermore, the functional brain maps differed between the genotypes. The maLPA1-null mice showed increased limbic-system activation, similar to that observed in depressive patients. Antidepressant treatment induced behavioural improvements and functional brain normalisation. Finally, based on validity criteria, maLPA1-null mice are proposed as an animal model of anxious depression. Here, for we believe the first time, we have identified a possible relationship between the LPA1 receptor and anxious depression, shedding light on the unknown neurobiological basis of this subtype of depression and providing an opportunity to explore new therapeutic targets for the treatment of mood disorders, especially for the anxious subtype of depression.

  8. maLPA1-null mice as an endophenotype of anxious depression

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Fernández, R D; Pérez-Martín, M; Castilla-Ortega, E; Rosell del Valle, C; García-Fernández, M I; Chun, J; Estivill-Torrús, G; Rodríguez de Fonseca, F; Santín, L J; Pedraza, C

    2017-01-01

    Anxious depression is a prevalent disease with devastating consequences and a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this mood disorder remain poorly characterized. The LPA1 receptor is one of the six characterized G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6) through which lysophosphatidic acid acts as an intracellular signalling molecule. The loss of this receptor induces anxiety and several behavioural and neurobiological changes that have been strongly associated with depression. In this study, we sought to investigate the involvement of the LPA1 receptor in mood. We first examined hedonic and despair-like behaviours in wild-type and maLPA1 receptor null mice. Owing to the behavioural response exhibited by the maLPA1-null mice, the panic-like reaction was assessed. In addition, c-Fos expression was evaluated as a measure of the functional activity, followed by interregional correlation matrices to establish the brain map of functional activation. maLPA1-null mice exhibited anhedonia, agitation and increased stress reactivity, behaviours that are strongly associated with the psychopathological endophenotype of depression with anxiety features. Furthermore, the functional brain maps differed between the genotypes. The maLPA1-null mice showed increased limbic-system activation, similar to that observed in depressive patients. Antidepressant treatment induced behavioural improvements and functional brain normalisation. Finally, based on validity criteria, maLPA1-null mice are proposed as an animal model of anxious depression. Here, for we believe the first time, we have identified a possible relationship between the LPA1 receptor and anxious depression, shedding light on the unknown neurobiological basis of this subtype of depression and providing an opportunity to explore new therapeutic targets for the treatment of mood disorders, especially for the anxious subtype of depression. PMID:28375206

  9. Inflammation enhances resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in IL-10 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Karen E.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Rigby, Rachael J.; von Allmen, Doug C.; Lund, P. Kay; Helmrath, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical resection of the ileum, cecum and proximal right colon (ICR) is common in the management of Crohn’s disease, yet little is known about the effect of active inflammation on the adaptive response following intestinal loss. We recently developed a surgical model of ICR in germ-free (GF) IL-10 null mice that develop small intestinal inflammation only when mice undergo conventionalization with normal fecal microflora (CONV) before surgical intervention. In this study, we examined the effects of post-surgical small bowel inflammation on adaptive growth after ICR. Methods 8-10 week old GF 129SvEv IL-10 null mice were allocated to GF or CONV groups. Non-operated GF and CONV mice provided baseline controls. Two weeks later GF and CONV mice were further allocated to ICR or sham operation. Small intestine and colon were harvested 7d after surgery for histological analysis. Results All mice within the gnotobiotic facility maintained GF status and did not develop small intestinal or colonic inflammation. CONV resulted in colitis in all groups, whereas small intestinal inflammation was only observed following ICR. Resection-induced small intestinal inflammation in CONV mice was associated with increases in proliferation, crypt depth and villus height when compared to GF mice after ICR. Resection-induced increases in crypt fission only occurred in CONV mice. Conclusion ICR-dependent small intestinal inflammation in CONV IL-10 null mice dramatically enhances early adaptive growth of the small intestine. Additional studies utilizing our model may provide clinical insight leading to optimal therapies in managing IBD patients after surgical resection. PMID:20074747

  10. Altered lipid and salt taste responsivity in ghrelin and GOAT null mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-Na; Daimon, Caitlin M; Wang, Rui; Tschöp, Matthias H; Sévigny, Jean; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Taste perception plays an important role in regulating food preference, eating behavior and energy homeostasis. Taste perception is modulated by a variety of factors, including gastric hormones such as ghrelin. Ghrelin can regulate growth hormone release, food intake, adiposity, and energy metabolism. Octanoylation of ghrelin by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is a specific post-translational modification which is essential for many biological activities of ghrelin. Ghrelin and GOAT are both widely expressed in many organs including the gustatory system. In the current study, overall metabolic profiles were assessed in wild-type (WT), ghrelin knockout (ghrelin(-/-)), and GOAT knockout (GOAT(-/-)) mice. Ghrelin(-/-) mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased plasma triglycerides and increased ketone bodies compared to WT mice while demonstrating WT-like body weight, fat composition and glucose control. In contrast GOAT(-/-) mice exhibited reduced body weight, adiposity, resting glucose and insulin levels compared to WT mice. Brief access taste behavioral tests were performed to determine taste responsivity in WT, ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. Ghrelin and GOAT null mice possessed reduced lipid taste responsivity. Furthermore, we found that salty taste responsivity was attenuated in ghrelin(-/-) mice, yet potentiated in GOAT(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Expression of the potential lipid taste regulators Cd36 and Gpr120 were reduced in the taste buds of ghrelin and GOAT null mice, while the salt-sensitive ENaC subunit was increased in GOAT(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. The altered expression of Cd36, Gpr120 and ENaC may be responsible for the altered lipid and salt taste perception in ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. The data presented in the current study potentially implicates ghrelin signaling activity in the modulation of both lipid and salt taste modalities.

  11. Altered Lipid and Salt Taste Responsivity in Ghrelin and GOAT Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Caitlin M.; Wang, Rui; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Sévigny, Jean; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Taste perception plays an important role in regulating food preference, eating behavior and energy homeostasis. Taste perception is modulated by a variety of factors, including gastric hormones such as ghrelin. Ghrelin can regulate growth hormone release, food intake, adiposity, and energy metabolism. Octanoylation of ghrelin by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is a specific post-translational modification which is essential for many biological activities of ghrelin. Ghrelin and GOAT are both widely expressed in many organs including the gustatory system. In the current study, overall metabolic profiles were assessed in wild-type (WT), ghrelin knockout (ghrelin−/−), and GOAT knockout (GOAT−/−) mice. Ghrelin−/− mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased plasma triglycerides and increased ketone bodies compared to WT mice while demonstrating WT-like body weight, fat composition and glucose control. In contrast GOAT−/− mice exhibited reduced body weight, adiposity, resting glucose and insulin levels compared to WT mice. Brief access taste behavioral tests were performed to determine taste responsivity in WT, ghrelin−/− and GOAT−/− mice. Ghrelin and GOAT null mice possessed reduced lipid taste responsivity. Furthermore, we found that salty taste responsivity was attenuated in ghrelin−/− mice, yet potentiated in GOAT−/− mice compared to WT mice. Expression of the potential lipid taste regulators Cd36 and Gpr120 were reduced in the taste buds of ghrelin and GOAT null mice, while the salt-sensitive ENaC subunit was increased in GOAT−/− mice compared with WT mice. The altered expression of Cd36, Gpr120 and ENaC may be responsible for the altered lipid and salt taste perception in ghrelin−/− and GOAT−/− mice. The data presented in the current study potentially implicates ghrelin signaling activity in the modulation of both lipid and salt taste modalities. PMID:24124572

  12. Impaired capsule formation of tumors in periostin-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, Masashi; Kudo, Akira

    2008-03-21

    Being a secreted protein, periostin is a multifunctional matricellular glycoprotein. In vitro, periostin has the ability to promote the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts. Previously, it was demonstrated that periostin is mainly produced by cancer-associated fibroblasts or tumor stromal cells. In the present study, we show that periostin regulates capsule formation in a positive manner and inhibits tumor growth. Consistent with a previous finding, several tumor cell lines did not exhibit expression of periostin in vitro or in vivo; and the growth of tumors that had been allografted into periostin -/- mice was significantly accelerated compared with that of the same kind of tumors grafted into periostin +/+ mice. Immunostaining and biochemical analyses revealed that mature collagen was detected abundantly in the capsules and interstitium of the wild-type-grafted tumors but not in those of the periostin -/- grafted tumors. Moreover, the number of activated tumor stromal cells was decreased significantly in the periostin -/- grafted tumors. Our studies suggest that host-derived periostin negatively regulates tumor growth by promoting capsule formation and by mediating changes in the deposition and organization of the tumor microenvironment coordinated by periostin-producing stromal cells.

  13. Orexin Receptor Antagonism Improves Sleep and Reduces Seizures in Kcna1-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Roundtree, Harrison M; Simeone, Timothy A; Johnson, Chaz; Matthews, Stephanie A; Samson, Kaeli K; Simeone, Kristina A

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid sleep disorders occur in approximately one-third of people with epilepsy. Seizures and sleep disorders have an interdependent relationship where the occurrence of one can exacerbate the other. Orexin, a wake-promoting neuropeptide, is associated with sleep disorder symptoms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that orexin dysregulation plays a role in the comorbid sleep disorder symptoms in the Kcna1-null mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Rest-activity was assessed using infrared beam actigraphy. Sleep architecture and seizures were assessed using continuous video-electroencephalography-electromyography recordings in Kcna1-null mice treated with vehicle or the dual orexin receptor antagonist, almorexant (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Orexin levels in the lateral hypothalamus/perifornical region (LH/P) and hypothalamic pathology were assessed with immunohistochemistry and oxygen polarography. Kcna1-null mice have increased latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep onset, sleep fragmentation, and number of wake epochs. The numbers of REM and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs are significantly reduced in Kcna1-null mice. Severe seizures propagate to the wake-promoting LH/P where injury is apparent (indicated by astrogliosis, blood-brain barrier permeability, and impaired mitochondrial function). The number of orexin-positive neurons is increased in the LH/P compared to wild-type LH/P. Treatment with a dual orexin receptor antagonist significantly increases the number and duration of NREM sleep epochs and reduces the latency to REM sleep onset. Further, almorexant treatment reduces the incidence of severe seizures and overall seizure burden. Interestingly, we report a significant positive correlation between latency to REM onset and seizure burden in Kcna1-null mice. Dual orexin receptor antagonists may be an effective sleeping aid in epilepsy, and warrants further study on their somnogenic and ant-seizure effects in other epilepsy models. © 2016 Associated

  14. Temporal and regional alterations in NMDA receptor expression in Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Blue, Mary E; Kaufmann, Walter E; Bressler, Joseph; Eyring, Charlotte; O'driscoll, Cliona; Naidu, Sakkubai; Johnston, Michael V

    2011-10-01

    Our previous postmortem study of girls with Rett Syndrome (RTT), a development disorder caused by MECP2 mutations, found increases in the density of N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the prefrontal cortex of 2-8-year-old girls, whereas girls older than 10 years had reductions in NMDA receptors compared with age-matched controls (Blue et al., Ann Neurol 1999b;45:541-545). Using [(3)H]-CGP to label NMDA-type glutamate receptors in 2- and 7-week old wild-type (WT), Mecp2-null, and Mecp2-heterozygous (HET) mice (Bird model), we found that frontal areas of the brain also exhibited a bimodal pattern in NMDA expression, with increased densities of NMDA receptors in Mecp2-null mice at 2 weeks of age but decreased densities at 7 weeks of age. Visual cortex showed a similar pattern, while other cortical regions only exhibited changes in NMDA receptor densities at 2 weeks (retrosplenial granular) or 7 weeks (somatosensory). In thalamus of null mice, NMDA receptors were increased at 2 and 7 weeks. No significant differences in density were found between HET and WT mice at both ages. Western blots for NMDAR1 expression in frontal brain showed higher levels of expression in Mecp2-null mice at 2 weeks of age but not at 1 or 7 weeks of age. Our mouse data support the notion that deficient MeCP2 function is the primary cause of the NMDA receptor changes we observed in RTT. Furthermore, the findings of regional and temporal differences in NMDA expression illustrate the importance of age and brain region in evaluating different genotypes of mice.

  15. Altered astrocyte morphology and vascular development in dystrophin-Dp71-null mice.

    PubMed

    Giocanti-Auregan, Audrey; Vacca, Ophélie; Bénard, Romain; Cao, Sijia; Siqueiros, Lourdes; Montañez, Cecilia; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Sennlaub, Florian; Guillonneau, Xavier; Rendon, Alvaro; Tadayoni, Ramin

    2016-05-01

    Understanding retinal vascular development is crucial because many retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy (in adults) or retinopathy of prematurity (in children) are among the leading causes of blindness. Given the localization of the protein Dp71 around the retinal vessels in adult mice and its role in maintaining retinal homeostasis, the aim of this study was to determine if Dp71 was involved in astrocyte and vascular development regulation. An experimental study in mouse retinas was conducted. Using a dual immunolabeling with antibodies to Dp71 and anti-GFAP for astrocytes on retinal sections and isolated astrocytes, it was found that Dp71 was expressed in wild-type (WT) mouse astrocytes from early developmental stages to adult stage. In Dp71-null mice, a reduction in GFAP-immunopositive astrocytes was observed as early as postnatal day 6 (P6) compared with WT mice. Using real-time PCR, it was showed that Dp71 mRNA was stable between P1 and P6, in parallel with post-natal vascular development. Regarding morphology in Dp71-null and WT mice, a significant decrease in overall astrocyte process number in Dp71-null retinas at P6 to adult age was found. Using fluorescence-conjugated isolectin Griffonia simplicifolia on whole mount retinas, subsequent delay of developing vascular network at the same age in Dp71-null mice was found. An evidence that the Dystrophin Dp71, a membrane-associated cytoskeletal protein and one of the smaller Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene products, regulates astrocyte morphology and density and is associated with subsequent normal blood vessel development was provided.

  16. Gastrointestinal Mucins of Fut2-Null Mice Lack Terminal Fucosylation without Affecting Colonization by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Elizabeth A.; Holmén, Jessica M.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Domino, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Post-translational modification of apomucins by the sequential action of glycosyltransferases is required to produce mature mucins. The “Secretor” gene (FUT2) encodes an α(1,2)fucosyltransferase (E.C. 2.4.1.69) that catalyzes addition of terminal α(1,2)fucose residues on mucins and other molecules in mucosal epithelium. Mutant mice containing targeted replacement of Fut2 with the bacterial reporter gene lacZ were studied to determine the affect of the loss of Fut2 on glycosylation of mucins in the gastrointestinal tract. By whole organ X-gal staining, lacZ activity is prominently expressed in the foveolar pit and chief cells of the glandular stomach, Brunner's glands of the duodenum, and goblet cells in the large intestine of Fut2-LacZ null mice. Staining with Aleuria aurantia agglutinin demonstrates loss of l-fucosylated epithelial glycans throughout the gastrointestinal tract of Fut2-LacZ null mice, however, histologic appearance of the tissues appears normal. Analysis of oligosaccharides released from insoluble colonic mucins, largely Muc2, by mass spectrometry shows complete lack of terminal fucosylation of O-linked oligosaccharides in Fut2-LacZ null mice. Precursor glycans accumulate with no evidence of compensation by other fucosyltransferases or sialyltransferases on mucin glycosylation. Since Candida albicans has been reported to adhere to intestinal mucins creating a potential reservoir associated with vaginitis, Fut2-LacZ null and wild type mice were inoculated by gastric lavage with C. albicans. We observe no difference in colonization between genotypes suggesting mucin terminal fucosylation does not significantly influence C. albicans-host interaction in the intestine, highlighting that infections caused by the same organism at different mucosal surfaces are not equal. PMID:15958416

  17. Attenuated allergic airway inflammation in Cd39 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ayata, C. Korcan; Müller, Tobias; Dürk, Thorsten; Grimm, Melanie; Baudiß, Kristin; Vieira, Rodolfo P.; Cicko, Sanja; Boehlke, Christopher; Zech, Andreas; Sorichter, Stephan; Pelletier, Julie; Sévigny, Jean; Robson, Simon C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracellular ATP is known to accumulate in the lung, following allergen challenge, and contributes via activation of purinergic receptors on dendritic cells (DC), to the development of allergic airway inflammation (AAI). Extracellular ATP-levels in the airways are normally tightly regulated by CD39. This ectonucleotidase is highly expressed by DC purified from skin (Langerhans cells) and bone marrow, and has been shown to modulate DC adaptive/haptenic immune responses. In this study, we have evaluated the impact of Cd39 deletion and associated perturbation of purinergic signaling in AAI. Methods Standard OVA-alum and house dust mite (HDM) bone marrow derived DC (BMDC) dependent models of AAI were used to study effects of Cd39. Migration assays, time lapse microscopy and T-cell priming assays were further used to determine functional relevance of Cd39 expression on BMDC in the setting of immune and Th2-mediated responses in these models. Results Cd39−/− mice exhibited marked increases in BALF ATP-levels but paradoxically exhibited limited AAI in both OVA-alum and HDM models. These pathophysiological abnormalities were associated with decreased myeloid DC activation and chemotaxis towards ATP, and were linked to purinergic receptor desensitization responses. Further, Cd39−/− DCs exhibited limited capacity to both prime Th2-responses and form stable immune synaptic interactions with OVA-transgenic naïve T-cells. Conclusions Cd39-deficient DCs exhibit limited capacity to induce Th2 immunity in a DC-driven model of AAI in vivo. Our data demonstrate a role of CD39 and perturbed purinergic signaling in models of AAI, PMID:23452076

  18. Glial dysfunction in parkin null mice: effects of aging.

    PubMed

    Solano, Rosa M; Casarejos, Maria J; Menéndez-Cuervo, Jamie; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose A; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, Maria A

    2008-01-16

    Parkin mutations in humans produce parkinsonism whose pathogenesis is related to impaired protein degradation, increased free radicals, and abnormal neurotransmitter release. The role of glia in parkin deficiency is little known. We cultured midbrain glia from wild-type (WT) and parkin knock-out (PK-KO) mice. After 18-20 d in vitro, PK-KO glial cultures had less astrocytes, more microglia, reduced proliferation, and increased proapoptotic protein expression. PK-KO glia had greater levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH), increased mRNA expression of the GSH-synthesizing enzyme gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and greater glutathione S-transferase and lower glutathione peroxidase activities than WT. The reverse happened in glia cultured in serum-free defined medium (EF12) or in old cultures. PK-KO glia was more susceptible than WT to transference to EF12 or neurotoxins (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, blockers of GSH synthesis or catalase, inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinases), aging of the culture, or combination of these insults. PK-KO glia was less susceptible than WT to Fe2+ plus H2O2 and less responsive to protection by deferoxamine. Old WT glia increased the expression of heat shock protein 70, but PK-KO did not. Glia conditioned medium (GCM) from PK-KO was less neuroprotective and had lower levels of GSH than WT. GCM from WT increased the levels of dopamine markers in midbrain neuronal cultures transferred to EF12 more efficiently than GCM from PK-KO, and the difference was corrected by supplementation with GSH. PK-KO-GCM was a less powerful suppressor of apoptosis and microglia in neuronal cultures. Our data prove that abnormal glial function is critical in parkin mutations, and its role increases with aging.

  19. Female ROMK null mice manifest more severe Bartter II phenotype on renal function and higher PGE2 production

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qingshang; Yang, Xinbo; Cantone, Alessandra; Giebisch, Gerhard; Hebert, Steven; Wang, Tong

    2008-01-01

    ROMK null mice with a high survival rate and varying severity of hydronephrosis provide a good model to study type II Bartter syndrome pathophysiology (26). During the development of such a colony, we found that more male than female null mice survived, 58.7% vs. 33.3%. To investigate the possible mechanism of this difference, we compared the survival rates, renal functions, degree of hydronephrosis, as well as PGE2 and TXB2 production between male and female ROMK wild-type and null mice. We observed that female ROMK Bartter's mice exhibited lower GFR (0.37 vs. 0.54 ml·min−1·100 g BW−1, P < 0.05) and higher fractional Na+ excretion (0.66% vs. 0.48%, P < 0.05) than male Bartter's. No significant differences in acid-base parameters, urinary K+ excretion, and plasma electrolyte concentrations were observed between sexes. In addition, we assessed the liquid retention rate in the kidney to evaluate the extent of hydronephrosis and observed that 67% of male and 90% of female ROMK null mice were hydronephrotic mice. Urinary PGE2 excretion was higher in both sexes of ROMK null mice: 1.35 vs. 1.10 ng/24 h in males and 2.90 vs. 0.87 ng/24 h in females. TXB2 excretion was higher in female mice in both wild-type and ROMK null mice. The increments of urinary PGE2 and TXB2 were significantly higher in female null mice than males, 233.33% vs. 22.74% of PGE2 and 85.67% vs. 20.36% of TXB2. These data demonstrate a more severe Bartter phenotype in female ROMK null mice, and higher PGE2 and TXB2 production may be one of the mechanisms of this manifestation. PMID:18579648

  20. Amelogenesis imperfecta and other biomineralization defects in Fam20a and Fam20c null mice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Hansen, G M; Read, R W; Vance, R B; Thiel, M; Liu, J; Wronski, T J; Smith, D D; Jeter-Jones, S; Brommage, R

    2012-11-01

    The FAM20 family of secreted proteins consists of three members (FAM20A, FAM20B, and FAM20C) recently linked to developmental disorders suggesting roles for FAM20 proteins in modulating biomineralization processes. The authors report here findings in knockout mice having null mutations affecting each of the three FAM20 proteins. Both Fam20a and Fam20c null mice survived to adulthood and showed biomineralization defects. Fam20b (-/-) embryos showed severe stunting and increased mortality at E13.5, although early lethality precluded detailed investigations. Physiologic calcification or biomineralization of extracellular matrices is a normal process in the development and functioning of various tissues (eg, bones and teeth). The lesions that developed in teeth, bones, or blood vessels after functional deletion of either Fam20a or Fam20c support a significant role for their encoded proteins in modulating biomineralization processes. Severe amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) was present in both Fam20a and Fam20c null mice. In addition, Fam20a (-/-) mice developed disseminated calcifications of muscular arteries and intrapulmonary calcifications, similar to those of fetuin-A deficient mice, although they were normocalcemic and normophosphatemic, with normal dentin and bone. Fam20a gene expression was detected in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and the parathyroid gland, with local and systemic effects suggesting both local and/or systemic effects for FAM20A. In contrast, Fam20c (-/-) mice lacked ectopic calcifications but were severely hypophosphatemic and developed notable lesions in both dentin and bone to accompany the AI. The bone and dentin lesions, plus the marked hypophosphatemia and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase and FGF23 levels, are indicative of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia in Fam20c (-/-) mice.

  1. Orexin Receptor Antagonism Improves Sleep and Reduces Seizures in Kcna1-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roundtree, Harrison M.; Simeone, Timothy A.; Johnson, Chaz; Matthews, Stephanie A.; Samson, Kaeli K.; Simeone, Kristina A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Comorbid sleep disorders occur in approximately one-third of people with epilepsy. Seizures and sleep disorders have an interdependent relationship where the occurrence of one can exacerbate the other. Orexin, a wake-promoting neuropeptide, is associated with sleep disorder symptoms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that orexin dysregulation plays a role in the comorbid sleep disorder symptoms in the Kcna1-null mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: Rest-activity was assessed using infrared beam actigraphy. Sleep architecture and seizures were assessed using continuous video-electroencephalography-electromyography recordings in Kcna1-null mice treated with vehicle or the dual orexin receptor antagonist, almorexant (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Orexin levels in the lateral hypothalamus/perifornical region (LH/P) and hypothalamic pathology were assessed with immunohistochemistry and oxygen polarography. Results: Kcna1-null mice have increased latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep onset, sleep fragmentation, and number of wake epochs. The numbers of REM and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs are significantly reduced in Kcna1-null mice. Severe seizures propagate to the wake-promoting LH/P where injury is apparent (indicated by astrogliosis, blood-brain barrier permeability, and impaired mitochondrial function). The number of orexin-positive neurons is increased in the LH/P compared to wild-type LH/P. Treatment with a dual orexin receptor antagonist significantly increases the number and duration of NREM sleep epochs and reduces the latency to REM sleep onset. Further, almorexant treatment reduces the incidence of severe seizures and overall seizure burden. Interestingly, we report a significant positive correlation between latency to REM onset and seizure burden in Kcna1-null mice. Conclusion: Dual orexin receptor antagonists may be an effective sleeping aid in epilepsy, and warrants further study on their somnogenic and ant-seizure effects in

  2. Evidence of Aortopathy in Mice with Haploinsufficiency of Notch1 in Nos3-Null Background.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Sara N; Bosse, Kevin M; Nadorlik, Holly A; Lilly, Brenda; Garg, Vidu

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. While the exact etiology is unknown, genetic factors play an important role. Mutations in NOTCH1 have been linked to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and aortopathy in humans. The aim of this study was to determine if haploinsufficiency of Notch1 contributes to aortopathy using Notch1(+/-); Nos3(-/-) mice. Echocardiographic analysis of Notch1(+/-); Nos3(-/-) mice reveals effacement of the sinotubular junction and a trend toward dilation of the aortic sinus. Furthermore, examination of the proximal aorta of Notch1(+/-); Nos3(-/-) mice reveals elastic fiber degradation, a trend toward increased matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression, and increased smooth muscle cell apoptosis, features characteristic of aneurysmal disease. Although at a lower penetrance, we also found features consistent with aortopathic changes in Notch1 heterozygote mice and in Nos3-null mice. Our findings implicate a novel role for Notch1 in aortopathy of the proximal aorta.

  3. CRSBP-1/LYVE-1-null Mice Exhibit Identifiable Morphological and Functional Alterations of Lymphatic Capillary Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuan S.; Liu, I-Hua; Smith, Tracy; Shah, Maulik R.; Johnson, Frank E.; Huang, Jung S.

    2010-01-01

    CRSBP-1, a membrane glycoprotein, can mediate cell-surface retention of secreted growth factors containing CRS motifs such as PDGF-BB. CRSBP-1 has recently been found to be identical to LYVE-1, a specific marker for lymphatic capillary endothelial cells. The in vivo role of CRSBP-1/LYVE-1 is unknown. CRSBP-1-null mice are overtly normal and fertile but exhibit identifiable morphological and functional alterations of lymphatic capillary vessels in certain tissues, marked by the constitutively increased interstitial-lymphatic flow and lack of typical irregularly-shaped lumens. The CRSBP-1 ligands PDGF-BB and HA enhance interstitial-lymphatic flow in wild-type mice but not in CRSBP-1-null animals. PMID:17070806

  4. Discoidin domain receptor 1 null mice are protected against hypertension-induced renal disease.

    PubMed

    Flamant, Martin; Placier, Sandrine; Rodenas, Anita; Curat, Cyrile Anne; Vogel, Wolfgang F; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2006-12-01

    A frequent complication of hypertension is the development of chronic renal failure. This pathology usually is initiated by inflammatory events and is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of collagens within the renal tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a nonintegrin collagen receptor that displays tyrosine-kinase activity, in the development of renal fibrosis. To this end, hypertension was induced with angiotensin in mice that were genetically deficient of DDR1 and in wild-type controls. After 4 or 6 wk of angiotensin II administration, wild-type mice developed hypertension that was associated with perivascular inflammation, glomerular sclerosis, and proteinuria. Systolic pressure increase was similar in the DDR1-deficient mice, but the histologic lesions of glomerular fibrosis and inflammation were significantly blunted and proteinuria was markedly prevented. Immunostaining for lymphocytes, macrophages, and collagens I and IV was prominent in the renal cortex of wild-type mice but substantially reduced in DDR1 null mice. In separate experiments, renal cortical slices of DDR1 null mice showed a blunted response of chemokines to LPS that was accompanied by a considerable protection against the LPS-induced mortality. These results indicate the importance of DDR1 in mediating inflammation and fibrosis. Use of DDR1 inhibitors could provide a completely novel therapeutic approach against diseases that have these combined pathologies.

  5. NOD/Shi-scid IL2rgamma(null) (NOG) mice more appropriate for humanized mouse models.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Kobayashi, K; Nakahata, T

    2008-01-01

    "Humanized mice," in which various kinds of human cells and tissues can be engrafted and retain the same functions as in humans, are extremely useful because human diseases can be studied directly. Using the newly combined immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rgamma(null) mice and Rag2(null) IL2rgamma(null) humanized mice, it has became possible to expand applications because various hematopoietic cells can be differentiated by human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the human immune system can be reconstituted to some degree. This work has attracted attention worldwide, but the development and use of immunodeficient mice in Japan are not very well known or understood. This review describes the history and characteristics of the NOD/Shi-scid IL2rgamma(null) (NOG) and BALB/cA-Rag2(null) IL2rgamma(null) mice that were established in Japan, including our unpublished data from researchers who are currently using these mice. In addition, we also describe the potential development of new immunodeficient mice that can be used as humanized mice in the future.

  6. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-jiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Methods: ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein liquid chromatography. Hepatic gene expression was detected using real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Leucine supplementation resulted in 57.6% reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in apoE null mice, accompanied by 41.2% decrease of serum LDL-C levels and 40.2% increase of serum HDL-C levels. The body weight, food intake and blood glucose level were not affected by leucine supplementation. Furthermore, leucine supplementation increased the expression of Abcg5 and Abcg8 (that were involved in hepatic cholesterol efflux) by 1.28- and 0.86-fold, respectively, and significantly increased their protein levels. Leucine supplementation also increased the expression of Srebf1, Scd1 and Pgc1b (that were involved in hepatic triglyceride metabolism) by 3.73-, 1.35- and 1.71-fold, respectively. Consequently, leucine supplementation resulted in 51.77% reduction of liver cholesterol content and 2.2-fold increase of liver triglyceride content. Additionally, leucine supplementation did not affect the serum levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12, but markedly decreased the serum level of MCP-1. Conclusion: Leucine supplementation effectively attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE null mice by improving the plasma lipid profile and reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:26687933

  7. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-jiang

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein liquid chromatography. Hepatic gene expression was detected using real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Leucine supplementation resulted in 57.6% reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in apoE null mice, accompanied by 41.2% decrease of serum LDL-C levels and 40.2% increase of serum HDL-C levels. The body weight, food intake and blood glucose level were not affected by leucine supplementation. Furthermore, leucine supplementation increased the expression of Abcg5 and Abcg8 (that were involved in hepatic cholesterol efflux) by 1.28- and 0.86-fold, respectively, and significantly increased their protein levels. Leucine supplementation also increased the expression of Srebf1, Scd1 and Pgc1b (that were involved in hepatic triglyceride metabolism) by 3.73-, 1.35- and 1.71-fold, respectively. Consequently, leucine supplementation resulted in 51.77% reduction of liver cholesterol content and 2.2-fold increase of liver triglyceride content. Additionally, leucine supplementation did not affect the serum levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12, but markedly decreased the serum level of MCP-1. Leucine supplementation effectively attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE null mice by improving the plasma lipid profile and reducing systemic inflammation.

  8. Compensatory changes in CYP expression in three different toxicology mouse models: CAR-null, Cyp3a-null, and Cyp2b9/10/13-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramiya; Mota, Linda C.; Litoff, Elizabeth J.; Rooney, John P.; Boswell, W. Tyler; Courter, Elliott; Henderson, Charles M.; Hernandez, Juan P.; Corton, J. Christopher; Moore, David D.

    2017-01-01

    Targeted mutant models are common in mechanistic toxicology experiments investigating the absorption, metabolism, distribution, or elimination (ADME) of chemicals from individuals. Key models include those for xenosensing transcription factors and cytochrome P450s (CYP). Here we investigated changes in transcript levels, protein expression, and steroid hydroxylation of several xenobiotic detoxifying CYPs in constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)-null and two CYP-null mouse models that have subfamily members regulated by CAR; the Cyp3a-null and a newly described Cyp2b9/10/13-null mouse model. Compensatory changes in CYP expression that occur in these models may also occur in polymorphic humans, or may complicate interpretation of ADME studies performed using these models. The loss of CAR causes significant changes in several CYPs probably due to loss of CAR-mediated constitutive regulation of these CYPs. Expression and activity changes include significant repression of Cyp2a and Cyp2b members with corresponding drops in 6α- and 16β-testosterone hydroxylase activity. Further, the ratio of 6α-/15α-hydroxylase activity, a biomarker of sexual dimorphism in the liver, indicates masculinization of female CAR-null mice, suggesting a role for CAR in the regulation of sexually dimorphic liver CYP profiles. The loss of Cyp3a causes fewer changes than CAR. Nevertheless, there are compensatory changes including gender-specific increases in Cyp2a and Cyp2b. Cyp2a and Cyp2b were down-regulated in CAR-null mice, suggesting activation of CAR and potentially PXR following loss of the Cyp3a members. However, the loss of Cyp2b causes few changes in hepatic CYP transcript levels and almost no significant compensatory changes in protein expression or activity with the possible exception of 6α-hydroxylase activity. This lack of a compensatory response in the Cyp2b9/10/13-null mice is probably due to low CYP2B hepatic expression, especially in male mice. Overall, compensatory and

  9. Galectin-3–null mice display defective neutrophil clearance during acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rachael D; Souza, Patricia R.; Flak, Magdalena B.; Thedchanamoorthy, Prasheetha; Norling, Lucy V.; Cooper, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Galectin-3 has been associated with a plethora of proinflammatory functions because of its ability, among others, to promote neutrophil activation and because of the reduction in neutrophil recruitment in models of infection in Gal-3-null mice. Conversely, it has also been linked to resolution of inflammation through its actions as an opsonin and its ability to promote efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. Using a self-resolving model of peritonitis, we have addressed the modulation and role of Gal-3 in acute inflammation. We have shown that Gal-3 expression is increased in neutrophils that travel to the inflamed peritoneum and that cellular localization of this lectin is modulated during the course of the inflammatory response. Furthermore, neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed peritoneum is increased in Gal-3–null mice during the course of the response, and that correlates with reduced numbers of monocytes/macrophages in the cavities of those mice, as well as reduced apoptosis and efferocytosis of Gal-3–null neutrophils. These data indicate a role for endogenous Gal-3 in neutrophil clearance during acute inflammation. PMID:27733579

  10. Otx1 null mutant mice show partial segregation of sensory epithelia comparable to lamprey ears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Signore, M.; Simeone, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the development of inner ear innervation in Otx1 null mutants, which lack a horizontal canal, between embryonic day 12 (E12) and postnatal day 7 (P7) with DiI and immunostaining for acetylated tubulin. Comparable to control animals, horizontal crista-like fibers were found to cross over the utricle in Otx1 null mice. In mutants these fibers extend toward an area near the endolymphatic duct, not to a horizontal crista. Most Otx1 null mutants had a small patch of sensory hair cells at this position. Measurement of the area of the utricular macula suggested it to be enlarged in Otx1 null mutants. We suggest that parts of the horizontal canal crista remain incorporated in the utricular sensory epithelium in Otx1 null mutants. Other parts of the horizontal crista appear to be variably segregated to form the isolated patch of hair cells identifiable by the unique fiber trajectory as representing the horizontal canal crista. Comparison with lamprey ear innervation reveals similarities in the pattern of innervation with the dorsal macula, a sensory patch of unknown function. SEM data confirm that all foramina are less constricted in Otx1 null mutants. We propose that Otx1 is not directly involved in sensory hair cell formation of the horizontal canal but affects the segregation of the horizontal canal crista from the utricle. It also affects constriction of the two main foramina in the ear, but not their initial formation. Otx1 is thus causally related to horizontal canal morphogenesis as well as morphogenesis of these foramina.

  11. Otx1 null mutant mice show partial segregation of sensory epithelia comparable to lamprey ears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Signore, M.; Simeone, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the development of inner ear innervation in Otx1 null mutants, which lack a horizontal canal, between embryonic day 12 (E12) and postnatal day 7 (P7) with DiI and immunostaining for acetylated tubulin. Comparable to control animals, horizontal crista-like fibers were found to cross over the utricle in Otx1 null mice. In mutants these fibers extend toward an area near the endolymphatic duct, not to a horizontal crista. Most Otx1 null mutants had a small patch of sensory hair cells at this position. Measurement of the area of the utricular macula suggested it to be enlarged in Otx1 null mutants. We suggest that parts of the horizontal canal crista remain incorporated in the utricular sensory epithelium in Otx1 null mutants. Other parts of the horizontal crista appear to be variably segregated to form the isolated patch of hair cells identifiable by the unique fiber trajectory as representing the horizontal canal crista. Comparison with lamprey ear innervation reveals similarities in the pattern of innervation with the dorsal macula, a sensory patch of unknown function. SEM data confirm that all foramina are less constricted in Otx1 null mutants. We propose that Otx1 is not directly involved in sensory hair cell formation of the horizontal canal but affects the segregation of the horizontal canal crista from the utricle. It also affects constriction of the two main foramina in the ear, but not their initial formation. Otx1 is thus causally related to horizontal canal morphogenesis as well as morphogenesis of these foramina.

  12. Nutritional Intervention Restores Muscle but Not Kidney Phenotypes in Adult Calcineurin Aα Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Kirsten; Reddy, Ramesh N.; Price, S. Russ; Williams, Clintoria R.; Gooch, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking the α isoform of the catalytic subunit of calcineurin (CnAα) were first reported in 1996 and have been an important model to understand the role of calcineurin in the brain, immune system, bones, muscle, and kidney. Research using the mice has been limited, however, by failure to thrive and early lethality of most null pups. Work in our laboratory led to the rescue of CnAα−/− mice by supplemental feeding to compensate for a defect in salivary enzyme secretion. The data revealed that, without intervention, knockout mice suffer from severe caloric restriction. Since nutritional deprivation is known to significantly alter development, it is imperative that previous conclusions based on CnAα−/− mice are revisited to determine which aspects of the phenotype were attributable to caloric restriction versus a direct role for CnAα. In this study, we find that defects in renal development and function persist in adult CnAα−/− mice including a significant decrease in glomerular filtration rate and an increase in blood urea nitrogen levels. These data indicate that impaired renal development we previously reported was not due to caloric restriction but rather a specific role for CnAα in renal development and function. In contrast, we find that rather than being hypoglycemic, rescued mice are mildly hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Examination of muscle fiber types shows that previously reported reductions in type I muscle fibers are no longer evident in rescued null mice. Rather, loss of CnAα likely alters insulin response due to a reduction in insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS2) expression and signaling in muscle. This study illustrates the importance of re-examining the phenotypes of CnAα−/− mice and the advances that are now possible with the use of adult, rescued knockout animals. PMID:23638102

  13. Connexin26 hemichannels with a mutation that causes KID syndrome in humans lack sensitivity to CO2

    PubMed Central

    Meigh, Louise; Hussain, Naveed; Mulkey, Daniel K; Dale, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in connexin26 (Cx26) underlie a range of serious human pathologies. Previously we have shown that Cx26 hemichannels are directly opened by CO2 (Meigh et al., 2013). However the effects of human disease-causing mutations on the CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 are entirely unknown. Here, we report the first connection between the CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 and human pathology, by demonstrating that Cx26 hemichannels with the mutation A88V, linked to Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome, are both CO2 insensitive and associated with disordered breathing in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04249.001 PMID:25422938

  14. Gap-junctional channel and hemichannel activity of two recently identified connexin 26 mutants associated with deafness.

    PubMed

    Dalamon, Viviana; Fiori, Mariana C; Figueroa, Vania A; Oliva, Carolina A; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Gonzalez, Wendy; Canan, Jonathan; Elgoyhen, Ana B; Altenberg, Guillermo A; Retamal, Mauricio A

    2016-05-01

    Gap-junction channels (GJCs) are formed by head-to-head association of two hemichannels (HCs, connexin hexamers). HCs and GJCs are permeable to ions and hydrophilic molecules of up to Mr ~1 kDa. Hearing impairment of genetic origin is common, and mutations of connexin 26 (Cx26) are its major cause. We recently identified two novel Cx26 mutations in hearing-impaired subjects, L10P and G109V. L10P forms functional GJCs with slightly altered voltage dependence and HCs with decrease ATP/cationic dye selectivity. G109V does not form functional GJCs, but forms functional HCs with enhanced extracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity and subtle alterations in voltage dependence and ATP/cationic dye selectivity. Deafness associated with G109V could result from decreased GJCs activity, whereas deafness associated to L10P may have a more complex mechanism that involves changes in HC permeability.

  15. Mutations of GJB2 encoding connexin 26 contribute to non-syndromic moderate and severe hearing loss in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Salman, Midhat; Bashir, Rasheeda; Imtiaz, Ayesha; Maqsood, Azra; Mujtaba, Ghulam; Iqbal, Muddassar; Naz, Sadaf

    2015-08-01

    Mutations of GJB2 which encode connexin 26, contribute to 6-7 % of profound deafness in Pakistan. We investigated the involvement of GJB2 mutations in a cohort of 84 pedigrees and 86 sporadic individuals with moderate or severe hearing loss. Individuals in eight consanguineous families and four sporadic cases (9.52 and 4.65 %, respectively) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for p.W24X or p.W77X mutations in GJB2. These two variants are also among the most common mutations known to cause profound deafness in South Asia. The association of identical mutations with both profound and less severe phenotype of hearing loss suggests that alleles of other genes modify the phenotype due to these GJB2 nonsense mutations. Our study demonstrates that GJB2 mutations are an important contributor to aetiology of moderate to severe hearing loss in Pakistan.

  16. Stem cell expansion during carcinogenesis in stem cell-depleted conditional telomeric repeat factor 2 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, B; Ho, H-Y; Wu, J; Crowe, D L

    2013-10-24

    To examine the role of telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) in epithelial tumorigenesis, we characterized conditional loss of TRF2 expression in the basal layer of mouse epidermis. These mice exhibit some characteristics of dyskeratosis congenita, a human stem cell depletion syndrome caused by telomere dysfunction. The epidermis in conditional TRF2 null mice exhibited DNA damage response and apoptosis, which correlated with stem cell depletion. The stem cell population in conditional TRF2 null epidermis exhibited shorter telomeres than those in control mice. Squamous cell carcinomas induced in conditional TRF2 null mice developed with increased latency and slower growth due to reduced numbers of proliferating cells as the result of increased apoptosis. TRF2 null epidermal stem cells were found in both primary and metastatic tumors. Despite the low-grade phenotype of the conditional TRF2 null primary tumors, the number of metastatic lesions was similar to control cancers. Basal cells from TRF2 null tumors demonstrated extreme telomere shortening and dramatically increased numbers of telomeric signals by fluorescence in situ hybridization due to increased genomic instability and aneuploidy in these cancers. DNA damage response signals were detected at telomeres in TRF2 null tumor cells from these mice. The increased genomic instability in these tumors correlated with eightfold expansion of the transformed stem cell population compared with that in control cancers. We concluded that genomic instability resulting from loss of TRF2 expression provides biological advantages to the cancer stem cell population.

  17. Altered somatosensory barrel cortex refinement in the developing brain of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Moroto, M; Nishimura, A; Morimoto, M; Isoda, K; Morita, T; Yoshida, M; Morioka, S; Tozawa, T; Hasegawa, T; Chiyonobu, T; Yoshimoto, K; Hosoi, H

    2013-11-06

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. In previous studies, monoaminergic dysfunctions have been detected in patients with RTT and in a murine model of RTT, the Mecp2-null mouse. Therefore, the pathogenesis of RTT is thought to involve impairments in the monoaminergic systems. However, there have been limited data showing that the impairment of monoamines leads to early symptoms during development. We used histochemistry to study the somatosensory barrel cortex in the B6.129P2(C)-Mecp2(tm1.1Bird) mouse model of RTT. The barrel cortex is widely used to investigate neuronal development and its regulation by various neurotransmitters including 5-HT. 5-HT levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC/EC), and serotonin transporter (SERT) and 5-HT1B receptor mRNAs were measured in the somatosensory cortex, thalamus and striatum on postnatal days (P) 10, P20 and P40. Mecp2-null mice (Mecp2-/y) had significantly smaller barrel fields than age-matched wild-type controls (Mecp2+/y) on P10 and P40, but the topographic map was accurately formed. Levels of 5-HT, and SERT and 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression in the somatosensory cortex did not differ significantly between the Mecp2-null and wild-type mice on P10. However, thalamic 5-HT was reduced in Mecp2-null mice. Our data indicate that a lack of MeCP2 may disturb the refinement of the barrel cortex in the early postnatal period. Our findings suggest that a decrease in thalamic 5-HT might be involved in this phenomenon.

  18. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, airway innervation, and smooth muscle are altered in Cftr null mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Luk, Catherine; Kent, Geraldine; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2006-09-01

    The amine- and peptide-producing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lung as solitary cells and innervated clusters, neuroepithelial bodies (NEB), which function as airway O2 sensors. These cells express Cftr and hence could play a role in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We performed confocal microscopy and morphometric analysis on lung sections from Cftr-/- (null), Cftr+/+, and Cftr+/- (control) mice at developmental stages E20, P5, P9, and P30 to determine the distribution, frequency, and innervation of PNEC/NEB, innervation and cell mass of airway smooth muscle, and neuromuscular junctions using synaptic vesicle protein 2, smooth muscle actin, and synaptophysin markers, respectively. The mean number of PNEC/NEB in Cftr-/- mice was significantly reduced compared with control mice at E20, whereas comparable or increased numbers were observed postnatally. NEB cells in Cftr null mice showed a significant reduction in intracorpuscular nerve endings compared with control mice, which is consistent with an intrinsic abnormality of the PNEC system. The airways of Cftr-/- mice showed reduced density (approximately 20-30%) of smooth muscle innervation, decreased mean airway smooth muscle mass (approximately 35%), and reduced density (approximately 20%) of nerve endings compared with control mice. We conclude that the airways of Cftr-/- mice exhibit heretofore unappreciated structural alterations affecting cellular and neural components of the PNEC system and airway smooth muscle and its innervation resulting in blunted O2 sensing and reduced airway tonus. Cftr could play a role in the development of the PNEC system, lung innervation, and airway smooth muscle.

  19. Modafinil more effectively induces wakefulness in orexin-null mice than in wild-type littermates.

    PubMed

    Willie, J T; Renthal, W; Chemelli, R M; Miller, M S; Scammell, T E; Yanagisawa, M; Sinton, C M

    2005-01-01

    Narcolepsy-cataplexy, a disorder of excessive sleepiness and abnormalities of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, results from deficiency of the hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides. Modafinil, an atypical wakefulness-promoting agent with an unknown mechanism of action, is used to treat hypersomnolence in these patients. Fos protein immunohistochemistry has previously demonstrated that orexin neurons are activated after modafinil administration, and it has been hypothesized that the wakefulness-promoting properties of modafinil might therefore be mediated by the neuropeptide. Here we tested this hypothesis by immunohistochemical, electroencephalographic, and behavioral methods using modafinil at doses of 0, 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg i.p. in orexin-/- mice and their wild-type littermates. We found that modafinil produced similar patterns of neuronal activation, as indicated by Fos immunohistochemistry, in both genotypes. Surprisingly, modafinil more effectively increased wakefulness time in orexin-/- mice than in the wild-type mice. This may reflect compensatory facilitation of components of central arousal in the absence of orexin in the null mice. In contrast, the compound did not suppress direct transitions from wakefulness to REM sleep, a sign of narcolepsy-cataplexy in mice. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram in awake orexin-/- mice under baseline conditions revealed reduced power in the theta; band frequencies (8-9 Hz), an index of alertness or attention during wakefulness in the rodent. Modafinil administration only partly compensated for this attention deficit in the orexin null mice. We conclude that the presence of orexin is not required for the wakefulness-prolonging action of modafinil, but orexin may mediate some of the alerting effects of the compound.

  20. Enhanced endotoxin sensitivity in fps/fes-null mice with minimal defects in hematopoietic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zirngibl, Ralph A; Senis, Yotis; Greer, Peter A

    2002-04-01

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase implicated in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling and thought to be essential for the survival and terminal differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Fps/Fes-null mice were healthy and fertile, displayed slightly reduced numbers of bone marrow myeloid progenitors and circulating mature myeloid cells, and were more sensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These phenotypes were rescued using a fps/fes transgene. This confirmed that Fps/Fes is involved in, but not required for, myelopoiesis and that it plays a role in regulating the innate immune response. Bone marrow-derived Fps/Fes-null macrophages showed no defects in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-, interleukin 6 (IL-6)-, or IL-3-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and Stat5A or LPS-induced degradation of I kappa B or activation of p38, Jnk, Erk, or Akt.

  1. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F. Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  2. Chronic Toxoplasma gondii in Nurr1-Null Heterozygous Mice Exacerbates Elevated Open Field Activity

    PubMed Central

    Eells, Jeffrey B.; Varela-Stokes, Andrea; Guo-Ross, Shirley X.; Kummari, Evangel; Smith, Holly M.; Cox, Erin; Lindsay, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection with Toxoplasma gondii is common in humans (approximately 30% of the global population) and is a significant risk factor for schizophrenia. Since prevalence of T. gondii infection is far greater than prevalence of schizophrenia (0.5-1%), genetic risk factors are likely also necessary to contribute to schizophrenia. To test this concept in an animal model, Nurr1-null heterozygous (+/-) mice and wild-type (+/+) mice were evaluate using an emergence test, activity in an open field and with a novel object, response to bobcat urine and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI) prior to and 6 weeks after infection with T. gondii. In the emergence test, T. gondii infection significantly decreased the amount of time spent in the cylinder. Toxoplasma gondii infection significantly elevated open field activity in both +/+ and +/- mice but this increase was significantly exacerbated in +/- mice. T. gondii infection reduced PPI in male +/- mice but this was not statistically significant. Aversion to bobcat urine was abolished by T. gondii infection in +/+ mice. In female +/- mice, aversion to bobcat urine remained after T. gondii infection while the male +/- mice showed no aversion to bobcat urine. Antibody titers of infected mice were a critical variable associated with changes in open field activity, such that an inverted U shaped relationship existed between antibody titers and the percent change in open field activity with a significant increase in activity at low and medium antibody titers but no effect at high antibody titers. These data demonstrate that the Nurr1 +/- genotype predisposes mice to T. gondii-induced alterations in behaviors that involve dopamine neurotransmission and are associated with symptoms of schizophrenia. We propose that these alterations in murine behavior were due to further exacerbation of the altered dopamine neurotransmission in Nurr1 +/- mice. PMID:25855987

  3. Systemic Analysis of Atg5-Null Mice Rescued from Neonatal Lethality by Transgenic ATG5 Expression in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kuma, Akiko; Akashi, Takumi; Hara, Taichi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurikawa, Yoshitaka; Itakura, Eisuke; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Shitara, Hiroshi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizushima, Noboru

    2016-10-10

    Autophagy is a cytoplasmic degradation system that is important for starvation adaptation and cellular quality control. Previously, we reported that Atg5-null mice are neonatal lethal; however, the exact cause of their death remains unknown. Here, we show that restoration of ATG5 in the brain is sufficient to rescue Atg5-null mice from neonatal lethality. This suggests that neuronal dysfunction, including suckling failure, is the primary cause of the death of Atg5-null neonates, which would further be accelerated by nutrient insufficiency due to a systemic failure in autophagy. The rescued Atg5-null mouse model, as a resource, allows us to investigate the physiological roles of autophagy in the whole body after the neonatal period. These rescued mice demonstrate previously unappreciated abnormalities such as hypogonadism and iron-deficiency anemia. These observations provide new insights into the physiological roles of the autophagy factor ATG5.

  4. Impaired Thermogenesis and a Molecular Signature for Brown Adipose Tissue in Id2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Mathew, Deepa; Duffield, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Id2 null mice have sex-specific elevated glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Here we further explored the role of Id2 in the regulation of core body temperature over the circadian cycle and the impact of Id2 deficiency on genes involved in insulin signaling and adipogenesis in BAT. We discovered a reduced core body temperature in Id2−/− mice. Moreover, in Id2−/− BAT, 30 genes including Irs1, PPARs, and PGC-1s were identified as differentially expressed in a sex-specific pattern. These data provide valuable insights into the impact of Id2 deficiency on energy homeostasis of mice in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27144179

  5. Joint dysfunction and functional decline in middle age myostatin null mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen; Miller, Andrew D; Pencina, Karol; Wong, Siu; Lee, Amanda; Yee, Michael; Toraldo, Gianluca; Jasuja, Ravi; Bhasin, Shalender

    2016-02-01

    Since its discovery as a potent inhibitor for muscle development, myostatin has been actively pursued as a drug target for age- and disease-related muscle loss. However, potential adverse effects of long-term myostatin deficiency have not been thoroughly investigated. We report herein that male myostatin null mice (mstn(-/-)), in spite of their greater muscle mass compared to wild-type (wt) mice, displayed more significant functional decline from young (3-6months) to middle age (12-15months) than age-matched wt mice, measured as gripping strength and treadmill endurance. Mstn(-/-) mice displayed markedly restricted ankle mobility and degenerative changes of the ankle joints, including disorganization of bone, tendon and peri-articular connective tissue, as well as synovial thickening with inflammatory cell infiltration. Messenger RNA expression of several pro-osteogenic genes was higher in the Achilles tendon-bone insertion in mstn(-/-) mice than wt mice, even at the neonatal age. At middle age, higher plasma concentrations of growth factors characteristic of excessive bone remodeling were found in mstn(-/-) mice than wt controls. These data collectively indicate that myostatin may play an important role in maintaining ankle and wrist joint health, possibly through negative regulation of the pro-osteogenic WNT/BMP pathway.

  6. mPGES-1 null mice are resistant to bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is an inducible enzyme that acts downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) to specifically catalyze the conversion of prostaglandin (PG) H2 to PGE2. mPGES-1 plays a key role in inflammation, pain and arthritis; however, the role of mPGES-1 in fibrogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we examine the role of mPGES-1 in a mouse model of skin scleroderma using mice deficient in mPGES-1. Methods Wild type (WT) and mPGES-1 null mice were subjected to the bleomycin model of cutaneous skin scleroderma. mPGES-1 expressions in scleroderma fibroblasts and in fibroblasts derived from bleomycin-exposed mice were assessed by Western blot analysis. Degree of fibrosis, dermal thickness, inflammation, collagen content and the number of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells were determined by histological analyses. The quantity of the collagen-specific amino acid hydroxyproline was also measured. Results Compared to normal skin fibroblasts, mPGES-1 protein expression was elevated in systemic sclerosis (SSc) fibroblasts and in bleomycin-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, mPGES-1-null mice were resistant to bleomycin-induced inflammation, cutaneous thickening, collagen production and myofibroblast formation. Conclusions mPGES-1 expression is required for bleomycin-induced skin fibrogenesis. Inhibition of mPGES-1 may be a viable method to alleviate the development of cutaneous sclerosis and is a potential therapeutic target to control the onset of fibrogenesis. PMID:21266028

  7. Increased angiogenic response in aortic explants of collagen XVIII/endostatin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2004-08-01

    Endostatin, a proteolytic fragment of basement membrane-associated collagen XVIII, has been shown to be a potent angiogenesis inhibitor both in vivo and in vitro when given at high concentrations. The precise molecular mechanisms by which it functions and whether or not it plays a role in physiological regulation of angiogenesis are not clear. In mice with targeted null alleles of Col18a1, there appears to be no major abnormality in vascular patterns or capillary density in most organs. Furthermore, the growth of experimental tumors is not increased. However, a detailed analysis of induced angiogenesis in these mice has not been performed. Therefore, we compared the angiogenic responses induced by in vitro culture of aortic explants from collagen XVIII/endostatin-null mice (ko) to wild-type (wt) littermates. We found a twofold increase in microvessel outgrowth in explants from ko mice, relative to wt explants. This increased angiogenesis was reduced to the wt level by the addition of low levels (0.1 microg/ml) of recombinant mouse or human endostatin during the culture period. To address cellular/molecular mechanisms underlying this difference in angiogenic response between ko and wt mice, we isolated endothelial cells from both strains and compared their biological behavior. Proliferation assays showed no difference between the two types of endothelial cells. In contrast, adhesion assays showed a striking difference in their ability to adhere to fibronectin suggesting that collagen XVIII/endostatin may regulate interactions between endothelial cells and underlying basement membrane-associated components, including fibronectin, such that in the absence of collagen XVIII/endostatin, endothelial cells are more adhesive to fibronectin. In the aortic explant assay, characterized by dynamic processes of microvessel elongation and regression, this may result in stabilization of newly formed vessels, reduced regression, and a net increase in microvessel outgrowth in

  8. Epithelial defect in prostates of Stat5a-null mice.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, M T; Ahonen, T J; Yamashita, H; Chandrashekar, V; Bartke, A; Grimley, P M; Robinson, G W; Hennighausen, L; Rui, H

    2000-07-01

    The transcription factor Stat5a critically mediates prolactin (PRL)-induced mammary gland development and lactogenesis. PRL also stimulates growth and differentiation of prostate tissue. Specifically, hyperprolactinemia gives rise to prostate hyperplasia, and prostate size is reduced in PRL-deficient mice. We therefore investigated the importance of Stat5a for prostate development and function by examining Stat5a-null mice. The absence of Stat5a in mice was associated with a distinct prostate morphology characterized by an increased prevalence of local disorganization within acinar epithelium of ventral prostates. Affected acini were typically filled with desquamated, granular epithelial cells that had become embedded in dense, coagulated secretory material. These features were reminiscent of acinar cyst formation and degeneration frequently observed in human benign prostate hyperplasia, however, cystic changes in prostate acini of Stat5a-deficient mice were not associated with increased prostate size or morphologic hallmarks of epithelial hyperplasia. Instead, immunohistochemistry of the prostate-specific secretory marker, probasin, suggested that hypersecretory function of the epithelium could underlie local congestion and cyst formation in prostates of Stat5a-null mice. Serum testosterone and PRL levels were normal in Stat5a knockout mice, but prostate PRL receptor expression was reduced as determined by immunohistochemistry. Expression levels or activation states of other PRL signal transduction proteins, including Stat5b, Stat3, Stat1, ERK1, and ERK2 were not altered. The present study offers the first evidence for a direct role of Stat5a in the maintenance of normal tissue architecture and function of the mouse prostate.

  9. Reduced excitatory neurotransmission and mild autism-relevant phenotypes in adolescent Shank3 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mu; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Wöhr, Markus; Roullet, Florence I; Katz, Adam M; Abrams, Danielle N; Kalikhman, David; Simon, Harrison; Woldeyohannes, Leuk; Zhang, James Y; Harris, Mark J; Saxena, Roheeni; Silverman, Jill L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2012-05-09

    Mutations in the synaptic scaffolding protein gene SHANK3 are strongly implicated in autism and Phelan-McDermid 22q13 deletion syndrome. The precise location of the mutation within the Shank3 gene is key to its phenotypic outcomes. Here, we report the physiological and behavioral consequences of null and heterozygous mutations in the ankyrin repeat domain in Shank3 mice. Both homozygous and heterozygous mice showed reduced glutamatergic transmission and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus with more severe deficits detected in the homozygous mice. Three independent cohorts were evaluated for magnitude and replicability of behavioral endophenotypes relevant to autism and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Mild social impairments were detected, primarily in juveniles during reciprocal interactions, while all genotypes displayed normal adult sociability on the three-chambered task. Impaired novel object recognition and rotarod performance were consistent across cohorts of null mutants. Repetitive self-grooming, reduced ultrasonic vocalizations, and deficits in reversal of water maze learning were detected only in some cohorts, emphasizing the importance of replication analyses. These results demonstrate the exquisite specificity of deletions in discrete domains within the Shank3 gene in determining severity of symptoms.

  10. Amphetamine-elicited striatal Fos expression is attenuated in neurotensin null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Jim; Dobner, Paul R; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2006-07-10

    Neurotensin (NT) has been suggested to interact with dopamine systems in different forebrain sites to exert both antipsychotic- and psychostimulant-like effects. We previously found that genetic or pharmacological manipulations that disrupt endogenous NT signaling attenuate antipsychotic drug-induced Fos expression in the dorsolateral and central striatum but not other striatal regions. To assess the role of NT in psychostimulant responses, we examined the ability of d-amphetamine (AMP) to induce Fos in wild-type and NT null mutant mice. AMP-elicited Fos expression was significantly attenuated in the medial striatum of NT null mutant mice, but was unaffected in other striatal territories. Similar results were obtained in rats and mice pretreated with the high affinity neurotensin receptor (NTR1) antagonist SR 48692. The effect of the NTR1 antagonist was particularly apparent in the striatal patch (striosome) compartment, as defined by mu-opioid receptor immunoreactivity. These data suggest that NT is required for the full activation by AMP of medial striatal neurons.

  11. Generation of mice with a conditional null Fraser syndrome 1 (Fras1) allele.

    PubMed

    Pitera, Jolanta E; Turmaine, Mark; Woolf, Adrian S; Scambler, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skin lesions and kidney and upper airway malformations. Fraser syndrome 1 (FRAS1) is an extracellular matrix protein, and FRAS1 homozygous mutations occur in some FS individuals. FRAS1 is expressed at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface in embryonic skin and kidney. blebbed mice have a null Fras1 mutation and phenocopy human FS. Like humans with FS, they exhibit a high fetal and neonatal mortality, precluding studies of FRAS1 functions in later life. We generated conditional Fras1 null allele mice. Cre-mediated generalized deletion of this allele generated embryonic skin blisters and renal agenesis characteristic of blebbed mice and human FS. Targeted deletion of Fras1 in kidney podocytes circumvented skin blistering, renal agenesis, and early death. FRAS1 expression was downregulated in maturing glomeruli which then became sclerotic. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that locally produced FRAS1 has roles in glomerular maturation and integrity. This conditional allele will facilitate study of possible role for FRAS1 in other tissues such as the skin.

  12. Initial characterization of mice null for Lphn3, a gene implicated in ADHD and addiction.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Deeann; Hill, Denise S; Mendez, Ian A; Abbott, Louise C; Finnell, Richard H; Wellman, Paul J; Setlow, Barry

    2012-06-29

    The LPHN3 gene has been associated with both attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and addiction, suggesting that it may play a role in the etiology of these disorders. Unfortunately, almost nothing is known about the normal functions of this gene, which has hampered understanding of its potential pathogenic role. To begin to characterize such normal functions, we utilized a gene-trap embryonic stem cell line to generate mice mutant for the Lphn3 gene. We evaluated differential gene expression in whole mouse brain between mutant and wild type male littermates at postnatal day 0 using TaqMan gene expression assays. Most notably, we found changes in dopamine and serotonin receptors and transporters (Dat1, Drd4, 5Htt, 5Ht2a), changes in neurotransmitter metabolism genes (Th, Gad1), as well as changes in neural developmental genes (Nurr, Ncam). When mice were examined at 4-6 weeks of age, null mutants showed increased levels of dopamine and serotonin in the dorsal striatum. Finally, null mutant mice had a hyperactive phenotype in the open field test, independent of sex, and were more sensitive to the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. Considered together, these results suggest that Lphn3 plays a role in development and/or regulation of monoamine signaling. Given the central role for monoamines in ADHD and addiction, it seems likely that the influence of LPHN3 genotype on these disorders is mediated through alterations in monoamine signaling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Altered ion-responsive gene expression in Mmp20 null mice.

    PubMed

    Tye, C E; Sharma, R; Smith, C E; Bartlett, J D

    2010-12-01

    During enamel maturation, hydroxyapatite crystallites expand in volume, releasing protons that acidify the developing enamel. This acidity is neutralized by the buffering activity of carbonic anhydrases and ion transporters. Less hydroxyapatite forms in matrix metalloproteinase-20 null (Mmp20(-/-)) mouse incisors, because enamel thickness is reduced by approximately 50%. We therefore asked if ion regulation was altered in Mmp20(-/-) mouse enamel. Staining of wild-type and Mmp20(-/-) incisors with pH indicators demonstrated that wild-type mice had pronounced changes in enamel pH as development progressed. These pH changes were greatly attenuated in Mmp20(-/-) mice. Expression of 4 ion-regulatory genes (Atp2b4, Slc4a2, Car6, Cftr) was significantly decreased in enamel organs from Mmp20(-/-) mice. Notably, expression of secreted carbonic anhydrase (Car6) was reduced to almost undetectable levels in the null enamel organ. In contrast, Odam and Klk4 expression was unaffected. We concluded that a feedback mechanism regulates ion-responsive gene expression during enamel development.

  14. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Uncovering Novel Reproductive Defects in Neurokinin B Receptor Null Mice: Closing the Gap Between Mice and Men

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jasmine J.; Caligioni, Claudia S.; Chan, Yee-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Patients bearing mutations in TAC3 and TACR3 (which encode neurokinin B and its receptor, respectively) have sexual infantilism and infertility due to GnRH deficiency. In contrast, Tacr3−/− mice have previously been reported to be fertile. Because of this apparent phenotypic discordance between mice and men bearing disabling mutations in Tacr3/TACR3, Tacr3 null mice were phenotyped with close attention to pubertal development, estrous cyclicity, and fertility. Tacr3−/− mice demonstrated normal timing of preputial separation and day of first estrus, markers of sexual maturation. However, at postnatal d 60, Tacr3−/− males had significantly smaller testes and lower FSH levels than their wild-type littermates. Tacr3−/− females had lower uterine weights and abnormal estrous cyclicity. Approximately half of Tacr3−/− females had no detectable corpora lutea on ovarian histology at postnatal d 60. Despite this apparent ovulatory defect, all Tacr3−/− females achieved fertility when mated. However, Tacr3−/− females were subfertile, having both reduced numbers of litters and pups per litter. The subfertility of these animals was not due to a primary ovarian defect, because they demonstrated a robust response to exogenous gonadotropins. Thus, although capable of fertility, Tacr3-deficient mice have central reproductive defects. The remarkable ability of acyclic female Tacr3 null mice to achieve fertility is reminiscent of the reversal of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism seen in a high proportion of human patients bearing mutations in TACR3. Tacr3 mice are a useful model to examine the mechanisms by which neurokinin B signaling modulates GnRH release. PMID:22253416

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21-Null Mice Do Not Exhibit an Impaired Response to Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Antonellis, Patrick Joseph; Hayes, Meghan Patricia; Adams, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a pleotropic metabolic regulator, expression of which is elevated during fasting. To this end, the precise role played by FGF21 in the biology of fasting has been the subject of several recent studies, which have demonstrated contributions to the regulation of both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In the present study, we compared wild-type (WT) and FGF21-null (FGF21KO) mice, demonstrating that, despite the significant induction of FGF21 during fasting in the WT animals, our strain of FGF21-null mice exhibits only limited impairments in their adaptation to nutrient deprivation. Specifically, fasted FGF21KO mice display a mild attenuation of gluconeogenic transcriptional induction in the liver accompanied by partially blunted glucose production in response to a pyruvate challenge. Furthermore, FGF21KO mice displayed only minor impairments in lipid metabolism in the fasted state, limited to accumulation of hepatic triglycerides and a reduction in expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. To address the possibility of compensation to germline deletion of FGF21, we further interrogated the role of endogenous FGF21 via acute pharmacological blockade of FGF21 signaling. At the transcriptional level, we show that FGF21 signaling is required for full induction of gluconeogenic and oxidative genes in the liver. However, corroborating our findings in FGF21KO mice, pharmacological blockade of the FGF21 axis did not profoundly disrupt the physiological response to fasting. Taken as a whole, these data demonstrate that, while FGF21 is partially required for appropriate gene expression during the fed to fasted transition, its absence does not significantly impact the downstream physiology of the fasted state. PMID:27445980

  17. The Lack of Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) Dictates the Course of Wound Healing in Double-TSP1/TSP2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Agah, Azin; Kyriakides, Themis R.; Lawler, Jack; Bornstein, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) 1 and 2, share the same overall structure and interact with a number of the same cell-surface receptors. In an attempt to elucidate their biological roles more clearly, we generated double-TSP1/TSP2-null animals and compared their phenotype to those of TSP1- and TSP2-null mice. Double-null mice exhibited an apparent phenotype that primarily represented the sum of the abnormalities observed in the single-null mice. However, surprisingly, the wound-healing response in double-null mice resembled that in TSP1-null animals and differed from that in TSP2-nulls. Thus, although the excisional wounds of TSP2-null mice are characterized by increased neovascularization and heal at an accelerated rate, TSP1-null and double-null animals demonstrated delayed healing, as indicated by the prolonged persistence of inflammation and delayed scab loss. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that, similar to TSP1-null mice, the granulation tissue of double-null mice was not excessively vascularized. Furthermore as in TSP1-nulls, decreases in macrophage recruitment and in the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 indicated that the inflammatory phase of the wound-healing response was impaired in double-null mice. Our data demonstrate that the consequences of a lack of TSP1 predominate in the response of double-null mice, and dictate the course of wound healing. These findings reflect distinct temporal and spatial expressions of TSP1 and TSP2 in the healing wound. PMID:12213711

  18. Altered Arachidonate Distribution in Macrophages from Caveolin-1 Null Mice Leading to Reduced Eicosanoid Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Astudillo, Alma M.; Pérez-Chacón, Gema; Meana, Clara; Balgoma, David; Pol, Albert; del Pozo, Miguel A.; Balboa, María A.; Balsinde, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have studied the effect of caveolin-1 deficiency on the mechanisms that regulate free arachidonic acid (AA) availability. The results presented here demonstrate that macrophages from caveolin-1-deficient mice exhibit elevated fatty acid incorporation and remodeling and a constitutively increased CoA-independent transacylase activity. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomic analyses reveal stable alterations in the profile of AA distribution among phospholipids, manifested by reduced levels of AA in choline glycerophospholipids but elevated levels in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol. Furthermore, macrophages from caveolin-1 null mice show decreased AA mobilization and prostaglandin E2 and LTB4 production upon cell stimulation. Collectively, these results provide insight into the role of caveolin-1 in AA homeostasis and suggest an important role for this protein in the eicosanoid biosynthetic response. PMID:21852231

  19. Behavioral Disturbances in Estrogen-Related Receptor alpha-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z.; Anderson, Rachel M.; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E.; Yin, Terry C.; Radley, Jason J.; Pieper, Andrew A.; Lutter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains. PMID:25865889

  20. Slow ventricular conduction in mice heterozygous for a connexin43 null mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, P A; Schuessler, R B; Davis, L M; Beyer, E C; Johnson, C M; Yamada, K A; Saffitz, J E

    1997-01-01

    To characterize the role of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) in ventricular conduction, we studied hearts of mice with targeted deletion of the Cx43 gene. Mice homozygous for the Cx43 null mutation (Cx43 -/-) die shortly after birth. Attempts to record electrical activity in neonatal Cx43 -/- hearts (n = 5) were unsuccessful. Ventricular epicardial conduction of paced beats, however, was 30% slower in heterozygous (Cx43 -/+) neonatal hearts (0.14+/-0.04 m/s, n = 27) than in wild-type (Cx43 +/+) hearts (0.20+/-0.07 m/s, n = 32; P < 0.001). This phenotype was even more severe in adult mice; ventricular epicardial conduction was 44% slower in 6-9 mo-old Cx43 -/+ hearts (0.18+/-0.03 m/s, n = 5) than in wild-type hearts (0.32+/-0.07 m/s, n = 7, P < 0.001). Electrocardiograms revealed significant prolongation of the QRS complex in adult Cx43 -/+ mice (13.4+/-1.8 ms, n = 13) compared with Cx43 +/+ mice (11.5+/-1.4 ms, n = 12, P < 0.01). Whole-cell recordings of action potential parameters in cultured disaggregated neonatal ventricular myocytes from Cx43 -/+ and +/+ hearts showed no differences. Thus, reduction in the abundance of a major cardiac gap junction protein through targeted deletion of a Cx43 allele directly leads to slowed ventricular conduction. PMID:9109444

  1. Evidence of Aortopathy in Mice with Haploinsufficiency of Notch1 in Nos3-Null Background

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Sara N.; Bosse, Kevin M.; Nadorlik, Holly A.; Lilly, Brenda; Garg, Vidu

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. While the exact etiology is unknown, genetic factors play an important role. Mutations in NOTCH1 have been linked to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and aortopathy in humans. The aim of this study was to determine if haploinsufficiency of Notch1 contributes to aortopathy using Notch1+/−; Nos3−/− mice. Echocardiographic analysis of Notch1+/−; Nos3−/− mice reveals effacement of the sinotubular junction and a trend toward dilation of the aortic sinus. Furthermore, examination of the proximal aorta of Notch1+/−; Nos3−/− mice reveals elastic fiber degradation, a trend toward increased matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression, and increased smooth muscle cell apoptosis, features characteristic of aneurysmal disease. Although at a lower penetrance, we also found features consistent with aortopathic changes in Notch1 heterozygote mice and in Nos3-null mice. Our findings implicate a novel role for Notch1 in aortopathy of the proximal aorta. PMID:25914885

  2. Adrenocorticotropic hormone protects learning and memory function in epileptic Kcna1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Scantlebury, Morris H; Chun, Kyoung-Chul; Ma, Shun-Chieh; Rho, Jong M; Kim, Do Young

    2017-04-03

    ACTH, a member of the melanocortin family of peptides, is often used in the treatment of the developmental epileptic encephalopathy spectrum disorders including, Ohtahara, West, Lennox Gastaut and Landau-Kleffner Syndromes and electrical status epilepticus of sleep. In these disorders, although ACTH is often successful in controlling the seizures and/or inter-ictal EEG abnormalities, it is unknown whether ACTH possesses other beneficial effects independent of seizure control. We tested whether ACTH can ameliorate the intrinsic impairment of hippocampal-based learning and memory in epileptic Kcna1-null (KO) mice. We found that ACTH - administered in the form of Acthar Gel given i.p. four times daily at a dose of 4 IU/kg (16 IU/kg/day) for 7days - prevented impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) evoked with high-frequency stimulation in CA1 hippocampus and also restored spatial learning and memory on the Barnes maze test. However, with this treatment regimen, ACTH did not exert a significant effect on the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Together, our findings indicate that ACTH can ameliorate memory impairment in epileptic Kcna1-null mice separate from seizure control, and suggest that this widely used peptide may exert direct nootropic effects in the epileptic brain.

  3. Dietary carnosine prevents early atherosclerotic lesion formation in apolipoprotein E-null mice.

    PubMed

    Barski, Oleg A; Xie, Zhengzhi; Baba, Shahid P; Sithu, Srinivas D; Agarwal, Abhinav; Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Srivastava, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are associated with the accumulation of reactive aldehydes derived from oxidized lipids. Although inhibition of aldehyde metabolism has been shown to exacerbate atherosclerosis and enhance the accumulation of aldehyde-modified proteins in atherosclerotic plaques, no therapeutic interventions have been devised to prevent aldehyde accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions. We examined the efficacy of carnosine, a naturally occurring β-alanyl-histidine dipeptide, in preventing aldehyde toxicity and atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-null mice. In vitro, carnosine reacted rapidly with lipid peroxidation-derived unsaturated aldehydes. Gas chromatography mass-spectrometry analysis showed that carnosine inhibits the formation of free aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal and malonaldialdehyde in Cu(2+)-oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Preloading bone marrow-derived macrophages with cell-permeable carnosine analogs reduced 4-hydroxynonenal-induced apoptosis. Oral supplementation with octyl-D-carnosine decreased atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic valves of apolipoprotein E-null mice and attenuated the accumulation of protein-acrolein, protein-4-hydroxyhexenal, and protein-4-hydroxynonenal adducts in atherosclerotic lesions, whereas urinary excretion of aldehydes as carnosine conjugates was increased. The results of this study suggest that carnosine inhibits atherogenesis by facilitating aldehyde removal from atherosclerotic lesions. Endogenous levels of carnosine may be important determinants of atherosclerotic lesion formation, and treatment with carnosine or related peptides could be a useful therapy for the prevention or the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  4. Transcriptional Fingerprint of Hypomyelination in Zfp191null and Shiverer (Mbpshi) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aaker, Joshua D.; Elbaz, Benayahu; Wu, Yuwen; Looney, Timothy J.; Zhang, Li; Lahn, Bruce T.

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional program that controls oligodendrocyte maturation and central nervous system (CNS) myelination has not been fully characterized. In this study, we use high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze how the loss of a key transcription factor, zinc finger protein 191 (ZFP191), results in oligodendrocyte development abnormalities and CNS hypomyelination. Using a previously described mutant mouse that is deficient in ZFP191 protein expression (Zfp191null), we demonstrate that key transcripts are reduced in the whole brain as well as within oligodendrocyte lineage cells cultured in vitro. To determine whether the loss of myelin seen in Zfp191null mice contributes indirectly to these perturbations, we also examined the transcriptome of a well-characterized mouse model of hypomyelination, in which the myelin structural protein myelin basic protein (MBP) is deficient. Interestingly, Mbpshi (shiverer) mice had far fewer transcripts perturbed with the loss of myelin alone. This study demonstrates that the loss of ZFP191 disrupts expression of genes involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination, largely independent from the loss of myelin. Nevertheless, hypomyelination in both mouse mutants results in the perturbation of lipid synthesis pathways, suggesting that oligodendrocytes have a feedback system that allows them to regulate myelin lipid synthesis depending on their myelinating state. The data presented are of potential clinical relevance as the human orthologs of the Zfp191 and MBP genes reside on a region of Chromosome 18 that is deleted in childhood leukodystrophies. PMID:27683878

  5. Dietary Carnosine Prevents Early Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation in ApoE-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barski, Oleg A.; Xie, Zhengzhi; Baba, Shahid P.; Sithu, Srinivas D.; Agarwal, Abhinav; Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Srivastava, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerotic lesions are associated with the accumulation of reactive aldehydes derived from oxidized lipids. Although inhibition of aldehyde metabolism has been shown to exacerbate atherosclerosis and enhance the accumulation of aldehyde-modified proteins in atherosclerotic plaques, no therapeutic interventions have been devised to prevent aldehyde accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions. Approach and Results We examined the efficacy of carnosine, a naturally occurring β-alanyl-histidine dipeptide in preventing aldehyde toxicity and atherogenesis in apoE-null mice. In vitro, carnosine reacted rapidly with lipid peroxidation-derived unsaturated aldehydes. Gas chromatography mass-spectrometry analysis showed that carnosine inhibits the formation of free aldehydes - HNE and malonaldialdehyde in Cu2+-oxidized LDL. Preloading bone marrow-derived macrophages with cell-permeable carnosine analogs reduced HNE-induced apoptosis. Oral supplementation with octyl-D-carnosine decreased atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic valves of apoE-null mice and attenuated the accumulation of protein-acrolein, protein-HHE and protein-HNE adducts in atherosclerotic lesions, while urinary excretion of aldehydes as carnosine conjugates was increased. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that carnosine inhibits atherogenesis by facilitating aldehyde removal from atherosclerotic lesions. Endogenous levels of carnosine may be important determinants of atherosclerotic lesion formation and treatment with carnosine or related peptides could be a useful therapy for the prevention or the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:23559625

  6. Transcriptional Fingerprint of Hypomyelination in Zfp191null and Shiverer (Mbpshi) Mice.

    PubMed

    Aaker, Joshua D; Elbaz, Benayahu; Wu, Yuwen; Looney, Timothy J; Zhang, Li; Lahn, Bruce T; Popko, Brian

    2016-10-01

    The transcriptional program that controls oligodendrocyte maturation and central nervous system (CNS) myelination has not been fully characterized. In this study, we use high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze how the loss of a key transcription factor, zinc finger protein 191 (ZFP191), results in oligodendrocyte development abnormalities and CNS hypomyelination. Using a previously described mutant mouse that is deficient in ZFP191 protein expression (Zfp191(null)), we demonstrate that key transcripts are reduced in the whole brain as well as within oligodendrocyte lineage cells cultured in vitro To determine whether the loss of myelin seen in Zfp191(null) mice contributes indirectly to these perturbations, we also examined the transcriptome of a well-characterized mouse model of hypomyelination, in which the myelin structural protein myelin basic protein (MBP) is deficient. Interestingly, Mbp(shi) (shiverer) mice had far fewer transcripts perturbed with the loss of myelin alone. This study demonstrates that the loss of ZFP191 disrupts expression of genes involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination, largely independent from the loss of myelin. Nevertheless, hypomyelination in both mouse mutants results in the perturbation of lipid synthesis pathways, suggesting that oligodendrocytes have a feedback system that allows them to regulate myelin lipid synthesis depending on their myelinating state. The data presented are of potential clinical relevance as the human orthologs of the Zfp191 and MBP genes reside on a region of Chromosome 18 that is deleted in childhood leukodystrophies.

  7. Nucleus-targeted Dmp1 transgene fails to rescue dental defects in Dmp1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Ward, Leanne; Lu, Yong-Bo; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2014-09-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is essential to odontogenesis. Its mutations in human subjects lead to dental problems such as dental deformities, hypomineralization and periodontal impairment. Primarily, DMP1 is considered as an extracellular matrix protein that promotes hydroxyapatite formation and activates intracellular signaling pathway via interacting with αvβ3 integrin. Recent in vitro studies suggested that DMP1 might also act as a transcription factor. In this study, we examined whether full-length DMP1 could function as a transcription factor in the nucleus and regulate odontogenesis in vivo. We first demonstrated that a patient with the DMP1 M1V mutation, which presumably causes a loss of the secretory DMP1 but does not affect the nuclear translocation of DMP1, shows a typical rachitic tooth defect. Furthermore, we generated transgenic mice expressing (NLS)DMP1, in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) entry signal sequence of DMP1 was replaced by a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, under the control of a 3.6 kb rat type I collagen promoter plus a 1.6 kb intron 1. We then crossbred the (NLS)DMP1 transgenic mice with Dmp1 null mice to express the (NLS)DMP1 in Dmp1-deficient genetic background. Although immunohistochemistry demonstrated that (NLS)DMP1 was localized in the nuclei of the preodontoblasts and odontoblasts, the histological, morphological and biochemical analyses showed that it failed to rescue the dental and periodontal defects as well as the delayed tooth eruption in Dmp1 null mice. These data suggest that the full-length DMP1 plays no apparent role in the nucleus during odontogenesis.

  8. Nucleus-targeted Dmp1 transgene fails to rescue dental defects in Dmp1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Ward, Leanne; Lu, Yong-Bo; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is essential to odontogenesis. Its mutations in human subjects lead to dental problems such as dental deformities, hypomineralization and periodontal impairment. Primarily, DMP1 is considered as an extracellular matrix protein that promotes hydroxyapatite formation and activates intracellular signaling pathway via interacting with αvβ3 integrin. Recent in vitro studies suggested that DMP1 might also act as a transcription factor. In this study, we examined whether full-length DMP1 could function as a transcription factor in the nucleus and regulate odontogenesis in vivo. We first demonstrated that a patient with the DMP1 M1V mutation, which presumably causes a loss of the secretory DMP1 but does not affect the nuclear translocation of DMP1, shows a typical rachitic tooth defect. Furthermore, we generated transgenic mice expressing NLSDMP1, in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) entry signal sequence of DMP1 was replaced by a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, under the control of a 3.6 kb rat type I collagen promoter plus a 1.6 kb intron 1. We then crossbred the NLSDMP1 transgenic mice with Dmp1 null mice to express the NLSDMP1 in Dmp1-deficient genetic background. Although immunohistochemistry demonstrated that NLSDMP1 was localized in the nuclei of the preodontoblasts and odontoblasts, the histological, morphological and biochemical analyses showed that it failed to rescue the dental and periodontal defects as well as the delayed tooth eruption in Dmp1 null mice. These data suggest that the full-length DMP1 plays no apparent role in the nucleus during odontogenesis. PMID:25105818

  9. Autism phenotypes in ZnT3 null mice: Involvement of zinc dyshomeostasis, MMP-9 activation and BDNF upregulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Min Heui; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoon, Young Hee; Koh, Jae-Young

    2016-06-29

    To investigate the role of synaptic zinc in the ASD pathogenesis, we examined zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) null mice. At 4-5 weeks of age, male but not female ZnT3 null mice exhibited autistic-like behaviors. Cortical volume and neurite density were significantly greater in male ZnT3 null mice than in WT mice. In male ZnT3 null mice, consistent with enhanced neurotrophic stimuli, the level of BDNF as well as activity of MMP-9 was increased. Consistent with known roles for MMPs in BDNF upregulation, 2.5-week treatment with minocycline, an MMP inhibitor, significantly attenuated BDNF levels as well as megalencephaly and autistic-like behaviors. Although the ZnT3 null state removed synaptic zinc, it rather increased free zinc in the cytosol of brain cells, which appeared to increase MMP-9 activity and BDNF levels. The present results suggest that zinc dyshomeostasis during the critical period of brain development may be a possible contributing mechanism for ASD.

  10. Autism phenotypes in ZnT3 null mice: Involvement of zinc dyshomeostasis, MMP-9 activation and BDNF upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Min Heui; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoon, Young Hee; Koh, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of synaptic zinc in the ASD pathogenesis, we examined zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) null mice. At 4–5 weeks of age, male but not female ZnT3 null mice exhibited autistic-like behaviors. Cortical volume and neurite density were significantly greater in male ZnT3 null mice than in WT mice. In male ZnT3 null mice, consistent with enhanced neurotrophic stimuli, the level of BDNF as well as activity of MMP-9 was increased. Consistent with known roles for MMPs in BDNF upregulation, 2.5-week treatment with minocycline, an MMP inhibitor, significantly attenuated BDNF levels as well as megalencephaly and autistic-like behaviors. Although the ZnT3 null state removed synaptic zinc, it rather increased free zinc in the cytosol of brain cells, which appeared to increase MMP-9 activity and BDNF levels. The present results suggest that zinc dyshomeostasis during the critical period of brain development may be a possible contributing mechanism for ASD. PMID:27352957

  11. A novel compound heterozygous mutation (35delG, 363delC) in the Connexin 26 gene causes non-syndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Onsori, Habib; Rahmati, Mohammad; Fazli, Davood

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Connexin 26 (Cx26) gene are a common cause of hereditary hearing loss in different populations. In the present study, an Iranian patient with bilateral hearing loss underwent molecular analysis for the causative mutation. DNA studies were performed for the Cx26 gene by PCR and sequencing methods. We describe a novel compound heterozygous mutation (35delG, 363delC) in the Cx26 gene that is strongly associated with congenital non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL).

  12. A urine-concentrating defect in 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Louise C.; Livingstone, Dawn E.; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Jansen, Maurits A.; Dear, James W.; Mullins, John J.

    2012-01-01

    In aldosterone target tissues, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2) is coexpressed with mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and protects the receptor from activation by glucocorticoids. Null mutations in the encoding gene, HSD11B2, cause apparent mineralocorticoid excess, in which hypertension is thought to reflect volume expansion secondary to sodium retention. Hsd11b2−/− mice are indeed hypertensive, but impaired natriuretic capacity is associated with significant volume contraction, suggestive of a urine concentrating defect. Water turnover and the urine concentrating response to a 24-h water deprivation challenge were therefore assessed in Hsd11b2−/− mice and controls. Hsd11b2−/− mice have a severe and progressive polyuric/polydipsic phenotype. In younger mice (∼2 mo of age), polyuria was associated with decreased abundance of aqp2 and aqp3 mRNA. The expression of other genes involved in water transport (aqp4, slc14a2, and slc12a2) was not changed. The kidney was structurally normal, and the concentrating response to water deprivation was intact. In older Hsd11b2−/− mice (>6 mo), polyuria was associated with a severe atrophy of the renal medulla and downregulation of aqp2, aqp3, aqp4, slc14a2, and slc12a2. The concentrating response to water deprivation was impaired, and the natriuretic effect of the loop diuretic bumetanide was lost. In older Hsd11b2−/− mice, the V2 receptor agonist desmopressin did not restore full urine concentrating capacity. We find that Hsd11b2−/− mice develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Gross changes to renal structure are observed, but these were probably secondary to sustained polyuria, rather than of developmental origin. PMID:22622456

  13. High prevalences of carriers of the 35delG mutation of connexin 26 in the Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2007-05-01

    Mutation 35delG in the connexin 26 gene is the main cause of recessive deafness in Europe. The prevalence of carriers varies, with a mean value proportion of 1/31 in Mediterranean countries. The aim of this study is to determinate the percentage of carriers in seven populations of the Mediterranean area and to compare prevalence of the mutation in seventeen other published populations in the same area. This study has been carried out on the genomic DNAs out of a total of 886 healthy subjects, originating from Sevilla (Spain), Genoa, Sicily (Italy), Alexandria (Egypt), Libya, Algier (Algeria) and Tangier (Morocco), genotyped by Taqman assay. The approximate proportions of the 35delG mutation are <1/149 in Sevilla, 1/129 in Genoa, 1/34 in Sicily, 1/54 in Alexandria, 1/41 in Libya, 1/141 in Algier and 1/123 in Tangier. When compared to other Mediterranean populations, the mean prevalence of the mutation is 1/49. One of the most elevated values of 35delG prevalence corresponds to Greece (1/28); the pattern of various 35delG prevalences is interpretated in the present meta-analysis as the result of Ancient Greek colonizations of the "Magna Grecia" in historical times.

  14. A novel connexin 26 gene mutation associated with features of the keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome and the follicular occlusion triad.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jay R; White, Thomas W; Martin, Bryan L; Turner, Maria L; Holland, Steven M

    2004-09-01

    We report the case of a congenitally deaf white male with mild palmoplantar keratoderma, ichthyosiform scaling, follicular hyperkeratosis, and mild keratitis, features consistent with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome. His major problem was severe, disfiguring, inflammatory dissecting folliculitis of the scalp, hidradenitis suppurativa, and cystic acne, features comprising the follicular occlusion triad. This unusual phenotype is associated with a novel heterozygous point mutation (C119T) in the gap junction beta2 gene that substitutes a valine for alanine at codon 40 (A40V) in the connexin 26 protein. Through Xenopus oocyte expression studies, this mutant protein was shown to significantly disrupt the function of the specialized gap junctions connecting the cytoplasm of adjacent cells critical for tissue homeostasis. Mutations within the connexin 26 protein are associated with syndromes involving both sensorineural deafness and hyperkeratotic skin disorders. This is the first report of an association between a connexin 26 protein mutation, follicular hyperkeratosis of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome, and severe follicular occlusion triad.

  15. Enhanced neurodegeneration after a high dose of methamphetamine in Adenosine A3 receptor Null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Luo, Yu; Yu, Seong-Jin; Wang, Yun

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) knockout mice are more sensitive to ischemic or hypoxic brain injury. The purpose of this study was to examine if suppression of A3R expression is associated with increase in sensitivity to injury induced by a high dose of methamphetamine (Meth). Adult male A3R null mutant (−/−) mice and their controls (+/+) were injected with 4 doses (2 hours apart) of Meth (10 mg/kg) or saline. Animals were placed in a behavioral activity chamber, equipped with food and water, for 52 hours starting from one day after injections. The first 4 hours were used for studying exploratory behaviors and the next 48 hours were used to measure locomotor activity. High doses of Meth equally reduced the 4-hour exploratory behavior in −/− and +/+ mice. Meth suppressed locomotor activity between 4 and 52 hours in both groups, with a greater reduction being found in the −/− mice. Brain tissues were collected at 3 days after the Meth or saline injections. Meth treatment reduced striatal dopamine (DA) levels in both +/+ and −/− mice, examined by HPLC, with an increase in DOPAC/DA ratio being found only in −/− animals. Meth also significantly increased ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) and cleaved caspase-3 level in striatum as well as Iba-1 and TNFα mRNA expression in nigra in −/−, compared to +/+, mice. Previous studies have shown that pharmacological suppression of VMAT2 by reserpine enhanced Meth toxicity by increasing cytosolic DA and inflammation. A significant reduction in striatal VMAT2 expression was found in −/− mice, compared to +/+ mice, suggesting that increase in sensitivity to Meth injury in −/− mice may be related to a reduction in VMAT2 expression in these mice. In conclusion, our data suggest that A3R −/− mice are more sensitive to high doses of Meth. PMID:21867746

  16. Perturbed desmosomal cadherin expression in grainy head-like 1-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilanowski, Tomasz; Caddy, Jacinta; Ting, Stephen B; Hislop, Nikki R; Cerruti, Loretta; Auden, Alana; Zhao, Lin-Lin; Asquith, Stephen; Ellis, Sarah; Sinclair, Rodney; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2008-01-01

    In Drosophila, the grainy head (grh) gene plays a range of key developmental roles through the regulation of members of the cadherin gene family. We now report that mice lacking the grh homologue grainy head-like 1 (Grhl1) exhibit hair and skin phenotypes consistent with a reduction in expression of the genes encoding the desmosomal cadherin, desmoglein 1 (Dsg1). Grhl1-null mice show an initial delay in coat growth, and older mice exhibit hair loss as a result of poor anchoring of the hair shaft in the follicle. The mice also develop palmoplantar keratoderma, analogous to humans with DSG1 mutations. Sequence analysis, DNA binding, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that the human and mouse Dsg1 promoters are direct targets of GRHL1. Ultrastructural analysis reveals reduced numbers of abnormal desmosomes in the interfollicular epidermis. These findings establish GRHL1 as an important regulator of the Dsg1 genes in the context of hair anchorage and epidermal differentiation, and suggest that cadherin family genes are key targets of the grainy head-like genes across 700 million years of evolution. PMID:18288204

  17. Vitamin D and Human Health: Lessons from Vitamin D Receptor Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Roger; Carmeliet, Geert; Verlinden, Lieve; van Etten, Evelyne; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Luderer, Hilary F.; Lieben, Liesbet; Mathieu, Chantal; Demay, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The vitamin D endocrine system is essential for calcium and bone homeostasis. The precise mode of action and the full spectrum of activities of the vitamin D hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D], can now be better evaluated by critical analysis of mice with engineered deletion of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Absence of a functional VDR or the key activating enzyme, 25-OHD-1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), in mice creates a bone and growth plate phenotype that mimics humans with the same congenital disease or severe vitamin D deficiency. The intestine is the key target for the VDR because high calcium intake, or selective VDR rescue in the intestine, restores a normal bone and growth plate phenotype. The VDR is nearly ubiquitously expressed, and almost all cells respond to 1,25-(OH)2D exposure; about 3% of the mouse or human genome is regulated, directly and/or indirectly, by the vitamin D endocrine system, suggesting a more widespread function. VDR-deficient mice, but not vitamin D- or 1α-hydroxylase-deficient mice, and man develop total alopecia, indicating that the function of the VDR and its ligand is not fully overlapping. The immune system of VDR- or vitamin D-deficient mice is grossly normal but shows increased sensitivity to autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease or type 1 diabetes after exposure to predisposing factors. VDR-deficient mice do not have a spontaneous increase in cancer but are more prone to oncogene- or chemocarcinogen-induced tumors. They also develop high renin hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and increased thrombogenicity. Vitamin D deficiency in humans is associated with increased prevalence of diseases, as predicted by the VDR null phenotype. Prospective vitamin D supplementation studies with multiple noncalcemic endpoints are needed to define the benefits of an optimal vitamin D status. PMID:18694980

  18. Alteration of Skin Wound Healing in Keratinocyte-Specific Mediator Complex Subunit 1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Shigeki; Reddy, Janardan K.; Itami, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    MED1 (Mediator complex subunit 1) is a co-activator of various transcription factors that function in multiple transcriptional pathways. We have already established keratinocyte-specific MED1 null mice (Med1epi−/−) that develop epidermal hyperplasia. Herein, to investigate the function(s) of MED1 in skin wound healing, full-thickness skin wounds were generated in Med1epi−/− and age-matched wild-type mice and the healing process was analyzed. Macroscopic wound closure and the re-epithelialization rate were accelerated in 8-week-old Med1epi−/− mice compared with age-matched wild-type mice. Increased lengths of migrating epithelial tongues and numbers of Ki67-positive cells at the wounded epidermis were observed in 8-week-old Med1epi−/− mice, whereas wound contraction and the area of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts in the granulation tissue were unaffected. Migration was enhanced in Med1epi−/− keratinocytes compared with wild-type keratinocytes in vitro. Immunoblotting revealed that the expression of follistatin was significantly decreased in Med1epi−/− keratinocytes. Moreover, the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was enhanced before and after treatment of Med1epi−/− keratinocytes with activin A in vitro. Cell-cycle analysis showed an increased ratio of S phase cells after activin A treatment of Med1epi−/− keratinocytes compared with wild-type keratinocytes. These findings indicate that the activin-follistatin system is involved in this acceleration of skin wound healing in 8-week-old Med1epi−/− mice. On the other hand, skin wound healing in 6-month-old Med1epi−/− mice was significantly delayed with decreased numbers of Ki67-positive cells at the wounded epidermis as well as BrdU-positive label retaining cells in hair follicles compared with age-matched wild-type mice. These results agree with our previous observation that hair follicle bulge stem cells are reduced in older Med1epi−/− mice, indicating a decreased

  19. Macrophage deficiency of Akt2 reduces atherosclerosis in Ldlr null mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, Vladimir R.; Hebron, Katie E.; Wiese, Carrie B.; Toth, Cynthia L.; Ding, Lei; Zhang, Youmin; May, James M.; Fazio, Sergio; Vickers, Kasey C.; Linton, MacRae F.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play crucial roles in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. Akt, a serine/threonine protein kinase B, is vital for cell proliferation, migration, and survival. Macrophages express three Akt isoforms, Akt1, Akt2, and Akt3, but the roles of Akt1 and Akt2 in atherosclerosis in vivo remain unclear. To dissect the impact of macrophage Akt1 and Akt2 on early atherosclerosis, we generated mice with hematopoietic deficiency of Akt1 or Akt2. After 8 weeks on Western diet, Ldlr−/− mice reconstituted with Akt1−/− fetal liver cells (Akt1−/−→Ldlr−/−) had similar atherosclerotic lesion areas compared with control mice transplanted with WT cells (WT→Ldlr−/−). In contrast, Akt2−/−→Ldlr−/− mice had dramatically reduced atherosclerotic lesions compared with WT→Ldlr−/− mice of both genders. Similarly, in the setting of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, Akt2−/−→Ldlr−/− mice had smaller aortic lesions compared with WT→Ldlr−/− and Akt1−/−→Ldlr−/− mice. Importantly, Akt2−/−→Ldlr−/− mice had reduced numbers of proinflammatory blood monocytes expressing Ly-6Chi and chemokine C-C motif receptor 2. Peritoneal macrophages isolated from Akt2−/− mice were skewed toward an M2 phenotype and showed decreased expression of proinflammatory genes and reduced cell migration. Our data demonstrate that loss of Akt2 suppresses the ability of macrophages to undergo M1 polarization reducing both early and advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:25240046

  20. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  1. Increased expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and anomalous neurites in catecholaminergic neurons of ATF-2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masayo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toshio; Ishii, Shunsuke; Sumi-Ichinose, Chiho; Nomura, Takahide; Ichinose, Hiroshi

    2008-02-15

    ATF-2/CRE-BP1 was originally identified as a cAMP-responsive element (CRE) binding protein abundant in the brain. We previously reported that phosphorylation of ATF-2 increased the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which is the rate-limiting enzyme for catecholamine biosynthesis, directly acting on the CRE in the promoter region of the TH gene in PC12D cells (Suzuki et al. [2002] J. Biol. Chem. 277:40768-40774). To examine the role of ATF-2 on transcriptional control of the TH gene in the brain, we investigated the TH expression in ATF-2-/- mice. We found that TH expression was greatly increased in medulla oblongata and locus ceruleus of the ATF-2-deficient embryos. Ectopic expression of TH was observed in the raphe magnus nucleus, where serotonergic neural cell bodies are located. Interestingly, A10 dorsal neurons were lost in the embryos of ATF-2-/- mice. There was no difference in the TH immunoreactivity in the olfactory bulb. The data showed that alteration in TH expression by absence of ATF-2 gradually declined from caudal to rostral part of the brain. We also found anomalous neurite extension in catecholaminergic neurons of ATF-2 null mice, i.e., increased dendritic arborization and shortened axons. These data suggest that ATF-2 plays critical roles for proper expression of the TH gene and for neurite extension of catecholaminergic neurons, possibly through a repressor-like action. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE-/-) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE-/- mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE-/- mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE-/- mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27648138

  3. Irisin protects against endothelial injury and ameliorates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-Null diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Xiang, Guangda; Liu, Min; Mei, Wen; Xiang, Lin; Dong, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The circulating irisin increases energy expenditure and improves insulin resistance in mice and humans. The improvement of insulin resistance ameliorates atherosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that irisin alleviates atherosclerosis in diabetes. Endothelial function was measured by acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation using aortic rings in apolipoprotein E-Null (apoE(-/-)) streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Atherosclerotic lesion was evaluated by plaque area and inflammatory response in aortas. In addition, the endothelium-protective effects of irisin were also further investigated in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. The in vivo experiments showed that irisin treatment significantly improved endothelial dysfunction, decreased endothelial apoptosis, and predominantly decreased atherosclerotic plaque area of both en face and cross sections when compared with normal saline-treated diabetic mice. Moreover, the infiltrating macrophages and T lymphocytes within plaque and the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines in aortas were also significantly reduced by irisin treatment in mice. The in vitro experiments revealed that irisin inhibited high glucose-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and increased antioxidant enzymes expression in HUVECs, and pretreatment with LY294002, l-NAME, AMPK-siRNA or eNOS-siRNA, attenuated the protection of irisin on HUVECs apoptosis induced by high glucose. In addition, the in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that irisin increased the phosphorylation of AMPK, Akt and eNOS in aortas and cultured HUVECs. The present study indicates that systemic administration of irisin may be protected against endothelial injury and ameliorated atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) diabetic mice. The endothelium-protective action of irisin was through activation of AMPK-PI3K-Akt-eNOS signaling pathway. Irisin could be therapeutic for atherosclerotic vascular diseases in diabetes. Copyright

  4. Maturation Stage Enamel Malformations in Amtn and Klk4 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Stephanie M.; Chun, Yong-Hee P.; Ganss, Bernhard; Hu, Yuanyuan; Richardson, Amelia S; Schmitz, James E.; Fajardo, Roberto; Yang, Jie; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) and kallikrein-4 (KLK4) are secreted proteins specialized for enamel biomineralization. We characterized enamel from wild-type, Amtn−/−, Klk4−/−, Amtn+/−Klk4+/− and Amtn−/−Klk4−/− mice to gain insights into AMTN and KLK4 functions during amelogenesis. All of the null mice were healthy and fertile. The mandibular incisors in Amtn−/−, Klk4−/− and Amtn−/−Klk4−/− mice were chalky-white and chipped. No abnormalities except in enamel were observed, and no significant differences were detected in enamel thickness or volume, or in rod decussation. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) maximum intensity projections localized the onset of enamel maturation in wild-type incisors distal to the first molar, but mesial to this position in Amtn−/−, Klk4−/− and Amtn−/−Klk4−/− mice, demonstrating a delay in enamel maturation in Amtn−/− incisors. Micro-CT detected significantly reduced enamel mineral density (2.5 and 2.4 gHA/cm3) in the Klk4−/− and Amtn−/−Klk4−/− mice respectively, compared with wild-type enamel (3.1 gHA/cm3). Backscatter scanning electron microscopy showed that mineral density progressively diminished with enamel depth in the Klk4−/− and Amtn−/−Klk4−/− mice. Knoop hardness of Amtn−/− outer enamel was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type and was not as hard as the middle or inner enamel. Klk4−/− enamel hardness was significantly reduced at all levels, but the outer enamel was significantly harder than the inner and middle enamel. Thus the hardness patterns of the Amtn−/− and Klk4−/− mice were distinctly different, while the Amtn−/−Klk4−/− outer enamel was not as hard as in the Amtn−/− and Klk4−/− mice. We conclude that AMTN and KLK4 function independently, but are both necessary for proper enamel maturation. PMID:26620968

  5. Carrier frequencies of mutations/polymorphisms in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in the Moroccan population.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Omar; Boulouiz, Redouane; Nahili, Halima; Bakhouch, Khadija; Wakrim, Lahcen; Rouba, Hassan; Chafik, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2008-12-01

    Mutations in the Connexin 26 gene (GJB2/Cx26) are responsible for more than half of all cases of prelingual nonsyndromic recessive deafness in Caucasians. The carrier frequency of the 35delG-GJB2 mutation was found to be as high as 2-4% in the Mediterranean populations. Different GJB2 mutations were reported in the Moroccan patients with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss; however, rare studies were carried out on the carrier frequencies of these mutations in the healthy populations. The aim of this study was to estimate the carrier frequencies of the GJB2 mutations in the Moroccan population. The molecular analysis of the 35delG mutation and other GJB2 sequence variations was performed in 386 healthy unrelated Moroccan individuals with no known hearing loss. Five GJB2 sequence variations at heterozygous state were found: two mutations, 35delG and 109G > A (V37I), and three polymorphisms, 79G > A (V27I), 341G > A (E114G), and 457G > A (V153I). The carrier frequency of the 35delG mutation was the highest with 2.07% [95% confidence interval (0.90-4.04%)], followed by that of the V37I mutation with 1.43% (0.06-5.39). The carrier frequency of V27I, E114G, and V153I changes was estimated to be 0.71% (0.01-4.34). This finding shows that the 35delG carrier frequency found here is similar to the one observed in Mediterranean populations. It provides new information about GJB2 carrier rates facilitating the diagnosis and the genetic counseling in the Moroccan population.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations highlight structural and functional alterations in deafness–related M34T mutation of connexin 26

    PubMed Central

    Zonta, Francesco; Buratto, Damiano; Cassini, Chiara; Bortolozzi, Mario; Mammano, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the GJB2 gene encoding the connexin 26 (Cx26) gap junction protein, which is widely expressed in the inner ear, are the primary cause of hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss in several populations. The deafness–associated single amino acid substitution of methionine 34 (M34) in the first transmembrane helix (TM1) with a threonine (T) ensues in the production of mutant Cx26M34T channels that are correctly synthesized and assembled in the plasma membrane. However, mutant channels overexpressed in HeLa cells retain only 11% of the wild type unitary conductance. Here we extend and rationalize those findings by comparing wild type Cx26 (Cx26WT) and Cx26M34T mutant channels in silico, using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that the quaternary structure of the Cx26M34T hemichannel is altered at the level of the pore funnel due to the disruption of the hydrophobic interaction between M34 and tryptophan 3 (W3) in the N–terminal helix (NTH). Our simulations also show that external force stimuli applied to the NTHs can detach them from the inner wall of the pore more readily in the mutant than in the wild type hemichannel. These structural alterations significantly increase the free energy barrier encountered by permeating ions, correspondingly decreasing the unitary conductance of the Cx26M34T hemichannel. Our results accord with the proposal that the mutant resides most of the time in a low conductance state. However, the small displacement of the NTHs in our Cx26M34T hemichannel model is not compatible with the formation of a pore plug as in the related Cx26M34A mutant. PMID:24624091

  7. Spinal cord compression injury in lysophosphatidic acid 1 receptor-null mice promotes maladaptive pronociceptive descending control.

    PubMed

    Suardíaz, M; Galan-Arriero, I; Avila-Martin, G; Estivill-Torrús, G; de Fonseca, F R; Chun, J; Gómez-Soriano, J; Bravo-Esteban, E; Taylor, J

    2016-02-01

    Although activation of the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1) is known to mediate pronociceptive effects in peripheral pain models, the role of this receptor in the modulation of spinal nociception following spinal cord injury (SCI) is unknown. In this study, LPA1 regulation of spinal excitability mediated by supraspinal descending antinociceptive control systems was assessed following SCI in both wild-type (WT) and maLPA1-null receptor mice. The effect of a T8 spinal compression in WT and maLPA1-null mice was assessed up to 1 month after SCI using histological, immunohistochemical and behavioural techniques analysis including electrophysiological recording of noxious toes-Tibialis Anterior (TA) stimulus-response reflex activity. The effect of a T3 paraspinal transcutaneous electrical conditioning stimulus on TA noxious reflex temporal summation was also assessed. Histological analysis demonstrated greater dorsolateral funiculus damage after SCI in maLPA1-null mice, without a change in the stimulus-response function of the TA noxious reflex when compared to WT mice. While T3 conditioning stimulation in the WT group inhibited noxious TA reflex temporal summation after SCI, this stimulus strongly excited TA reflex temporal summation in maLPA1-null mice. The functional switch from descending inhibition to maladaptive facilitation of central excitability of spinal nociception demonstrated in maLPA1-null mice after SCI was unrelated to a general change in reflex activity. These data suggest that the LPA1 receptor is necessary for inhibition of temporal summation of noxious reflex activity, partly mediated via long-tract descending modulatory systems acting at the spinal level. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  8. Gamma Interferon (IFN-γ) Receptor Null-Mutant Mice Are More Susceptible to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection than IFN-γ Ligand Null-Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Edouard; Tanamachi, Becky; Openshaw, Harry; Mann, Jeff; Clarke, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Mouse strains with null mutations in the gamma interferon gene (Ifng) or the gamma interferon receptor gene (Ifngr) have been engineered. The use of these strains as animal models of viral and bacterial infections has enhanced our understanding of the role of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in the host immune response. However, direct comparisons between Ifng−/− (GKO) and Ifngr−/− (RGKO) mice have been problematic because previously available strains of these mice have had different genetic backgrounds (i.e., C57BL/6 and BALB/c for GKO mice and 129/Sv//Ev for RGKO mice). To enable direct comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections in GKO and RGKO mice, we introduced the IFN-γ null mutation into the 129/Sv//Ev background. We report that, after HSV-1 inoculation, mortality was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice (38 versus 23%, P = 0.0001). Similarly, the mortality from vaccinia virus challenge was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice. With differences in genetic background excluded as a confounding issue, these results are consistent with the existence of an alternative ligand(s) for the IFN-γ receptor that is also capable of mediating protection against viral challenge. PMID:10233988

  9. Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Null Mice Exhibit Decreased Intestinal Inflammation and Tissue Damage in the DSS-Induced Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Sean P.; Obery, Dana R.; de la Motte, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) overproduction is a hallmark of multiple inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Hyaluronan can act as a leukocyte recruitment molecule and in the most common mouse model of intestinal inflammation, the chemically induced dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) experimental colitis model, we previously determined that changes in colon distribution of HA occur before inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that, during a pathologic challenge, HA promotes inflammation. In this study, we tested the progression of inflammation in mice null for the hyaluronan synthase genes (HAS1, HAS3, or both HAS1 and HAS3) in the DSS-colitis model. Our data demonstrate that both the HAS1/HAS3 double and the HAS3 null mice are protected from colitis, compared to wild-type and HAS1 null mice, as determined by measurement of weight loss, disease activity, serum IL-6 levels, histologic scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Most notable is the dramatic increase in submucosal microvasculature, hyaluronan deposition, and leukocyte infiltration in the inflamed colon tissue of wild-type and HAS1 null mice. Our data suggest, HAS3 plays a crucial role in driving gut inflammation. Developing a temporary targeted therapeutic intervention of HAS3 expression or function in the microcirculation may emerge as a desirable strategy toward tempering colitis in patients undergoing flares of IBD. PMID:26448758

  10. Global Renal Gene Expression Profiling Analysis in B2-Kinin Receptor Null Mice: Impact of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaffa, Miran A.; Kobeissy, Firas; Al Hariri, Moustafa; Chalhoub, Hussein; Eid, Assaad; Ziyadeh, Fuad N.; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), the leading cause of end-stage renal failure, is clinically manifested by albuminuria and a progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate. The risk factors and mechanisms that contribute to the development and progression of DN are still incompletely defined. To address the involvement of bradykinin B2-receptors (B2R) in DN, we used a genome wide approach to study the effects of diabetes on differential renal gene expression profile in wild type and B2R knockout (B2R−/−) mice. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin and plasma glucose levels and albumin excretion rate (AER) were measured at predetermined times throughout the 23 week study period. Longitudinal analysis of AER indicated that diabetic B2R−/−D null mice had a significantly decreased AER levels compared to wild type B2R+/+D mice (P = 0.0005). Results from the global microarray study comparing gene expression profiles among four groups of mice respectively: (B2R+/+C, B2R+/+D, B2R−/−C and B2R−/−D) highlighted the role of several altered pathological pathways in response to disruption of B2R and to the diabetic state that included: endothelial injury, oxidative stress, insulin and lipid metabolism and inflammatory process with a marked alteration in the pro-apoptotic genes. The findings of the present study provide a global genomics view of biomarkers that highlight the mechanisms and putative pathways involved in DN. PMID:23028588

  11. Altered Morphine-Induced Analgesia in Neurotensin Type 1 Receptor Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roussy, Geneviève; Beaudry, Hélène; Lafrance, Mylène; Belleville, Karine; Beaudet, Nicolas; Wada, Keiji; Gendron, Louis; Sarret, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Both neurotensin (NT) and opioid agonists have been shown to induce antinociception in rodents after central administration. Besides, previous studies have revealed the existence of functional interactions between NT and opioid systems in the regulation of pain processing. We recently demonstrated that NTS1 receptors play a key role in the mediation of the analgesic effects of NT in long-lasting pain. In the present study, we therefore investigated whether NTS1 gene deletion affected the antinociceptive action of mu opioid drugs. To this end, pain behavioral responses to formalin were determined following systemic administration of morphine in both male and female NTS1 knockout mice. Acute injection of morphine (2 or 5 mg/kg) produced strong antinociceptive effects in both male and female wild-type littermates, with no significant sex differences. On the other hand, morphine analgesia was considerably reduced in NTS1-deficient mice of both sexes compared to their respective controls, indicating that the NTS1 receptor actively participates in mu opioid alleviating pain. By examining specifically the flinching, licking and biting nociceptive behaviors, we also showed that the functional crosstalk between NTS1 and mu opioid receptors influences the supraspinally-mediated behaviors. Interestingly, sexual dimorphic action of morphine-induced pain inhibition was found in NTS1 null mice in the formalin test, suggesting that the endogenous NT system interacts differently with the opioid network in male and female mice. Altogether, these results demonstrated that NTS1 receptor activation operates downstream to the opioidergic transmission and that NTS1-selective agonists combined with morphine may act synergistically to reduce persistent pain. PMID:20727387

  12. Deficiency in acellular cementum and periodontal attachment in bsp null mice.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Soenjaya, Y; Nociti, F H; Holm, E; Zerfas, P M; Wimer, H F; Holdsworth, D W; Aubin, J E; Hunter, G K; Goldberg, H A; Somerman, M J

    2013-02-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues of the skeleton and dentition. BSP is multifunctional, affecting cell attachment and signaling through an RGD integrin-binding region, and acting as a positive regulator for mineral precipitation by nucleating hydroxyapatite crystals. BSP is present in cementum, the hard tissue covering the tooth root that anchors periodontal ligament (PDL) attachment. To test our hypothesis that BSP plays an important role in cementogenesis, we analyzed tooth development in a Bsp null ((-/-)) mouse model. Developmental analysis by histology, histochemistry, and SEM revealed a significant reduction in acellular cementum formation on Bsp (-/-) mouse molar and incisor roots, and the cementum deposited appeared hypomineralized. Structural defects in cementum-PDL interfaces in Bsp (-/-) mice caused PDL detachment, likely contributing to the high incidence of incisor malocclusion. Loss of BSP caused progressively disorganized PDL and significantly increased epithelial down-growth with aging. Bsp (-/-) mice displayed extensive root and alveolar bone resorption, mediated by increased RANKL and the presence of osteoclasts. Results collected here suggest that BSP plays a non-redundant role in acellular cementum formation, likely involved in initiating mineralization on the root surface. Through its importance to cementum integrity, BSP is essential for periodontal function.

  13. Impaired insulin secretion and glucose intolerance in synaptotagmin-7 null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Lao, Ye; Maximov, Anton; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Kostromina, Elena; Repa, Joyce J.; Li, Cai; Radda, George K.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Han, Weiping

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrates express at least 15 different synaptotagmins with the same domain structure but diverse localizations and tissue distributions. Synaptotagmin-1,-2, and -9 act as calcium sensors for the fast phrase of neurotransmitter release, and synaptotagmin-12 acts as a calcium-independent modulator of release. The exact functions of the remaining 11 synaptotagmins, however, have not been established. By analogy to the role of synaptotagmin-1, -2, and -9 in neurotransmission, these other synaptotagmins may serve as Ca2+ transducers regulating other Ca2+-dependent membrane processes, such as insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Of these other synaptotagmins, synaptotagmin-7 is one of the most abundant and is present in pancreatic β-cells. To determine whether synaptotagmin-7 regulates Ca2+-dependent insulin secretion, we analyzed synaptotagmin-7 null mutant mice for glucose tolerance and insulin release. Here, we show that synaptotagmin-7 is required for the maintenance of systemic glucose tolerance and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Mutant mice have normal insulin sensitivity, insulin production, islet architecture and ultrastructural organization, and metabolic and calcium responses but exhibit impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, indicating a calcium-sensing defect during insulin-containing secretory granule exocytosis. Taken together, our findings show that synaptotagmin-7 functions as a positive regulator of insulin secretion and may serve as a calcium sensor controlling insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells. PMID:18308938

  14. Impaired insulin secretion and glucose intolerance in synaptotagmin-7 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Lao, Ye; Maximov, Anton; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Kostromina, Elena; Repa, Joyce J; Li, Cai; Radda, George K; Südhof, Thomas C; Han, Weiping

    2008-03-11

    Vertebrates express at least 15 different synaptotagmins with the same domain structure but diverse localizations and tissue distributions. Synaptotagmin-1,-2, and -9 act as calcium sensors for the fast phrase of neurotransmitter release, and synaptotagmin-12 acts as a calcium-independent modulator of release. The exact functions of the remaining 11 synaptotagmins, however, have not been established. By analogy to the role of synaptotagmin-1, -2, and -9 in neurotransmission, these other synaptotagmins may serve as Ca(2+) transducers regulating other Ca(2+)-dependent membrane processes, such as insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. Of these other synaptotagmins, synaptotagmin-7 is one of the most abundant and is present in pancreatic beta-cells. To determine whether synaptotagmin-7 regulates Ca(2+)-dependent insulin secretion, we analyzed synaptotagmin-7 null mutant mice for glucose tolerance and insulin release. Here, we show that synaptotagmin-7 is required for the maintenance of systemic glucose tolerance and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Mutant mice have normal insulin sensitivity, insulin production, islet architecture and ultrastructural organization, and metabolic and calcium responses but exhibit impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, indicating a calcium-sensing defect during insulin-containing secretory granule exocytosis. Taken together, our findings show that synaptotagmin-7 functions as a positive regulator of insulin secretion and may serve as a calcium sensor controlling insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells.

  15. Calcium Homeostasis and Muscle Energy Metabolism Are Modified in HspB1-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Brigitte; Kammoun, Malek; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Barboiron, Christiane; Meunier, Bruno; Chambon, Christophe; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Hsp27—encoded by HspB1—is a member of the small heat shock proteins (sHsp, 12–43 kDa (kilodalton)) family. This protein is constitutively present in a wide variety of tissues and in many cell lines. The abundance of Hsp27 is highest in skeletal muscle, indicating a crucial role for muscle physiology. The protein identified as a beef tenderness biomarker was found at a crucial hub in a functional network involved in beef tenderness. The aim of this study was to analyze the proteins impacted by the targeted invalidation of HspB1 in the Tibialis anterior muscle of the mouse. Comparative proteomics using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed 22 spots that were differentially abundant between HspB1-null mice and their controls that could be identified by mass spectrometry. Eighteen spots were more abundant in the muscle of the mutant mice, and four were less abundant. The proteins impacted by the absence of Hsp27 belonged mainly to calcium homeostasis (Srl and Calsq1), contraction (TnnT3), energy metabolism (Tpi1, Mdh1, PdhB, Ckm, Pygm, ApoA1) and the Hsp proteins family (HspA9). These data suggest a crucial role for these proteins in meat tenderization. The information gained by this study could also be helpful to predict the side effects of Hsp27 depletion in muscle development and pathologies linked to small Hsps. PMID:28248227

  16. Cognition and Mood-Related Behaviors in L3mbtl1 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Erica Y.; Jiang, Yan; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Hock, Hanno; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in histone lysine methylation and epigenetic regulators of gene expression could play a role in the neurobiology and treatment of patients diagnosed with mood spectrum disorder, including depression and anxiety. Mutations and altered expression of various lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) and demethylases (KDMs) have been linked to changes in motivational and emotional behaviors in preclinical model systems. However, it is not known whether regulators operating downstream of histone lysine methylation could affect mood-related behavior. Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain ‘chromatin reader’ proteins bind to methylated histone lysine residues and associate with chromatin remodeling complexes to facilitate or repress gene expression. MBT proteins, including the founding member, L3mbtl1, maintain high levels of expression in neurons of the mature brain. Here, we exposed L3mbtl1 null mutant mice to a wide range of tests exploring cognition and mood-relevant behaviors at baseline and in the context of social isolation, as a stressor to elicit depression-related behavior in susceptible mice. L3mbtl1 loss-of-function was associated with significant decreases in depression and and anxiety in some of the behavioral paradigms. This was not associated with a more generalized neurological dysfunction because cognition and memory remained unaltered in comparison to controls. These findings warrant further investigations on the role of MBT chromatin reader proteins in the context of emotional and affective behaviors. PMID:25849281

  17. Deficiency in Acellular Cementum and Periodontal Attachment in Bsp Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foster, B.L.; Soenjaya, Y.; Nociti, F.H.; Holm, E.; Zerfas, P.M.; Wimer, H.F.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Aubin, J.E.; Hunter, G.K.; Goldberg, H.A.; Somerman, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues of the skeleton and dentition. BSP is multifunctional, affecting cell attachment and signaling through an RGD integrin-binding region, and acting as a positive regulator for mineral precipitation by nucleating hydroxyapatite crystals. BSP is present in cementum, the hard tissue covering the tooth root that anchors periodontal ligament (PDL) attachment. To test our hypothesis that BSP plays an important role in cementogenesis, we analyzed tooth development in a Bsp null (-/-) mouse model. Developmental analysis by histology, histochemistry, and SEM revealed a significant reduction in acellular cementum formation on Bsp-/- mouse molar and incisor roots, and the cementum deposited appeared hypomineralized. Structural defects in cementum-PDL interfaces in Bsp-/- mice caused PDL detachment, likely contributing to the high incidence of incisor malocclusion. Loss of BSP caused progressively disorganized PDL and significantly increased epithelial down-growth with aging. Bsp-/- mice displayed extensive root and alveolar bone resorption, mediated by increased RANKL and the presence of osteoclasts. Results collected here suggest that BSP plays a non-redundant role in acellular cementum formation, likely involved in initiating mineralization on the root surface. Through its importance to cementum integrity, BSP is essential for periodontal function. PMID:23183644

  18. Taurodontism, variations in tooth number, and misshapened crowns in Wnt10a null mice and human kindreds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Reid, Bryan M; Hu, Yuanyuan; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Herzog, Curtis R; Kim-Berman, Hera; Lee, Moses; Benke, Paul J; Kent Lloyd, K C; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2015-01-01

    WNT10A is a signaling molecule involved in tooth development, and WNT10A defects are associated with tooth agenesis. We characterized Wnt10a null mice generated by the knockout mouse project (KOMP) and six families with WNT10A mutations, including a novel p.Arg104Cys defect, in the absence of EDA,EDAR, or EDARADD variations. Wnt10a null mice exhibited supernumerary mandibular fourth molars, and smaller molars with abnormal cusp patterning and root taurodontism. Wnt10a−/− incisors showed distinctive apical–lingual wedge-shaped defects. These findings spurred us to closely examine the dental phenotypes of our WNT10A families. WNT10A heterozygotes exhibited molar root taurodontism and mild tooth agenesis (with incomplete penetrance) in their permanent dentitions. Individuals with two defective WNT10A alleles showed severe tooth agenesis and had fewer cusps on their molars. The misshapened molar crowns and roots were consistent with the Wnt10a null phenotype and were not previously associated with WNT10A defects. The missing teeth contrasted with the presence of supplemental teeth in the Wnt10a null mice and demonstrated mammalian species differences in the roles of Wnt signaling in early tooth development. We conclude that molar crown and root dysmorphologies are caused by WNT10A defects and that the severity of the tooth agenesis correlates with the number of defective WNT10A alleles. PMID:25629078

  19. Fluvastatin inhibits intimal hyperplasia in wild-type but not Thbs1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Desai, Pratik; Helkin, Alex; Odugbesi, Adeola; Stein, Jeff; Bruch, David; Lawler, Jack; Maier, Kristopher G; Gahtan, Vivian

    2017-04-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is functionally important to intimal hyperplasia (IH) development. Statin drugs have beneficial pleiotropic effects, including reduced IH; however, the effect of statins on IH in a TSP-1-independent setting is unknown. Statins will be less effective in attenuating IH after vascular injury in TSP-1-null (Thbs1(-/-)) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Carotid artery ligation was performed on WT and Thbs1(-/-) mice. Each strain was divided into two groups: no statin control or standard chow containing fluvastatin (10 or 40 mg/kg/d). After 28 d, analysis included morphometric analysis and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on the arteries and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on plasma (TSP-1 WT, TSP-2 WT, and Thbs1(-/-)). Comparisons were made by analysis of variance, with P < 0.05 considered significant. In no statin controls, WT mice had more IH than Thbs1(-/-) mice (0.46 ± 0.09 versus 0.15 ± 0.04). Fluvastatin reduced IH in the WT (0.46 ± 0.09 versus 0.23 ± 0.06), but not in Thbs1(-/-) groups (0.15 ± 0.04 versus 0.22 ± 0.07). No difference in IH existed between Thbs1(-/-) no statin controls and fluvastatin WT and Thbs1(-/-) groups. Statin dose did not affect IH. TSP-1 plasma levels were increased in fluvastatin WT. TSP-2 levels were decreased in fluvastatin WT and elevated in fluvastatin Thbs1(-/-). Fluvastatin had no effect on tissue Thbs1 or Thbs2 gene expression. TSP-1 is necessary for robust IH after arterial injury. Because fluvastatin had no effect on IH in Thbs1(-/-), the data suggest that the statin effect on IH may be largely TSP-1 dependent. Both statins and the presence of TSP-1 affect TSP-1 and TSP-2 plasma levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Abnormal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in pancreas-specific Tcf7l2-null mice.

    PubMed

    da Silva Xavier, G; Mondragon, A; Sun, G; Chen, L; McGinty, J A; French, P M; Rutter, G A

    2012-10-01

    Individuals carrying type 2 diabetes risk alleles in TCF7L2 display decreased beta cell levels of T cell factor 7 like-2 (TCF7L2) immunoreactivity, and impaired insulin secretion and beta cell sensitivity to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Here, we sought to determine whether selective deletion of Tcf7l2 in mouse pancreas impairs insulin release and glucose homeostasis. Pancreas-specific Tcf7l2-null (pTcf7l2) mice were generated by crossing mice carrying conditional knockout alleles of Tcf7l2 (Tcf7l2-flox) with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the Pdx1 promoter (Pdx1.Cre). Gene expression was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and beta cell mass by optical projection tomography. Glucose tolerance, insulin secretion from isolated islets, and plasma insulin, glucagon and GLP-1 content were assessed by standard protocols. From 12 weeks of age, pTcf7l2 mice displayed decreased oral glucose tolerance vs control littermates; from 20 weeks they had glucose intolerance upon administration of glucose by the intraperitoneal route. pTcf7l2 islets displayed impaired insulin secretion in response to 17 (vs 3.0) mmol/l glucose (54.6 ± 4.6%, p < 0.01) or to 17 mmol/l glucose plus 100 nmol/l GLP-1 (44.3 ± 4.9%, p < 0.01) compared with control islets. Glp1r (42 ± 0.08%, p < 0.01) and Ins2 (15.4 ± 4.6%, p < 0.01) expression was significantly lower in pTcf7l2 islets than in controls. Maintained on a high-fat (but not on a normal) diet, pTcf7l2 mice displayed decreased expansion of pancreatic beta cell volume vs control littermates. No differences were observed in plasma insulin, proinsulin, glucagon or GLP-1 concentrations. Selective deletion of Tcf7l2 in the pancreas replicates key aspects of the altered glucose homeostasis in human carriers of TCF7L2 risk alleles, indicating the direct role of this factor in controlling beta cell function.

  1. Hexim1 heterozygosity stabilizes atherosclerotic plaque and decreased steatosis in ApoE null mice fed atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Rozenberg, Inna; Iqbal, Jahangir; Hussain, M Mahmood; Beckles, Daniel; Mascareno, Eduardo

    2017-02-01

    Hexim-1 is an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II transcription elongation. Decreased Hexim-1 expression in animal models of chronic diseases such as left ventricular hypertrophy, obesity and cancer triggered significant changes in adaptation and remodeling. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Hexim1 in lipid metabolism focused in the progression of atherosclerosis and steatosis. We used the C57BL6 apolipoprotein E (ApoE null) crossed bred to C57BL6Hexim1 heterozygous mice to obtain ApoE null - Hexim1 heterozygous mice (ApoE-HT). Both ApoE null backgrounds were fed high fat diet for twelve weeks. Then, we evaluated lipid metabolism, atherosclerotic plaque formation and liver steatosis. In order to understand changes in the transcriptome of both backgrounds during the progression of steatosis, we performed Affymetrix mouse 430 2.0 microarray. After 12 weeks of HFD, ApoE null and ApoE-HT showed similar increase of cholesterol and triglycerides in plasma. Plaque composition was altered in ApoE-HT. Additionally, liver triglycerides and steatosis were decreased in ApoE-HT mice. Affymetrix analysis revealed that decreased steatosis might be due to impaired inducible SOCS3 expression in ApoE-HT mice. In conclusion, decreased Hexim-1 expression does not alter cholesterol metabolism in ApoE null background after HFD. However, it promotes stable atherosclerotic plaque and decreased steatosis by promoting the anti-inflammatory TGFβ pathway and blocking the expression of the inducible and pro-inflammatory expression of SOCS3 respectively. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Expression of Basigin in Reproductive Tissues of Oestrogen Receptor-α or –β Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Bi, Jiajia; Nakai, Masaaki; Bunick, David; Couse, John F.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Nowak, Romana A.

    2016-01-01

    Basigin plays important roles in both male and female reproduction because basigin (Bsg) null male and female mice are infertile. The aim of the present study was to determine whether basigin expression in reproductive organs requires oestrogen receptor (ER) α or ERβ. Expression of basigin protein in the testis, ovary and male and female reproductive tracts was studied in adult wild type, ERα-null (αERKO) and ERβ-null (βERKO) mice by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Basigin mRNA levels in ovary and uterus were examined by quantitative RT-PCR. In females, basigin protein expression was observed mainly in granulosa and interstitial cells of the ovary and epithelial cells of the proximal oviduct in all genotypes. Basigin protein was also expressed in the uterine epithelium at prooestrus and oestrus in WT and βERKO mice but not in αERKO mice. However, a higher level of basigin mRNA was observed in uteri of αERKO mice compared with WT and βERKO mice. In males, basigin was expressed in Leydig cells and all germ cells except spermatogonia in all genotypes. Basigin was present in epithelial cells lining the efferent ductules in WT and βERKO mice but expression was greatly reduced in αERKO mice. In epididymal ducts, basigin expression was observed in epithelial cells in the caput and cauda in all genotypes. These data suggest that expression of basigin protein requires ERα, but not ERβ, in the uterus and efferent ductules, but is independent of ER in the ovary, oviduct, testis and epididymis. PMID:20388736

  3. Atoh1 Null Mice Show Directed Afferent Fiber Growth to Undifferentiated Ear Sensory Epithelia Followed by Incomplete Fiber Retention

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, B.; Matei, V.A.; Nichols, D.H.; Bermingham, N.; Jones, K.; Beisel, K.W.; Wang, V.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells have been suggested as attractors for growing afferent fibers, possibly through the release of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Atoh1 null mice never fully differentiate hair cells and supporting cells and, therefore, may show aberrations in the growth and/or retention of their innervation. We investigated the distribution of cells positive for Atoh1- or Bdnf-mediated β-galactosidase expression in Atoh1 null and Atoh1 heterozygotic mice and correlated the distribution of these cells with their innervation. Embryonic day (E) 18.5 Atoh1 null and heterozygotic littermates show Atoh1- and BDNF-β-galactosidase–positive cells in comparable distributions in the canal cristae and the cochlea apex. Atoh1-β-galactosidase–positive but only occasional Bdnf-β-galactosidase–positive cells are found in the utricle, saccule, and cochlea base of Atoh1 null mutant mice. Absence of Bdnf-β-galactosidase expression in the utricle and saccule of Atoh1 null mice is first noted at E12.5, a time when Atoh1-β-galactosidase expression is also first detected in these epithelia. These data suggest that expression of Bdnf is dependent on ATOH1 protein in some but does not require ATOH1 protein in other inner ear cells. Overall, the undifferentiated Atoh1- and Bdnf-β-galactosidase–positive cells show a distribution reminiscent of that in the six sensory epithelia in control mice, suggesting that ear patterning processes can form discrete patches of Atoh1 and Bdnf expression in the absence of ATOH1 protein. The almost normal growth of afferent and efferent fibers in younger embryos suggests that neither fully differentiated hair cells nor BDNF are necessary for the initial targeted growth of fibers. E18.5 Atoh1 null mice have many afferent fibers to the apex of the cochlea, the anterior and the posterior crista, all areas with numerous Bdnf-β-galactosidase–positive cells. Few fibers remain to the saccule, utricle, and the base of

  4. WIP null mice display a progressive immunological disorder that resembles Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curcio, C; Pannellini, T; Lanzardo, S; Forni, G; Musiani, P; Antón, I M

    2007-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency syndrome caused by mutations in the WAS protein (WASP). This participates in signalling and cytoskeletal homoeostasis, and some of its activities are regulated by its binding to the WASP interacting protein (WIP). WIP deficiency, however, has not yet been shown to be of pathological significance in humans. Here we show that, in WIP null (WIP(-/-)) mice, it produces haematological alterations and anatomical abnormalities in several organs, most probably as a consequence of autoimmune attacks. Granulocytosis and severe lymphopenia are associated with a proportional increase in segmented cells and fewer bone marrow erythrocytes and lymphocytes. Splenomegaly is accompanied by an increase of haematopoietic tissue and red pulp, reduction of the white pulp, and fewer B (B220(+)) lymphocytes (also apparent in the lymph nodes and Peyer's patches). Ulcerative colitis, interstitial pneumonitis, glomerular nephropathy with IgA deposits, autoantibodies, and joint inflammation are also evident. These progressive immunological disorders closely mimic those seen in WAS. WIP deficiency may thus be implicated in some cases in which mutations in the gene encoding WASP are not detected. Copyright (c) 2006 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Forelimb contractures and abnormal tendon collagen fibrillogenesis in fibulin-4 null mice.

    PubMed

    Markova, Dessislava Z; Pan, Te-Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Zhu; Zhang, Guiyun; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2016-06-01

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein essential for elastic fiber formation. Mice deficient in fibulin-4 die perinatally because of severe pulmonary and vascular defects associated with the lack of intact elastic fibers. Patients with fibulin-4 mutations demonstrate similar defects, and a significant number die shortly after birth or in early childhood from cardiopulmonary failure. The patients also demonstrate skeletal and other systemic connective tissue abnormalities, including joint laxity and flexion contractures of the wrist. A fibulin-4 null mouse strain was generated and used to analyze the roles of fibulin-4 in tendon fibrillogenesis. This mouse model displayed bilateral forelimb contractures, in addition to pulmonary and cardiovascular defects. The forelimb and hindlimb tendons exhibited disruption in collagen fibrillogenesis in the absence of fibulin-4 as analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Fewer fibrils were assembled, and fibrils were disorganized compared with wild-type controls. The organization of developing tenocytes and compartmentalization of the extracellular space was also disrupted. Fibulin-4 was co-localized with fibrillin-1 and fibrillin-2 in limb tendons by using immunofluorescence microscopy. Thus, fibulin-4 seems to play a role in regulating tendon collagen fibrillogenesis, in addition to its essential function in elastogenesis.

  6. Mecp2-Null Mice Provide New Neuronal Targets for Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Urdinguio, Rocio G.; Lopez-Serra, Lidia; Lopez-Nieva, Pilar; Alaminos, Miguel; Diaz-Uriarte, Ramon; Fernandez, Agustin F.; Esteller, Manel

    2008-01-01

    Background Rett syndrome (RTT) is a complex neurological disorder that is one of the most frequent causes of mental retardation in women. A great landmark in research in this field was the discovery of a relationship between the disease and the presence of mutations in the gene that codes for the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Currently, MeCP2 is thought to act as a transcriptional repressor that couples DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. The present study aimed to identify new target genes regulated by Mecp2 in a mouse model of RTT. Methodology/Principal Findings We have compared the gene expression profiles of wild type (WT) and Mecp2-null (KO) mice in three regions of the brain (cortex, midbrain, and cerebellum) by using cDNA microarrays. The results obtained were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed seven direct target genes of Mecp2 bound in vivo (Fkbp5, Mobp, Plagl1, Ddc, Mllt2h, Eya2, and S100a9), and three overexpressed genes due to an indirect effect of a lack of Mecp2 (Irak1, Prodh and Dlk1). The regions bound by Mecp2 were always methylated, suggesting the involvement of the methyl-CpG binding domain of the protein in the mechanism of interaction. Conclusions We identified new genes that are overexpressed in Mecp2-KO mice and are excellent candidate genes for involvement in various features of the neurological disease. Our results demonstrate new targets of MeCP2 and provide us with a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of RTT. PMID:18989361

  7. Increased maternofetal calcium flux in parathyroid hormone-related protein-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Bond, H; Dilworth, M R; Baker, B; Cowley, E; Requena Jimenez, A; Boyd, R D H; Husain, S M; Ward, B S; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D

    2008-01-01

    The role of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in fetal calcium homeostasis and placental calcium transport was examined in mice homozygous for the deletion of the PTHrP gene (PTHrP−/− null; NL) compared to PTHrP+/+ (wild-type; WT) and PTHrP+/− (heterozygous; HZ) littermates. Fetal blood ionized calcium was significantly reduced in NL fetuses compared to WT and HZ groups at 18 days of pregnancy (dp) with abolition of the fetomaternal calcium gradient. In situ placental perfusion of the umbilical circulation at 18 dp was used to measure unidirectional clearance of 45Ca across the placenta in maternofetal (CaKmf) and fetoplacental (CaKfp) directions; CaKfp was < 5% of CaKmf for all genotypes. At 18 dp, CaKmf across perfused placenta and intact placenta (CaKmf(intact)) were similar and concordant with net calcium accretion rates in vivo. CaKmf was significantly raised in NL fetuses compared to WT and HZ littermates. Calcium accretion was significantly elevated in NL fetuses by 19 dp. Placental calbindin-D9K expression in NL fetuses was marginally enhanced (P < 0.07) but expression of TRPV6/ECaC2 and plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) isoforms 1 and 4 were unaltered. We conclude that PTHrP is an important regulator of fetal calcium homeostasis with its predominant effect being on unidirectional maternofetal transfer, probably mediated by modifying placental calbindin-D9K expression. In situ perfusion of mouse placenta is a robust methodology for allowing detailed dissection of placental transfer mechanisms in genetically modified mice. PMID:18258656

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mutant and Null Mice Retain Morphine-Induced Tolerance, Hyperalgesia, and Physical Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Theresa Alexandra; Leduc-Pessah, Heather; Skelhorne-Gross, Graham; Nicol, Christopher J. B.; Milne, Brian; Trang, Tuan; Cahill, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system modulates opioid-induced effects within the central nervous system and one target that has received considerable attention is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, we examined the contribution of TLR4 in the development of morphine tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence in two inbred mouse strains: C3H/HeJ mice which have a dominant negative point mutation in the Tlr4 gene rendering the receptor non-functional, and B10ScNJ mice which are TLR4 null mutants. We found that neither acute antinociceptive response to a single dose of morphine, nor the development of analgesic tolerance to repeated morphine treatment, was affected by TLR4 genotype. Likewise, opioid induced hyperalgesia and opioid physical dependence (assessed by naloxone precipitated withdrawal) were not altered in TLR4 mutant or null mice. We also examined the behavioural consequence of two stereoisomers of naloxone: (−) naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and (+) naloxone, a purported antagonist of TLR4. Both stereoisomers of naloxone suppressed opioid induced hyperalgesia in wild-type control, TLR4 mutant, and TLR4 null mice. Collectively, our data suggest that TLR4 is not required for opioid-induced analgesic tolerance, hyperalgesia, or physical dependence. PMID:24824631

  9. Behavioral phenotype of maLPA1-null mice: increased anxiety-like behavior and spatial memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Santin, L.J.; Bilbao, A.; Pedraza, C.; Matas-Rico, E.; López-Barroso, D.; Castilla-Ortega, E.; Sánchez-López, J.; Riquelme, R.; Varela-Nieto, I.; de la Villa, P.; Suardíaz, M.; Chun, J.; De Fonseca, F. Rodriguez; Estivill-Torrús, G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has emerged as a new regulatory molecule in the brain. Recently, some studies have demonstrated a role for this molecule and its LPA1 receptor in the regulation of plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult brain. However, no systematic studies have been conducted to investigate whether the LPA1 receptor is involved in behavior. Here we studied the phenotype of maLPA1–null mice, which bear a targeted deletion at the lpa1 locus, in a battery of tests examining neurologic performance, habituation in exploratory behavior in response to low and mild anxiety environments and spatial memory. MaLPA1-null mutants showed deficits in both olfaction and somesthesis, but not in retinal or auditory functions. Sensorimotor coordination was impaired only in the equilibrium and grasping reflexes. The mice also showed impairments in neuromuscular strength and analgesic response. No additional differences were observed in the rest of the tests used to study sensoriomotor orientation, limb reflexes, and coordinated limb use. At behavioral level, maLPA1-null mice showed an impaired exploration in the open field and increased anxiety-like response when exposed to the elevated plus maze. Furthermore, the mice exhibit impaired spatial memory retention and reduced use of spatial strategies in the Morris water maze. We propose that the LPA1 receptor may play a major role in both spatial memory and response to anxiety-like conditions. PMID:19689455

  10. Nephropathy in Pparg-null mice highlights PPARγ systemic activities in metabolism and in the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Toffoli, Barbara; Gilardi, Federica; Winkler, Carine; Soderberg, Magnus; Kowalczuk, Laura; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Bamberg, Krister; Bonny, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor involved in many aspects of metabolism, immune response, and development. Total-body deletion of the two Pparg alleles provoked generalized lipoatrophy along with severe type 2 diabetes. Herein, we explore the appearance and development of structural and functional alterations of the kidney, comparing Pparg null-mice to their littermate controls (carrying Pparg floxed alleles). We show that renal hypertrophy and functional alterations with increased glucosuria and albuminuria are already present in 3 weeks-old Pparg null-mice. Renal insufficiency with decreased creatinine clearance progress at 7 weeks of age, with the advance of the type 2 diabetes. At 52 weeks of age, these alterations are accompanied by signs of fibrosis and mesangial expansion. More intriguingly, aged Pparg null-mice concomitantly present an anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), characterized by the late appearance of microthrombi and a mesangioproliferative pattern of glomerular injury, associated with significant plasmatic levels of anti-β2- glycoprotein1 antibodies and renal deposition of IgG, IgM, and C3. Thus, in line with the role of PPARγ in metabolic homeostasis, Pparg null-mice first represent a potent model for studying the initiation and the development of diabetic nephropathy. Second, and in relation with the important PPARγ activity in inflammation and in immune system, these mice also highlight a new role for PPARγ signaling in the promotion of APS, a syndrome whose pathogenesis is poorly known and whose current treatment is limited to prevention of thrombosis events. PMID:28182703

  11. periostin Null Mice Exhibit Dwarfism, Incisor Enamel Defects, and an Early-Onset Periodontal Disease-Like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Hector; Koushik, Shrinagesh V.; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Hong-Ming; Lindsley, Andrew; Rogers, Rhonda; Chen, Zhi; Maeda, Manabu; Kruzynska-Frejtag, Agnieszka; Feng, Jian Q.; Conway, Simon J.

    2005-01-01

    Periostin was originally identified as an osteoblast-specific factor and is highly expressed in the embryonic periosteum, cardiac valves, placenta, and periodontal ligament as well as in many adult cancerous tissues. To investigate its role during development, we generated mice that lack the periostin gene and replaced the translation start site and first exon with a lacZ reporter gene. Surprisingly, although periostin is widely expressed in many developing organs, periostin-deficient (perilacZ) embryos are grossly normal. Postnatally, however, ∼14% of the nulls die before weaning and all of the remaining perilacZ nulls are severely growth retarded. Skeletal analysis revealed that trabecular bone in adult homozygous skeletons was sparse, but overall bone growth was unaffected. Furthermore, by 3 months, the nulls develop an early-onset periodontal disease-like phenotype. Unexpectedly, these mice also show a severe incisor enamel defect, although there is no apparent change in ameloblast differentiation. Significantly, placing the perilacZ nulls on a soft diet that alleviated mechanical strain on the periodontal ligament resulted in a partial rescue of both the enamel and periodontal disease-like phenotypes. Combined, these data suggest that a healthy periodontal ligament is required for normal amelogenesis and that periostin is critically required for maintenance of the integrity of the periodontal ligament in response to mechanical stresses. PMID:16314533

  12. Constitutive Androgen Receptor-Null Mice Are Sensitive to the Toxic Effects of Parathion: Association with Reduced Cytochrome P450-Mediated Parathion MetabolismS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Linda C.; Hernandez, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive androgen receptor (CAR) is activated by several chemicals and in turn regulates multiple detoxification genes. Our research demonstrates that parathion is one of the most potent, environmentally relevant CAR activators with an EC50 of 1.43 μM. Therefore, animal studies were conducted to determine whether CAR was activated by parathion in vivo. Surprisingly, CAR-null mice, but not wild-type (WT) mice, showed significant parathion-induced toxicity. However, parathion did not induce Cyp2b expression, suggesting that parathion is not a CAR activator in vivo, presumably because of its short half-life. CAR expression is also associated with the expression of several drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (P450). CAR-null mice demonstrate lower expression of Cyp2b9, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 primarily, but not exclusively in males. Therefore, we incubated microsomes from untreated WT and CAR-null mice with parathion in the presence of esterase inhibitors to determine whether CAR-null mice show perturbed P450-mediated parathion metabolism compared with that in WT mice. The metabolism of parathion to paraoxon and p-nitrophenol (PNP) was reduced in CAR-null mice with male CAR-null mice showing reduced production of both paraoxon and PNP, and female CAR-null mice showing reduced production of only PNP. Overall, the data indicate that CAR-null mice metabolize parathion slower than WT mice. These results provide a potential mechanism for increased sensitivity of individuals with lower CAR activity such as newborns to parathion and potentially other chemicals due to decreased metabolic capacity. PMID:20573718

  13. Prevention of hepatic fibrosis with liver microsomal triglyceride transfer protein deletion in liver fatty acid binding protein null mice.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Elizabeth P; Xie, Yan; Kennedy, Susan M; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Jiang, Hui; Chen, Anping; Ory, Daniel S; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2017-03-01

    Blocking hepatic very low-density lipoprotein secretion through genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp) causes hepatic steatosis, yet the risks for developing hepatic fibrosis are poorly understood. We report that liver-specific Mttp knockout mice (Mttp-LKO) exhibit both steatosis and fibrosis, which is exacerbated by a high-transfat/fructose diet. When crossed into germline liver fatty acid (FA) binding protein null mice (Mttp-LKO, i.e., double knockout mice) hepatic steatosis was greatly diminished and fibrosis prevented, on both low-fat and high-fat diets. The mechanisms underlying protection include reduced long chain FA uptake, shifts in FA distribution (lipidomic profiling), and metabolic turnover, specifically decreased hepatic 18:2 FA and triglyceride species and a shift in 18:2 FA use for oxidation versus incorporation into newly synthesized triglyceride. Double knockout mice were protected against fasting-induced hepatic steatosis (a model of enhanced exogenous FA delivery) yet developed steatosis upon induction of hepatic de novo lipogenesis with fructose feeding. Mttp-LKO mice, on either the liver FA binding protein null or Apobec-1 null background (i.e., apolipoprotein B100 only) exhibited only subtle increases in endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that an altered unfolded protein response is unlikely to account for the attenuated phenotype in double knockout mice. Acute, antisense-mediated liver FA binding protein knockdown in Mttp-LKO mice also reduced FA uptake, increased oxidation versus incorporation of 18:2 species with complete reversal of hepatic steatosis, increased hepatic injury, and worsened fibrosis. Perturbing exogenous hepatic FA use modulates both hepatic steatosis and fibrosis in the setting of hepatic Mttp deletion, adding new insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms and consequences of defective very low-density lipoprotein secretion. (Hepatology 2017;65:836-852). © 2016 by

  14. Loss of niche-satellite cell interactions in syndecan-3 null mice alters muscle progenitor cell homeostasis improving muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pisconti, Addolorata; Banks, Glen B; Babaeijandaghi, Farshad; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Rossi, Fabio M V; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle stem cell niche provides an environment that maintains quiescent satellite cells, required for skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Syndecan-3, a transmembrane proteoglycan expressed in satellite cells, supports communication with the niche, providing cell interactions and signals to maintain quiescent satellite cells. Syndecan-3 ablation unexpectedly improves regeneration in repeatedly injured muscle and in dystrophic mice, accompanied by the persistence of sublaminar and interstitial, proliferating myoblasts. Additionally, muscle aging is improved in syndecan-3 null mice. Since syndecan-3 null myofiber-associated satellite cells downregulate Pax7 and migrate away from the niche more readily than wild type cells, syxndecan-3 appears to regulate satellite cell homeostasis and satellite cell homing to the niche. Manipulating syndecan-3 provides a promising target for development of therapies to enhance muscle regeneration in muscular dystrophies and in aged muscle.

  15. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration associated with axial and radiating low back pain in ageing SPARC-null mice.

    PubMed

    Millecamps, Magali; Tajerian, Maral; Naso, Lina; Sage, E Helene; Stone, Laura S

    2012-06-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a complex, multifactorial disorder with unclear underlying mechanisms. In humans and rodents, decreased expression of secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and signs of LBP. The current study investigates the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP. SPARC-null and age-matched control mice ranging from 6 to 78 weeks of age were evaluated in this study. X-ray and histologic analysis revealed reduced IVD height, increased wedging, and signs of degeneration (bulging and herniation). Cutaneous sensitivity to cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli were used as measures of referred (low back and tail) and radiating pain (hind paw). Region specificity was assessed by measuring icilin- and capsaicin-evoked behaviour after subcutaneous injection into the hind paw or upper lip. Axial discomfort was measured by the tail suspension and grip force assays. Motor impairment was determined by the accelerating rotarod. Physical function was evaluated by voluntary activity after axial strain or during ambulation with forced lateral flexion. SPARC-null mice developed (1) region-specific, age-dependent hypersensitivity to cold, icilin, and capsaicin (hind paw only), (2) axial discomfort, (3) motor impairment, and (4) reduced physical function. Morphine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced cutaneous sensitivity and alleviated axial discomfort in SPARC-null mice. Ageing SPARC-null mice mirror many aspects of the complex and challenging nature of LBP in humans and incorporate both anatomic and functional components of the disease. The current study supports the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP.

  16. A mouse renin distal enhancer is essential for blood pressure homeostasis in BAC-rescued renin-null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Keiji; Kanafusa, Sumiyo; Ushiki, Aki; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Ishida, Junji; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Renin is predominantly expressed in juxtaglomerular cells in the kidney and regulates blood pressure homeostasis. To examine possible in vivo functions of a mouse distal enhancer (mdE), we generated transgenic mice (TgM) carrying either wild-type or mdE-deficient renin BACs (bacterial artificial chromosome), integrated at the identical chromosomal site. In the kidneys of the TgM, the mdE contributed 80% to basal renin promoter activity. To test for possible physiological roles for the mdE, renin BAC transgenes were used to rescue the hypotensive renin-null mice. Interestingly, renal renin expression in the Tg(BAC):renin-null compound mice was indistinguishable between the wild-type and mutant BAC carriers. Surprisingly, however, the plasma renin activity and angiotensin I concentration in the mdE compound mutant mice were significantly lower than the same parameters in the control mice, and the mutants were consistently hypotensive, demonstrating that blood pressure homeostasis is regulated through transcriptional cis elements controlling renin activity.

  17. Defective platelet aggregation and increased resistance to thrombosis in purinergic P2Y1 receptor–null mice

    PubMed Central

    Léon, Catherine; Hechler, Béatrice; Freund, Monique; Eckly, Anita; Vial, Catherine; Ohlmann, Philippe; Dierich, Andrée; LeMeur, Marianne; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Gachet, Christian

    1999-01-01

    ADP is a key agonist in hemostasis and thrombosis. ADP-induced platelet activation involves the purinergic P2Y1 receptor, which is responsible for shape change through intracellular calcium mobilization. This process also depends on an unidentified P2 receptor (P2cyc) that leads to adenylyl cyclase inhibition and promotes the completion and amplification of the platelet response. P2Y1-null mice were generated to define the role of the P2Y1 receptor and to determine whether the unidentified P2cyc receptor is distinct from P2Y1. These mice are viable with no apparent abnormalities affecting their development, survival, reproduction, or the morphology of their platelets, and the platelet count in these animals is identical to that of wild-type mice. However, platelets from P2Y1-deficient mice are unable to aggregate in response to usual concentrations of ADP and display impaired aggregation to other agonists, while high concentrations of ADP induce platelet aggregation without shape change. In addition, ADP-induced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase still occurs, demonstrating the existence of an ADP receptor distinct from P2Y1. P2Y1-null mice have no spontaneous bleeding tendency but are resistant to thromboembolism induced by intravenous injection of ADP or collagen and adrenaline. Hence, the P2Y1 receptor plays an essential role in thrombotic states and represents a potential target for antithrombotic drugs. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1731–1737 (1999). PMID:10606627

  18. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Orlicky, David J; Maclean, Kenneth N

    2015-08-14

    In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap.

  19. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K. Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P.; Allen, Robert H.; Orlicky, David J.; Maclean, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap. PMID:26276101

  20. Dioxin-dependent and dioxin-independent gene batteries: comparison of liver and kidney in AHR-null mice.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Paul C; Bielefeld, Kirsten A; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Harper, Patricia A

    2009-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a widely expressed ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates cellular responses to dioxins and other planar aromatic hydrocarbons. Ahr-null mice are refractory to the toxic effects of dioxin exposure. Although some mechanistic aspects of AHR activity are well understood, the tissue specificity of AHR effects remains unclear, both during development and following administration of exogenous ligands. To address the latter issue, we defined and compared transcriptional responses to dioxin exposure in the liver and kidney of wild-type and Ahr-null adult C57BL/6J mice treated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or corn-oil vehicle. In both tissues, essentially all effects of dioxin on hepatic mRNA levels were mediated by the AHR. Although 297 genes were altered by dioxin exposure in the liver, only 17 were changed in the kidney, including a number of well-established AHR target genes. Ahr genotype had a large effect in both tissues, profoundly remodeling both the renal and hepatic transcriptomes. Surprisingly, a large number of genes were affected by Ahr genotype in both tissues, suggesting the presence of a basal AHR gene battery. Alterations of the renal transcriptome in Ahr-null animals were associated with perturbation of specific functional pathways and enrichment of specific DNA motifs. Our results demonstrate the importance of intertissue comparisons, highlight the basal role of the AHR in liver and kidney, and support a role in development or normal physiology.

  1. Lack of Hypophagia in CB1 Null Mice is Associated to Decreased Hypothalamic POMC and CART Expression

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Claudia; Seoane-Collazo, Patricia; Fernø, Johan; Mazza, Roberta; Bosch, Fátima; Seoane, Luisa M.; Nogueiras, Ruben; Diéguez, Carlos; Quarta, Carmelo; López, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cumulative data indicate that the endocannabinoid system plays a major role in feeding behavior and energy balance. Genetic silencing of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) reduces body weight gain, independently of food intake. Methods: In this work, we investigated whether the hypothalamic neuropeptide expression pattern supports the absence of the anorexigenic response observed under constitutive CB1 ablation, by using neuronal CB1 conditional null mice (CamK-CB1-KO) and whole body CB1 null mice (CB1-KO). Results: Our data showed that both CB1 null models display a marked decrease in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) expression in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC). Conclusions: This evidence suggests that a lack of hypophagia is associated with the suppression of ARC anorexigenic neuropeptides and that behavioral changes in food intake (or lack thereof) after constitutive CB1 ablation are likely mediated by impaired melanocortin and CART signaling in the hypothalamus. PMID:25655433

  2. Disruption of Npr1 gene differentially regulates the juxtaglomerular and distal tubular renin levels in null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Minolfa C; Das, Subhankar; Somanna, Naveen K; Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M; Navar, L Gabriel; Pandey, Kailash N

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exerts an inhibitory effect on juxtaglomerular (JG) renin synthesis and release by activating guanylyl cyclase/ natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA). Renin has also been localized in connecting tubule cells; however, the effect of ANP/NPRA signaling on tubular renin has not been determined. In the present study, we determined the role of NPRA in regulating both JG and tubular renin using Npr1 (coding for NPRA) gene-disrupted mice, which exhibit a hypertensive phenotype. Renin-positive immunoreactivity in Npr1-/- homozygous null mutant mice was significantly reduced compared with Npr1+/+ wild-type mice (23% vs 69% renin-positive glomeruli). However, after chronic diuretic treatment, Npr1-/- mice showed an increment of JG renin immunoreactivity compared with Npr1+/+ mice (70% vs 81% renin-positive glomeruli). There were no significant differences in the distal tubule renin between Npr1+/+ and Npr1-/- mice. However, after diuretic treatment, Npr1-/- mice showed a significant decrease in renin immunoreactivity in principal cells of cortical collecting ducts (p<0.05). The increased JG renin immunoreactivity after reduction in blood pressure in diuretic-treated Npr1-/- mice, demonstrates an inhibitory action of ANP/NPRA system on JG renin; however, a decreased expression of distal tubular renin suggests a differential effect of ANP/NPRA signaling on JG and distal tubular renin. PMID:23071870

  3. Astrogliosis is delayed in type 1 interleukin-1 receptor-null mice following a penetrating brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Basu, Anirban; Druckman, Charles; Cicchese, Michael; Krady, J Kyle; Levison, Steven W

    2006-01-01

    The cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β are induced rapidly after insults to the CNS, and their subsequent signaling through the type 1 IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1) has been regarded as essential for a normal astroglial and microglial/macrophage response. To determine whether abrogating signaling through the IL-1R1 will alter the cardinal astrocytic responses to injury, we analyzed molecules characteristic of activated astrocytes in response to a penetrating stab wound in wild type mice and mice with a targeted deletion of IL-1R1. Here we show that after a stab wound injury, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) induction on a per cell basis is delayed in the IL-1R1-null mice compared to wild type counterparts. However, the induction of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, tenascin, S-100B as well as glutamate transporter proteins, GLAST and GLT-1, and glutamine synthetase are independent of IL-1RI signaling. Cumulatively, our studies on gliosis in the IL-1R1-null mice indicate that abrogating IL-1R1 signaling delays some responses of astroglial activation; however, many of the important neuroprotective adaptations of astrocytes to brain trauma are preserved. These data recommend the continued development of therapeutics to abrogate IL-1R1 signaling to treat traumatic brain injuries. However, astroglial scar related proteins were induced irrespective of blocking IL-1R1 signaling and thus, other therapeutic strategies will be required to inhibit glial scarring. PMID:16808851

  4. Astrogliosis is delayed in type 1 interleukin-1 receptor-null mice following a penetrating brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Basu, Anirban; Druckman, Charles; Cicchese, Michael; Krady, J Kyle; Levison, Steven W

    2006-06-30

    The cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta are induced rapidly after insults to the CNS, and their subsequent signaling through the type 1 IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1) has been regarded as essential for a normal astroglial and microglial/macrophage response. To determine whether abrogating signaling through the IL-1R1 will alter the cardinal astrocytic responses to injury, we analyzed molecules characteristic of activated astrocytes in response to a penetrating stab wound in wild type mice and mice with a targeted deletion of IL-1R1. Here we show that after a stab wound injury, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) induction on a per cell basis is delayed in the IL-1R1-null mice compared to wild type counterparts. However, the induction of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, tenascin, S-100B as well as glutamate transporter proteins, GLAST and GLT-1, and glutamine synthetase are independent of IL-1RI signaling. Cumulatively, our studies on gliosis in the IL-1R1-null mice indicate that abrogating IL-1R1 signaling delays some responses of astroglial activation; however, many of the important neuroprotective adaptations of astrocytes to brain trauma are preserved. These data recommend the continued development of therapeutics to abrogate IL-1R1 signaling to treat traumatic brain injuries. However, astroglial scar related proteins were induced irrespective of blocking IL-1R1 signaling and thus, other therapeutic strategies will be required to inhibit glial scarring.

  5. Icariin improves eNOS/NO pathway to prohibit the atherogenesis of apolipoprotein E-null mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong-Bo; Sui, Guo-Guang; Lu, Xiang-Yang

    2016-12-22

    Impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) pathway induces atherogenesis. The present study examined whether icariin improves the eNOS/NO pathway to prohibit the atherogenesis of apolipoprotein E-null (ApoE(-/-)) mice. In vitro, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were randomly divided into 7 groups: control; vehicle; icariin 10; lyphosphatidylcholine (LPC) group; LPC + icariin 1; LPC + icariin 3; and LPC + icariin 10. In vivo, 80 mice were separated randomly into 4 groups (n = 20): control, ApoE(-/-), ApoE(-/-) + icariin 10, and ApoE(-/-) + icariin 30. ApoE(-/-) mice had significantly more atherosclerosis in the aortic root together with increased aortic ROS production, body mass, plasma triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) concentration, decreased aortic eNOS expression, and plasma NO concentration. LPC (10 μg/mL) treatment induced a big decline in NO level in the conditioned medium and eNOS expression, and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in HUVECs. Icariin treatment decreased atherogenesis, ROS production, body mass, plasma TG concentration, and plasma TC concentration, and increased NO concentration and eNOS expression. These findings suggested icariin could improve eNOS/NO-pathway to prohibit the atherogenesis of apolipoprotein E-null mice by restraining oxidative stress.

  6. Reduction of aberrant NF-κB signalling ameliorates Rett syndrome phenotypes in Mecp2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Noriyuki; MacDonald, Jessica L.; Ye, Julia; Molyneaux, Bradley J.; Azim, Eiman; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the transcriptional regulator Mecp2 cause the severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). In this study, we investigate genes that function downstream of MeCP2 in cerebral cortex circuitry, and identify upregulation of Irak1, a central component of the NF-κB pathway. We show that overexpression of Irak1 mimics the reduced dendritic complexity of Mecp2-null cortical callosal projection neurons (CPN), and that NF-κB signalling is upregulated in the cortex with Mecp2 loss-of-function. Strikingly, we find that genetically reducing NF-κB signalling in Mecp2-null mice not only ameliorates CPN dendritic complexity but also substantially extends their normally shortened lifespan, indicating broader roles for NF-κB signalling in RTT pathogenesis. These results provide new insight into both the fundamental neurobiology of RTT, and potential therapeutic strategies via NF-κB pathway modulation. PMID:26821816

  7. iNOS null MRL+/+ mice show attenuation of trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity: contribution of reactive nitrogen species and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Wakamiya, Maki; Wang, Jianling; Ansari, G A S; Firoze Khan, M

    2015-12-01

    Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggest that free radicals, especially overproduction of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes (LDRAs), are associated with trichloroethene (TCE)-mediated autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the contribution of RNS and LDRAs in TCE-mediated autoimmunity by using iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice. iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were obtained by backcrossing iNOS-null mice (B6.129P2-Nos2(tm1Lau)/J) to MRL +/+ mice. Female MRL+/+ and iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were given TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4(th) day) for 6 weeks; their respective controls received corn oil only. TCE exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA in livers, iNOS protein in livers and sera, increased nitrotyrosine (NT) formation in both livers and sera, induction of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in livers and their respective antibodies in sera along with significant increases in serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA in MRL+/+ mice. Even though in iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice, the iNOS and NT levels were negligible in both TCE-treated and untreated groups, TCE treatment still led to significant increases in MDA-/HNE-protein adducts and their respective antibodies along with increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA compared to controls. Most remarkably, the increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA induced by TCE in the iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were significantly less pronounced compared to that in MRL+/+ mice. Our results provide further evidence that both RNS and LDRAs contribute to TCE-induced autoimmunity in MRL+/+ mice, and iNOS deficiency attenuates this autoimmune response.

  8. iNOS null MRL+/+ mice show attenuation of trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity: contribution of reactive nitrogen species and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gangduo; Wakamiya, Maki; Wang, Jianling; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2015-01-01

    Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggest that free radicals, especially overproduction of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes (LDRAs), are associated with trichloroethene (TCE)-mediated autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the contribution of RNS and LDRAs in TCE-mediated autoimmunity by using iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice. iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were obtained by backcrossing iNOS-null mice (B6.129P2-Nos2tm1Lau/J) to MRL +/+ mice. Female MRL+/+ and iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were given TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day) for 6 weeks; their respective controls received corn oil only. TCE exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA in livers, iNOS protein in livers and sera, increased nitrotyrosine (NT) formation in both livers and sera, induction of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in livers and their respective antibodies in sera along with significant increases in serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA in MRL+/+ mice. Even though in iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice, the iNOS and NT levels were negligible in both TCE-treated and untreated groups, TCE treatment still led to significant increases in MDA-/HNE-protein adducts and their respective antibodies along with increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA compared to controls. Most remarkably, the increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA induced by TCE in the iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were significantly less pronounced compared to that in MRL+/+ mice. Our results provide further evidence that both RNS and LDRAs contribute to TCE-induced autoimmunity in MRL+/+ mice, and iNOS deficiency attenuates this autoimmune response. PMID:26472195

  9. Connexin 26 (GJB2) mutations in two Swedish patients with atypical Vohwinkel (mutilating keratoderma plus deafness) and KID syndrome both extensively treated with acitretin.

    PubMed

    Bondeson, Marie-Louise; Nyström, Anna-Maja; Gunnarsson, Ulrika; Vahlquist, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Neuroectodermal syndromes involving the skin and inner ear may be associated with mutations in connexin proteins, which form gap junctions important for intercellular communication. Vohwinkel syndrome (keratodermia mutilans with hearing loss) and keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome are rare ectodermal dysplasias associated with dominant mutations in the GJB2 gene encoding connexin 26. We report here two patients, one with KID and one with Vohwinkel syndrome. Both displayed unusual clinical features and responded well to long-term treatment with oral retinoid. Mutation analysis revealed a novel GJB2 mutation p.Gly59Ser in the patient with Vohwinkel syndrome, whereas a recurrent mutation p.Asp50Asn was found in the patient with KID syndrome. The clinical features, particularly a proneness to skin cancer in the patient with Vohwinkel syndrome, are discussed in relation to the identified genotypes.

  10. The 35delG mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) associated with congenital deafness: European carrier frequencies and evidence for its origin in ancient Greece.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard; Diéterlen, Florent

    2005-01-01

    The 35delG mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) at the DFNB1 locus represents the most common mutation in Caucasian patients with genetic sensorineural deafness. This new meta-analysis concerns published carrier frequencies of the 35delG mutation in 27 populations for 6,628 unrelated individuals in Europe and in the Middle East; the mean carrier frequency of the mutation is 1.9%. Compared on a regional basis, the most elevated carrier frequency value is of 1 individual carrier in 31 in southern Europe. It is probable that the 35delG mutation originated in ancient Greece and was subsequently propagated in other Mediterranean countries (especially in Italy) during recent historical times.

  11. Novel Role for SGK3 in Glucose Homeostasis Revealed in SGK3/Akt2 Double-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Li-Jun; McCormick, James A.; Wang, Jian; Yang, Katherine Y.; Kidwai, Atif; Colussi, Gian Luca; Boini, Krishna M.; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Lang, Florian; German, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent kinase, Akt2, plays a central role in mediating insulin effects in glucose-metabolizing tissues. Akt2 knockout mice display insulin resistance with a reactive increase in pancreatic islet mass and hyperinsulinemia. The related phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent kinase, serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 3 (SGK3), is essential for normal postnatal hair follicle development but plays no apparent role in glucose homeostasis. We report here an unexpected role of SGK3 in islet β-cell function, which is revealed in Akt2/SGK3 double-knockout (DKO) mice. DKO mice have markedly worse glucose homeostasis than Akt2 single-null animals, including greater baseline glucose, and greater rise in blood glucose after glucose challenge. However, surprisingly, our data strongly support the idea that this exacerbation of the glucose-handling defect is due to impaired β-cell function, rather than increased insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. DKO mice had lower plasma insulin and C-peptide levels, lower β-cell mass, reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and greater sensitivity to exogenous insulin than Akt2 single nulls. We further demonstrated that SGK3 is strongly expressed in normal mouse islets and, interestingly, that β-catenin expression is dramatically lower in the islets of DKO mice than in those of Akt2−/−/SGK3+/+ or Akt2−/−/SGK3+/− mice. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that SGK3 plays a previously unappreciated role in glucose homeostasis, likely through direct effects within β-cells, to stimulate proliferation and insulin release, at least in part by controlling the expression and activity of β-catenin. PMID:21980074

  12. Differential effects of green tea-derived catechin on developing versus established atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-null mice.

    PubMed

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Babbidge, Stephanie M; Zhao, Xiaoning; Dandillaya, Ram; Rietveld, Anton G; Yano, Juliana; Dimayuga, Paul; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K

    2004-05-25

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in vascular injury and atherogenesis, and antioxidant treatment has shown favorable results in preclinical studies. Despite this, antioxidant therapy has failed to show benefit in clinical trials. Failure of antioxidants in clinical trials may be partly because such therapy is started after atherosclerosis is already well established, whereas the benefits in animal models may be results from early initiation of antioxidants while atherosclerosis is still evolving. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main antioxidant derived from green tea, on evolving and established atherosclerotic lesions in hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-null mice. Established native aortic atherosclerotic lesions and evolving atherosclerotic lesions produced by periadventitial cuff injury to carotid arteries were assessed in mice after 21 and 42 days of treatment with daily intraperitoneal injections of EGCG (10 mg/kg) or PBS. EGCG treatment resulted in an increase in the antioxidant capacity in local vascular tissue and systemic circulation and reduced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and redox-sensitive gene activation in vitro. EGCG reduced cuff-induced evolving atherosclerotic plaque size at 21 and 42 days by 55% and 73%, respectively, compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05). Conversely, EGCG had no effect on established lesions in the aortic sinuses or the rest of the aorta. Our data suggest that antioxidant EGCG differentially reduces evolving atherosclerotic lesions without influencing established atherosclerosis in the apolipoprotein E-null mice.

  13. Lovastatin fails to improve motor performance and survival in methyl-CpG-binding protein2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Villani, Claudia; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Bagnati, Renzo; Passoni, Alice; Fusco, Federica; Carli, Mirjana; Invernizzi, Roberto William

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies provided evidence for the alteration of brain cholesterol homeostasis in 129.Mecp2-null mice, an experimental model of Rett syndrome. The efficacy of statins in improving motor symptoms and prolonging survival of mutant mice suggested a potential role of statins in the therapy of Rett syndrome. In the present study, we show that Mecp2 deletion had no effect on brain and reduced serum cholesterol levels and lovastatin (1.5 mg/kg, twice weekly as in the previous study) had no effects on motor deficits and survival when Mecp2 deletion was expressed on a background strain (C57BL/6J; B6) differing from that used in the earlier study. These findings indicate that the effects of statins may be background specific and raise important issues to consider when contemplating clinical trials. The reduction of the brain cholesterol metabolite 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC) found in B6.Mecp2-null mice suggests the occurrence of changes in brain cholesterol metabolism and the potential utility of using plasma levels of 24S-OHC as a biomarker of brain cholesterol homeostasis in RTT. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22409.001 PMID:27892851

  14. Electrocardiographic and other cardiac anomalies in beta-glucuronidase-null mice corrected by nonablative neonatal marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, A J T; Hampton, T J; Chu, V; Vogler, C A; Galvin, N; Lessard, M D; Barker, J E

    2004-01-13

    Cardiovascular manifestations of lysosomal storage disease (LSD) are a significant health problem for affected patients. Infantile-onset cardiac disease, because of its rapid progression, is usually treated symptomatically. Therapy in older patients includes valve replacement and bone marrow (BM) transplantation, both of which are life threatening in the already debilitated patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has potential benefit but has not yet been demonstrated to provide long-term relief for cardiac disease. Here, we demonstrate prevention of severe cardiac manifestations in beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) null mice BM-transplanted i.v. as neonates without myeloablative pretreatment. The mice, a model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPSVII, Sly syndrome), develop progressive LSD unless provided with GUSB early in life. The BM recipients retained GUSB+ donor cells in the peripheral blood and heart until necropsy at > or = 11 months of age. The enzyme beta-hexosamindase increased in tissues of GUSB null MPSVII mice was reduced significantly (P = 0.001) in treated MPSVII hearts. Electrocardiography demonstrated normalization of heart rate, PR, PQ, and QRS intervals in BM recipients. Storage was markedly reduced in the stroma of heart valves, adventitial cells of the aortic root, perivascular and interstitial cells of the myocardium, and interstitial cells of the conduction tissue. Heart/body weight ratio normalized. The aortic root was still grossly distended, and the conductive myocytes retained storage, suggesting neither plays a major role in ECG normalization. We conclude that transplantation of MPSVII neonates without toxic intervention can prevent many of the cardiovascular manifestations of LSD.

  15. Prolyl 3-hydroxylase-1 null mice exhibit hearing impairment and abnormal morphology of the middle ear bone joints

    PubMed Central

    Pokidysheva, Elena; Tufa, Sara; Bresee, Chris; Brigande, John V.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    Prolyl 3-hydroxylase1 (P3H1) is a collagen modifying enzyme which hydroxylates certain prolines in the Xaa position of conventional GlyXaaYaa triple helical sequence. Recent investigations have revealed that mutations in the LEPRE1 (gene encoding for P3H1) cause severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in humans. Similarly LEPRE1 knockout mice display an OI-like phenotype. Significant hearing loss is a common problem for people with osteogenesis imperfecta. Here we report that hearing of the P3H1 null mice is substantially affected. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) of the P3H1 null mice show an average increase of 20–30 dB in auditory thresholds. Three dimensional reconstructions of the mutant middle ear bones by Micro-scale X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT) demonstrate abnormal morphology of the incudostapedial and incudomalleal joints. We establish the LEPRE1 knockout mouse as a valuable model system to investigate the mechanism of hearing loss in recessive OI. PMID:23186870

  16. Genetic Disruption of Myostatin Reduces the Development of Proatherogenic Dyslipidemia and Atherogenic Lesions In Ldlr Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Powen; Bhasin, Shalender; Hruz, Paul W.; Herbst, Karen L.; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Hua, Ning; Hamilton, James A.; Guo, Wen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin-resistant states, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, contribute substantially to accelerated atherogenesis. Null mutations of myostatin (Mstn) are associated with increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. In this study, we determined whether Mstn disruption could prevent the development of insulin resistance, proatherogenic dyslipidemia, and atherogenesis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS C57BL/6 Ldlr−/− mice were cross-bred with C57BL/6 Mstn−/− mice for >10 generations to generate Mstn−/−/Ldlr−/− double-knockout mice. The effects of high-fat/high-cholesterol diet on body composition, plasma lipids, systemic and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity, hepatic steatosis, as well as aortic atheromatous lesion were characterized in Mstn−/−/Ldlr−/− mice in comparison with control Mstn+/+/Ldlr−/− mice. RESULTS Compared with Mstn+/+/Ldlr−/− controls, Mstn−/−/ Ldlr−/− mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity, and had greatly improved insulin sensitivity, as indicated by 42% higher glucose infusion rate and 90% greater muscle [3H]-2-deoxyglucose uptake during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Mstn−/−/Ldlr−/− mice were protected against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and had 56% higher rate of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation than controls. Mstn−/−/Ldlr−/− mice also had 36% lower VLDL secretion rate and were protected against diet-induced dyslipidemia, as indicated by 30–60% lower VLDL and LDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, and triglycerides. Magnetic resonance angiography and en face analyses demonstrated 41% reduction in aortic atheromatous lesions in Ldlr−/− mice with Mstn deletion. CONCLUSIONS Inactivation of Mstn protects against the development of insulin resistance, proatherogenic dyslipidemia, and aortic atherogenesis in Ldlr−/− mice. Myostatin may be a useful target for drug development for prevention and treatment of obesity and its associated type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis

  17. Modeling the Cell Muscle Membrane from Normal and Desmin- or Dystrophin-null Mice as an Elastic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; González-Serratos, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Two of the most important proteins linking the contractile apparatus and costameres at the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers are dystrophin and desmin. We have developed an elastic model of the proteins that link the sarcolemma to the myofibrils. This is a distributed model, with an elastic constant, k, that includes the main protein components of the costameres. The distributed spring model is composed of parallel units attached in series. To test the model, we performed experiments in which we applied negative pressure, generated by an elastimeter, to a small area of the sarcolemma from single myofiber. The negative pressure formed a bleb of variable height, dependent on the pressure applied. We normalized our measurements of k in dystrophin-null (mdx) and desmin-null (des-/-) mice to the value we obtained for wild type (WT) mice, which was set at 1.0. The relative experimental value for the stiffness of myofibers from mice lacking dystrophin or desmin was 0.5 and 0.7, respectively. The theoretical k values of the individual elements were obtained using neural networks (NN), in which the input was the k value for each parallel spring component and the output was the solution of each resulting parallel system. We compare the experimental values of k in control and mutant muscles to the theoretical values obtained by NN for each protein. Computed theoretical values were 0.4 and 0.8 for dystrophin- and desmin-null muscles, respectively, and 0.9 for WT, in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. This suggests that, although it is a simplified spring model solved by NN, it provides a good approximation of the distribution of spring elements and the elastic constants of the proteins that form the costameres. Our results show that dystrophin is the protein that contributes more than any other to the strength of the connections between the sarcolemma and the contractile apparatus, the costameres.

  18. Enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Blue, Mary E; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the X-linked gene for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The underlying cellular mechanism for the sensory deficits in patients with RTT is largely unknown. This study used the Bird mouse model of RTT to investigate sensory thalamocortical synaptic transmission in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice. Electrophysiological results showed an excitation/inhibition imbalance, biased toward inhibition, due to an increase in efficacy of postsynaptic GABAA receptors rather than alterations in inhibitory network and presynaptic release properties. Enhanced inhibition impaired the transmission of tonic sensory signals from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex. Previous morphological studies showed an upregulation of NMDA receptors in the neocortex of both RTT patients and Mecp2-null mice at early ages [Blue ME, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Ann Neurol 45: 541-545, 1999; Blue ME, Kaufmann WE, Bressler J, Eyring C, O'Driscoll C, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294: 1624-1634, 2011]. Although AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission was not altered in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice, extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses increased markedly. These responses were blocked by memantine, suggesting that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of RTT. The results suggest that enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses may underlie impaired somatosensation and that pharmacological blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may have therapeutic value for RTT.

  19. Enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Blue, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the X-linked gene for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The underlying cellular mechanism for the sensory deficits in patients with RTT is largely unknown. This study used the Bird mouse model of RTT to investigate sensory thalamocortical synaptic transmission in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice. Electrophysiological results showed an excitation/inhibition imbalance, biased toward inhibition, due to an increase in efficacy of postsynaptic GABAA receptors rather than alterations in inhibitory network and presynaptic release properties. Enhanced inhibition impaired the transmission of tonic sensory signals from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex. Previous morphological studies showed an upregulation of NMDA receptors in the neocortex of both RTT patients and Mecp2-null mice at early ages [Blue ME, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Ann Neurol 45: 541–545, 1999; Blue ME, Kaufmann WE, Bressler J, Eyring C, O'Driscoll C, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294: 1624–1634, 2011]. Although AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission was not altered in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice, extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses increased markedly. These responses were blocked by memantine, suggesting that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of RTT. The results suggest that enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses may underlie impaired somatosensation and that pharmacological blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may have therapeutic value for RTT. PMID:26683074

  20. Age-related and depot-specific changes in white adipose tissue of growth hormone receptor-null mice.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Berryman, Darlene E; Lubbers, Ellen R; Zhang, Han; Vesel, Clare B; Troike, Katie M; Gosney, Elahu S; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone receptor-null (GHR(-/-)) mice are dwarf, insulin sensitive, and long-lived in spite of increased adiposity. However, their adiposity is not uniform, with select white adipose tissue (WAT) depots enlarged. To study WAT depot-specific effects on insulin sensitivity and life span, we analyzed individual WAT depots of 12- and 24-month-old GHR(-) (/-) and wild-type (WT) mice, as well as their plasma levels of selected hormones. Adipocyte sizes and plasma insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels decreased with age in both GHR(-) (/-) and WT mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis proteomes of WAT depots were similar among groups, but several proteins involved in endocytosis and/or cytoskeletal organization (Ehd2, S100A10, actin), anticoagulation (S100A10, annexin A5), and age-related conditions (alpha2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein A-I, transthyretin) showed significant differences between genotypes. Because Ehd2 may regulate endocytosis of Glut4, we measured Glut4 levels in the WAT depots of GHR(-) (/-) and WT mice. Inguinal WAT of 12-month-old GHR(-) (/-) mice displayed lower levels of Glut4 than WT. Overall, the protein changes detected in this study offer new insights into possible mechanisms contributing to enhanced insulin sensitivity and extended life span in GHR(-) (/-) mice.

  1. Parathyroid Hormone Administration Improves Bone Marrow Microenvironment and Partially Rescues Haematopoietic Defects in Bmi1-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ruinan; Wang, Qian; Han, Yongli; Li, Jianyong; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Miao, Dengshun

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic regulator Bmi1 is key in haematopoietic stem cells, and its inactivation leads to defects in haematopoiesis. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), an important modulator of bone homeostasis, also regulates haematopoiesis, so we asked whether PTH administration improves bone marrow microenvironment and rescues the haematopoietic defects in Bmi1-null mice. The mice were treated with PTH1-34 (containing the first 34 residues of mature PTH), an anabolic drug currently used for treating osteoporosis, and compared with the vehicle-treated Bmi1-/- and wild-type littermates in terms of skeletal and haematopoietic phenotypes. We found that the administration significantly increased all parameters related to osteoblastic bone formation and significantly reduced the adipocyte number and PPARγ expression. The bone marrow cellularity, numbers of haematopoietic progenitors and stem cells in the femur, and numbers of lymphocytes and other white blood cells in the peripheral blood all increased significantly when compared to vehicle-treated Bmi1-/- mice. Moreover, the number of Jagged1-positive cells and percentage of Notch intracellular domain-positive bone marrow cells and protein expression levels of Jagged1 and NICD in bone tissue were also increased in Bmi1-/- mice upon PTH1-34 administration,whereas the up-regulation of PTH on both Notch1 and Jagged1 gene expression was blocked by the Notch inhibitor DAPT administration. These results thus indicate that PTH administration activates the notch pathway and partially rescues haematopoietic defects in Bmi1-null mice, further suggesting that haematopoietic defects in the animals are not only a result of reduced self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells but also due to impaired bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24705625

  2. BAAV Mediated GJB2 Gene Transfer Restores Gap Junction Coupling in Cochlear Organotypic Cultures from Deaf Cx26Sox10Cre Mice

    PubMed Central

    Crispino, Giulia; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Scimemi, Pietro; Rodriguez, Laura; Galindo Ramirez, Fabian; De Siati, Romolo Daniele; Santarelli, Rosa Maria; Arslan, Edoardo; Bortolozzi, Mario; Chiorini, John A.; Mammano, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The deafness locus DFNB1 contains GJB2, the gene encoding connexin26 and GJB6, encoding connexin30, which appear to be coordinately regulated in the inner ear. In this work, we investigated the expression and function of connexin26 and connexin30 from postnatal day 5 to adult age in double transgenic Cx26Sox10Cre mice, which we obtained by crossing connexin26 floxed mice with a deleter Sox10–Cre line. Cx26Sox10Cre mice presented with complete connexin26 ablation in the epithelial gap junction network of the cochlea, whereas connexin30 expression was developmentally delayed; immunolabeling patterns for both connexins were normal in the cochlear lateral wall. In vivo electrophysiological measurements in Cx26Sox10Cre mice revealed profound hearing loss accompanied by reduction of endocochlear potential, and functional experiments performed in postnatal cochlear organotypic cultures showed impaired gap junction coupling. Transduction of these cultures with a bovine adeno associated virus vector restored connexin26 protein expression and rescued gap junction coupling. These results suggest that restoration of normal connexin levels by gene delivery via recombinant adeno associated virus could be a way to rescue hearing function in DFNB1 mouse models and, in future, lead to the development of therapeutic interventions in humans. PMID:21876744

  3. BAAV mediated GJB2 gene transfer restores gap junction coupling in cochlear organotypic cultures from deaf Cx26Sox10Cre mice.

    PubMed

    Crispino, Giulia; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Scimemi, Pietro; Rodriguez, Laura; Galindo Ramirez, Fabian; De Siati, Romolo Daniele; Santarelli, Rosa Maria; Arslan, Edoardo; Bortolozzi, Mario; Chiorini, John A; Mammano, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The deafness locus DFNB1 contains GJB2, the gene encoding connexin26 and GJB6, encoding connexin30, which appear to be coordinately regulated in the inner ear. In this work, we investigated the expression and function of connexin26 and connexin30 from postnatal day 5 to adult age in double transgenic Cx26(Sox10Cre) mice, which we obtained by crossing connexin26 floxed mice with a deleter Sox10-Cre line. Cx26(Sox10Cre) mice presented with complete connexin26 ablation in the epithelial gap junction network of the cochlea, whereas connexin30 expression was developmentally delayed; immunolabeling patterns for both connexins were normal in the cochlear lateral wall. In vivo electrophysiological measurements in Cx26(Sox10Cre) mice revealed profound hearing loss accompanied by reduction of endocochlear potential, and functional experiments performed in postnatal cochlear organotypic cultures showed impaired gap junction coupling. Transduction of these cultures with a bovine adeno associated virus vector restored connexin26 protein expression and rescued gap junction coupling. These results suggest that restoration of normal connexin levels by gene delivery via recombinant adeno associated virus could be a way to rescue hearing function in DFNB1 mouse models and, in future, lead to the development of therapeutic interventions in humans.

  4. Dioxin-Dependent and Dioxin-Independent Gene Batteries: Comparison of Liver and Kidney in AHR-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boutros, Paul C.; Bielefeld, Kirsten A.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Harper, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a widely expressed ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates cellular responses to dioxins and other planar aromatic hydrocarbons. Ahr-null mice are refractory to the toxic effects of dioxin exposure. Although some mechanistic aspects of AHR activity are well understood, the tissue specificity of AHR effects remains unclear, both during development and following administration of exogenous ligands. To address the latter issue, we defined and compared transcriptional responses to dioxin exposure in the liver and kidney of wild-type and Ahr-null adult C57BL/6J mice treated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or corn-oil vehicle. In both tissues, essentially all effects of dioxin on hepatic mRNA levels were mediated by the AHR. Although 297 genes were altered by dioxin exposure in the liver, only 17 were changed in the kidney, including a number of well-established AHR target genes. Ahr genotype had a large effect in both tissues, profoundly remodeling both the renal and hepatic transcriptomes. Surprisingly, a large number of genes were affected by Ahr genotype in both tissues, suggesting the presence of a basal AHR gene battery. Alterations of the renal transcriptome in Ahr-null animals were associated with perturbation of specific functional pathways and enrichment of specific DNA motifs. Our results demonstrate the importance of intertissue comparisons, highlight the basal role of the AHR in liver and kidney, and support a role in development or normal physiology. PMID:19759094

  5. Pharmacological treatment with mirtazapine rescues cortical atrophy and respiratory deficits in MeCP2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Bittolo, Tamara; Raminelli, Carlo Antonio; Deiana, Chiara; Baj, Gabriele; Vaghi, Valentina; Ferrazzo, Sara; Bernareggi, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-01-25

    Loss of MeCP2 (Methyl CpG binding protein 2) in Rett syndrome (RTT) causes brain weight decrease, shrinkage of the cortex with reduced dendritic arborization, behavioral abnormalities, seizures and cardio-respiratory complications. The observed monoamine neurotransmitters reduction in RTT suggested antidepressants as a possible therapy. We treated MeCP2-null mice from postnatal-day 28 for two weeks with desipramine, already tested in RTT, or mirtazapine, an antidepressant with limited side-effects, known to promote GABA release. Mirtazapine was more effective than desipramine in restoring somatosensory cortex thickness by fully rescuing pyramidal neurons dendritic arborization and spine density. Functionally, mirtazapine treatment normalized heart rate, breath rate, anxiety levels, and eliminated the hopping behavior observed in MeCP2-null mice, leading to improved phenotypic score. These morphological and functional effects of mirtazapine were accompanied by reestablishment of the GABAergic and glutamatergic receptor activity recorded in cortex and brainstem tissues. Thus, mirtazapine can represent a new potential pharmacological treatment for the Rett syndrome.

  6. Renoprotective Effects of Vitex megapotamica (Spreng.) Moldenke in C57BL/6 LDLr-Null Mice Undergoing High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Valdinei de Oliveira; Gasparotto, Francielly Mourão; Pires, Vanessa Aranega; Maciel, Aline Antunes; Ortmann, Caroline Flach; Cardozo Junior, Euclides Lara; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes

    2015-01-01

    Although Vitex megapotamica (Spreng.) Moldenke is used in Brazilian folk medicine as hypolipidemic drug no study has been conducted to evaluate the effects of this species in an experimental model of atherosclerosis. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible renoprotective activity of methanolic extract obtained from Vitex megapotamica (MEVM) using C57BL/6 LDLr-null mice submitted to high fat diet (HFD). MEVM was orally administered at doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, for three weeks, starting from the 2nd week of HFD. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diuretic activity were measured weekly. At the end of experiments the serum lipids, atherogenic index serum (AIS), oxidative stress, and markers of renal function were determined. HFD induced a significant increase in the systolic blood pressure, dyslipidemia, increase in AIS, and lipid peroxidation accompanied by an important reduction in renal function. Treatment with MEVM was able to prevent increase in SBP, total cholesterol, triglycerides, AIS, urea, and creatinine levels in LDLr-null mice. These effects were accompanied by a significant reduction in oxidative stress and renal injury. The data reported here support the potential of Vitex megapotamica as candidate to be an herbal medicine used in cardiovascular or renal diseases. PMID:25788962

  7. Pharmacological treatment with mirtazapine rescues cortical atrophy and respiratory deficits in MeCP2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Bittolo, Tamara; Raminelli, Carlo Antonio; Deiana, Chiara; Baj, Gabriele; Vaghi, Valentina; Ferrazzo, Sara; Bernareggi, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Loss of MeCP2 (Methyl CpG binding protein 2) in Rett syndrome (RTT) causes brain weight decrease, shrinkage of the cortex with reduced dendritic arborization, behavioral abnormalities, seizures and cardio-respiratory complications. The observed monoamine neurotransmitters reduction in RTT suggested antidepressants as a possible therapy. We treated MeCP2-null mice from postnatal-day 28 for two weeks with desipramine, already tested in RTT, or mirtazapine, an antidepressant with limited side-effects, known to promote GABA release. Mirtazapine was more effective than desipramine in restoring somatosensory cortex thickness by fully rescuing pyramidal neurons dendritic arborization and spine density. Functionally, mirtazapine treatment normalized heart rate, breath rate, anxiety levels, and eliminated the hopping behavior observed in MeCP2-null mice, leading to improved phenotypic score. These morphological and functional effects of mirtazapine were accompanied by reestablishment of the GABAergic and glutamatergic receptor activity recorded in cortex and brainstem tissues. Thus, mirtazapine can represent a new potential pharmacological treatment for the Rett syndrome. PMID:26806603

  8. Liver specific expression of Cu/ZnSOD extends the lifespan of Sod1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael; Bokov, Alex; Ikeno, Yuji; Jang, Young C; Perez, Viviana I; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan

    2016-03-01

    Genetic ablation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in mice (Sod1(-/-) mice) leads to shortened lifespan with a dramatic increase in hepatocellular carcinoma and accelerated aging phenotypes, including early onset sarcopenia. To study the tissue specific effects of oxidative stress in the Sod1(-/-) mice, we generated mice that only express the human SOD1 gene specifically in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice (Sod1(-/-)/hSOD1(alb) mice). Expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice improved liver function, reduced oxidative damage in liver, and partially restored the expression of several genes involved in tumorigenesis, which are abnormally expressed in the livers of the Sod1(-/-) mice. However, liver specific expression of hSOD1 did not prevent the loss of body weight and muscle mass and alterations in the structure of neuromuscular junctions. The expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice significantly improved the lifespan of Sod1(-/-) mice; however, the lifespan of the Sod1(-/-)/hSOD1(alb) mice was still significantly shorter than wild type mice.

  9. Elevated insulin-like growth factor 2 expression may contribute to the hypermuscular phenotype of myostatin null mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daniel L; Clark, Diana I; Hogan, Elizabeth K; Kroscher, Kellie A; Dilger, Anna C

    2015-10-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) inhibits while insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (Igf1 and Igf2) increase skeletal muscle growth. However, there is little known regarding Mstn regulation of Igf1 and Igf2 expression. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify the expression of IGF family members in skeletal muscle and liver throughout the growth phase of Mstn null (MN) mice. Further, differences between male and female mice were investigated. Male and female wild type (WT) and MN mice were euthanized at birth (0 d), 7 days (7 d), weaning (21 d), sexual maturity (42 d), and 70 d. For the neonatal periods, 0 d and 7 d, all muscles from the hind limbs were compiled for RNA extraction. At 21 d, 42 d, and 70 d, biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior, triceps brachii (TB), and gastrocnemius-soleus complex were collected. As expected, muscle weights were up to 90% greater in MN mice compared with WT mice at 21 d, 42 d and 70 d. However, Igf1 expression was reduced (P ≤ 0.04) at 7d and 21 d in MN mice compared to WT mice. Expression of Igf2 did not differ between genotypes at 0 d and 7d, but, at 21 d, 42 d and 70 d in BF and TB muscles, Igf2 expression was 1.9-2.9 fold greater (P<0.01) in MN compared to WT mice. Hepatic Igf1 and Igf2 levels were minimally affected by genotype; with the exception of a 1.4-fold reduction (P=0.04) in Igf1 expression in 21 d MN mice compared with WT mice. Though male mice were heavier than females starting at 21 d of age, expression differences in Igf1, Igf2, their receptors and binding proteins do not account for growth differences. In every case, when expression was different between sexes, female expression was increased despite increased growth in male mice. This study is the first to provide evidence that Mstn may negatively regulate Igf2 expression to control postnatal skeletal muscle growth, however differences in growth between male and female mice are not readily explained by changes in expression of Igf family members. Copyright

  10. Increased lipolysis in adipose tissues is associated with elevation of systemic free fatty acids and insulin resistance in perilipin null mice.

    PubMed

    Zhai, W; Xu, C; Ling, Y; Liu, S; Deng, J; Qi, Y; Londos, C; Xu, G

    2010-04-01

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) are thought to restrict glucose utilization and induce insulin resistance. Plasma FFA concentrations are primarily governed by lipolysis in adipocytes. Perilipin surrounds the lipid droplet in adipocytes and has a dual role in lipolysis regulation. Perilipin null mice studied by two independent laboratories exhibited similar phenotypes of reduced adipose mass and resistance to diet-induced obesity, but have inconsistent metabolic parameters such as plasma levels of FFA, glucose, and insulin. This discrepancy may be due to differences in genetic background, generation, and nutritional status of the animals examined. In this study, we examined the major metabolic parameters in 129/SvEv perilipin null mice fasted for 4 h and observed increased plasma concentrations of FFA, glycerol, glucose, and insulin. An increase in the score for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index confirmed the insulin resistance in perilipin null mice, which may be attributed to the plasma FFA elevation. Basal lipolysis was increased in adipose tissues or primary adipocytes isolated from perilipin null mice with increased mass and activity of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase. The increased lipolytic action may accelerate FFA efflux from the adipose tissues to the bloodstream, thereby accounting for systemic FFA elevation and, hence, insulin resistance in perilipin null mice. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  11. Aberrant Collagen Composition of the Trabecular Meshwork Results in Reduced Aqueous Humor Drainage and Elevated IOP in MMP-9 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Groef, Lies; Andries, Lien; Siwakoti, Anuja; Geeraerts, Emiel; Bollaerts, Ilse; Noterdaeme, Lut; Etienne, Isabelle; Papageorgiou, Anna-Pia; Stalmans, Ingeborg; Billen, Johan; West-Mays, Judith A.; Moons, Lieve

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Homeostatic turnover of the trabecular meshwork extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential to regulate aqueous humor outflow and to maintain intraocular pressure homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated aqueous humor turnover, intraocular pressure, and trabecular meshwork organization in MMP-9 null mice. Methods Intraocular pressure and aqueous humor turnover were measured in MMP-9 null versus wild-type mice. Morphology of the anterior segment of the eye, with special attention to the structural organization of the trabecular meshwork, was investigated by means of optical coherence tomography, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunostainings, we evaluated the ECM composition of the trabecular meshwork. Finally, the integrity and function of the retina and optic nerve were assessed, via optical coherence tomography, histologic techniques, and optomotor testing. Results MMP-9 null mice displayed early-onset ocular hypertension and reduced aqueous humor turnover. While transmission electron microscopic analysis did not reveal any abnormalities in the cellular organization of the trabecular meshwork, detailed investigation of collagen expression indicated that there is an aberrant trabecular meshwork ECM composition in MMP-9 null mice. Notably, at the age of 13 months, no glaucomatous neurodegeneration was seen in MMP-9 null mice. Conclusions Our observations corroborate MMP-9 as an important remodeler of the collagenous composition of the trabecular meshwork and provide evidence for a causal link between MMP-9 deficiency, trabecular meshwork ultrastructure, and ocular hypertension. PMID:27820954

  12. Cardiac proteasome activity in muscle ring finger-1 null mice at rest and following synthetic glucocorticoid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hwee, Darren T.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2011-01-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac mass through its control of the ubiquitin proteasome system. While it has been suggested that MuRF1 is required for cardiac atrophy, a resting cardiac phenotype has not been reported in mice with a null deletion [knockout (KO)] of MuRF1. Here, we report that MuRF1 KO mice have significantly larger hearts than age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates at ≥6 mo of age and that loss of cardiac mass can occur in the absence of MuRF1. The objective of this study was to determine whether changes in proteasome activity were responsible for the cardiac phenotypes observed in MuRF1 KO mice. Cardiac function, architecture, and proteasome activity were analyzed at rest and following 28 days of dexamethasone (Dex) treatment in 6-mo-old WT and MuRF1 KO mice. Echocardiography demonstrated normal cardiac function in the enlarged hearts in MURF1 KO mice. At rest, heart mass and cardiomyocyte diameter were significantly greater in MuRF1 KO than in WT mice. The increase in cardiac size in MuRF1 KO mice was related to a decrease in proteasome activity and an increase in Akt signaling relative to WT mice. Dex treatment induced a significant loss of cardiac mass in MuRF1 KO, but not WT, mice. Furthermore, Dex treatment resulted in an increase in proteasome activity in KO, but a decrease in WT, mice. In contrast, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling decreased in MuRF1 KO mice and increased in WT mice in response to Dex treatment. These findings demonstrate that MuRF1 plays an important role in regulating cardiac size through alterations in protein turnover and that MuRF1 is not required to induce cardiac atrophy. PMID:21828340

  13. Cardiac proteasome activity in muscle ring finger-1 null mice at rest and following synthetic glucocorticoid treatment.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Gomes, Aldrin V; Bodine, Sue C

    2011-11-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac mass through its control of the ubiquitin proteasome system. While it has been suggested that MuRF1 is required for cardiac atrophy, a resting cardiac phenotype has not been reported in mice with a null deletion [knockout (KO)] of MuRF1. Here, we report that MuRF1 KO mice have significantly larger hearts than age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates at ≥ 6 mo of age and that loss of cardiac mass can occur in the absence of MuRF1. The objective of this study was to determine whether changes in proteasome activity were responsible for the cardiac phenotypes observed in MuRF1 KO mice. Cardiac function, architecture, and proteasome activity were analyzed at rest and following 28 days of dexamethasone (Dex) treatment in 6-mo-old WT and MuRF1 KO mice. Echocardiography demonstrated normal cardiac function in the enlarged hearts in MURF1 KO mice. At rest, heart mass and cardiomyocyte diameter were significantly greater in MuRF1 KO than in WT mice. The increase in cardiac size in MuRF1 KO mice was related to a decrease in proteasome activity and an increase in Akt signaling relative to WT mice. Dex treatment induced a significant loss of cardiac mass in MuRF1 KO, but not WT, mice. Furthermore, Dex treatment resulted in an increase in proteasome activity in KO, but a decrease in WT, mice. In contrast, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling decreased in MuRF1 KO mice and increased in WT mice in response to Dex treatment. These findings demonstrate that MuRF1 plays an important role in regulating cardiac size through alterations in protein turnover and that MuRF1 is not required to induce cardiac atrophy.

  14. Apamin Boosting of Synaptic Potentials in CaV2.3 R-Type Ca2+ Channel Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Kelley, Melissa H; Wu, Wendy W; Adelman, John P; Maylie, James

    2015-01-01

    SK2- and KV4.2-containing K+ channels modulate evoked synaptic potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Each is coupled to a distinct Ca2+ source that provides Ca2+-dependent feedback regulation to limit AMPA receptor (AMPAR)- and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated postsynaptic depolarization. SK2-containing channels are activated by Ca2+ entry through NMDARs, whereas KV4.2-containing channel availability is increased by Ca2+ entry through SNX-482 (SNX) sensitive CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels. Recent studies have challenged the functional coupling between NMDARs and SK2-containing channels, suggesting that synaptic SK2-containing channels are instead activated by Ca2+ entry through R-type Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, SNX has been implicated to have off target affects, which would challenge the proposed coupling between R-type Ca2+ channels and KV4.2-containing K+ channels. To reconcile these conflicting results, we evaluated the effect of SK channel blocker apamin and R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX on evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from CaV2.3 null mice. The results show that in the absence of CaV2.3 channels, apamin application still boosted EPSPs. The boosting effect of CaV2.3 channel blockers on EPSPs observed in neurons from wild type mice was not observed in neurons from CaV2.3 null mice. These data are consistent with a model in which SK2-containing channels are functionally coupled to NMDARs and KV4.2-containing channels to CaV2.3 channels to provide negative feedback regulation of EPSPs in the spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  15. Relationship between hepatic phenotype and changes in gene expression in cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) null mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiu Jun; Chamberlain, Mark; Vassieva, Olga; Henderson, Colin J.; Wolf, C. Roland

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase is the unique electron donor for microsomal cytochrome P450s; these enzymes play a major role in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. In mice with a liver-specific deletion of cytochrome P450 reductase, hepatic cytochrome P450 activity is ablated, with consequent changes in bile acid and lipid homoeostasis. In order to gain insights into the metabolic changes resulting from this phenotype, we have analysed changes in hepatic mRNA expression using microarray analysis and real-time PCR. In parallel with the perturbations in bile acid levels, changes in the expression of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and lipid homoeostasis were observed in hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null mice. This was characterized by a reduced expression of Cyp7b1, and elevation of Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 expression. The levels of mRNAs for other cytochrome P450 genes, including Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11 and Cyp3a16, were increased, demonstrating that endogenous factors play a role in regulating the expression of these proteins and that the increases are due, at least in part, to altered levels of transcripts. In addition, levels of mRNAs encoding genes involved in glycolysis and lipid transport were also increased; the latter may provide an explanation for the increased hepatic lipid content observed in the hepatic null mice. Serum testosterone and oestradiol levels were lowered, accompanied by significantly decreased expression of Hsd3b2 (3β-hydroxy-Δ5-steroid dehydrogenase-2), Hsd3b5 (3β-hydroxy-Δ5-steroid dehydrogenase-5) and Hsd11b1 (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1), key enzymes in steroid hormone metabolism. These microarray data provide important insights into the control of metabolic pathways by the cytochrome system. PMID:15717863

  16. Endocrinomic profile of neurointermediate lobe pituitary prohormone processing in PC1/3- and PC2-Null mice using SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hardiman, Atira; Friedman, Theodore C; Grunwald, William C; Furuta, Machi; Zhu, Ziaorong; Steiner, Donald F; Cool, David R

    2015-01-01

    Pro-vasopressin and pro-oxytocin are prohormones processed in the neurointermediate lobe pituitary to form the biologically active peptide hormones, arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin. Neurointermediate lobe pituitaries from normal (+/+), heterozygous (+/−), PC2-Null (−/−), PC1/3-Null and oxytocin-Null mice were analyzed by SELDI-TOF mass spectroscopy for the peptide hormone products, AVP, oxytocin and neurophysin I and II. Molecular ion species with masses characteristic of oxytocin, AVP, neurophysin I and II, i.e. 1009·41, 1084·5, 9677 and 9679 daltons respectively, were identified in all but the oxytocin-Null mice by comparison with synthetic standards or by C-terminal sequence analysis. Other ion species were found specifically in PC2-Null, heterozygote or normal mice. The results indicate that, in mice, both PC1/3 or PC2 enzyme activity are capable, but not required to correctly process pro-vasopressin or pro-oxytocin to their constituent active peptide hormones. PMID:15956344

  17. Decreased bile-acid synthesis in livers of hepatocyte-conditional NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-null mice results in increased bile acids in serum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) is essential for the function of microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), including those P450s involved in bile acid (BA) synthesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (H-Cpr-null) have been engineered to understand the in vivo function of hepatic P450s in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. However, the impact of hepatic Cpr on BA homeostasis is not clear. The present study revealed that H-Cpr-null mice had a 60% decrease in total BA concentration in liver, whereas the total BA concentration in serum was almost doubled. The decreased level of cholic acid (CA) in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice is likely due to diminished enzyme activity of Cyp8b1 that is essential for CA biosynthesis. Feedback mechanisms responsible for the reduced liver BA concentrations and/or increased serum BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice included the following: 1) enhanced alternative BA synthesis pathway, as evidenced by the fact that classic BA synthesis is diminished but chenodeoxycholic acid still increases in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice; 2) inhibition of farnesoid X receptor activation, which increased the mRNA of Cyp7a1 and 8b1; 3) induction of intestinal BA transporters to facilitate BA absorption from the intestine to the circulation; 4) induction of hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters to increase BA efflux from the liver to blood; and 5) increased generation of secondary BAs. In summary, the present study reveals an important contribution of the alternative BA synthesis pathway and BA transporters in regulating BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice.

  18. Decreased Bile-Acid Synthesis in Livers of Hepatocyte-Conditional NADPH–Cytochrome P450 Reductase–Null Mice Results in Increased Bile Acids in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Zhang, Youcai

    2014-01-01

    NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) is essential for the function of microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), including those P450s involved in bile acid (BA) synthesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase (H-Cpr-null) have been engineered to understand the in vivo function of hepatic P450s in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. However, the impact of hepatic Cpr on BA homeostasis is not clear. The present study revealed that H-Cpr-null mice had a 60% decrease in total BA concentration in liver, whereas the total BA concentration in serum was almost doubled. The decreased level of cholic acid (CA) in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice is likely due to diminished enzyme activity of Cyp8b1 that is essential for CA biosynthesis. Feedback mechanisms responsible for the reduced liver BA concentrations and/or increased serum BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice included the following: 1) enhanced alternative BA synthesis pathway, as evidenced by the fact that classic BA synthesis is diminished but chenodeoxycholic acid still increases in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice; 2) inhibition of farnesoid X receptor activation, which increased the mRNA of Cyp7a1 and 8b1; 3) induction of intestinal BA transporters to facilitate BA absorption from the intestine to the circulation; 4) induction of hepatic multidrug resistance–associated protein transporters to increase BA efflux from the liver to blood; and 5) increased generation of secondary BAs. In summary, the present study reveals an important contribution of the alternative BA synthesis pathway and BA transporters in regulating BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice. PMID:25034404

  19. Distribution of mercury in metallothionein-null mice after exposure to mercury vapor: amount of metallothionein isoform does not affect accumulation of mercury in the brain.

    PubMed

    Yasutake, Akira; Yoshida, Minoru; Honda, Akiko; Watanabe, Chiho; Satoh, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    To examine the contribution of metallothionein (MT) to mercury accumulation in mouse tissues, 129 strain female mice and MT null mice were exposed to metallic mercury vapor at a sub-toxic level, and Hg levels in the brain, kidney and liver were determined on 1, 3 and 7 days after the exposure. After exposure to mercury vapor, significant Hg accumulation was observed in the brains of wild-type and MT-I/II null and MT-III null mice, as well as in the liver and kidneys. No strain difference was observed in the tissue Hg accumulations 24 hr after the exposure except for the kidneys, where the highest accumulation was found in MT-III null mice. Although the brains of MT-III null mice showed slightly higher Hg accumulation than the other two strains, no significant difference was observed except in the cerebrum on Day 7. Gel chromatograms of cerebrum soluble fractions revealed that a significant amount of Hg existed as an MT-bound form in all the mouse strains. On the other hand, MT-bound Hg was found as a minor fraction in soluble fractions of the kidneys and livers in wild-type and MT-III null mice. Despite a significant strain difference in total MT levels in the cerebrum, there was no difference among the three strains in the amount of Hg accumulated in the cerebrum and its distribution rates in MT fractions. The present study demonstrated that brain uptake of Hg(0) and its accumulation as Hg(2+) did not depend on the amount of MT isoform in the tissue, at least in the early phase.

  20. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E; Depriest, Adam D; Cone, Angela C; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  1. Analysis of Trafficking, Stability and Function of Human Connexin 26 Gap Junction Channels with Deafness-Causing Mutations in the Fourth Transmembrane Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E.; DePriest, Adam D.; Cone, Angela C.; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I. Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  2. Prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) null mice have increased mu opioid receptor levels accompanied by altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Lutfy, K; Parikh, D; Lee, D L; Liu, Y; Ferrini, M G; Hamid, A; Friedman, T C

    2016-08-04

    Chronic morphine treatment increases the levels of prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) in brain regions involved in nociception, tolerance and dependence. Thus, we tested if PC2 null mice exhibit altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. PC2 null mice and their wild-type controls were tested for baseline hot plate latency, injected with morphine (1.25-10mg/kg) and tested for antinociception 30min later. For tolerance studies, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg) on day 1. Mice then received an additional dose so that the final dose of morphine was 10mg/kg on this day. On days 2-4, mice received additional doses of morphine (20, 40 and 80mg/kg on days 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively). On day 5, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg). For withdrawal studies, mice were treated with the escalating doses of morphine (10, 20, 40 and 80mg/kg) for 4days, implanted with a morphine pellet on day 5 and 3 days later injected with naloxone (1mg/kg) and signs of withdrawal were recorded. Morphine dose-dependently induced antinociception and the magnitude of this response was greater in PC2 null mice. Tolerance to morphine was observed in wild-type mice and this phenomenon was blunted in PC2 null mice. Withdrawal signs were also reduced in PC2 null mice. Immunohistochemical studies showed up-regulation of the mu opioid receptor (MOP) protein expression in the periaqueductal gray area, ventral tegmental area, lateral hypothalamus, medial hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and somatosensory cortex in PC2 null mice. Likewise, naloxone specific binding was increased in the brains of these mice compared to their wild-type controls. The results suggest that the PC2-derived peptides may play a functional role in morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. Alternatively, lack of opioid peptides led to up-regulation of the MOP and altered morphine

  3. Impulsive action in the 5-choice serial reaction time test in 5-HT₂c receptor null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Paul J; Soko, Ashlie D; Higgins, Guy A

    2013-04-01

    Depletion of brain serotonin (5-HT) results in impulsive behaviour as measured by increased premature responding in the five-choice serial reaction time (5-CSRT) test. Acute selective blockade of 5-HT2C receptors also increases this form of impulsive action, whereas 5-HT2C receptor stimulation reduces premature responding. These experiments determined the impact of genetic disruption of 5-HT2C receptor function on impulsive responding in the 5-CSRT test. Food-restricted 5-HT2C receptor null mutant and wild-type (WT) mice were trained on the 5-CSRT test in which subjects detect and correctly respond to brief light stimuli for food reinforcement. Impulsivity is measured as premature responses that occur prior to stimulus presentation. Both lines of mice quickly learned this task, but there were no genotype differences in premature responding or any other aspect of performance. A series of drug challenges were then given. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist Ro60-0175 (0.6 mg/kg) reduced premature responding in WT mice but not mutant mice. The 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB242084 increased premature responding in WT mice only. Cocaine increased premature responding at 7.5 mg/kg but not at a higher dose that disrupted overall responding; these effects were observed in both lines of mice. Amphetamine (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg) did not affect premature responding, but disrupted other aspects of performance in both genotypes. Genetic deletion of 5-HT2C receptor function does not induce an impulsive state or exacerbate that state induced by psychomotor stimulants but does prevent the acute effects of 5-HT2C receptor stimulation or blockade on impulsive action.

  4. Similar L-dopa-stimulated motor activity in mice with adult-onset 6-hydroxydopamine-induced symmetric dopamine denervation and in transcription factor Pitx3 null mice with perinatal-onset symmetric dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Sagot, Ben; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2015-07-30

    The transcription factor Pitx3 null mutant (Pitx3Null) mice have a constitutive perinatal-onset and symmetric bilateral dopamine (DA) loss in the striatum. In these mice l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) induces apparently normal horizontal movements (walking) but also upward movements consisting of the vertical body trunk and waving paws that are absent in normal animals and in animals with the classic unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion-induced DA denervation. Thus, a concern is that the perinatal timing of the DA loss and potential developmental abnormalities in Pitx3Null mice may underlie these upward movements, thus reducing the usefulness as a DA denervation model. Here we show that in normal wild-type (Pitx3WT) mice with adult-onset symmetric, bilateral 6-OHDA-induced DA lesion in the dorsal striatum, l-dopa induces normal horizontal movements and upward movements that are qualitatively identical to those in Pitx3Null mice. Furthermore, after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the residual DA innervation in the striatum in Pitx3Null mice, l-dopa induces contraversive rotation that is similar to that in Pitx3WT mice with the classic unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. These results indicate that in Pitx3Null mice, the bilateral symmetric DA denervation in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for expressing the l-dopa-induced motor phenotype and the perinatal timing of their DA loss is not a determining factor, providing further evidence that Pitx3Null mice are a convenient and suitable mouse model to study the consequences of DA loss and dopaminergic replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  5. Microglia contribute to circuit defects in Mecp2 null mice independent of microglia-specific loss of Mecp2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Dorothy P; Heller, Christopher T; Gunner, Georgia; Heller, Molly; Gordon, Christopher; Hammond, Timothy; Wolf, Yochai; Jung, Steffen; Stevens, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident CNS macrophages, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder. However, the mechanism by which microglia contribute to the disorder is unclear and recent data suggest that microglia do not play a causative role. Here, we use the retinogeniculate system to determine if and how microglia contribute to pathogenesis in a RTT mouse model, the Mecp2 null mouse (Mecp2tm1.1Bird/y). We demonstrate that microglia contribute to pathogenesis by excessively engulfing, thereby eliminating, presynaptic inputs at end stages of disease (≥P56 Mecp2 null mice) concomitant with synapse loss. Furthermore, loss or gain of Mecp2 expression specifically in microglia (Cx3cr1CreER;Mecp2fl/yor Cx3cr1CreER; Mecp2LSL/y) had little effect on excessive engulfment, synapse loss, or phenotypic abnormalities. Taken together, our data suggest that microglia contribute to end stages of disease by dismantling neural circuits rendered vulnerable by loss of Mecp2 in other CNS cell types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15224.001 PMID:27458802

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta1 null mutation causes infertility in male mice associated with testosterone deficiency and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Wendy V; Robertson, Sarah A

    2007-08-01

    TGFbeta1 is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in gonad and secondary sex organ development, steroidogenesis, and spermatogenesis. To determine the physiological requirement for TGFbeta1 in male reproduction, Tgfb1 null mutant mice on a Prkdc(scid) immunodeficient background were studied. TGFbeta1-deficient males did not deposit sperm or induce pseudopregnancy in females, despite an intact reproductive tract with morphologically normal penis, seminal vesicles, and testes. Serum and intratesticular testosterone and serum androstenedione were severely diminished in TGFbeta1-deficient males. Testosterone deficiency was secondary to disrupted pituitary gonadotropin secretion because serum LH and to a lesser extent serum FSH were reduced, and exogenous LH replacement with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induced serum testosterone to control levels. In the majority of TGFbeta1-deficient males, spermatogenesis was normal and sperm were developmentally competent as assessed by in vitro fertilization. Analysis of sexual behavior revealed that although TGFbeta1 null males showed avid interest in females and engaged in mounting activity, intromission was infrequent and brief, and ejaculation was not attained. Administration of testosterone to adult males, even after neonatal androgenization, was ineffective in restoring sexual function; however, erectile reflexes and ejaculation could be induced by electrical stimulation. These studies demonstrate the profound effect of genetic deficiency in TGFbeta1 on male fertility, implicating this cytokine in essential roles in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in testosterone-independent regulation of mating competence.

  7. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Null Mice Exhibit Female and Male Differences In Regulation of Vascular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vanella, Luca; Canestraro, Martina; Lee, Craig R.; Cao, Jian; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Schwartzman, Michal L.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2015-01-01

    Increased CYP epoxygenase activity and consequently up regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) levels provides protection against metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Conversion of arachidonic acid epoxides to diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) diminishes the beneficial cardiovascular properties of these epoxyeicosanoids. We therefore examined the possible biochemical consequences of sEH deletion on vascular responses in male and female mice. Through the use of the sEH KO mouse, we provide evidence of differences in the compensatory response in the balance between nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), EETs and the vasoconstrictor 20-HETE in male and female KO mice. Serum levels of adiponectin, TNFα, IL-1b and MCP1 and protein expression in vascular tissue of p-AMPK, p-AKT and p-eNOS were measured. Deletion of sEH caused a significant (p<0,05) decrease in body weight, and an increase in adiponectin, pAMPK and pAKT levels in female KO mice compared to male KO mice. Gene deletion resulted in a higher production of renal EETs in female KO compared to male KO mice and, concomitantly, we observed an increase in renal 20-HETEs levels and superoxide anion production only in male KO mice. sEH deletion increased p-AKT and p-eNOS protein expression but decreased p-AMPK levels in female KO mice. Increased levels of p-eNOS at Thr-495 were observed only in KO male mice. While p-eNOS at 1177 were not significantly different between male and female. Nitric oxide production was unaltered in male KO mice. These results provide evidence of gender differences in the preservation of vascular homeostasis in response to sEH deletion which involves regulation of phosphorylation of eNOS at the 495 site. PMID:25908301

  8. Effect of ghrelin receptor antagonist on meal patterns in cholecystokinin type 1 receptor null mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer; Martin, Elizabeth; Paulino, Gabriel; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-03

    Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express the cholecystokinin (CCK) type 1 receptor (CCK₁R) and, as predicted by the role of CCK in inducing satiation, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingest larger and longer meals. However, after a short fast, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting high fat (HF) diets initiate feeding earlier than wild-type mice. We hypothesized that the increased drive to eat in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice eating HF diet is mediated by ghrelin, a gut peptide that stimulates food intake. The decrease in time to first meal, and the increase in meal size and duration in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ compared to wild-type mice ingesting high fat (HF) diet were reversed by administration of GHSR1a antagonist D-(Lys3)-GHRP-6 (p<0.05). Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist significantly increased expression of the neuropeptide cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in VAN of HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ but not wild-type mice. Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist decreased neuronal activity measured by immunoreactivity for fos protein in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the arcuate nucleus of both HF-fed wild-type and CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice. The data show that hyperphagia in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting HF diet is reversed by blockade of the ghrelin receptor, suggesting that in the absence of the CCK₁R, there is an increased ghrelin-dependent drive to feed. The site of action of ghrelin receptors is unclear, but may involve an increase in expression of CART peptide in VAN in HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice.

  9. CMP-Neu5Ac Hydroxylase Null Mice as a Model for Studying Metabolic Disorders Caused by the Evolutionary Loss of Neu5Gc in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Choi, Yun-Jung; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Seo, Han Geuk; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the modification/turnover of gene products that are altered in humans due to evolutionary loss of Neu5Gc. CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase- (Cmah-) deficient mice show the infiltration of Kupffer cells within liver sinusoids, whereas body and liver weight develop normally. Pathway analysis by use of Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip provided evidence that a number of biological pathways, including the glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, and pentose phosphate pathways, as well as glycogen metabolism-related gene expression, were significantly upregulated in Cmah-null mice. The intracellular glucose supply in Cmah-null mice resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the advanced glycation end products accumulation that could further induce oxidative stress. Finally, low sirtuin-1 and sirtuin-3 gene expressions due to higher NADH/NAD in Cmah-null mice decreased Foxo-1 and MnSOD gene expression, suggesting that oxidative stress may result in mitochondrial dysfunction in Cmah-null mouse. The present study suggests that mice with CMAH deficiency can be taken as an important model for studying metabolic disorders in humans. PMID:26558285

  10. Neil2-null Mice Accumulate Oxidized DNA Bases in the Transcriptionally Active Sequences of the Genome and Are Susceptible to Innate Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Wakamiya, Maki; Venkova-Canova, Tatiana; Pandita, Raj K; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Sarker, Altaf H; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Hosoki, Koa; Wood, Thomas G; Sharma, Gulshan; Cardenas, Victor; Sarkar, Partha S; Sur, Sanjiv; Pandita, Tej K; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K

    2015-10-09

    Why mammalian cells possess multiple DNA glycosylases (DGs) with overlapping substrate ranges for repairing oxidatively damaged bases via the base excision repair (BER) pathway is a long-standing question. To determine the biological role of these DGs, null animal models have been generated. Here, we report the generation and characterization of mice lacking Neil2 (Nei-like 2). As in mice deficient in each of the other four oxidized base-specific DGs (OGG1, NTH1, NEIL1, and NEIL3), Neil2-null mice show no overt phenotype. However, middle-aged to old Neil2-null mice show the accumulation of oxidative genomic damage, mostly in the transcribed regions. Immuno-pulldown analysis from wild-type (WT) mouse tissue showed the association of NEIL2 with RNA polymerase II, along with Cockayne syndrome group B protein, TFIIH, and other BER proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis from mouse tissue showed co-occupancy of NEIL2 and RNA polymerase II only on the transcribed genes, consistent with our earlier in vitro findings on NEIL2's role in transcription-coupled BER. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of genomic region-specific repair in mammals. Furthermore, telomere loss and genomic instability were observed at a higher frequency in embryonic fibroblasts from Neil2-null mice than from the WT. Moreover, Neil2-null mice are much more responsive to inflammatory agents than WT mice. Taken together, our results underscore the importance of NEIL2 in protecting mammals from the development of various pathologies that are linked to genomic instability and/or inflammation. NEIL2 is thus likely to play an important role in long term genomic maintenance, particularly in long-lived mammals such as humans.

  11. Neil2-null Mice Accumulate Oxidized DNA Bases in the Transcriptionally Active Sequences of the Genome and Are Susceptible to Innate Inflammation* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Wakamiya, Maki; Venkova-Canova, Tatiana; Pandita, Raj K.; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Sarker, Altaf H.; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Hosoki, Koa; Wood, Thomas G.; Sharma, Gulshan; Cardenas, Victor; Sarkar, Partha S.; Sur, Sanjiv; Pandita, Tej K.; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Why mammalian cells possess multiple DNA glycosylases (DGs) with overlapping substrate ranges for repairing oxidatively damaged bases via the base excision repair (BER) pathway is a long-standing question. To determine the biological role of these DGs, null animal models have been generated. Here, we report the generation and characterization of mice lacking Neil2 (Nei-like 2). As in mice deficient in each of the other four oxidized base-specific DGs (OGG1, NTH1, NEIL1, and NEIL3), Neil2-null mice show no overt phenotype. However, middle-aged to old Neil2-null mice show the accumulation of oxidative genomic damage, mostly in the transcribed regions. Immuno-pulldown analysis from wild-type (WT) mouse tissue showed the association of NEIL2 with RNA polymerase II, along with Cockayne syndrome group B protein, TFIIH, and other BER proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis from mouse tissue showed co-occupancy of NEIL2 and RNA polymerase II only on the transcribed genes, consistent with our earlier in vitro findings on NEIL2's role in transcription-coupled BER. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of genomic region-specific repair in mammals. Furthermore, telomere loss and genomic instability were observed at a higher frequency in embryonic fibroblasts from Neil2-null mice than from the WT. Moreover, Neil2-null mice are much more responsive to inflammatory agents than WT mice. Taken together, our results underscore the importance of NEIL2 in protecting mammals from the development of various pathologies that are linked to genomic instability and/or inflammation. NEIL2 is thus likely to play an important role in long term genomic maintenance, particularly in long-lived mammals such as humans. PMID:26245904

  12. Vascular endothelial tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP)-null mice undergo vasculogenesis but die embryonically because of defects in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Melissa G.; Hughes, Virginia C.; Pan, Li; Simmons, Mary; Daly, Christopher; Anderson, Keith; Noguera-Troise, Irene; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Davis, Samuel; Thurston, Gavin; Yancopoulos, George D.; Gale, Nicholas W.

    2007-01-01

    Development of the vascular system depends on the highly coordinated actions of a variety of angiogenic regulators. Several of these regulators are members of the tyrosine kinase superfamily, including VEGF receptors and angiopoietin receptors, Tie1 and Tie2. Tyrosine kinase signaling is counter-regulated by the activity of tyrosine phosphatases, including vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), which has previously been shown to modulate Tie2 activity. We generated mice in which VE-PTP is replaced with a reporter gene. We confirm that VE-PTP is expressed in endothelium and also show that VE-PTP is highly expressed in the developing outflow tract of the heart and later is expressed in developing heart valves. Vasculogenesis occurs normally in mice lacking VE-PTP; however, angiogenesis is abnormal. Angiogenic defects in VE-PTP-null mice were most pronounced in the yolk sac and include a complete failure to elaborate the primitive vascular scaffold into higher-order branched arteries, veins, and capillaries. VE-PTP continues to be expressed into adulthood in the vasculature and heart valves, suggesting later roles in vascular development or homeostasis. VE-PTP is also expressed in the vasculature of growing tumors, suggesting that VE-PTP may be a new potential target for angiogenic therapies. PMID:17360632

  13. Altered Trabecular Bone Structure and Delayed Cartilage Degeneration in the Knees of Collagen VI Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Susan E.; Coles, Jeffrey M.; Zelenski, Nicole A.; Furman, Bridgette D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Zauscher, Stefan; Bonaldo, Paolo; Guilak, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Mutation or loss of collagen VI has been linked to a variety of musculoskeletal abnormalities, particularly muscular dystrophies, tissue ossification and/or fibrosis, and hip osteoarthritis. However, the role of collagen VI in bone and cartilage structure and function in the knee is unknown. In this study, we examined the role of collagen VI in the morphology and physical properties of bone and cartilage in the knee joint of Col6a1−/− mice by micro-computed tomography (microCT), histology, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning microphotolysis (SCAMP). Col6a1−/− mice showed significant differences in trabecular bone structure, with lower bone volume, connectivity density, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness but higher structure model index and trabecular separation compared to Col6a1+/+ mice. Subchondral bone thickness and mineral content increased significantly with age in Col6a1+/+ mice, but not in Col6a1−/− mice. Col6a1−/− mice had lower cartilage degradation scores, but developed early, severe osteophytes compared to Col6a1+/+mice. In both groups, cartilage roughness increased with age, but neither the frictional coefficient nor compressive modulus of the cartilage changed with age or genotype, as measured by AFM. Cartilage diffusivity, measured via SCAMP, varied minimally with age or genotype. The absence of type VI collagen has profound effects on knee joint structure and morphometry, yet minimal influences on the physical properties of the cartilage. Together with previous studies showing accelerated hip osteoarthritis in Col6a1−/− mice, these findings suggest different roles for collagen VI at different sites in the body, consistent with clinical data. PMID:22448243

  14. FKBP51 Null Mice Are Resistant to Diet-Induced Obesity and the PPARγ Agonist Rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Stechschulte, Lance A; Qiu, Bin; Warrier, Manya; Hinds, Terry D; Zhang, Man; Gu, Hao; Xu, Yuxue; Khuder, Saja S; Russo, Lucia; Najjar, Sonia M; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Yong, Weidong; Sanchez, Edwin R

    2016-10-01

    FK506-binding protein-51 (FKBP51) is a molecular cochaperone recently shown to be a positive regulator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the master regulator of adipocyte differentiation and function. In cellular models of adipogenesis, loss of FKBP51 not only reduced PPARγ activity but also reduced lipid accumulation, suggesting that FKBP51 knock-out (KO) mice might have insufficient development of adipose tissue and lipid storage ability. This model was tested by examining wild-type (WT) and FKBP51-KO mice under regular and high-fat diet conditions. Under both diets, FKBP51-KO mice were resistant to weight gain, hepatic steatosis, and had greatly reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) but higher amounts of brown adipose tissue. Under high-fat diet, KO mice were highly resistant to adiposity and exhibited reduced plasma lipids and elevated glucose and insulin tolerance. Profiling of perigonadal and sc WAT revealed elevated expression of brown adipose tissue lineage genes in KO mice that correlated increased energy expenditure and a shift of substrate oxidation to carbohydrates, as measured by indirect calorimetry. To directly test PPARγ involvement, WT and KO mice were fed rosiglitazone agonist. In WT mice, rosiglitazone induced whole-body weight gain, increased WAT mass, a shift of substrate oxidation to lipids, and elevated expression of PPARγ-regulated lipogenic genes in WAT. In contrast, KO mice had reduced rosiglitazone responses for these parameters. Our results identify FKBP51 as an important regulator of PPARγ in WAT and as a potential new target in the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

  15. Leptin Resistance Contributes to Obesity in Mice with Null Mutation of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Russo, Lucia; Castaneda, Tamara R; Pfeiffer, Verena; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Wu, Jieshen; Faulkner, Latrice D; Ergün, Süleyman; McInerney, Marcia F; Hill, Jennifer W; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-05-20

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes hepatic insulin clearance. Consistently, mice with null mutation of Ceacam1 (Cc1(-/-)) exhibit impaired insulin clearance with increased lipid production in liver and redistribution to white adipose tissue, leading to visceral obesity at 2 months of age. When the mutation is propagated on the C57/BL6J genetic background, total fat mass rises significantly with age, and glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance develop at 6 months of age. This study was carried out to determine the mechanisms underlying the marked increase in total fat mass in 6-month-old mutants. Indirect calorimetry analysis showed that Cc1(-/-) mice develop hyperphagia and a significant reduction in physical activity, in particular in the early hours of the dark cycle, during which energy expenditure is only slightly lower than in wild-type mice. They also exhibit increased triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle, due in part to incomplete fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, hypothalamic leptin signaling is reduced, as demonstrated by blunted STAT3 phosphorylation in coronal sections in response to an intracerebral ventricular injection of leptin. Hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity is also elevated in the mutants. Together, the data show that the increase in total fat mass in Cc1(-/-) mice is mainly attributed to hyperphagia and reduced spontaneous physical activity. Although the contribution of the loss of CEACAM1 from anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus is unclear, leptin resistance and elevated hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity could underlie altered energy balance in these mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Altered Body Weight Regulation in CK1ε Null and tau Mutant Mice on Regular Chow and High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Summa, Keith C.; Olker, Christopher; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms results in metabolic dysfunction. Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) is a canonical circadian clock gene. Null and tau mutations in CK1ε show distinct effects on circadian period. To investigate the role of CK1ε in body weight regulation under both regular chow (RC) and high fat (HF) diet conditions, we examined body weight on both RC and HF diets in CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mice on a standard 24 hr light-dark (LD) cycle. Given the abnormal entrainment of CK1εtau/tau mice on a 24 hr LD cycle, a separate set of CK1εtau/tau mice were tested under both diet conditions on a 20 hr LD cycle, which more closely matches their endogenous period length. On the RC diet, both CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mutants on a 24 hr LD cycle and CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle exhibited significantly lower body weights, despite similar overall food intake and activity levels. On the HF diet, CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle were protected against the development of HF diet-induced excess weight gain. These results provide additional evidence supporting a link between circadian rhythms and energy regulation at the genetic level, particularly highlighting CK1ε involved in the integration of circadian biology and metabolic physiology. PMID:27144030

  17. Placental glucose and amino acid transport in calorie-restricted wild-type and Glut3 null heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Amit; Collis, Laura; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2012-08-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) decreased placenta and fetal weights in wild-type (wt) and glucose transporter (Glut) 3 heterozygous null (glut3(+/-)) mice. Because placental nutrient transport is a primary energy determinant of placentofetal growth, we examined key transport systems. Maternal CR reduced intra- and transplacental glucose and leucine transport but enhanced system A amino acid transport in wt mice. These transport perturbations were accompanied by reduced placental Glut3 and leucine amino acid transporter (LAT) family member 2, no change in Glut1 and LAT family member 1, but increased sodium coupled neutral amino acid transporter (SNAT) and SNAT2 expression. We also noted decreased total and active phosphorylated forms of mammalian target of rapamycin, which is the intracellular nutrient sensor, the downstream total P70S6 kinase, and pS6 ribosomal protein with no change in total and phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1. To determine the role of placental Glut3 in mediating CR-induced placental transport changes, we next investigated the effect of gestational CR in glut3(+/-) mice. In glut3(+/-) mice, a key role of placental Glut3 in mediating transplacental and intraplacental glucose transport was established. In addition, reduced Glut3 results in a compensatory increase of leucine and system A transplacental transport. On the other hand, diminished Glut3-mediated intraplacental glucose transport reduced leucine transport and mammalian target of rapamycin and preserved LAT and enhancing SNAT. CR in glut3(+/-) mice further reduced transplacental glucose transport and enhanced system A amino acid transport, although the increased leucine transport was lost. In addition, increased Glut3 was seen and preserved Glut1, LAT, and SNAT. These placental changes collectively protect survival of wt and glut3(+/-) fetuses against maternal CR-imposed reduction of macromolecular nutrients.

  18. Placental Glucose and Amino Acid Transport in Calorie-Restricted Wild-Type and Glut3 Null Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Amit; Collis, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) decreased placenta and fetal weights in wild-type (wt) and glucose transporter (Glut) 3 heterozygous null (glut3+/−) mice. Because placental nutrient transport is a primary energy determinant of placentofetal growth, we examined key transport systems. Maternal CR reduced intra- and transplacental glucose and leucine transport but enhanced system A amino acid transport in wt mice. These transport perturbations were accompanied by reduced placental Glut3 and leucine amino acid transporter (LAT) family member 2, no change in Glut1 and LAT family member 1, but increased sodium coupled neutral amino acid transporter (SNAT) and SNAT2 expression. We also noted decreased total and active phosphorylated forms of mammalian target of rapamycin, which is the intracellular nutrient sensor, the downstream total P70S6 kinase, and pS6 ribosomal protein with no change in total and phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1. To determine the role of placental Glut3 in mediating CR-induced placental transport changes, we next investigated the effect of gestational CR in glut3+/− mice. In glut3+/− mice, a key role of placental Glut3 in mediating transplacental and intraplacental glucose transport was established. In addition, reduced Glut3 results in a compensatory increase of leucine and system A transplacental transport. On the other hand, diminished Glut3-mediated intraplacental glucose transport reduced leucine transport and mammalian target of rapamycin and preserved LAT and enhancing SNAT. CR in glut3+/− mice further reduced transplacental glucose transport and enhanced system A amino acid transport, although the increased leucine transport was lost. In addition, increased Glut3 was seen and preserved Glut1, LAT, and SNAT. These placental changes collectively protect survival of wt and glut3+/− fetuses against maternal CR-imposed reduction of macromolecular nutrients. PMID:22700768

  19. The cl2/dro1/ccdc80 null mice develop thyroid and ovarian neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Leone, Vincenza; Ferraro, Angelo; Schepis, Filippo; Federico, Antonella; Sepe, Romina; Arra, Claudio; Langella, Concetta; Palma, Giuseppe; De Lorenzo, Carlo; Troncone, Giancarlo; Masciullo, Valeria; Scambia, Giovanni; Fusco, Alfredo; Pallante, Pierlorenzo

    2015-02-28

    We have previously reported that the expression of the CL2/CCDC80 gene is downregulated in human papillary thyroid carcinomas, particularly in follicular variants. We have also reported that the restoration of CL2/CCDC80 expression reverted the malignant phenotype of thyroid carcinoma cell lines and that CL2/CCDC80 positively regulated E-cadherin expression, an ability that likely accounts for the role of the CL2/CCDC80 gene in thyroid cancer progression. In order to validate the tumour suppressor role of the CL2/CCDC80 gene in thyroid carcinogenesis we generated cl2/ccdc80 knock-out mice. We found that embryonic fibroblasts from cl2/ccdc80(-/-) mice showed higher proliferation rate and lower susceptibility to apoptosis. Furthermore, cl2/ccdc80(-/-) mice developed thyroid adenomas and ovarian carcinomas. Finally, ret/PTC1 transgenic mice crossed with the cl2/ccdc80 knock-out mice developed more aggressive thyroid carcinomas compared with those observed in the single ret/PTC1 transgenic mice. Together, these results indicate CL2/CCDC80 as a putative tumour suppressor gene in human thyroid carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural Killer Cells and Mast Cells from gp49B Null Mutant Mice Are Functional

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Susana; Stebbins, Christopher C.; Peterson, Mary E.; Dombrowicz, David; Wagtmann, Nicolai; Long, Eric O.

    2000-01-01

    Immune responses are controlled by a combination of positive and negative cellular signals. Effector cells in the immune system express inhibitory receptors that serve to limit effector cell expansion and to protect the host from autoreactivity. gp49B is a receptor of unknown function that is expressed on activated mast cells and natural killer (NK) cells and whose cytoplasmic tail endows it with inhibitory potential. To gain insight into the function of gp49B in mice, we disrupted the gp49B gene by homologous recombination. gp49B0 mice were born at expected ratios, were healthy and fertile, and displayed normal long-term survival rates. gp49B0 mice showed no defect in NK or mast cell development. Furthermore, NK and mast cells from the gp49B0 mice showed activation properties in vitro similar to those of cells isolated from wild-type mice. Therefore, gp49B is not critical for the development, expansion, and maturation of mast cells and NK cells in vivo. The healthy status of gp49B0 mice makes them suitable for testing the role of gp49B in immune responses to infectious agents. PMID:10982834

  1. Oxidative stress and ROS metabolism via down-regulation of sirtuin 3 expression in Cmah-null mice affect hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah) disruption caused several abnormalities and diseases including hearing loss in old age. However, underling molecular mechanisms that give rise to age-related hearing loss (AHL) in Cmah-null mouse are still obscure. In this study, Cmah-null mice showed age-related decline of hearing associated with loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons, and/or stria vascularis degeneration in the cochlea. To identify differential gene expression profiles and pathway associated with AHL, we performed microarray analysis using Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip and pathway-focused PCR array in the cochlear tissues of Cmah-null mouse. Pathway and molecular mechanism analysis using differentially expressed genes provided evidences that altered biological pathway due to oxidative damage by low expressed antioxidants and dysregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Especially, low sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) gene expressions in Cmah-null mice decreased both of downstream regulator (Foxo1 and MnSod) and regulatory transcription factor (Hif1α and Foxo3a) gene expression. Taken together, we suggest that down-regulation of Sirt3 expression leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction by regulation of ROS and that it could alter various signaling pathways in Cmah-null mice with AHL. PMID:26319214

  2. Design, Synthesis and Properties of Branch-chained Maltoside Detergents for Stabilization and Crystallization of Integral Membrane Proteins: Human Connexin 26

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Baker, Kent A.; Ma, Xingquan; Stevens, Raymond C.; Yeager, Mark; Zhang, Qinghai

    2010-01-01

    A challenging requirement for structural studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) is the use of amphiphiles that replicate the hydrophobic environment of membranes. Progress has been impeded by the limited number of useful detergents and the need for a deeper understanding of their structure-activity relationships. To this end, we designed a family of detergents containing short, branched alkyl chains at the interface between the polar head and apolar tail. This design mimics the second aliphatic chain of lipid molecules and reduces water penetration, thereby increasing the hydrophobicity within the interior of the micelle. To compare with the popular straight-chained maltoside detergents, the branch-chained β-D-maltosides were synthesized efficiently in pure anomeric form. The branch-chained maltosides form smaller micelles by having shorter main chains, while having comparable hydrophobicity to the detergents with only straight chains. Selected branch-chained and straight-chained maltoside detergents were examined for their ability to solubilize, stabilize, and aid the crystallization of human connexin 26, an α-helical IMP that forms hexamers. We showed that the branch-chained maltosides performed as well as straight-chained analogues and enabled crystallization in different space groups. PMID:20232919

  3. Design, synthesis, and properties of branch-chained maltoside detergents for stabilization and crystallization of integral membrane proteins: human connexin 26.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Baker, Kent A; Ma, Xingquan; Stevens, Raymond C; Yeager, Mark; Zhang, Qinghai

    2010-06-01

    A challenging requirement for structural studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) is the use of amphiphiles that replicate the hydrophobic environment of membranes. Progress has been impeded by the limited number of useful detergents and the need for a deeper understanding of their structure-activity relationships. To this end, we designed a family of detergents containing short, branched alkyl chains at the interface between the polar head and the apolar tail. This design mimics the second aliphatic chain of lipid molecules and reduces water penetration, thereby increasing the hydrophobicity within the interior of the micelle. To compare with the popular straight-chained maltoside detergents, the branch-chained beta-D-maltosides were synthesized efficiently in pure anomeric form. The branch-chained maltosides form smaller micelles by having shorter main chains, while having comparable hydrophobicity to the detergents with only straight chains. Selected branch-chained and straight-chained maltoside detergents were examined for their ability to solubilize, stabilize, and aid the crystallization of human connexin 26, an alpha-helical IMP that forms hexamers. We showed that the branch-chained maltosides with optimized micellar properties performed as well as or better than the straight-chained analogues and enabled crystallization in different space groups.

  4. A missense mutation in connexin26, D66H, causes mutilating keratoderma with sensorineural deafness (Vohwinkel's syndrome) in three unrelated families.

    PubMed

    Maestrini, E; Korge, B P; Ocaña-Sierra, J; Calzolari, E; Cambiaghi, S; Scudder, P M; Hovnanian, A; Monaco, A P; Munro, C S

    1999-07-01

    The multiplicity of functions served by intercellular gap junctions is reflected by the variety of phenotypes caused by mutations in the connexins of which they are composed. Mutations in the connexin26 (Cx26) gene ( GJB2 ) at 13q11-q13 are a major cause of autosomal recessive hearing loss (DFNB1), but have also been reported in autosomal dominant deafness (DFNA3). We now report a Cx26 mutation in three families with mutilating keratoderma and deafness [Vohwinkel's syndrome (VS; MIM 124500), as originally described]. VS is characterized by papular and honeycomb keratoderma associated with constrictions of digits leading to autoamputation, distinctive starfish-like acral keratoses and moderate degrees of deafness. In a large British pedigree, we have mapped the defect to the Cx26 locus. All 10 affected members were heterozygous for a non-conservative mutation, D66H, in Cx26. The same mutation was found subsequently in affected individuals from two unrelated Spanish and Italian pedigrees segregating VS, suggesting that D66H in Cx26 is a common mutation in classical VS. This mutation occurs at a highly conserved residue in the first extracellular domain of the Cx26 molecule, and may exert its effects by interfering with assembly into connexons, docking with adjacent cells or gating properties of the gap junction. Our results provide evidence that a specific mutation in Cx26 can impair epidermal differentiation, as well as inner ear function.

  5. [Audiologic and molecular screening for hearing loss by 35delG mutation in connexin 26 gene and congenital cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Streitenberger, Edgardo Raúl; Suárez, Ariel Ignacio; Masciovecchio, María Verónica; Laurnagaray, Diana; Alda, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    Hearing loss may be attributed to genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the gene of the CX26 protein (connexin 26), are responsible for 30-80% of all cases of non-syndromic profound hearing loss. The 35delG is the most frequent variant in the caucasian population. As to environmental factors, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the main cause of congenital infection. To determine the prevalence of congenital CMV infection and the frequency of the 35delG mutation in newborns. To identify those at risk of suffering hearing loss in order to do an audiologic follow-up of detected cases. One thousand and twenty samples of dry blood spots corresponding to newborns were tested using conventional and real time PCR. Audiologic screening was performed to all newborns before hospital discharge. Fifteen out of 1020 subjects were heterozygous for the mutation. No homozygous patients were found. Six out of the samples tested positive for CMV (confirmed by a urine sample), out of which only one newborn was symptomatic. The auditory brainstem response was recorded in all these children. Hearing loss was found in three children with congenital CMV infection and two with 35delG mutation. The frecuency of 35delG mutation carriers in our population was 1.3% and the CMV congenital infection prevalence was 0.6%. Audiologic monitoring of these two populations allowed detection of hearing loss of late onset.

  6. High prevalence of the W24X mutation in the gene encoding connexin-26 (GJB2) in Spanish Romani (gypsies) with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Araceli; del Castillo, Ignacio; Villamar, Manuela; Aguirre, Luis A; González-Neira, Anna; López-Nevot, Alicia; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A; Moreno, Felipe

    2005-09-01

    Molecular testing for mutations in the gene encoding connexin-26 (GJB2) at the DFNB1 locus has become the standard of care for genetic diagnosis and counseling of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI). The spectrum of mutations in GJB2 varies considerably among the populations, different alleles predominating in different ethnic groups. A cohort of 34 families of Spanish Romani (gypsies) with ARNSHI was screened for mutations in GJB2. We found that DFNB1 deafness accounts for 50% of all ARNSHI in Spanish gypsies. The predominating allele is W24X (79% of the DFNB1 alleles), and 35delG is the second most common allele (17%). An allele-specific PCR test was developed for the detection of the W24X mutation. By using this test, carrier frequencies were determined in two sample groups of gypsies from different Spanish regions (Andalusia and Catalonia), being 4% and 0%, respectively. Haplotype analysis for microsatellite markers closely flanking the GJB2 gene revealed five different haplotypes associated with the W24X mutation, all sharing the same allele from marker D13S141, suggesting that a founder effect for this mutation is responsible for its high prevalence among Spanish gypsies. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Impact of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 testing on deaf identity and comprehension of genetic test results in a sample of deaf adults: a prospective, longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christina G S; Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2014-01-01

    Using a prospective, longitudinal study design, this paper addresses the impact of genetic counseling and testing for deafness on deaf adults and the Deaf community. This study specifically evaluated the effect of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results on participants' deaf identity and understanding of their genetic test results. Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic testing was offered to participants in the context of linguistically and culturally appropriate genetic counseling. Questionnaire data collected from 209 deaf adults at four time points (baseline, immediately following pre-test genetic counseling, 1-month following genetic test result disclosure, and 6-months after result disclosure) were analyzed. Four deaf identity orientations (hearing, marginal, immersion, bicultural) were evaluated using subscales of the Deaf Identity Development Scale-Revised. We found evidence that participants understood their specific genetic test results following genetic counseling, but found no evidence of change in deaf identity based on genetic counseling or their genetic test results. This study demonstrated that culturally and linguistically appropriate genetic counseling can improve deaf clients' understanding of genetic test results, and the formation of deaf identity was not directly related to genetic counseling or Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results.

  8. Impact of Genetic Counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 Testing on Deaf Identity and Comprehension of Genetic Test Results in a Sample of Deaf Adults: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Christina G. S.; Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.

    2014-01-01

    Using a prospective, longitudinal study design, this paper addresses the impact of genetic counseling and testing for deafness on deaf adults and the Deaf community. This study specifically evaluated the effect of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results on participants' deaf identity and understanding of their genetic test results. Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic testing was offered to participants in the context of linguistically and culturally appropriate genetic counseling. Questionnaire data collected from 209 deaf adults at four time points (baseline, immediately following pre-test genetic counseling, 1-month following genetic test result disclosure, and 6-months after result disclosure) were analyzed. Four deaf identity orientations (hearing, marginal, immersion, bicultural) were evaluated using subscales of the Deaf Identity Development Scale-Revised. We found evidence that participants understood their specific genetic test results following genetic counseling, but found no evidence of change in deaf identity based on genetic counseling or their genetic test results. This study demonstrated that culturally and linguistically appropriate genetic counseling can improve deaf clients' understanding of genetic test results, and the formation of deaf identity was not directly related to genetic counseling or Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results. PMID:25375116

  9. Epac2a-null mice exhibit obesity-prone nature more susceptible to leptin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, M; Go, Y; Park, J-H; Shin, S-K; Song, S E; Oh, B-C; Im, S-S; Hwang, I; Jeon, Y H; Lee, I-K; Seino, S; Song, D-K

    2017-01-01

    Background: The exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which is primarily involved in cAMP signaling, has been known to be essential for controlling body energy metabolism. Epac has two isoforms: Epac1 and Epac2. The function of Epac1 on obesity was unveiled using Epac1 knockout (KO) mice. However, the role of Epac2 in obesity remains unclear. Methods: To evaluate the role of Epac2 in obesity, we used Epac2a KO mice, which is dominantly expressed in neurons and endocrine tissues. Physiological factors related to obesity were analyzed: body weight, fat mass, food intake, plasma leptin and adiponectin levels, energy expenditure, glucose tolerance, and insulin and leptin resistance. To determine the mechanism of Epac2a, mice received exogenous leptin and then hypothalamic leptin signaling was analyzed. Results: Epac2a KO mice appeared to have normal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity until 12 weeks of age, but an early onset increase of plasma leptin levels and decrease of plasma adiponectin levels compared with wild-type mice. Acute leptin injection revealed impaired hypothalamic leptin signaling in KO mice. Consistently, KO mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) were significantly obese, presenting greater food intake and lower energy expenditure. HFD-fed KO mice were also characterized by greater impairment of hypothalamic leptin signaling and by weaker leptin-induced decrease in food consumption compared with HFD-fed wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, acute exogenous leptin injection or chronic HFD feeding tended to induce hypothalamic Epac2a expression. Conclusions: Considering that HFD is an inducer of hypothalamic leptin resistance and that Epac2a functions in pancreatic beta cells during demands of greater work load, hypothalamic Epac2a may have a role in facilitating leptin signaling, at least in response to higher metabolic demands. Thus, our data indicate that Epac2a is critical for preventing obesity and thus Epac2a activators may be used to

  10. Delayed liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in adipose differentiation related protein-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kohjima, Motoyuki; Tsai, Tsung-Huang; Tackett, Bryan C.; Thevananther, Sundararajah; Li, Lan; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Adult hepatocytes undergo cell cycle progression and proliferation in response to partial hepatectomy (PH). Transient lipid accumulation within hepatocytes preceding the peak proliferative phase is a characteristic feature of regenerating livers. However, the molecular mediators and mechanisms responsible for lipid accumulation in regenerating livers are not well understood. Adipose differentiation related protein (ADRP; Plin2) regulates hepatic triglyceride storage and Plin2-deficient (Plin2−/−) mice have significantly reduced triglyceride (TG) content in the liver. We sought to determine the functional significance of PLIN2 in liver regeneration in response to PH and toxic liver injury and examined whether absence of Plin2 expression modulates hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration. Methods We subjected wild-type (WT) and Plin2−/− mice to 70% PH or acute carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) treatment and examined the hepatic lipid content, the expression profile of lipid metabolism-related genes, the rate of cellular proliferation and the dynamics of liver regeneration in the treated animals. Results In response to PH, Plin2−/− mice showed decreased hepatic triglyceride accumulation and delayed cell cycle progression, which was associated with impaired liver regeneration. Fatty acid (FA) synthesis and lipid transfer gene expression profile were comparable between Plin2−/− and wild-type mice, while VLDL secretion rate was higher in the Plin2−/− mice. Downregulated β-oxidation and reduced cytosolic FA level in Plin2−/− mice may have contributed to the attenuation of the liver regeneration capacity in these animals. In parallel experiments, we also observed attenuated hepatic lipid accumulation and proliferation in response to CCl4-mediated acute toxic liver injury in Plin2−/− mice. Conclusions We conclude that PLIN2-mediated lipid accumulation and utilization by the liver is important for efficient liver regeneration

  11. Bone response to intermittent parathyroid hormone is altered in mice null for {beta}-Arrestin2.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, S L; Pierroz, D D; Glatt, V; Goddard, D S; Bianchi, E N; Lin, F T; Manen, D; Bouxsein, M L

    2005-04-01

    Intermittent PTH administration increases bone turnover, resulting in net anabolic effects on bone. These effects are primarily mediated by intracellular cAMP signaling. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PTH activity in bone remain incompletely understood. beta-Arrestin2, a G protein-coupled receptor regulatory protein, inhibits PTH-stimulated cAMP accumulation in vitro. Using beta-arrestin2(-/-) (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice, we investigated the response to PTH in primary osteoblasts (POB) and the effects of intermittent PTH administration on bone mass and microarchitecture in vivo. Compared with that in WT mice, PTH-stimulated intracellular cAMP was increased and sustained in KO POB. Intermittent exposure of POB to PTH significantly decreased the ratio of osteoprotegerin (OPG) receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA expression in KO POB, whereas it increased this ratio in WT POB. Total body bone mass and cortical and trabecular bone parameters were 5-10% lower in male KO mice compared with WT, and these differences were magnified upon in vivo administration of intermittent PTH (80 mug/kg.d) for 1 month. Thus, PTH significantly increased total body bone mineral content as well as vertebral trabecular bone volume and thickness in WT, but not KO mice. The anabolic response to PTH in cortical bone was also slightly more pronounced in WT than KO mice. Histomorphometry indicated that PTH prominently stimulated indexes of bone formation in both WT and KO mice, whereas it significantly increased indexes of bone resorption (i.e. osteoclast number and surface) in KO mice only. In conclusion, these results suggest that beta-arrestins may specify the activity of intermittent PTH on the skeleton by limiting PTH-induced osteoclastogenesis.

  12. Peripheral mechanisms contributing to the glucocorticoid hypersensitivity in proopiomelanocortin null mice treated with corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Zoi; Coll, Anthony P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Morton, Nicholas M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency causes severe obesity through hyperphagia of hypothalamic origin. However, low glucocorticoid levels caused by adrenal insufficiency mitigate against insulin resistance, hyperphagia and fat accretion in Pomc−/− mice. Upon exogenous glucocorticoid replacement, corticosterone-supplemented (CORT) Pomc−/− mice show exaggerated responses, including excessive fat accumulation, hyperleptinaemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the peripheral mechanisms underlying this glucocorticoid hypersensitivity, we examined the expression levels of key determinants and targets of glucocorticoid action in adipose tissue and liver. Despite lower basal expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which generates active glucocorticoids within cells, CORT-mediated induction of 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels was more pronounced in adipose tissues of Pomc−/− mice. Similarly, CORT treatment increased lipoprotein lipase mRNA levels in all fat depots in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with exaggerated fat accumulation. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were selectively elevated in liver and retroperitoneal fat of Pomc−/− mice but were corrected by CORT in the latter depot. In liver, CORT increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels specifically in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with their insulin-resistant phenotype. Furthermore, CORT induced hypertension in Pomc−/− mice, independently of adipose or liver renin–angiotensin system activation. These data suggest that CORT-inducible 11β-HSD1 expression in fat contributes to the adverse cardiometabolic effects of CORT in POMC deficiency, whereas higher GR levels may be more important in liver. PMID:17592030

  13. Pancreas-specific aquaporin 12 null mice showed increased susceptibility to caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Eriko; Itoh, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Tomomi; Kumagai, Jiro; Ko, Shigeru B H; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Ohno, Mayuko; Uchida, Keiko; Ohta, Akihito; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2009-12-01

    Aquaporin 12 (AQP12) is the most recently identified member of the mammalian AQP family and is specifically expressed in pancreatic acinar cells. In vitro expression studies have revealed that AQP12 is localized at intracellular sites. To determine the physiological roles of AQP12 in the pancreas, we generated knockout mice for this gene (AQP12-KO). No obvious differences were observed under normal conditions between wild-type (WT) and AQP12-KO mice in terms of growth, blood chemistry, pancreatic fluid content, or histology. However, when we induced pancreatitis through the administration of a cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) analog, the AQP12-KO mice showed more severe pathological damage to this organ than WT mice. Furthermore, when we analyzed exocytosis in the pancreatic acini using a two-photon excitation imaging method, the results revealed larger exocytotic vesicles (vacuoles) in the acini of AQP12-KO mice at a high CCK-8 dose (100 nM). From these results, we conclude that AQP12 may function in the mechanisms that control the proper secretion of pancreatic fluid following rapid and intense stimulation.

  14. Ciliary neurotrophic factor is not required for terminal sprouting and compensatory reinnervation of neuromuscular synapses: Re-evaluation of CNTF null mice

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Megan C.; Son, Young-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Loss of synaptic activity or innervation induces sprouting of intact motor nerve terminals that adds or restores nerve-muscle connectivity. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and terminal Schwann cells (tSCs) have been implicated as molecular and cellular mediators of the compensatory process. We wondered if the previously reported lack of terminal sprouting in CNTF null mice was due to abnormal reactivity of tSCs. To this end, we examined nerve terminal and tSC responses in CNTF null mice using experimental systems that elicited extensive sprouting in wildtype mice. Contrary to the previous report, we found that motor nerve terminals in the null mice sprout extensively in response to major sprouting-stimuli such as exogenously applied CNTF per se, botulinum toxin-elicited paralysis, and partial denervation by L4 spinal root transection. In addition, the number, length and growth patterns of terminal sprouts, and the extent of reinnervation by terminal or nodal sprouts, were similar in wildtype and null mice. tSCs in the null mice were also reactive to the sprouting-stimuli, elaborating cellular processes that accompanied terminal sprouts or guided reinnervation of denervated muscle fibers. Lastly, CNTF was absent in quiescent tSCs in intact, wildtype muscles and little if any was detected in reactive tSCs in denervated muscles. Thus, CNTF is not required for induction of nerve terminal sprouting, for reactivation of tSCs, and for compensatory reinnervation after nerve injury. We interpret these results to support the notion that compensatory sprouting in adult muscles is induced primarily by contact-mediated mechanisms, rather than by diffusible factors. PMID:17445802

  15. Characterizing the role of endothelin-1 in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Amie K.; Goens, M. Beth; Nunez, Bethany A.; Walker, Mary K. . E-mail: mkwalker@unm.edu

    2006-04-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor characterized to play a role in detection and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Genetic deletion of AhR results in hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, associated with elevated plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), thus AhR appears to contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that ET-1 mediates cardiovascular pathology in AhR null mice via ET{sub A} receptor activation. First, we determine the time courses of cardiac hypertrophy, and of plasma and tissue ET-1 expression in AhR wildtype and null mice. AhR null mice exhibited increases in heart-to-body weight ratio and age-related expression of cardiac hypertrophy markers, {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC), and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), which were significant at 2 months. Similarly, plasma and tissue ET-1 expression was significantly elevated at 2 months and increased further with age. Second, AhR null mice were treated with ET{sub A} receptor antagonist, BQ-123 (100 nmol/kg/day), for 7, 28, or 58 days and blood pressure, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac hypertrophy assessed, respectively. BQ-123 for 7 days significantly reduced mean arterial pressure in conscious, catheterized mice. BQ-123 for 28 days significantly reduced the histological appearance of cardiac fibrosis. Treatment for 58 days significantly reduced cardiac mass, assessed by heart weight, echocardiography, and {beta}-MHC and ANF expression; and reduced cardiac fibrosis as determined by osteopontin and collagen I mRNA expression. These findings establish ET-1 and the ET{sub A} receptor as primary determinants of hypertension and cardiac pathology in AhR null mice.

  16. Mice carrying a CAR-2 null allele lack carbonic anhydrase II immunohistochemically and show vascular calcification.

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, S. S.; Lewis, S. E.; Tashian, R. E.; Schulte, B. A.

    1989-01-01

    Mutant mice reported to lack carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme II (CA II) have been examined here for immunocytochemical evidence of CA II and for histopathologic change. All histologic sites that immunostain for CA II in a wide range of organs in normal mice failed to show such immunoreactivity in the homozygous mutants. The CA II-deficient mice differed from controls in evidencing an age dependent medial calcification of small arteries in a number of organs. The male genital tract revealed the most extensive arterial calcinosis and males were possibly more affected in general than females. One or another Car-2n/Car-2n mouse showed changes additionally in uterus, small bowel, lymph nodes, or renal pelvis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:2495727

  17. Aβ reduction in BACE1 heterozygous null 5XFAD mice is associated with transgenic APP level.

    PubMed

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Eimer, William A; Cole, Sarah L; Vassar, Robert

    2015-01-07

    The β-secretase, BACE1, cleaves APP to initiate generation of the β-amyloid peptide, Aβ, that comprises amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reducing BACE1 activity is an attractive therapeutic approach to AD, but complete inhibition of BACE1 could have mechanism-based side-effects as BACE1-/- mice show deficits in axon guidance, myelination, memory, and other neurological processes. Since BACE1+/- mice appear normal there is interest in determining whether 50% reduction in BACE1 is potentially effective in preventing or treating AD. APP transgenic mice heterozygous for BACE1 have decreased Aβ but the extent of reduction varies greatly from study to study. Here we assess the effects of 50% BACE1 reduction on the widely used 5XFAD mouse model of AD. 50% BACE1 reduction reduces Aβ42, plaques, and BACE1-cleaved APP fragments in female, but not in male, 5XFAD/BACE1+/- mice. 5XFAD/BACE1+/+ females have higher levels of Aβ42 and steady-state transgenic APP than males, likely caused by an estrogen response element in the transgene Thy-1 promoter. We hypothesize that higher transgenic APP level in female 5XFAD mice causes BACE1 to no longer be in excess over APP so that 50% BACE1 reduction has a significant Aβ42 lowering effect. In contrast, the lower APP level in 5XFAD males allows BACE1 to be in excess over APP even at 50% BACE1 reduction, preventing lowering of Aβ42 in 5XFAD/BACE1+/- males. We also developed and validated a dot blot assay with an Aβ42-selective antibody as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to ELISA for measuring cerebral Aβ42 levels. 50% BACE1 reduction lowers Aβ42 in female 5XFAD mice only, potentially because BACE1 is not in excess over APP in 5XFAD females with higher transgene expression, while BACE1 is in excess over APP in 5XFAD males with lower transgene expression. Our results suggest that greater than 50% BACE1 inhibition might be necessary to significantly lower Aβ, given that BACE1 is likely to be in excess over

  18. Soluble maltase-glucoamylase is alternatively spliced and secreted by Paneth and goblet cells in enterocyte maltase-glucoamylase Null mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch is the major energy source in the mouse diet. Knockout of intestinal membrane-bound maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) in mice revealed presence of soluble starch digesting activity in Null jejunum and ileum that is secreted by Paneth and goblet cells. Hypotheses: 1. WT have two Mgam mRNAs, Mgamme...

  19. Ghrelin Receptor Deficiency does not Affect Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Habegger, Kirk M.; Grant, Erin; Pfluger, Paul Thomas; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Daugherty, Alan; Bruemmer, Dennis; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hofmann, Susanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Ghrelin, a stomach-derived, secreted peptide, and its receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR) are known to modulate food intake and energy homeostasis. The ghrelin system is also expressed broadly in cardiovascular tissues. Since ghrelin has been associated with anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties, but is also well known to promote obesity and impair glucose metabolism, we investigated whether ghrelin has any impact on the development of atherosclerosis. The hypothesis that endogenous ghrelin signaling may be involved in atherosclerosis has not been tested previously. Methods and Results: We crossed ghrelin receptor knockout mice (GHSr−/−) into a low-density lipoprotein receptor-null (Ldlr−/−) mouse line. In this model, atherosclerotic lesions were promoted by feeding a high-fat, high-cholesterol Western-type diet for 13 months, following a standard protocol. Body composition and glucose homeostasis were similar between Ldlr−/− and Ldlr/GHSR−/−ko mice throughout the study. Absence or presence of GHSr did not alter the apolipoprotein profile changes in response to diet exposure on an LDLRko background. Atherosclerotic plaque volume in the aortic arch and thoracic aorta were also not affected differentially in mice without ghrelin signaling due to GHSR gene disruption as compared to control LDLRko littermates. In light of the associations reported for ghrelin with cardiovascular disease in humans, the lack of a phenotype in these loss-of-function studies in mice suggests no direct role for endogenous ghrelin in either the inhibition or the promotion of diet-induced atherosclerosis. Conclusion: These data indicate that, surprisingly, the complex and multifaceted actions of endogenous ghrelin receptor mediated signaling on the cardiovascular system have minimal direct impact on atherosclerotic plaque progression as based on a loss-of-function mouse model of the disease. PMID:22649381

  20. GENE PROFILING IN WILD TYPE AND PPARÁ NULL MICE EXPOSED TO PFOA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perflurooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid used in a variety of commercial applications. Concerns have been raised because PFOA is ubiquitous in the environment and can be detected in human tissues. PFOA is a rodent carcinogen and a developmental toxicant in mice. W...

  1. Nerve injury induces robust allodynia and ectopic discharges in Nav1.3 null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mohammed A; Baker, Mark D; Levato, Alessandra; Ingram, Rachel; Mallucci, Giovanna; McMahon, Stephen B; Wood, John N

    2006-01-01

    Changes in sodium channel activity and neuronal hyperexcitability contribute to neuropathic pain, a major clinical problem. There is strong evidence that the re-expression of the embryonic voltage-gated sodium channel subunit Nav1.3 underlies neuronal hyperexcitability and neuropathic pain. Here we show that acute and inflammatory pain behaviour is unchanged in global Nav1.3 mutant mice. Surprisingly, neuropathic pain also developed normally in the Nav1.3 mutant mouse. To rule out any genetic compensation mechanisms that may have masked the phenotype, we investigated neuropathic pain in two conditional Nav1.3 mutant mouse lines. We used Nav1.8-Cre mice to delete Nav1.3 in nociceptors at E14 and NFH-Cre mice to delete Nav1.3 throughout the nervous system postnatally. Again normal levels of neuropathic pain developed after nerve injury in both lines. Furthermore, ectopic discharges from damaged nerves were unaffected by the absence of Nav1.3 in global knock-out mice. Our data demonstrate that Nav1.3 is neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of nerve-injury related pain. PMID:17052333

  2. Lipid abnormalities in alpha/beta2-syntrophin null mice are independent from ABCA1

    PubMed Central

    Hebel, Tobias; Eisinger, Kristina; Neumeier, Markus; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Pohl, Rebekka; Meier, Elisabeth M.; Boettcher, Alfred; Froehner, Stanley C.; Adams, Marvin E.; Liebisch, Gerhard; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2015-01-01

    The syntrophins alpha (SNTA) and beta 2 (SNTB2) are molecular adaptor proteins shown to stabilize ABCA1, an essential regulator of HDL cholesterol. Furthermore, SNTB2 is involved in glucose stimulated insulin release. Hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are characteristic features of the metabolic syndrome, a serious public health problem with rising prevalence. Therefore, it is important to understand the role of the syntrophins herein. Mice deficient for both syntrophins (SNTA/B2−/−) have normal insulin and glucose tolerance, hepatic ABCA1 protein and cholesterol. When challenged with a HFD, wild type and SNTA/B2−/− mice have similar weight gain, adiposity, serum and liver triglycerides. Hepatic ABCA1, serum insulin and insulin sensitivity are normal while glucose tolerance is impaired. Liver cholesterol is reduced, and expression of SREBP2 and HMG-CoA-R is increased in the knockout mice. Scavenger receptor-BI (SR-BI) protein is strongly diminished in the liver of SNTA/B2−/− mice while SR-BI binding protein NHERF1 is not changed and PDZK1 is even induced. Knock-down of SNTA, SNTB2 or both has no effect on hepatocyte SR-BI and PDZK1 proteins. Further, SR-BI levels are not reduced in brown adipose tissue of SNTA/B2−/− mice excluding that syntrophins directly stabilize SR-BI. SR-BI stability is regulated by MAPK and phosphorylated ERK2 is induced in the liver of the knock-out mice. Blockage of ERK activity upregulates hepatocyte SR-BI showing that increased MAPK activity contributes to low SR-BI. Sphingomyelin which is well described to regulate cholesterol metabolism is reduced in the liver and serum of the knock-out mice while the size of serum lipoproteins is not affected. Current data exclude a major function of these syntrophins in ABCA1 activity and insulin release but suggest a role in regulating glucose uptake, ERK and SR-BI levels, and sphingomyelin metabolism in obesity. PMID:25625330

  3. Influence of genetic knockout of Pept2 on the in vivo disposition of endogenous and exogenous carnosine in wild-type and Pept2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Mohamed A.; Jiang, Huidi; Hu, Yongjun; Keep, Richard. F.; Smith, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-l-histidine), an endogenous dipeptide substrate of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter PEPT2, plays an important role in many physiological processes. This study examined the effect of PEPT2 on the disposition of endogenous and exogenous carnosine in wild-type and Pept2 null mice. After exogenous dosing of [3H]carnosine (1 nmol/g iv bolus), a marked increase was observed in its systemic clearance in Pept2 null mice (0.50 vs. 0.29 ml/min), resulting in a decreased systemic exposure of dipeptide (area under the curve = 43.7 vs. 73.0 min×μM). Carnosine uptake was substantially reduced in the kidney of Pept2 null mice, and renal clearance increased 18-fold in this genotype (206 vs. 11.5 μl/min). Fractional reabsorption of carnosine in Pept2 null mice was only one-fifth that in wild-type animals (0.20 vs. 0.94). PEPT2 also had a substantial impact in brain where the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-to-plasma concentration ratio of carnosine was eightfold greater in Pept2 null mice (0.70 vs. 0.08). With respect to endogenous carnosine levels, significant reductions were observed in Pept2 null compared with wild-type mice for choroid plexus (0.026 vs. 0.20 mmol/kg), olfactory bulb (1.12 vs. 1.79 mmol/kg), and spleen (0.019 vs. 0.029 mmol/kg). In contrast, carnosine levels in the skeletal muscle of Pept2 null mice were significantly increased (1.70 vs. 1.14 mmol/kg), and no differences were observed between genotypes for endogenous carnosine levels in plasma and CSF. These results demonstrate that PEPT2 significantly modulates the disposition of exogenous carnosine. However, endogenous carnosine levels may be under homeostatic control to maintain systemic and central concentrations under physiological in vivo conditions. PMID:19225147

  4. Impaired neutrophil function in 24p3 null mice contributes to enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuoming; Petersen, Robert; Devireddy, L.

    2013-01-01

    Lipocalin 24p3 (24p3) is a neutrophil secondary granule protein. 24p3 is also a siderocalin, which binds several bacterial siderophores. It was therefore proposed that synthesis and secretion of 24p3 by stimulated macrophages or release of 24p3 upon neutrophil degranulation sequesters iron-laden siderophores to attenuate bacterial growth. Accordingly, 24p3-deficient mice are susceptible to bacterial pathogens whose siderophores would normally be chelated by 24p3. Specific granule deficiency (SGD) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by complete absence of proteins in secondary granules. Neutrophils from SGD patients, who are prone to bacterial infections, lack normal functions but the potential role of 24p3 in neutrophil dysfunction in SGD is not known. Here we show that neutrophils from 24p3−/− mice are defective in many neutrophil functions. Specifically, neutrophils in 24p3−/− mice do not extravasate to sites of infection and are defective for chemotaxis. A transcriptome analysis revealed that genes that control cytoskeletal reorganization are selectively suppressed in 24p3−/− neutrophils. Additionally, small regulatory RNAs (miRNAs) that control upstream regulators of cytoskeletal proteins are also increased in 24p3−/− neutrophils. Further, 24p3−/− neutrophils failed to phagocytose bacteria, which may account for the enhanced sensitivity of 24p3−/− mice to both intracellular (Listeria monocytogenes) and extracellular (Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus) pathogens. Listeria does not secrete siderophores and additionally, the siderophore secreted by Candida is not sequestered by 24p3. Therefore, the heightened sensitivity of 24p3−/− mice to these pathogens is not due to sequestration of siderophores limiting iron availability, but is a consequence of impaired neutrophil function. PMID:23543755

  5. LPS-induced systemic inflammation is more severe in P2Y12 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Liverani, Elisabetta; Rico, Mario C.; Yaratha, Laxmikausthubha; Tsygankov, Alexander Y.; Kilpatrick, Laurie E.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2014-01-01

    Thienopyridines are a class of antiplatelet drugs that are metabolized in the liver to several metabolites, of which only one active metabolite can irreversibly antagonize the platelet P2Y12 receptor. Possible effects of these drugs and the role of activated platelets in inflammatory responses have also been investigated in a variety of animal models, demonstrating that thienopyridines could alter inflammation. However, it is not clear whether it is caused only by the P2Y12 antagonism or whether off-target effects of other metabolites also intervene. To address this question, we investigated P2Y12 KO mice during a LPS-induced model of systemic inflammation, and we treated these KO mice with a thienopyridine drug (clopidogrel). Contrary to the reported effects of clopidogrel, numbers of circulating WBCs and plasma levels of cytokines were increased in LPS-exposed KO mice compared with WT in this inflammation model. Moreover, both spleen and bone marrow show an increase in cell content, suggesting a role for P2Y12 in regulation of bone marrow and spleen cellular composition. Finally, the injury was more severe in the lungs of KO mice compared with WT. Interestingly, clopidogrel treatments also exerted protective effects in KO mice, suggesting off-target effects for this drug. In conclusion, the P2Y12 receptor plays an important role during LPS-induced inflammation, and this signaling pathway may be involved in regulating cell content in spleen and bone marrow during LPS systemic inflammation. Furthermore, clopidogrel may have effects that are independent of P2Y12 receptor blockade. PMID:24142066

  6. PKCβ Promotes Vascular inflammation and Acceleration of Atherosclerosis in Diabetic ApoE Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Linghua; Shen, Xiaoping; Lin, Lili; Leitges, Michael; Rosario, Rosa; Zou, Yu Shan; Yan, Shi Fang

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diabetic subjects are at high risk for developing atherosclerosis through a variety of mechanisms. As the metabolism of glucose results in production of activators of protein kinase C (PKC)β, it was logical to investigate the role of PKCβ in modulation of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Approach and Results ApoE−/− and PKCβ −/−/ApoE−/− mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin. Quantification of atherosclerosis, gene expression profiling or analysis of signaling molecules was performed on aortic sinus or aortas from diabetic mice. Diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis increased the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and JNK mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases and augmented vascular expression of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased monocyte/macrophage infiltration and CD11c+ cells accumulation in diabetic ApoE−/− mice; processes which were diminished in diabetic PKCβ −/−/ApoE−/− mice. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in diabetic ApoE−/− mice. In vitro, the inhibitors of PKCβ and ERK1/2, as well as small interfering RNA (siRNA) to Egr-1 significantly decreased high glucose-induced expression of CD11c (Itgax), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and interleukin (IL)-1β in U937 macrophages. Conclusions These data link enhanced activation of PKCβ to accelerated diabetic atherosclerosis via a mechanism that includes modulation of gene transcription and signal transduction in the vascular wall; processes that contribute to acceleration of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in diabetes. Our results uncover a novel role for PKCβ in modulating CD11c expression and inflammatory response of macrophages in the development of diabetic atherosclerosis. These findings support PKCβ activation as a potential therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:23766264

  7. Biomechanics of the sarcolemma and costameres in single skeletal muscle fibers from normal and dystrophin-null mice

    PubMed Central

    García-Pelagio, K. P.; Bloch, R. J.; Ortega, A.; González-Serratos, H.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the biomechanical properties of the sarcolemma and its links through costameres to the contractile apparatus in single mammalian myofibers of Extensor digitorum longus muscles isolated from wild (WT) and dystrophin-null (mdx) mice. Suction pressures (P) applied through a pipette to the sarcolemma generated a bleb, the height of which increased with increasing P. Larger increases in P broke the connections between the sarcolemma and myofibrils and eventually caused the sarcolemma to burst. We used the values of P at which these changes occurred to estimate the tensions and stiffness of the system and its individual elements. Tensions of the whole system and the sarcolemma, as well as the maximal tension sustained by the costameres, were all significantly lower (1.8–3.3 fold) in muscles of mdx mice compared to WT. Values of P at which separation and bursting occurred, as well as the stiffness of the whole system and of the isolated sarcolemma, were ~2-fold lower in mdx than in WT. Our results indicate that the absence of dystrophin reduces muscle stiffness, increases sarcolemmal deformability, and compromises the mechanical stability of costameres and their connections to nearby myofibrils. PMID:21312057

  8. Caffeine-stimulated fatty acid oxidation is blunted in CD36 null mice.

    PubMed

    Lally, J S V; Jain, S S; Han, X X; Snook, L A; Glatz, J F C; Luiken, J J F P; McFarlan, J; Holloway, G P; Bonen, A

    2012-05-01

    The increase in skeletal muscle fatty acid metabolism during exercise has been associated with the release of calcium. We examined whether this increase in fatty acid oxidation was attributable to a calcium-induced translocation of the fatty acid transporter CD36 to the sarcolemma, thereby providing an enhanced influx of fatty acids to increase their oxidation. Calcium release was triggered by caffeine (3 mm) to examine fatty acid oxidation in intact soleus muscles of WT and CD36-KO mice, while fatty acid transport and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation were examined in giant vesicles and isolated mitochondria, respectively, from caffeine-perfused hindlimb muscles of WT and CD36-KO mice. Western blotting was used to examine calcium-induced signalling. In WT, caffeine stimulated muscle palmitate oxidation (+136%), but this was blunted in CD36-KO mice (-70%). Dantrolene inhibited (WT) or abolished (CD36-KO) caffeine-induced palmitate oxidation. In muscle, caffeine-stimulated palmitate oxidation was not attributable to altered mitochondrial palmitate oxidation. Instead, in WT, caffeine increased palmitate transport (+55%) and the translocation of fatty acid transporters CD36, FABPpm, FATP1 and FATP4 (26-70%) to the sarcolemma. In CD36-KO mice, caffeine-stimulated FABPpm, and FATP1 and 4 translocations were normal, but palmitate transport was blunted (-70%), comparable to the reductions in muscle palmitate oxidation. Caffeine did not alter the calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylation but did increase the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase comparably in WT and CD36-KO. These studies indicate that sarcolemmal CD36-mediated fatty acid transport is a primary mediator of the calcium-induced increase in muscle fatty acid oxidation. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  9. Aged PrP null mice show defective processing of neuregulins in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Benvegnù, Stefano; Gasperini, Lisa; Legname, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    A prion, a protease-resistant conformer of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), is the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. While this property is well established for the aberrantly folded protein, the physiological function of PrP(C) remains elusive. Among different putative functions, the non-pathogenic protein isoform PrP(C) is involved in several cellular processes. Here, we show that PrP(C) regulates the cleavage of neuregulin-1 proteins (NRG1). Neuregulins provide key axonal signals that regulate several processes, including glial cells proliferation, survival and myelination. Interestingly, mice devoid of PrP(C) (Prnp⁰/⁰) were recently shown to have a late-onset demyelinating disease in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) but not in the central nervous system (CNS). We found that NRG1 processing is developmentally regulated in the PNS and, by comparing wildtype and Prnp⁰/⁰ mice, that PrP(C) influences NRG1 processing in old, but not in young, animals. In addition, we found that also the processing of neuregulin-3, another neuregulin family member, is altered in the PNS of Prnp⁰/⁰ mice. These differences in neuregulin proteins processing are not paralleled in the CNS, thus suggesting a different cellular function for PrP(C) between the CNS and the PNS.

  10. Lacrimal gland inflammation is responsible for ocular pathology in TGF-beta 1 null mice.

    PubMed Central

    McCartney-Francis, N. L.; Mizel, D. E.; Frazier-Jessen, M.; Kulkarni, A. B.; McCarthy, J. B.; Wahl, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Mice homozygous for a nonfunctional transforming growth factor-beta 1 gene develop rampant inflammation in vital organs that contributes to a shortened life span. The presence of circulating anti-nuclear anti-bodies, immune deposits in tissues, leukocyte infiltration, and increased major histocompatibility complex antigen expression resembles an autoimmune-like syndrome. One of the overt symptoms that appears in these mice lacking transforming growth factor-beta 1 is the development of dry crusty eyes that close persistently as their health declines. Histologically, the eyes appear normal with little or no inflammation. However, inflammatory lesions, predominantly lymphocytic, develop in the lacrimal glands, disrupting their structure and function and severely limiting their ability to generate tears. This histopathology and aberrant function mimic that of Sjögren's syndrome, a human autoimmune disease characterized by dry eyes and dry mouth. Impeding the leukocyte infiltration into the glands with synthetic fibronectin peptides, which block adhesion, not only prevents the inflammatory pathology but also prevents the persistent eye closure characteristic of these mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9358754

  11. Glutathione deficiency in Gclm null mice results in complex I inhibition and dopamine depletion following paraquat administration.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li-Ping; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Patel, Manisha

    2013-08-01

    Depletion of glutathione has been shown to occur in autopsied brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and in animal models of PD. The goal of this study was to determine whether chronic glutathione (GSH) deficiency per se resulted in complex I inhibition and/or dopamine depletion and whether these indices were further potentiated by aging or administration of paraquat, a redox-cycling herbicide that produces a PD-like neurodegeneration model in rodents (Brooks, A. I., Chadwick, C. A., Gelbard, H. A., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Federoff, H. J. [1999]. Paraquat elicited neurobehavioral syndrome caused by dopaminergic neuron loss. Brain Res. 823, 1-10; McCormack, A. L., Thiruchelvam, M., Manning-Bog, A. B., Thiffault, C., Langston, J. W., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Di Monte, D. A. [2002]. Environmental risk factors and Parkinson's disease: Selective degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons caused by the herbicide paraquat. Neurobiol. Dis. 10, 119-127.) Deletion of the rate-limiting GSH synthesis gene, glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (Gclm), leads to significantly lower GSH concentrations in all tissues including brain. Gclm null (Gclm (-/-)) mice provide a model of prolonged GSH depletion to explore the relationship between GSH, complex I inhibition, and dopamine loss in vivo. Despite ~60% depletion of brain GSH in Gclm (-/-) mice of ages 3-5 or 14-16 months, striatal complex I activity, dopamine levels, 3-nitrotyroine/tyrosine ratios, aconitase activity, and CoASH remained unchanged. Administration of paraquat (10mg/kg, twice/week, 3 weeks) to 3- to 5-month-old Gclm (-/-) mice resulted in significantly decreased aconitase activity, complex I activity, and dopamine levels but not in 3- to 5-month-old Gclm (+/+) mice. Furthermore, paraquat-induced inhibition of complex I and aconitase activities in Gclm (-/-) mice was observed in the striatum but not in the cortex. The results suggest that chronic deficiency of GSH in Gclm (-/-) mice was not

  12. Glutathione Deficiency in Gclm Null Mice Results in Complex I Inhibition and Dopamine Depletion Following Paraquat Administration

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Depletion of glutathione has been shown to occur in autopsied brains of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and in animal models of PD. The goal of this study was to determine whether chronic glutathione (GSH) deficiency per se resulted in complex I inhibition and/or dopamine depletion and whether these indices were further potentiated by aging or administration of paraquat, a redox-cycling herbicide that produces a PD-like neurodegeneration model in rodents (Brooks, A. I., Chadwick, C. A., Gelbard, H. A., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Federoff, H. J. [1999]. Paraquat elicited neurobehavioral syndrome caused by dopaminergic neuron loss. Brain Res. 823, 1–10; McCormack, A. L., Thiruchelvam, M., Manning-Bog, A. B., Thiffault, C., Langston, J. W., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Di Monte, D. A. [2002]. Environmental risk factors and Parkinson’s disease: Selective degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons caused by the herbicide paraquat. Neurobiol. Dis. 10, 119–127.) Deletion of the rate-limiting GSH synthesis gene, glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (Gclm), leads to significantly lower GSH concentrations in all tissues including brain. Gclm null (Gclm −/−) mice provide a model of prolonged GSH depletion to explore the relationship between GSH, complex I inhibition, and dopamine loss in vivo. Despite ~60% depletion of brain GSH in Gclm −/− mice of ages 3–5 or 14–16 months, striatal complex I activity, dopamine levels, 3-nitrotyroine/tyrosine ratios, aconitase activity, and CoASH remained unchanged. Administration of paraquat (10mg/kg, twice/week, 3 weeks) to 3- to 5-month-old Gclm −/− mice resulted in significantly decreased aconitase activity, complex I activity, and dopamine levels but not in 3- to 5-month-old Gclm +/+ mice. Furthermore, paraquat-induced inhibition of complex I and aconitase activities in Gclm −/− mice was observed in the striatum but not in the cortex. The results suggest that chronic deficiency of GSH in Gclm

  13. Comparative metabolism of methacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile to cyanide using cytochrome P4502E1 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    El Hadri, L.; Chanas, B.; Ghanayem, B.I. . E-mail: ghanayem@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-06-01

    Methacrylonitrile (MAN) and acrylonitrile (AN) are metabolized via glutathione (GSH) conjugation or epoxide formation. We have recently shown that CYP2E1 is essential for AN epoxidation and subsequent cyanide liberation. Current studies were designed to compare the enzymatic basis of MAN vs. AN metabolism to cyanide using wild-type (WT), CYP2E1-, and mEH-null mice. Mice received a single gavage dose of 0.047, 0.095, 0.19, or 0.38 mmol/kg of MAN or AN, and blood cyanide was measured at 1 or 3 h later. Blood cyanide levels in WT mice treated with AN or MAN were dose and time dependent. At equimolar doses, significantly higher levels of cyanide were detected in the blood of MAN- vs. AN-treated mice. Further, while significant reduction in blood cyanide levels occurred in MAN-treated CYP2E1-null vs. WT mice, AN metabolism to cyanide was largely abolished in CYP2E1-null mice. Pretreatment of mice with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT, CYP inhibitor) demonstrated that CYPs other than CYP2E1 also contribute to MAN metabolism to cyanide. Blood cyanide levels in mEH-null mice treated with aliphatic nitriles are generally lower than levels in similarly treated WT mice. Western blot analysis showed that expression of sEH was greater in male vs. female mice. The role of various epoxide hydrolases (EHs) in the production of cyanide from aliphatic nitriles is apparently structure and dose dependent. Regardless of genotype, significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female mice treated with MAN or AN. In conclusion, these data showed that (1) at equimolar doses, higher blood cyanide levels were detected in mice treated with MAN vs. AN; (2) while CYP2E1 is the only enzyme responsible for AN metabolism to cyanide, other CYPs also contribute to MAN metabolism; and (3) significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female treated with either nitrile. Higher blood cyanide levels in male vs. female mice and in MAN- vs. AN

  14. A role for TGFbeta1 in langerhans cell biology. Further characterization of the epidermal Langerhans cell defect in TGFbeta1 null mice.

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, T A; Letterio, J J; Mackall, C L; Saitoh, A; Wang, X J; Roop, D R; Gress, R E; Udey, M C

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies of TGFbeta1 null (-/-) mice indicated that the epidermis was devoid of Langerhans cells (LC) and that the LC deficiency was not secondary to the inflammation that is the dominant feature of the -/- phenotype (Borkowski, T.A., J.J. Letterio, A.G. Farr, and M.C. Udey. 1996. J. Exp. Med. 184:2417-2422). Herein, we demonstrate that dendritic cells could be expanded from the bone marrow of -/- mice and littermate controls. Bone marrow from -/- mice also gave rise to LC after transfer into lethally irradiated recipients. Thus, the LC defect in TGFbeta1 null mice does not result from an absolute deficiency in bone marrow precursors, and paracrine TGFbeta1 production is sufficient for LC development. Several approaches were used to assess the suitability of -/- skin for LC localization. A survey revealed that although a number of cytokine mRNAs were expressed de novo, mRNAs encoding proinflammatory cytokines known to mobilize LC from epidermis (IL-1 and TNFalpha) were not strikingly overrepresented in -/- skin. In addition, bone marrow-derived LC populated full-thickness TGFbeta1 null skin after engraftment onto BALB/c nu/nu recipients. Finally, the skin of transgenic mice expressing a truncated loricrin promoter-driven dominant-negative TGFbeta type II receptor contained normal numbers of LC. Because TGFbeta1 signaling in these mice is disrupted only in keratinocytes and the keratinocyte hyperproliferative component of the TGFbeta1 -/- phenotype is reproduced, these results strongly suggest that the LC defect in TGFbeta1 null mice is not due to an epidermal abnormality but reflects a requirement of murine LC (or their precursors) for TGFbeta1. PMID:9239404

  15. Genetically null mice reveal a central role for epidermal growth factor receptor in the differentiation of the hair follicle and normal hair development.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L. A.; Alexander, N.; Hogan, M. E.; Sundberg, J. P.; Dlugosz, A.; Threadgill, D. W.; Magnuson, T.; Yuspa, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Mice harboring a targeted disruption of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) allele exhibit a severely disorganized hair follicle phenotype, fuzzy coat, and systemic disease resulting in death before 3 weeks. This skin phenotype was reproduced in whole skin grafts and in grafts of EGFR null hair follicle buds onto nude mice, providing a model to evaluate the natural evolution of skin lacking the EGFR. Hair follicles in grafts of null skin did not progress from anagen to telogen and scanning electron micrografts revealed wavy, flattened hair fibers with cuticular abnormalities. Many of the EGFR null hair follicles in the grafted skin were consumed by an inflammatory reaction resulting in complete hair loss in 67% of the grafts by 10 weeks. Localization of follicular differentiation markers including keratin 6, transglutaminase, and the hair keratins mHa2 and hacl-1 revealed a pattern of premature differentiation within the null hair follicles. In intact EGFR null mice, proliferation in the interfollicular epidermis, but not hair follicles, was greatly decreased in the absence of EGFR. In contrast, grafting of EGFR null skin resulted in a hyperplastic response in the epidermis that did not resolve even after 10 weeks, although the wound-induced hyperplasia in EGFR wild-type grafts had resolved within 3 to 4 weeks. Thus, epithelial expression of the EGFR has complex functions in the skin. It is important in delaying follicular differentiation, may serve to protect the hair follicle from immunological reactions, and modifies both normal and wound-induced epidermal proliferation but seems dispensable for follicular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9176390

  16. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na+ current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  17. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle.

  18. A novel mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in a child with clinical and histological features of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koppelhus, U; Tranebjaerg, L; Esberg, G; Ramsing, M; Lodahl, M; Rendtorff, N D; Olesen, H V; Sommerlund, M

    2011-03-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare congenital ectodermal disorder, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in GJB2, encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26. The commonest mutation is the p.Asp50Asn mutation, and only a few other mutations have been described to date. To report the fatal clinical course and characterize the genetic background of a premature male neonate with the clinical and histological features of KID syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and used for PCR amplification of the GJB2 gene. Direct sequencing was used for mutation analysis. The clinical features included hearing impairment, ichthyosiform erythroderma with hyperkeratotic plaques, palmoplantar keratoderma, alopecia of the scalp and eyelashes, and a thick vernix caseosa-like covering of the scalp. On histological analysis, features characteristic of KID syndrome, such as acanthosis and papillomatosis of the epidermis with basket-weave hyperkeratosis, were seen. The skin symptoms were treated successfully with acitretin 0.5 mg/kg. The boy developed intraventricular and intracerebral haemorrhage, leading to hydrocephalus. His condition was further complicated by septicaemia and meningitis caused by infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Severe respiratory failure followed, and the child died at 46 weeks of gestational age (13 weeks postnatally). Sequencing of the GJB2 gene showed that the child was heterozygous for a novel nucleotide change, c.263C>T, in exon 2, leading to a substitution of alanine for valine at position 88 (p.Ala88Val). This study has identified a new heterozygous de novo mutation in the Cx26 gene (c.263C>T; p.Ala88Val) leading to KID syndrome. © The Author(s). CED © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Role of gamma carboxylated Glu47 in connexin 26 hemichannel regulation by extracellular Ca²⁺: insight from a local quantum chemistry study.

    PubMed

    Zonta, Francesco; Mammano, Fabio; Torsello, Mauro; Fortunati, Nicola; Orian, Laura; Polimeno, Antonino

    2014-02-28

    Connexin hemichannels are regulated by several gating mechanisms, some of which depend critically on the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]e). It is well established that hemichannel activity is inhibited at normal (∼1 mM) [Ca(2+)]e, whereas lowering [Ca(2+)]e to micromolar levels fosters hemichannel opening. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows significant and reversible changes of pore diameter at the extracellular mouth of Cx26 hemichannels exposed to different [Ca(2+)]e, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Analysis of the crystal structure of connexin 26 (Cx26) gap junction channels, corroborated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, suggests that several negatively charged amino acids create a favorable environment for low-affinity Ca(2+) binding within the extracellular vestibule of the Cx26 hemichannel. In particular a highly conserved glutammic acid, found in position 47 in most connexins, is thought to undergo post translational gamma carboxylation (γGlu47), and is thus likely to play an important role in Ca(2+) coordination. γGlu47 may also form salt bridges with two conserved arginines (Arg75 and Arg184 in Cx26), which are considered important in stabilizing the structure of the extracellular region. Using a combination of quantum chemistry methods, we analyzed the interaction between γGlu47, Arg75 and Arg184 in a Cx26 hemichannel model both in the absence and in the presence of Ca(2+). We show that Ca(2+) imparts significant local structural changes and speculate that these modifications may alter the structure of the extracellular loops in Cx26, and may thus account for the mechanism of hemichannel closure in the presence of mM [Ca(2+)]e.

  20. Prevalence of Deafness-Associated Connexin-26 (GJB2) and Connexin-30 (GJB6) Pathogenic Alleles in a Large Patient Cohort from Eastern Sicily.

    PubMed

    Amorini, Maria; Romeo, Petronilla; Bruno, Rocco; Galletti, Francesco; Di Bella, Chiara; Longo, Patrizia; Briuglia, Silvana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Rigoli, Luciana

    2015-06-19

    Mutations in the gene encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26 (GJB2) and connexin 30 (GJB6) have been shown to be a major contributor to prelingual, sensorineural, nonsyndromic deafness. The aim of this study was to characterize and establish the prevalence of GJB2 and GJB6 gene alterations in 196 patients affected by sensorineural, nonsyndromic hearing loss, from Eastern Sicily. We performed sequence analysis of GJB2 and identified sequence variants in 68 out of 196 patients (34.7%); (28 homozygous for c.35delG, 22 compound heterozygous and 11 with only one variant allele). We found 12 different allelic variants, the most prevalent being c.35delG, which was found on 89 chromosomes (65.5%), followed by other alleles with different frequencies (p.E47X, c.-23+1G>A, p.L90P, p.R184W, p.M34T, c.167delT, p.R127H, p.M163V, p.V153I, p.W24X, and p.T8M). Importantly, for the first time we present the frequency and spectrum of GJB2 mutations in NSHL patients from Eastern Sicily. No alterations were found in the GJB6 gene, confirming that alterations in this gene are uncommon in our geographic area. Note that 65.3% and 23.5% of our patients, respectively were found to be negative or carriers by GJB2 molecular screening. This emphasizes the need to broaden the genetic analysis to other genes involved in hearing loss.

  1. Remodelling of motor nerve terminals in demyelinating axons of periaxin null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Court, Felipe A; Brophy, Peter J; Ribchester, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Myelin formation around axons increases nerve conduction velocity and regulates phenotypic characteristics of the myelinated axon. In the peripheral nervous system, demyelinating forms of hereditary Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases, due to Schwann-cell intrinsic molecular defects, leads to reduced nerve conduction velocity and changes in the axonal phenotype. Several mouse models of CMT diseases have been generated, allowing the study of consequences of demyelination in peripheral nerve fibres. Nevertheless, the effect of demyelination at the level of the neuromuscular synapse has been largely overlooked. Here we show that in the periaxin knock-out mice, a model of CMT condition, neuromuscular junctions develop profound morphological changes in pre-terminal region of motoraxons. These changes include extensive preterminal branches which originate in demyelinated regions of the nerve fibre and axonal swellings associated with residually-myelinated regions of the fibre. Using intracellular recording from muscle fibres we detected asynchronous failure of action potential transmission at high but not low stimulation frequencies, a phenomenon consistent with branch point failure. Taken together, our morphological and electrophysiological findings suggest that preterminal branching due to segmental demyelination near the neuromuscular synapse in periaxin KO mice may underlie phenotypic disabilities present in this mouse model of CMT disease. These results opens a new avenue of research in order to understand the cellular changes responsible for clinical disabilities in demyelinating conditions. PMID:18205176

  2. Loss of TIMP3 exacerbates atherosclerosis in ApoE null mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Robert; Cavalera, Michele; Menini, Stefano; Mavilio, Maria; Casagrande, Viviana; Rossi, Claudia; Urbani, Andrea; Cardellini, Marina; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Menghini, Rossella; Federici, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) is a stromal protein that inhibits the activity of various proteases and receptors. We have previously shown TIMP3 to be downregulated in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. We have now generated an ApoE(-/-)Timp3(-/-) mouse model in which, through the use of genetics, metabolomics and in-vivo phenotypical analysis we investigated the role of TIMP3 in the development of atherosclerosis. En face aorta analysis and aortic root examination showed that ApoE(-/-)Timp3(-/-) mice show increased atherosclerosis with increased infiltration of macrophages into the plaque. Serum concentration of MCP-1 were elevated in the serum of ApoE(-/-)Timp3(-/-) mice coupled with an expansion of the inflammatory (M1) Gr1+ macrophages, both in the circulation and within the aortic tissue. Targeted analysis of metabolites revealed a trend to reduced short chain acylcarnitines. Our study shows that lack of TIMP3 increases inflammation and polarizes macrophages towards a more inflammatory phenotype resulting in increased atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Passive Viscoelastic Properties of Costameres in EDL Skeletal Muscle in Normal and Dystrophin Null Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; Gonzalez-Serratos, Hugo

    2008-08-01

    Costameres at the sarcolemmal skeletal myofibers transmit the lateral force generated by myofibrils from them to the extracellular matrix. We used an elastimeter method by which sucking pressure is applied through a micropipette to the surface membrane of single mice myofibers of the Extensor digitorum longus to measure the viscoelasticity of the sarcolemma-costamere complex as a function of sarcomere length (SL). Constant suction pressure applied to the sarcolemma generated a sarcolemmal-costamere-myofibril bleb of variable height depending on the sucking pressure and SL. It took some time for the bleb to reach a stable height after applying the pressure. This time delay indicates that the sarcolemma-costamere-myofibril system acts as a viscoelastic system. We undertook the present experiments to measure the height stabilization time of the bleb at different sarcomere lengths from which we estimated the viscoelastic parameters of the system. The time course of the bleb formation was biphasic and reached a plateau between 3.5 to 1.3 and 4.9 to 3.5 min for normal and dystrophic mice respectively depending on SL of 3.0 to 5.6 μm. Based on a Maxwell-Voigt system we found the viscoelastic parameters such as viscosity, friction coefficient and the costameres (k) and sarcolemma (k1) elasticity constants.

  4. Cholesterol Feeding Prevents Hepatic Accumulation of Bile Acids in Cholic Acid-Fed Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-Null Mice: FXR-Independent Suppression of Intestinal Bile Acid Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Masaaki; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Nomoto, Masahiro; Takamatsu, Yuki; Sato, Nozomi; Hamatsu, Mayumi; Dawson, Paul A.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    Cholic acid (CA) feeding of farnesoid X receptor (Fxr)-null mice results in markedly elevated hepatic bile acid levels and liver injury. In contrast, Fxr-null mice fed cholesterol plus CA (CA+Chol) do not exhibit liver injury, and hepatic bile acid levels and bile acid pool size are reduced 51 and 40%, respectively, compared with CA-treated Fxr-null mice. These decreases were not observed in wild-type mice. Despite a reduced bile acid pool size, hepatic Cyp7a1 mRNA expression was increased in Fxr-null mice fed the CA+Chol diet, and biliary bile acid output was not changed. Analysis of other potential protective mechanisms revealed significant decreases in portal blood bile acid concentrations and a reduced ileal bile acid absorption capacity, as estimated using an in situ loop method. Fecal bile acid excretion was also increased in Fxr-null mice fed the CA+Chol versus CA diet. The decreased ileal bile acid absorption correlated with decreased ileal apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT) protein expression in brush-border membranes. These results suggest a critical role for ileal bile acid absorption in regulation of hepatic bile acid levels in Fxr-null mice fed CA+Chol. Furthermore, experiments with Fxr-null mice suggest that cholesterol feeding can down-regulate ASBT expression through a pathway independent of FXR. PMID:18988759

  5. Targeted expression of human vitamin d receptor in the skin promotes the initiation of the postnatal hair follicle cycle and rescues the alopecia in vitamin D receptor null mice.

    PubMed

    Kong, Juan; Li, Xiao Jian; Gavin, Donna; Jiang, Yulei; Li, Yan Chun

    2002-04-01

    Alopecia is a predominant feature of vitamin D receptor inactivation in mice and humans. To determine the role of vitamin D receptor in the regulation of hair growth directly, we used the human keratin 14 promoter to target human vitamin D receptor expression to the skin of transgenic mice, and generated vitamin D receptor null mice that express the human vitamin D receptor transgene. Parallel studies were carried out in littermates of wild-type, vitamin D receptor null, transgenic, and human vitamin D receptor-expressing null mice in two transgenic lines. The transgenic mice were grossly normal. The vitamin D receptor null and vitamin D receptor null/human vitamin D receptor mice were growth retarded and developed hypocalcemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and rickets. In contrast to the vitamin D receptor null mice that developed alopecia, however, the vitamin D receptor null/human vitamin D receptor mice displayed a normal hair coat, and their hair shaft and skin histology were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type mice. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the human vitamin D receptor was highly expressed in the basal layer of the epidermis and outer root sheath of the hair follicle. During follicular morphogenesis, no major histologic differences were seen in the skin of wild-type, vitamin D receptor null, transgenic, and vitamin D receptor null/human vitamin D receptor littermates. When anagen was induced by hair depilation at day 20 after birth, the vitamin D receptor null mice failed to initiate the hair cycle, whereas the vitamin D receptor null/human vitamin D receptor mice displayed the same pattern of anagen follicle formation as the wild-type mice. Interestingly, the transgenic mice initiated the follicular cycle earlier than the wild-type and vitamin D receptor null/human vitamin D receptor mice in a gene concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these data provide direct evidence that vitamin D receptor is required for the

  6. Dissociation of Hyperglycemia from Altered Vascular Contraction and Relaxation Mechanisms in Caveolin-1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pojoga, Luminita H.; Yao, Tham M.; Opsasnick, Lauren A.; Garza, Amanda E.; Reslan, Ossama M.; Adler, Gail K.; Williams, Gordon H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and endothelial dysfunction are associated with hypertension, but the specific causality and genetic underpinning are unclear. Caveolin-1 (cav-1) is a plasmalemmal anchoring protein and modulator of vascular function and glucose homeostasis. Cav-1 gene variants are associated with reduced insulin sensitivity in hypertensive individuals, and cav-1−/− mice show endothelial dysfunction, hyperglycemia, and increased blood pressure (BP). On the other hand, insulin-sensitizing therapy with metformin may inadequately control hyperglycemia while affecting the vascular outcome in certain patients with diabetes. To test whether the pressor and vascular changes in cav-1 deficiency states are related to hyperglycemia and to assess the vascular mechanisms of metformin under these conditions, wild-type (WT) and cav-1−/− mice were treated with either placebo or metformin (400 mg/kg daily for 21 days). BP and fasting blood glucose were in cav-1−/− > WT and did not change with metformin. Phenylephrine (Phe)- and KCl-induced aortic contraction was in cav-1−/− < WT; endothelium removal, the nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) blocker l-NAME (Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester), or soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) enhanced Phe contraction, and metformin blunted this effect. Acetylcholine-induced relaxation was in cav-1−/− > WT, abolished by endothelium removal, l-NAME or ODQ, and reduced with metformin. Nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside was more potent in inducing relaxation in cav-1−/− than in WT, and metformin reversed this effect. Aortic eNOS, AMPK, and sGC were in cav-1−/− > WT, and metformin decreased total and phosphorylated eNOS and AMPK in cav-1−/−. Thus, metformin inhibits both vascular contraction and NO-cGMP-dependent relaxation but does not affect BP or blood glucose in cav-1−/− mice, suggesting dissociation of hyperglycemia from altered vascular function in cav-1

  7. Oxazolone and ethanol induce colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγ(null) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Nolte, T; Zadeh-Khorasani, M; Safarov, O; Rueff, F; Gülberg, V; Herbach, N; Wollenberg, A; Mueller, T; Siebeck, M; Wolf, E; Gropp, R

    2013-05-01

    Oxazolone-induced colitis in mice has become a recognized model to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the immunological response underlying the development of inflammatory bowel disease. However, this model cannot be used when therapeutics designed to address human targets do not interact with the respective murine counterpart. In this study, we examined the induction of oxazolone mediated colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγ(null) (NOD-SCID IL2Rγ(null)) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC), atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy volunteers. NOD-SCID IL2Rγ (null) mice were engrafted with hPBMC followed by challenge with oxazolone or ethanol vehicle. Mice developed the same symptoms as observed previously in immunocompetent mice. The clinical activity score increased and the colon architecture was characterized by the development of oedema, fibrosis, crypt loss and dense infiltration of predominantly T cells into the lamina propria. Fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes in the colon identified natural killer (NK) T cells as a major constituent. In contrast to studies with immunocompetent mice, we observed the same phenotype in the group challenged with ethanol vehicle. The phenotype was most pronounced in mice engrafted with PBMC derived from a patient suffering from UC, suggesting that the immunological history of the donors predisposes the engrafted mice to react to ethanol. The model described here has the potential to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting human lymphocytes in a model which is more reflective of the human disease. In addition, it might be developed to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the disease.

  8. Oxazolone and ethanol induce colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, T; Zadeh-Khorasani, M; Safarov, O; Rueff, F; Gülberg, V; Herbach, N; Wollenberg, A; Mueller, T; Siebeck, M; Wolf, E; Gropp, R

    2013-01-01

    Oxazolone-induced colitis in mice has become a recognized model to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the immunological response underlying the development of inflammatory bowel disease. However, this model cannot be used when therapeutics designed to address human targets do not interact with the respective murine counterpart. In this study, we examined the induction of oxazolone mediated colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγnull (NOD-SCID IL2Rγnull) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC), atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy volunteers. NOD-SCID IL2Rγ null mice were engrafted with hPBMC followed by challenge with oxazolone or ethanol vehicle. Mice developed the same symptoms as observed previously in immunocompetent mice. The clinical activity score increased and the colon architecture was characterized by the development of oedema, fibrosis, crypt loss and dense infiltration of predominantly T cells into the lamina propria. Fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes in the colon identified natural killer (NK) T cells as a major constituent. In contrast to studies with immunocompetent mice, we observed the same phenotype in the group challenged with ethanol vehicle. The phenotype was most pronounced in mice engrafted with PBMC derived from a patient suffering from UC, suggesting that the immunological history of the donors predisposes the engrafted mice to react to ethanol. The model described here has the potential to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting human lymphocytes in a model which is more reflective of the human disease. In addition, it might be developed to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. PMID:23574330

  9. A human FSHB transgene encoding the double N-glycosylation mutant (Asn(7Δ) Asn(24Δ)) FSHβ subunit fails to rescue Fshb null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huizhen; Butnev, Vladimir; Bousfield, George R; Kumar, T Rajendra

    2016-05-05

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a gonadotrope-derived heterodimeric glycoprotein. Both the common α- and hormone-specific β subunits contain Asn-linked N-glycan chains. Recently, macroheterogeneous FSH glycoforms consisting of β-subunits that differ in N-glycan number were identified in pituitaries of several species and subsequently the recombinant human FSH glycoforms biochemically characterized. Although chemical modification and in vitro site-directed mutagenesis studies defined the roles of N-glycans on gonadotropin subunits, in vivo functional analyses in a whole-animal setting are lacking. Here, we have generated transgenic mice with gonadotrope-specific expression of either an HFSHB(WT) transgene that encodes human FSHβ WT subunit or an HFSHB(dgc) transgene that encodes a human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, and separately introduced these transgenes onto Fshb null background using a genetic rescue strategy. We demonstrate that the human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, unlike human FSHβ WT subunit, inefficiently combines with the mouse α-subunit in pituitaries of Fshb null mice. FSH dimer containing this mutant FSHβ subunit is inefficiently secreted with very low levels detectable in serum. Fshb null male mice expressing HFSHB(dgc) transgene are fertile and exhibit testis tubule size and sperm number similar to those of Fshb null mice. Fshb null female mice expressing the mutant, but not WT human FSHβ subunit-containing FSH dimer are infertile, demonstrate no evidence of estrus cycles, and many of the FSH-responsive genes remain suppressed in their ovaries. Thus, HFSHB(dgc) unlike HFSHB(WT) transgene does not rescue Fshb null mice. Our genetic approach provides direct in vivo evidence that N-linked glycans on FSHβ subunit are essential for its efficient assembly with the α-subunit to form FSH heterodimer in pituitary. Our studies also reveal that N-glycans on FSHβ subunit are

  10. Macrophage-specific expression of human apolipoprotein E reduces atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-null mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bellosta, S; Mahley, R W; Sanan, D A; Murata, J; Newland, D L; Taylor, J M; Pitas, R E

    1995-01-01

    apoE deficiency causes hyperlipidemia and premature atherosclerosis. To determine if macrophage-specific expression of apoE would decrease the extent of atherosclerosis, we expressed human apoE in macrophages of apoE-null mice (apoE-/-) and assessed the effect on lipid accumulation in cells of the arterial wall. Macrophage-specific expression of human apoE in normal mice was obtained by use of the visna virus LTR. These animals were bred with apoE-/- mice to produce animals hemizygous for expression of human apoE in macrophages in the absence of murine apoE (apoE-/-,hTgE+/0). Low levels of human apoE mRNA were present in liver and spleen and high levels in lung and peritoneal macrophages. Human apoE was secreted by peritoneal macrophages and was detected in Kupffer cells of the liver. Human apoE in the plasma of apoE-/-,hTgE+/0 mice (n = 30) was inversely correlated (P < 0.005) with the plasma cholesterol concentration. After 15 wk on a normal chow diet, atherosclerosis was assessed in apoE-/-,hTgE+/0 animals and in apoE-/-,hTgE0/0 littermates matched for plasma cholesterol level (approximately 450 mg/dl) and lipoprotein profile. There was significantly less atherosclerosis in both the aortic sinus and in the proximal aorta (P < 0.0001) in the animals expressing the human apoE transgene. In apo-E-/-,hTgE+/0 animals, which had detectable atherosclerotic lesions, human apoE was detected in the secretory apparatus of macrophage-derived foam cells in the arterial wall. The data demonstrate that expression of apoE by macrophages is antiatherogenic even in the presence of high levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. The data suggest that apoE prevents atherosclerosis by promoting cholesterol efflux from cells of the arterial wall. Images PMID:7593602

  11. Drosophila atonal fully rescues the phenotype of Math1 null mice: new functions evolve in new cellular contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Vincent Y.; Hassan, Bassem A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2002-01-01

    Many genes share sequence similarity between species, but their properties often change significantly during evolution. For example, the Drosophila genes engrailed and orthodenticle and the onychophoran gene Ultrabithorax only partially substitute for their mouse or Drosophila homologs. We have been analyzing the relationship between atonal (ato) in the fruit fly and its mouse homolog, Math1. In flies, ato acts as a proneural gene that governs the development of chordotonal organs (CHOs), which serve as stretch receptors in the body wall and joints and as auditory organs in the antennae. In the fly CNS, ato is important not for specification but for axonal arborization. Math1, in contrast, is required for the specification of cells in both the CNS and the PNS. Furthermore, Math1 serves a role in the development of secretory lineage cells in the gut, a function that does not parallel any known to be served by ato. We wondered whether ato and Math1 might be more functionally homologous than they appear, so we expressed Math1 in ato mutant flies and ato in Math1 null mice. To our surprise, the two proteins are functionally interchangeable.

  12. Acipimox, an inhibitor of lipolysis, attenuates atherogenesis in LDLR-null mice treated with HIV protease inhibitor ritonavir.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen; Wong, Siu; Pudney, Jeffrey; Jasuja, Ravi; Hua, Ning; Jiang, Lan; Miller, Andrew; Hruz, Paul W; Hamilton, James A; Bhasin, Shalender

    2009-12-01

    The advent of HIV protease inhibitors has greatly extended the life span of AIDS patients. With an aging HIV(+) population, the cardiometabolic side effects of these drugs are becoming increasingly important clinical concerns. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of adipose lipolysis will retard atherogenic lesion development induced by the antiviral protease inhibitors. LDLR-null mice receiving ritonavir were compared with those receiving ritonavir plus lipolysis inhibitor acipimox or vehicle alone to determine how acipimox would affect ritonavir-induced atherogenesis. Intermittent high-fat high-cholesterol diet was used to facilitate optimal atheromatous lesion development. Drug effects were assessed as changes in aortic lesion score, plasma lipid and lipoprotein profile, body fat mass, and insulin-induced suppression of plasma fatty acid concentrations. Ritonavir increased aortic lesions, in association with decreased body fat mass, impaired antilipolysis action of insulin, and increased proatherogenic plasma lipoproteins. All these adverse effects were attenuated by cotreatment with acipimox. Our results provide the first direct evidence that supports the hypothesis that dysregulation of adipose lipolysis is an important contributor to the proatherogenic role of selected HIV protease inhibitors.

  13. Drosophila atonal fully rescues the phenotype of Math1 null mice: new functions evolve in new cellular contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Vincent Y.; Hassan, Bassem A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2002-01-01

    Many genes share sequence similarity between species, but their properties often change significantly during evolution. For example, the Drosophila genes engrailed and orthodenticle and the onychophoran gene Ultrabithorax only partially substitute for their mouse or Drosophila homologs. We have been analyzing the relationship between atonal (ato) in the fruit fly and its mouse homolog, Math1. In flies, ato acts as a proneural gene that governs the development of chordotonal organs (CHOs), which serve as stretch receptors in the body wall and joints and as auditory organs in the antennae. In the fly CNS, ato is important not for specification but for axonal arborization. Math1, in contrast, is required for the specification of cells in both the CNS and the PNS. Furthermore, Math1 serves a role in the development of secretory lineage cells in the gut, a function that does not parallel any known to be served by ato. We wondered whether ato and Math1 might be more functionally homologous than they appear, so we expressed Math1 in ato mutant flies and ato in Math1 null mice. To our surprise, the two proteins are functionally interchangeable.

  14. Decreased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene 6 in cumulus cells of the cyclooxygenase-2 and EP2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Ochsner, Scott A; Russell, Darryl L; Day, Anthony J; Breyer, Richard M; Richards, Joanne S

    2003-03-01

    Ovulation, the release of fertilizable oocytes from mature follicles, involves tissue remodeling and increased prostaglandin (PG) signaling. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is the rate-limiting enzyme during PG synthesis. Female mice null for either COX-2 or the PGE(2) receptor EP2 are infertile, show decreased ovulation, and exhibit abnormal cumulus expansion. Cumulus expansion is the production of a complex extracellular matrix surrounding the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC). Matrix components consist of hyaluronan, proteoglycans, and proteins with hyaluronan binding domains. One such hyaluronan binding protein is TNFalpha-stimulated gene 6 (TSG-6). By various methods, we show induction of TSG-6 and hyaluronan synthase-2 mRNA in ovaries of mice treated with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin. By in situ hybridization, we show that both genes are expressed in periantral mural granulosa cells and cumulus cells of the mouse ovary. Notably, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization show that TSG-6 mRNA but not hyaluronan synthase-2 mRNA expression is selectively reduced in cumulus cells of COX-2 and EP2 null mice. Western analysis further confirms that TSG-6 protein is reduced in isolated COCs but remains covalently associated with inter alpha-trypsin inhibitor in COX-2 null mice. These observations identify TSG-6 as a target of PG action and show that its production in ovulatory follicles is associated with proper formation of the cumulus-derived extracellular matrix.

  15. Distribution of glycylsarcosine and cefadroxil among cerebrospinal fluid, choroid plexus, and brain parenchyma after intracerebroventricular injection is markedly different between wild-type and Pept2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David E; Hu, Yongjun; Shen, Hong; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Fenstermacher, Joseph D; Keep, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance kinetics, choroid plexus uptake, and parenchymal penetration of PEPT2 substrates in different regions of the brain after intracerebroventricular administration. To accomplish these objectives, we performed biodistribution studies using [14C]glycylsarcosine (GlySar) and [3H]cefadroxil, along with quantitative autoradiography of [14C]GlySar, in wild-type and Pept2 null mice. We found that PEPT2 deletion markedly reduced the uptake of GlySar and cefadroxil in choroid plexuses at 60 mins by 94% and 82% (P<0.001), respectively, and lowered their CSF clearances by about fourfold. Autoradiography showed that GlySar concentrations in the lateral, third, and fourth ventricle choroid plexuses were higher in wild-type as compared with Pept2 null mice (P<0.01). Uptake of GlySar by the ependymal–subependymal layer and septal region was higher in wild-type than in null mice, but the half-distance of penetration into parenchyma was significantly less in wild-type mice. The latter is probably because of the clearance of GlySar from interstitial fluid by brain cells expressing PEPT2, which stops further penetration. These studies show that PEPT2 knockout can significantly modify the spatial distribution of GlySar and cefadroxil (and presumably other peptides/mimetics and peptide-like drugs) in brain. PMID:20571525

  16. Partial Restoration of CFTR Function in cftr-Null Mice following Targeted Cell Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duchesneau, Pascal; Besla, Rickvinder; Derouet, Mathieu F; Guo, Li; Karoubi, Golnaz; Silberberg, Amanda; Wong, Amy P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2017-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the gene encoding CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Alteration in CFTR leads to thick airway mucus and bacterial infection. Cell therapy has been proposed for CFTR restoration, but efficacy has been limited by low engraftment levels. In our previous studies, we have shown that using a pre-conditioning regimen in combination with optimization of cell number and time of delivery, we could obtain greater bone marrow cell (BMC) retention in the lung. Here, we found that optimized delivery of wild-type (WT) BMC contributed to apical CFTR expression in airway epithelium and restoration of select ceramide species and fatty acids in CFTR(-/-) mice. Importantly, WT BMC delivery delayed Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection and increased survival of CFTR(-/-) recipients. Only WT BMCs had a beneficial effect beyond 6 months, suggesting a dual mechanism of BMC benefit: a non-specific effect early after cell delivery, possibly due to the recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils, and a late beneficial effect dependent on long-term CFTR expression. Taken together, our results suggest that BMC can improve overall lung function and may have potential therapeutic benefit for the treatment of CF.

  17. Advancing age increases sperm chromatin damage and impairs fertility in peroxiredoxin 6 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozkosem, Burak; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Fisher, Aron B.; O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Due to socioeconomic factors, more couples are choosing to delay conception than ever. Increasing average maternal and paternal age in developed countries over the past 40 years has raised the question of how aging affects reproductive success of males and females. Since oxidative stress in the male reproductive tract increases with age, we investigated the impact of advanced paternal age on the integrity of sperm nucleus and reproductive success of males by using a Prdx6−/− mouse model. We compared sperm motility, cytoplasmic droplet retention sperm chromatin quality and reproductive outcomes of young (2-month-old), adult (8-month-old), and old (20-month-old) Prdx6−/− males with their age-matched wild type (WT) controls. Absence of PRDX6 caused age-dependent impairment of sperm motility and sperm maturation and increased sperm DNA fragmentation and oxidation as well as decreased sperm DNA compaction and protamination. Litter size, total number of litters and total number of pups per male were significantly lower in Prdx6−/− males compared to WT controls. These abnormal reproductive outcomes were severely affected by age in Prdx6−/− males. In conclusion, the advanced paternal age affects sperm chromatin integrity and fertility more severely in the absence of PRDX6, suggesting a protective role of PRDX6 in age-associated decline in the sperm quality and fertility in mice. PMID:25796034

  18. Xenogeneic Graft-versus-Host-Disease in NOD-scid IL-2Rγnull Mice Display a T-Effector Memory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Niwa; Flutter, Barry; Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Sharif-Paghaleh, Ehsan; Barber, Linda D.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Nestle, Frank O.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD) is a prevalent and potentially lethal complication that develops following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Humanized mouse models of xenogeneic-GvHD based upon immunodeficient strains injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC; “Hu-PBMC mice”) are important tools to study human immune function in vivo. The recent introduction of targeted deletions at the interleukin-2 common gamma chain (IL-2Rγnull), notably the NOD-scid IL-2Rγnull (NSG) and BALB/c-Rag2null IL-2Rγnull (BRG) mice, has led to improved human cell engraftment. Despite their widespread use, a comprehensive characterisation of engraftment and GvHD development in the Hu-PBMC NSG and BRG models has never been performed in parallel. We compared engrafted human lymphocyte populations in the peripheral blood, spleens, lymph nodes and bone marrow of these mice. Kinetics of engraftment differed between the two strains, in particular a significantly faster expansion of the human CD45+ compartment and higher engraftment levels of CD3+ T-cells were observed in NSG mice, which may explain the faster rate of GvHD development in this model. The pathogenesis of human GvHD involves anti-host effector cell reactivity and cutaneous tissue infiltration. Despite this, the presence of T-cell subsets and tissue homing markers has only recently been characterised in the peripheral blood of patients and has never been properly defined in Hu-PBMC models of GvHD. Engrafted human cells in NSG mice shows a prevalence of tissue homing cells with a T-effector memory (TEM) phenotype and high levels of cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) expression. Characterization of Hu-PBMC mice provides a strong preclinical platform for the application of novel immunotherapies targeting TEM-cell driven GvHD. PMID:22937164

  19. Neurobehavioral changes and alteration of gene expression in the brains of metallothionein-I/II null mice exposed to low levels of mercury vapor during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Minoru; Honda, Masako; Watanabe, Chiho; Satoh, Masahiko; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the neurobehavioral changes and alteration in gene expression in the brains of metallothionein (MT)-I/II null mice exposed to low-levels of mercury vapor (Hg(0)) during postnatal development. MT-I/II null and wild-type mice were repeatedly exposed to Hg(0) at 0.030 mg/m(3) (range: 0.023-0.043 mg/m(3)), which was similar to the current threshold value (TLV), for 6 hr per day until the 20th day postpartum. The behavioral effects were evaluated with locomotor activity in the open field (OPF), learning ability in the passive avoidance response (PA) and spatial learning ability in the Morris water maze (MM) at 12 weeks of age. Hg(0)-exposed MT-I/II null mice showed a significant decrease in total locomotor activity in females, though learning ability and spatial learning ability were not affected. Immediately after Hg(0) exposure, mercury concentrations in the brain did not exceed 0.5 µg/g in any animals. Hg(0) exposure resulted in significant alterations in gene expression in the brains of both strains using DNA microarray analysis. The number of altered genes in MT-I/II null mice was higher than that in wild-type mice and calcium-calmodulin kinase II (Camk2a) involved in learning and memory in down-regulated genes was detected. These results provide useful information to elucidate the development of behavioral toxicity following low-level exposure to Hg(0).

  20. Enrichment of hematopoietic stem cells with SLAM and LSK markers for the detection of hematopoietic stem cell function in normal and Trp53 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jichun; Ellison, Felicia M.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Omokaro, Stephanie O.; Desierto, Marie J.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Young, Neal S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To test function of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vivo in C57BL/6 (B6) and Trp53-deficient (Trp53 null) mice by using two HSC enrichment schemes. Methods Bone marrow (BM) Lin-CD41-CD48-CD150+ (SLAM, signaling lymphocyte activation molecules), Lin-CD41-CD48-CD150- (SLAM-) and Lin-Sca1+CD117+ (LSK) cells were defined by fluorescence activated cell staining (FACS). Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was also analyzed by FACS. Sorted SLAM, SLAM- and LSK cells were tested in vivo in the competitive repopulation (CR) and serial transplantation assays. Results The SLAM cell fraction was 0.0078 ± 0.0010% and 0.0135 ± 0.0010% of total BM cells in B6 and Trp53 null mice, and was highly correlated (R2 = 0.7116) with LSK cells. CD150+ BM cells also contained more ROSlow cells than did CD150- cells. B6 SLAM cells repopulated recipients much better than B6 SLAM- cells, showing high HSC enrichment. B6 SLAM cells also engrafted recipients better than Trp53 null SLAM cells in the CR and the follow-up serial transplantation assays. Similarly, LSK cells from B6 donors also had higher repopulating ability than those from Trp53 null donors. However, whole BM cells from the same B6 and Trp53 null donors showed the opposite functional trend in recipient engraftment. Conclusion Both SLAM and LSK marker sets can enrich HSCs from B6 and Trp53 mice. Deficiency of Trp53 up-regulates HSC self-renewal but causes no gain of HSC function. PMID:18562080

  1. [Changes in the connexin 26 (GJB2) gene in Russian patients with hearing disorders: results of long-term molecular diagnostics of hereditary nonsyndromic deafness].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Galkina, V A; Matiushchenko, G N; Kisina, A G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Search for mutations in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) is a routine molecular-genetic analysis ofthe hereditary deafness worldwide. However, till now there is no assessment of the diagnostic significance of this analysis for Russian patients, and there are difficulties in interpretation of the results of DNA diagnostics. In the present study, a sample of 705 patients with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness from different regions of Russian Federation was investigated. A portion of deafness like DFNB1 caused by mutations in the GJB2 gene among the sample was 46%. The frequency of deafness of such genetic type was 1:1000, that is, the frequency of isolated autosomal recessive deafness was 1:500 in the population. It was found that each sixteenth individual in Russia is a heterozygous carrier of the mutation in the GJB2gene. Totally, 20 pathological GJB2 alleles were detected; among them, a c.35delG mutation with the allelic frequency 81% prevails. Six most frequent mutations (c.35delG, c.313_326de114, c.-23+1G>A (IVS1+1G>A), c.235delC, c.167delT, and p.Glul20del), which account for 95% of pathological GJB2 alleles, were detected. Mutations previously not described in the GJB2 gene (c.129delG, p.Gly200Arg, and c[Arg127His, Gly160Ser]) were found. An optimal algorithm of molecular investigation of Russian patients which detects up to 100% of mutations in the GJB2 gene was suggested. Data concerning a clinical significance of p.Met34Thr and p.Va137Ile mutations are confirmed in the study. Eight polymorphic substitutions in the GJB2gene which do not have clinical significance (p.Va127Ile, c.*3C>A, p.Va115311e, p.Gly160Ser, c.Arg127His, p.Glull4Gly (c.341A>G), c.-45C>A, and p.Ala149Thr) were also detected.

  2. Role of gamma carboxylated Glu47 in connexin 26 hemichannel regulation by extracellular Ca{sup 2+}: Insight from a local quantum chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Zonta, Francesco; Mammano, Fabio; Torsello, Mauro; Fortunati, Nicola; Orian, Laura; Polimeno, Antonino

    2014-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • QM calculations show that Ca{sup 2+} binds to γGlu47 in connexin hemichannels. • Molecular models of increasing size are employed in hybrid DFT calculations. • Ca{sup 2+} binding affects the interaction between γGlu47 and Arg75, Arg184. • Ca{sup 2+} binding alters the structure in a critical region of connexin hemichannels. - Abstract: Connexin hemichannels are regulated by several gating mechanisms, some of which depend critically on the extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}). It is well established that hemichannel activity is inhibited at normal (∼1 mM) [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}, whereas lowering [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e} to micromolar levels fosters hemichannel opening. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows significant and reversible changes of pore diameter at the extracellular mouth of Cx26 hemichannels exposed to different [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Analysis of the crystal structure of connexin 26 (Cx26) gap junction channels, corroborated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, suggests that several negatively charged amino acids create a favorable environment for low-affinity Ca{sup 2+} binding within the extracellular vestibule of the Cx26 hemichannel. In particular a highly conserved glutammic acid, found in position 47 in most connexins, is thought to undergo post translational gamma carboxylation (γGlu47), and is thus likely to play an important role in Ca{sup 2+} coordination. γGlu47 may also form salt bridges with two conserved arginines (Arg75 and Arg184 in Cx26), which are considered important in stabilizing the structure of the extracellular region. Using a combination of quantum chemistry methods, we analyzed the interaction between γGlu47, Arg75 and Arg184 in a Cx26 hemichannel model both in the absence and in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. We show that Ca{sup 2+} imparts significant local structural changes and speculate

  3. Assessment of Benzene-Induced Hematotoxicity Using a Human-Like Hematopoietic Lineage in NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Tsujimura, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Masahito; Otsuka, Kensuke; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Nakasono, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advancements, it is still difficult to evaluate in vivo responses to toxicants in humans. Development of a system that can mimic the in vivo responses of human cells will enable more accurate health risk assessments. A surrogate human hematopoietic lineage can be established in NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγnull (NOG) mice by transplanting human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (Hu-NOG mice). Here, we first evaluated the toxic response of human-like hematopoietic lineage in NOG mice to a representative toxic agent, benzene. Flow cytometric analysis showed that benzene caused a significant decrease in the number of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in the bone marrow and the number of human leukocytes in the peripheral blood and hematopoietic organs. Next, we established chimeric mice by transplanting C57BL/6 mouse-derived bone marrow cells into NOG mice (Mo-NOG mice). A comparison of the degree of benzene-induced hematotoxicity in donor-derived hematopoietic lineage cells within Mo-NOG mice indicated that the toxic response of Hu-NOG mice reflected interspecies differences in susceptibilities to benzene. Responses to the toxic effects of benzene were greater in lymphoid cells than in myeloid cells in Mo-NOG and Hu-NOG mice. These findings suggested that Hu-NOG mice may be a powerful in vivo tool for assessing hematotoxicity in humans, while accounting for interspecies differences. PMID:23226520

  4. Expression and externalization of annexin 1 in the adrenal gland: structure and function of the adrenal gland in annexin 1-null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Davies, Evelyn; Omer, Selma; Buckingham, Julia C; Morris, John F; Christian, Helen C

    2007-03-01

    Annexin 1 (ANXA1) is a member of the annexin family of phospholipid- and calcium-binding proteins with a well demonstrated role in early delayed (30 min to 3 h) inhibitory feedback of glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. This study used adrenal gland tissue from ANXA1-null transgenic mice, in which a beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) reporter gene was controlled by the ANXA1 promoter, and wild-type control mice to explore the potential role of ANXA1 in adrenal function. RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed strong expression of ANXA1 mRNA and protein in the adrenal gland. Immunofluorescence labeling of ANXA1 in wild-type and beta-Gal expression in ANXA1-null adrenals localized intense staining in the outer perimeter cell layers. Immunogold electron microscopy identified cytoplasmic and nuclear ANXA1 labeling in outer cortical cells and capsular cells. Exposure of adrenal segments in vitro to dexamethasone (0.1 mum, 3 h) caused an increase in the amount of ANXA1 in the intracellular compartment and attached to the surface of the cells. The N-terminal peptide ANXA1(Ac2-26) inhibited corticosterone release. Corticosterone release was significantly greater from ANXA1-null adrenal cells compared with wild type in response to ACTH (10 pm to 5 nm). In contrast, basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone release from ANXA1-null adrenal cells was not different from wild type. Morphometry studies demonstrated that ANXA1 null adrenal glands were smaller than wild-type, and the cortical/medullary area ratio was significantly reduced. These results suggest ANXA1 is a regulator of adrenocortical size and corticosterone secretion.

  5. Sex difference in neural tube defects in p53-null mice is caused by differences in the complement of X not Y genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuqi; Watkins, Rebecca; Delot, Emmanuele; Reliene, Ramune; Schiestl, Robert H; Burgoyne, Paul S; Arnold, Arthur P

    2008-02-01

    To shed light on the biological origins of sex differences in neural tube defects (NTDs), we examined Trp53-null C57BL/6 mouse embryos and neonates at 10.5 and 18.5 days post coitus (dpc) and at birth. We confirmed that female embryos show more NTDs than males. We also examined mice in which the testis-determining gene Sry is deleted from the Y chromosome but inserted onto an autosome as a transgene, producing XX and XY gonadal females and XX and XY gonadal males. At birth, Trp53 nullizygous mice were predominantly XY rather than XX, irrespective of gonadal type, showing that the sex difference in the lethal effect of Trp53 nullizygosity by postnatal day 1 is caused by differences in sex chromosome complement. At 10.5 dpc, the incidence of NTDs in Trp53-null progeny of XY* mice, among which the number of the X chromosomes varies independently of the presence or absence of a Y chromosome, was higher in mice with two copies of the X chromosome than in mice with a single copy. The presence of a Y chromosome had no protective effect, suggesting that sex differences in NTDs are caused by sex differences in the number of X chromosomes.

  6. Genome-Wide Screening of Alpha-Tocopherol Sensitive Genes in Heart Tissue from Alpha-Tocopherol Transfer Protein Null Mice (ATTP−/−)

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Vihas T.; Hobson, Brad; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Cross, Carroll E.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha tocopherol transfer protein (ATTP) null mice (ATTP−/−) have a systemic deficiency of alpha-tocopherol (AT). The heart AT levels of ATTP−/− are <10% of those in ATTP+/+ mice. The genomic responses of heart to AT deficiency were determined in 3 months old male ATTP−/− mice and compared with their ATTP+/+ littermate controls using Affymetrix 430A 2.0 high density oligonucleotide arrays. Differential analysis of ~13,000 genes identified repression of genes related to immune system and activation of genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammation with no significant change in the expression of classical antioxidant genes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) in ATTP−/− as compared to ATTP+/+ mice. The present data identifies novel classes of AT sensitive genes in heart tissue. PMID:17382327

  7. Development of an autism severity score for mice using Nlgn4 null mutants as a construct-valid model of heritable monogenic autism.

    PubMed

    El-Kordi, Ahmed; Winkler, Daniela; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Kästner, Anne; Krueger, Dilja; Ronnenberg, Anja; Ritter, Caroline; Jatho, Jasmin; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Bourgeron, Thomas; Fischer, Julia; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2013-08-15

    Autism is the short name of a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders (autism spectrum disorders, ASD) with several lead symptoms required for classification, including compromised social interaction, reduced verbal communication and stereotyped repetitive behaviors/restricted interests. The etiology of ASD is still unknown in most cases but monogenic heritable forms exist that have provided insights into ASD pathogenesis and have led to the notion of autism as a 'synapse disorder'. Among the most frequent monogenic causes of autism are loss-of-function mutations of the NLGN4X gene which encodes the synaptic cell adhesion protein neuroligin-4X (NLGN4X). We previously described autism-like behaviors in male Nlgn4 null mutant mice, including reduced social interaction and ultrasonic communication. Here, we extend the phenotypical characterization of Nlgn4 null mutant mice to both genders and add a series of additional autism-relevant behavioral readouts. We now report similar social interaction and ultrasonic communication deficits in females as in males. Furthermore, aggression, nest-building parameters, as well as self-grooming and circling as indicators of repetitive behaviors/stereotypies were explored in both genders. The construction of a gender-specific autism severity composite score for Nlgn4 mutant mice markedly diminishes population/sample heterogeneity typically obtained for single tests, resulting in p values of <0.00001 and a genotype predictability of 100% for male and of >83% for female mice. Taken together, these data underscore the similarity of phenotypical consequences of Nlgn4/NLGN4X loss-of-function in mouse and man, and emphasize the high relevance of Nlgn4 null mutant mice as an ASD model with both construct and face validity.

  8. FosB Null Mutant Mice Show Enhanced Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity: Potential Involvement of FosB in Intracellular Feedback Signaling and Astroglial Function

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kumi O; Ornthanalai, Veravej G; Kato, Tadafumi; Murphy, Niall P

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies show that (1) two members of fos family transcription factors, c-Fos and FosB, are induced in frontal brain regions by methamphetamine; (2) null mutation of c-Fos exacerbates methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity; and (3) null mutation of FosB enhances behavioral responses to cocaine. Here we sought a role of FosB in responses to methamphetamine by studying FosB null mutant (−/−) mice. After a 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injection, FosB(−/−) mice were more prone to self-injury. Concomitantly, the intracellular feedback regulators of Sprouty and Rad-Gem-Kir (RGK) family transcripts had lower expression profiles in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of the FosB(−/−) mice. Three days after administration of four 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injections, the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(−/−) mice contained more degenerated neurons as determined by Fluoro-Jade B staining. The abundance of the small neutral amino acids, serine, alanine, and glycine, was lower and/or was poorly induced after methamphetamine administration in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(−/−) mice. In addition, methamphetamine-treated FosB(−/−) frontoparietal and piriform cortices showed more extravasation of immunoglobulin, which is indicative of blood–brain barrier dysfunction. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia, brain dopamine content, and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum, however, were not different between genotypes. These data indicate that FosB is involved in thermoregulation-independent protective functions against methamphetamine neurotoxicity in postsynaptic neurons. Our findings suggest two possible mechanisms of FosB-mediated neuroprotection: one is induction of negative feedback regulation within postsynaptic neurons through Sprouty and RGK. Another is supporting astroglial function such as maintenance of the blood–brain barrier, and metabolism of serine and glycine, which are important

  9. FosB null mutant mice show enhanced methamphetamine neurotoxicity: potential involvement of FosB in intracellular feedback signaling and astroglial function.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kumi O; Ornthanalai, Veravej G; Kato, Tadafumi; Murphy, Niall P

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies show that (1) two members of fos family transcription factors, c-Fos and FosB, are induced in frontal brain regions by methamphetamine; (2) null mutation of c-Fos exacerbates methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity; and (3) null mutation of FosB enhances behavioral responses to cocaine. Here we sought a role of FosB in responses to methamphetamine by studying FosB null mutant (-/-) mice. After a 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injection, FosB(-/-) mice were more prone to self-injury. Concomitantly, the intracellular feedback regulators of Sprouty and Rad-Gem-Kir (RGK) family transcripts had lower expression profiles in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of the FosB(-/-) mice. Three days after administration of four 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injections, the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(-/-) mice contained more degenerated neurons as determined by Fluoro-Jade B staining. The abundance of the small neutral amino acids, serine, alanine, and glycine, was lower and/or was poorly induced after methamphetamine administration in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(-/-) mice. In addition, methamphetamine-treated FosB(-/-) frontoparietal and piriform cortices showed more extravasation of immunoglobulin, which is indicative of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia, brain dopamine content, and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum, however, were not different between genotypes. These data indicate that FosB is involved in thermoregulation-independent protective functions against methamphetamine neurotoxicity in postsynaptic neurons. Our findings suggest two possible mechanisms of FosB-mediated neuroprotection: one is induction of negative feedback regulation within postsynaptic neurons through Sprouty and RGK. Another is supporting astroglial function such as maintenance of the blood-brain barrier, and metabolism of serine and glycine, which are important glial modulators of nerve cells.

  10. An Improved Protocol for Efficient Engraftment in NOD/LTSZ-SCIDIL-2RγNULL Mice Allows HIV Replication and Development of Anti-HIV Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Gaudray, Gilles; Musumeci, Lucia; Thielen, Caroline; Vaira, Dolores; Vandergeeten, Claire; Delacroix, Laurence; Van Gulck, Ellen; Vanham, Guido; de Leval, Laurence; Rahmouni, Souad; Moutschen, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rγnull (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long-term HIV-1 replication studies. Total body irradiation (TBI) is a classical myeloablation regimen used to improve engraftment levels of human cells in these humanized mice. Some recent reports suggest the use of busulfan as a myeloablation regimen to transplant HPCs in neonatal and adult NSG mice. In the present study, we further ameliorated the busulfan myeloablation regimen with fresh CB-CD34+cell transplantation in 3–4 week old NSG mice. In this CB-CD34+transplanted NSG mice engraftment efficiency of human CD45+cell is over 90% in peripheral blood. Optimal engraftment promoted early and increased CD3+T cell levels, with better lymphoid tissue development and prolonged human cell chimerism over 300 days. These humanized NSG mice have shown long-lasting viremia after HIV-1JRCSF and HIV-1Bal inoculation through intravenous and rectal routes. We also saw a gradual decline of the CD4+T cell count, widespread immune activation, up-regulation of inflammation marker and microbial translocation after HIV-1 infection. Humanized NSG mice reconstituted according to our new protocol produced, moderate cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-1 postinfection. We believe that NSG mice reconstituted according to our easy to use protocol will provide a better in vivo model for HIV-1 replication and anti-HIV-1 therapy trials. PMID:22675567

  11. Delayed parturition and altered myometrial progesterone receptor isoform A expression in mice null for Krüppel-like factor 9.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhaoyang; Velarde, Michael C; Simmen, Frank A; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2008-06-01

    Preterm and delayed labor conditions are devastating health problems with currently unknown etiologies. We previously showed that the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) influences the expression and/or transcriptional activity of receptors for estrogen and progesterone in endometrial cells in vivo and in vitro. Given that estrogen and progesterone differentially regulate uterine myometrial contractility during gestation, we hypothesized that lack of KLF9 could compromise myometrial function, leading to defects in parturition. To test this, we used mice null for Klf9 to evaluate gestation length, response to the progesterone receptor (PGR) antagonist RU486, expression levels of steroid receptor proteins, nuclear receptor coactivator and contractility-associated genes, and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity in myometrium near term. Klf9 knockout (KO) mice exhibited delayed parturition by 1-2 days relative to wild-type (WT) counterparts, in the absence of fetal genotype contribution and differences in serum estrogen and progesterone levels. Knockout mice near term were refractory to the abortive action of RU486, and they displayed aberrant myometrial expression patterns of nuclear PGR-A and NF-kappaB p65/RELA relative to WT mice. Myometrial expression levels of nuclear estrogen receptor-alpha did not differ, whereas those for Oxtr and Crebbp mRNAs were lower, in KO versus WT mice. Results indicate that KLF9 contributes to the regulation of PGR-associated components in the myometrium necessary for timely onset of parturition in mice. The present study highlights the potential utility of Klf9 null mice to investigate the pathophysiology of parturition defects involving PGR signaling.

  12. Bacterial Infection of Smad3/Rag2 Double-Null Mice with Transforming Growth Factor-β Dysregulation as a Model for Studying Inflammation-Associated Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Price, Lillian; Treuting, Piper; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Seamons, Audrey; Drivdahl, Rolf; Zeng, Weiping; Lai, LapHin; Huycke, Mark; Phelps, Susan; Brabb, Thea; Iritani, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in genes encoding transforming growth factor-β-signaling components contribute to colon cancer in humans. Similarly, mice deficient in the transforming growth factor-β signaling molecule, Smad3, develop colon cancer, but only after a bacterial trigger occurs, resulting in chronic inflammation. To determine whether Smad3-null lymphocytes contribute to increased cancer susceptibility, we crossed Smad3-null mice with mice deficient in both B and T lymphocytes (Rag2−/− mice). Helicobacter-infected Smad3/Rag2-double knockout (DKO) mice had more diffuse inflammation and increased incidence of adenocarcinoma compared with Helicobacter-infected Smad3−/− or Rag2−/− mice alone. Adoptive transfer of WT CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells provided significant protection of Smad3/Rag2-DKO from bacterial-induced typhlocolitis, dysplasia, and tumor development, whereas Smad3−/− T-regulatory cells provided no protection. Immunohistochemistry, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analyses of colonic tissues from Smad3/Rag2-DKO mice 1 week after Helicobacter infection revealed an influx of macrophages, enhanced nuclear factor-κB activation, increased BclXL/Bcl-2 expression, increased c-Myc expression, accentuated epithelial cell proliferation, and up-regulated IFN-γ, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 transcription levels. These results suggest that the loss of Smad3 increases susceptibility to colon cancer by at least two mechanisms: deficient T-regulatory cell function, which leads to excessive inflammation after a bacterial trigger; and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, enhanced nuclear factor-κB activation, and increased expression of both pro-oncogenic and anti-apoptotic proteins that result in increased cell proliferation/survival of epithelial cells in colonic tissues. PMID:19119184

  13. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; diIorio, Philip; Brostowin, Dean; Leehy, Linda; Yang, Chaoxing; Urano, Fumihiko; Harlan, David M; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice treated with alogliptin show improved human insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation compared to control mice engrafted with the same donor islets. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets provide a useful model to interrogate potential therapies to improve human islet function and survival in vivo. PMID:24376359

  14. Comparison of germ cell mutagenicity in male CYP2E1-null and wild-type mice treated with acrylamide: evidence supporting a glycidamide-mediated effect.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, B I; Witt, K L; El-Hadri, L; Hoffler, U; Kissling, G E; Shelby, M D; Bishop, J B

    2005-01-01

    Acrylamide is an animal carcinogen and probable human carcinogen present in appreciable amounts in heated carbohydrate-rich foodstuffs. It is also a germ cell mutagen, inducing dominant lethal mutations and heritable chromosomal translocations in postmeiotic sperm of treated mice. Acrylamide's affinity for male germ cells has sometimes been overlooked in assessing its toxicity and defining human health risks. Previous investigations of acrylamide's germ cell activity in mice showed stronger effects after repeated administration of low doses compared with a single high dose, suggesting the possible involvement of a stable metabolite. A key oxidative metabolite of acrylamide is the epoxide glycidamide, generated by cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1). To explore the role of CYP2E1 metabolism in the germ cell mutagenicity of acrylamide, CYP2E1-null and wild-type male mice were treated by intraperitoneal injection with 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg acrylamide (5 ml saline)(-1) kg(-1) day(-1) for 5 consecutive days. At defined times after exposure, males were mated to untreated B6C3F1 females. Females were killed in late gestation and uterine contents were examined. Dose-related increases in resorption moles (chromosomally aberrant embryos) and decreases in the numbers of pregnant females and the proportion of living fetuses were seen in females mated to acrylamide-treated wild-type mice. No changes in any fertility parameters were seen in females mated to acrylamide-treated CYP2E1-null mice. Our results constitute the first unequivocal demonstration that acrylamide-induced germ cell mutations in male mice require CYP2E1-mediated epoxidation of acrylamide. Thus, CYP2E1 polymorphisms in human populations, resulting in variable enzyme metabolic activities, may produce differential susceptibilities to acrylamide toxicities.

  15. Dystrophin and utrophin expression require sarcospan: loss of α7 integrin exacerbates a newly discovered muscle phenotype in sarcospan-null mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jamie L; Chou, Eric; Oh, Jennifer; Kwok, Allan; Burkin, Dean J; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2012-10-15

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a core component of the major adhesion complexes in skeletal muscle, the dystrophin- and utrophin (Utr)-glycoprotein complexes (DGC and UGC). We performed a rigorous analysis of SSPN-null mice and discovered that loss of SSPN decreased DGC and UGC abundance, leading to impaired laminin-binding activity and susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced injury in skeletal muscle. We show that loss of SSPN increased levels of α7β1 integrin. To genetically test whether integrin compensates for the loss of DGC and UGC function in SSPN-nulls, we generated mice lacking both SSPN and α7 integrin (DKO, double knockout). Muscle regeneration, sarcolemma integrity and fibrosis were exacerbated in DKO mice and were remarkably similar to muscle from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, suggesting that secondary loss of integrin contributes significantly to pathogenesis. Expression of the DGC and UGC, laminin binding and Akt signaling were negatively impacted in DKO muscle, resulting in severely diminished specific force properties. We demonstrate that SSPN is a necessary component of dystrophin and Utr function and that SSPN modulation of integrin signaling is required for extracellular matrix attachment and muscle force development.

  16. Hepatic effects of repeated oral administration of diclofenac to hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN™) and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Akingbasote, James A; Foster, Alison J; Wilson, Ian; Sarda, Sunil; Jones, Huw B; Kenna, J Gerry

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase null (HRN™) mice exhibit normal hepatic and extrahepatic biotransformation enzyme activities when compared to wild-type (WT) mice, but express no functional hepatic cytochrome P450 activities. When incubated in vitro with [(14)C]-diclofenac, liver microsomes from WT mice exhibited extensive biotransformation to oxidative and glucuronide metabolites and covalent binding to proteins was also observed. In contrast, whereas glucuronide conjugates and a quinone-imine metabolite were formed when [(14)C]-diclofenac was incubated with HRN™ mouse liver, only small quantities of P450-derived oxidative metabolites were produced in these samples and covalent binding to proteins was not observed. Livers from vehicle-treated HRN™ mice exhibited enhanced lipid accumulation, bile duct proliferation, hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration, which were not present in livers from WT mice. Elevated liver-derived alanine aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities were also observed in plasma from HRN™ mice. When treated orally with diclofenac for 7 days, at 30 mg/kg/day, the severities of the abnormal liver histopathology and plasma liver enzyme findings in HRN™ mice were reduced markedly. Oral diclofenac administration did not alter the liver histopathology or elevate plasma enzyme activities of WT mice. These findings indicate that HRN™ mice are valuable for exploration of the role played by hepatic P450s in drug biotransformation, but poorly suited to investigations of drug-induced liver toxicity. Nevertheless, studies in HRN™ mice could provide novel insights into the role played by inflammation in liver injury and may aid the evaluation of new strategies for its treatment.

  17. Engraftment of human HSCs in nonirradiated newborn NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice is enhanced by transgenic expression of membrane-bound human SCF

    PubMed Central

    Racki, Waldemar J.; Leif, Jean; Burzenski, Lisa; Hosur, Vishnu; Wetmore, Amber; Gott, Bruce; Herlihy, Mary; Ignotz, Ronald; Dunn, Raymond; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human HSCs support multidisciplinary translational experimentation, including the study of human hematopoiesis. Heightened levels of human HSC engraftment are observed in immunodeficient mice expressing mutations in the IL2-receptor common γ chain (IL2rg) gene, including NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice. Engraftment of human HSC requires preconditioning of immunodeficient recipients, usually with irradiation. Such preconditioning increases the expression of stem cell factor (SCF), which is critical for HSC engraftment, proliferation, and survival. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of human membrane-bound stem cell factor Tg(hu-mSCF)] would increase levels of human HSC engraftment in nonirradiated NSG mice and eliminate complications associated with irradiation. Surprisingly, detectable levels of human CD45+ cell chimerism were observed after transplantation of cord blood–derived human HSCs into nonirradiated adult as well as newborn NSG mice. However, transgenic expression of human mSCF enabled heightened levels of human hematopoietic cell chimerism in the absence of irradiation. Moreover, nonirradiated NSG-Tg(hu-mSCF) mice engrafted as newborns with human HSCs rejected human skin grafts from a histoincompatible donor, indicating the development of a functional human immune system. These data provide a new immunodeficient mouse model that does not require irradiation preconditioning for human HSC engraftment and immune system development. PMID:22246028

  18. Retina Restored and Brain Abnormalities Ameliorated by Single-Copy Knock-In of Human NR2E1 in Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmouth, J.-F.; Banks, K. G.; Mathelier, A.; Gregory-Evans, C. Y.; Castellarin, M.; Holt, R. A.; Gregory-Evans, K.; Wasserman, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Nr2e1 encodes a stem cell fate determinant of the mouse forebrain and retina. Abnormal regulation of this gene results in retinal, brain, and behavioral abnormalities in mice. However, little is known about the functionality of human NR2E1. We investigated this functionality using a novel knock-in humanized-mouse strain carrying a single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). We also documented, for the first time, the expression pattern of the human BAC, using an NR2E1-lacZ reporter strain. Unexpectedly, cerebrum and olfactory bulb hypoplasia, hallmarks of the Nr2e1-null phenotype, were not fully corrected in animals harboring one functional copy of human NR2E1. These results correlated with an absence of NR2E1-lacZ reporter expression in the dorsal pallium of embryos and proliferative cells of adult brains. Surprisingly, retinal histology and electroretinograms demonstrated complete correction of the retina-null phenotype. These results correlated with appropriate expression of the NR2E1-lacZ reporter in developing and adult retina. We conclude that the human BAC contained all the elements allowing correction of the mouse-null phenotype in the retina, while missing key regulatory regions important for proper spatiotemporal brain expression. This is the first time a separation of regulatory mechanisms governing NR2E1 has been demonstrated. Furthermore, candidate genomic regions controlling expression in proliferating cells during neurogenesis were identified. PMID:22290436

  19. Ly-2+ T cell enlargement and null cell proliferation occur at the onset of splenomegaly and autoantibody production in New Zealand Black mice.

    PubMed

    Manohar, V; Brown, E M; Leiserson, W M; Edison, L J; Chused, T M

    1984-12-01

    Splenic T and B lymphocyte and null cell populations were analyzed in NZB mice as autoimmune disease developed during the first year of life. In the B lymphocytes, a progressive shift occurred from the surface IgD bright subset to the surface IgM bright subset. There was a slight increase in the ratio of Ly-2- to Ly-2+ T cells. Splenomegaly was not detected until after 40 wk of age and was primarily due to an increase in the number of null cells. This change was accompanied by an increase in the size, as determined by narrow-angle forward light scatter, of the Ly-2+ but not the Ly-2- T cells, an elevation of IgG-containing plasma cells, and the appearance of anti-erythrocyte autoantibody. The splenic B cell subset distribution and the enlargement of the Ly-2+ T cells were reflected in the peripheral blood, whereas the T cell subset ratio was not. The B cell subset alteration did not correlate with any of the other changes observed. Statistical associations were found between the ratios of T cell subsets, the enlargement of the Ly-2+ T cells, and the increased number of null cells, suggesting a linkage among those late changes that immediately precede the development of overt autoimmune disease.

  20. Rescue of motor coordination by Purkinje cell-targeted restoration of Kv3.3 channels in Kcnc3-null mice requires Kcnc1.

    PubMed

    Hurlock, Edward C; Bose, Mitali; Pierce, Ganon; Joho, Rolf H

    2009-12-16

    The role of cerebellar Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channels in motor coordination was examined with an emphasis on the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Kv3 channel subunits encoded by Kcnc genes are distinguished by rapid activation and deactivation kinetics that support high-frequency, narrow action potential firing. Previously we reported that increased lateral deviation while ambulating and slips while traversing a narrow beam of ataxic Kcnc3-null mice were corrected by restoration of Kv3.3 channels specifically to Purkinje cells, whereas Kcnc3-mutant mice additionally lacking one Kcnc1 allele were partially rescued. Here, we report mice lacking all Kcnc1 and Kcnc3 alleles exhibit no such rescue. For Purkinje cell output to reach the rest of the brain it must be conveyed by neurons of the DCN or vestibular nuclei. As Kcnc1, but not Kcnc3, alleles are lost, mutant mice exhibit increasing gait ataxia accompanied by spike broadening and deceleration in DCN neurons, suggesting the facet of coordination rescued by Purkinje-cell-restricted Kv3.3 restoration in mice lacking just Kcnc3 is hypermetria, while gait ataxia emerges when additionally Kcnc1 alleles are lost. Thus, fast repolarization in Purkinje cells appears important for normal movement velocity, whereas DCN neurons are a prime candidate locus where fast repolarization is necessary for normal gait patterning.

  1. Exosome secretion, including the DNA damage-induced p53-dependent secretory pathway, is severely compromised in TSAP6/Steap3-null mice.

    PubMed

    Lespagnol, A; Duflaut, D; Beekman, C; Blanc, L; Fiucci, G; Marine, J-C; Vidal, M; Amson, R; Telerman, A

    2008-11-01

    TSAP6 (tumor suppressor-activated pathway 6), also known as Steap3, is a direct p53 transcriptional target gene. It regulates protein secretion, for example translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), which is implicated in tumor reversion. In keeping with the latter, we show herein that TSAP6 is a glycosylated protein present in the trans-Golgi network, endosomal-vesicular compartment and cytoplasmic membrane. To further investigate the physiological function of TSAP6, we have generated TSAP6-deficient mice. These mice exhibit microcytic anemia with abnormal reticulocyte maturation and deficient transferrin receptor downregulation, a process known to be dependent on exosomal secretion. Moreover, we provide direct evidence that exosome production is severely compromised in TSAP6-null cells. Finally, we show that the DNA damage-induced p53-dependent nonclassical exosomal secretory pathway is abrogated in TSAP6-null cells. Given the fact that exosomes are used as cell-free vaccines against cancer and that they could be involved in the biogenesis and spread of human immunodeficiency virus, it is important to understand their regulation. The results presented here provide the first genetic demonstration that exosome formation is a tightly controlled biological process dependent of TSAP6.

  2. Insulin storage and glucose homeostasis in mice null for the granule zinc transporter ZnT8 and studies of the type 2 diabetes-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, Tamara J; Bellomo, Elisa A; Wijesekara, Nadeeja; Loder, Merewyn K; Baldwin, Jocelyn M; Gyulkhandanyan, Armen V; Koshkin, Vasilij; Tarasov, Andrei I; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Kronenberger, Katrin; Taneja, Tarvinder K; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Libert, Sarah; Froguel, Philippe; Scharfmann, Raphael; Stetsyuk, Volodymir; Ravassard, Philippe; Parker, Helen; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Sladek, Robert; Hughes, Stephen J; Johnson, Paul R V; Masseboeuf, Myriam; Burcelin, Remy; Baldwin, Stephen A; Liu, Ming; Lara-Lemus, Roberto; Arvan, Peter; Schuit, Frans C; Wheeler, Michael B; Chimienti, Fabrice; Rutter, Guy A

    2009-09-01

    Zinc ions are essential for the formation of hexameric insulin and hormone crystallization. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs13266634 in the SLC30A8 gene, encoding the secretory granule zinc transporter ZnT8, is associated with type 2 diabetes. We describe the effects of deleting the ZnT8 gene in mice and explore the action of the at-risk allele. Slc30a8 null mice were generated and backcrossed at least twice onto a C57BL/6J background. Glucose and insulin tolerance were measured by intraperitoneal injection or euglycemic clamp, respectively. Insulin secretion, electrophysiology, imaging, and the generation of adenoviruses encoding the low- (W325) or elevated- (R325) risk ZnT8 alleles were undertaken using standard protocols. ZnT8(-/-) mice displayed age-, sex-, and diet-dependent abnormalities in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and body weight. Islets isolated from null mice had reduced granule zinc content and showed age-dependent changes in granule morphology, with markedly fewer dense cores but more rod-like crystals. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, granule fusion, and insulin crystal dissolution, assessed by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, were unchanged or enhanced in ZnT8(-/-) islets. Insulin processing was normal. Molecular modeling revealed that residue-325 was located at the interface between ZnT8 monomers. Correspondingly, the R325 variant displayed lower apparent Zn(2+) transport activity than W325 ZnT8 by fluorescence-based assay. ZnT8 is required for normal insulin crystallization and insulin release in vivo but not, remarkably, in vitro. Defects in the former processes in carriers of the R allele may increase type 2 diabetes risks.

  3. Insulin Storage and Glucose Homeostasis in Mice Null for the Granule Zinc Transporter ZnT8 and Studies of the Type 2 Diabetes–Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Nicolson, Tamara J.; Bellomo, Elisa A.; Wijesekara, Nadeeja; Loder, Merewyn K.; Baldwin, Jocelyn M.; Gyulkhandanyan, Armen V.; Koshkin, Vasilij; Tarasov, Andrei I.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Kronenberger, Katrin; Taneja, Tarvinder K.; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Libert, Sarah; Froguel, Philippe; Scharfmann, Raphael; Stetsyuk, Volodymir; Ravassard, Philippe; Parker, Helen; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Sladek, Robert; Hughes, Stephen J.; Johnson, Paul R.V.; Masseboeuf, Myriam; Burcelin, Remy; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Liu, Ming; Lara-Lemus, Roberto; Arvan, Peter; Schuit, Frans C.; Wheeler, Michael B.; Chimienti, Fabrice; Rutter, Guy A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Zinc ions are essential for the formation of hexameric insulin and hormone crystallization. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs13266634 in the SLC30A8 gene, encoding the secretory granule zinc transporter ZnT8, is associated with type 2 diabetes. We describe the effects of deleting the ZnT8 gene in mice and explore the action of the at-risk allele. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Slc30a8 null mice were generated and backcrossed at least twice onto a C57BL/6J background. Glucose and insulin tolerance were measured by intraperitoneal injection or euglycemic clamp, respectively. Insulin secretion, electrophysiology, imaging, and the generation of adenoviruses encoding the low- (W325) or elevated- (R325) risk ZnT8 alleles were undertaken using standard protocols. RESULTS ZnT8−/− mice displayed age-, sex-, and diet-dependent abnormalities in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and body weight. Islets isolated from null mice had reduced granule zinc content and showed age-dependent changes in granule morphology, with markedly fewer dense cores but more rod-like crystals. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, granule fusion, and insulin crystal dissolution, assessed by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, were unchanged or enhanced in ZnT8−/− islets. Insulin processing was normal. Molecular modeling revealed that residue-325 was located at the interface between ZnT8 monomers. Correspondingly, the R325 variant displayed lower apparent Zn2+ transport activity than W325 ZnT8 by fluorescence-based assay. CONCLUSIONS ZnT8 is required for normal insulin crystallization and insulin release in vivo but not, remarkably, in vitro. Defects in the former processes in carriers of the R allele may increase type 2 diabetes risks. PMID:19542200

  4. Oral administration of L-mR18L, a single domain cationic amphipathic helical peptide, inhibits lesion formation in ApoE null mice.

    PubMed

    Handattu, Shaila P; Datta, Geeta; Epand, Richard M; Epand, Raquel F; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N; Mishra, Vinod K; Monroe, Candyce E; Keenum, Tamara D; Chaddha, Manjula; Anantharamaiah, G M; Garber, David W

    2010-12-01

    We have shown that Ac-hE18A-NH₂, a dual-domain cationic apolipoprotein-mimetic peptide, reduces plasma cholesterol levels in dyslipidemic mice. Two single-domain cationic peptides based on the lytic class L peptide 18L were developed to test the hypothesis that a single-domain cationic amphipathic peptide can reduce atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein (apo)E null mice when orally administered. To incorporate anti-inflammatory properties, aromatic residues were clustered in the nonpolar face similar to peptide 4F, resulting in modified 18L (m18L). To reduce lytic properties, the Lys residues of 18L were replaced with Arg with the resulting peptide called modified R18L (mR18L). Biophysical studies showed that mR18L had stronger interactions with lipids than did m18L. Peptide mR18L was also more effective than m18L in promoting LDL uptake by HepG2 cells. ApoE null mice received normal chow or chow containing m18L or mR18L for six weeks. A significant reduction in plasma cholesterol and aortic sinus lesion area was seen only in the mR18L group. Plasma from mice administered mR18L, unlike those from the control and m18L groups, did not enhance monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Thus oral administration of mR18L reduces plasma cholesterol and lesion formation and inhibits monocyte adhesion.

  5. Elevated glutathione is not sufficient to protect against doxorubicin-induced nuclear damage in heart in multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (Mrp1/Abcc1) null mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jun; Coy, Donna; Zhang, Wei; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Wang, Chi; Chaiswing, Luksana; St Clair, Daret; Vore, Mary; Jungsuwadee, Paiboon

    2015-11-01

    Cardiotoxicity is a major dose-limiting adverse effect of doxorubicin (DOX), mediated in part by overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Abcc1 (Mrp1) mediates the efflux of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH, GSSG) and is also a major transporter that effluxes the GSH conjugate of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE; GS-HNE), a toxic product of lipid peroxidation formed during oxidative stress. To assess the role of Mrp1 in protecting the heart from DOX-induced cardiac injury, wild-type (WT) and Mrp1 null (Mrp1(-/-)) C57BL/6 littermate mice were administered DOX (15 mg/kg) or saline (7.5 ml/kg) i.v., and heart ventricles were examined at 72 hours. Morphometric analysis by electron microscopy revealed extensive injuries in cytosol, mitochondria, and nuclei of DOX-treated mice in both genotypes. Significantly more severely injured nuclei were observed in Mrp1(-/-) versus WT mice (P = 0.031). GSH and the GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly increased in treatment-naïve Mrp1(-/-) versus WT mice; GSH remained significantly higher in Mrp1(-/-) versus WT mice after saline and DOX treatment, with no changes in GSSG or GSH/GSSG. GS-HNE, measured by mass spectrometry, was lower in the hearts of treatment-naïve Mrp1(-/-) versus WT mice (P < 0.05). DOX treatment decreased GS-HNE in WT but not Mrp1(-/-) mice, so that GS-HNE was modestly but significantly higher in Mrp1(-/-) versus WT hearts after DOX. Expression of enzymes mediating GSH synthesis and antioxidant proteins did not differ between genotypes. Thus, despite elevated GSH levels in Mrp1(-/-) hearts, DOX induced significantly more injury in the nuclei of Mrp1(-/-) versus WT hearts. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Expression in SPARC-null Mice of Collagen type I lacking the Globular Domain of the α1(I) N-propeptide Results in Abdominal Hernias and Loss of Dermal Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Card, Lauren; Henderson, Nikki; Zhang, Yuhua; Bornstein, Paul; Bradshaw, Amy D.

    2010-01-01

    The sequence encoding the N-propeptide of collagen I is characterized by significant conservation of amino acids across species; however, the function of the N-propeptide remains poorly defined. Studies in vitro have suggested that one activity of this propeptide might be to act as a feedback inhibitor of collagen I synthesis. To determine whether the N-propeptide contributed to decreased collagen content in SPARC-null mice, mice carrying a deletion of exon 2, which encodes the globular domain of the N-propeptide of collagen I, were crossed to SPARC-null animals. Mice lacking SPARC and expressing collagen I without the globular domain of the N-propeptide were viable and fertile. However, a significant number of animals developed abdominal hernias within the first 2 months of life with an approximate 20% penetrance (~35% of males). The dermis of SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted mice was thinner and contained fewer large collagen fibers in comparison with wild-type or in either single transgenic animal. The average collagen fibril diameter of exon 2-deleted mice did not significantly differ from wild-type mice (WT: 87.9 nm versus exon 2-deleted: 88.2 nm), whereas SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted fibrils were smaller than that of SPARC-null dermis (SPARC-null: 60.2 nm, SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted: 40.8 nm). As measured by hydroxyproline analysis, double transgenic skin biopsies contained significantly less collagen than those of wild-type, those of exon 2-deleted, and those of SPARC-null biopsies. Acetic acid extraction of collagen from skin biopsies revealed an increase in the proportion of soluble collagen in the SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted mice. These results support a function of the N-propeptide of collagen I in facilitating incorporation and stabilization of collagen I into the insoluble ECM and argue against a primary function of the N-propeptide as a negative regulator of collagen synthesis. PMID:20708079

  7. Expression in SPARC-null mice of collagen type I lacking the globular domain of the α1(I) N-propeptide results in abdominal hernias and loss of dermal collagen.

    PubMed

    Card, Lauren; Henderson, Nikki; Zhang, Yuhua; Bornstein, Paul; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2010-09-01

    The sequence encoding the N-propeptide of collagen I is characterized by significant conservation of amino acids across species; however, the function of the N-propeptide remains poorly defined. Studies in vitro have suggested that one activity of this propeptide might be to act as a feedback inhibitor of collagen I synthesis. To determine whether the N-propeptide contributed to decreased collagen content in SPARC-null mice, mice carrying a deletion of exon 2, which encodes the globular domain of the N-propeptide of collagen I, were crossed to SPARC-null animals. Mice lacking SPARC and expressing collagen I without the globular domain of the N-propeptide were viable and fertile. However, a significant number of animals developed abdominal hernias within the first 2 months of life with an approximate 20% penetrance (~35% of males). The dermis of SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted mice was thinner and contained fewer large collagen fibers in comparison with wild-type or in either single transgenic animal. The average collagen fibril diameter of exon 2-deleted mice did not significantly differ from wild-type mice (WT: 87.9 nm versus exon 2-deleted: 88.2 nm), whereas SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted fibrils were smaller than that of SPARC-null dermis (SPARC-null: 60.2 nm, SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted: 40.8 nm). As measured by hydroxyproline analysis, double transgenic skin biopsies contained significantly less collagen than those of wild-type, those of exon 2-deleted, and those of SPARC-null biopsies. Acetic acid extraction of collagen from skin biopsies revealed an increase in the proportion of soluble collagen in the SPARC-null/exon 2-deleted mice. These results support a function of the N-propeptide of collagen I in facilitating incorporation and stabilization of collagen I into the insoluble ECM and argue against a primary function of the N-propeptide as a negative regulator of collagen synthesis.

  8. Identification of novel toxicity-associated metabolites by metabolomics and mass isotopomer analysis of acetaminophen metabolism in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2008-02-22

    CYP2E1 is recognized as the most important enzyme for initiation of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. In this study, the resistance of Cyp2e1-null mice to APAP treatment was confirmed by comparing serum aminotransferase activities and blood urea nitrogen levels in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. However, unexpectedly, profiling of major known APAP metabolites in urine and serum revealed that the contribution of CYP2E1 to APAP metabolism decreased with increasing APAP doses administered. Measurement of hepatic glutathione and hydrogen peroxide levels exposed the importance of oxidative stress in determining the consequence of APAP overdose. Subsequent metabolomic analysis was capable of constructing a principal components analysis (PCA) model that delineated a relationship between urinary metabolomes and the responses to APAP treatment. Urinary ions high in wild-type mice treated with 400 mg/kg APAP were elucidated as 3-methoxy-APAP glucuronide (VII) and three novel APAP metabolites, including S-(5-acetylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)mercaptopyruvic acid (VI, formed by a Cys-APAP transamination reaction in kidney), 3,3'-biacetaminophen (VIII, an APAP dimer), and a benzothiazine compound (IX, originated from deacetylated APAP), through mass isotopomer analysis, accurate mass measurement, tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation, in vitro reactions, and chemical treatments. Dose-, time-, and genotype-dependent appearance of these minor APAP metabolites implied their association with the APAP-induced toxicity and potential biomarker application. Overall, the oxidative stress elicited by CYP2E1-mediated APAP metabolism might significantly contribute to APAP-induced toxicity. The combination of genetically modified animal models, mass isotopomer analysis, and metabolomics provides a powerful and efficient technical platform to characterize APAP-induced toxicity through identifying novel biomarkers and unraveling novel mechanisms.

  9. NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to test therapeutics targeting human signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models of human inflammatory diseases have limited predictive quality for human clinical trials for various reasons including species specific activation mechanisms and the immunological background of the animals which markedly differs from the genetically heterogeneous and often aged patient population. Objective Development of an animal model allowing for testing therapeutics targeting pathways involved in the development of Atopic Dermatitis (AD) with better translatability to the patient. Methods NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from AD and healthy volunteers were treated with IL-4 and the antagonistic IL-4 variant R121/Y124D (Pitrakinra). Levels of human (h)IgE, amount of B-, T- and plasma- cells and ratio of CD4 : CD8 positive cells served as read out for induction and inhibition of cell proliferation and hIgE secretion. Results were compared to in vitro analysis. Results hIgE secretion was induced by IL-4 and inhibited by the IL-4 antagonist Pitrakinra in vivo when formulated with methylcellulose. B-cells proliferated in response to IL-4 in vivo; the effect was abrogated by Pitrakinra. IL-4 shifted CD4 : CD8 ratios in vitro and in vivo when hPBMC derived from healthy volunteers were used. Pitrakinra reversed the effect. Human PBMC derived from patients with AD remained inert and engrafted mice reflected the individual responses observed in vitro. Conclusion NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human PBMC reflect the immunological history of the donors and provide a complementary tool to in vitro studies. Thus, studies in this model might provide data with better translatability from bench to bedside. PMID:23294516

  10. Acute intermittent hypoxia-induced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor is disrupted in the brainstem of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, A; Jenkins, V K; Knopp, S J; Balkowiec, A; Bissonnette, J M

    2012-03-29

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). One of its targets is the gene encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf). In vitro studies using cultured neurons have produced conflicting results with respect to the role of MeCP2 in BDNF expression. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces plasticity in the respiratory system characterized by long-term facilitation of phrenic nerve amplitude. This paradigm induces an increase in BDNF protein. We hypothesized that AIH leads to augmentation of BDNF transcription in respiratory-related areas of the brainstem and that MeCP2 is necessary for this process. Wild-type and mecp2 null (mecp2(-/y)) mice were subjected to three 5-min episodes of exposure to 8% O(2)/4% CO(2)/88% N(2), delivered at 5-min intervals. Normoxia control wild-type and mecp2 null mice were exposed to room air for the total length of time, that is, 30 min. Following a recovery in room air, the pons and medulla were rapidly removed. Expression of BDNF protein and transcripts were determined by ELISA and quantitative PCR, respectively. AIH induced a significant increase in BDNF protein in the pons and medulla, and in mRNA transcript levels in the pons of wild-type animals. In contrast, there were no significant changes in either BDNF protein or transcripts in the pons or medulla of mice lacking MeCP2. The results indicate that MeCP2 is required for regulation of BDNF expression by acute intermittent hypoxia in vivo.

  11. Wild-type and IL10-null mice have differential colonic epithelial gene expression responses to dietary supplementation with synbiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis and inulin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Chan, Wan-Chun; Hu, Zihua

    2014-03-01

    Prebiotic plus probiotic (synbiotic) supplementations promote fermentation and have shown anti-inflammatory activity in colonic epithelium. However, in many instances, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have demonstrated adverse effects after prebiotic supplementation at a dose well tolerated by normal individuals. To test the hypothesis that the host inflammation affects the colonic epithelial response to increased fermentation, the gene expression of colonic epithelium was analyzed. In a 1-way experimental design to test the effect of supplements in wild-type mice using the standard diet formulated by the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN-93G) as the control diet, fermentable fiber inulin (5%) in the absence or presence of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) (10(8) CFU/kg diet) showed limited effects on gene expression as determined by whole-genome microarray. Bb12 supplementation alone was known not to increase fermentation and here instead significantly upregulated genes in nucleic acid metabolic processes. The effects of the synbiotic diet were then determined in mice exposed to LPS-induced inflammation in a 2-way experimental design testing the effect of diet and LPS. The microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses on the wild-type mice revealed that LPS-induced changes in the colonic epithelium were 4- to 10-fold less in the synbiotic diet group compared with the control diet group. Unlike the wild-type mice, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL10)-null mice (susceptible to IBD) given the synbiotic diet, compared with those given the control diet, had 3- to 40-fold increased expression of inflammation-related genes such as Cxcl1 (chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1) and S100a9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9) in the absence and presence of LPS exposure. These contrasting intestinal epithelial responses to increased fermentation in wild-type and IL10-null mice are similar

  12. Long-Term Enrichment Enhances the Cognitive Behavior of the Aging Neurogranin Null Mice without Affecting Their Hippocampal LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Freesia L.; Huang, Kuo-Ping; Boucheron, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Neurogranin (Ng), a PKC substrate, is abundantly expressed in brain regions important for cognitive functions. Deletion of Ng caused severe deficits in spatial learning and LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice. These Ng-/- mice also exhibit deficits in the amplification of their hippocampal signaling pathways critical for learning and memory.…

  13. Accumulation of xenotransplanted canine bone marrow cells in NOD/SCID/γc(null) mice with acute hepatitis induced by CCl4.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takashi; Hisasue, Masaharu; Segawa, Kazuhito; Fujimoto, Ayumi; Makiishi, Eri; Neo, Sakurako; Yasuno, Kyohei; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Tsuchiya, Ryo

    2013-07-31

    Bone marrow cell infusion (BMI) has recently been suggested as an effective therapy for refractory liver disease; however, the efficiency of BMI using canine bone marrow cells (cBMCs) has not been reported. We evaluated the accumulation potential of cBMCs in a mouse model of acute liver failure. Acute hepatitis was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment in NOD/SCID/γc(null)(NOG) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL mice, and the characteristics of liver dysfunction and the degree of hepatic injury and regeneration were compared between the two mouse models. Next, female CCl4-treated NOG mice were xenotransplanted with male PKH26-labeled cBMCs, and the potential of cBMCs to accumulate in injured liver tissue compartments was examined. Fluorescence microscopy was performed to histologically detect the infused cBMCs, and DNA polymerase chain reaction was performed for detection of the male Y chromosome (SRY gene) in the recipient female NOG mice. The number of PKH26-positive cBMCs transplanted in the liver tissue gradually increased in the NOG mice. The infused cBMCs were located in the necrotic area of the liver at an early stage after transplantation, and most had accumulated a week after transplantation. However, the therapeutic efficacy of the xenotransplantation remained unclear, because no significant differences were observed concerning the extent liver injury and regeneration between the cBMC-transplanted and saline control mice. These results suggest that cBMCs will specifically accumulate in injured liver tissue and that BMC transplantation may have the potential to repair liver deficiency.

  14. Null mutation of the β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit attenuates nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Astrid K; Marks, Michael J; Markou, Athina

    2015-04-15

    The anhedonic signs of nicotine withdrawal are predictive of smoking relapse rates in humans. Identification of the neurobiological substrates that mediate anhedonia will provide insights into the genetic variations that underlie individual responses to smoking cessation and relapse. The present study assessed the role of β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nACh receptor) subunits in nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia using β2 nACh receptor subunit knockout (β2(-/-)) and wildtype (β2(+/+)) mice. Anhedonia was assessed with brain reward thresholds, defined as the current intensity that supports operant behavior in the discrete-trial current-intensity intracranial self-stimulation procedure. Nicotine was delivered chronically through osmotic minipumps for 28 days (40 mg/kg/day, base), and withdrawal was induced by either administering the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (i.e., antagonist-precipitated withdrawal) in mice chronically treated with nicotine or terminating chronic nicotine administration (i.e., spontaneous withdrawal). Mecamylamine (6 mg/kg, salt) significantly elevated brain reward thresholds in nicotine-treated β2(+/+) mice compared with saline-treated β2(+/+) mice and nicotine-treated β2(-/-) mice. Spontaneous nicotine withdrawal similarly resulted in significant elevations in thresholds in nicotine-withdrawing β2(+/+) mice compared with saline-treated β2(+/+) and nicotine-treated β2(-/-) mice, which remained at baseline levels. These results showed that precipitated and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia was attenuated in β2(-/-) mice. The reduced expression of anhedonic signs during nicotine withdrawal in β2(-/-) mice may have resulted from the lack of neuroadaptations in β2 nACh receptor subunit expression and function that may have occurred during either nicotine exposure or nicotine withdrawal in wildtype mice. In conclusion, individuals with genetic variations that result in diminished

  15. Maintenance of muscle mass and load-induced growth in Muscle RING Finger 1 null mice with age.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Baehr, Leslie M; Philp, Andrew; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C

    2014-02-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass occurs to varying degrees in all individuals and has a detrimental effect on morbidity and mortality. Muscle RING Finger 1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase, is believed to mediate muscle atrophy through the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Deletion of MuRF1 (KO) in mice attenuates the loss of muscle mass following denervation, disuse, and glucocorticoid treatment; however, its role in age-related muscle loss is unknown. In this study, skeletal muscle from male wild-type (WT) and MuRF1 KO mice was studied up to the age of 24 months. Muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area decreased significantly with age in WT, but not in KO mice. In aged WT muscle, significant decreases in proteasome activities, especially 20S and 26S β5 (20-40% decrease), were measured and were associated with significant increases in the maladaptive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker, CHOP. Conversely, in aged MuRF1 KO mice, 20S or 26S β5 proteasome activity was maintained or decreased to a lesser extent than in WT mice, and no increase in CHOP expression was measured. Examination of the growth response of older (18 months) mice to functional overload revealed that old WT mice had significantly less growth relative to young mice (1.37- vs. 1.83-fold), whereas old MuRF1 KO mice had a normal growth response (1.74- vs. 1.90-fold). These data collectively suggest that with age, MuRF1 plays an important role in the control of skeletal muscle mass and growth capacity through the regulation of cellular stress. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Coordinated Regulation of Hepatic Phase I and II Drug-Metabolizing Genes and Transporters using AhR-, CAR-, PXR-, PPARα-, and Nrf2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factors aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulate genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice after chemical activation. However, the specificity of their transcriptional regulation has not been determined systematically in vivo. The purpose of this study was to identify genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters altered by chemical activators in a transcription factor-dependent manner using wild-type and transcription factor-null mice. Chemical activators were administered intraperitoneally to mice once daily for 4 days. Livers were collected 24 h after the final dose, and total RNA was isolated for mRNA quantification of cytochromes P450, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), aldehyde dehydrogenases (Aldhs), glutathione transferases (Gsts), sulfotransferases (Sults), UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugts), organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps). Pharmacological activation of each transcription factor leads to mRNA induction of drug metabolic and transport genes in livers of male and female wild-type mice, but no change in null mice: AhR (Cyp1a2, Nqo1, Aldh7a1, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, Ugt1a9, Ugt2b35, Sult5a1, Gstm3, and Mrp4), CAR (Cyp2b10, Aldh1a1, Aldh1a7, Ugt1a1, Ugt2b34, Sult1e1, Sult3a1, Sult5a1, Papps2, Gstt1, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1–4, and Mrp2–4), PXR (Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a5, Ugt1a9, Gsta1, Gstm1–m3, Oatp1a4, and Mrp3), PPARα (Cyp4a14, Aldh1a1, mGst3, Gstm4, and Mrp4), and Nrf2 (Nqo1, Aldh1a1, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1–m4, mGst3, and Mrp3–4). Taken together, these data reveal transcription factor specificity and overlap in regulating hepatic drug disposition genes by chemical activators. Coordinated regulation of phase I, phase II, and transport genes by

  17. Endothelial Cell-Specific Deletion of P2Y2 Receptor Promotes Plaque Stability in Atherosclerosis-Susceptible ApoE-Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingjuan; Qian, Shaomin; Hoggatt, April; Tang, Hongying; Hacker, Timothy A; Obukhov, Alexander G; Herring, Paul B; Seye, Cheikh I

    2017-01-01

    Nucleotide P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) contributes to vascular inflammation by increasing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in endothelial cells (EC), and global P2Y2R deficiency prevents fatty streak formation in apolipoprotein E null (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Because P2Y2R is ubiquitously expressed in vascular cells, we investigated the contribution of endothelial P2Y2R in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. EC-specific P2Y2R-deficient mice were generated by breeding VEcadherin5-Cre mice with the P2Y2R floxed mice. Endothelial P2Y2R deficiency reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and significantly altered ATP- and UTP (uridine 5'-triphosphate)-induced vasorelaxation without affecting vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine. Telemetric blood pressure and echocardiography measurements indicated that EC-specific P2Y2R-deficient mice did not develop hypertension. We investigated the role of endothelial P2Y2R in the development of atherosclerotic lesions by crossing the EC-specific P2Y2R knockout mice onto an ApoE(-/-) background and evaluated lesion development after feeding a standard chow diet for 25 weeks. Histopathologic examination demonstrated reduced atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic sinus and entire aorta, decreased macrophage infiltration, and increased smooth muscle cell and collagen content, leading to the formation of a subendothelial fibrous cap in EC-specific P2Y2R-deficient ApoE(-/-) mice. Expression and proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 was significantly reduced in atherosclerotic lesions from EC-specific P2Y2R-deficient ApoE(-/-) mice. Furthermore, EC-specific P2Y2R deficiency inhibited nitric oxide production, leading to significant increase in smooth muscle cell migration out of aortic explants. EC-specific P2Y2R deficiency reduces atherosclerotic burden and promotes plaque stability in ApoE(-/-) mice through impaired macrophage infiltration acting together with reduced matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and

  18. A marginal level of dystrophin partially ameliorates hindlimb muscle passive mechanical properties in dystrophin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Chady H; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether a minimal level of dystrophin expression improves the passive mechanical properties of skeletal muscle in the murine Duchenne muscular dystrophy model. We compared the elastic and viscous properties of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) in mdx3cv and mdx4cv mice at 6, 14, and 20 months of age. Both strains are on the C57Bl/6 background, and both lose the full-length dystrophin protein. Interestingly, mdx3cv mice express a near full-length dystrophin at ≈ 5% of the normal level. We found that the stress-strain profile and the stress relaxation rate of the EDL in mdx3cv mice were partially preserved in all age groups compared with age-matched mdx4cv mice. Our results suggest that a low level of dystrophin expression may treat muscle stiffness in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Production of anti-ABO blood group antibodies after minor ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation in NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) mice.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hirofumi; Fuchimoto, Yasushi; Mori, Takehiko; Kato, Jun; Uemura, Tomoe; Handa, Makoto; Tazawa, Hirofumi; Ohdan, Hideki; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    ABO incompatibility is a barrier for solid organ transplantation, but not for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To investigate tolerance induction, we enrolled patients who had undergone minor ABO-incompatible (O into A group, n = 6) and ABO-identical (O into O group, n = 4) bone marrow transplantation (BMT). None of the six O into A patients were positive for recipient-specific (anti-blood group A) isohemagglutinins, whereas all four O into O patients were. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were engrafted into NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) (NOG) mice, followed by sensitization of blood group A red blood cells. Anti-blood group A antibodies (Abs) in the sera of the patients and the human PBMC-engrafted NOG mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Anti-blood group A Abs in the patients' sera were significantly correlated with anti-A isohemagglutinin titers (p < 0.01). In the human PBMC-engrafted NOG mice, anti-blood group A Abs were significantly lower in the O into A group than in the O into O group (p < 0.05), despite ex vivo restimulation of B cells. The results of this study suggest that long after receiving minor ABO-incompatible BMT, B cells derived from newly engrafted donor precursor cells were induced tolerance to recipient-specific antigens. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Podocyte-Specific VEGF-A Gain of Function Induces Nodular Glomerulosclerosis in eNOS Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Veron, Delma; Aggarwal, Pardeep K.; Velazquez, Heino; Kashgarian, Michael; Moeckel, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    VEGF-A and nitric oxide are essential for glomerular filtration barrier homeostasis and are dysregulated in diabetic nephropathy. Here, we examined the effect of excess podocyte VEGF-A on the renal phenotype of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout mice. Podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function in eNOS−/− mice resulted in nodular glomerulosclerosis, mesangiolysis, microaneurysms, and arteriolar hyalinosis associated with massive proteinuria and renal failure in the absence of diabetic milieu or hypertension. In contrast, podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function in wild-type mice resulted in less pronounced albuminuria and increased creatinine clearance. Transmission electron microscopy revealed glomerular basement membrane thickening and podocyte effacement in eNOS−/− mice with podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function. Furthermore, glomerular nodules overexpressed collagen IV and laminin extensively. Biotin-switch and proximity ligation assays demonstrated that podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function decreased glomerular S-nitrosylation of laminin in eNOS−/− mice. In addition, treatment with VEGF-A decreased S-nitrosylated laminin in cultured podocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that excess glomerular VEGF-A and eNOS deficiency is necessary and sufficient to induce Kimmelstiel-Wilson–like nodular glomerulosclerosis in mice through a process that involves deposition of laminin and collagen IV and de-nitrosylation of laminin. PMID:24578128

  1. Behavioral characterization of cereblon forebrain-specific conditional null mice: a model for human non-syndromic intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Ra, Stephen; Kishinevsky, Sarah; Lee, Anni S; Romanienko, Peter; DuBoff, Mariel; Yang, Chingwen; Zupan, Bojana; Byrne, Maureen; Daruwalla, Zeeba R; Mark, Willie; Kosofsky, Barry E; Toth, Miklos; Higgins, Joseph J

    2012-01-15

    A nonsense mutation in the human cereblon gene (CRBN) causes a mild type of autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability (ID). Animal studies show that crbn is a cytosolic protein with abundant expression in the hippocampus (HPC) and neocortex (CTX). Its diverse functions include the developmental regulation of ion channels at the neuronal synapse, the mediation of developmental programs by ubiquitination, and a target for herpes simplex type I virus in HPC neurons. To test the hypothesis that anomalous CRBN expression leads to HPC-mediated memory and learning deficits, we generated germ-line crbn knock-out mice (crbn(-/-)). We also inactivated crbn in forebrain neurons in conditional knock-out mice in which crbn exons 3 and 4 are deleted by cre recombinase under the direction of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha promoter (CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-)). crbn mRNA levels were negligible in the HPC, CTX, and cerebellum (CRBM) of the crbn(-/-) mice. In contrast, crbn mRNA levels were reduced 3- to 4-fold in the HPC, CTX but not in the CRBM in CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-) mice as compared to wild type (CamKII(cre/+), crbn(+/+)). Contextual fear conditioning showed a significant decrease in the percentage of freezing time in CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-) and crbn(-/-) mice while motor function, exploratory motivation, and anxiety-related behaviors were normal. These findings suggest that CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-) mice exhibit selective HPC-dependent deficits in associative learning and supports the use of these mice as in vivo models to study the functional consequences of CRBN aberrations on memory and learning in humans.

  2. Bone homeostasis in growth hormone receptor-null mice is restored by IGF-I but independent of Stat5.

    PubMed

    Sims, N A; Clément-Lacroix, P; Da Ponte, F; Bouali, Y; Binart, N; Moriggl, R; Goffin, V; Coschigano, K; Gaillard-Kelly, M; Kopchick, J; Baron, R; Kelly, P A

    2000-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates both bone growth and remodeling, but it is unclear whether these actions are mediated directly by the GH receptor (GHR) and/or IGF-I signaling. The actions of GH are transduced by the Jak/Stat signaling pathway via Stat5, which is thought to regulate IGF-I expression. To determine the respective roles of GHR and IGF-I in bone growth and remodeling, we examined bones of wild-type, GHR knockout (GHR(-/-)), Stat5ab(-/-), and GHR(-/-) mice treated with IGF-I. Reduced bone growth in GHR(-/-) mice, due to a premature reduction in chondrocyte proliferation and cortical bone growth, was detected after 2 weeks of age. Additionally, although trabecular bone volume was unchanged, bone turnover was significantly reduced in GHR(-/-) mice, indicating GH involvement in the high bone-turnover level during growth. IGF-I treatment almost completely rescued all effects of the GHR(-/-) on both bone growth and remodeling, supporting a direct effect of IGF-I on both osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Whereas bone length was reduced in Stat5ab(-/-) mice, there was no reduction in trabecular bone remodeling or growth-plate width as observed in GHR(-/-) mice, indicating that the effects of GH in bone may not involve Stat5 activation.

  3. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide–Null Mice Demonstrate Enhanced Sweet Taste Preference, Dysglycemia, and Reduced Taste Bud Leptin Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bronwen; Shin, Yu-Kyong; White, Caitlin M.; Ji, Sunggoan; Kim, Wook; Carlson, Olga D.; Napora, Joshua K.; Chadwick, Wayne; Chapter, Megan; Waschek, James A.; Mattson, Mark P.; Maudsley, Stuart; Egan, Josephine M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE It is becoming apparent that there is a strong link between taste perception and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence implicates gut-related hormones in taste perception, including glucagon-like peptide 1 and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). We used VIP knockout mice to investigate VIP's specific role in taste perception and connection to energy regulation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Body weight, food intake, and plasma levels of multiple energy-regulating hormones were measured and pancreatic morphology was determined. In addition, the immunocytochemical profile of taste cells and gustatory behavior were examined in wild-type and VIP knockout mice. RESULTS VIP knockout mice demonstrate elevated plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin levels, with no islet β-cell number/topography alteration. VIP and its receptors (VPAC1, VPAC2) were identified in type II taste cells of the taste bud, and VIP knockout mice exhibit enhanced taste preference to sweet tastants. VIP knockout mouse taste cells show a significant decrease in leptin receptor expression and elevated expression of glucagon-like peptide 1, which may explain sweet taste preference of VIP knockout mice. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that the tongue can play a direct role in modulating energy intake to correct peripheral glycemic imbalances. In this way, we could view the tongue as a sensory mechanism that is bidirectionally regulated and thus forms a bridge between available foodstuffs and the intricate hormonal balance in the animal itself. PMID:20150284

  4. Sensorineural hearing loss in insulin-like growth factor I-null mice: a new model of human deafness.

    PubMed

    Cediel, R; Riquelme, R; Contreras, J; Díaz, A; Varela-Nieto, I

    2006-01-01

    It has been reported that mutations in the gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) cause syndromic hearing loss. To study the precise role of IGF-I in auditory function and to hypothesize the possible morphological and electrophysiological changes that may occur in the human inner ear, we have analysed the auditory brainstem response in a mouse model of IGF-I deficiency. We show here that homozygous Igf-1(-/-) mice present an all-frequency involved bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Igf-1(-/-) mice also present a delayed response to acoustic stimuli; this increases along the auditory pathway, indicating a contribution of the central nervous system to the hearing loss in Igf-1(-/-) mice. These results support the use of the Igf-1(-/-) mouse as a new model for the study of human syndromic deafness.

  5. A mouse model for ulcerative colitis based on NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from affected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Palamides, Pia; Jodeleit, Henrika; Föhlinger, Michael; Beigel, Florian; Herbach, Nadja; Mueller, Thomas; Wolf, Eckhard; Siebeck, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal models reflective of ulcerative colitis (UC) remain a major challenge, and yet are crucial to understand mechanisms underlying the onset of disease and inflammatory characteristics of relapses and remission. Mouse models in which colitis-like symptoms are induced through challenge with toxins such as oxazolone, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) have been instrumental in understanding the inflammatory processes of UC. However, these neither reflect the heterogeneous symptoms observed in the UC-affected population nor can they be used to test the efficacy of inhibitors developed against human targets where high sequence and structural similarity of the respective ligands is lacking. In an attempt to overcome these problems, we have developed a mouse model that relies on NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from UC-affected individuals. Upon challenge with ethanol, mice developed colitis-like symptoms and changes in the colon architecture, characterized by influx of inflammatory cells, edema, crypt loss, crypt abscesses and epithelial hyperplasia, as previously observed in immune-competent mice. TARC, TGFβ1 and HGF expression increased in distal parts of the colon. Analysis of human leucocytes isolated from mouse spleen revealed an increase in frequencies of CD1a+, CD64+, CD163+ and TSLPR+ CD14+ monocytes, and antigen-experienced CD44+ CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in response to ethanol. Analysis of human leucocytes from the colon of challenged mice identified CD14+ monocytes and CD11b+ monocytes as the predominant populations. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis from distal parts of the colon indicated that IFNγ might be one of the cytokines driving inflammation. Treatment with infliximab ameliorated symptoms and pathological manifestations, whereas pitrakinra had no therapeutic benefit. Thus, this model is partially reflective of the human disease and might

  6. Assessment of functional recovery and axonal sprouting in oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) null mice after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Benxiu; Case, Lauren C; Liu, Kai; Shao, Zhaohui; Lee, Xinhua; Yang, Zhongshu; Wang, Joy; Tian, Tim; Shulga-Morskaya, Svetlana; Scott, Martin; He, Zhigang; Relton, Jane K; Mi, Sha

    2008-10-01

    Oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) is a myelin component that has been shown in vitro to inhibit neurite outgrowth by binding to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR1)/Lingo-1/Taj (TROY)/p75 receptor complex to activate the RhoA pathway. To investigate the effects of OMgp on axon regeneration in vivo, OMgp(-/-) mice on a mixed 129/Sv/C57BL/6 (129BL6) or a C57BL/6 (BL6) genetic background were tested in two spinal cord injury (SCI) models - a severe complete transection or a milder dorsal hemisection. OMgp(-/-) mice on the mixed 129BL6 genetic background showed greater functional improvement compared to OMgp(+/+) littermates, with increased numbers of cholera toxin B-labeled ascending sensory axons and 5-HT(+) descending axons and less RhoA activation after spinal cord injury. Myelin isolated from OMgp(-/-) mice (129BL6) was significantly less inhibitory to neurite outgrowth than wild-type (wt) myelin in vitro. However, OMgp(-/-) mice on a BL/6 genetic background showed neither statistically significant functional recovery nor axonal sprouting following dorsal hemisection.

  7. Disturbances in the secretion of neurotransmitters in IA-2/IA-2beta null mice: changes in behavior, learning and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Kubosaki, A; Ito, Y; Notkins, A L

    2009-03-17

    Islet-associated protein 2 (IA-2) and IA-2beta are major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes and transmembrane proteins in dense core secretory vesicles (DCV) of neuroendocrine cells. The deletion of these genes results in a decrease in insulin secretion. The present study was initiated to test the hypothesis that this deletion not only affects the secretion of insulin, but has a more global effect on neuroendocrine secretion that leads to disturbances in behavior and learning. Measurement of neurotransmitters showed that norepinephrine, dopamine and 5-HT were significantly decreased in the brain of double knockout (DKO) mice (P<0.05 to <0.001). In tests evaluating anxiety-like behavior and conditioned-learning, the DKO mice showed a highly significant increase in anxiety-like behavior (P<0.01 to <0.001) and impairment of conditioned learning (P<0.01) as compared to WT mice. The DKO mice also displayed an increase in spontaneous and induced seizures (P<0.01) and age-related death. Contrary to the generally held view that IA-2 and IA-2beta are expressed exclusively in DCV, subcellular fractionation studies revealed that IA-2beta, but not IA-2, co-purifies with fractions rich in synaptic vesicles (SV), and that the secretion of dopamine, GABA and glutamate from the synaptosomes of the DKO mice was significantly decreased as was the number of SV (P<0.01). Taken together, these findings show that IA-2beta is present in both DCV and SV, and that the deletion of IA-2/IA-2beta has a global effect on the secretion of neurotransmitters. The impairment of secretion leads to behavioral and learning disturbances, seizures and reduced lifespan.

  8. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit (Gclm) Null Mice Have Increased Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Accelerated Age-Related Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jinhwan; Nakamura, Brooke N.; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the one of the most abundant intracellular antioxidants. Mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH. Our prior work showed that GSH plays antiapoptotic roles in ovarian follicles. We hypothesized that Gclm−/− mice have accelerated ovarian aging due to ovarian oxidative stress. We found significantly decreased ovarian GSH concentrations and oxidized GSH/oxidized glutathione redox potential in Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries. Prepubertal Gclm−/− and Gclm+/+ mice had similar numbers of ovarian follicles, and as expected, the total number of ovarian follicles declined with age in both genotypes. However, the rate of decline in follicles was significantly more rapid in Gclm−/− mice, and this was driven by accelerated declines in primordial follicles, which constitute the ovarian reserve. We found significantly increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining (oxidative lipid damage marker) and significantly increased nitrotyrosine immunostaining (oxidative protein damage marker) in prepubertal and adult Gclm−/− ovaries compared with controls. The percentage of small ovarian follicles with increased granulosa cell proliferation was significantly higher in prepubertal and 2-month-old Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries, indicating accelerated recruitment of primordial follicles into the growing pool. The percentages of growing follicles with apoptotic granulosa cells were increased in young adult ovaries. Our results demonstrate increased ovarian oxidative stress and oxidative damage in young Gclm−/− mice, associated with an accelerated decline in ovarian follicles that appears to be mediated by increased recruitment of follicles into the growing pool, followed by apoptosis at later stages of follicular development. PMID:26083875

  9. Comparison of the pathology of interstitial plaque in human ICSF stone patients to NHERF-1 and THP-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Weinman, Edward J.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Lingeman, James E.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Coe, Fredric L.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive evidence now supports the role of papillary interstitial deposits—Randall’s plaques—in the formation of stones in the idiopathic, calcium oxalate stone former. These plaques begin as deposits of apatite in the basement membranes of the thin limbs of Henle’s loop, but can grow to become extensive deposits beneath the epithelium covering the papillary surface. Erosion of this covering epithelium allows deposition of calcium oxalate onto this plaque material, and the transition of mineral type and organic material from plaque to stone has been investigated. The fraction of the papilla surface that is covered with Randall’s plaque correlates with stone number in these patients, as well as with urine calcium excretion, and plaque coverage also correlates inversely with urine volume and pH. Two animal models—the NHERF-1 and THP-null mice—have been shown to develop sites of interstitial apatite plaque in the renal papilla. In these animal models, the sites of interstitial plaque in the inner medulla are similar to that found in human idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, except that the deposits in the mouse models are not localized solely to the basement membrane of the thin limbs of Henle’s loop, as in humans. This may be due to the different morphology of the human versus mouse papillary region. Both mouse models appear to be important to characterize further in order to determine how well they mimic human kidney stone disease. PMID:21063698

  10. Tracking human multiple myeloma xenografts in NOD-Rag-1/IL-2 receptor gamma chain-null mice with the novel biomarker AKAP-4.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Yu, Yuefei; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Cobos, Everardo; John, Constance M; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2011-09-16

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a fatal malignancy ranking second in prevalence among hematological tumors. Continuous efforts are being made to develop innovative and more effective treatments. The preclinical evaluation of new therapies relies on the use of murine models of the disease. Here we describe a new MM animal model in NOD-Rag1null IL2rgnull (NRG) mice that supports the engraftment of cell lines and primary MM cells that can be tracked with the tumor antigen, AKAP-4. Human MM cell lines, U266 and H929, and primary MM cells were successfully engrafted in NRG mice after intravenous administration, and were found in the bone marrow, blood and spleen of tumor-challenged animals. The AKAP-4 expression pattern was similar to that of known MM markers, such as paraproteins, CD38 and CD45. We developed for the first time a murine model allowing for the growth of both MM cell lines and primary cells in multifocal sites, thus mimicking the disease seen in patients. Additionally, we validated the use of AKAP-4 antigen to track tumor growth in vivo and to specifically identify MM cells in mouse tissues. We expect that our model will significantly improve the pre-clinical evaluation of new anti-myeloma therapies.

  11. Autistic-like syndrome in mu opioid receptor null mice is relieved by facilitated mGluR4 activity.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jérôme A J; Clesse, Daniel; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Schwab, Yannick; Le Merrer, Julie; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-08-01

    The etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) remains largely unknown. Identifying vulnerability genes for autism represents a major challenge in the field and allows the development of animal models for translational research. Mice lacking the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm1(-/-)) were recently proposed as a monogenic mouse model of autism, based on severe deficits in social behavior and communication skills. We confirm this hypothesis by showing that adult Oprm1(-/-) animals recapitulate core and multiple comorbid behavioral symptoms of autism and also display anatomical, neurochemical, and genetic landmarks of the disease. Chronic facilitation of mGluR4 signaling, which we identified as a novel pharmacological target in ASDs in these mice, was more efficient in alleviating behavioral deficits than the reference molecule risperidone. Altogether, our data provide first evidence that disrupted mu opioid receptor signaling is sufficient to trigger a comprehensive autistic syndrome, maybe through blunted social reward processes, and this mouse model opens promising avenues for therapeutic innovation.

  12. Presenilin-1 familial Alzheimer's disease mutation alters hippocampal neurogenesis and memory function in CCL2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Tomomi; Morrison, Christine M; Tu, Guihua; Dyavarshetty, Bhagyalaxmi; Weir, Robert A; Zhang, Gang; Xiong, Huangui; Gendelman, Howard E

    2015-10-01

    Aberrations in hippocampal neurogenesis are associated with learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the linkage between them, β-amyloidosis and neuroinflammation is not well understood. To this end, we generated a mouse overexpressing familial AD (FAD) mutant human presenilin-1 (PS1) crossed with a knockout (KO) of the CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) gene. The PS1/CCL2KO mice developed robust age-dependent deficits in hippocampal neurogenesis associated with impairments in learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation. Neurogliogenesis gene profiling supported β-amyloid independent pathways for FAD-associated deficits in hippocampal neurogenesis. We conclude that these PS1/CCL2KO mice are suitable for studies linking host genetics, immunity and hippocampal function.

  13. Co-transplantation of human fetal thymus, bone and CD34(+) cells into young adult immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice optimizes humanized mice that mount adaptive antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Joo, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae Berm; Moon, Hana; Kim, Tae Jin; Kim, Se Ho; Hong, Seokmann; Chang, Jun; Kang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-04-01

    Both the thymus (T) and bone (B) are necessary hematopoietic niches in adult humans. We previously showed that co-transplantation of human fetal T and B tissues into neonatal immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (NSG, N) mice facilitated hematopoiesis. However, transplantation into neonatal mice resulted in high frequency of early death, making it unrealistic for repetitive experiments. In this study, young adult N mice were pre-engrafted with T and B, T alone, B alone or no tissues. The animals were irradiated and injected with autologous fetal liver (FL)-derived CD34(+) cells (34). The resultant mice were TB34N, T34N, B34N and 34N, respectively, and challenged with T cell dependent antigens (Ags). The humanized TB34N mice showed best performance of these mouse models in many aspects resembling the adult human Ag-experienced spleen. The TB34N mice exhibited better hematopoietic reconstitution; balanced development of T- and B-cell, and common progenitor cells; follicular lymphoid structures with a functional germinal center (GC) enriched with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and plasma cells (PCs); secretion of hIgG in the sera in response to Ags at comparable levels to those of human; derivations of hIgG mAb-secreting hybridoma clones. Collectively, the humanized TB34N mice could develop an adaptive immunity that was capable of producing Ag-specific hIgG at a significant level via class switching. This unprecedented TB34N platform in humanized mice would be useful in dissecting human immunity, for generating human Abs and clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Abnormality in Wnt Signaling is Causatively Associated with Oxidative Stress-Induced Intestinal Tumorigenesis in MUTYH-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Isoda, Takuro; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Yamauchi, Kazumi; Piao, Jingshu; Yao, Takashi; Honda, Hiroshi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa

    2014-01-01

    MUTYH is a DNA glycosylase that excises adenine paired with 8-oxoguanine to prevent mutagenesis in mammals. Biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH have been found in patients predisposed to a recessive form of familial adenomatous polyposis (MAP: MUTYH-associated polyposis). We previously reported that Mutyh-deficient mice showed a high susceptibility to spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced intestinal adenoma/carcinoma. Here, we performed mutation analysis of the tumor-associated genes including Apc, Ctnnb1, Kras and Trp53 in the intestinal tumors of Mutyh-deficient mice. In the 62 tumors, we identified 25 mutations in Apc of 18 tumors and 36 mutations in Ctnnb1 of 36 tumors. Altogether, 54 out of the 62 tumors (87.1%) had a mutation in either Apc or Ctnnb1; no tumor displayed mutations simultaneously in the both genes. Similar to MAP, 60 out of 61 mutations (98.3%) were identified as G:C to T:A transversions of which 85% occurred at either AGAA or TGAA sequences. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the accumulation of β-catenin in the nuclei of tumors. No mutation was found in either Kras or Trp53 in the tumors. These results indicate that the uncontrolled activation of Wnt signaling pathway is causatively associated with oxidative stress-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in the Mutyh-deficient mice. PMID:25170306

  15. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adult hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.

  16. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; ...

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adultmore » hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.« less

  17. Vasodilation induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation is attenuated in cerebral arteries of SUR2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Adebiyi, Adebowale; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological functions of arterial smooth muscle cell ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, which are composed of inwardly rectifying K+ channel 6.1 and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR)-2 subunits, during metabolic inhibition are unresolved. In the present study, we used a genetic model to investigate the physiological functions of SUR2-containing KATP channels in mediating vasodilation to hypoxia, oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) or metabolic inhibition, and functional recovery following these insults. Data indicate that SUR2B is the only SUR isoform expressed in murine cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Pressurized SUR2 wild-type (SUR2wt) and SUR2 null (SUR2nl) mouse cerebral arteries developed similar levels of myogenic tone and dilated similarly to hypoxia (<10 mmHg Po2). In contrast, vasodilation induced by pinacidil, a KATP channel opener, was ∼71% smaller in SUR2nl arteries. Human cerebral arteries also expressed SUR2B, developed myogenic tone, and dilated in response to hypoxia and pinacidil. OGD, oligomycin B (a mitochondrial ATP synthase blocker), and CCCP (a mitochondrial uncoupler) all induced vasodilations that were ∼39–61% smaller in SUR2nl than in SUR2wt arteries. The restoration of oxygen and glucose following OGD or removal of oligomycin B and CCCP resulted in partial recovery of tone in both SUR2wt and SUR2nl cerebral arteries. However, SURnl arteries regained ∼60–82% more tone than did SUR2wt arteries. These data indicate that SUR2-containing KATP channels are functional molecular targets for OGD, but not hypoxic, vasodilation in cerebral arteries. In addition, OGD activation of SUR2-containing KATP channels may contribute to postischemic loss of myogenic tone. PMID:21784985

  18. Mouse and human BAC transgenes recapitulate tissue-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor in mice and rescue the VDR-null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Min; Bishop, Kathleen A; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-06-01

    The biological actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in numerous target tissues in a cell type-selective manner. Recent studies using genomic analyses and recombineered bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) have defined the specific features of mouse and human VDR gene loci in vitro. In the current study, we introduced recombineered mouse and human VDR BACs as transgenes into mice and explored their expression capabilities in vivo. Individual transgenic mouse strains selectively expressed BAC-derived mouse or human VDR proteins in appropriate vitamin D target tissues, thereby recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of endogenous mouse VDR. The mouse VDR transgene was also regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and dibutyryl-cAMP. When crossed into a VDR-null mouse background, both transgenes restored wild-type basal as well as 1,25(OH)2D3-inducible gene expression patterns in the appropriate tissues. This maneuver resulted in the complete rescue of the aberrant phenotype noted in the VDR-null mouse, including systemic features associated with altered calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and disrupted production of parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, and abnormalities associated with the skeleton, kidney, parathyroid gland, and the skin. This study suggests that both mouse and human VDR transgenes are capable of recapitulating basal and regulated expression of the VDR in the appropriate mouse tissues and restore 1,25(OH)2D3 function. These results provide a baseline for further dissection of mechanisms integral to mouse and human VDR gene expression and offer the potential to explore the consequence of selective mutations in VDR proteins in vivo.

  19. A comparative study of the central effects of specific POMC-derived melanocortin peptides on food intake and body weight in Pomc null mice

    PubMed Central

    Tung, YC Loraine; Piper, Sarah J; Yeung, Debra; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Coll, Anthony P

    2008-01-01

    Functional disruption of either MC3R or MC4R results in obesity, implicating both in the control of energy homeostasis. The ligands for these receptors are derived from the prohormone POMC, which is post-translationally processed to produce a set of melanocortin peptides with a range of activities at the MC3R and MC4R. The relative importance of each of these peptides (α-MSH, γ3 MSH, γ2 MSH, γ lipotropin (γ-LPH) and, in man but not in rodents, β-MSH) in the maintenance of energy homeostasis is, as yet, unclear. To investigate this further, equimolar amounts (2nmols) of each peptide were centrally administered to freely feeding, corticosterone supplemented, Pomc null (Pomc-/-) mice. Following a single dose at the onset of the dark cycle, α-MSH had the most potent anorexigenic effect, reducing food intake to 35% of sham treated animals. β-MSH, γ-LPH, γ3-and γ2- MSH all reduced food intake but to a lesser degree. The effects of peptide administration over three days were also assessed. Only α-MSH significantly reduced body weight, affecting both fat and lean mass. Other peptides had no significant effect on body weight. Pair-feeding of sham-treated mice to those treated with α-MSH resulted in identical changes in total weight, fat and lean mass indicating that the effects of α-MSH were primarily due to reduced food intake rather than increased energy expenditure. Although other melanocortins can reduce food intake in the short term, only α-MSH can reduce the excess fat and lean mass found in Pomc-/- mice, mediated largely through an effect on food intake. PMID:16959830

  20. Highly efficient in vivo delivery of PMO into regenerating myotubes and rescue in laminin-α2 chain-null congenital muscular dystrophy mice.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Nagata, Tetsuya; Yokota, Toshifumi; Nakamura, Akinori; Wood, Matthew J A; Partridge, Terence; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-12-15

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)-mediated exon skipping is among the more promising approaches to the treatment of several neuromuscular disorders including Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The main weakness of this approach arises from the low efficiency and sporadic nature of the delivery of charge-neutral PMO into muscle fibers, the mechanism of which is unknown. In this study, to test our hypothesis that muscle fibers take up PMO more efficiently during myotube formation, we induced synchronous muscle regeneration by injection of cardiotoxin into the tibialis anterior muscle of Dmd exon 52-deficient mdx52 and wild-type mice. Interestingly, by in situ hybridization, we detected PMO mainly in embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive regenerating fibers. In addition, we showed that PMO or 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate is taken up efficiently into C2C12 myotubes when transfected 24-72 h after the induction of differentiation but is poorly taken up into undifferentiated C2C12 myoblasts suggesting efficient uptake of PMO in the early stages of C2C12 myotube formation. Next, we tested the therapeutic potential of PMO for laminin-α2 chain-null dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice: a model of merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) with active muscle regeneration. We confirmed the recovery of laminin-α2 chain and slightly prolonged life span following skipping of the mutated exon 4 in dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. These findings support the idea that PMO entry into fibers is dependent on a developmental stage in myogenesis rather than on dystrophinless muscle membranes and provide a platform for developing PMO-mediated therapies for a variety of muscular disorders, such as MDC1A, that involve active muscle regeneration.

  1. Beneficial effects of quinoline-3-carboxamide (ABR-215757) on atherosclerotic plaque morphology in S100A12 transgenic ApoE null mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ling; Bjork, Per; Butuc, Radu; Gawdzik, Joseph; Earley, Judy; Kim, Gene; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is an emerging widespread interest in the role of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMP) S100A8, S100A9 and S100A12 in cardiovascular and other diseases. In this study we tested the efficacy of ABR-215757, a S100 protein binding immuno-modulatory compound to stabilize atherosclerosis in transgenic ApoE null mice that express the human pro-inflammatory S100A12 protein within the smooth muscle cell (SM22α-S100A12). Methods Twelve-week old S100A12 transgenic/ApoE-/- and WT/ApoE-/- mice were treated with ABR-21575 for 5 weeks and were analyzed 4 month later. Results Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that S100A12 interacts with ABR-215757 in a zinc dependent manner in vitro. In vivo, ABR-215757 administration reduced features of advanced plaque morphology resulting in smaller necrotic cores, diminished intimal and medial vascular calcification, and reduced amount of infiltrating inflammatory cells. ABR-215757 normalized aortic expression of RAGE protein and normalized experimentally-induced delayed hypersensitivity. The effect of ABR-215757 was more prominent in ApoE-/- mice expressing S100A12 than in ApoE-/- animals lacking expression of human S100A12 protein. Conclusion Our data suggest that S100A12 is important for progression of atherosclerosis and can be targeted by the small molecule ABR-215757. The specific binding of quinoline-3-carboxamides to S100A12 attenuates S100A12-mediated features of accelerated murine atherosclerosis. PMID:23497784

  2. D-carnosine octylester attenuates atherosclerosis and renal disease in ApoE null mice fed a Western diet through reduction of carbonyl stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Menini, Stefano; Iacobini, Carla; Ricci, Carlo; Scipioni, Angela; Fantauzzi, Claudia Blasetti; Giaccari, Andrea; Salomone, Enrica; Canevotti, Renato; Lapolla, Annunziata; Orioli, Marica; Aldini, Giancarlo; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Lipoxidation-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS) such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) react with proteins to form advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs), which have been implicated in both atherosclerosis and renal disease. L-carnosine acts as an endogenous HNE scavenger, but it is rapidly inactivated by carnosinase. This study aimed at assessing the effect of the carnosinase-resistant, D-carnosine, on HNE-induced cellular injury and of its bioavailable prodrug D-carnosine octylester on experimental atherosclerosis and renal disease. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were exposed to HNE or H2O2 plus D-carnosine. ApoE null mice fed a Western, pro-atherogenic diet were treated with D-carnosine octylester for 12 weeks. KEY RESULTS In vitro, D-carnosine attenuated the effect of HNE, but not of H2O2, on VSMCs. In vivo, D-carnosine octylester-treated mice showed reduced lesion area and a more stable plaque phenotype compared with untreated animals, with reduced foam cell accumulation, inflammation and apoptosis and increased clearance of apoptotic bodies and collagen deposition, resulting in decreased necrotic core formation. Likewise, renal lesions were attenuated in D-carnosine octylester-treated versus untreated mice, with lower inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis. This was associated with increased urinary levels of HNE-carnosine adducts and reduced protein carbonylation, circulating and tissue ALEs, expression of receptors for these products, and systemic and tissue oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data indicate RCS quenching with a D-carnosine ester was highly effective in attenuating experimental atherosclerosis and renal disease by reducing carbonyl stress and inflammation and that this may represent a promising therapeutic strategy in humans. PMID:22229552

  3. Resilient RTN fast spiking in Kv3.1 null mice suggests redundancy in the action potential repolarization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Porcello, Darrell M; Ho, Chi Shun; Joho, Rolf H; Huguenard, John R

    2002-03-01

    Fast spiking (FS), GABAergic neurons of the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) are capable of firing high-frequency trains of brief action potentials, with little adaptation. Studies in recombinant systems have shown that high-voltage-activated K(+) channels containing the Kv3.1 and/or Kv3.2 subunits display biophysical properties that may contribute to the FS phenotype. Given that RTN expresses high levels of Kv3.1, with little or no Kv3.2, we tested whether this subunit was required for the fast action potential repolarization mechanism essential to the FS phenotype. Single- and multiple-action potentials were recorded using whole-cell current clamp in RTN neurons from brain slices of wild-type and Kv3.1-deficient mice. At 23 degrees C, action potentials recorded from homozygous Kv3.1 deficient mice (Kv3.1(-/-)) compared with their wild-type (Kv3.1(+/+)) counterparts had reduced amplitudes (-6%) and fast after-hyperpolarizations (-16%). At 34 degrees C, action potentials in Kv3.1(-/-) mice had increased duration (21%) due to a reduced rate of repolarization (-30%) when compared with wild-type controls. Action potential trains in Kv3.1(-/-) were associated with a significantly greater spike decrement and broadening and a diminished firing frequency versus injected current relationship (F/I) at 34 degrees C. There was no change in either spike count or maximum instantaneous frequency during low-threshold Ca(2+) bursts in Kv3.1(-/-) RTN neurons at either temperature tested. Our findings show that Kv3.1 is not solely responsible for fast spikes or high-frequency firing in RTN neurons. This suggests genetic redundancy in the system, possibly in the form of other Kv3 members, which may suffice to maintain the FS phenotype in RTN neurons in the absence of Kv3.1.

  4. Mechanical and material properties of cortical and trabecular bone from cannabinoid receptor-1-null (Cnr1(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Aysha B; Goodyear, Simon R; Ross, Ruth A; Aspden, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system is known for its regulatory effects on bone metabolism through the cannabinoid receptors, Cnr1 and Cnr2. In this study we analysed the mechanical and material properties of long bones from Cnr1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 background. Tibiae and femora from 5- and 12-week-old mice were subjected to three-point bending to measure bending stiffness and yield strength. Elastic modulus, density and mineral content were measured in the diaphysis. Second moment of area (MOA2), inner and outer perimeters of the cortical shaft and trabecular fractional bone volume (BV/TV) were measured using micro-CT. In Cnr1(-/-) males and females at both ages the bending stiffness was reduced due to a smaller MOA2. Bone from Cnr1(-/-) females had a greater modulus than wild-type controls, although no differences were observed in males. BV/TV of 12-week-old Cnr1(-/-) females was greater than controls, although no difference was seen at 5-weeks. On the contrary, Cnr1(-/-) males had the same BV/TV as controls at 12-weeks while they had significantly lower values at 5-weeks. This study shows that deleting Cnr1 decreases the amount of cortical bone in both males and females at 12-weeks, but increases the amount of trabecular bone only in females. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex differences in brain proteomes of neuron-specific STAT3-null mice after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Casalena, Gabriella; Jia, Jia; Sultana, Rukhsana; Barone, Eugenio; Cai, Jian; Pierce, William M; Cini, Chiara; Mancuso, Cesare; Perluigi, Marzia; Davis, Catherine M; Alkayed, Nabil J; Butterfield, D Allan; Butterfield, Allan D

    2012-05-01

    Signal transduction and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) plays an important role in neuronal survival, regeneration and repair after brain injury. We previously demonstrated that STAT3 is activated in brain after cerebral ischemia specifically in neurons. The effect was sex-specific and modulated by sex steroids, with higher activation in females than males. In the current study, we used a proteomics approach to identify downstream proteins affected by ischemia in male and female wild-type (WT) and neuron-specific STAT3 knockout (KO) mice. We established four comparison groups based on the transgenic condition and the hemisphere analyzed, respectively. Moreover, the sexual variable was taken into account and male and female animals were analyzed independently. Results support a role for STAT3 in metabolic, synaptic, structural and transcriptional responses to cerebral ischemia, indeed the adaptive response to ischemia/reperfusion injury is delayed in neuronal-specific STAT3 KO mice. The differences observed between males and females emphasize the importance of sex-specific neuronal survival and repair mechanisms, especially those involving antioxidant and energy-related activities, often caused by sex hormones.

  6. Disruption of NBS1 gene leads to early embryonic lethality in homozygous null mice and induces specific cancer in heterozygous mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Henrie, Melinda; Ouyang, Honghai; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Ito, Hisao; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B.; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Gloria C.; Chen, David J.

    2002-04-15

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive chromosome instability syndrome characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition, with cellular features similar to that of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). NBS results from mutations in the mammalian gene Nbs1 that codes for a 95-kDa protein called nibrin, NBS1, or p95. To establish an animal model for NBS, we attempted to generate NBS1 knockout mice. However, NBS1 gene knockouts were lethal at an early embryonic stage. NBS1 homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured in vitro showed retarded growth and subsequently underwent growth arrest within 5 days of culture. Apoptosis, assayed by TUNEL staining, was observed in NBSI homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured for four days. NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice were normal, and exhibited no specific phenotype for at least one year. However, fibroblast cells from NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice displayed an enhanced frequency of spontaneous transformation to anchorage-independent growth as compared to NBS1 wild-type(+/+) cells. Furthermore, heterozygous(+/-) mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after one year compared to wild-type mice, even though no significant differences in the incidence of other tumors such as lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma were observed. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that NBS1 heterozygosity and reduced NBSI expression induces formation of specific tumors in mice.

  7. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Melissa M.; Wang, David C.; D'Souza, Donna M.; Krause, Matthew P.; Layne, Andrew S.; Criswell, David S.; O'Neill, Hayley M.; Connor, Michael K.; Anderson, Judy E.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Hawke, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolism. While muscle-specific AMPK β1β2 double-knockout (β1β2M-KO) mice display alterations in metabolic and mitochondrial capacity, their severe exercise intolerance suggested a secondary contributor to the observed phenotype. We find that tibialis anterior (TA), but not soleus, muscles of sedentary β1β2M-KO mice display a significant myopathy (decreased myofiber areas, increased split and necrotic myofibers, and increased centrally nucleated myofibers. A mitochondrial- and fiber-type-specific etiology to the myopathy was ruled out. However, β1β2M-KO TA muscles displayed significant (P<0.05) increases in platelet aggregation and apoptosis within myofibers and surrounding interstitium (P<0.05). These changes correlated with a 45% decrease in capillary density (P<0.05). We hypothesized that the β1β2M-KO myopathy in resting muscle resulted from impaired AMPK-nNOSμ signaling, causing increased platelet aggregation, impaired vasodilation, and, ultimately, ischemic injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, AMPK-specific phosphorylation (Ser1446) of nNOSμ was decreased in β1β2M-KO compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The AMPK-nNOSμ relationship was further demonstrated by administration of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) to β1β2-MKO muscles and C2C12 myotubes. AICAR significantly increased nNOSμ phosphorylation and nitric oxide production (P<0.05) within minutes of administration in WT muscles and C2C12 myotubes but not in β1β2M-KO muscles. These findings highlight the importance of the AMPK-nNOSμ pathway in resting skeletal muscle.—Thomas, M. M., Wang, D. C., D'Souza, D. M., Krause, M. P., Layne, A. S., Criswell, D. S., O'Neill, H. M., Connor, M. K., Anderson, J. E., Kemp, B. E., Steinberg, G. R., and Hawke, T. J. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles. PMID:24522207

  8. A mouse model for ulcerative colitis based on NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from affected individuals.

    PubMed

    Palamides, Pia; Jodeleit, Henrika; Föhlinger, Michael; Beigel, Florian; Herbach, Nadja; Mueller, Thomas; Wolf, Eckhard; Siebeck, Matthias; Gropp, Roswitha

    2016-09-01

    Animal models reflective of ulcerative colitis (UC) remain a major challenge, and yet are crucial to understand mechanisms underlying the onset of disease and inflammatory characteristics of relapses and remission. Mouse models in which colitis-like symptoms are induced through challenge with toxins such as oxazolone, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) have been instrumental in understanding the inflammatory processes of UC. However, these neither reflect the heterogeneous symptoms observed in the UC-affected population nor can they be used to test the efficacy of inhibitors developed against human targets where high sequence and structural similarity of the respective ligands is lacking. In an attempt to overcome these problems, we have developed a mouse model that relies on NOD-scid IL2R γ(null) mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from UC-affected individuals. Upon challenge with ethanol, mice developed colitis-like symptoms and changes in the colon architecture, characterized by influx of inflammatory cells, edema, crypt loss, crypt abscesses and epithelial hyperplasia, as previously observed in immune-competent mice. TARC, TGFβ1 and HGF expression increased in distal parts of the colon. Analysis of human leucocytes isolated from mouse spleen revealed an increase in frequencies of CD1a+, CD64+, CD163+ and TSLPR+ CD14+ monocytes, and antigen-experienced CD44+ CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in response to ethanol. Analysis of human leucocytes from the colon of challenged mice identified CD14+ monocytes and CD11b+ monocytes as the predominant populations. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis from distal parts of the colon indicated that IFNγ might be one of the cytokines driving inflammation. Treatment with infliximab ameliorated symptoms and pathological manifestations, whereas pitrakinra had no therapeutic benefit. Thus, this model is partially reflective of the human disease and might help

  9. Indirect modulation of Shh signaling by Dlx5 affects the oral-nasal patterning of palate and rescues cleft palate in Msx1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Mayo, Julie; Xu, Xun; Li, Jingyuan; Bringas, Pablo; Maas, Richard L; Rubenstein, John L R; Chai, Yang

    2009-12-01

    Cleft palate represents one of the most common congenital birth defects in human. During embryonic development, palatal shelves display oronasal (O-N) and anteroposterior polarity before the onset of fusion, but how the O-N pattern is established and how it relates to the expansion and fusion of the palatal shelves are unknown. Here we address these questions and show that O-N patterning is associated with the expansion and fusion of the palatal shelves and that Dlx5 is required for the O-N patterning of palatal mesenchyme. Loss of Dlx5 results in downregulation of Fgf7 and expanded Shh expression from the oral to the nasal side of the palatal shelf. This expanded Shh signaling is sufficient to restore palatal expansion and fusion in mice with compromised palatal mesenchymal cell proliferation, such as Msx1-null mutants. Exogenous Fgf7 inhibits Shh signaling and reverses the cranial neural crest (CNC) cell proliferation rescue in the Msx1/Dlx5 double knockout palatal mesenchyme. Thus, Dlx5-regulated Fgf7 signaling inhibits the expression of Shh, which in turn controls the fate of CNC cells through tissue-tissue interaction and plays a crucial role during palatogenesis. Our study shows that modulation of Shh signaling may be useful as a potential therapeutic approach for rescuing cleft palate.

  10. The delicate balance between vitamin D, calcium and bone homeostasis: lessons learned from intestinal- and osteocyte-specific VDR null mice.

    PubMed

    Lieben, Liesbet; Carmeliet, Geert

    2013-07-01

    The serum calcium levels and the calcium content of the skeleton are highly interdependent. Indeed, bone requires calcium to preserve its strength, but it is at the same time also the predominant calcium storage from which calcium can be mobilized to supply the serum pool. The active form of vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] plays a crucial role in regulating the transfer of calcium between blood and bone, evidenced by experimental data obtained from systemic, intestinal-specific and osteocyte-specific vitamin D receptor (Vdr) null mice. In fact, 1,25(OH)2D is required to maintain normocalcemia and bone health by enhancing intestinal calcium absorption when dietary calcium intake is normal/low. When, however, insufficient calcium is absorbed via the intestine, 1,25(OH)2D levels will increase and will act on mature osteoblasts and osteocytes to minimize calcium levels in bone tissue in favor of the blood calcium pool. Mechanistically, the high 1,25(OH)2D levels enhance bone remodeling which leads to osteopenia, and suppress bone matrix mineralization by increasing the levels of mineralization inhibitors, which causes hyperosteoidosis and hypomineralization. Thus, depending on the intestinal calcium acquisition, 1,25(OH)2D will target the intestine and/or the skeleton to maintain calcium levels in serum within a normal range. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Noninvasive and real-time assessment of reconstructed functional human endometrium in NOD/SCID/gamma c(null) immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hirotaka; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Hiratsu, Emi; Yamane, Junichi; Iwanami, Akio; Nagashima, Takashi; Ono, Masanori; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okano, Hirotaka James; Ito, Mamoru; Tamaoki, Norikazu; Nomura, Tatsuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2007-02-06

    Human uterine endometrium exhibits unique properties of cyclical regeneration and remodeling throughout reproductive life and also is subject to endometriosis through ectopic implantation of retrogradely shed endometrial fragments during menstruation. Here we show that functional endometrium can be regenerated from singly dispersed human endometrial cells transplanted beneath the kidney capsule of NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) immunodeficient mice. In addition to the endometrium-like structure, hormone-dependent changes, including proliferation, differentiation, and tissue breakdown and shedding (menstruation), can be reproduced in the reconstructed endometrium, the blood to which is supplied predominantly by human vessels invading into the mouse kidney parenchyma. Furthermore, the hormone-dependent behavior of the endometrium regenerated from lentivirally engineered endometrial cells expressing a variant luciferase can be assessed noninvasively and quantitatively by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. These results indicate that singly dispersed endometrial cells have potential applications for tissue reconstitution, angiogenesis, and human-mouse chimeric vessel formation, providing implications for mechanisms underlying the physiological endometrial regeneration during the menstrual cycle and the establishment of endometriotic lesions. This animal system can be applied as the unique model of endometriosis or for other various types of neoplastic diseases with the capacity of noninvasive and real-time evaluation of the effect of therapeutic agents and gene targeting when the relevant cells are transplanted beneath the kidney capsule.

  12. Generation of Aorta Transcript Atlases of Wild-Type and Apolipoprotein E-null Mice by Laser Capture Microdissection-Based mRNA Expression Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yin, Changjun; Mohanta, Sarajo; Ma, Zhe; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Weih, Falk; Habenicht, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a transmural chronic inflammatory disease of medium and large arteries. Though it is well recognized that immune responses contribute to atherosclerosis, it remains unclear whether these responses are carried out in secondary lymphoid organs such as the spleen and lymph nodes and/or within the arterial wall. Arteries are composed of three major layers, i.e., the laminae intima, media, and adventitia. However, each of these layers may play different roles in arterial wall biology and atherogenesis. We identified well-structured artery tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs) in the abdominal aorta adventitia but not in the intima of aged apolipoprotein E-null (ApoE(-/-)) mice. These observations suggested that disease-associated immune responses are highly territorialized within the arterial wall and that the adventitia may play distinct and hitherto unrecognized roles. Here, we set out to apply laser capture microdissection (LCM) to dissect plaque, media, adventitia, and adjacent aorta-draining lymph nodes (LN) in aged ApoE(-/-) mice in attempts to establish the territoriality of atherosclerosis immune responses. Using whole-genome mRNA expression microarrays of arterial wall tissues, we constructed robust transcript atlases of wild-type and ApoE(-/-) mouse aortas. Data were deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information's gene expression omnibus (GEO) and are accessible to the public through the Internet. These transcript atlases are anticipated to prove valuable to address a wide scope of issues ranging from atherosclerosis immunity and inflammation to the role of single genes in regulating arterial wall remodeling. This chapter presents protocols for LCM of mouse aorta and microarray expression analysis from LCM-isolated aorta laminae.

  13. Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Atherosclerosis at the Aortic Root Identified in an Intercross between DBA2J and 129S6 Apolipoprotein E-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kayashima, Yukako; Tomita, Hirofumi; Zhilicheva, Svetlana; Kim, Shinja; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Bennett, Brian J.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E-null mice on a DBA/2J genetic background (DBA-apoE) are highly susceptible to atherosclerosis in the aortic root area compared with those on a 129S6 background (129-apoE). To explore atherosclerosis-responsible genetic regions, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis using 172 male and 137 female F2 derived from an intercross between DBA-apoE and 129-apoE mice. A genome-wide scan identified two significant QTL for the size of lesions at the root: one is Ath44 on Chromosome (Chr) 1 at 158 Mb, and the other Ath45 on Chr 2 at 162 Mb. Ath44 co-localizes with but appears to be independent of a previously reported QTL, Ath1, while Ath45 is a novel QTL. DBA alleles of both Ath44 and Ath45 confer atherosclerosis-susceptibility. In addition, a QTL on Chr 14 at 73 Mb was found significant only in males, and 129 allele conferring susceptibility. Further analysis detected female-specific interactions between a second QTL on Chr 1 at 73 Mb and a QTL on Chr 3 at 21 Mb, and between Chr 7 at 84 Mb and Chr 12 at 77 Mb. These loci for the root atherosclerosis were independent of QTLs for plasma total cholesterol and QTLs for triglycerides, but a QTL for HDL (Chr 1 at 126 Mb) overlapped with the Ath44. Notably, haplotype analysis among 129S6, DBA/2J and C57BL/6 genomes and their gene expression data narrowed the candidate regions for Ath44 and Ath45 to less than 5 Mb intervals where multiple genome wide associations with cardiovascular phenotypes have also been reported in humans. SNPs in or near Fmo3, Sele and Selp for Ath44, and Lbp and Pkig for Ath45 were suggested for further investigation as potential candidates underlying the atherosclerosis susceptibility. PMID:24586312

  14. Null and hypomorph Prickle1 alleles in mice phenocopy human Robinow syndrome and disrupt signaling downstream of Wnt5a

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunqiao; Lin, Chen; Gao, Chun; May-Simera, Helen; Swaroop, Anand; Li, Tiansen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling plays a critical role in tissue morphogenesis. In mammals, disruption of three of the six “core PCP” components results in polarity-dependent defects with rotated cochlear hair cell stereocilia and open neural tube. We recently demonstrated a role of Prickle1, a core PCP molecule in Drosophila, in mammalian neuronal development. To examine Prickle1 function along a broader developmental window, we generated three mutant alleles in mice. We show that the complete loss of Prickle1 leads to systemic tissue outgrowth defects, aberrant cell organization and disruption of polarity machinery. Curiously, Prickle1 mutants recapitulate the characteristic features of human Robinow syndrome and phenocopy mouse mutants with Wnt5a or Ror2 gene defects, prompting us to explore an association of Prickle1 with the Wnt pathway. We show that Prickle1 is a proteasomal target of Wnt5a signaling and that Dvl2, a target of Wnt5a signaling, is misregulated in Prickle1 mutants. Our studies implicate Prickle1 as a key component of the Wnt-signaling pathway and suggest that Prickle1 mediates some of the WNT5A-associated genetic defects in Robinow syndrome. PMID:25190059

  15. Revitalization of a Diastemal Tooth Primordium in Spry2 Null Mice Results From Increased Proliferation and Decreased Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Peterkova, Renata; Churava, Svatava; Lesot, Herve; Rothova, Michaela; Prochazka, Jan; Peterka, Miroslav; Klein, Ophir D.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the factors that promote or inhibit tooth development is essential for designing biological tooth replacements. The embryonic mouse dentition provides an ideal system for studying such factors because it consists of two types of tooth primordia. One type of primordium will go on to form a functional tooth, whereas the other initiates development but arrests at or before the bud stage. This developmental arrest contributes to the formation of the toothless mouse diastema. It is accompanied by the apoptosis of the rudimentary diastemal buds, which presumably results from the insufficient activity of anti-apoptotic signals such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). We have previously shown that the arrest of a rudimentary tooth bud can be rescued by inactivating Spry2, an antagonist of FGF signaling. Here, we studied the role of the epithelial cell death and proliferation in this process by comparing the development of a rudimentary diastemal tooth bud (R2) and the first molar in the mandibles of Spry2−/− and wild-type (WT) embryos using histological sections, image analysis and 3D reconstructions. In the WT R2 at embryonic day 13.5, significantly increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation were found compared with the first molar. In contrast, increased levels of FGF signaling in Spry2−/− embryos led to significantly decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation in the R2 bud. Consequently, the R2 was involved in the formation of a supernumerary tooth primordium. Studies of the revitalization of rudimentary tooth primordia in mutant mice can help to lay the foundation for tooth regeneration by enhancing our knowledge of mechanisms that regulate tooth formation. PMID:19127536

  16. MMP20, KLK4, and MMP20/KLK4 double null mice define roles for matrix proteases during dental enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Smith, Charles E; Richardson, Amelia S; Bartlett, John D; Hu, Jan C C; Simmer, James P

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) are secreted proteinases that are essential for proper dental enamel formation. We characterized and compared enamel formed in wild-type, Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice using dissecting and light microscopy, backscattered scanning electron microscopy (bSEM), SEM, microcomputed tomography (μCT), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Following eruption, fractures were observed on Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) molars. Failure of the enamel in the Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) molars was unexpected and suggested that digenic effects could contribute to the etiology of amelogenesis imperfecta in humans. Micro-CT analyses of hemimandibles demonstrated significantly reduced high-density enamel volume in the Mmp20 (-/-) and Klk4 (-/-) mice relative to the wild-type, which was further reduced in Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice. bSEM images of 7-week Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mandibular incisors showed rough, pitted enamel surfaces with numerous indentations and protruding nodules. The Mmp20 (+/-) and Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors showed prominent, evenly spaced, horizontal ridges that were more distinct in Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors relative to Mmp20 (+/-) incisors due to the darkening of the valleys between the ridges. In cross sections, the Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) exhibited three distinct layers. The outer layer exhibited a disturbed elemental composition and an irregular enamel surface covered with nodules. The Mmp20 null enamel was apparently unable to withstand the sheer forces associated with eruption and separated from dentin during development. Cells invaded the cracks and interposed between the dentin and enamel layers. MMP20 and KLK4 serve overlapping and complementary functions to harden enamel by removing protein, but MMP20 potentially serves multiple

  17. Hyper-Variability in Circulating Insulin, High Fat Feeding Outcomes, and Effects of Reducing Ins2 Dosage in Male Ins1-Null Mice in a Specific Pathogen-Free Facility

    PubMed Central

    Templeman, Nicole M.; Mehran, Arya E.; Johnson, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is an essential hormone with key roles in energy homeostasis and body composition. Mice and rats, unlike other mammals, have two insulin genes: the rodent-specific Ins1 gene and the ancestral Ins2 gene. The relationships between insulin gene dosage and obesity has previously been explored in male and female Ins2-/- mice with full or reduced Ins1 dosage, as well as in female Ins1-/- mice with full or partial Ins2 dosage. We report herein unexpected hyper-variability in Ins1-null male mice, with respect to their circulating insulin levels and to the physiological effects of modulating Ins2 gene dosage. Two large cohorts of Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- mice and their Ins1-/-:Ins2+/+ littermates were fed chow diet or high fat diet (HFD) from weaning, and housed in specific pathogen-free conditions. Cohort A and cohort B were studied one year apart. Contrary to female mice from the same litters, inactivating one Ins2 allele on the complete Ins1-null background did not consistently cause a reduction of circulating insulin in male mice, on either diet. In cohort A, all HFD-fed males showed an equivalent degree of insulin hypersecretion and weight gain, regardless of Ins2 dosage. In cohort B the effects of HFD appeared generally diminished, and cohort B Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- males showed decreased insulin levels and body mass compared to Ins1-/-:Ins2+/+ littermates, on both diets. Although experimental conditions were consistent between cohorts, we found that HFD-fed Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- mice with lower insulin levels had increased corticosterone. Collectively, these observations highlight the phenotypic characteristics that change in association with differences in circulating insulin and Ins2 gene dosage, particularly in male mice. PMID:27055260

  18. Calcium receptor expression and function in oligodendrocyte commitment and lineage progression: potential impact on reduced myelin basic protein in CaR-null mice.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Yano, Shozo; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Brown, Edward M; de Vellis, Jean

    2008-08-01

    Oligodendrocytes develop from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which in turn arise from a subset of neuroepithelial precursor cells during midneurogenesis. Development of the oligodendrocyte lineage involves a plethora of cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic signals. A cell surface calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) has been shown to be functionally expressed in immature oligodendrocytes. Here, we investigated the expression and function of the CaR during oligodendrocyte development. We show that the order of CaR mRNA expression as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction is mature oligodendrocyte > neuron > astrocyte. We next determined the rank order of CaR expression on inducing specification of neural stem cells to the neuronal, oligodendroglial, or astrocytic lineages and found that the relative levels of CaR mRNA expression are OPC > neuron > astrocytes. CaR mRNA expression in cells at various stages of development along the oligodendrocyte lineage revealed that its expression is robustly up-regulated during the OPC stage and remains high until the premyelinating stage, decreasing thereafter by severalfold in the mature oligodendrocyte. In OPCs, high Ca(2+) acting via the CaR promotes cellular proliferation. We further observed that high Ca(2+) stimulates the mRNA levels of myelin basic protein in preoligodendrocytes, which is also CaR mediated. Finally, myelin basic protein levels were significantly reduced in the cerebellum of CaR-null mice during development. Our results show that CaR expression is up-regulated when neural stem cells are specified to the oligodendrocyte lineage and that activation of the receptor results in OPC expansion and differentiation. We conclude that the CaR may be a novel regulator of oligodendroglial development and function.

  19. Suppression of cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) expression in hepatoma cells replicates the hepatic lipidosis observed in hepatic POR-null mice.

    PubMed

    Porter, Todd D; Banerjee, Subhashis; Stolarczyk, Elzbieta I; Zou, Ling

    2011-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) is a microsomal electron transport protein essential to cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and sterol and bile acid synthesis. The conditional deletion of hepatic POR gene expression in mice results in a marked decrease in plasma cholesterol levels counterbalanced by the accumulation of triglycerides in lipid droplets in hepatocytes. To evaluate the role of cholesterol and bile acid synthesis in this hepatic lipidosis, as well as the possible role of lipid transport from peripheral tissues, we developed a stable, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated cell culture model for the suppression of POR. POR mRNA and protein expression were decreased by greater than 50% in McArdle-RH7777 rat hepatoma cells 10 days after transfection with a POR-siRNA expression plasmid, and POR expression was nearly completely extinguished by day 20. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed a marked accumulation of lipid droplets in cells by day 15, accompanied by a nearly 2-fold increase in cellular triglyceride content, replicating the lipidosis seen in hepatic POR-null mouse liver. In contrast, suppression of CYP51A1 (lanosterol demethylase) did not result in lipid accumulation, indicating that loss of cholesterol synthesis is not the basis for this lipidosis. Indeed, addition of cholesterol to the medium appeared to augment the lipidosis in POR-suppressed cells, whereas removal of lipids from the medium reversed the lipidosis. Oxysterols did not accumulate in POR-suppressed cells, discounting a role for liver X receptor in stimulating triglyceride synthesis, but addition of chenodeoxycholate significantly repressed lipid accumulation, suggesting that the absence of bile acids and loss of farnesoid X receptor stimulation lead to excessive triglyceride synthesis.

  20. Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Reductase (POR) Expression in Hepatoma Cells Replicates the Hepatic Lipidosis Observed in Hepatic POR-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Subhashis; Stolarczyk, Elzbieta I.; Zou, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) is a microsomal electron transport protein essential to cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and sterol and bile acid synthesis. The conditional deletion of hepatic POR gene expression in mice results in a marked decrease in plasma cholesterol levels counterbalanced by the accumulation of triglycerides in lipid droplets in hepatocytes. To evaluate the role of cholesterol and bile acid synthesis in this hepatic lipidosis, as well as the possible role of lipid transport from peripheral tissues, we developed a stable, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated cell culture model for the suppression of POR. POR mRNA and protein expression were decreased by greater than 50% in McArdle-RH7777 rat hepatoma cells 10 days after transfection with a POR-siRNA expression plasmid, and POR expression was nearly completely extinguished by day 20. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed a marked accumulation of lipid droplets in cells by day 15, accompanied by a nearly 2-fold increase in cellular triglyceride content, replicating the lipidosis seen in hepatic POR-null mouse liver. In contrast, suppression of CYP51A1 (lanosterol demethylase) did not result in lipid accumulation, indicating that loss of cholesterol synthesis is not the basis for this lipidosis. Indeed, addition of cholesterol to the medium appeared to augment the lipidosis in POR-suppressed cells, whereas removal of lipids from the medium reversed the lipidosis. Oxysterols did not accumulate in POR-suppressed cells, discounting a role for liver X receptor in stimulating triglyceride synthesis, but addition of chenodeoxycholate significantly repressed lipid accumulation, suggesting that the absence of bile acids and loss of farnesoid X receptor stimulation lead to excessive triglyceride synthesis. PMID:21368239

  1. ILDR1 null mice, a model of human deafness DFNB42, show structural aberrations of tricellular tight junctions and degeneration of auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Morozko, Eva L.; Nishio, Ayako; Ingham, Neil J.; Chandra, Rashmi; Fitzgerald, Tracy; Martelletti, Elisa; Borck, Guntram; Wilson, Elizabeth; Riordan, Gavin P.; Wangemann, Philine; Forge, Andrew; Steel, Karen P.; Liddle, Rodger A.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Belyantseva, Inna A.

    20