Science.gov

Sample records for consequences future papers

  1. Procrastination, consideration of future consequences, and episodic future thinking.

    PubMed

    Rebetez, Marie My Lien; Barsics, Catherine; Rochat, Lucien; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Van der Linden, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Despite the intrinsic temporal nature of procrastination, little research has examined the link between this form of self-regulatory failure and the consideration of future consequences, and no study has addressed the link between procrastination and episodic future thinking. The aim of the present study was to explore these relationships. Participants were asked to project themselves into possible future events and to rate the amount of sensory-perceptual details and autonoetic consciousness associated with their representations. They were also asked to complete questionnaires that assessed procrastination, the consideration of future consequences, and negative affect. Results showed that both the consideration of future consequences and episodic future thinking were associated with procrastination, and in particular with procrastination-related decision making abilities and procrastination-related motivational dispositions, respectively.

  2. Anticipating the Social Consequences of AIDS: A Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Richard A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Focuses on the social consequences of the AIDS epidemic, arguing that sociologists have an important contribution to make in planning for the long-range social consequences of AIDS. Concludes with three different commentaries on Berk's article. (Author/BSR)

  3. Forgiveness and Consideration of Future Consequences in Aggressive Driving

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Dahlen, Eric R.

    2008-01-01

    Most research on aggressive driving has focused on identifying aspects of driver personality which will exacerbate it (e.g., sensation seeking, impulsiveness, driving anger, etc.). The present study was designed to examine two theoretically relevant but previously unexplored personality factors predicted to reduce the risk of aggressive driving: trait forgiveness and consideration of future consequences. The utility of these variables in predicting aggressive driving and driving anger expression was evaluated among 316 college student volunteers. Hierarchical multiple regressions permitted an analysis of the incremental validity of these constructs beyond respondent gender, age, miles driven per week, and driving anger. Both forgiveness and consideration of future consequences contributed to the prediction of aggressive driving and driving anger expression, independent of driving anger. Research on aggressive driving may be enhanced by greater attention to adaptive, potentially risk-reducing traits. Moreover, forgiveness and consideration of future consequences may have implications for accident prevention. PMID:18760093

  4. The Consequences of Unintended Childbearing: A White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Cassandra; Holcombe, Emily; Manlove, Jennifer; Ryan, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This report provides a critical review of the current research literature on the consequences of unintended childbearing for families and children. The review addresses the following potential consequences: prenatal and perinatal risks (e.g., inadequate or delayed initiation of prenatal care, smoking/drinking/substance use during pregnancy,…

  5. SARCOPENIA: ITS ASSESSMENT, ETIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, CONSEQUENCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    ROLLAND, Y.; CZERWINSKI, S.; VAN KAN, G. ABELLAN; MORLEY, J.E.; CESARI, M.; ONDER, G.; WOO, J.; BAUMGARTNER, R.; PILLARD, F.; BOIRIE, Y.; CHUMLEA, W.M.C.; VELLAS, B.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of muscle protein mass and loss of muscle function. It occurs with increasing age, being a major component in the development of frailty. Current knowledge on its assessment, etiology, pathogenesis, consequences and future perspectives are reported in the present review. On-going and future clinical trials on sarcopenia may radically change our preventive and therapeutic approaches of mobility disability in older people. PMID:18615225

  6. Planning for Arizona's Future. Paper P-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amara, Roy

    The problem of how best to plan for Arizona's future is approached from two different angles. First, an outline is presented of 10 key assumptions regarding the most likely scenario for the United States in the 1980's. Assumptions are that there will be an unstable international environment but no nuclear war; fiscal conservatism in all areas of…

  7. Three Papers on the Political Consequences of Oil Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo Tenorio, Adriana

    Given the importance of oil in any country's energy needs, it should not be surprising that the increasing volatility of oil prices in the past decades is a challenge for most political systems. While the political and economic impact of natural resource wealth in general is strongly debated, the political consequences of these sudden shifts have gone understudied. This dissertation examines the relationship between politics and oil from a new perspective. First, I implement a Bayesian meta-regression model to assess the state of research on the natural resource curse, finding that the measurement of resources is one of the most important sources of the debate. In the second part of the dissertation, I turn to discussing the impact of fuel prices on politics. I argue that at the domestic level, rational leaders feel pressured to compensate for oil price shocks because they are held accountable for these shifts by their constituents. This hypothesis is tested using Bayesian multilevel models that allow state and time-varying information to be matched to individual survey responses for a sample of voters in nine American states between 2008 and 2009. This chapter shows that fuel prices are related to appraisals of the economy only during electoral periods. The results also provide evidence that the degree to which voters use fuel prices to evaluate the president's performance varies greatly across party lines. At the global level, I posit in the final chapter that cross-country cooperation in other issue areas is pursued to mitigate the economic impact of oil price volatility. By developing a Bayesian bivariate Poisson change-point model and implementing it using MCMC methods, I find that fuel price shifts are related to increased trade networks, especially for oil-exporting countries.

  8. Portuguese Validation of the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Esteves, Cristina; Gomes, Catarina Vilares; Ortuño, Victor E C

    2015-03-11

    The Consideration of Future Consequences Scale (CFC-S) is a measure of the extent to which individuals reflect and are influenced by the immediate as well as by the distant outcomes of current behavior. It's composed by 12 items, grouped into two subscales (future and immediate). This study aims to explore the factor structure, psychometric properties and construct validity of the Portuguese version of the CFC-S in 5 samples, composed by 527 participants with ages between 13 and 71. A 2 factor structure has been found through Confirmatory Factor Analysis among several tested models. Item 5 has been eliminated in order to achieve better fit indices (χ2 df = 3.88, CFI = .90, GFI = .95, RMSEA = .07) and improve internal consistency. Both CFC subscales presented strong correlations with several psychological phenomena (Sensation Seeking, Self-Esteem, Temporal Extension and Time Perspective) and main effects among groups of age and criminal record (for CFC-I, p < .001, for CFC-F, p < .001). These results allow us to support CFC as an efficient psychological evaluation instrument and as an important metric for individual differences in the study of temporal orientation.

  9. Telecommunications Policy Research Conference. Future of Cable TV Section. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This group of four papers considers the future of the cable television industry, and in particular, examines the impact of recent court and regulatory decisions in this field. The papers presented are: (1) "The First Amendment, Cable TV, and the Must-Carry Rule: Moving towards a Cost-Benefit Analysis" (John R. Woodbury, Federal Trade…

  10. A flexible future for paper-based electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tongfen; Zou, Xiyue; Mazzeo, Aaron D.

    2016-05-01

    This paper will review the origins and state of the art in paper-based electronics, suggesting the stage is set for future promising applications. Current interest in paper-based electronics can trace its roots to recent developments in paper-based microfluidics. With a need to improve the reliability and sensitivity of paperbased microfluidics for certain tasks, there were natural efforts to begin embedding sensing electrodes into microfluidic devices. Recognizing the general benefits of paper as an advanced material (e.g., its environmental friendliness, bendable nature, and low cost), efforts in paper-based electronics also began to take a life of their own with demonstrations of transistors, batteries and devices for energy storage, energy harvesting, sensors to improve situational awareness, acoustics, and displays. The state-of-the-art paper-based electronic devices have benefited and will continue to profit from technologies for printing and transferring electronic functionality onto the surfaces of paper-based substrates. Nonetheless, the authors suggest that many future promising applications will go beyond using paper as a carrier/substrate for electronic components to explore tuning of the electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties of the paper itself. With these technical advances, paper-based electronics will move closer to economically viable killer applications.

  11. Accelerating Technologies: Consequences for the Future Wellbeing of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltinski, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Today's students, K-12 and beyond, will face an ominous future unless educators quickly invest in preparing student perspectives for the accelerating technologies that will have global implications for the wellbeing of all humanity. Accelerating technologies are quietly, almost insidiously, transforming the world with little fanfare and certainly…

  12. Household Consequences of High Fertility in Pakistan. World Bank Discussion Paper Series No. 111.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Susan Hill; And Others

    The theory and evidence of the consequences of high fertility in Pakistan are reviewed in this paper. Several data sets are analyzed to examine the effects of the number of children on school participation and labor participation in urban Pakistan. Other data are utilized to examine the effects of children on savings in urban and rural areas.…

  13. Chronic Pancreatitis: Landmark Papers, Management Decisions, and Future.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Eugene P; DiMagno, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    On May 16, 2015 at the invitation of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute Council E.P.D. presented a state-of-the-art lecture at Digestive Disease Week 2015. The aims were to discuss a selection of landmark papers in chronic pancreatitis (CP) that influence modern management and to conclude by suggesting some future directions. This is based on that presentation. We will specifically review the following: duct anatomy and pancreas divisum, description of chronic relapsing pancreatitis and its differentiation from recurrent acute pancreatitis and established CP (ECP), natural histories and gene discoveries of alcoholic, idiopathic and hereditary pancreatitis, development of pancreatic cancer in CP, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and calculation of dose and delivery of enzymes, endoscopic ultrasonography, and autoimmune pancreatitis. With some exceptions, we exclude basic science and surgery.

  14. The origin of scientific neurology and its consequences for modern and future neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, David A

    2014-01-01

    John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911) created a science of brain function that, in scope and profundity, is among the great scientific discoveries of the 19th century. It is interesting that the magnitude of his achievement is not completely recognized even among his ardent admirers. Although thousands of practitioners around the world use the clinical applications of his science every day, the principles from which bedside neurology is derived have broader consequences-for modern and future science-that remain unrecognized and unexploited. This paper summarizes the scientific formalism that created modern neurology, demonstrates how its direct implications affect a current area of neuroscientific research, and indicates how Hughlings Jackson's ideas form a path toward a novel solution to an important open problem of the brain and mind.

  15. Temporal Consequences, Message Framing, and Consideration of Future Consequences: Persuasion Effects on Adult Fruit Intake Intention and Resolve.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Budding, Jeen

    2016-08-01

    Message framing is a persuasive strategy that has seen mixed evidence for promoting fruit intake intentions, potentially because framed messages for fruit intake have not (a) explicitly compared short-term consequences versus long-term consequences, (b) considered individual-level differences in time perspective, and (c) used alternative measures of fruit intake intentions. In the present online study, the effects of persuasive messages created from temporal context (short term vs. long term) and message frame (gain framed vs. loss framed) were investigated on fruit intake intentions and resolve among a sample of Dutch adults who were categorized as either present oriented or future oriented. For intention and resolve, results showed a significant Type of Frame × Type of Temporal Context interaction, such that gain-framed messages were more persuasive when combined with long-term consequences and loss-framed messages were more persuasive when combined with short-term consequences. The effect sizes for these differences were similar for resolve and intention, but only differences for intentions were significant. No other effects were found. These results demonstrate that message framing theory may usefully consider the inclusion of temporal context of outcomes and alternative motivation measures to maximize their persuasive effects.

  16. Past and future implications of near-misses and their emotional consequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiyuan; Covey, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The Reflection and Evaluation Model (REM) of comparative thinking predicts that temporal perspective could moderate people's emotional reactions to close counterfactuals following near-misses (Markman & McMullen, 2003). The experiments reported in this paper tested predictions derived from this theory by examining how people's emotional reactions to a near-miss at goal during a football match (Experiment 1) or a close score in a TV game show (Experiment 2) depended on the level of perceived future possibility. In support of the theory it was found that the presence of future possibility enhanced affective assimilation (e.g., if the near-miss occurred at the beginning of the game the players who had nearly scored were hopeful of future success) whereas the absence of future possibility enhanced affective contrast (e.g., if the near-miss occurred at the end of the game the players who had nearly scored were disappointed about missing an opportunity). Furthermore the experiments built upon our theoretical understanding by exploring the mechanisms which produce assimilation and contrast effects. In Experiment 1 we examined the incidence of present-oriented or future-oriented thinking, and in Experiment 2 we examined the mediating role of counterfactual thinking in the observed effect of proximity on emotions by testing whether stronger counterfactuals (measured using counterfactual probability estimates) produce bigger contrast and assimilation effects. While the results of these investigations generally support the REM, they also highlight the necessity to consider other psychological mechanisms (e.g., social comparison), in addition to counterfactual thinking, that might contribute to the emotional consequences of near-miss outcomes.

  17. Integrating Future Information through Scenarios. AIR 1985 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zentner, Rene D.

    The way that higher education planners can take into account changes in the post-industrial society is discussed. The scenario method is proposed as a method of integrating futures information. The planner can be provided with several probable futures, each of which can be incorporated in a scenario. An effective scenario provides the planner…

  18. World Trends and Alternative Futures. Open Grants Papers No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, John; Cordell, Magda

    We are now at a stage in human global development in which the continuous review and assessment of the long-range future implications of our past and present actions becomes crucially important for the survival of human society. This report includes a synoptic view of world trends and alternative futures. The first and major portion of the…

  19. Future Time Perspective in Sociocultural Contexts: A Discussion Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy P.

    2009-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) serves as a strong motivational force for individuals to engage in activities that may be instrumental in future outcomes. There has been a voluminous body of research studies, to date, that explored the importance of FTP. This article discusses FTP from sociocultural perspectives. Based on previous empirical…

  20. Artificial Aging as a Predictor of Paper's Future Useful Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansa, Helmut; Hofer, Hans-H.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment with the artificial aging of paper which--in contrast with the usual practice--was carried out at relatively low temperatures (i.e., 50-95 degrees Celsius), and not on laboratory handsheets, but on naturally aged paper from the commercial production of four centuries, produced results justifying the thesis that there may be at best…

  1. Skilling and Reskilling for Our (Greener) Future. Conference Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2010-01-01

    This paper was presented at the 2009 Economic and Social Outlook Conference, November 5-6 at the University of Melbourne. It takes a sceptical view of the push for "green skills", arguing that skills required in the labour market evolve relatively slowly, and that the way business operates is driven by changing costs, new technologies…

  2. Telecommunications Policy Research Conference. Communication & Future Employment Trends Section. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Three papers consider various aspects of the labor market in the telecommunications field in the United States. The first, "Employment and Worker Dislocation in Telecommunications Equipment" (Julie Gorte, Office of Technology Assessment), notes that the increasing importance of international trade in the American economy has meant both a…

  3. Perspectives on Adolescent Alcohol Use and Consideration of Future Consequences: Results from a Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Séamus A.; McKay, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Consideration of future consequences (CFC) is described as the attention that individuals pay to the potential outcomes of their behaviour, and how their behaviour is affected as a result of attention to these outcomes. Greater CFC has been associated with less alcohol use, thus indicating its potential utility in health-promotion initiatives. A…

  4. SCENARIO ANALYSIS FOR THE SAN PEDRO RIVER, ANALYZING HYDROLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES FOR A FUTURE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of future management and policy options based on different assumptions provide a mechanism to examine possible outcomes and especially their likely benefits and consequences. The San Pedro River in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico is an area that has undergone rapid changes in ...

  5. Demographic Subgroup Trends for Various Licit and Illicit Drugs, 1975-2009. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series. Paper 73

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    This occasional paper serves as a supplement to one of four annual monographs from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study, written by the study's investigators and published by the study's sponsor, the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The full 2009 survey results are reported in "Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use,…

  6. Does presentation at the Registrars' Papers Day predict future publication?

    PubMed

    Wong, Shing W; Crowe, Philip J

    2006-06-01

    There are research requirements for trainees to be eligible to present for their final examinations (Fellowship of Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, FRACS). One option is the presentation of a paper or poster at a meeting of which abstracts are subject to review and selection. This includes presentation at the annual Registrars' Papers Day (RPD) in New South Wales. There has been some debate surrounding whether research requirements are fulfilled by presentation at such meetings. Publication in a peer-reviewed journal should be the ultimate aim. A high publication rate will validate the quality of the meeting. All abstracts submitted to the RPD in 1998 and 1999 were analysed. A Medline search was performed in 2005 to identify publication of these presentations in a peer-reviewed journal. Variables of the study that were potentially predictive of subsequent publication were analysed. This included type of presentation, surgical specialty, clinical or laboratory-based study, study design (prospective or retrospective) and sample size. Chi-squared test with Yates' continuity correction was used to compare two independent proportions and significance was set at P < 0.05. The publication rates were: oral presentations 50% (17/34), poster presentations 39% (9/23) and rejected presentations 20% (2/10). The mean and median time to publication was 23.8 and 21.0 months. Prospective design was the only variable identified to have a statistically significant effect on the publication rate (P < 0.002). The most common publishing journal was the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery (12 of 26). Overall consistency (author and study sample consistency) from presentation to publication was 32%. The overall 46% publication rate of this state-based trainees-organized meeting compares favourably with international meetings. The research requirement of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS), which includes presentation at the RPD in New South Wales, produces

  7. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-02-03

    together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  8. 40 CFR 1400.3 - Public access to paper copies of off-site consequence analysis information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.3 Public access to... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public access to paper copies of off-site consequence analysis information. 1400.3 Section 1400.3 Protection of Environment...

  9. 40 CFR 1400.3 - Public access to paper copies of off-site consequence analysis information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.3 Public access to... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public access to paper copies of off-site consequence analysis information. 1400.3 Section 1400.3 Protection of Environment...

  10. The Academic Consequences of Employment for Students Enrolled in Community College. CCRC Working Paper No. 46

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadgar, Mina

    2012-01-01

    College students are increasingly combining studying with paid employment, and community college students tend to work even longer hours compared with students at four-year colleges. Yet, there is little evidence on the academic consequences of community college students' term-time employment. Using a rare administrative dataset from Washington…

  11. The Consequences of Age at First Childbirth: Final Research Summary. Working Paper: 1146-07.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A.; Hofferth, Sandra L.

    This document summarizes the findings of a research report which focuses on the consequences of early childbearing on the later life of the mother. Education, family size, marriage and marriage stability, labor force participation and earnings, welfare receipt, and poverty are all considered. Each of these outcomes is described separately. In…

  12. Future climate change driven sea-level rise: secondary consequences from human displacement for island biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Florian T; Kissling, W Daniel; Beissmann, Helmut; Penn, Dustin J

    2012-09-01

    Sea-level rise (SLR) due to global warming will result in the loss of many coastal areas. The direct or primary effects due to inundation and erosion from SLR are currently being assessed; however, the indirect or secondary ecological effects, such as changes caused by the displacement of human populations, have not been previously evaluated. We examined the potential ecological consequences of future SLR on >1,200 islands in the Southeast Asian and the Pacific region. Using three SLR scenarios (1, 3, and 6 m elevation, where 1 m approximates most predictions by the end of this century), we assessed the consequences of primary and secondary SLR effects from human displacement on habitat availability and distributions of selected mammal species. We estimate that between 3-32% of the coastal zone of these islands could be lost from primary effects, and consequently 8-52 million people would become SLR refugees. Assuming that inundated urban and intensive agricultural areas will be relocated with an equal area of habitat loss in the hinterland, we project that secondary SLR effects can lead to an equal or even higher percent range loss than primary effects for at least 10-18% of the sample mammals in a moderate range loss scenario and for 22-46% in a maximum range loss scenario. In addition, we found some species to be more vulnerable to secondary than primary effects. Finally, we found high spatial variation in vulnerability: species on islands in Oceania are more vulnerable to primary SLR effects, whereas species on islands in Indo-Malaysia, with potentially 7-48 million SLR refugees, are more vulnerable to secondary effects. Our findings show that primary and secondary SLR effects can have enormous consequences for human inhabitants and island biodiversity, and that both need to be incorporated into ecological risk assessment, conservation, and regional planning.

  13. Retrocausal Information Flow: What are the Consequences of Knowing the Future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobyns, York H.

    2006-10-01

    This paper discusses experimental findings from the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research project supporting the existence of retrocausal information flow. Possible alternative explanations to retrocausation are examined for each experiment. In each case it can be shown that retrocausal information flow is either a parsimonious explanation, or the only currently available explanation, for the observational data. Gedankenexperiments are then examined to demonstrate that regardless of observational effect size, empirical phenomena of the type seen in these experiments cannot produce time paradoxes. The theoretical discussion pursuant to the experimental data covers some of the basic problems in the physical representation of time. Human perception of time incorporates a dichotomy: the past is known but cannot be changed, the future is presumed to be indeterminate and hence controllable but unknowable in advance. Physical formalisms have difficulty in representing this dichotomy, arriving in the most extreme case at the completely deterministic Einsteinian block universe view of spacetime. Strict physical determinism, however, currently seems implausible due to apparently essential indeterminism at the quantum scale. Retrocausal phenomena attack the dichotomy on empirical rather than theoretical grounds, since if past events can be causally influenced by future events either the past is malleable or the future is knowable. This approach allows a resolution of the past/future dichotomy by additional approaches other than strict determinism: the past may be indeterminate, or both past and future can contain a mixture of deterministic and indeterminate events.

  14. 2014 - 2015 Civil Affairs Issue Papers: The Future of Civil Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-18

    the future of Civil Affairs includes some hopeful prospects thanks to practical steps recently taken.” All three panels agreed that in looking to...Guard and Reserve forces will continue into the future . This is at odds with the prior, strategic use of those forces, which historically expected...2014 - 2015 CIVIL AFFAIRS ISSUE PAPERS: THE FUTURE OF CIVIL AFFAIRS Edited by Christopher Holshek John C. Church, Jr.ISBN: 978-0-9861865-0-9 USAWC

  15. Future consequences of decreasing marginal production efficiency in the high-yielding dairy cow.

    PubMed

    Moallem, U

    2016-04-01

    The objectives were to examine the gross and marginal production efficiencies in high-yielding dairy cows and the future consequences on dairy industry profitability. Data from 2 experiments were used in across-treatments analysis (n=82 mid-lactation multiparous Israeli-Holstein dairy cows). Milk yields, body weights (BW), and dry matter intakes (DMI) were recorded daily. In both experiments, cows were fed a diet containing 16.5 to 16.6% crude protein and net energy for lactation (NEL) at 1.61 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM). The means of milk yield, BW, DMI, NEL intake, and energy required for maintenance were calculated individually over the whole study, and used to calculate gross and marginal efficiencies. Data were analyzed in 2 ways: (1) simple correlation between variables; and (2) cows were divided into 3 subgroups, designated low, moderate, and high DMI (LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI), according to actual DMI per day: ≤ 26 kg (n=27); >26 through 28.2 kg (n=28); and >28.2 kg (n=27). The phenotypic Pearson correlations among variables were analyzed, and the GLM procedure was used to test differences between subgroups. The relationships between milk and fat-corrected milk yields and the corresponding gross efficiencies were positive, whereas BW and gross production efficiency were negatively correlated. The marginal production efficiency from DM and energy consumed decreased with increasing DMI. The difference between BW gain as predicted by the National Research Council model (2001) and the present measurements increased with increasing DMI (r=0.68). The average calculated energy balances were 1.38, 2.28, and 4.20 Mcal/d (standard error of the mean=0.64) in the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The marginal efficiency for milk yields from DMI or energy consumed was highest in LDMI, intermediate in MDMI, and lowest in HDMI. The predicted BW gains for the whole study period were 22.9, 37.9, and 75.8 kg for the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The

  16. Crises and Opportunities: The Futures of Scholarly Publishing. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 57

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Carlos J.; Davidson, Cathy N.; Unsworth, John M.; Withey, Lynne

    2003-01-01

    Presented herein are papers presented at a session entitled "Crises and Opportunities: The Future of Scholarly Publishing," from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Annual Meeting, May 10, 2003. Four speakers approached this topic from different standpoints: as leaders of learned societies, as senior university officials, from the…

  17. Future Opportunities for Television. Part I. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostow, Eugene V.

    A staff paper to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy examines the future of broadcast television. The central question in formulating broadcast policy is how to mesh traditional policies with new technology to exploit fully the potential value of television. Two areas are stressed--the basic structure of TV broadcasting in the…

  18. Alaska Native Languages: Past, Present, and Future. Alaska Native Language Center Research Papers No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael E.

    Three papers (1978-80) written for the non-linguistic public about Alaska Native languages are combined here. The first is an introduction to the prehistory, history, present status, and future prospects of all Alaska Native languages, both Eskimo-Aleut and Athabaskan Indian. The second and third, presented as appendixes to the first, deal in…

  19. Pulp and paper mill of the future: A workshop. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, E.; Sobczynski, S.F.

    1993-10-01

    This workshop began with sessions to consider where the industry is likely to be, or ideally where it should be, say, by the year 2020. The next sessions considered the `drivers` that motivate the industry to change. These drivers could be motivations towards the vision developed earlier, or they may be forces that tend to prevent the vision of the future form being realized. The final sessions focused on what techniques are being (or should be) developed in four major process areas of a typical manufacturing plant, consistent with the previously identified vision of a future pulp or paper mill.

  20. Early signs of range disjunction of submountainous plant species: an unexplored consequence of future and contemporary climate changes.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Emilien; Lenoir, Jonathan; Piedallu, Christian; Gégout, Jean-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Poleward and upward species range shifts are the most commonly anticipated and studied consequences of climate warming. However, these global responses to climate change obscure more complex distribution change patterns. We hypothesize that the spatial arrangement of mountain ranges and, consequently, climatic gradients in Europe, will result in range disjunctions. This hypothesis was investigated for submountainous forest plant species at two temporal and spatial scales: (i) under future climate change (between 1950-2000 and 2061-2080 periods) at the European scale and (ii) under contemporary climate change (between 1914-1987 and 1997-2013 periods) at the French scale. We selected 97 submountainous forest plant species occurring in France, among which distribution data across Europe are available for 25 species. By projecting future distribution changes for the 25 submountainous plant species across Europe, we demonstrated that range disjunction is a likely consequence of future climate change. To assess whether it is already taking place, we used a large forest vegetation-plot database covering the entire French territory over 100 years (1914-2013) and found an average decrease in frequency (-0.01 ± 0.004) in lowland areas for the 97 submountainous species - corresponding to a loss of 6% of their historical frequency - along with southward and upward range shifts, suggesting early signs of range disjunctions. Climate-induced range disjunctions should be considered more carefully since they could have dramatic consequences on population genetics and the ability of species to face future climate changes.

  1. Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Yajima, Seiko

    2013-01-01

    An educational experiment illustrates the electrolysis of water and copper chloride to middle school science students. The electrolysis cell is composed of filter paper soaked with Na[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4] or CuCl[subscript 2] aqueous solution sandwiched, along with a sheet of platinum foil, between two coin-type lithium batteries. When the…

  2. Taking a "Future Focus" in Education--What Does It Mean? An NZCER Working Paper from the Future-Focussed Issues in Education (FFI) Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolstad, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    This working paper describes some of the ideas underpinning NZCER's Future-Focused Issues (FFI) project. There is a variety of ways to interpret what it means to take a "future focus" in education. This paper explains why the FFI project has focused primarily on concepts specifically mentioned in relation to "future focus" in…

  3. Weeds in a Changing Climate: Vulnerabilities, Consequences, and Implications for Future Weed Management.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Kulasekaran; Matloob, Amar; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S

    2017-01-01

    Whilst it is agreed that climate change will impact on the long-term interactions between crops and weeds, the results of this impact are far from clear. We suggest that a thorough understanding of weed dominance and weed interactions, depending on crop and weed ecosystems and crop sequences in the ecosystem, will be the key determining factor for successful weed management. Indeed, we claim that recent changes observed throughout the world within the weed spectrum in different cropping systems which were ostensibly related to climate change, warrant a deeper examination of weed vulnerabilities before a full understanding is reached. For example, the uncontrolled establishment of weeds in crops leads to a mixed population, in terms of C3 and C4 pathways, and this poses a considerable level of complexity for weed management. There is a need to include all possible combinations of crops and weeds while studying the impact of climate change on crop-weed competitive interactions, since, from a weed management perspective, C4 weeds would flourish in the increased temperature scenario and pose serious yield penalties. This is particularly alarming as a majority of the most competitive weeds are C4 plants. Although CO2 is considered as a main contributing factor for climate change, a few Australian studies have also predicted differing responses of weed species due to shifts in rainfall patterns. Reduced water availability, due to recurrent and unforeseen droughts, would alter the competitive balance between crops and some weed species, intensifying the crop-weed competition pressure. Although it is recognized that the weed pressure associated with climate change is a significant threat to crop production, either through increased temperatures, rainfall shift, and elevated CO2 levels, the current knowledge of this effect is very sparse. A few models that have attempted to predict these interactions are discussed in this paper, since these models could play an integral

  4. Weeds in a Changing Climate: Vulnerabilities, Consequences, and Implications for Future Weed Management

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Kulasekaran; Matloob, Amar; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K.; Chauhan, Bhagirath S.

    2017-01-01

    Whilst it is agreed that climate change will impact on the long-term interactions between crops and weeds, the results of this impact are far from clear. We suggest that a thorough understanding of weed dominance and weed interactions, depending on crop and weed ecosystems and crop sequences in the ecosystem, will be the key determining factor for successful weed management. Indeed, we claim that recent changes observed throughout the world within the weed spectrum in different cropping systems which were ostensibly related to climate change, warrant a deeper examination of weed vulnerabilities before a full understanding is reached. For example, the uncontrolled establishment of weeds in crops leads to a mixed population, in terms of C3 and C4 pathways, and this poses a considerable level of complexity for weed management. There is a need to include all possible combinations of crops and weeds while studying the impact of climate change on crop-weed competitive interactions, since, from a weed management perspective, C4 weeds would flourish in the increased temperature scenario and pose serious yield penalties. This is particularly alarming as a majority of the most competitive weeds are C4 plants. Although CO2 is considered as a main contributing factor for climate change, a few Australian studies have also predicted differing responses of weed species due to shifts in rainfall patterns. Reduced water availability, due to recurrent and unforeseen droughts, would alter the competitive balance between crops and some weed species, intensifying the crop-weed competition pressure. Although it is recognized that the weed pressure associated with climate change is a significant threat to crop production, either through increased temperatures, rainfall shift, and elevated CO2 levels, the current knowledge of this effect is very sparse. A few models that have attempted to predict these interactions are discussed in this paper, since these models could play an integral

  5. Drug Use among American College Students and Their Noncollege Age Peers. Monitoring the Future. Occasional Paper Series, Paper 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; And Others

    Monitoring the Future is an ongoing research program which annually surveys high school seniors and also performs followup surveys of previous high school classes. This study used five different questionnaire forms to examine illicit and licit (alcohol and nicotine) drug use among U.S. college students and their age-peers not in college. The…

  6. Demographic Subgroup Trends for Various Licit and Illicit Drugs, 1975-2010. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series. Paper 74

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The full 2010 survey results are reported in "Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975;2010: Volume I, Secondary School Students". That monograph contains a description of MTF's design and purposes, as well as extended reporting on substance use of all kinds, licit and illicit, and a number of related factors such as…

  7. Effects of Consideration of Future Consequences and Temporal Framing on Acceptance of the HPV Vaccine Among Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jarim; Nan, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    This study examines how individual difference in consideration of future consequences (CFC) and temporal framing (i.e., present- vs. future-oriented message) interact to influence the persuasive outcomes of a health message promoting human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young adults. Results of an experiment (N = 416) showed a significant interaction effect of CFC and temporal framing on persuasion. The nature of the interaction suggested that individuals with high CFC generally were more persuaded by the present-oriented messages, compared to the future-oriented messages. On the other hand, those with low CFC responded similarly to the present- and future-oriented messages. Implications of the findings for HPV vaccination messaging are discussed.

  8. ASAS Centennial Paper: Developments and future outlook for postslaughter food safety.

    PubMed

    Sofos, J N

    2009-07-01

    Meat has been important to human survival and personal enjoyment for thousands of years, and as societies become more affluent, the amount and quality of meat consumed increases. Ancient Egyptians are known to have consumed ground meat, whereas the Greeks and Romans enjoyed various types of sausages. Ground meat has been consumed throughout the world under various names and for several centuries. However, in recent years, microbial meat safety has become a major concern, and it appears that meat safety challenges will persist in future years. This paper provides a brief historical account of selected developments in microbiology, meat science, and safety, and associated industrial and regulatory highlights, and a brief overview of current and future food safety issues, concerns, and challenges.

  9. Short-Term Medical Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: Lessons for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Robert Peter

    1988-01-01

    The author of this article discusses the world's most serious nuclear accident to date: the Chernobyl nuclear accident of April 1986. His major focus is on the short-term medical consequences of the accident, including reduction of exposure to persons at risk, evaluation of persons potentially affected, dosimetry, and specific medical interventions. PMID:21253129

  10. Individual differences in the consideration of future consequences scale correlate with sleep habits, sleep quality, and GPA in university students.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brandon R; Joireman, Jeff; Ridgway, Richard L

    2005-06-01

    The present study examined relationships between individual differences in the consideration of future consequences, sleep habits and sleep quality, and academic achievement in a sample of 231 undergraduates, 156 women and 75 men, whose ages ranged from 18 to 41 years (M = 19.0 yr., SD=2.82). Individuals were recruited from two introductory courses and two upper-division courses, one each in the fields of biology and psychology. An 8-page questionnaire was administered to assess variables relating to personality, sleep habits and quality, and grade point average (GPA). Each volunteer was given extra credit in their respective courses for participation. Higher scores on the Consideration of Future Consequences scale were associated with self-reported measures of more regular sleep schedules, greater satisfaction with sleep, a reduced likelihood of oversleeping, and higher grade point averages. Moreover, oversleeping was significantly correlated with both scale scores and GPA.

  11. An introduction to the special issue on Geoscience Papers of the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Cédric H.; Gil, Yolanda; Duffy, Christopher J.; Peckham, Scott D.; Venayagamoorthy, S. Karan

    2016-10-01

    Advocates of enhanced quality for published scientific results are increasingly voicing the need for further transparency of data and software for scientific reproducibility. However, such advanced digital scholarship can appear perplexing to geoscientists that are seduced by the concept of open science yet wonder about the exact mechanics and implications of the associated efforts. This special issue of Earth and Space Science entitled "Geoscience Papers of the Future" includes a review of existing best practices for digital scholarship and bundles a set of example articles that share their digital research products and reflect on the process of opening their scientific approach in a common quest for reproducible science.

  12. Future Deforestation in the Amazon and Consequences for South American Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, A. L. S.; Longo, M.; Knox, R. G.; Lee, E.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing agricultural expansion in Amazonia and the surrounding areas of Brazil is expected to continue over the next several decades as global food demand increases. The transition of natural forest and cerrado ecosystems to pastureland and agricultural crops is predicted to create warmer and drier atmospheric conditions than the native vegetation. Using a coupled ecosystem- regional atmospheric model (ED-BRAMS) we investigate the impacts of predicted future land use on the climate of South America. We find that the climate response in our model is consistent with expectations - with drier conditions resulting from deforestation, however the changes in precipitation are moderate. Local drying is driven primarily by decreases in evapotranspiration associated with the loss of leaf area, and coincident increases in runoff. Significant consistent changes are seen in convectively available potential energy and convective inhibition suggesting that the decrease in surface latent heat flux is indeed leading to a drier atmosphere, however these changes occur at mean state values that are already very favorable for convection leading to little change in precipitation. If large-scale circulation changes occur in the future to push the atmosphere over the Amazon towards a drier state as predicted by the CMIP3 and CMIP5 archives, we postulate that land use change could accelerate the movement across a convective threshold.

  13. Adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular consequences of chronic emotional stress: Review and perspectives for future research.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Carlos C

    2017-03-01

    Emotional stress has been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Adolescence has been proposed as a developmental period of vulnerability to stress. This idea has been mainly supported by experimental research in animals demonstrating a higher impact of chronic emotional stress in adolescents compared with adults. Adolescent vulnerability is also based on evidence that stress during this developmental period affects development, so that enduring changes are found in adult animals that experienced stress during adolescence. The purpose of the present review is to discuss experimental research in rodent models that investigated the impact of long-term exposure to stressful events during adolescence on cardiovascular function. The development of cardiovascular function and autonomic activity in rodents is initially reviewed. Then, a discussion of an adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular effects of chronic stress is presented. From the reviewed literature, perspective for future research is proposed to better elucidate adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular complications evoked by chronic emotional stress.

  14. Rate of establishing the gut microbiota in infancy has consequences for future health

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Shaillay; Sakwinska, Olga; Soh, Shu-E; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Brück, Wolfram M; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald; Karnani, Neerja; Lee, Yung Seng; Yap, Fabian; Chong, Yap-Seng; Godfrey, Keith M; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2015-01-01

    The gut of the human neonate is colonized rapidly after birth from an early sparse and highly distinct microbiota to a more adult-like and convergent state, within 1 to 3 years. The progression of colonizing bacterial species is non-random. During the first months of life several shifts commonly occur in the species prevalent in our guts. Although the sequential progression of these species is remarkably consistent across individuals and geographies, there is inter-individual variation in the rate of progression. Our study and others suggest that the rate is influenced by environmental factors, and influences our future health. In this article, we review our recent contribution to cataloging the developing infant gut microbiota alongside other important recent studies. We suggest testable hypotheses that arise from this synthesis. PMID:26516657

  15. Industrialization of Rural Areas: Recent Trends and the Social and Economic Consequences. Staff Paper No. SP-79-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Brady J.

    There is no present consensus regarding long-term consequences of rural industrialization on society. Since 1950, smaller rural communities in the South and Southwestern United States have gained in industrialization due to their generally low-wage non-union labor supply and lower tax structure, both attractive to industry seeking greater profits.…

  16. ASAS Centennial Paper: Future needs of research and extension in forage utilization.

    PubMed

    Rouquette, F M; Redmon, L A; Aiken, G E; Hill, G M; Sollenberger, L E; Andrae, J

    2009-01-01

    Forage-animal production agriculture is implementing infrastructure changes and management strategies to adjust to increased energy-related costs of fuel, feed grains, fertilizers, and seeds. The primary objectives of this position paper are to assess future research and extension scientific needs in forage utilization, financial support for the discipline, and changing status and number of scientists. A survey questionnaire returned from 25 land-grant universities in the eastern half of the United States rated the top 4 research needs as 1) pasture systems and efficiency of production; 2) interfacing with energy concerns; 3) forage cultivar evaluations and persistence; and 4) environment impacts. Plant-animal future research needs at 11 USDA-ARS regional locations are targeted at sustainable management and improved livestock performance, ecophysiology and ecology of grasslands, environment impacts, and improved technologies for nutritive value assessments. Extension scientists from 17 southern and northeastern states listed the top 3 needs as forage persistence, soil fertility and nutrient management, and pasture systems and efficiency of production. Grant funds currently provide more than 40% of land-grant university research and extension efforts in forage utilization, and scientists estimate that this support base will increase to 55 to 60% of the funding total by 2013. Reduced allocation of state and federal funding has contributed to a reduction in the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) scientists engaged in forage utilization research and extension activities. The current 25 state FTE conducting research number about 2.8 per state. This includes 10 states with >3, 11 states with <2, and 3 states with <1 FTE. Increased interest in cellulosic energy, climate change, and environmental impact may offer new opportunities for these FTE to participate in integrated cross-discipline research Extension programming, and technology transfer methods will change to

  17. Consequences of future increased Arctic runoff on Arctic Ocean stratification, circulation, and sea ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nummelin, Aleksi; Ilicak, Mehmet; Li, Camille; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean has important freshwater sources including river runoff, low evaporation, and exchange with the Pacific Ocean. In the future, we expect even larger freshwater input as the global hydrological cycle accelerates, increasing high-latitude precipitation, and river runoff. Previous modeling studies show some robust responses to high-latitude freshwater perturbations, including a strengthening of Arctic stratification and a weakening of the large-scale ocean circulation; some idealized modeling studies also document a stronger cyclonic circulation within the Arctic Ocean itself. With the broad range of scales and processes involved, the overall effect of increasing runoff requires an understanding of both the local processes and the broader linkages between the Arctic and surrounding oceans. Here we adopt a more comprehensive modeling approach by increasing river runoff to the Arctic Ocean in a coupled ice-ocean general circulation model, and show contrasting responses in the polar and subpolar regions. Within the Arctic, the stratification strengthens, the halocline and Atlantic Water layer warm, and the cyclonic circulation spins up, in agreement with previous work. In the subpolar North Atlantic, the model simulates a colder and fresher water column with weaker barotropic circulation. In contrast to the estuarine circulation theory, the volume exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding oceans does not increase with increasing runoff. While these results are robust in our model, we require experiments with other model systems and more complete observational syntheses to better constrain the sensitivity of the climate system to high-latitude freshwater perturbations.

  18. Future directions in the ontogeny of plant defence: understanding the evolutionary causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kasey E; Boege, Karina

    2017-04-01

    Plant defence often varies by orders of magnitude as plants develop from the seedling to juvenile to mature and senescent stages. Ontogenetic trajectories can involve switches among defence traits, leading to complex shifting phenotypes across plant lifetimes. While considerable research has characterised ontogenetic trajectories for now hundreds of plant species, we still lack a clear understanding of the molecular, ecological and evolutionary factors driving these patterns. In this study, we identify several non-mutually exclusive factors that may have led to the evolution of ontogenetic trajectories in plant defence, including developmental constraints, resource allocation costs, multi-functionality of defence traits, and herbivore selection pressure. Evidence from recent physiological studies is highlighted to shed light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation and activation of these developmental changes. Overall, our goal is to promote new research avenues that would provide evidence for the factors that have promoted the evolution of this complex lifetime phenotype. Future research focusing on the questions and approaches identified here will advance the field and shed light on why defence traits shift so dramatically across plant ontogeny, a widespread but poorly understood ecological pattern.

  19. Consequences of simulating terrestrial N dynamics for projecting future terrestrial C storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaehle, S.; Friend, A. D.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2009-04-01

    We present results of a new land surface model, O-CN, which includes a process-based coupling between the terrestrial cycling of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen. The model represents the controls of the terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycling on carbon (C) pools and fluxes through photosynthesis, respiration, changes in allocation patterns, as well as soil organic matter decomposition, and explicitly accounts for N leaching and gaseous losses. O-CN has been shown to give realistic results in comparison to observations at a wide range of scales, including in situ flux measurements, productivity databases, and atmospheric CO2 concentration data. Notably, O-CN simulates realistic responses of net primary productivity, foliage area, and foliage N content to elevated atmospheric [CO2] as evidenced at free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) sites (Duke, Oak Ridge). We re-examine earlier model-based assessments of the terrestrial C sequestration potential using a global transient O-CN simulation driven by increases in atmospheric [CO2], N deposition and climatic changes over the 21st century. We find that accounting for terrestrial N cycling about halves the potential to store C in response to increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations; mainly due to a reduction of the net C uptake in temperate and boreal forests. Nitrogen deposition partially alleviates the effect of N limitation, but is by far not sufficient to compensate for the effect completely. These findings underline the importance of an accurate representation of nutrient limitations in future projections of the terrestrial net CO2 exchanges and therefore land-climate feedback studies.

  20. Global Change and Our Common Future: Papers from a Forum. Papers from the Committee on Global Change, National Research Council, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFries, Ruth S., Ed.; Malone, Thomas F., Ed.

    This volume of papers includes 21 of the 38 presentations given at the Forum on Global Change and Our Common Future. The objectives of the forum were threefold: (1) to present to the public a balanced and authoritative view of the wide range of global change issues, including the science of the earth system, the impacts of global change on…

  1. Student Drug Use, Attitudes, and Beliefs in the Department of Defense Dependent Schools Class of 1982. Monitoring the Future. Occasional Paper Series, Paper 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; And Others

    This paper compared findings from a drug use and related attitudes survey with those from the Monitoring the Future study. The comparison group consisted of high school seniors who attended the Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DoDDS) in 1982. The current prevalence of drug use among high school seniors in DoDDS and comparisons of drug use…

  2. Differentiation of Period, Age, and Cohort Effects on Drug Use 1976-1986. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series, Paper 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Patrick M.; And Others

    Conducted as part of the Monitoring the Future project, this study used a cohort-sequential design to examine period, age, and cohort effects on substance use among American youth between the ages of 18 and 28 from the high school classes of 1976 to 1986. This manuscript supersedes Paper 14 in the series which reported on American youth from 18-24…

  3. Future consequences and challenges for dairy cow production systems arising from climate change in Central Europe - a review.

    PubMed

    Gauly, M; Bollwein, H; Breves, G; Brügemann, K; Dänicke, S; Daş, G; Demeler, J; Hansen, H; Isselstein, J; König, S; Lohölter, M; Martinsohn, M; Meyer, U; Potthoff, M; Sanker, C; Schröder, B; Wrage, N; Meibaum, B; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G; Stinshoff, H; Wrenzycki, C

    2013-05-01

    It is well documented that global warming is unequivocal. Dairy production systems are considered as important sources of greenhouse gas emissions; however, little is known about the sensitivity and vulnerability of these production systems themselves to climate warming. This review brings different aspects of dairy cow production in Central Europe into focus, with a holistic approach to emphasize potential future consequences and challenges arising from climate change. With the current understanding of the effects of climate change, it is expected that yield of forage per hectare will be influenced positively, whereas quality will mainly depend on water availability and soil characteristics. Thus, the botanical composition of future grassland should include species that are able to withstand the changing conditions (e.g. lucerne and bird's foot trefoil). Changes in nutrient concentration of forage plants, elevated heat loads and altered feeding patterns of animals may influence rumen physiology. Several promising nutritional strategies are available to lower potential negative impacts of climate change on dairy cow nutrition and performance. Adjustment of feeding and drinking regimes, diet composition and additive supplementation can contribute to the maintenance of adequate dairy cow nutrition and performance. Provision of adequate shade and cooling will reduce the direct effects of heat stress. As estimated genetic parameters are promising, heat stress tolerance as a functional trait may be included into breeding programmes. Indirect effects of global warming on the health and welfare of animals seem to be more complicated and thus are less predictable. As the epidemiology of certain gastrointestinal nematodes and liver fluke is favourably influenced by increased temperature and humidity, relations between climate change and disease dynamics should be followed closely. Under current conditions, climate change associated economic impacts are estimated to be

  4. The Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: Turning Points and Consequences. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.12.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, John; Hextrum, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This white paper was prepared at the request of the Advisory Committee to the Athletic Study Center as a result of their concern over poor graduation rates in football as released by the NCAA in 2012. The paper received extensive review by the members of that committee as well as several other knowledgeable faculty and senior administrators before…

  5. Too Scared to Learn? The Academic Consequences of Feeling Unsafe at School. Working Paper #02-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoe, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A safe environment is a prerequisite for productive learning. This paper represents the first large-scale analysis of how feelings of safety at school affect educational outcomes. Using a unique longitudinal dataset of survey responses from New York City middle school students, the paper provides insight into the causal relationship between…

  6. Forecasting the Future Food Service World of Work. Final Report. Volume III. Technical Papers on the Future of the Food Service Industry. Service Management Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Thomas F., Ed.; Swinton, John R., Ed.

    This third and final volume of a study on the future of the food service industry contains the technical papers on which the information in the previous two volumes was based. The papers were written by various members of the Pennsylvania State University departments of economics, food science, nutrition, social psychology, and engineering and by…

  7. Futurism and Education: Some Perspectives for Global Educators. Occasional Papers Series, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Neal; Salomon, Manjula

    A working knowledge of futurist perspective is becoming essential to educators. While global education acquaints students with their responsibilities as members of a group extending beyond their personal and local boundaries, futurism awakens students to the interconnectedness of past, present, and future. Although debate exists over whether it is…

  8. The Future Institutional Research Office: Brave New Workplace or Electronic Sweatshop? AIR 1989 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebmann, Jeffrey D.

    Information technology is changing the workplace. Forecasts range from wondrous visions of future capabilities to dark scenarios of employment loss and dehumanization. Some predict revolutionary impacts, while others conclude that the way we do business will change only gradually if much at all. The less positive visions of the future workplace…

  9. Temporal framing and consideration of future consequences: effects on smokers' and at-risk nonsmokers' responses to cigarette health warnings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoquan; Nan, Xiaoli; Iles, Irina Alexandra; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the influence of temporal framing (long-term vs. short-term) and individual difference in consideration of future consequences (CFC) on the effectiveness of cigarette health warnings among smokers and at-risk nonsmokers in a college population. An online experiment (N = 395) revealed a three-way interaction among temporal framing, CFC, and smoking status. The results among at-risk nonsmokers supported the temporal fit hypothesis--those high in CFC responded more favorably to long-term framing, whereas those low in CFC responded more positively to short-term framing. The findings among smokers revealed a different pattern in which short-term framing was more effective among high-CFC smokers, whereas among low-CFC smokers the framing effect was not distinct. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. 40 CFR 1400.3 - Public access to paper copies of off-site consequence analysis information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be provided with access to a paper copy of the OCA information for up to 10 stationary sources...) Obtained the person's signature on a sign-in sheet and a certification that the person has not received... documentation; and (2) Obtained the person's signature on a sign-in sheet. (g) Record keeping. Reading...

  11. Under the Weather: Health, Schooling, and Economic Consequences of Early-Life Rainfall. NBER Working Paper No. 14031

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccini, Sharon L.; Yang, Dean

    2008-01-01

    How sensitive is long-run individual well-being to environmental conditions early in life? This paper examines the effect of weather conditions around the time of birth on the health, education, and socioeconomic outcomes of Indonesian adults born between 1953 and 1974. We link historical rainfall for each individual's birth-year and…

  12. The Consequences of Age at First Childbirth: Labor Force Participation and Earnings. Working Paper: 1146-04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofferth, Sandra L.; And Others

    The primary focus of this paper is on the impact an early birth has on later labor force participation and earnings of women. Variables affecting the participation of women in a given year and factors affecting the total work experience are discussed in detail. These include: hours worked, annual earnings, hourly wages, occupational status, race,…

  13. An Australian Land Force for Conflict in a World Without Precedent (Future Warfare Concept Paper)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    chaos of future conflict. Discussion: In order to gain the best effect from the greater lethality of its weapon systems , and ensure its own...have and will continue to greatly enhance the lethality of weapon systems ; this will also change tactics and organizations as it has in the past... chaos of future conflict. Intended to 5 replace Industrial Age infantry brigades, the smaller ETF possesses greater combat weight. While possessing

  14. A perspective on paper-based microfluidics: Current status and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Ballerini, David R.; Shen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Paper-based microfluidics” or “lab on paper,” as a burgeoning research field with its beginning in 2007, provides a novel system for fluid handling and fluid analysis for a variety of applications including health diagnostics, environmental monitoring as well as food quality testing. The reasons why paper becomes an attractive substrate for making microfluidic systems include: (1) it is a ubiquitous and extremely cheap cellulosic material; (2) it is compatible with many chemical/biochemical/medical applications; and (3) it transports liquids using capillary forces without the assistance of external forces. By building microfluidic channels on paper, liquid flow is confined within the channels, and therefore, liquid flow can be guided in a controlled manner. A variety of 2D and even 3D microfluidic channels have been created on paper, which are able to transport liquids in the predesigned pathways on paper. At the current stage of its development, paper-based microfluidic system is claimed to be low-cost, easy-to-use, disposable, and equipment-free, and therefore, is a rising technology particularly relevant to improving the healthcare and disease screening in the developing world, especially for those areas with no- or low-infrastructure and limited trained medical and health professionals. The research in paper-based microfluidics is experiencing a period of explosion; most published works have focused on: (1) inventing low-cost and simple fabrication techniques for paper-based microfluidic devices; and (2) exploring new applications of paper-based microfluidics by incorporating efficient detection methods. This paper aims to review both the fabrication techniques and applications of paper-based microfluidics reported to date. This paper also attempts to convey to the readers, from the authors’ point of view the current limitations of paper-based microfluidics which require further research, and a few perspective directions this new analytical system

  15. A perspective on paper-based microfluidics: Current status and future trends.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Ballerini, David R; Shen, Wei

    2012-03-01

    "Paper-based microfluidics" or "lab on paper," as a burgeoning research field with its beginning in 2007, provides a novel system for fluid handling and fluid analysis for a variety of applications including health diagnostics, environmental monitoring as well as food quality testing. The reasons why paper becomes an attractive substrate for making microfluidic systems include: (1) it is a ubiquitous and extremely cheap cellulosic material; (2) it is compatible with many chemical/biochemical/medical applications; and (3) it transports liquids using capillary forces without the assistance of external forces. By building microfluidic channels on paper, liquid flow is confined within the channels, and therefore, liquid flow can be guided in a controlled manner. A variety of 2D and even 3D microfluidic channels have been created on paper, which are able to transport liquids in the predesigned pathways on paper. At the current stage of its development, paper-based microfluidic system is claimed to be low-cost, easy-to-use, disposable, and equipment-free, and therefore, is a rising technology particularly relevant to improving the healthcare and disease screening in the developing world, especially for those areas with no- or low-infrastructure and limited trained medical and health professionals. The research in paper-based microfluidics is experiencing a period of explosion; most published works have focused on: (1) inventing low-cost and simple fabrication techniques for paper-based microfluidic devices; and (2) exploring new applications of paper-based microfluidics by incorporating efficient detection methods. This paper aims to review both the fabrication techniques and applications of paper-based microfluidics reported to date. This paper also attempts to convey to the readers, from the authors' point of view the current limitations of paper-based microfluidics which require further research, and a few perspective directions this new analytical system may take in

  16. Future Critical World Issues in Education: A Provisional Report of Findings. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Philip H.

    A review is presented of findings emerging from the International Council for Educational Development assessment of the world educational crisis. The assessment was made of education in both developed and developing countries and was geared toward finding the future status of education in the 1980s and the 1990s. An analysis is made of basic…

  17. The Future of the Automobile in an Oil-Short World. Worldwatch Paper 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.; And Others

    Possible future roles and designs of cars are examined in light of depletion of the earth's oil reserves. A major problem with regard to the rapidly changing world oil outlook is that cars will be competing with more essential claiments for scarce oil supplies including food production, industrial power, home heating, and running trucks and…

  18. Revisiting Marriage Effects on Substance Use among Young Adults. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 68

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; Freedman-Doan, Peter; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John E.; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    2008-01-01

    A decade ago we published a book reporting an extensive analysis of nationwide panel data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) project showing impacts of post-high school experiences on substance use (Bachman, Wadsworth, O'Malley, Johnston, & Schulenberg, 1997). One of the most important findings was that various categories of marital status,…

  19. An Assessment of Future Employment Opportunities for Individuals Trained in the Automotive Trades. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Employment Development, Sacramento.

    The California Youth Authority (CYA) planned to offer a training program covering all aspects of the automotive trades to wards during their incarceration. Through analysis, it showed future job opportunities exist, due to increased job numbers and high turnover rate, for persons trained in the automotive trades in California over a 10-year period…

  20. Connecting Minds: Emergence of a Future Bent, Writing/Thinking Intensive Psychology Course. Occasional Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, J. E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    How might students engage mindful learning? How might the professor engage mindful teaching? Both questions derived from fieldnotes a participant observer had created for the Future of Learning 2010 Summer Institute (Harvard Graduate School of Education) and the Tests and Measurements course, fall 2010 at Edward Waters College (EWC). Additionally,…

  1. The Aims and Objectives of the Monitoring the Future Study and Progress toward Fulfilling Them. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper No. 34. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John; Bachman, Jerald G.

    This paper presents information from the ongoing research program, Monitoring the Future. The program is designed to: (1) monitor drug use and potential explanatory factors among American secondary school students, and other young adults; (2) distinguish which of three different kinds of change--maturational, historical, and/or cohort are…

  2. The Evolving Requirements of the Canadian Special Operations Forces: A Future Concept Paper

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    demanding security challenges: Canadians have deployed to Afghanistan, Rwanda, Haiti, and even Yugoslavia. Dr. Taillon discusses a way forward for Canada ...ascertain if either one could address current and future Canadian SOF requirements. The inclusion of SOF reservists in Canada , however, would re- quire...countries that may target Canada or Canadian interests, or those of our allies. The campaign in Afghanistan revealed certain CANSOF activities when a

  3. Finding the Balance: U.S. Military and Future Operations (PKSOI Papers)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Latin America . Along with General James N. Mat- tis, he spearheaded the development of the FM 3-24, Counterinsurgency in 2006, the first intensive...FINDING THE BALANCE: U.S. MILITARY AND FUTURE OPERATIONS INTRODUCTION In 1755, the British Army in North America , shak- en by the defeat of General...in the complex environment of North America .1 In 1966 the U.S Army, shaken by it experience in Viet Nam transformed itself. By 1972 the Army had

  4. Future Air Force aircraft propulsion control systems: The extended summary paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skira, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Hydromechanical control technology simply cannot compete against the performance benefits offered by electronics. Future military aircraft propulsion control systems will be full authority, digital electronic, microprocessor base systems. Anticipating the day when microprocessor technology will permit the integration and management of aircraft flight control, fire control and propulsion control systems, the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory is developing control logic algorithms for a real time, adaptive control and diagnostic information system.

  5. Colloquium paper: species invasions and extinction: the future of native biodiversity on islands.

    PubMed

    Sax, Dov F; Gaines, Steven D

    2008-08-12

    Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction of many native animal species on islands, whereas competition from exotic plants has caused few native plant extinctions. Exotic plant addition to islands is highly nonrandom, with an almost perfect 1 to 1 match between the number of naturalized and native plant species on oceanic islands. Here, we evaluate several alternative implications of these findings. Does the consistency of increase in plant richness across islands imply that a saturation point in species richness has been reached? If not, should we expect total plant richness to continue to increase as new species are added? Finally, is the rarity of native plant extinctions to date a misleading measure of the impact of past invasions, one that hides an extinction debt that will be paid in the future? By analyzing historical records, we show that the number of naturalized plant species has increased linearly over time on many individual islands. Further, the mean ratio of naturalized to native plant species across islands has changed steadily for nearly two centuries. These patterns suggest that many more species will become naturalized on islands in the future. We also discuss how dynamics of invasion bear upon alternative saturation scenarios and the implications these scenarios have for the future retention or extinction of native plant species. Finally, we identify invasion-motivated research gaps (propagule pressure, time-lags to extinction, abundance shifts, and loss of area) that can aid in forecasting extinction and in developing a more comprehensive theory of species extinctions.

  6. Demographic Subgroup Trends for Various Licit and Illicit Drugs, 1975-2006. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 67

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2007-01-01

    This occasional paper is intended to serve as a supplement to the larger annual volume, "Monitoring the Future National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2006: Volume I: Secondary School Students." This supplement contains the graphic presentation of the trends in drug use for various demographic subgroups, namely those defined by gender, college…

  7. Informing the Future: A Plan for Higher Education for the Eighties. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    Major issues affecting higher education in Texas in the 1980s are identified in 20 working papers from outside consultants, the academic community, and Texas College and University System Coordinating Board staff. Topics and authors include: higher education in Texas in the 1980s (Christopher Dede); leadership in higher education (Joseph…

  8. Research on Migration in Africa: Past, Present, and Future, African Rural Employment Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerlee, Derek

    African nations have been experiencing rapid rates of urbanization accompanied by serious problems of urban unemployment due to the rate of rural-urban migration and the lack of an adequate understanding of the migration process for economic policy formulation. The aim of this paper was to review the present knowledge of African rural-urban…

  9. Education as a Way of Reflecting on the Future. Working Paper 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Hanna Holborn

    This working paper is one in a series of policy statements on the relationship between liberal education and careers in business. In this presentation, the president of the University of Chicago suggests that the importance of understanding education, particularly liberal arts education, as a complex subject is critical in understanding the…

  10. Shifting the Paradigm: Knowledge and Learning for Canada's Future. CPRN Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Jane

    This paper examines the personal and societal choices that will shape the kind of country Canada will become. It is argued that Canadian policymakers' current approach to work, family, and urban life is based on patterns and associations that were developed in an earlier time and no longer reflect Canadians' experiences in the 2000s. Recent trends…

  11. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  12. Future directions for career choice research in nursing: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Price, Sheri

    2009-02-01

    The last few decades have seen considerable changes in the characteristics of the healthcare workplace and workforce. There is a significant emphasis on recruitment and retention of healthcare providers internationally especially within the profession of Nursing, where there is a critical and growing shortage of nurses. Career choice is a critical component of recruitment and retention strategies and has significant organizational implications in regards to person-environment fit, career satisfaction and commitment. Many extant career choice theories fail to capture the challenges, complexities and uncertainties of the 21st century. Moreover, some early theories do not recognize the unique characteristics of upcoming generational cohorts and the multivariate influences on their career decisions. An extensive review and synthesis of the related literature provide the basis for a critical discussion on the adoption of new methodological approaches to exploring career choice in Nursing. The use of qualitative and mixed method approaches, a focus on generational differences and an exploration of adaptive and adjustment processes to career change provide a foundation for future career choice research and theoretical development which are reflective of the characteristics of the contemporary employee and the reality of modern healthcare organizations.

  13. Colloquium paper: Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions.

    PubMed

    Barnosky, Anthony D

    2008-08-12

    Earth's most recent major extinction episode, the Quaternary Megafauna Extinction, claimed two-thirds of mammal genera and one-half of species that weighed >44 kg between approximately 50,000 and 3,000 years ago. Estimates of megafauna biomass (including humans as a megafauna species) for before, during, and after the extinction episode suggest that growth of human biomass largely matched the loss of non-human megafauna biomass until approximately 12,000 years ago. Then, total megafauna biomass crashed, because many non-human megafauna species suddenly disappeared, whereas human biomass continued to rise. After the crash, the global ecosystem gradually recovered into a new state where megafauna biomass was concentrated around one species, humans, instead of being distributed across many species. Precrash biomass levels were finally reached just before the Industrial Revolution began, then skyrocketed above the precrash baseline as humans augmented the energy available to the global ecosystem by mining fossil fuels. Implications include (i) an increase in human biomass (with attendant hunting and other impacts) intersected with climate change to cause the Quaternary Megafauna Extinction and an ecological threshold event, after which humans became dominant in the global ecosystem; (ii) with continued growth of human biomass and today's unprecedented global warming, only extraordinary and stepped-up conservation efforts will prevent a new round of extinctions in most body-size and taxonomic spectra; and (iii) a near-future biomass crash that will unfavorably impact humans and their domesticates and other species is unavoidable unless alternative energy sources are developed to replace dwindling supplies of fossil fuels.

  14. Intuitive engineering, human factors, and the design of future interfaces (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, James B.

    2005-05-01

    Human factors engineering (HFE) professionals complain that they are often called in after-the-fact to help correct human interface problems. They believe many design flaws can be avoided if design teams involve them early on. However, in the case of innovative technology, such post hoc human factors may not be avoidable unless the inventor is also a human factors engineer or the prospective user. In rare cases an inventor of a new technology has an intuitive understanding of human engineering principles and knows well the capabilities and limitations of operators. This paper outlines the importance of focusing on the user-system interface and encouraging engineers to develop their own intuitive sense of users through mental imagery. If design engineers start with a clear mental picture of a specific user and task rather than generalities of use, fewer interface problems are likely to be encountered later in development. Successful technology innovators often use a visual thinking approach in the development of new concepts. Examples are presented to illustrate the successful application of intuitive design. An approach is offered on how designers can improve their non-verbal thinking skills. The author shares the view that the mission of HFE should not be to make system developers dependent on the small community of HF experts but rather to help them learn the value of applying user-centered design techniques.

  15. Predicting H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs: the role of individual difference in consideration of future consequences.

    PubMed

    Nan, Xiaoli; Kim, Jarim

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the influence of individual difference in consideration of future consequences on H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs (i.e., perceived susceptibility to and severity of the H1N1 flu, perceived efficacy and safety of the H1N1 vaccine, and perceived self-efficacy in obtaining the H1N1 vaccine). A survey of 411 college students showed that consideration of future consequences had no direct effect on vaccine uptake, but higher consideration of future consequences was associated with greater perceived severity of the flu, higher perceived effectiveness of the vaccine, and greater perceived self-efficacy. Additional analysis suggested that consideration of future consequences had a significant indirect effect on vaccine uptake through perceived vaccine efficacy. Results of the study also revealed gender and racial differences in some of the H1N1-related health beliefs. Implications of the findings for vaccine risk communication are discussed.

  16. Review of the Structure of Bulk Power Markets Grid of the Future White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.J.

    2000-05-02

    This paper is intended to provide an understanding of the needs of a restructured electricity market and some of the market methods and systems that have developed to address those needs. Chapter 2 discusses the historic market framework of vertically integrated utilities. Chapter 3 introduces the changes to the vertically integrated utility brought about by restructuring. It discusses generation and transmission planning, control and the regulatory process. It also summarizes reliability, security and adequacy. Chapter 4 discusses the basic structures of generation and transmission markets along with transmission-congestion contracts (TCCs) and transmission pricing principles. A discussion is given of the 12 ancillary services needed to reliably operate the power system. Chapter 4 also deals with the role of transmission in opening up markets to competition. In California increments (incs) and decrements (decs) are bid to overcome price differences in different zones caused by congestion. In PJM, any member can purchase Fixed Transmission Rights (FTRs) which allows the member to ''collect rent'' on congested lines and essentially obtain a hedge against congestion. There has been a worrisome slowdown in the growth of the transmission system in the United States since about the mid 70's. However, there are methods for providing incentives for construction of new transmission using tariffs. The California and PJM transmission planning processes are outlined. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has recently issued a proposed rulemaking on Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) which stated that the traditional methods of grid management are showing signs of strain and may be inadequate to support efficient and reliable transmission operations. Chapter 5 provides examples of market implementations and a discussion of the price spikes seen in the Midwest in the summers of 1998 and 1999. An examination of six restructured market systems is performed in

  17. Ecosystem consequences of changing inputs of terrestrial dissolved organic matter to lakes: current knowledge and future challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solomon, Christopher T.; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Buffam, Ishi; Fork, Megan L; Karlsson, Jan; Larsen, Soren; Lennon, Jay T.; Read, Jordan S.; Sadro, Steven; Saros, Jasmine E.

    2015-01-01

    Lake ecosystems and the services that they provide to people are profoundly influenced by dissolved organic matter derived from terrestrial plant tissues. These terrestrial dissolved organic matter (tDOM) inputs to lakes have changed substantially in recent decades, and will likely continue to change. In this paper, we first briefly review the substantial literature describing tDOM effects on lakes and ongoing changes in tDOM inputs. We then identify and provide examples of four major challenges which limit predictions about the implications of tDOM change for lakes, as follows: First, it is currently difficult to forecast future tDOM inputs for particular lakes or lake regions. Second, tDOM influences ecosystems via complex, interacting, physical-chemical-biological effects and our holistic understanding of those effects is still rudimentary. Third, non-linearities and thresholds in relationships between tDOM inputs and ecosystem processes have not been well described. Fourth, much understanding of tDOM effects is built on comparative studies across space that may not capture likely responses through time. We conclude by identifying research approaches that may be important for overcoming those challenges in order to provide policy- and management-relevant predictions about the implications of changing tDOM inputs for lakes.

  18. Predictors of alcohol-related negative consequences in adolescents: A systematic review of the literature and implications for future research

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Myriam; Unger, Jennifer B.; Sussman, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of the literature examining risk and protective factors of alcohol related negative consequences (ARNCs) among adolescents. Methods We conducted a systematic search of original empirical articles published between January 1, 1990 and June 1, 2015. The qualitative synthesis was performed using the Theory of Triadic Influence as a framework. Results Fifty-two studies were reviewed. Intrapersonal (e.g., personality traits, drinking motives and expectancies, depression), interpersonal (e.g., parental and peer alcohol use, violence exposure) and attitudinal factors (e.g., media exposure to alcohol, religiosity) influence ARNCs. Emerging evidence of new trends contributing to ARNCs include ready mixed alcohol drinks and childhood trauma and abuse. Conclusions Risk factors from all domains of influence were observed. More research is needed on protective factors and how alcohol use interacts with preventive factors in predicting ARNCs. The conceptualization of negative consequences varies significantly between studies and may impact the external validity of previous research. PMID:26871952

  19. Federal and state forestry cost-share assistance programs: Structure, accomplishments, and future outlook. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, T.

    1995-09-01

    Cost-share assistance programs have been an effective policy mechanism for increasing productivity on nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) lands. In light of reduced harvests from Federal lands, timber productivity on these lands has become increasingly important to ensure sufficient timber supplies in the future. Productivity of other forest resources has also been enhanced through these programs. Four Federal programs, the Forestry Incentives Program, the Agricultural Conservation Program, the Stewardship Incentives program, and the Conservation Reserve Program, provided cost-share assistance for tree planting on 467,000 acres in 1993. During the course of this study, the provisions of the individual State programs, funding levels, accomplishments, and outlook for continuation or expansion, were examined. Federal programs were reviewed as well, with respect to their interaction with State-level programs. The results of the study are presented in this paper.

  20. Toward the Geoscience Paper of the Future: Best practices for documenting and sharing research from data to software to provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Yolanda; David, Cédric H.; Demir, Ibrahim; Essawy, Bakinam T.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Huikyo; Mills, Heath J.; Oh, Ji-Hyun; Pierce, Suzanne A.; Pope, Allen; Tzeng, Mimi W.; Villamizar, Sandra R.; Yu, Xuan

    2016-10-01

    Geoscientists now live in a world rich with digital data and methods, and their computational research cannot be fully captured in traditional publications. The Geoscience Paper of the Future (GPF) presents an approach to fully document, share, and cite all their research products including data, software, and computational provenance. This article proposes best practices for GPF authors to make data, software, and methods openly accessible, citable, and well documented. The publication of digital objects empowers scientists to manage their research products as valuable scientific assets in an open and transparent way that enables broader access by other scientists, students, decision makers, and the public. Improving documentation and dissemination of research will accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by improving the ability of others to build upon published work.

  1. Learning about the history of landscape use for the future: consequences for ecological and social systems in Swedish Bergslagen.

    PubMed

    Angelstam, Per; Andersson, Kjell; Isacson, Maths; Gavrilov, Dmitri V; Axelsson, Robert; Bäckström, Mattias; Degerman, Erik; Elbakidze, Marine; Kazakova-Apkarimova, Elena Yu; Sartz, Lotta; Sädbom, Stefan; Törnblom, Johan

    2013-03-01

    Barriers and bridges to implement policies about sustainable development and sustainability commonly depend on the past development of social-ecological systems. Production of metals required integration of use of ore, streams for energy, and wood for bioenergy and construction, as well as of multiple societal actors. Focusing on the Swedish Bergslagen region as a case study we (1) describe the phases of natural resource use triggered by metallurgy, (2) the location and spatial extent of 22 definitions of Bergslagen divided into four zones as a proxy of cumulative pressure on landscapes, and (3) analyze the consequences for natural capital and society. We found clear gradients in industrial activity, stream alteration, and amount of natural forest from the core to the periphery of Bergslagen. Additionally, the legacy of top-down governance is linked to today's poorly diversified business sector and thus municipal vulnerability. Comparing the Bergslagen case study with other similar regions in Russia and Germany, we discuss the usefulness of multiple case studies.

  2. Futurism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Jane Loring

    The objectives of this research report are to gain insight into the main problems of the future and to ascertain the attitudes that the general population has toward the treatment of these problems. In the first section of this report the future is explored socially, psychologically, and environmentally. The second section describes the techniques…

  3. Men regret anabolic steroid use due to a lack of comprehension regarding the consequences on future fertility.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J R; Scovell, J; Ramasamy, R; Rajanahally, S; Coward, R M; Smith, R P; Lipshultz, L I

    2015-10-01

    We examined whether men with anabolic-steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) seeking testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) regretted their decision to use anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and what their reasons were for this regret. An anonymous, prospective survey was distributed to 382 men seeking follow-up treatment for hypogonadism. Prior AAS use was confirmed by self-report, and men were categorised based upon whether they regretted (R) or did not regret (NR) their use of AAS. The average patient age was 40 ± 0.9 years (n = 79) and 15.2% expressed regret over AAS use. No demographic differences were identified between those who regretted AAS use (n = 12) and those who did not (n = 67). Regret was not related to ASIH diagnosis or to AAS-related side effects like increased aggression, mood disorders, erectile dysfunction, acne, fluid retention or dyslipidemia. Those who regretted AAS use were significantly more likely to have not comprehended the negative impact on future fertility (P < 0.030). Actual fertility issues were comparable in men who regretted AAS use (16.7%) and those who did not (13%). A total of 15.2% of men regretted using AAS. A lack of awareness regarding the negative long-term effects on fertility was the primary factor related to regret of AAS use in men with ASIH.

  4. On Organizations of the Future. Administrative and Policy Studies Series: Volume I, No. 03-006. A Sage Professional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyris, Chris

    Some of the most important causes for organizational deterioration and entropy are related to the fact that organizations have been designed and managed on a restricted view of man. Lack of interpersonal competence (and its consequences in group and intergroup behavior) has helped to create such an internal environment that the rational and…

  5. Forum Futures: Exploring the Future of Higher Education, 2000 Papers. Forum Strategy Series, Volume 3. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Maureen E., Ed.; Meyerson, Joel W., Ed.

    This book summarizes presentations and discussions from the Fall 1999 symposium of the Forum for the Future of Higher Education. Part 1, "Winner-Take-All Markets," includes: (1) "Higher Education: The Ultimate Winner-Take-All Market?" (Robert H. Frank); (2) "The Return to Attending a More Selective College: 1960 to the…

  6. A Collection of Papers on Self-Study and Institutional Improvement, 2003. Volume 2: Organizational Effectiveness and Future Directions. 2003 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kollenburg, Susan E., Ed.

    Papers in this collection were prepared for the annual meeting of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. This volume contains papers related to organizational effectiveness and future directions. Chapter 1, "Mission, Planning, and Organizational Change," contains: (1) "Revitalizing Mission: A Collaborative Model" (Stephany…

  7. Future Training Issues in Australia's Industries. A Collection of the Papers Presented at the NCVER 1998 Conference: Industry Training Outlook '98 (Sydney, Australia, October 12-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Penelope, Ed.

    This book contains 31 papers from a conference on future training issues in Australia's industries. The following papers are included: "Training Development in Australia" (Chris Ellison); "Meeting National and Employer Training Requirements" (Mark Paterson); "Meeting Employee Training Requirements" (Bill Mansfield);…

  8. Scenario simulations of future salinity and ecological consequences in the Baltic Sea and adjacent North Sea areas–implications for environmental monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Vuorinen, Ilppo; Hänninen, Jari; Rajasilta, Marjut; Laine, Päivi; Eklund, Jan; Montesino-Pouzols, Federico; Corona, Francesco; Junker, Karin; Meier, H.E.Markus; Dippner, Joachim W.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial ecological changes occurred in the 1970s in the Northern Baltic during a temporary period of low salinity (S). This period was preceded by an episodic increase in the rainfall over the Baltic Sea watershed area. Several climate models, both global and regional, project an increase in the runoff of the Northern latitudes due to proceeding climate change. The aim of this study is to model, firstly, the effects on Baltic Sea salinity of increased runoff due to projected global change and, secondly, the effects of salinity change on the distribution of marine species. The results suggest a critical shift in the S range 5–7, which is a threshold for both freshwater and marine species distributions and diversity. We discuss several topics emphasizing future monitoring, modelling, and fisheries research. Environmental monitoring and modelling are investigated because the developing alternative ecosystems do not necessarily show the same relations to environment quality factors as the retiring ones. An important corollary is that the observed and modelled S changes considered together with species’ ranges indicate what may appear under a future climate. Consequences could include a shift in distribution areas of marine benthic foundation species and some 40–50 other species, affiliated to these. This change would extend over hundreds of kilometres, in the Baltic Sea and the adjacent North Sea areas. Potential cascading effects, in coastal ecology, fish ecology and fisheries would be extensive, and point out the necessity to develop further the “ecosystem approach in the environmental monitoring”. PMID:25737660

  9. Past and future demographic dynamics of alpine species: limited genetic consequences despite dramatic range contraction in a plant from the Spanish Sierra Nevada.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Pastor, J L; Fernández-Mazuecos, M; Vargas, P

    2013-08-01

    Anthropogenic global climate change is expected to cause severe range contractions among alpine plants. Alpine areas in the Mediterranean region are of special concern because of the high abundance of endemic species with narrow ranges. This study combined species distribution models, population structure analyses and Bayesian skyline plots to trace the past and future distribution and diversity of Linaria glacialis, an endangered narrow endemic species that inhabits summits of Sierra Nevada (Spain). The results showed that: (i) the habitat of this alpine-Mediterranean species in Sierra Nevada suffered little changes during glacial and interglacial stages of late Quaternary; (ii) climatic oscillations in the last millennium (Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age) moderately affected the demographic trends of L. glacialis; (iii) future warming conditions will cause severe range contractions; and (iv) genetic diversity will not diminish at the same pace as the distribution range. As a consequence of the low population structure of this species, genetic impoverishment in the alpine zones of Sierra Nevada should be limited during range contraction. We conclude that maintenance of large effective population sizes via high mutation rates and high levels of gene flow may promote the resilience of alpine plant species when confronted with global warming.

  10. Challenging the Politics of the Teacher Accountability Movement: Toward a More Hopeful Educational Future. Occasional Paper Series 27

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank Street College of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Guest editors Gail Boldt and William Ayers have asked 14 leading educators to address the politics of the teacher accountability movement in America. Who benefits and who is hurt? What is gained and what is lost? How can we move forward with a more hopeful and inclusive vision of our educational future? All of the contributors are motivated by an…

  11. Trends in Military Propensity and the Propensity-Enlistment Relationship. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper No. 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; Freedman-Doan, Peter; Segal, David R.; O'Malley, Patrick M.

    This report discusses the University of Michigan's Monitoring the Future Project in relation to trends in military propensity and the relationship between propensity and enlistment. The findings show that the military propensities of most young people are firmly formed by the end of high school, especially among men. Substantial majorities of…

  12. The Skills and Training Needed by Farm Management Researchers in the Future: Discussion. Economics Staff Paper 93-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Douglas R.

    In view of continuing trends in farming and the trend toward increasing farm diversification and specialization, the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges and individual researchers have proposed their own lists of the skills that will be needed by farm management researchers in the future. Because farm management…

  13. Consistency and Change in Correlates of Youth Substance Abuse, 1976-1997. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tony N.; Schulenberg, John; Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    Researchers have seldom examined whether risk and protective factors are consistently linked to substance use across historical time. Using nationally representative data collected from 22 consecutive cohorts of high school seniors (approximate N=188,000) from the Monitoring the Future project, this study investigated whether correlates of…

  14. The Future of Low-Wage Jobs: Case Studies in the Retail Industry. IEE Working Paper No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhardt, Annette

    The future of low-wage jobs is examined through a case study of firm restructuring in the retail industry. The study confirms that the retailing sector has come to be dominated by the Wal-Mart model, which emphasizes an efficient technology-driven inventory management system and a human resource approach that includes the following elements:…

  15. Paper 8775 - Integrating Natural Resources and Ecological Science into the Disaster Risk CYCLE: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnan, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Familiar to disaster risk reduction (DRR) scientists and professionals, the disaster cycle is an adaptive approach that involves planning, response and learning for the next event. It has proven effective in saving lives and helping communities around the world deal with natural and other hazards. But it has rarely been applied to natural resource and ecological science, despite the fact that many communities are dependent on these resources. This presentation will include lessons learned from applying science to tackle ecological consequences in several disasters in the US and globally, including the Colorado Floods, the SE Asia tsunami, the Montserrat volcanic eruption, and US SAFRR tsunami scenario. The presentation discusses the role that science and scientists can play at each phase of the disaster cycle. The consequences of not including disaster cycles in the management of natural systems leaves these resources and the huge investments made to protect highly vulnerable. The presentation discusses how The presentation discusses how science can help government and communities in planning and responding to these events. It concludes with a set of lessons learned and guidlines for moving forward.

  16. Part-Time Work by High School Seniors: Sorting Out Correlates and Possible Consequences. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 32. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; Schulenberg, John

    This study is intended to assess the changing lifestyles, values, and preferences of American youth on a continuing basis. Each year since 1975, about 17,000 seniors have participated in the survey, which is conducted in about 130 high schools nationwide. In addition, subsamples of seniors from previously participating classes receive follow-up…

  17. Communications Satellite Services in the United States--Present Status, Future Prospects. A Paper Prepared for the National Institute of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwood, Frank W.

    To provide a baseline for thinking about future experiments, this paper begins with a review of educational satellite experiments undertaken in the past. A review and analysis of the communications satellites currently in use by both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and by the various commercial carriers is presented in…

  18. Education Policy, Academic Research, and Public Opinion. AEI Future of American Education Project, Working Paper 2007-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility that citizens' mediated and sporadic exposure to education research influences their policy attitudes. It reflects upon how citizens--who are not direct consumers of education research and who lack basic training in the modes of social scientific inquiry--use the paucity of information made available to them…

  19. The Future of the Federal Role in Elementary and Secondary Education. A Collection of Papers (Washington, DC, December 4, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, Washington, DC.

    This document presents eight papers prepared for a conference that examined the federal role in elementary and secondary education. The purpose of the meeting was to share ideas and proposals that could be helpful to the Congress and the Administration as they addressed education policy in 2001. Some of the questions addressed here include "What…

  20. Beyond Day 1: The Future of the Catalog. Papers Presented at a Cataloging Committee Program, June 7, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Library Consortium, MA.

    These papers presented at a program by the Boston Library Consortium Cataloging Committee had three objectives: to present basic non-technical information on the implications for member libraries of the decision by the Library of Congress to close its catalog and to adopt AACR2; to emphasize the need to make decisions in the next two years on card…

  1. Policy Options for the Future of Compensatory Education: Conference Papers (Washington, D.C., November 18-19, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Denis P., Ed.; And Others

    This book, divided into three sections, comprises papers delivered at a conference on "Alternative Strategies in Compensatory Education," convened by the staff of the National Assessment of Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act and designed to aid Congress in its 1987 reauthorization of Chapter 1. The introduction,…

  2. The Relationships between Faculty Preparation Programs and Teaching Assistant Development Programs. Preparing Future Faculty. Occasional Paper No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tice, Stacey Lane

    This paper examines the relationship between teaching assistant (TA) development programs and faculty preparation programs, the commonalities between the two types of program, and the issues to be considered when making the transition from the former to the latter. It notes that many institutions adopted TA training programs in the 1980s in…

  3. Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond: A White Paper submitted for the 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. A.; Radebaugh, J.; Lopes, R. M.; de Pater, I.; Schneider, N. M.; Marchis, F.; Moses, J. I.; Davies, A. G.; Perry, J.; Kargel, J. S.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Paranicas, C.; McEwen, A. S.; Jessup, K.; Goldstein, D.; Bunte, M. K.; Rathbun, J. A.; McGrath, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Jupiter's satellite Io is the most geologically dynamic solid body in the Solar System. Io undergoes severe tidal heating, induced by the orbital eccentricity forced by Jupiter and the 4:2:1 Laplace resonance between Io, Europa, and Ganymede. Io's high global heat flow (>2 W m-2, compared to the 0.06 W m-2 average for Earth) presages an extremely rich array of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and atmospheric phenomena operating at a scale not currently seen active anywhere else in our Solar System. Thus we are not restricted, as on other planetary bodies, to reconstructing processes from their long-dead remains. Io also is the main source of neutral gas, plasma, and dust to the Jovian magnetosphere. And importantly, Io is the best place in the Solar System to study the effects of tidal heating. Testing models of tidal heating on Io has implications for many satellites in our own Solar System, and to the possibility of expanded habitability zones in extrasolar systems. Io's history is directly linked to the evolution of the one of most promising sites for extraterrestrial life, Europa. By studying the time-variable orbital and thermal evolution of Io, we also gain a better understanding of time-variable tidal heating of Europa, with obvious implications for the sustainability of its putative subsurface ocean and history of habitability. An Io-dedicated mission that operates in the 2013-2022 timeframe could identify key parameters involved in Europa’s orbital-thermal evolution, which can be further investigated by the NASA-ESA Europa-Jupiter System Mission's (EJSM) orbiters when they enter the Jovian system in 2025. This presentation will review the science objectives and proposed mission concepts for future exploration of Io in the next decade and beyond. We recommend specific mission concepts and instruments be implemented during the next Decadal Survey period. These include: 1) a Jupiter-orbiting spacecraft (Io Observer) of either Discovery-class or New

  4. The Future of Io Exploration, 2013-2023: A White Paper Submitted for the 2011 Planetary Decadal Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David A.

    2009-09-01

    Jupiter's satellite Io is the most geologically dynamic solid body in the Solar System, including Earth. Io undergoes severe tidal heating, induced by the orbital eccentricity forced by Jupiter and the 4:2:1 Laplace resonance between Io, Europa, and Ganymede. Global heat flow is estimated at >2 W/sq. m, compared to the 0.06 W/sq. m average for Earth. This one remarkable number presages a huge variety of interconnected phenomena operating at a scale not seen active anywhere else in our Solar System. Io offers an extremely rich array of geophysical, geological, geochemical, atmospheric, and magnetospheric phenomena. Diurnal tidal flexing amplitudes may reach 100 meters, dissipating huge amounts of heat in the interior, and resulting in extensive volcanic activity. Lavas of poorly known composition inundate the surface, while volcanic plumes feed a tenuous, inhomogeneous atmosphere controlled by a combination of volcanic outgassing, the formation of surface frosts and the sublimation of these frosts. Complementing Io's pervasive volcanic landforms, the surface is studded with some of the Solar System's highest and most dramatic mountains, and by scarps of both tectonic and erosional origin. As one of the most spectacular places in the Solar System, Io has unique public appeal, and Io exploration offers many opportunities to attract and engage public interest in planetary science. This poster highlights the science goals established to advance scientific understanding of Io for the next decade. We give a series of recommendations to the Planetary Decadal Survey Large Satellites Panel to advance Io exploration, including concepts for future Discovery- and New Frontiers-class missions, and ground- and spaced-based telescopic observations and instruments.

  5. ASAS Centennial Paper: Impact of animal science research on United States goat production and predictions for the future.

    PubMed

    Sahlu, T; Dawson, L J; Gipson, T A; Hart, S P; Merkel, R C; Puchala, R; Wang, Z; Zeng, S; Goetsch, A L

    2009-01-01

    Goat research in the United States has increased but at a rate less than that in production. Research on goat meat includes nutritional quality, packaging, color, sensory characteristics, and preslaughter management. Goat skins have value for leather, but quality of goat leather has not been extensively studied. Research in the production, quality, antibiotic residues, and sensory characteristics of goat milk and its products has aided development of the US dairy goat industry. Limited progress has been made in genetic improvement of milk or meat production. There is need to explore applications of genomics and proteomics and improve consistency in texture and functionality of goat cheeses. New goat meat and milk products are needed to increase demand and meet the diverse tastes of the American public. Despite research progress in control of mohair and cashmere growth, erratic prices and sale of raw materials have contributed to further declines in US production. Innovative and cooperative ventures are needed for profit sharing up to the consumer level. Internal parasites pose the greatest challenge to goat production in humid areas largely because of anthelmintic resistance. Study of alternative controls is required, including immunity enhancement via nutrition, vaccination, pasture management such as co-grazing with cattle, and genetic resistance. Similarly, the importance of health management is increasing related in part to a lack of effective vaccines for many diseases. Nutrition research should address requirements for vitamins and minerals, efficiencies of protein utilization, adjusting energy requirements for nutritional plane, acclimatization, and grazing conditions, feed intake prediction, and management practices for rapid-growth production systems. Moreover, efficient technology transfer methods are needed to disseminate current knowledge and that gained in future research.

  6. Erratum to "Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23-Paper 1" [J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 70(2-4) (2008) 245-253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the figures (Fig. 4) in "Solar sources and geospace consequences of interplanetary magnetic Clouds observed during solar cycle 23 -- Paper 1" by Gopalswamy et al. (2008, JASTP, Vol. 70, Issues 2-4, February 2008, pp. 245-253) is incorrect because of a software error in t he routine that was used to make the plot. The source positions of various magnetic cloud (MC) types are therefore not plotted correctly.

  7. Conference on Advanced Technology for Future Space Systems, Hampton, Va., May 8-10, 1979, Technical Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Propulsion systems for spacecraft, satellite communications technology, the design of large light-weight erectable structures for assembly in space, electronics and information processing for spacecraft, and self-diagnostic, fault-tolerant controls based on high memory and processing capabilities are discussed. Topics of the papers include the design of large delta wings for earth-to-orbit transports, dual-fuel propulsion units, magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, heating rates on blunt-nosed bodies at various angles of attack, remote manipulators for space assembly tasks, solar electric propulsion for planetary missions, deployable space platforms with multiple payloads, the design of large offset-fed antennas, a nonlinear stress-strain relationship for metallic meshes, and adaptive sensors for spacecraft.

  8. NATO: Continuing and Emerging Challenges -- Continuing and New Relevance. White Paper Study Group on NATO’s Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    1882 IDA Document NS P- 4906 Log: H 12-001046 July 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. About This Publication The views...U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document NS P- 4906 iii Contents 1. Purpose...Paper NS P- 4906 9 . S P O N S OR IN G / M O N I TOR IN G A GE N C Y N AM E ( S ) A N D A D D R E S S (E S ) 1 0 . S P O N S OR ’S / M ON I TO R

  9. Mitigating the consequences of future earthquakes in historical centres: what perspectives from the joined use of past information and geological-geophysical surveys?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenzio Gizzi, Fabrizio; Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Potenza, Maria Rosaria; Zotta, Cinzia; Simionato, Maurizio; Pileggi, Domenico; Castenetto, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    To mitigate the damage effects of earthquakes in urban areas and particularly in historical centres prone to high seismic hazard is an important task to be pursued. As a matter of fact, seismic history throughout the world informs us that earthquakes have caused deep changes in the ancient urban conglomerations due to their high building vulnerability. Furthermore, some quarters can be exposed to an increase of seismic actions if compared with adjacent areas due to the geological and/or topographical features of the site on which the historical centres lie. Usually, the strategies aimed to estimate the local seismic hazard make only use of the geological-geophysical surveys. Thorough this approach we do not draw any lesson from what happened as a consequences of past earthquakes. With this in mind, we present the results of a joined use of historical data and traditional geological-geophysical approach to analyse the effects of possible future earthquakes in historical centres. The research activity discussed here is arranged into a joint collaboration between the Department of Civil Protection of the Presidency of Council of Ministers, the Institute of Environmental Geology and Geoengineering and the Institute of Archaeological and Monumental Heritage of the National (Italian) Research Council. In order to show the results, we discuss the preliminary achievements of the integrated study carried out on two historical towns located in Southern Apennines, a portion of the Italian peninsula exposed to high seismic hazard. Taking advantage from these two test sites, we also discuss some methodological implications that could be taken as a reference in the seismic microzonation studies.

  10. Reactor Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, James E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reacts to seven papers presented at a symposium on the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education. The reaction focuses on the issue of dentistry's movement toward medicine both within the context of educational programs and as schools of dental medicine within academic health…

  11. Section on Supernova Remnants and Cosmic Rays of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, M.; Abdo, Aous A.; Atoyan, A.; Baring, Matthew G.; Beacom, John Francis; Blandford, R.; Butt, Y.; Bykov, A.; Ellison, D.; Funk, S.; Halzen, Francis L.; Hays, Elizabeth A.; Humensky, B.; Jones, T.; Kaaret, P.; Kieda, David B.; LeBohec, S.; Meszaros, Peter; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Slane, P.; Strong, A.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Chicago U., EFI

    2011-11-09

    This is a report on the findings of the SNR/cosmic-ray working group for the white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper is an APS commissioned document, and the overall version has also been released and can be found on astro-ph. This detailed section of the white paper discusses the status of past and current attempts to observe shell-type supernova remnants and diffuse emission from cosmic rays at GeV-TeV energies. We concentrate on the potential of future ground-based gamma-ray experiments to study the acceleration of relativistic charged particles which is one of the main unsolved, yet fundamental, problems in modern astrophysics. The acceleration of particles relies on interactions between energetic particles and magnetic turbulence. In the case of SNRs we can perform spatially resolved studies in systems with known geometry, and the plasma physics deduced from these observations will help us to understand other systems where rapid particle acceleration is believed to occur and where observations as detailed as those of SNRs are not possible.

  12. Work Requirements in Transformation, Competence for the Future: A Critical Look at the Consequences of Current Positions. IAB Labour Market Research Topics No. 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plath, Hans-Eberhard

    In Germany and elsewhere, the literature on current and future work requirements rarely discusses the effects of globalization, internationalization, computerization, and other factors from the point of view of workers. Some have suggested that a blurring of limits will be one of the main changes in work in the future. This blurring will involve…

  13. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  14. Opportunity for offshore wind to reduce future demand for coal-fired power plants in China with consequent savings in emissions of CO2.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi; McElroy, Michael B; Chen, Xinyu; Kang, Chongqing

    2014-12-16

    Although capacity credits for wind power have been embodied in power systems in the U.S. and Europe, the current planning framework for electricity in China continues to treat wind power as a nondispatchable source with zero contribution to firm capacity. This study adopts a rigorous reliability model for the electric power system evaluating capacity credits that should be recognized for offshore wind resources supplying power demands for Jiangsu, China. Jiangsu is an economic hub located in the Yangtze River delta accounting for 10% of the total electricity consumed in China. Demand for electricity in Jiangsu is projected to increase from 331 TWh in 2009 to 800 TWh by 2030. Given a wind penetration level of 60% for the future additional Jiangsu power supply, wind resources distributed along the offshore region of five coastal provinces in China (Shandong, Jiangsu, Shanghai, Zhejiang, and Fujian) should merit a capacity credit of 12.9%, the fraction of installed wind capacity that should be recognized to displace coal-fired systems without violating the reliability standard. In the high-coal-price scenario, with 60% wind penetration, reductions in CO2 emissions relative to a business as usual reference could be as large as 200.2 million tons of CO2 or 51.8% of the potential addition, with a cost for emissions avoided of $29.0 per ton.

  15. An Update of the Review of Neuropsychological Consequences of HIV and Substance Abuse: A Literature Review and Implications for Treatment and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Lisa R.; Basso, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuropyschological dysfunction, ranging from mild cerebral indicators to dementia has been a consistent part of the medical picture of HIV/AIDS. However, advances in medical supervision, particularly as a result of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment, have resulted in some mitigation of the neuropsychological effects of HIV and necessitate re-evaluation of the pattern and nature of HIV-related cognitive or mental deficits. The associated enhancements in morbidity and mortality that have occurred as a result of ARV medication have led to a need for interventions and programs that maintain behaviors that are healthy and stop the resurgence of the risk of HIV transmission. Risk factors such as mental illness and substance use that may have contributed to the initial infection with HIV still need consideration. These risk factors may also increase neuropsychological dysfunction and impact observance of prevention for treatment and recommendations. Explicitly, a better comprehension of the role of substance use on the progression of HIV-related mental decline can enlighten management and evaluation of persons living with HIV with concurrent disorders of substance use. This review provides a summary of the neurophyschology of substance use and HIV and the existing research that has looked at the effects of both substance use and HIV disease on neurophyscological function and suggestions for future research and treatment. PMID:25751583

  16. Impacts of Parental Education on Substance Use: Differences among White, African-American, and Hispanic Students in 8th, 10th, and 12th Grades (1999-2008). Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series. Paper No. 70

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    The Monitoring the Future (MTF) project reports annually on levels and trends in self-reported substance use by secondary school students (e.g., Johnston, O'Malley, Bachman, & Schulenberg, 2009). The reports include subgroup comparisons, and these have revealed substantial differences among race/ethnicity groups, as well as some differences…

  17. Antarctic notothenioid fish: what are the future consequences of 'losses' and 'gains' acquired during long-term evolution at cold and stable temperatures?

    PubMed

    Beers, Jody M; Jayasundara, Nishad

    2015-06-01

    Antarctic notothenioids dominate the fish fauna of the Southern Ocean. Evolution for millions of years at cold and stable temperatures has led to the acquisition of numerous biochemical traits that allow these fishes to thrive in sub-zero waters. The gain of antifreeze glycoproteins has afforded notothenioids the ability to avert freezing and survive at temperatures often hovering near the freezing point of seawater. Additionally, possession of cold-adapted proteins and membranes permits them to sustain appropriate metabolic rates at exceptionally low body temperatures. The notothenioid genome is also distinguished by the disappearance of traits in some species, losses that might prove costly in a warmer environment. Perhaps the best-illustrated example is the lack of expression of hemoglobin in white-blooded icefishes from the family Channichthyidae. Loss of key elements of the cellular stress response, notably the heat shock response, has also been observed. Along with their attainment of cold tolerance, notothenioids have developed an extreme stenothermy and many species perish at temperatures only a few degrees above their habitat temperatures. Thus, in light of today's rapidly changing climate, it is critical to evaluate how these extreme stenotherms will respond to rising ocean temperatures. It is conceivable that the remarkable cold specialization of notothenioids may ultimately leave them vulnerable to future thermal increases and threaten their fitness and survival. Within this context, our review provides a current summary of the biochemical losses and gains that are known for notothenioids and examines these cold-adapted traits with a focus on processes underlying thermal tolerance and acclimation capacity.

  18. An examination of the consequences in high consequence operations

    SciTech Connect

    Spray, S.D.; Cooper, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    Traditional definitions of risk partition concern into the probability of occurrence and the consequence of the event. Most safety analyses focus on probabilistic assessment of an occurrence and the amount of some measurable result of the event, but the real meaning of the ``consequence`` partition is usually afforded less attention. In particular, acceptable social consequence (consequence accepted by the public) frequently differs significantly from the metrics commonly proposed by risk analysts. This paper addresses some of the important system development issues associated with consequences, focusing on ``high consequence operations safety.``

  19. Metapopulations in temporary streams - the role of drought-flood cycles in promoting high genetic diversity in a critically endangered freshwater fish and its consequences for the future.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Santos, Carla; Robalo, Joana I; Francisco, Sara M; Carrapato, Carlos; Cardoso, Ana Cristina; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2014-11-01

    Genetic factors have direct and indirect impacts in the viability of endangered species. Assessing their genetic diversity levels and population structure is thus fundamental for conservation and management. In this paper we use mitochondrial and nuclear markers to address phylogeographic and demographic data on the critically endangered Anaecypris hispanica, using a broad sampling set which covered its known distribution area in the Iberian Peninsula. Our results showed that the populations of A. hispanica are strongly differentiated (high and significant ФST and FST values, corroborated by the results from AMOVA and SAMOVA) and genetically diversified. We suggest that the restricted gene flow between populations may have been potentiated by ecological, hydrological and anthropogenic causes. Bayesian skyline plots revealed a signal for expansion for all populations (tMRCA between 68kya and 1.33Mya) and a genetic diversity latitudinal gradient was detected between the populations from the Upper (more diversified) and the Lower (less diversified) Guadiana river basin. We postulate a Pleistocenic westwards colonization route for A. hispanica in the Guadiana river basin, which is in agreement with the tempo and mode of paleoevolution of this drainage. The colonization of River Guadalquivir around 60kya with migrants from the Upper Guadiana, most likely by stream capture, is also suggested. This study highlights the view that critically endangered species facing range retreats (about 47% of its known populations have disappeared in the last 15years) are not necessarily small and genetically depleted. However, the extinction risk is not negligible since A. hispanica faces the combined effect of several deterministic and stochastic negative factors and, moreover, recolonization events after localized extinctions are very unlikely to occur due to the strong isolation of populations and to the patchily ecologically-conditioned distribution of fish. The inferred species

  20. It was a first class start which laid the basis for a promising future: Experience from comparative studies on gravity related behavior in animals and consequences for future experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Eberhard R.

    2000-01-01

    The main title was chosen in imitation of the headline of a lecture given by H. S. Wolff at the ESA-Symposium ``Life Odyssey'' in Maastricht/NL (1999) to contrast his pessimistic view of the science output from biological microgravity studies during the past 25 years with an optimistic view of the author who had the opportunity for studies on the gravity sensory systems of developing vertebrates and insects during the space missions STS-55, STS-84, and STS-90, and who was stimulated by this experience to undertake any effort to extend these studies on the International Space Station ISS. We studied compensatory eye and head movements induced by a lateral roll of the animals, and we found that exposure to both microgravity and hypergravity affect their development. Future studies have to consider long-term exposures to altered gravitational conditions to find answers to two questions, the mechanisms of adaptation during exposure, and the degree of residual effects after becoming an adult animal and also after re-entry to IG-conditions. The main hypothesis on the development of animals in space is that a fertilized egg will be converted to a normal adult animal guided by physiological and morphological set-points which represent the genetic program. In case of developmental retardations or accelerations or otherwise occurring deviations from normal structural and physiological development during specific periods of the embryonic and postembryonic life, these genetically defined supervisors activate readaptive mechanisms which direct the developmental processes towards normality, i.e., stability. Thus, an orbit-stabilized organism will be dramatically disturbed after return to Earth. Because this failure will need support to reach neuronal stability, research has also to consider the analysis of mechanisms which are able to overcome these disturbances. This research will open the door to applications because it forms a bridge to human medicine with its analytical

  1. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Jefferson County Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darfler, Anne; Riggan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures"™ in Education program in Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS). As described in the CPRE proposal and research design, the purpose was to closely…

  2. Project EFFECT. Energy for the Future: Education, Conservation, Training. Curriculum Guide for the Training of Energy Extension Agents. A Working Paper, Volume ii: Supplemental Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., South Bend. Center for Energy Conservation.

    Intended to be used in conjunction with the Project EFFECT (Energy for the Future--Education, Conservation, Training) Curriculum Guide for Training Energy Extension Agents (available in ERIC as CE 025 100-103), this volume contains supplementary materials and full references to all outside resources used in teaching the modules. Samples of…

  3. Technology and the Future of the Community College. New Expeditions: Charging the Second Century of Community Colleges. Issues Paper No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryland, Jane N.

    This document explores the current environment from which community colleges are charting their paths to the future, with an emphasis on technology as an empowering force for change. It includes an overview of the current higher education environment, emphasizing that much of the demand comes from new markets of learners of all ages, motivated by…

  4. The "Well-Futured" College: Reaching for Tommorrow--Today. Southern Association of Community and Junior Colleges Occasional Paper, Volume 3, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Harold G.

    Much of the current crisis in education has its roots in an inability of colleges to get beyond a "now-oriented" approach to problems within the educational system. It is time for the educational focus to be directed toward anticipating alternative futures since the application of selected perspectives and procedures drawn from the field of…

  5. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Cincinnati Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sam, Cecile; Riggan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures"™ in Education program in Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS). The purpose was to closely analyze district capacity to support system-wide instructional…

  6. Quality Assurance of Higher Education in Portugal: An Assessment of the Existing System and Recommendations for a Future System. ENQA Occasional Papers 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ENQA (European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education), 2006

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the past and present external quality assurance for higher education in Portugal and to recommend a future quality assurance and accreditation system that meets the standards for quality assurance in the European Higher Education Area. The review was carried out on the initiative of the Portuguese Ministry…

  7. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Erie Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggan, Matt; Fink, Ryan; Sam, Cecile; Darfler, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures" ™ in Education program in Erie Public Schools (EPS). As described in the CPRE proposal and research design, the purpose was to closely analyze district…

  8. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Stamford Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ryan; Riggan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures"™ in Education program in Stamford Public Schools (SPS). The purpose was to closely analyze district capacity to support system-wide instructional…

  9. Library and Information Science Education in the Americas: Present and Future. Papers from a Conference held in Austin, Texas, February 14, l980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, William Vernon, Ed.

    Four primary papers and additional related reaction papers are presented from a conference sponsored by the Association of American Library Schools, the Organization of American States, and the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials, which was held to promote a useful dialog between educators from North American library…

  10. European silver paper on the future of health promotion and preventive actions, basic research and clinical aspects of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Franco, Alain; Sommer, Pascal; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Jankowska, Ewa; Maggi, Adriana; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ryś, Andrzej; Szczerbińska, Katarzyna; Diseases, Andrzej Milewicz And All Other Participants Of European Summit-Age-Related

    2009-01-01

    The current article is a statement of the meeting with international and multidisciplinary participation, held in Wrocław, Poland on September 11-13, 2008. The meeting was devoted to working out a position focusing on the challenge for individuals, health care systems, biological, psychosocial, epidemiological, medical, and public health sciences in the ageing populations of the twenty-first century. The statement is presented as an overview, in tabular format, of the current European situation regarding basic biological research on ageing, health promotion and preventive action, clinical care for older people, and recommendations for future actions.

  11. Cultural consequences of miscarriages of justice.

    PubMed

    Cole, Simon A

    2009-01-01

    Social science scholarship has tended to focus more on the causes than the consequences of miscarriages of justice. Within the literature on consequences, the overwhelming emphasis has been on individual consequences: psychological and material impacts on the wrongly convicted individual and, in some cases, other indirectly impacted individuals such as family members of the wrongly convicted and victims of the true perpetrator's future crimes. Some attention has been devoted to social harms, the impact of miscarriages of justice on the broader society within which they are situated, such as the undermining of the legitimacy of the criminal justice system. This paper focuses on what are called here cultural consequences of miscarriages of justice: the way in which some high-profile miscarriages of justice can shape the public's beliefs about some of the most basic "facts" about crime, such as the nature, prevalence, or even existence of certain categories of crime and the types of individual who tend to perpetrate particular types of crime. In this way, the paper argues, miscarriages of justice may have hitherto underexplored consequences: reshaping, based on false premises, the public's belief about the very nature of crime itself. This paper discusses three cases studies of miscarriages of justice that for varying periods of time created widespread false beliefs about the nature of crime in large segments of the public. The paper concludes by noting that the "righting" of these false beliefs was in most cases fortuitous. This suggests that unexposed miscarriages of justice may still be shaping popular beliefs about the nature of crime, and aspects of the public's current conception of crime may yet be based on false premises.

  12. Comparing Drug-Using Behaviors among High School Graduates Entering Military Service, College, and Civilian Employment. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; Freedman-Doan, Peter; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.; Segal, David R.

    The United States armed forces adopted "zero tolerance" policies concerning illicit drug use in 1980, and later developed policies to discourage tobacco and alcohol abuse. This paper examines drug use among young active-duty recruits both before and after enlistment, compared with non-military age-mates. It also documents historical shifts in such…

  13. Planning Our Future. A Staff Background Paper on Long-Range Enrollment and Facilities Planning in California Public Higher Education. Commission Report 89-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutsen, Kirk L.

    A background paper on long-range enrollment and facilities planning in California's public segments of higher education is designed to: (1) establish a policy framework within which the Postsecondary Education Commission can examine and assess the planning processes of the segments; and (2) describe the processes, identifying major differences…

  14. Improving the Quality of Basic Education for the Future Youth of Yemen Post Arab Spring. Global Economy & Development. Working Paper 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuki, Takako; Kameyama, Yuriko

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the issue of the quality of education in Yemen. It uses micro-data from TIMSS and from surveys conducted in underserved rural areas, as well as macro-level policy information from the System Assessment for Better Education Results (SABER) database. The analysis indicates that the availability of teachers and resources at…

  15. Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Grid of the Future White Paper on Review of Recent Reliability Issues and Systems Events

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, John F.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    1999-12-01

    This report is one of six reports developed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program in Power System Integration and Reliability (PSIR). The objective of this report is to review, analyze, and evaluate critical reliability issues demonstrated by recent disturbance events in the North America power system. Eleven major disturbances are examined, most occurring in this decade. The strategic challenge is that the pattern of technical need has persisted for a long period of time. For more than a decade, anticipation of market deregulation has been a major disincentive to new investments in system capacity. It has also inspired reduced maintenance of existing assets. A massive infusion of better technology is emerging as the final option to continue reliable electrical services. If an investment in better technology will not be made in a timely manner, then North America should plan its adjustments to a very different level of electrical service. It is apparent that technical operations staff among the utilities can be very effective at marshaling their forces in the immediate aftermath of a system emergency, and that serious disturbances often lead to improved mechanisms for coordinated operation. It is not at all apparent that such efforts can be sustained through voluntary reliability organizations in which utility personnel external to those organizations do most of the technical work. The eastern interconnection shows several situations in which much of the technical support has migrated from the utilities to the Independent System Operator (ISO), and the ISO staffs or shares staff with the regional reliability council. This process may be a natural and very positive consequence of utility restructuring. If so, the process should be expedited in regions where it is less advanced.

  16. Institutional Consequences of Quality Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joao Rosa, Maria; Tavares, Diana; Amaral, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the opinions of Portuguese university rectors and academics on the quality assessment system and its consequences at the institutional level. The results obtained show that university staff (rectors and academics, with more of the former than the latter) held optimistic views of the positive consequences of quality assessment…

  17. Advanced GI Surgery Training-a Roadmap for the Future: the White Paper from the SSAT Task Force on Advanced GI Surgery Training.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Matthew M; Behrns, Kevin E; Soper, Nathaniel J; Michelassi, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    surgery training could occupy the area between general surgery residency and further subspecialty training as seen in the graph below. Visually, we are trying to define the red hash mark area. This is challenging as the inner border with core general surgery is ill defined and interpreted differently by various stakeholders. Similarly, the outer border of the red hash marks, which defines areas that require a surgical subspecialist, is also not clear. Inevitably, overlap exists in the care of these patients and is influenced by the complexity of the underlying disease presentations. The concept is noble, but the future is unclear. Challenges and uncertainties include whether the Certificate of Focused Expertise will go forward, and what the RRC and ABS might decide on the structure of General Surgery training. Funding and the ability to offer autonomy during training are additional challenges in today's training environment. Currently, the ABS is considering a "Core Plus" concept, though what is "the Core" and what is the "Plus" are not yet determined, and these concepts have been promoted for years. Whether training becomes 4 +1, or 4 +1+1, 5+1 or some other model continues to be discussed. We, the Task Force of Advanced GI Surgery Training, have drafted a vision of what advanced GI training could/should look like to help guide the ABMS/ABS/RRC/ACGME as they contemplate surgery residency redesign goals. Despite the uncertainty, we will develop the curriculum, milestones, and case requirements for advanced GI surgery training, to not only provide this vision but so that an advanced GI training program is ready to go, to be plugged in to whatever the future structure for surgical training may be.

  18. Refugees and Migrants: Problems and Program Responses. A Look at the Causes and Consequences of Today's Major International Population Flows, and at the Ford Foundation's New Programs to Address the Problems of Refugees and Migrants in the United States and Elsewhere in the World. A Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford Foundation, New York, NY.

    The paper reflects the Ford Foundation's emphasis since 1980 on long-term problems of refugees and migrants across national borders, and the desire of the Foundation staff to strengthen the long-term capacity of key institutions and communities to cope with population flows. Focus is first on the consequences of migrant flows for sending and…

  19. Novel targets and future strategies for acute cardioprotection: Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Hausenloy, Derek J; Garcia-Dorado, David; Erik Bøtker, Hans; Davidson, Sean M; Downey, James; Engel, Felix B; Jennings, Robert; Lecour, Sandrine; Leor, Jonathan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Ovize, Michel; Perrino, Cinzia; Prunier, Fabrice; Schulz, Rainer; Sluijter, Joost P G; Van Laake, Linda W; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob; Yellon, Derek M; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Heusch, Gerd; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-03-17

    Ischaemic heart disease and the heart failure that often results, remain the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and worldwide. As such, in order to prevent heart failure and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, novel therapies are required to protect the heart against the detrimental effects of acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. During the last three decades, a wide variety of ischaemic conditioning strategies and pharmacological treatments have been tested in the clinic - however, their translation from experimental to clinical studies for improving patient outcomes has been both challenging and disappointing. Therefore, in this Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart, we critically analyse the current state of ischaemic conditioning in both the experimental and clinical settings, provide recommendations for improving its translation into the clinical setting, and highlight novel therapeutic targets and new treatment strategies for reducing acute myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

  20. Exploring Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Exploratorium Magazine communicates ideas that exhibits cannot easily demonstrate, extending the museum beyond its physical walls. This issue takes an in-depth look at the science and history of paper. Topics include: (1) Fascinating Facts about Paper; (2) A Closer Look at the Paper in This Magazine; (3) Handmade Paper; (4) Paper Airplanes; (5)…

  1. Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty - A Joint CEC/USNRC Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Julie J.; Harper, Frederick T.

    1999-07-28

    The joint USNRC/CEC consequence uncertainty study was chartered after the development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS in the U.S. and COSYMA in Europe. Both the USNRC and CEC had a vested interest in expanding the knowledge base of the uncertainty associated with consequence modeling, and teamed up to co-sponsor a consequence uncertainty study. The information acquired from the study was expected to provide understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of current models as well as a basis for direction of future research. This paper looks at the elicitation process implemented in the joint study and discusses some of the uncertainty distributions provided by eight panels of experts from the U.S. and Europe that were convened to provide responses to the elicitation. The phenomenological areas addressed by the expert panels include atmospheric dispersion and deposition, deposited material and external doses, food chain, early health effects, late health effects and internal dosimetry.

  2. Paper electronics.

    PubMed

    Tobjörk, Daniel; Österbacka, Ronald

    2011-05-03

    Paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and a truly low-cost substrate. The use of paper substrates could be extended even further, if electronic applications would be applied next to or below the printed graphics. However, applying electronics on paper is challenging. The paper surface is not only very rough compared to plastics, but is also porous. While this is detrimental for most electronic devices manufactured directly onto paper substrates, there are also approaches that are compatible with the rough and absorptive paper surface. In this review, recent advances and possibilities of these approaches are evaluated and the limitations of paper electronics are discussed.

  3. Materials for future lithography (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seung Wook; Yang, Da; Dai, Junyan; Felix, Nelson; Bratton, Daniel; Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Kwark, Young-Je; Bravo-Vasquez, Juan-Pablo; Ober, Christopher K.; Cao, Heidi B.; Deng, Hai

    2005-05-01

    The demands for high resolution and issues of line edge roughness require a reconsideration of current resist design strategies. In particular, EUV lithography will provide an opportunity to examine new resist concepts including new elemental compositions and low molar mass resists or molecular resists. In the former case, resist compositions incorporating elements such as silicon and boron have been explored for EUV resists and will be described. In an example of the latter case, molecular glass resists have been designed using synthetic architectures in globular and core-arm forms ranging from one to multiple arms. Moreover, our studies include a series of ring and irregularly shaped small molecules modified to give imaging performance. These materials have been explored to improve line edge roughness (LER) compared to common polymer resists. Several examples of polymeric and molecular glass resists will be described. Several compositions showed high glass transition temperatures (Tg) of ~ 120°C and possessed no crystallinity as seen from XRD studies. Negative-tone molecular glass resists with a T-shaped phenolic core structure, 4-[4-[1,1-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl

  4. The future of medical diagnostics: review paper

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    While histopathology of excised tissue remains the gold standard for diagnosis, several new, non-invasive diagnostic techniques are being developed. They rely on physical and biochemical changes that precede and mirror malignant change within tissue. The basic principle involves simple optical techniques of tissue interrogation. Their accuracy, expressed as sensitivity and specificity, are reported in a number of studies suggests that they have a potential for cost effective, real-time, in situ diagnosis. We review the Third Scientific Meeting of the Head and Neck Optical Diagnostics Society held in Congress Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria on the 11th May 2011. For the first time the HNODS Annual Scientific Meeting was held in association with the International Photodynamic Association (IPA) and the European Platform for Photodynamic Medicine (EPPM). The aim was to enhance the interdisciplinary aspects of optical diagnostics and other photodynamic applications. The meeting included 2 sections: oral communication sessions running in parallel to the IPA programme and poster presentation sessions combined with the IPA and EPPM posters sessions. PMID:21861912

  5. Reactor Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    This response to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education suggests the IOM report is stimulating dental schools to undertake new initiatives. The author regrets, however, that the IOM study gave only superficial treatment to continuing education and the global responsibilities and…

  6. Torn Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1975-01-01

    Colored construction paper was used to develop an interesting, creative experience for elementary and high school students, who learned to appreciate and to understand the torn paper innovation in art. Examples of this tearing technique are found in works by Picasso, Motherwell, Vincenti, and Matisse. (Author/RK)

  7. Paper Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Invented in 1948, electric hand dryers now are widely available in public restrooms. Given the expense of making paper, the labor involved in keeping restrooms stocked, and the waste generated from disposing paper, the use of hand dryers is an alternative for school and university facility owners and managers. However, standing in the way of…

  8. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  9. The Economic Consequences of Absent Parents. JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marianne E.; Stevens, Ann Huff

    In recent years, the belief that marriage bestows large economic gains has generated enthusiasm for policy proposals that encourage the formation and continuation of two-parent families. This study examined the effects of family structure on economic resources, controlling for unobservable family background characteristics. Data were drawn from…

  10. Poster papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael

    In many scientific societies, presentation by poster has become a popular alternative to oral delivery for contributed papers at major meetings. This has not been so in the AGU. My purpose in this 'editorial' is to acquaint the AGU membership with some of the advantages of the poster paper as an occasional alternative to the 10-minute talk.The main advantage for the author of a poster paper is the opportunity for interaction with an interested audience for a 3 hour period. Significant feedback from the audience is a bonus that gives the author a better understanding of his own work and how to explain it, both orally and in print. Those of us who have tried poster presentation have found it to be a very positive experience.

  11. Should You Turn Yourself in? The Consequences of Environmental Self-Policing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Sarah L.

    2007-01-01

    Facilities that self-police under the Environmental Protection Agency's Audit Policy are eligible for reduced penalties on disclosed violations. This paper investigates whether self-policing has additional consequences; in particular, whether self-policing reduces future enforcement activity. Using data on U.S. hazardous waste enforcement and…

  12. Fueling the future

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, D.

    2000-01-01

    Forecasts can be made for a range of probabilities based on logical decisions by world leaders during the next century, and an Austrian think tank, the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), with the World Energy Council (WEC), has presented a range of six alternatives moving toward the next century. In all of those scenarios, the world will use a smaller percentage of oil than it does now, and in most, it will use a smaller percentage of gas, but the amounts of oil and gas will be greater than today's levels in most of those futures. In all six scenarios, population will grow from a 1990 level of 5.3 billion to 10.1 billion in 2050 and 11.7 billion 50 years later. And the paths for all six scenarios will be about the same through 2020, because of the long life of existing power plants and refineries. After that time, all scenarios move away from the existing strong reliance on oil and gas as a 53% owner of the total energy supply. To establish a baseline, coal had 24% of the market in 1990, and other sources had 23%. The three basic cases are: (A) a future of impressive technological improvements and consequent high economic growth; (B) a future with less ambitious, though perhaps more realistic, technological improvements, and consequently more intermediate economic growth; and (C) an ecologically driven future that includes substantial technological progress and unprecedented international co-operation centered explicitly on environmental protection and international equity. The paper discusses all three cases.

  13. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  14. Uncertainties in offsite consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.L.; Harper, F.T.; Lui, C.H.

    1996-03-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequences from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the European Commission began co-sponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables using a formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process. This paper focuses on the methods used in and results of this on-going joint effort.

  15. Paper justice.

    PubMed

    Culler, T A

    2000-01-01

    This article relates the case of two young girls who became pregnant as a result of rape and their efforts to exercise their rights to terminate the pregnancy. The first victim was a 12-year-old girl from Bolivia and the second was Paulina, a 13-year-old resident of Baja California, Mexico. Though abortion is illegal in both countries, in the case of rape the procedure is "unpunishable" in Bolivia and legal in Mexico. Despite these laws, the girls, their families and their advocates contend repeatedly with local government and Catholic Church officials on the issue. Only the first victim successfully exercised her right to terminate her pregnancy through the efforts of her family and the decision of Penal Judge Luis Ledezma. This paper also highlights the need for reforms in the abortion law in both countries.

  16. Comments on the Lonsdale Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkewitz, Thomas S.; Wakefield, Howard E.

    1975-01-01

    Questions the case for the use of futurism in education made in the Lonsdale paper; notes that futurism involves political as well as technological dimensions; and discusses both possibilities for doctoral dissertation research and the amount of concern actually shown by local school district officials for any kind of futures research. (JM)

  17. Ecological Consequences of Clonal Integration in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fenghong; Liu, Jian; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Clonal plants are widespread throughout the plant kingdom and dominate in diverse habitats. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity of environment is pervasive at multiple scales, even at scales relevant to individual plants. Clonal integration refers to resource translocation and information communication among the ramets of clonal plants. Due to clonal integration, clonal plant species possess a series of peculiar attributes: plasticity in response to local and non-local conditions, labor division with organ specialization for acquiring locally abundant resources, foraging behavior by selective placement of ramets in resource-rich microhabitats, and avoidance of intraclonal competition. Clonal integration has very profound ecological consequences for clonal plants. It allows them to efficiently cope with environmental heterogeneity, by alleviating local resource shortages, buffering environmental stresses and disturbances, influencing competitive ability, increasing invasiveness, and altering species composition and invasibility at the community level. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of research on the ecological consequences of plant clonal integration based on a large body of literature. We also attempt to propose perspectives for future research. PMID:27446093

  18. Silver paper: the future of health promotion and preventive actions, basic research, and clinical aspects of age-related disease--a report of the European Summit on Age-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Franco, Alain; Sommer, Pascal; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Jankowska, Ewa; Maggi, Adriana; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rys, Andrzej; Szczerbinska, Kataryna; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Milewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-01

    BACKGROUND. In September 2008, under the French Presidency of the European Union and with the support of the Polish Minister of Health, a European Summit on Age-Related Disease was organised inWroclaw (Poland). At this meeting, European politicians, gerontologists and geriatricians gathered to discuss a common approach to future challenges related to age-related disease. Politicians and decision-makers from the European Union and Ministers of Health and their deputies from many European countries raised the problems and difficulties to be tackled in a growing population with a high burden of disease, and asked scientists to write a consensus document with recommendations for future actions and decisions. Scientists and clinicians worked in parallel in three different groups, on health promotion and preventive actions, basic research in age-related disease, and clinical aspects of disease in older people. Beforehand, the format of the paper with recommendations was discussed, and it was finally agreed that, for a better understanding by decision- makers, it would be divided in two different columns: one with facts that were considered settled and agreed by most experts (under the heading We know), and a second with recommendations related to each fact (We recommend). No limit on the number of topics to be discussed was settled. After careful and detailed discussion in each group, which in most cases included the exact wording of each statement, chairpersons presented the results in a plenary session, and new input from all participants was received, until each of the statements and recommendations were accepted by a large majority. Areas with no consensus were excluded from the document. Immediately after the Summit, the chairpersons sent the document both to the main authors and to a list of experts (see footnote) who had made presentations at the summit and agreed to review and critically comment on the final document, which is presented below. As regards the

  19. The Educationally Disadvantaged: A National Crisis. The State Youth Initiatives Project. Working Paper #6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.

    Available data reviewed in this paper suggest that at least 30% of elementary and secondary school students in the United States are educationally disadvantaged, and that the proportion will rise rapidly in the future. When these youth reach adulthood, their poor educational foundations will have deleterious economic and social consequences,…

  20. "Diabetes Has Instant Consequences..."

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Diabetes has instant consequences…" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... want to chuck it all. But Diabetes has instant consequences. You learn to be responsible pretty quickly, ...

  1. Graphene Nanoribbons (GNRs) for Future Interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat

    2016-05-01

    Selecting and developing materials for the future devices require a sound understanding of design requirements. Miniaturization of electronic devices, as commonly expressed by Moore Law, has involved the integration level. Increase of the level has caused some consequences in the design and selection of materials for interconnection. The present paper deals with the challenge of materials design and selection beyond the nanoscale limit and the ability of traditional materials to cope with. One of the emerging materials, i.e. Graphene, will be reviewed with particular reference to its characteristics and potentials for future interconnection.

  2. Exploring the future with anticipatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulimowski, A. M. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theory of anticipatory networks that originates from anticipatory models of consequences in multicriteria decision problems. When making a decision, the decision maker takes into account the anticipated outcomes of each future decision problem linked by the causal relations with the present one. In a network of linked decision problems, the causal relations are defined between time-ordered nodes. The scenarios of future consequences of each decision are modeled by multiple vertices starting from an appropriate node. The network is supplemented by one or more relations of anticipation, or future feedback, which describe a situation where decision makers take into account the anticipated results of some future optimization problems while making their choice. So arises a multigraph of decision problems linked causally and by one or more anticipation relation, termed here the anticipatory network. We will present the properties of anticipatory networks and propose a method of reducing, transforming and using them to solve current decision problems. Furthermore, it will be shown that most anticipatory networks can be regarded as superanticipatory systems, i.e. systems that are anticipatory in the Rosen sense and contain a future model of at least one other anticipatory system. The anticipatory networks can also be applied to filter the set of future scenarios in a foresight exercise.

  3. One decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, A.; Landfermann, H.; Thieme, M.

    1996-11-01

    During the week 8-12 April 1996, an international conference summing up the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster after one decade took place in Vienna. Organizers were the European Commission (EC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (EC/IAEA/WHO 1996). One of the authors, A. Kaul, presented the outcome of the conference as given below to the IPRA 9 congress which was held in Vienna the following week. Two caveats have to be mentioned here: firstly, only facts actually reported and reviewed at the conference can be accounted for, and, secondly, according to the groundrules of the conference, the deadline for the background papers of the conference was the 9 February 1996, meaning that facts materializing after that time are not covered in this paper. The same applied to information given at the conference that was not properly reviewed and published. Reports, for example, given at the conference on an observed increase of thyroid cancers and leukemia among liquidators and of diabetes mellitus among children are not yet substantiated and are, therefore, not yet recognized as consequences. If corroborated, and it is obvious that all higher exposed groups should be closely monitored in the future, an update on the consequences will have to take this into account. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Compassion fatigue and nursing work: can we accurately capture the consequences of caring work?

    PubMed

    Sabo, Brenda M

    2006-06-01

    Health outcomes and, in particular, patient health outcomes have become a driving force within health-care delivery. Little emphasis has been placed on the potential health consequences for nurses providing care and caring within the health-care system. Compassion fatigue (or secondary traumatic stress) has emerged as a natural consequence of caring for clients who are in pain, suffering or traumatized. This paper sheds light on how nursing work might impact the health of nurses by exploring the concept of compassion fatigue. Limitations of current instruments to measure compassion fatigue are highlighted, and suggestions for future direction are presented.

  5. The Rayleigh Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas; Bederson, Benjamin

    2005-04-01

    The Third Lord Rayleigh (1842-1919), aka John William Strutt, was among the most stellar physicists of the Nineteenth Century, in both theory and experiment. He spent most of his mature years in his own laboratory, self-funded, on his family estate. One of the consequences was the fact that all of his papers remained at the estate upon his death. After his son's (Robert John Strutt, 1875-1947) death both their scientific papers ended up on the auction block. (Robert John was himself an atmospheric physicist.) Part of the Strutt collection went to the Burndy Library of the Dibner Institute at MIT, but most landed in the library at the US Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hansom AFB), purchased from the auctioneer out of library funds, for 9,000. The individual most responsible for preserving these papers was John N. Howard, the laboratory Chief Scientist, who was a founding editor of the journal Applied Optics. Recently the authors examined first hand the Rayleigh papers. Included in these are a complete set of his handwritten scientific notes, taken over the period 1862-1919, from the time he was a student at Trinity College, Cambridge until just months before his death. We will show a number of interesting examples from these notes, including his first identification of argon, as well as some other fascinating items from the collection.

  6. NEO Impact Consequences and Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulchignoni, Marcello; Barucci, M. Antonietta

    2005-04-01

    A short overview of main characteristics of the impactor population from which major terrestrial impacts originated is given. This population includes the objects that may hit the Earth in the future (potentially hazardous asteroids, PHAs). An impact frequency (a way of measuring the probability of a given collision) versus impact energy (an index of the impact consequences) relationship is described on the basis of this analysis. The current state of actions started planetwide by the most developed countries to face the threat represented by an asteroid collision with the Earth is summarized. The 'Torino scale', which assesses the risks connected with a discovery of a PHA in a simple and clear way is finally described. To cite this article: M. Fulchignoni, M.A. Barucci, C. R. Physique 6 (2005).

  7. Antecedents and Consequences of Envy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Geir; Glasø, Lars; Martinsen, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between individual attributes and envy, and to determine how envy may impact personal response variables in the workplace. To address these issues we apply Vecchio's theory on antecedents and consequences of envy (1995) as a theoretical framework. The present study relied on a cross-sectional measurement design. A total of 135 leaders and 772 followers employed in business organizations participated. SEM analysis shows that span of supervision serves as an important antecedent of envy, where span of supervision is significantly associated to envy via supportive leadership. Furthermore, envy seems to be indirectly and negatively related to self-esteem via distress and directly related to social loafing. The implications of these findings are discussed, and suggestions for future research are outlined.

  8. Papers in Phonology. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Six working papers on phonology, primarily concerning less commonly taught languages, are presented are in this volume. Titles include: "Non-Uniqueness Condition and the Segmentation of the Chinese Syllable" (Benjamin Ao); "Theoretical Consequences of Metathesis in Maltese" (Elizabeth Hume); "Cs and Vs or Moras: The Case…

  9. FutureCoast: "Listen to your futures"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Eklund, K.; Thacher, S.; Orlove, B. S.; Diane Stovall-Soto, G.; Brunacini, J.; Hernandez, T.

    2014-12-01

    Two science-arts approaches are emerging as effective means to convey "futurethinking" to learners: systems gaming and experiential futures. FutureCoast exemplifies the latter: by engaging participants with voicemails supposedly leaking from the cloud of possible futures, the storymaking game frames the complexities of climate science in relatable contexts. Because participants make the voicemails themselves, FutureCoast opens up creative ways for people to think about possibly climate-changed futures and personal ways to talk about them. FutureCoast is a project of the PoLAR Partnership with a target audience of informal adult learners primarily reached via mobile devices and online platforms. Scientists increasingly use scenarios and storylines as ways to explore the implications of environmental change and societal choices. Stories help people make connections across experiences and disciplines and link large-scale events to personal consequences. By making the future seem real today, FutureCoast's framework helps people visualize and plan for future climate changes. The voicemails contributed to FutureCoast are spread through the game's intended timeframe (2020 through 2065). Based on initial content analysis of voicemail text, common themes include ecosystems and landscapes, weather, technology, societal issues, governance and policy. Other issues somewhat less frequently discussed include security, food, industry and business, health, energy, infrastructure, water, economy, and migration. Further voicemail analysis is examining: temporal dimensions (salient time frames, short vs. long term issues, intergenerational, etc.), content (adaptation vs. mitigation, challenges vs. opportunities, etc.), and emotion (hopeful, resigned, etc. and overall emotional context). FutureCoast also engaged audiences through facilitated in-person experiences, geocaching events, and social media (Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube). Analysis of the project suggests story

  10. S.E.E.ing the Future: Science, Engineering and Education. Commentary from the Scientific Grassroots. A White Paper on the Issues and Need for Public Funding of Basic Science and Engineering Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jemison, Mae C., Ed.

    This document reports on the results of an ad hoc workshop called "S.E.E.ing the Future: Science Engineering and Education" Held at Dartmouth College in November of 2000 and sponsored by Dartmouth, the National Science Foundation, the Dow Chemical Company, and Science Service of Washington, DC. This transdisciplinary conference was one of a series…

  11. From Chaos to Order and Back? A Revisionist Reflection on the California Master Plan for Higher Education@50 and Thoughts about Its Future. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.7.10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2010-01-01

    In 1960, California developed a "master plan" for its already famed public higher education system. It was and continues to be arguably the single most influential effort to plan the future of a system of higher education in the annals of American higher education. Despite popular belief, however, the California Master Plan for Higher…

  12. Slug flow: Occurrence, consequences, and prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.J.; Wood, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    BP Exploration currently has an interest in hundreds of kilometers of operating multiphase flowlines. Most of the company`s proposed field developments also involve multiphase flowlines. A large number of these do or will experience slug flow, either as the normal flow regime, or as a result of transient behavior. Data on flow regime and slug flow characteristics have been collected from many lines over the past 8 years. Information on slug characteristics from a number of different systems is presented in this paper, including velocity, length and holdup. Some unfavorable consequences of slug flow on both process performance and system integrity are highlighted, including plant shutdowns and mechanical damage. The need to be able to predict slug flow for the design of future systems, and to advise the operators of existing systems, remains a high priority for R and D activities, as ever longer and more complex multiphase systems are proposed. BP`s latest slug frequency method is described, followed by guidelines for pipework layout, and comments on current R and D on corrosion in multiphase flow.

  13. Intuitions, principles and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, A

    2001-01-01

    Some approaches to the assessment of moral intuitions are discussed. The controlled ethical trial isolates a moral issue from confounding factors and thereby clarifies what a person's intuition actually is. Casuistic reasoning from situations, where intuitions are clear, suggests or modifies principles, which can then help to make decisions in situations where intuitions are unclear. When intuitions are defended by a supporting principle, that principle can be tested by finding extreme cases, in which it is counterintuitive to follow the principle. An approach to the resolution of conflict between valid moral principles, specifically the utilitarian and justice principles, is considered. It is argued that even those who justify intuitions by a priori principles are often obliged to modify or support their principles by resort to the consideration of consequences. Key Words: Intuitions • principles • consequences • utilitarianism PMID:11233371

  14. Introduction to Jebsen's paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.

    2005-12-01

    Brief comment on a 1921 paper by Jebsen. This work provides the first published proof of “Birkhoff's” theorem. The author, who seems to have been an undergraduate at the time (tragically, he died shortly afterwards) understood (as did many others) that Einstein's equations reduced considerably in a “minimal,” namely two-component, metric in a simple gauge such as Schwarzschild's; a good part of the paper is devoted to deriving this interval form. The originality of his work lies instead in showing that time-independence of the exterior Schwarzschild solution need not be assumed, but is a consequence of Einstein's equations. From a modern perspective, it is a bit surprising that this result was not found earlier: for example, Einstein studied the spherical solution in the linearized theory, whose kinship to Maxwell's might have suggested the obvious parallel to charge conservation. In current language, the theorem states gauge theories forbid monopole radiation because they have no helicity zero modes. Editor's note: Further references to early derivations of “Birkhoff's” theorem can be found in [1] and [2] while [3] is one of the few papers that calls it “Jebsen-Birkhoff.” Since few's was written a more detailed biography of Jebsen has now appeared: gr-qc/0508163, by Johausen & Ravulal. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY04-00609

  15. Future generations, environmental ethics, and global environmental change

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.E.

    1994-12-31

    The elements of a methodology to be employed by the global community to investigate the consequences of global environmental change upon future generations and global ecosystems are outlined in this paper. The methodology is comprised of two major components: A possible future worlds model; and a formal, citizen-oriented process to judge whether the possible future worlds potentially inheritable by future generations meet obligational standards. A broad array of descriptors of future worlds can be encompassed within this framework, including survival of ecosystems and other species and satisfaction of human concerns. The methodology expresses fundamental psychological motivations and human myths journey, renewal, mother earth, and being-in-nature-and incorporates several viewpoints on obligations to future generations-maintaining options, fairness, humility, and the cause of humanity. The methodology overcomes several severe drawbacks of the economic-based methods most commonly used for global environmental policy analysis.

  16. High Consequence System Surety. Issue 1

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, G.T.

    1994-07-11

    High Consequence System Surety is an ongoing project at Sandia National Laboratories. This project pulls together a multi- disciplinary team to integrate the elements of surety into an encompassing process. The surety process will be augmented and validated by applying it to an automated system handling a critical nuclear weapon component at the Mason & Hanger Pantex Plant. This paper presents the development to date of an integrated, high consequence surety process.

  17. Making Geographical Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, John

    2015-01-01

    Although there are surprisingly few academic books about geography with the term "future" or "futures" in their titles, this paper indicates that for much of the twentieth century geographers contributed to important discussions about the shape of worlds to come. The paper offers a review of these debates within Anglo-American…

  18. The consequences of bilharziasis

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, D. M.; Bradley, D. J.

    1966-01-01

    A survey of the prevalence of bilharsiasis and its consequences in north-west Tanzania showed that, although Schistosoma mansoni infections were light and had little effect on public health, S. haematobium, rampant in the area, was giving rise to hydronephrosis, ureteric lesions or non-functioning kidneys in more than 20% of the child population and in over 10% of the adults. These figures, from an unselected community sample, were higher than had been expected; in addition, evidence of a significant mortality of young men from this cause was obtained. S. haematobium in Tanzania is therefore of considerable public health importance. PMID:5296234

  19. Evolution, consequences and future of plant and animal domestication.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Jared

    2002-08-08

    Domestication interests us as the most momentous change in Holocene human history. Why did it operate on so few wild species, in so few geographic areas? Why did people adopt it at all, why did they adopt it when they did, and how did it spread? The answers to these questions determined the remaking of the modern world, as farmers spread at the expense of hunter-gatherers and of other farmers.

  20. Unintended Consequences: An Uncertain Future for Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    While most in the academic community know about the attempt to rein in the for-profits, few are aware of its collateral damage. In October, the Department of Education (DOE) issued its Program Integrity Rules, intended to protect federal funds especially from those for-profit institutions with high student loan default rates. Well-intentioned…

  1. USAWC (US Army War College) Military Studies Program Paper. An Investigation of the Value of Taiwan To Future United States Relations with the People’s Republic of China.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-18

    instrum-ent of power in future U.S.- PRC relations. During the 1949-1978 timeframe, U.S.-PRC relations ran the gamut from armed conflict in the Korean...PRC relations ran the gamut from armed conflict in the Korean War to diplomatic relations declared in 1978. The first thawing in relations occurred...PRC relations. US-PRC relations during the 1949-1978 timeframe ran the gamut frou armed conflict during the Korean War to diplomatic recognition. With

  2. Introduction: consequences of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Noji, Eric K

    2003-01-01

    Recent acts of terrorism have ranged from the dissemination of anthrax spores to intentional contamination of food to the release of chemical weapons to suicide attacks using explosives. The prediction of such events is difficult, if not impossible. The recent attacks that have generated massive numbers of injured and dead may signal the crossing of a new threshold from multi-casualty events to the use of weapons of mass destruction. Consequently, the medical and healthcare infrastructure must be able to prevent and treat illness and injury resulting from such events. Thus, a first step in improving the preparation for and responses to such events must include a sustained commitment to training physicians, nurses, identification specialists, pathologists, and other first responders. The rapid spread of SARS gives reason to believe that the distribution of such agents has potential advantages over the use of other weapons. Investments in the public health and healthcare systems provide the best defense against terrorism.

  3. Adverse health consequences of the Iraq War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2013-03-16

    The adverse health consequences of the Iraq War (2003-11) were profound. We conclude that at least 116,903 Iraqi non-combatants and more than 4800 coalition military personnel died over the 8-year course. Many Iraqi civilians were injured or became ill because of damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of the country, and about 5 million were displaced. More than 31,000 US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological disorders and their concomitant psychosocial problems. Many family members of military personnel had psychological problems. Further review of the adverse health consequences of this war could help to minimise the adverse health consequences of, and help to prevent, future wars.

  4. The Future of Libraries in Human Communication: Abstracts and Fulltext Documents of Papers and Demos Given at the [International Association of Technological University Libraries] IATUL Conference (Chania, Greece, May 17-21, 1999). Volume 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association of Technological Univ. Libraries, Gothenburg (Sweden).

    This proceedings of the IATUL 1999 conference of the contains the following papers: "From Industry to Higher Education and Libraries: Building the Fast Response Library" (A. S. Apostolou & C. H. Skiadas); "Managing the Learning Agenda in a Converged Service Environment" (Richard Biddiscombe); "Management of Electronic Information" (Michael…

  5. From Paper to Electron

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kent R.

    2000-01-01

    The Internet represents a different type of technology for publishers of scientific, technical, and medical journals. It is not a technology that sustains current markets and creates new efficiencies but is, rather, a disruptive technology that could radically alter market forces, profit expectations, and business models. This paper is a translation and amplification of the research done in this area, applied to a large-circulation new science journal, Pediatrics. The findings suggest that the journal of the future will be electronic, have a less volatile cost structure, be supported more by services than by content, be less able to rely on subscription revenues, and abandon certain elements of current value networks. It also provides a possible framework for other publishers to use to evaluate their own journals relative to this disruptive technology. PMID:10833160

  6. Evaluation of Economic and Social Consequences of Cooperative Extension Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Science and Education Administration.

    This report describes the cooperative extension system and evaluates the consequences of its educational programs. An executive summary provides an overview of the contents: background, highlights of findings related to consequences, interpretations, and implications for the future. Following an introduction, chapter 2 discusses extension in terms…

  7. Nanotechnology in paper electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Österbacka, Professor Ronald; Han, Jin-Woo, Dr

    2014-03-01

    The ability to put cutting edge technology on paper—not in words but in a working physical form—has been attracting an increasing number of researchers over the past decade. Paper has many advantages that make it attractive for flexible electronics: it is relatively environmentally benign; it is renewable; it can be recycled; it is light weight; production processes for paper are well advanced; and it is inexpensive. This special issue, with guest editors Ronald Österbacka from Åbo Akademi University in Finland and Jin-Woo Han from the NASA AMES Research Center, features some of the latest in paper electronics research, including developments towards applications in displays, sensing and alternative energy sources, as well as fundamental studies to further our understanding of how paper can be most effectively used in electronics. As Andrew Steckl and colleagues in the US point out, 'Cellulose-based paper substrates were implemented as an electronic substrate as early as 1969, with most advancement occurring in the past decade largely due to technology improvements in thin film deposition and organic materials' [1, 2]. They report a detailed comparison between paper, standard liquid crystal display rigid glass and flexible glass for hosting pentacene organic thin film transistors, and obtain promising results for future paper-based devices. As most meaningful electronic devices rely on transistors to function, transistors feature quite prominently in this special issue. Rodrigo Martins and colleagues in France and Portugal study the effect of fibre type, structure and dimension on paper-based transistors and reveal further insights into how paper properties affect device performance [3]. Qing Wan and colleagues in China bring the state of the art in transistor technology to paper substrates [4], fabricating indium-zinc-oxide (IZO)-based protonic/electronic hybrid thin film transistors on paper and showing that they can be used as artificial synapses. Like the

  8. Aviation Safety Concerns for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E.; Roelen, Alfred L. C.; den Hertog, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    The Future Aviation Safety Team (FAST) is a multidisciplinary international group of aviation professionals that was established to identify possible future aviation safety hazards. The principle was adopted that future hazards are undesirable consequences of changes, and a primary activity of FAST became identification and prioritization of possible future changes affecting aviation. Since 2004, FAST has been maintaining a catalogue of "Areas of Change" (AoC) that could potentially influence aviation safety. The horizon for such changes is between 5 to 20 years. In this context, changes must be understood as broadly as possible. An AoC is a description of the change, not an identification of the hazards that result from the change. An ex-post analysis of the AoCs identified in 2004 demonstrates that changes catalogued many years previous were directly implicated in the majority of fatal aviation accidents over the past ten years. This paper presents an overview of the current content of the AoC catalogue and a subsequent discussion of aviation safety concerns related to these possible changes. Interactions among these future changes may weaken critical functions that must be maintained to ensure safe operations. Safety assessments that do not appreciate or reflect the consequences of significant interaction complexity will not be fully informative and can lead to inappropriate trade-offs and increases in other risks. The FAST strongly encourages a system-wide approach to safety risk assessment across the global aviation system, not just within the domain for which future technologies or operational concepts are being considered. The FAST advocates the use of the "Areas of Change" concept, considering that several possible future phenomena may interact with a technology or operational concept under study producing unanticipated hazards.

  9. Futures Conditional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, Robert

    The readings presented here are designed to help the reader perceive the future more vividly. Part one of the book suggests the various ways in which the future can be seen; it includes science fiction and the views of various analysts as to what the future holds. Part two collects printed materials about the future from various sources, including…

  10. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  11. [Rodenticide resistance and consequences].

    PubMed

    Esther, A; Endepols, S; Freise, J; Klemann, N; Runge, M; Pelz, H-J

    2014-05-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, such as warfarin was first described in 1958. Polymorphisms in the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) gene and respective substitutions of amino acids in the VKOR enzyme are the major cause for rodenticide resistance. Resistant Norway rats in Germany are characterized by the Tyr139Cys genotype, which is spread throughout the northwest of the country. Resistant house mice with the VKOR variants Tyr139Cys, Leu128Ser and Arg12Trp/Ala26Ser/Ala48Thr/Arg61Leu (spretus type) are distributed over a number of locations in Germany. Resistance can reduce management attempts with consequences for stored product protection, hygiene and animal health. Anticoagulants of the first generation (warfarin, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl) as well as bromadiolone and difenacoum are not an option for the control of resistant Norway rats. The same applies for house mice whereby the tolerance to compounds can be different between local incidences. Due to the higher toxicity and tendency to persist, the most potent anticoagulant rodenticides brodifacoum, flocoumafen and difethialone should be applied but only where resistance is known. In other cases less toxic anticoagulants should be preferred for rodent management in order to mitigate environmental risks. Resistance effects of further VKOR polymorphisms and their combinations, the spread of resistant rats and conditions supporting and reducing resistance should be investigated in order to improve resistance management strategies.

  12. Future talk in later life.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Isabella; Gomes, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    This article focuses on the relevance that the dimension of the future has for promoting healthy and active aging. Older people generally have difficulties in talking about the future and when they do they generally express very negative perspectives on it. The data analyzed in this paper are part of an on-going interdisciplinary research project: "Aging, poverty and social exclusion: an interdisciplinary study on innovative support services" (https://apseclunl.wordpress.com/). The project aims at documenting good practices in social intervention with older people who are at risk of exclusion. This study describes and critically discusses an activity carried out in Portugal among older women in a poor area in the suburb of Lisbon entitled "self-awareness workshop on the future". Through a detailed discourse analysis within an ethnomethodological framework the study shows age membership categorizations in use and categorization processes, examining the workshop interaction. In particular, the article describes how the psychologist works at deconstructing and problematizing the negative connotations related to age membership categories. Taking into consideration the interactionally constructed nature of aging and the material consequences that different attitudes towards aging can imply is very important in particular in relation to the provision of services to older people.

  13. The future of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, R.G. )

    1989-01-01

    In spite of a growing awareness of the future consequences of rising petroleum imports, oil shale has not become an integral element of federal energy policy. This paper discusses how recent actions by the private sector and regional governments have begun to reverse opinions. First, published estimates by industry have refuted the notion that shale oil will cost $60 to $80 per barrel. Second, state and local governments in the West are supporting planned development. In the early 1980's, there was extreme resistance to the mammoth development proposed at the time. Jobs and economic development are now very important. Third environmental regulations have been adopted which give the private sector and government a better framework from which to interact.

  14. The Consequences of Employee Commitment, Turnover, and Absenteeism: An Exploratory Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    of employee attachment in organizations. The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify the consequences that may follow from employee ... commitment , turnover, and absenteeism. In classifying consequences, three important distinctions are drawn. First, the consequences are examined separately

  15. Retrenchment Policies and Their Organizational Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Michael A.

    This paper focuses on the organizational consequences of retrenchment policies emphasizing efficiency (selective cuts to insure long-term survival) and equity (across the board actions). The effectiveness of each of these policies was tested on 59 cases of school district enrollment decline over a 10-year period by means of a…

  16. College students' evaluations of alcohol consequences as positive and negative.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Megan E; Maggs, Jennifer L

    2011-12-01

    Alcohol expectancy, motivation, and consequences measures assume a known valence of 'positive' and 'negative' outcomes. However, different individuals may rate the same consequences of alcohol use as good or bad. The current study examines the extent to which: (a) college students rate researcher-defined positive consequences as good and researcher-defined negative consequences as bad, and (b) these evaluations predict alcohol use and problems after controlling for previous use. In longitudinal self-reports via web-surveys across the first three semesters of college, students (N=600; 54% women) reported their alcohol use and problems, experienced consequences, and evaluations of those consequences. Contrary to the generally-accepted valence of positive consequences, Fun/Social consequences were viewed as neutral or negative by 22% (having more fun) to 73% (relieving boredom) of participants. Over half of participants evaluated each of the Relaxation, Sex, and Image consequences items as neutral or negative. Consistent with the generally-accepted valence of negative consequences, Physical/Behavioral consequences were viewed by the majority as negative, although 11% (getting in trouble with police/authorities) to 34% (doing/saying something embarrassing) of students rated these consequences as neutral or positive. Independent of levels of previous drinking, more positive evaluations of Fun/Social consequences prospectively predicted frequency, quantity, and maximum drinks. Less negative evaluations of Physical/Behavioral consequences predicted more alcohol problems. There is variation in the evaluations of consequences among college students, and understanding characteristics of those who view consequences as positive or negative may have implications for future alcohol-related behaviors and problems.

  17. The Future College Executive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA.

    This conference report examines various problems facing university administrators and discusses the future role of the executive in American colleges and universities. Conference papers concern the future college executive; efficiency, accountability and the college executive; administrative concerns; and the rights of college administrators. (MJM)

  18. Predicting Future Citation Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Quentin L.

    2003-01-01

    Develops the theory for a stochastic model for the citation process in the presence of obsolescence to predict the future citation pattern of individual papers in a collection. Shows that the expected number of future citations is a linear function of the current number, interpreted as an example of a success-breeds-success phenomenon. (Author/LRW)

  19. System Safety and the Unintended Consequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The analysis and identification of risks often result in design changes or modification of operational steps. This paper identifies the potential of unintended consequences as an over-looked result of these changes. Examples of societal changes such as prohibition, regulatory changes including mandating lifeboats on passenger ships, and engineering proposals or design changes to automobiles and spaceflight hardware are used to demonstrate that the System Safety Engineer must be cognizant of the potential for unintended consequences as a result of an analysis. Conclusions of the report indicate the need for additional foresight and consideration of the potential effects of analysis-driven design, processing changes, and/or operational modifications.

  20. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  1. Economic Consequences Of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlávik, János; Füle, Miklós

    2009-07-01

    Even though the climate conflict resulting from green houses gases (GHG) emissions was evident by the Nineties and the well-known agreements made, their enforcement is more difficult than that of other environmental agreements. That is because measures to reduce GHG emissions interfere with the heart of the economy and the market: energy (in a broader sense than the energy sector as defined by statistics) and economical growth. Analyzing the environmental policy responses to climate change the conclusion is that GHG emission reduction can only be achieved through intensive environmental policy. While extensive environmental protection complements production horizontally, intensive environmental protection integrates into production and the environment vertically. The latter eliminates the source of the pollution, preventing damage. It utilizes the biochemical processes and self-purification of the natural environment as well as technical development which not only aims to produce state-of-the-art goods, but to make production more environmentally friendly, securing a desired environmental state. While in extensive environmental protection the intervention comes from the outside for creating environmental balance, in intensive environmental protection the system recreates this balance itself. Instead of dealing with the consequences and the polluter pays principle, the emphasis is on prevention. It is important to emphasize that climate strategy decisions have complex effects regarding the aspects of sustainability (economical, social, ecological). Therefore, all decisions are political. At present, and in the near future, market economy decisions have little to do with sustainability values under normal circumstances. Taking social and ecological interests into consideration can only be successful through strategic political aims.

  2. The Migrant Papers. Behavorial Science Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Ira E.

    Four papers pertaining to health services for East Coast migrant workers are included in this publication. These papers are: (1) "The Crew Leader as a Broker with Implications for Health Service Delivery," (2) "Migrant Health Project with Implications for Health Service Delivery," (3) "Planned Change in a Migrant Health…

  3. Proceedings of the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Many organizations face high consequence safety situations where unwanted stimuli due to accidents, catastrophes, or inadvertent human actions can cause disasters. In order to improve interaction among such organizations and to build on each others` experience, preventive approaches, and assessment techniques, the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium was held July 12--14, 1994 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The symposium was conceived by Dick Schwoebel, Director of the SNL Surety Assessment Center. Stan Spray, Manager of the SNL System Studies Department, planned strategy and made many of the decisions necessary to bring the concept to fruition on a short time scale. Angela Campos and about 60 people worked on the nearly limitless implementation and administrative details. The initial symposium (future symposia are planned) was structured around 21 plenary presentations in five methodology-oriented sessions, along with a welcome address, a keynote address, and a banquet address. Poster papers addressing the individual session themes were available before and after the plenary sessions and during breaks.

  4. The Consequence of Consequence: Motivation, Anxiety, and Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Lisa F.; Smith, Jeffrey K.

    1995-01-01

    The relationships of test consequence, motivation, anxiety, and performance were studied with 158 undergraduates taking a child development course. Results indicated that test consequence (grade or no grade) had a strong influence on motivation and a modest influence on performance. Motivation and anxiety had opposite effects on performance. (SLD)

  5. Adverse consequences of immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic uses of immunostimulatory agents are generally in the treatments of infections or cancer. The traditional example of vaccination is one form of immunostimulation used in the prevention of pathogenic infections or cancer (e.g., human papillomavirus vaccine). Recombinant cytokines are increasingly used to stimulate immune system function. For example, interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) and interleukin (IL)-2 have been used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infection and metastatic melanoma, respectively. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies are used to target malignant cells for elimination via antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mechanisms or apoptosis, including the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-CD56 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, and the anti-erb2 receptor antibody trastuzumab used in the treatment of breast cancer. Finally, immunostimulation may develop via modulation of pathways involved in immune system regulation. For example, the anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody TGN1412 was developed as an agonist of regulatory T-cells for treatment of T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases or leukemias. A panel was convened to discuss potential toxicities associated with immunostimulation. At the Immunotoxicology IV meeting in 2006, a panel, moderated by Dr. Robert House (Dynport Vaccine Co., Frederick, MD), included Drs. Gary Burleson (Burleson Research Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, NC), Kenneth Hastings (US FDA, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research [CDER], Rockville, MD), Barbara Mounho (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA), Rafael Ponce (ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA), Mark Wing (Huntington Life Sciences, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom), Lauren Black (Navigators Consulting, Sparks, NV) and Anne Pilaro (US FDA, CDER, Rockville, MD). This paper reviews the major identified toxicities associated with immunostimulation, including the acute phase response, cell and tissue abnormalities/injury, cytokine

  6. [Climate changes, floods, and health consequences].

    PubMed

    Michelozzi, Paola; de' Donato, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    In the European Region, floods are the most common natural disaster, causing extensive damage and disruption. In Italy, it has been estimated that over 68% of municipalities are at high hydrogeological risk and with the recent intense rainfall events local populations have been facing severe disruptions. The health consequences of floods are wide ranging and are dependent upon the vulnerability of the environment and the local population. Health effects can be a direct or indirect consequence of flooding. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, heart attacks, injuries and hypothermia. The indirect effects include, injuries and infections, water-borne infectious disease, mental health problems, respiratory disease and allergies in both the medium and long term after a flood. Future efforts should be addressed to integrate health preparedness and prevention measures into emergency flood plans and hydrological warning systems.

  7. Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongxing; Mackenzie, Neil C. W.; Farquharson, Colin; MacRae, Vicky E.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification has severe clinical consequences and is considered an accurate predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Previously vascular calcification was thought to be a passive process which involved the deposition of calcium and phosphate in arteries and cardiac valves. However, recent studies have shown that vascular calcification is a highly regulated, cell-mediated process similar to bone formation. In this article, we outline the current understanding of key mechanisms governing vascular calcification and highlight the clinical consequences. By understanding better the molecular pathways and genetic circuitry responsible for the pathological mineralization process novel drug targets may be identified and exploited to combat and reduce the detrimental effects of vascular calcification on human health. PMID:22888324

  8. Future Orientation: A Construct with Implications for Adolescent Health and Wellbeing

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom Johnson, Sarah; Blum, Robert W; Cheng, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-disciplinary research has supported a relationship between adolescent future orientation (the ability to set future goals and plans) and positive adolescent health and development outcomes. Many preventive strategies—for example contracepting, exercising—are based on taking actions in the present to avoid unwanted or negative future consequences. However, research has been hampered by unclear and often divergent conceptualizations of the future orientation construct. The present paper aims to integrate previous conceptual and operational definitions into a conceptual framework that can inform programs and services for youth and efforts to evaluate future orientation as a target for intervention. Recommendations focus on furthering the study of the construct through measurement synthesis as well as studies of the normative development of future orientation. Also suggested is the need to pair environmental intervention strategies with individual level efforts to improve future orientation in order to maximize benefits. PMID:24523304

  9. The Consequences of School Desegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Christine H., Ed.; Hawley, Willis D., Ed.

    Materials on a variety of subjects related to school desegregation are collected in this book. Chapter 1 discusses assumptions about the overall consequences of desegregation. Chapters 2 to 5 synthesize the findings of existing research on the consequences of school desegregation for children and communities. Finally, Chapter 6 describes…

  10. Consequences of Diffusion of Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Kevin F.

    1979-01-01

    The article traces evolution of diffusion theory; illustrates undesirable consequences in a cross-cultural setting, reviews criticisms of several scholars; considers distributional effects and unanticipated consequences for potential ameliorative impact on diffusion theory; and codifies these factors into a framework for research into consequences…

  11. Strong Medicine and Unintended Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkdoll, Gerald L.

    1992-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence from interviews with some program managers gives evidence that unintended negative consequences of evaluations are more than a theoretical concern; they are a real problem deserving an evaluator's attention and energy. Negative consequences usually include: (1) wasted resources; (2) demotivation; and (3) program destruction and…

  12. Space Radiation and its Associated Health Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    During space travel, astronauts are exposed to energetic particles of a complex composition and energy distribution. For the same amount of absorbed dose, these particles can be much more effective than X- or gamma rays in the induction of biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts, and cancer induction. Several of the biological consequences of space radiation exposure have already been observed in astronauts. This presentation will introduce the space radiation environment and discuss its associated health risks. Accurate assessment of the radiation risks and development of respective countermeasures are essential for the success of future exploration missions to the Moon and Mars.

  13. Electricity from Sunlight: The Future of Photovoltaics. Worldwatch Paper 52.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Christopher

    Solar photovoltaic cells have been called the ultimate energy technology, environmentally benign and without moving parts, solar cells directly convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic energy conversion is fundamentally different from all other forms of electricity generation. Without turbines, generators or other mechanical equipment, it…

  14. The Theory Paper: What Is the Future of Mobile Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traxler, John; Koole, Marguerite

    2014-01-01

    Mobile learning is often described as ubiquitous, pervasive, accessible, and transparent. It has been seen as providing opportunities for those who could not previously cross existing digital divides-though it of course may create new ones. Yet, some work in the field lacks sufficient and appropriate grounding in theory to effectively address such…

  15. Human Factors Technologies: Past Promises, Future Issues. Final Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alluisi, Earl A.

    This discussion of the major issues confronting the human factors profession begins by pointing out that the concepts of systems and system design are central to the roles and functions of the human factors specialist. Three related disciplines--human factors engineering, ergonomics, and human skilled performance--are briefly described, and the…

  16. ASAS Centennial Paper: Future research in physiology and endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Seidel, G E

    2009-01-01

    Over the next quarter century in North America, the following eventualities are likely for physiology and endocrinology research with agricultural animals. 1) Total funding adjusted for inflation will change little but will come less from public sources, and most of that will be in the context of human health. Much of the privately funded research will be herd specific and remain proprietary. 2) The numbers of MS, PhD, and postdoctoral students probably will decrease, but research in the context of credentialing will remain important. 3) Resources such as expanded databases in genomics and proteomics, and remarkable new tools such as small inhibitory RNA will continue to become available, likely at a faster rate than in the previous 25 yr. 4) The huge amounts of data from production agriculture will make agricultural animals ideal models for some kinds of basic research, such as studying fetal programming, resulting in synergy with more applied research. Most of these experimental animals will be in private production herds and flocks, even when work is publicly funded. 5) The trend toward more interdisciplinary research will continue, especially considering interactions among reproduction, health, nutrition, selective breeding, management factors, and societal concerns; reductionist research probing deeper into cellular and molecular mechanisms will remain important, as will whole-animal approaches. 6) Agricultural animals are a product of evolution plus selective breeding. Insights drawn from the former will aid progress in the latter. One focus of research in physiology and endocrinology will be understanding heterosis, inbreeding depression, and epigenetic effects as it becomes possible to manipulate and identify the allelic structure of individual animals. 7) Additional insightful concepts will evolve that will simplify thinking in some respects, such as the maternal to embryonic shift in transcribed RNA in early embryos; however, animal biology will turn out to be even more complex than most of us currently imagine.

  17. Futurism: Framework for Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keroack, Elizabeth Carros; Marquis, Leah Keating

    Noting that the study of the future has been neglected within the language arts framework, this paper proposes a curriculum unit that uses such study as a vehicle to develop composition skills. The paper provides the following information: the general objectives of the unit; evaluation methods; general humanistic themes to be studied; materials;…

  18. Genealogical Trees of Scientific Papers.

    PubMed

    Waumans, Michaël Charles; Bersini, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Many results have been obtained when studying scientific papers citations databases in a network perspective. Articles can be ranked according to their current in-degree and their future popularity or citation counts can even be predicted. The dynamical properties of such networks and the observation of the time evolution of their nodes started more recently. This work adopts an evolutionary perspective and proposes an original algorithm for the construction of genealogical trees of scientific papers on the basis of their citation count evolution in time. The fitness of a paper now amounts to its in-degree growing trend and a "dying" paper will suddenly see this trend declining in time. It will give birth and be taken over by some of its most prevalent citing "offspring". Practically, this might be used to trace the successive published milestones of a research field.

  19. Genealogical Trees of Scientific Papers

    PubMed Central

    Waumans, Michaël Charles; Bersini, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Many results have been obtained when studying scientific papers citations databases in a network perspective. Articles can be ranked according to their current in-degree and their future popularity or citation counts can even be predicted. The dynamical properties of such networks and the observation of the time evolution of their nodes started more recently. This work adopts an evolutionary perspective and proposes an original algorithm for the construction of genealogical trees of scientific papers on the basis of their citation count evolution in time. The fitness of a paper now amounts to its in-degree growing trend and a “dying” paper will suddenly see this trend declining in time. It will give birth and be taken over by some of its most prevalent citing “offspring”. Practically, this might be used to trace the successive published milestones of a research field. PMID:26954677

  20. Campus Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dator, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Most people in the United States, no matter how extensive their education, have never had a course dealing primarily with the future. But they have had at least one course, and probably many courses, dealing with the past. Most also have never questioned why the past is so emphasized in formal education while the future--the only arena over which…

  1. Consequence Prioritization Process for Potential High Consequence Events (HCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Sarah G.

    2016-10-31

    This document describes the process for Consequence Prioritization, the first phase of the Consequence-Driven Cyber-Informed Engineering (CCE) framework. The primary goal of Consequence Prioritization is to identify potential disruptive events that would significantly inhibit an organization’s ability to provide the critical services and functions deemed fundamental to their business mission. These disruptive events, defined as High Consequence Events (HCE), include both events that have occurred or could be realized through an attack of critical infrastructure owner assets. While other efforts have been initiated to identify and mitigate disruptive events at the national security level, such as Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-41), this process is intended to be used by individual organizations to evaluate events that fall below the threshold for a national security. Described another way, Consequence Prioritization considers threats greater than those addressable by standard cyber-hygiene and includes the consideration of events that go beyond a traditional continuity of operations (COOP) perspective. Finally, Consequence Prioritization is most successful when organizations adopt a multi-disciplinary approach, engaging both cyber security and engineering expertise, as in-depth engineering perspectives are required to recognize and characterize and mitigate HCEs. Figure 1 provides a high-level overview of the prioritization process.

  2. Student Part-Time Employment: Characteristics and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robotham, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to examine the consequences of students engaging in part-time employment during their studies. It reports the results of a survey of part-time employment among university students. The research examined the possible consequences of combining part-time employment with full-time study, with particular reference to…

  3. Positive consequences of SETI before detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tough, A.

    Even before a signal is detected, six positive consequences will result from the scientific search for extraterrestrial intelligence, usually called SETI. (1) Humanity's self-image: SETI has enlarged our view of ourselves and enhanced our sense of meaning. Increasingly, we feel a kinship with the civilizations whose signals we are trying to detect. (2) A fresh perspective: SETI forces us to think about how extraterrestrials might perceive us. This gives us a fresh perspective on our society's values, priorities, laws and foibles. (3) Questions: SETI is stimulating thought and discussion about several fundamental questions. (4) Education: some broad-gage educational programs have already been centered around SETI. (5) Tangible spin-offs: in addition to providing jobs for some people, SETI provides various spin-offs, such as search methods, computer software, data, and international scientific cooperation. (6) Future scenarios: SETI will increasingly stimulate us to think carefully about possible detection scenarios and their consequences, about our reply, and generally about the role of extraterrestrial communication in our long-term future. Such thinking leads, in turn, to fresh perspectives on the SETI enterprise itself.

  4. The educational consequences of teen childbearing.

    PubMed

    Kane, Jennifer B; Philip Morgan, S; Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Guilkey, David K

    2013-12-01

    A huge literature shows that teen mothers face a variety of detriments across the life course, including truncated educational attainment. To what extent is this association causal? The estimated effects of teen motherhood on schooling vary widely, ranging from no discernible difference to 2.6 fewer years among teen mothers. The magnitude of educational consequences is therefore uncertain, despite voluminous policy and prevention efforts that rest on the assumption of a negative and presumably causal effect. This study adjudicates between two potential sources of inconsistency in the literature—methodological differences or cohort differences—by using a single, high-quality data source: namely, The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. We replicate analyses across four different statistical strategies: ordinary least squares regression; propensity score matching; and parametric and semiparametric maximum likelihood estimation. Results demonstrate educational consequences of teen childbearing, with estimated effects between 0.7 and 1.9 fewer years of schooling among teen mothers. We select our preferred estimate (0.7), derived from semiparametric maximum likelihood estimation, on the basis of weighing the strengths and limitations of each approach. Based on the range of estimated effects observed in our study, we speculate that variable statistical methods are the likely source of inconsistency in the past. We conclude by discussing implications for future research and policy, and recommend that future studies employ a similar multimethod approach to evaluate findings.

  5. Software Systems: Consequence versus Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Ray; Winter, Victor L.

    1999-08-05

    The purpose of this panel is to present different perspectives and opinions regarding the issues surrounding why software should or shouldn't be entrusted with critical (high consequence) functionality.

  6. Assessing the consequences of unrealistic optimism: Challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Shepperd, James A; Pogge, Gabrielle; Howell, Jennifer L

    2017-04-01

    Of the hundreds of studies published on unrealistic optimism (i.e., expecting a better personal future than is reasonably likely), most have focused on demonstrating the phenomenon, examining boundary conditions, or documenting causes. Few studies have examined the consequences of unrealistic optimism. In this article, we provide an overview of the measurement of unrealistic optimism, review possible consequences, and identify numerous challenges confronting investigators attempting to understand the consequences. Assessing the consequences of unrealistic optimism is tricky, and ultimately probably impossible when researchers assess unrealistic optimism at the group level (which reveals if a group of people is displaying unrealistic optimism on average) rather than the individual level (which reveals whether a specific individual displays unrealistic optimism). We offer recommendations to researchers who wish to examine the consequences of unrealistic optimism.

  7. Human factors in high consequence manufacturing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Grose, E.

    1997-11-01

    A high consequence system is often defined as one in which the potential exists for severe or catastrophic accidents. Familiar examples include nuclear power plants, airline and other mass transportation, dams and reservoirs, and large-scale food processing. Many manufacturing systems also qualify as high consequence systems. Much of the authors` experience with high consequence systems derives from work associated with the surveillance and dismantlement of nuclear weapons for the US Department of Energy. With such operations, there exists a risk of high explosive detonation accompanied by radiological dispersal and, potentially, nuclear detonation. Analysis of major industrial accidents such as Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Bhopal have revealed that these incidents were not attributable to a single event or direct cause, but were the result of multiple factors that combined to create a condition ripe for an accident. In each case, human error was a critical factor contributing to the accident. Consequently, many authors have emphasized the need for greater appreciation of systematic factors and in particular, human activities. This paper discusses approaches used in hazard analysis of US nuclear weapons operations to assess risk associated with human factors.

  8. Correlates of Employment among High School Seniors. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series, Paper 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; And Others

    To explore costs and benefits of part-time work for high school students, survey responses of high school seniors from the classes of 1980 through 1984 were examined, distinguishing between those working many hours, those working fewer hours, and those not employed. Because hours of work differed by sex and by college plans, most analyses…

  9. Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Andrew P; Gotanda, Kiyoko M; Svensson, Erik I

    2017-01-19

    Humans have dramatic, diverse and far-reaching influences on the evolution of other organisms. Numerous examples of this human-induced contemporary evolution have been reported in a number of 'contexts', including hunting, harvesting, fishing, agriculture, medicine, climate change, pollution, eutrophication, urbanization, habitat fragmentation, biological invasions and emerging/disappearing diseases. Although numerous papers, journal special issues and books have addressed each of these contexts individually, the time has come to consider them together and thereby seek important similarities and differences. The goal of this special issue, and this introductory paper, is to promote and expand this nascent integration. We first develop predictions as to which human contexts might cause the strongest and most consistent directional selection, the greatest changes in evolutionary potential, the greatest genetic (as opposed to plastic) changes and the greatest effects on evolutionary diversification We then develop predictions as to the contexts where human-induced evolutionary changes might have the strongest effects on the population dynamics of the focal evolving species, the structure of their communities, the functions of their ecosystems and the benefits and costs for human societies. These qualitative predictions are intended as a rallying point for broader and more detailed future discussions of how human influences shape evolution, and how that evolution then influences species traits, biodiversity, ecosystems and humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'.

  10. Sustainable Futures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sustainable Futures is a voluntary program that encourages industry to use predictive models to screen new chemicals early in the development process and offers incentives to companies subject to TSCA section 5.

  11. The Consequences of Tongue Piercing on Oral and Periodontal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sakellari, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    This paper is discussing the potential consequences that may arise by the implementation of piercing in the oral cavity and is also categorizing the consequences according to their extent and severity. Furthermore, this paper is reviewing some possible oral hygiene methods that can prove to be auxiliary in decreasing the potential complications arising from oral piercing. This literature review is based on articles published from 1985 to 2012. PMID:24616814

  12. New Paper from Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes a paper recycling experiment in which students recycle a piece of newsprint to make a new sheet of paper. Involves collection of information from the internet for the activity. Includes both instructor information and a student worksheet. (YDS)

  13. The future of hydrogeology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford I.

    2005-01-01

    “The Future of Hydrogeology” would seem to be an overly ambitious topic for a theme issue of Hydrogeology Journal or for any other journal. Only a modicum of common sense and experience provides the insight that predicting the future of a science is a task fraught with uncertainty that should be approached with caution and humility. Please be assured that the intent of this issue of the journal is not to predict the future but rather to instigate discussion and to inspire creative thinking about hydrogeology. In their articles, authors have presented personal opinions concerning the future evolution of their subjects based on their experience. This is an acceptable approach, considering that any view of the future can be no more than an educated guess. Most authors have given their opinion after an expert and insightful review of the evolution of their subject to the present time or after reviewing the current state of knowledge or practice of their subject. Consequently, this issue of the Hydrogeology Journal provides an exciting view of potential developments in crucial aspects of hydrogeology founded upon developments to date.

  14. Biosensing with Paper-Based Miniaturized Printed Electrodes-A Modern Trend.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Célia M; Monteiro, Tiago; Almeida, Maria Gabriela

    2016-09-28

    From the bench-mark work on microfluidics from the Whitesides's group in 2007, paper technology has experienced significant growth, particularly regarding applications in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. Besides the structural properties supporting microfluidics, other advantageous features of paper materials, including their versatility, disposability and low cost, show off the great potential for the development of advanced and eco-friendly analytical tools. Consequently, paper was quickly employed in the field of electrochemical sensors, being an ideal material for producing custom, tailored and miniaturized devices. Stencil-, inkjet-, or screen-printing are the preferential techniques for electrode manufacturing. Not surprisingly, we witnessed a rapid increase in the number of publications on paper based screen-printed sensors at the turn of the past decade. Among the sensing strategies, various biosensors, coupling electrochemical detectors with biomolecules, have been proposed. This work provides a critical review and a discussion on the future progress of paper technology in the context of miniaturized printed electrochemical biosensors.

  15. Students: Paper Tigers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pricola, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Describes five top-notch secondary school newspapers, four led by National High School Journalism Teacher of the Year award winners or finalists and one (a middle school paper) which regularly beats high school entries in state and national competitions. For each paper, the article discusses the school, the advisor, the paper's format, breaking…

  16. Oxygen sensitive paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whidby, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Paper is impregnated with mixture of methylene blue and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Methylene blue is photo-reduced to leuco-form. Paper is kept isolated from oxygen until ready for use. Paper can be reused by photo-reduction after oxygen exposure.

  17. Paper Pulp Panoply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marque, Margo E.

    1999-01-01

    Explains that creating paper-pulp bowls is designed to acquaint students with the beginning vocabulary and finger dexterity needed to sculpt clay. Describes the process of making paper-pulp bowls and identifies important vocabulary words. Provides directions for making paper bowl forms and lists the materials. (CMK)

  18. Contributed Papers, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Libraries Association, New York, NY. Documentation Div.

    Included are six papers from the Special Libraries Association Documentation Division's Contributed Papers Session at the National Conference in New York, May 28 - June 1, 1967, which were not included in the November, 1967 issue of Special Libraries. The papers are: (1) "The Bibliographical Control of Aerospace Industry Conference Literature…

  19. Writing a Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikk, Jaan

    2006-01-01

    The value of research and the career of a university lecturer depend heavily on the success in publishing scientific papers. This article reviews the guidelines for writing and submitting research papers. The three most important success criteria in publishing are as follows: the paper describes a good research, it is written according to the…

  20. Prolactin and schizophrenia: clinical consequences of hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Anna Maria; O'Keane, Veronica

    2002-07-19

    Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone that is synthesized and secreted from specialised cells of the anterior pituitary gland, known as lactotrophs. The hormone was given it's name because extracts from the bovine pituitary gland caused growth of the crop sac and stimulated the elaboration of crop milk in pigeons, and promoted lactation in rabbits. Although prolactin is best known for the multiple effects it exerts on the mammary gland, it has over 300 separate biological activities not represented by its name. It sub serves multiple roles in reproduction other than lactation and is an important modulator of homeostasis in the mammalian organism. Hence Bern and Nicoll suggested renaming it "omnipotin or versatilin". Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that affects approximately one percent of the population worldwide. It is well established that traditional typical anti-psychotics elevate prolactin levels. It is also agreed that the serum prolactin concentration is not elevated in patients with schizophrenia who are not receiving anti-psychotic medication. Hyperprolactinaemia has direct effects on the brain and on other organs. Direct consequences include galactorrhoea. Indirect consequences of hyperprolactinaemia include oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea, erratic or absent ovulation, sexual dysfunction, reduced bone mineral density and cardiovascular disease. With the advent of prolactin sparing anti-psychotics, ample consideration needs to be given to the physiological consequences of hyperprolactinaemia in schizophrenic patients. In this paper we will examine molecular biology, secretion and physiology of prolactin. The consequences of hyperprolactinaemia in humans including effects on fertility, sexual dysfunction, bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease, changes in psychopathology and movement disorders will be reviewed. The literature on the association between schizophrenia, anti-psychotic medication and hyperprolactinaemia and more specifically

  1. Consequences of infertility in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Rouchou, Brittany

    2013-05-01

    Infertility affects more than 10% of the world's population. In developing countries, there are severe social, psychological and economic consequences for infertile men and women. All of the cited references are compiled from primary peer-reviewed research articles that were conducted through one-to-one interviews or focus groups in countries of developing regions, such as Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The following paper seeks to raise awareness of the consequences of infertility in developing nations and identify infertility as an under-observed, but significant public health issue. It is proposed that education programmes tailored to each society's specific religious beliefs and grounded traditions must be implemented in order to reverse the social stigma, detrimental psychological effects, and loss of economic security that results from infertility.

  2. A review of the Melcor Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS): Capabilities and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.

    1995-02-01

    MACCS was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship to estimate the offsite consequences of potential severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs). MACCS was publicly released in 1990. MACCS was developed to support the NRC`s probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) efforts. PSA techniques can provide a measure of the risk of reactor operation. PSAs are generally divided into three levels. Level one efforts identify potential plant damage states that lead to core damage and the associated probabilities, level two models damage progression and containment strength for establishing fission-product release categories, and level three efforts evaluate potential off-site consequences of radiological releases and the probabilities associated with the consequences. MACCS was designed as a tool for level three PSA analysis. MACCS performs probabilistic health and economic consequence assessments of hypothetical accidental releases of radioactive material from NPPs. MACCS includes models for atmospheric dispersion and transport, wet and dry deposition, the probabilistic treatment of meteorology, environmental transfer, countermeasure strategies, dosimetry, health effects, and economic impacts. The computer systems MACCS is designed to run on are the 386/486 PC, VAX/VMS, E3M RISC S/6000, Sun SPARC, and Cray UNICOS. This paper provides an overview of MACCS, reviews some of the applications of MACCS, international collaborations which have involved MACCS, current developmental efforts, and future directions.

  3. Positive consequences of false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Patel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research is replete with examples of the negative consequences of false memories. In the current research, we provide a different perspective on false memories and their development and demonstrate that false memories can have positive consequences. Specifically, we examined the role false memories play in subsequent problem-solving tasks. Children and adults studied and recalled neutral or survival-relevant lists of associated words. They then solved age-normed compound remote associates, some of whose solutions had been primed by false memories created when studying the previous lists. The results showed that regardless of age: (a) survival-related words were not only better recollected but were also more susceptible than neutral words to false memory illusions; and (b) survival-related false memories were better than neutral false memories as primes for problem-solving. These findings are discussed in the context of recent speculation concerning the positive consequences of false memories, and the adaptive nature of reconstructive memory.

  4. Consequences of Essential Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lands, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) are nutrients that form an amazingly large array of bioactive mediators that act on a large family of selective receptors. Nearly every cell and tissue in the human body expresses at least one of these receptors, allowing EFA-based signaling to influence nearly every aspect of human physiology. In this way, the health consequences of specific gene-environment interactions with these nutrients are more extensive than often recognized. The metabolic transformations have similar competitive dynamics for the n-3 and n-6 homologs when converting dietary EFA from the external environment of foods into the highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) esters that accumulate in the internal environment of cells and tissues. In contrast, the formation and action of bioactive mediators during tissue responses to stimuli tend to selectively create more intense consequences for n-6 than n-3 homologs. Both n-3 and n-6 nutrients have beneficial actions, but many common health disorders are undesired consequences of excessive actions of tissue n-6 HUFA which are preventable. This review considers the possibility of preventing imbalances in dietary n-3 and n-6 nutrients with informed voluntary food choices. That action may prevent the unintended consequences that come from eating imbalanced diets which support excessive chronic actions of n-6 mediators that harm human health. The consequences from preventing n-3 and n-6 nutrient imbalances on a nationwide scale may be very large, and they need careful evaluation and implementation to avoid further harmful consequences for the national economy. PMID:23112921

  5. Paper Sizes and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2007-01-01

    Reams of paper come in a standardised system of related sheet sizes. Most people are familiar with the international paper sizes A4, A3 and B4, but there are others. The ratio of the sides of any sheet in the series is such that if the paper is cut or folded in half on itself then the ratio of the sides remains unchanged. Due to this property of…

  6. Handmade Paper Landscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Making paper can be good for the planet, as well as an adventure for one's students. The costs of the activity of making the pulp from recycled paper are low and it is very eco-friendly. To begin, the author showed her middle-school students several examples of handmade paper in which outdoor scenes had been developed using an additive technique.…

  7. Robotics Strategy White Paper

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-19

    VIRGINIA 23651-1087 REPlY TO A1Tl!NTlON OF ATFC-DS 19 MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT: Robotics Strategy White Paper 1. The enclosed... Robotics Strategy White Paper is the result of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Anny Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) and the Tank-Automotive...Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC). This paper builds on a confederated Anny robotics "strategy" that is described by senior leader

  8. Fun with Paper Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Dava; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses paper chromatographic techniques and provides examples of typical classroom activities. Includes description of retardation values obtained during chromatography exercises and suggests using them for math lessons. (JN)

  9. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  10. Consequences of Growing Up Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.

    The consequences and correlates of growing up poor as well as the mechanisms through which poverty influences children are explored. This book is organized with a primary focus on research findings and a secondary concern with policy implications. The chapters are: (1) "Poor Families, Poor Outcomes: The Well-Being of Children and Youth" (Jeanne…

  11. Humanitarian Consequences of Land Mines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Ken

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the human and economic consequences of the continuing use and abandonment of land mines. Discusses the reasons for the worldwide proliferation (over 85 million uncleared mines in at least 62 countries) and the legal complexities in curtailing their use. Includes a brief account by a land-mine victim. (MJP)

  12. Social Consequences of Teenage Childbearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presser, Harriet B.

    Most research on teenage parenthood is concerned with illegitimacy and its determinants such as attitudes toward sex, contraceptive knowledge and practice, family relationships, and cultural factors. Empirical studies on the consequences of illegitimacy are generally limited to problems of recidivism, school dropouts, and welfare dependency.…

  13. Literacy in Somali: Linguistic Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biber, Douglas; Hared, Mohamed

    1991-01-01

    Linguistic consequences of literacy in Somalia are examined in a review of the literature and through a study of five dimensions of variation among Somali registers and the expansion of linguistic variation in Somali resulting from the introduction of written registers. (36 references) (LB)

  14. Enhancing Research Papers in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroffe, Kerry; McCann, G.

    2013-01-01

    XML-based production of journal articles, combined with real-time transformations, now make it possible to develop new enhancements to the reading experience and to the content of the article itself. Papers from AAS journals are now available in ‘Article Evolution’ HTML format, providing both familiar and new functionality that improves the reading experience. This poster will outline the roadmap for the development of ‘Article Evolution’ functionality and ask for input to help shape future enhancements that meet the needs of the astronomy community. Two of the ongoing developments described are ’semantic enrichment’ of articles and adoption of ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID). Both of these have exciting possibilities at an article level within ‘Article Evolution’ but will also impact widely on third party services, such as linking and discovery of research papers.

  15. Packaging legislation. Objectives and consequences.

    PubMed

    Christmann, H

    1995-05-01

    The recently published Directive on packaging and packaging waste makes new demands on the industry. This article highlights the key areas and raises some of the issues that must be confronted in the future.

  16. INTRODUCTION Summary of Papers Summary of Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    review various aspects of Turbulent Mixing that were discussed at the Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, held in summer 2009 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. The papers are arranged by TMB themes and within each theme they are ordered alphabetically by the last name of the first author, with tutorials following research contributions. Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. The theme of canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing is considered by several authors. Casciola et al investigate the dynamics of inertial particles dispersed in a turbulent jet and compare their numerical modeling results with the classical similarity theory of the jet far-field. Remarkable agreement is found between the theory and the direct numerical simulations (DNS), including decay of Stokes numbers with the distance from the origin, self-similarity of the mean axial particle velocity profile, etc. Nagata considers complex turbulent flows, which are known to exhibit no linear critical point for the laminar states, and which are linearly stable at finite Reynolds numbers. Square duct flow and sliding Couette flow in an annulus are considered and nonlinear traveling-wave states are found for the flows with the use of the homotopy approach developed by the author. These states may constitute a skeleton around which a time-dependent trajectory in the phase space is organized. Teitelbaum and Mininni study a decaying 3D incompressible turbulence, which mimicks turbulent mixing in geophysical flows, with rotation rendering the flow anisotropic at large scales. The authors analyze three DNS results (without and with rotation, and with helicity), observe a decoupling of the modes normal to the rotation axis, and show that the helicity decreases the decay rate of turbulence. Wang and Peters investigate the structure of turbulence by studying strain rates of various scalars, including a

  17. TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

  18. "Are You Paper?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Walter M.

    2004-01-01

    "Paper" was the term created in the late 1980s and early 1990s when Black fraternities and sororities first began to shorten their pledge periods, subsequently abolishing pledging in 1990. Paper signified a person who completed the membership intake process without pledging. Essentially, they followed the rules of the national organization as…

  19. Rethinking the Research Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballenger, Bruce

    With rare exceptions, the assignment of a research paper elicits groans from students and sighs from their teachers, or worse. While the research paper became a fixture in composition textbooks and classrooms by the 1940s, its origins can be traced to fundamental changes in the American academy after the Civil War. The language of the term paper…

  20. Transportation: Topic Paper E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper reviews the issue of transportation services. In the area of urban mass transit, four relevant pieces of legislation and public transportation accessibility regulations are cited, and cost issues are explored. Paratransit systems,…

  1. Crepe Paper Colorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, David L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Uses crepe paper for the introduction of spectrophotometric concepts. Dyes used in the manufacturing of the crepe paper dissolve rapidly in water to produce solutions of colors. The variety of colors provides spectra in the visible spectrum that allow students to grasp concepts of absorption and transmission. (AIM)

  2. The Mock Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carlton

    2008-01-01

    The mock research paper combines creative writing with academic writing and, in the process, breaks down that binary. This article describes a writing assignment that offers an introduction to the college research paper genre. This assignment helps students focus on crafting an argument and learning genre conventions while postponing until the…

  3. Updating the Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liepolt, Werner

    2005-01-01

    For more than 30 years, Staples High School (Westport, Connecticut) juniors have undertaken a major research paper. Their English teachers supervise this project-based unit and get feedback about the preparation students feel they have gotten in research and in writing. Students used to be taught to use notebooks, paper, pencil, and index cards…

  4. PAPERS ON COMPOSITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL. Curriculum Center in English.

    THE SCOPE OF THE NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM CENTER'S RESEARCH PROGRAM IN TEACHING COMPOSITION TO THE BEGINNING WRITER IS DEFINED IN THE EIGHT PAPERS COMPRISING THIS COLLECTION. THE TOPICS FOR THE PAPERS ARE--(1) LIMITING THE AIMS OF TEACHING COMPOSITION IN THE SEVENTH- AND EIGHTH-GRADES TO INCLUDE ONLY NARRATIVE AND DESCRIPTIVE WRITING AND…

  5. Three Reaction Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coop, Richard H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    In reaction papers, Richard H. Coop, an educational psychologist, discusses six themes evident in papers on gifted education; B. J. Cox argues that systems theory is a valuable addition to education of identified and potentially gifted students; and Gary D. Fenstermacher argues for specification of educational entitlements of any learner before…

  6. Administrative Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six papers on the theme, "Administrative Libraries in a Technological World: Past, Present, and Future--A General Stocktaking and a State of the Art Report" focus on West German telecommunications and information technology and the use of data processing and other technological aids in West German administrative libraries. These papers,…

  7. Environmental consequences of energy production: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    The Seventeenth Annual Illinois Energy conference entitled Environmental consequences of Energy Production was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 19-20, 1989. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on the technical, economic and institutional issues surrounding energy production and related environmental problems. The conference program was developed by a planning committee which included Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. The conference included presentations on four major topic areas. The issue areas were: urban pollution: where are we now and what needs to be done in the future; the acid rain problem: implications of proposed federal legislation on the Midwest; global warming: an update on the scientific debate; and strategies to minimize environmental damage. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual presentations. (FL)

  8. A Biosocial Education Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youdell, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how social justice orientated education research might engage with emerging ideas and approaches from the new biological sciences, and suggests a biosocial future for empirical education research that connects molecular biology--epigenetics, nutrigenomics and neuroscience--with sociology of education. In beginning to consider…

  9. Papering Over Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's battle against corrosion led to a new coating that was licensed to GeoTech and is commercially sold as Catize. The coating uses ligno sulfonic acid doped polyaniline (Ligno-Pani), also known as synthetic metal. Ligno-Pani can be used to extend the operating lives of steel bridges as one example of its applications. future applications include computers, televisions, cellular phones, conductive inks, and stealth technology.

  10. Defence White Paper 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    base, HMAS Stirling . Decisions on future options for increased US naval cooperation in Australia require further consideration by both Governments...locations, including HMAS Stirling , Australia’s Indian Ocean naval base. Space and Communications Cooperation 6.17 The Government is committed to... Roberts -Smith RFD QC. The Taskforce publicly released its Terms of Reference on 21 January 2013. It will conduct enquiries and liaise with those who have

  11. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  12. [Fetal pain - neurobiological causes and consequences].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Nuno; Rebelo, Sandra; Tavares, Isaura

    2010-01-01

    The existence of putatively painful situations to the fetus demands a careful evaluation of the issue of fetal pain. Several indirect approaches are used to evaluate the existence of fetal pain. Neurobiological studies showed that from the 30th week on, the anatomical and physiological system for pain transmission is already developed, with the connections from the periphery to the cortex being successively established. Stress responses to a painful stimulation are complex but they can be detected from the 16th week on. There is activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic nervous system and hemodynamic changes in response to nociceptive stimulation. In prematures exposed to pain there are significant increases of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol, hemodynamic changes, motor reflexes and facial reactions. The changes induced by strong nociceptive stimulation of newborns have important postnatal consequences since they affect future reactions to noxious stimuli. Central sensitization and immaturity of the pain inhibitory system are the main neurobiological explanations for the increased pain. Detailed studies of the neurobiological mechanisms of the transmission of painful stimuli along with follow-up studies of the consequences of exposure to pain during the development of the fetus are necessary to fully understand fetal pain.

  13. Ultrathin metallized PBI paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenevey, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of preparing ultrathin papers with a target weight of 3.5 g/m squared from polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibrids was undertaken. Small hand sheets of target weight were fabricated. They were light brown, low density materials with sufficient strength to be readily handleable. Characterization of these sheets included strength, fold endurance, thermal gravimetric analysis in air and nitrogen and photomicrographs. Two different batches of PBI fibrids were studied and differences in fabrication performance were noted. In neither case could target weight papers be prepared using conventional paper making techniques.

  14. Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students

    PubMed Central

    Hershner, Shelley D; Chervin, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    Daytime sleepiness, sleep deprivation, and irregular sleep schedules are highly prevalent among college students, as 50% report daytime sleepiness and 70% attain insufficient sleep. The consequences of sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness are especially problematic to college students and can result in lower grade point averages, increased risk of academic failure, compromised learning, impaired mood, and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents. This article reviews the current prevalence of sleepiness and sleep deprivation among college students, contributing factors for sleep deprivation, and the role of sleep in learning and memory. The impact of sleep and sleep disorders on academics, grade point average, driving, and mood will be examined. Most importantly, effective and viable interventions to decrease sleepiness and sleep deprivation through sleep education classes, online programs, encouragement of naps, and adjustment of class time will be reviewed. This paper highlights that addressing sleep issues, which are not often considered as a risk factor for depression and academic failure, should be encouraged. Promotion of university and college policies and class schedules that encourage healthy and adequate sleep could have a significant impact on the sleep, learning, and health of college students. Future research to investigate effective and feasible interventions, which disseminate both sleep knowledge and encouragement of healthy sleep habits to college students in a time and cost effective manner, is a priority. PMID:25018659

  15. Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students.

    PubMed

    Hershner, Shelley D; Chervin, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    Daytime sleepiness, sleep deprivation, and irregular sleep schedules are highly prevalent among college students, as 50% report daytime sleepiness and 70% attain insufficient sleep. The consequences of sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness are especially problematic to college students and can result in lower grade point averages, increased risk of academic failure, compromised learning, impaired mood, and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents. This article reviews the current prevalence of sleepiness and sleep deprivation among college students, contributing factors for sleep deprivation, and the role of sleep in learning and memory. The impact of sleep and sleep disorders on academics, grade point average, driving, and mood will be examined. Most importantly, effective and viable interventions to decrease sleepiness and sleep deprivation through sleep education classes, online programs, encouragement of naps, and adjustment of class time will be reviewed. This paper highlights that addressing sleep issues, which are not often considered as a risk factor for depression and academic failure, should be encouraged. Promotion of university and college policies and class schedules that encourage healthy and adequate sleep could have a significant impact on the sleep, learning, and health of college students. Future research to investigate effective and feasible interventions, which disseminate both sleep knowledge and encouragement of healthy sleep habits to college students in a time and cost effective manner, is a priority.

  16. ESCO White Paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA developed this white paper to explore energy performance contracting with Energy Service Companies (ESCOs) and its potential to be a best practice for installing solar thermal water heating systems in the commercial and industrial sector.

  17. Distribution System White Papers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA worked with stakeholders and developed a series of white papers on distribution system issues ranked of potentially significant public health concern (see list below) to serve as background material for EPA, expert and stakeholder discussions.

  18. Positive drinking consequences among hazardous drinking college students.

    PubMed

    Capron, Daniel W; Schmidt, Norman B

    2012-05-01

    Negative drinking consequences in college students have been well studied, but emerging evidence points to a role for positive drinking consequences in predicting alcohol related problems. Positive drinking consequences appear to be distinct from other drinking constructs such as drinking expectancies and drinking motives. However, no work has evaluated the role of positive drinking consequences in hazardous drinking college students, a population at high risk for alcohol related problems. The goal of the current study was to examine the effect of positive drinking consequences on problem drinking and alcohol problem recognition in a hazardous drinking college sample. Participants (N=222) were hazardous drinking undergraduate students completing a battery of self-report measures about alcohol use. Findings indicated that positive drinking consequences predicted problem drinking above and beyond other related constructs including positive drinking motives (i.e. enhancement and social). However, positive drinking consequences did not appear to play a significant role in alcohol problem recognition. Future research directions and implications for interventions with hazardous drinking college students are discussed.

  19. [Health consequence of stalking victimization].

    PubMed

    Will, R; Hintz, E; Blättner, B

    2012-05-01

    Life time prevalence of stalking is about 12-20%, while females are more often affected than male. Stalking is a statutory offense. However, it is not an assault of victims' law. For the purpose of health consequences for stalking victims, research in following database were conducted: EMBASE, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Social Science Index. English and German published studies of the years 2002-2010 were included. 17 primary studies and 2 meta-analyses were identified. Direct physiological consequences are relatively rare; however stalking victims report a poorer physiological health status. Almost every second stalking victim shows impairments on his/her psychical well-being. Impairments of social well-being are common, too. As a result, there is still a lot of research, especially in long-term studies, required. Socio-legal reassessment of stalking will probably benefit only a few of the affected people.

  20. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  1. The economic consequences of immigration.

    PubMed

    Borjas, G J; Tienda, M

    1987-02-06

    Available research supports several major conclusions about the economic consequences of immigration. (i) The aggregate impacts of foreign workers on the earnings and employment of native workers are quite small, but differ for selected population subgroups and high ethnic density labor markets. (ii) Immigrants who arrived during the 1970s are less skilled than earlier arrivals, and their earnings will remain substantially below those of natives throughout their working lives. (iii) The evidence on immigrants' receipt of public assistance income is inconclusive.

  2. Socioeconomic consequences of mercury use and pollution.

    PubMed

    Swain, Edward B; Jakus, Paul M; Rice, Glenn; Lupi, Frank; Maxson, Peter A; Pacyna, Jozef M; Penn, Alan; Spiegel, Samuel J; Veiga, Marcello M

    2007-02-01

    In the past, human activities often resulted in mercury releases to the biosphere with little consideration of undesirable consequences for the health of humans and wildlife. This paper outlines the pathways through which humans and wildlife are exposed to mercury. Fish consumption is the major route of exposure to methylmercury. Humans can also receive toxic doses of mercury through inhalation of elevated concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury. We propose that any effective strategy for reducing mercury exposures requires an examination of the complete life cycle of mercury. This paper examines the life cycle of mercury from a global perspective and then identifies several approaches to measuring the benefits of reducing mercury exposure, policy options for reducing Hg emissions, possible exposure reduction mechanisms, and issues associated with mercury risk assessment and communication for different populations.

  3. Projecting the risk of future climate shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enfield, David B.; Cid-Serrano, Luis

    2006-06-01

    Recent research has shown that decadal-to-multidecadal (D2M) climate variability is associated with environmental changes that have important consequences for human activities, such as public health, water availability, frequency of hurricanes, and so forth. As scientists, how do we convert these relationships into decision support products useful to water managers, insurance actuaries, and others, whose principal interest lies in knowing when future climate regime shifts will likely occur that affect long-horizon decisions? Unfortunately, numerical models are far from being able to make deterministic predictions for future D2M climate shifts. However, the recent development of paleoclimate reconstructions of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) (Gray et al., [2004]) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO); (MacDonald and Case, [2005]) give us a viable alternative: to estimate probability distribution functions from long climate index series that allow us to calculate the probability of future D2M regime shifts. In this paper, we show how probabilistic projections can be developed for a specific climate mode - the AMO as represented by the Gray et al. ([2004]) tree-ring reconstruction. The methods are robust and can be applied to any D2M climate mode for which a sufficiently long index series exists, as well as to the growing body of paleo-proxy reconstructions that have become available. The target index need not be a paleo-proxy calibrated against a climate index; it may profitably be calibrated against a specific resource of interest, such as stream flow or lake levels.

  4. Spaceflight osteoporosis: current state and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Cappellesso, R; Nicole, L; Guido, A; Pizzol, D

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the established major consequences of long-duration spaceflights in astronauts seriously undermining their health after their returning on Earth. Indeed, astronauts typically lose more bone mass during one month than postmenopausal women on Earth lose in one year. To date, countermeasures mainly consist in exercise and supplementation while pharmacological treatment as those used in postmenopausal women are not routine. However, it is evident that exercise and supplementation alone are not enough to maintain bone homeostasis. In this paper we describe the current countermeasures for bone loss during long-term spaceflight, review the modern treatment which are successfully employed to prevent osteoporosis on Earth and that could be quickly used also for astronauts and finally focus on the recent cellular and molecular understanding of bone homeostasis which might provide the basis for the development of future targeted therapies.

  5. Paper field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, E.; Correia, Nuno; Barquinha, Pedro; Costa, Cláudia; Pereira, Luís; Gonçalves, Gonçalo; Martins, Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we report the use of a sheet of cellulose fiber-based paper as the dielectric layer used in oxide based semiconductor thin film field-effect transistors (FETs). In this new approach we are using the cellulose fiber-based paper in an "interstrate" structure since the device is build on both sides of the cellulose sheet. Such hybrid FETs present excellent operating characteristics such as high channel saturation mobility (>30 cm2/Vs), drain-source current on/off modulation ratio of approximately 104, near-zero threshold voltage, enhancement n-type operation and sub-threshold gate voltage swing of 0.8 V/decade. The cellulose fiber-based paper FETs characteristics have been measured in air ambient conditions and present good stability. The obtained results outpace those of amorphous Si TFTs and rival with the same oxide based TFTs produced on either glass or crystalline silicon substrates. The compatibility of these devices with large-scale/large-area deposition techniques and low cost substrates as well as their very low operating bias delineates this as a promising approach to attain high-performance disposable electronics like paper displays, smart labels, smart packaging, RFID and point-of-care systems for self analysis in bio-applications, among others.

  6. Synopses of Selected Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Fairlie, David B.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2014-11-01

    The decisive contributors to the development of the formulation are Hermann Weyl (1885-1955), Eugene Wigner (1902-1995), Hilbrand Groenewold (1910-1996), and Jose Moyal (1910-1998). The bulk of the theory is implicit in Groenewold's and Moyal's seminal papers. But confidence in the autonomy of the formulation accreted slowly and fitfully. As a result, an appraisal of critical milestones cannot avoid subjectivity. Nevertheless, here we provide summaries of a few papers that we believe remedied confusion about the logical structure of the formulation ...

  7. Position paper update.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    In May 2007, the Board of Trustees of the American Academy of Periodontology rescinded the following position papers: "Periodontal Considerations in the HIV Positive Patient" (1994). "Periodontal Considerations in the Management of the Cancer Patient" (1997). "Periodontal Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases" (2002). "The Potential Role of Growth and Differentiation Factors in Periodontal Regeneration" (1996). "Sonic and Ultrasonic Scalers in Periodontics" (2000). These papers have been removed from the AAP Web and online Journal sites. Readers are encouraged to consult the literature for the most current information on these topics.

  8. Truth and Consequences on Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Harold L.

    1978-01-01

    The future of higher education has three dimensions: (1) changes in demographic patterns, migration, and changing high school curricula; (2) increases in industry-sponsored education, "colleges without campuses," and military instruction programs; and (3) possible responses, including more specific missions, improved counseling, and more…

  9. Hardship: The Welfare Consequences of Labor Market Problems. A Policy Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upjohn (W.E.) Inst. for Employment Research, Kalamazoo, MI.

    Social statistics may exaggerate the degree of hardship caused by labor market problems. Yet, in many ways social statistics underestimate the degree of hardship caused by extended unemployment, underemployment, and low wages. Therefore, new measures are needed to reassess long-term and cyclical labor market developments, the changing status of…

  10. Mathematics for Vocational Students in France and England: Contrasting Provision and Consequences. Discussion Paper No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Alison

    French postsecondary education for 16- to 19-year-olds is divided into programs that lead to the Baccalaureats--general, technical, and vocational--and to the lower-level Certificat d'Aptitude Professionnel (CAP) and Brevet d'Etudes Professionnelles (BEP). A common mathematics core curriculum is specified for all CAP students, regardless of…

  11. Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence. Low-Income Working Families. Paper 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Caroline; McKernan, Signe-Mary

    2012-01-01

    One in six newborns were born poor over the past 40 years, and nearly half remained poor half their childhoods. These persistently poor children are nearly 90 percent more likely than never-poor children to enter their 20s without completing high school and are four times more likely to give birth outside of marriage during their teenage years.…

  12. The Social and Psychological Consequences of Intragenerational Mobility. Working Paper 73.4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojek, Dean G.

    The relationship between prior and present socioeconomic status and 10 symptoms of social and psychological stress were examined for mobility effects. The analysis was confined to a 5-year, intragenerational mobility panel from 2 Illinois regions--Putnam County and segments of 3 other adjacent counties in north-central Illinois, and a portion of…

  13. Suburbanization, Demographic Change and the Consequences for School Finance. NBER Working Paper No. 16137

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figlio, David N.; Fletcher, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The existing literature on the relationship between the share of elderly in a community and the support for local public education has led to mixed results to date. One potential reason behind this is that the share of elderly in a community is endogenous, and it is very difficult to disentangle the effects of individuals aging in place from that…

  14. The Consequences of Age at First Childbirth: Family Size. Working Paper: 1146-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A.; Hofferth, Sandra L.

    Examined in this document is the effect the age at which a young woman has her first birth has on her later childbearing. Data from the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women are used in conjunction with a review of related literature in examining such factors as fertility, premarital pregnancy,…

  15. Language Arts Topics Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jane M.; And Others

    This document brings together six papers on language skills and language arts teaching of gifted students. "The State of the Art Issues in Language Study for High Ability Learners: Thinking about Language with Gifted Children" (Michael Clay Thompson) considers two areas traditionally included in discussions of language study--grammar and…

  16. [Collected Papers on Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Michael L., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on issues related to mathematics in technology and teacher education: "A Case for Strong Conceptualization in Technology Enhanced Mathematics Instruction" (Michael L. Connell and Delwyn L. Harnisch); "Faculty/Student Collaboration in Education and Math--Using the Web To Improve Student…

  17. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures…

  18. Torn Paper Birds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson for third-grade students that begins with an examination of bird prints done by John James Audubon and moves into the students creating their own torn paper birds. Introduces the students to the beauty of birds and focuses on the environmental issues that face birds and their habitats. (CMK)

  19. Papers on Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Open Court Publishing Co., La Salle, IL.

    The following papers collected in this publication were presented for discussion at the Open Court Editorial Advisory Board Meeting in 1970. "Testing, Grades, Standards" by Jacques Barzun discusses the relationship between these three elements and the process of education and of performance evaluation. In "The Limits of Reform in Education" James…

  20. Information Services. Miscellaneous Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on audiovisual information resources, the history of technical libraries, online legal information, and information technology for schoolchildren, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Continuing Issues in the Provision of Audiovisual Information Resources -…

  1. A New Exam Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an examination paper based on the British Open University television broadcast entitled "Principles of Organic Synthesis." The test was administered immediately after the presentation of the broadcast to British students who had completed a two-year sequence in organic chemistry. (MLH)

  2. The Federalist Papers Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Harold B., Ed.; Van Meter, Elena, Ed.

    Six pamphlets provide the springboard for community discussion on constitutional history by summarizing the main themes of seminars sponsored by the League of Women Voters. The "Federalist Papers" were used as a point of departure to promote discussion on the continued efficacy of the political principles and structures established in…

  3. iPhone paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-12-01

    Could you write a scientific manuscript using just your iPhone? Well, when Christoph Bartneck at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand was invited to submit a paper to the International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics, in Atlanta, Georgia, in November, he decided to do just that.

  4. Viking survey paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews Viking injection into Mars orbit, the landing, and the Orbiter. The following Viking investigations are discussed: the search for life (photosynthetic analysis, metabolic analysis, and respiration), molecular analysis, inorganic chemistry, water detection, thermal mapping, radio science, and physical and seismic characteristics. Also considered are the imaging system, the lander camera, entry science, and Mars weather.

  5. Testing. Occasional Papers 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, P. T., Ed.; White, J., Ed.

    Five papers on testing in English as a second language are included in this volume. "A Preliminary Diagnostic Test for Adult Immigrants" by Johan I. Arthur presents the first stage in a project to develop a test for limited English speaking adults in the Colchester, Essex area. "An Initial Testing Battery on a Course for Air Traffic…

  6. [Church Archives; Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Terry; And Others

    Papers presented at the Institute which were concerned with keeping of church archives are entitled: "St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Eugene, Oregon;""Central Lutheran Church, Eugene, Oregon: A History;""Mormon Church Archives: An Overview;""Sacramental Records of St. Mary's Catholic Church, Eugene,…

  7. Hereisthehouse: Critical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannaford, Christine B. D.

    Toni Morrison's vision of America juxtaposes the rubble and rabble of a silent, screaming America against an affluent America that cannot hear. In "The Bluest Eye" she offers a poignant portrayal of the bastardization of the American Dream: opportunity has become entitlement, success has been translated in currency. This paper analyzes…

  8. Extending Paper Chromatography Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    One of the "good old" standard activities middle school students seem to enjoy is paper chromatography. The procedures and materials needed are relatively simple and the results can be colorful. All too often, the activity ends just after these colorful results are obtained, cutting short the potential it holds for some further inquiry. With some…

  9. Panels: Papers and Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besser, Howard; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Contains student papers and abstracts of panel discussions on the following topics: (1) social impact of networked communications; (2) text authenticity issues; (3) geographic information systems; (4) the dilemma of open networks versus information accuracy and personal rights; and (5) empowering medical applications via the network. (KRN)

  10. Paper coal in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guennel, G.K.; Neavel, R.C.

    1959-01-01

    The foliated, papery texture of the upper third of an 18-inch coal seam in a strip mine near Rockville, Indiana, is attributable to matted plant cuticle. The cuticles of pinnules, pinnae, and rachides resemble Sphenopteris bradfordii Arnold and thus differ from the lycopsid stem cuticles of the Russian paper coal.

  11. AERA Symposium Papers 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldeway, Dan O.; And Others

    Five American Educational Research Association symposium papers (1979) are provided. "The Program Analysis Phase of Instructional Systems Design: Details of Phase II" (E. Curtis) describes the program analysis subsystem within the context of a systematic approach to instructional design, and reviews the process of carrying out such an…

  12. Future contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Alexander, N J

    1995-09-01

    This article looks at the improvements that may occur in contraceptives in the near future. While no product currently under study would be ideal (highly effective, safe, readily reversible, free of side effects, coitally independent, counteract the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, and inexpensive), several would come closer than those available today. For men, the condom is the only currently available contraception, and a thinner version has recently been introduced in response to the criticism that condoms reduce sexual pleasure. Methods under study for men include manipulating hormones to halt sperm production by the intramuscular injection of an androgen in combination with a progestin or by blocking the activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the future, long-acting reversible agents should be available to directly halt sperm production or maturation. In men and women, vaccines should become available that would use antibodies to disrupt reproduction. Additional hormonal options in women should include hormone-releasing vaginal rings, a simplified contraceptive implant delivery system, a hormone-releasing IUD, and a monthly pill. Vaginal chemicals could be used to impede some of the necessary changes that sperm undergo after ejaculation. Spermicides will also be available with the ability to prevent STDs. The order of appearance of these new contraceptives will probably be nonlatex condoms, vaginal rings, and new implants, followed by disease-reducing spermicides, hormone-releasing IUDs, new emergency contraceptives, a three-month injectable for men, biodegradable implants for women, and immunocontraceptives (if they receive the backing of the industry).

  13. Antecedents and Consequences of Words

    PubMed Central

    Catania, A. Charles

    2006-01-01

    As instances of behavior, words interact with environments. But they also interact with each other and with other kinds of behavior. Because of the interlocking nature of the contingencies into which words enter, their behavioral properties may become increasingly removed from nonverbal contingencies, and their relationship to those contingencies may become distorted by the social contingencies that maintain verbal behavior. Verbal behavior is an exceedingly efficient way in which one organism can change the behavior of another. All other functions of verbal behavior derive from this most basic function, sometimes called verbal governance. Functional verbal antecedents in verbal governance may be extended across time and space when individuals replicate the verbal behavior of others or their own verbal behavior. Differential contact with different verbal antecedents may follow from differential attention to verbal stimuli correlated with consequential events. Once in place, verbal behavior can be shaped by (usually social) consequences. Because these four verbal processes (verbal governance, replication, differential attention, and verbal shaping) share common stimulus and response terms, they produce interlocking contingencies in which extensive classes of behavior come to be dominated by verbal antecedents. Very different consequences follow from verbal behavior depending on whether it is anchored to environmental events, as in scientific verbal practices, or becomes independent of it, as in religious fundamentalism. PMID:22477347

  14. Nutritional consequences of chronic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Emmanuel C; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2012-10-01

    There is an undeniable link between gastrointestinal disorders and malnutrition. Chronic diarrhoea is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions that can impact a patient's nutritional status. The nutritional consequences will depend on the cause of the diarrhoea as well as the location and extent of gastrointestinal involvement. In general, malabsorption plays a central role in the interaction between malnutrition and chronic diarrhoea. Malabsorption can result in both nutritional deficits and diarrhoea. With severe malnutrition, chronic diarrhoea can persist due to impaired immune function and poor mucosal recovery. Food intolerance and an inappropriate diet in the setting of malabsorption may also contribute to chronic diarrhoea. Patients may attribute their gastrointestinal symptoms to specific dietary intake, which can lead to self-imposed indiscriminate dietary restrictions. Therefore, disease-specific treatment in conjunction with appropriate nutritional counselling and intervention is recommended in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in patients with chronic diarrhoea. Specialized nutritional support through enteral or parenteral administration may be required to treat severe caloric and micronutrient deficiencies. In this review, we aim to summarize the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of the nutritional consequences of chronic diarrhoea.

  15. Determinants and Consequences of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, Adela; Manson, JoAnn E.; Qi, Lu; Malik, Vasanti S.; Rimm, Eric B.; Sun, Qi; Willett, Walter C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHS and NHS II) in addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for and consequences of obesity. Methods. Narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Results. Long-term NHS research has shown that weight gain and being overweight or obese are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancers, and premature death. The cohorts have elucidated the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in obesity, especially sugar-sweetened beverages, poor diet quality, physical inactivity, prolonged screen time, short sleep duration or shift work, and built environment characteristics. Genome-wide association and gene–lifestyle interaction studies have shown that genetic factors predispose individuals to obesity but that such susceptibility can be attenuated by healthy lifestyle choices. This research has contributed to evolving clinical and public health guidelines on the importance of limiting weight gain through healthy dietary and lifestyle behaviors. Conclusions. The NHS cohorts have contributed to our understanding of the risk factors for and consequences of obesity and made a lasting impact on clinical and public health guidelines on obesity prevention. PMID:27459460

  16. Cardiovascular consequences of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tune, Johnathan D; Goodwill, Adam G; Sassoon, Daniel J; Mather, Kieren J

    2017-01-09

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is defined as the concurrence of obesity-associated cardiovascular risk factors including abdominal obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, decreased HDL cholesterol, and/or hypertension. Earlier conceptualizations of the MetS focused on insulin resistance as a core feature, and it is clearly coincident with the above list of features. Each component of the MetS is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the combination of these risk factors elevates rates and severity of cardiovascular disease, related to a spectrum of cardiovascular conditions including microvascular dysfunction, coronary atherosclerosis and calcification, cardiac dysfunction, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. While advances in understanding the etiology and consequences of this complex disorder have been made, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain incompletely understood, and it is unclear how these concurrent risk factors conspire to produce the variety of obesity-associated adverse cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we highlight current knowledge regarding the pathophysiological consequences of obesity and the MetS on cardiovascular function and disease, including considerations of potential physiological and molecular mechanisms that may contribute to these adverse outcomes.

  17. Metabolic Consequences after Urinary Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Raimund; Rubenwolf, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances are well-known, but sometimes neglected immediate consequences or late sequelae following urinary diversion (UD) using bowel segments. Whereas subclinical disturbances appear to be quite common, clinically relevant metabolic complications, however, are rare. Exclusion of bowel segments for UD results in loss of absorptive surface for its physiological function. Previous studies demonstrated that at least some of the absorptive and secreting properties of the bowel are preserved when exposed to urine. For each bowel segment typical consequences and complications have been reported. The use of ileal and/or colonic segments may result in hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, which can be prevented if prophylactic treatment with alkali supplementation is started early. The resection of ileal segments may be responsible for malabsorption of vitamin B12 and bile acids with subsequent neurological and hematological late sequelae as well as potential worsening of the patient’s bowel habits. Hence, careful patient and procedure selection, meticulous long-term follow-up, and prophylactic treatment of subclinical acidosis is of paramount importance in the prevention of true metabolic complications. PMID:24653981

  18. Charting the Future of HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on charting the future of human resource development (HRD). "Choose Your Future: Independent Technomancer or Holistic Human Developer" (Steven W. Semler) reports a study that used an historical vector analysis approach to identify three major changes in the roles of HRD professionals…

  19. Teaching, Technology, and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and technology and the future are discussed in 15 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching at New Mexico State University. Titles and authors are as follows: "Technology, Teaching, and the Future" (William F. May); "Bauhaus Experience: A Team Method of Teaching Technology" (Euguene…

  20. Future Challenges in Library Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murgai, Sarla R.

    This paper considers a number of potential developments for the future of library science and the roles of information professionals. Among the projections are: (1) the use of computers and management science operations research methodologies will form the basis of decision making in libraries in the future; (2) a concerted effort will be made to…

  1. Gender Differences in Determinants and Consequences of Health and Illness

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses a framework developed for gender and tropical diseases for the analysis of non-communicable diseases and conditions in developing and industrialized countries. The framework illustrates that gender interacts with the social, economic and biological determinants and consequences of tropical diseases to create different health outcomes for males and females. Whereas the framework was previously limited to developing countries where tropical infectious diseases are more prevalent, the present paper demonstrates that gender has an important effect on the determinants and consequences of health and illness in industrialized countries as well. This paper reviews a large number of studies on the interaction between gender and the determinants and consequences of chronic diseases and shows how these interactions result in different approaches to prevention, treatment, and coping with illness. Specific examples of chronic diseases are discussed in each section with respect to both developing and industrialized countries. PMID:17615903

  2. Recycling waste-paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widener, Edward L.

    1990-01-01

    Perhaps 80 percent of papermaking energy is expended in chemical pulping of vegetable cellulose, a natural polymer. Commercial supplies of wood, bagasse, cotton and flax are valued as renewable resources and bio-mass assets; however, few enterprises will salvage waste-paper and cardboard from their trash. A basic experiment in the Materials Lab uses simple equipment to make crude handsheets. Students learn to classify secondary fibers, identify contraries, and estimate earnings.

  3. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Federman, Steve; Kwong, Victor; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel; Stancil, Phillip; Weingartner, Joe; Ziurys, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomical and planetary research and will remain so for many generations to come. From the level of scientific conception to that of the scientific return, it is our understanding of the underlying processes that allows us to address fundamental questions regarding the origins and evolution of galaxies, stars, planetary systems, and life in the cosmos. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA and NSF; these efforts are necessary for the astronomical research being funded by the agencies. The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop met at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from 14-16 February, 2006 to identify the current laboratory data needed to support existing and future NASA missions and programs in the Astrophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD). Here we refer to both laboratory and theoretical work as laboratory astrophysics unless a distinction is necessary. The format for the Workshop involved invited talks by users of laboratory data, shorter contributed talks and poster presentations by both users and providers that highlighted exciting developments in laboratory astrophysics, and breakout sessions where users and providers discussed each others' needs and limitations. We also note that the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee are users as well as providers of laboratory data. As in previous workshops, the focus was on atomic, molecular, and solid state physics.

  4. Outstanding student paper awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Hydrology Section presented six outstanding student paper awards at the 2000 AGU Spring Meeting in Washington, D.C., last June.Wade T. Crow presented a poster titled Impacts of Upscaling Soil Moisture During SGP 97. He received a B.A. in physics from Carleton College in 1995, and a M.S.E.in civil and environmental engineering from Princeton University in 1998. Wade is currently completing his Ph.D. at Princeton. His dissertation work, supervised by Eric F Wood, focuses on spatial scale issues surrounding both the retrieval of soil moisture imagery by microwave remote sensors and the eventual assimilation of this imagery into hydrologic models.

  5. Outstanding student paper awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six Outstanding Student Paper awards were given in the Space Physics and Aeronomy Section at the AGU Spring Meeting, held last May in Baltimore, Md.David Walthour, who presented “Satellite Data Analysis of Two-Dimensional Magnetopause Structures,” is a doctoral student at the Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College. He received a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Cincinnati. His research interests include field-aligned MHD flows, the development of data analysis techniques for examining transient events at the Earth magnetopause, and the study of anomalous MHD wave properties in anisotropic plasmas with application to reconnection.

  6. Outstanding student papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Two presentations were named Outstanding Student Papers in the Geodesy Section at the 1993 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.Susan Owen was honored for her presentation “1990-1993 Surface Displacements on Kilauea Volcano Determined by GPS.” She is a Ph.D. student in the Geophysics department at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif. She received a B.A. in Physics from Harvard-Radcliffe College. Owen's research involves working with GPS data from Kilauea Volcano. She is also interested in active tectonic, crustal deformation, and the earthquake process.

  7. Steganography: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, J C

    2001-12-01

    Steganography (a rough Greek translation of the term Steganography is secret writing) has been used in various forms for 2500 years. It has found use in variously in military, diplomatic, personal and intellectual property applications. Briefly stated, steganography is the term applied to any number of processes that will hide a message within an object, where the hidden message will not be apparent to an observer. This paper will explore steganography from its earliest instances through potential future application.

  8. [Psychic consequences of natural disasters].

    PubMed

    Stepień, Agnieszka; Malyszczak, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The consequences of natural disasters were presented according to: development of the diagnosis of PTSD, variability of factors impacting on formation and sustenance (support) of distemper related to a cataclysm. The natural disaster causing emotional sufferings might be also the reason of psychic distempers that led to: 1. real or anticipate fear of death, 2. physical injuries, 3. economic loss, or 4. death of the relatives. Occurrence of PTSD relies on the pre-traumatic factors (like sex, coexistence of psychic disaster and/or risk of any other traumatic disturbances in the past, economical status, education), on the sort, intensity and duration of keeping the disorders initiated by the stressor and on the posttraumatic features such as social and psychological support.

  9. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  10. [Cardiovascular consequences of aerobic maneuvers].

    PubMed

    Trivelloni, Pierandrea; Berrettini, Umberto

    2010-10-01

    Gravitational (G) stress during aerobatics flights, both military and civilian, can suddenly incapacitate pilots in agile and supermaneuverable aircrafts. High +Gz stress, up to +9Gz, has two different physiological consequences: the first is the drop in head-level blood pressure that is proportional to the G load; the other, slightly delayed, is the blood pooling in the lower part of the body and the abdomen. This blood shift results in a decreased return of venous blood to the heart, decreased cardiac output, and decreased blood pressure, leading to a likely loss of consciousness. The natural countermeasure against the effects of high G stress is the baroreceptor reflex. The human physiological tolerance to the gravito-inertial forces developed in flight operations can be increased by physiological and technological means.

  11. Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed. PMID:24179461

  12. Outstanding student paper award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Planetology Section presented an outstanding student paper award to Julie Ann Rathbun at the AGU 1998 Spring Meeting in Boston, Mass., last May. Julie Ann Rathbun presented a paper titled “Ice Diapirs on Europa and Their Implications."” Julie received her B.S. degree in physics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in May 1994. She has an M.S. in astronomy from Cornell University that she received in July 1997. At present, she is working towards a Ph.D. in astronomy from Cornell under the direction of Steven Squyres. Julie's thesis topic is studying thermal upwellings on Venus and Europa using techniques developed for Coronae formation. She is doing this study in order to understand the subsurface structure of the bodies and how similar processes can differ in icy and rocky bodies. Work already accomplished toward this thesis are Magellan data used to model the formation of Beta Regio and Theia Mons, and Galileo data used to model the formation of small topographic domes to show that a liquid water ocean must have been present at the time of their formation.

  13. A methodology for overall consequence modeling in chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Arunraj, N S; Maiti, J

    2009-09-30

    Risk assessment in chemical process industry is a very important issue for safeguarding human and the ecosystem from damages caused to them. Consequence assessment is an integral part of risk assessment. However, the commonly used consequence estimation methods involve time-consuming complex mathematical models and simple assimilation of losses without considering all the consequence factors. This lead to the deterioration of quality of estimated risk value. So, the consequence modeling has to be performed in detail considering all major losses with optimal time to improve the decisive value of risk. The losses can be broadly categorized into production loss, assets loss, human health and safety loss, and environment loss. In this paper, a conceptual framework is developed to assess the overall consequence considering all the important components of major losses. Secondly, a methodology is developed for the calculation of all the major losses, which are normalized to yield the overall consequence. Finally, as an illustration, the proposed methodology is applied to a case study plant involving benzene extraction. The case study result using the proposed consequence assessment scheme is compared with that from the existing methodologies.

  14. Consequences of BBPs Affordability Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    extending programming from five years in the future to the full life of each acquisition program—typically in excess of 25 years—and discussing the full ...concepts that are fundamental to the affordability vision. The memo text begins with the example of a program that the Army decided to cancel (thus...reducing spending. This is a laudable goal, but it cannot be the DoD’s only one. BBP 3.0’s full title includes the words Achieving Dominant

  15. Future directions.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David L; Kress, W John

    2012-01-01

    It is a risky task to attempt to predict the direction that DNA barcoding and its applications may take in the future. In a very short time, the endeavor of DNA barcoding has gone from being a tool to facilitate taxonomy in difficult to identify species, to an ambitious, global initiative that seeks to tackle such pertinent and challenging issues as quantifying global biodiversity, revolutionizing the forensic identifications of species, advancing the study of interactions among species, and promoting the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships within communities. The core element of DNA barcoding will always remain the same: the generation of a set of well-identified samples collected and genotyped at one or more genetic barcode markers and assembled into a properly curated database. But the application of this body of data will depend on the creativity and need of the research community in using a "gold standard" of annotated DNA sequence data at the species level. We foresee several areas where the application of DNA barcode data is likely to yield important evolutionary, ecological, and societal insights, and while far from exclusive, provide examples of how DNA barcode data will continue to empower scientists to address hypothesis-driven research. Three areas of immediate and obvious concern are (1) biodiversity inventories, (2) phylogenetic applications, and (3) species interactions.

  16. Recent Advances in Paper-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liana, Devi D.; Raguse, Burkhard; Gooding, J. Justin; Chow, Edith

    2012-01-01

    Paper-based sensors are a new alternative technology for fabricating simple, low-cost, portable and disposable analytical devices for many application areas including clinical diagnosis, food quality control and environmental monitoring. The unique properties of paper which allow passive liquid transport and compatibility with chemicals/biochemicals are the main advantages of using paper as a sensing platform. Depending on the main goal to be achieved in paper-based sensors, the fabrication methods and the analysis techniques can be tuned to fulfill the needs of the end-user. Current paper-based sensors are focused on microfluidic delivery of solution to the detection site whereas more advanced designs involve complex 3-D geometries based on the same microfluidic principles. Although paper-based sensors are very promising, they still suffer from certain limitations such as accuracy and sensitivity. However, it is anticipated that in the future, with advances in fabrication and analytical techniques, that there will be more new and innovative developments in paper-based sensors. These sensors could better meet the current objectives of a viable low-cost and portable device in addition to offering high sensitivity and selectivity, and multiple analyte discrimination. This paper is a review of recent advances in paper-based sensors and covers the following topics: existing fabrication techniques, analytical methods and application areas. Finally, the present challenges and future outlooks are discussed. PMID:23112667

  17. Consequences of contamination of the spacecraft environment: immunologic consequences.

    PubMed

    Shearer, W T

    2001-06-01

    Long-term space voyages pose numerous known and unknown health hazards, to the human immune system. Well-studied clinical examples of secondary immunodeficiencies created on Earth, lead one to predict that the conditions of prolonged space flight would weaken the human immune responses that normally hold infection and cancer in check. From evidence gathered from humans flown for prolonged periods in space and from human models of space flight studied on Earth it is reasonable to suspect that space travelers to the planet Mars would experience a weakening of immunity. Subtle defects of immune cell structure and function have been observed in astronauts, such as weakening of specific T-lymphocyte recall of specific antigens. Ground-based models also have demonstrated alterations of immune function, such as the elevation of neuroendocrine immune system messengers, interleukin-6, and soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor in sleep deprivation. Since severe immune compromise the clinical consequences of reactivation of latent virus infections and the development of cancer, has yet to be seen in space flight or in the Earth models, it is extremely important to begin to quantify early changes in immunity to predict the development of immune system collapse with poor clinical outcomes. This approach is designed to validate a number of surrogate markers that will predict trouble ahead. Inherent in this research is the development of countermeasures to reduce the risks of infection and cancer in the first humans going to Mars.

  18. Consequences of contamination of the spacecraft environment: immunologic consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Long-term space voyages pose numerous known and unknown health hazards, to the human immune system. Well-studied clinical examples of secondary immunodeficiencies created on Earth, lead one to predict that the conditions of prolonged space flight would weaken the human immune responses that normally hold infection and cancer in check. From evidence gathered from humans flown for prolonged periods in space and from human models of space flight studied on Earth it is reasonable to suspect that space travelers to the planet Mars would experience a weakening of immunity. Subtle defects of immune cell structure and function have been observed in astronauts, such as weakening of specific T-lymphocyte recall of specific antigens. Ground-based models also have demonstrated alterations of immune function, such as the elevation of neuroendocrine immune system messengers, interleukin-6, and soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor in sleep deprivation. Since severe immune compromise the clinical consequences of reactivation of latent virus infections and the development of cancer, has yet to be seen in space flight or in the Earth models, it is extremely important to begin to quantify early changes in immunity to predict the development of immune system collapse with poor clinical outcomes. This approach is designed to validate a number of surrogate markers that will predict trouble ahead. Inherent in this research is the development of countermeasures to reduce the risks of infection and cancer in the first humans going to Mars.

  19. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Considine, John M.

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties. This work develops new methods to characterize the mechanical properties of heterogeneous materials through a combination of techniques in experimental mechanics, materials science and numerical analysis. Current methods to analyze heterogeneous materials focus on crystalline materials or polymer-crystalline composites, where material boundaries are usually distinct. This work creates a methodology to analyze small, continuously-varying stiffness gradients in 100% polymer systems and is especially relevant to paper materials where factors influencing heterogeneity include local mass, fiber orientation, individual pulp fiber properties, local density, and drying restraint. A unique approach was used to understand the effect of heterogeneity on paper tensile strength. Additional variation was intentionally introduced, in the form of different size holes, and their effect on strength was measured. By modifying two strength criteria, an estimate of strength in the absence of heterogeneity was determined. In order to characterize stiffness heterogeneity, a novel load fixture was developed to excite full-field normal and shear strains for anisotropic stiffness determination. Surface strains were measured with digital image correlation and were analyzed with the VFM (Virtual Fields Method). This approach led to VFM-identified stiffnesses that were similar to values determined by conventional tests. The load fixture and VFM analyses were used to measure local stiffness and local stiffness variation on heterogeneous anisotropic materials. The approach was validated on simulated heterogeneous materials and was applied experimentally to three different paperboards

  20. The consequences of tourism for sustainable water use on a tropical island: Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Gössling, S

    2001-02-01

    Many developing countries in the tropics have focused on tourism to generate additional income sources and to diversity the economy. Coastlines in particular have been on the forefront of tourist infrastructure development. Here, the presence of a large number of tourists has often had negative consequences for the sustainable use of the available resources, which in turn has had an effect on the integrity of the ecosystems. In this paper, the situation is described for the use of freshwater resources on the east coast of Zanzibar, Tanzania. This region is water poor, relying on freshwater derived from seasonal rains and stored in less efficient aquifers, which consist of freshwater lenses floating on the underlying seawater. Tourism in the area has grown rapidly in recent years and is expected to further increase in the future. This development is expected to put additional pressure on the freshwater resources of the east coast, which show already signs of over-use. The consequences of overexploitation can include the lowering of the groundwater table, land subsidence, deteriorating groundwater quality, and saltwater intrusion. These, in turn, determine the living conditions in coastal areas and the effects will be felt both by the local populations and the tourist industry. An investigation is made into the causes and consequences of water abstraction by the tourist industry. The results show that present levels of withdrawal are not sustainable, and parts of the local populations are already experiencing water deficits on a daily basis. In the future, if the expected increase in tourist numbers occurs, the pressure on the aquifers will correspondingly increase. The results could be that the tourism in the area becomes unsustainable, which could have an adverse effect on the national economy and also on the local population and environment. Therefore, a precautionary water-management approach is suggested.

  1. Outstanding student papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eight presentations were named Outstanding Student Papers in the Atmospheric Sciences Section at the 1995 Fall Meeting.Steve Davis, who presented “Reversal Effects in Wideband dE/dt from Lightning Measured at Multiple Ground Stations,” is currently attending the University of Florida pursuing a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He graduated with high honors in 1990 with his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Florida. He received his master's degree in 1992 from the University of Florida. The research for his master's degree was in the area of photonics with applications to laser and waveguide structures. His current research with Ewen Thomson involves measuring radiation from lightning at multiple ground stations. From these measurements, he hopes to determine lightning parameters such as velocities and currents and apply these to new and existing models.

  2. Partnership to Evaluate Alternatives to Bisphenol A in Thermal Paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The partnership project for alternatives assessment of alternatives to BPA in thermal paper sought to assess potential hazards for BPA and alternatives to reduce the possibility of unintended consequences of using substitutes

  3. Chernobyl vis-à-vis the nuclear future: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    González, Abel J

    2007-11-01

    The paper aims to provide an international perspective on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident vis-à-vis the future development of the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. It describes the major international initiatives that were undertaken over the years in order to quantify the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, and also analyzes the impact of the accident on the development of nuclear energy taking account of the perception of its consequences. The paper revisits the historical saga flowing since the fateful explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine 20 y ago. It looks at some of the misunderstandings about the consequences of the accident and explores the worldwide nuclear stagnation that followed Chernobyl, surveying the negative public reaction and also the possibilities of a nuclear revival. It finally searches for a way forward, concluding that an effective international nuclear safety regime is urgently needed with the purpose of preventing catastrophes like Chernobyl from occurring and also that the Chernobyl consequences need to be readdressed properly. The paper concludes with an appeal to the radiation protection community to resolve once and for all the difficult issues of attributing health effects to low-level radiation exposure.

  4. DUSEL Theory White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, S.; Walker, T.; Babu, K.S.; Baer, H.; Balantekin, A.B.; Barger, V.; Berezhiani, Z.; de Gouvea, A.; Dermisek, R.; Dolgov, A.; Fileviez Perez, P.; Gabadadze, G.; Gal, A.; Gondolo, P.; Haxton, W.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kayser, B.; Kearns, E.; Kopeliovich, B.; Lande, K.; Marfatia, D.; /Kansas U. /Maryland U. /Northeastern U. /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Minnesota U. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /SUNY, Stony Brook /Oklahoma State U. /Iowa State U. /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2011-11-14

    The scientific case for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory [DUSEL] located at the Homestake mine in Lead, South Dakota is exceptional. The site of this future laboratory already claims a discovery for the detection of solar neutrinos, leading to a Nobel Prize for Ray Davis. Moreover this work provided the first step to our present understanding of solar neutrino oscillations and a chink in the armor of the Standard Model of particle physics. We now know, from several experiments located in deep underground experimental laboratories around the world, that neutrinos have mass and even more importantly this mass appears to fit into the framework of theories which unify all the known forces of nature, i.e. the strong, weak, electromagnetic and gravitational. Similarly, DUSEL can forge forward in the discovery of new realms of nature, housing six fundamental experiments that will test the frontiers of our knowledge: (1) Searching for nucleon decay (the decay of protons and neutrons predicted by grand unified theories of nature); (2) Searching for neutrino oscillations and CP violation by detecting neutrinos produced at a neutrino source (possibly located at Brookhaven National Laboratory and/or Fermi National Laboratory); (3) Searching for astrophysical neutrinos originating from the sun, from cosmic rays hitting the upper atmosphere or from other astrophysical sources, such a supernovae; (4) Searching for dark matter particles (the type of matter which does not interact electromagnetically, yet provides 24% of the mass of the Universe); (5) Looking for the rare process known as neutrino-less double beta decay which is predicted by most theories of neutrino mass and allows two neutrons in a nucleus to spontaneously change into two protons and two electrons; and (6) Searching for the rare process of neutron- anti-neutron oscillations, which would establish violation of baryon number symmetry. A large megaton water Cherenkov detector for neutrinos and

  5. Negative grouting consequences on karst environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, O.; Roje-Bonacci, T.; Gottstein, S.

    2009-04-01

    Grouting is a procedure by means of which grout is injected into different kinds of karst spaces (cracks, fissures, conduits and caves). It has a wide application in modern civil engineering, especially in karst terrains. It started nearly 200 years ago. In most cases the ingredients for the preparation of mortars and grouting suspensions are: cement, bentonite, clay and fillers, additives for stability and water. In practice the composition of grouting suspension is not standardized. A suspension injected under pressure will circulate in the karst spaces like a more or less viscous fluid until some of the larger suspended particles are blocked where the karst voids get narrower than the size of injected grains. The injection of materials into karst groundwater, i.e. the construction of grouting curtains, definitely could be the cause of unpredictable negative consequences on karst groundwater environments. The building of dams in karst areas always go along the construction of grouting curtains. During the construction of most dams in karst all over the world millions tons of injection mass have been injected in karst underground. It may impact water quantity in vadose zone and in karstic aquifer causing water table lowering and spring desiccation. In such cases the negative impact on local karst environment could be very dangerous. Physically as well as chemically this mass voraciously and quickly destroyed underground habitats and killed an enormous number of endangered and endemic species. Very often this is extremely expensive procedure and in many cases not very successful from the engineering point of view. From the ecological point of view it could causes catastrophic consequences. The greatest problem is that until now neither engineers nor ecologists took care of these great and massive negative influences on underground karst environments. In this paper few examples of different consequences of grouting on the hydrogeological as well as ecological regime

  6. Behavioral health and disasters: looking to the future.

    PubMed

    Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2015-01-01

    Along with other manmade and natural disasters, oil spills produce profound and long-term impacts on the behavioral health of their survivors. Although previous and ongoing research has focused on producing evidence of the breadth and depth of these impacts, future efforts must begin to translate this evidence into developing and implementing policies, programs, and practices that effectively contribute to their prevention and mitigation. Drawing upon a conceptual framework of the behavioral health impacts of oil spills developed from data collected in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, this paper examines potential interventions designed to prevent or mitigate biopsychosocial, interpersonal, and intrapersonal impacts on behavioral health. Future efforts to translate behavioral health research into effective practice will require the formation and maintenance of academic-community partnerships for the purpose of building resilience to these impacts and providing targeted services to those most vulnerable to their long-term consequences.

  7. Behavioral Health and Disasters: Looking to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Along with other manmade and natural disasters, oil spills produce profound and long-term impacts on the behavioral health of their survivors. While previous and ongoing research has focused on producing evidence of the breadth and depth of these impacts, future efforts must begin to translate this evidence into developing and implementing policies, programs and practices that effectively contribute to their prevention and mitigation. Drawing upon a conceptual framework of the behavioral health impacts of oil spills developed from data collected in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, this paper examines potential interventions designed to prevent or mitigate biopsychosocial, interpersonal and intrapersonal impacts on behavioral health. Future efforts to translate behavioral health research into effective practice will require the formation and maintenance of academic-community partnerships for the purpose of building resilience to these impacts and providing targeted services to those most vulnerable to their long-term consequences. PMID:24443145

  8. Cognitive-Motor Interference in Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review of Evidence, Correlates, and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Wajda, Douglas A.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) regularly exhibit deficits in motor and cognitive function. Recent evidence suggests that these impairments are compounded when motor and cognitive task are performed simultaneously such as walking while talking. The changes incurred during simultaneous performance of motor and cognitive tasks are a result of cognitive-motor interference (CMI) and operationalized as dual task costs (DTC). Recently in MS, research has been conducted to understand and analyze the impact of CMI. The purpose of this paper was to review the current literature related to the evidence, correlates, and consequences of CMI in MS. Relevant literature was collected from the results of a PubMed search for terms including “Cognitive-motor interference” or “Cognitive-motor interaction” or “Dual task” and “multiple sclerosis.” Overall, 20 papers were included for review which focused on CMI during balance and walking tasks. The finding that there is a lack of evidence pertaining to changes in the cognitive domain as well as to the specific consequences of CMI in MS was noted. Future work should aim to fill these gaps and ultimately investigate the usefulness of targeted interventions in reducing the deleterious effects of CMI in individuals with MS. PMID:25839039

  9. Future food.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2016-12-01

    Food systems have changed markedly with human settlement and agriculture, industrialisation, trade, migration and now the digital age. Throughout these transitions, there has been a progressive population explosion and net ecosystem loss and degradation. Climate change now gathers pace, exacerbated by ecological dysfunction. Our health status has been challenged by a developing people-environment mismatch. We have regarded ecological conquest and innovative technology as solutions, but have not understood how ecologically dependent and integrated we are. We are ecological creatures interfaced by our sensoriness, microbiomes, shared regulatory (endocrine) mechanisms, immune system, biorhythms and nutritional pathways. Many of us are 'nature-deprived'. We now suffer what might be termed ecological health disorders (EHD). If there were less of us, nature's resilience might cope, but more than 9 billion people by 2050 is probably an intolerable demand on the planet. Future food must increasingly take into account the pressures on ecosystem-dependent food systems, with foods probably less biodiverse, although eating in this way allows optimal health; energy dysequilibrium with less physical activity and foods inappropriately energy dense; and less socially-conducive food habits. 'Personalised Nutrition', with extensive and resource-demanding nutrigenomic, metabolomic and microbiomic data may provide partial health solutions in clinical settings, but not be justified for ethical, risk management or sustainability reasons in public health. The globally prevalent multidimensional malnutritional problems of food insecurity, quality and equity require local, regional and global action to prevent further ecosystem degradation as well as to educate, provide sustainable livelihoods and encourage respectful social discourse and practice about the role of food.

  10. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  11. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  12. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  13. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  14. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  15. Depression and dementia: cause, consequence or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sophia; Thomas, Alan J

    2014-10-01

    The relationship between depression and dementia is complex and still not well understood. A number of different views exist regarding how the two conditions are linked as well as the underlying neurobiological mechanisms at work. This narrative review examined longitudinal and cross sectional studies in the existing literature and determined the evidence supporting depression being a risk factor, a prodrome, a consequence, or an independent comorbidity in dementia. Overall there is convincing evidence to support both the notion that early life depression can act as a risk factor for later life dementia, and that later life depression can be seen as a prodrome to dementia. There is also evidence to support both conditions showing similar neurobiological changes, particularly white matter disease, either indicating shared risk factors or a shared pattern of neuronal damage. These findings highlight the need to examine if effective treatment of depressive episodes has any effect in reducing the prevalence of dementia, as well as clinicians being vigilant for late life depression indicating the incipient development of dementia, and therefore carefully following up these individuals for future cognitive impairment.

  16. Outstanding student paper awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Hydrology Section presented five outstanding student paper awards at the 1999 Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June.Maneesha Joshi presented a poster titled “Estimation of the Extent and Duration of Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet using an Edge Detection Technique on Passive Microwave Data.” She received her B.Tech. in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1991, and a M.S. in environmental engineering from State University of New York, Buffalo in 1994. Maneesha expects to complete her Ph.D. in civil engineering (remote sensing) in September 1999, under the supervision of Carolyn Merry (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Science), Ken Jezek, and John Bolzan (Byrd Polar Research Center) at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Her thesis focuses on estimating the extent of melt, melt season, and duration, and absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet from passive microwave and SAR data. Maneesha's other interests include image processing, issues related to global climate change, and photogrammetry.

  17. Outstanding student paper awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Atmospheric Sciences Section presented the following outstanding student paper awards at the AGU 1997 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California, last December. James Corbett presented a poster on “Nitrogen and Sulfur Emissions From Oceangoing Ships.” James is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy (EPP) at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa. He has been awarded a M.S. degree in EPP and recently completed the M.S. requirements in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He graduated in 1985 with a degree in marine engineering technology from the California Maritime Academy and holds a California Professional Engineering License (Mechanical). He joined the doctoral program in engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University in August 1995. In 1997, he was selected for a U.S. EPA STAR Fellowship. His research focuses on international maritime transportation and pollution issues, particularly air emissions from ship propulsion. James has developed the first global geographic characterization of air emissions from international maritime transport. As recently published in Science (Corbett and Fischbeck, 1997), his work estimates the global annual nitrogen and sulfur emissions from ships to be 3.08 terragrams (Tg) N and 4.24 Tg S, respectively.

  18. Outstanding student papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Two presentations in the Geodesy Section were named Outstanding Student Papers at AGU's Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Md.John Weber presented “Estimation of Site Velocity Gradients from GPS Measurements in the New Madrid Seismic Zone.” Weber received an A.S. (1980) from Moraine Valley Community College, then a B.S. (1982), and an M.S(1987), both in Geology, from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. He completed his Ph.D. (1995) research at Northwestern University as a NASA Fellow, and is currently working at RSMAS as an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow. In his work, he estimates strains and motions in the Caribbean-South America plate boundary zone by comparing historic (1901) triangulation data to 1994 GPS measurements. His research interests are broadly related to kinematics and deformation, mostly in plate boundary zones (ancient and modern), although his Ph.D. research focused on poorly understood intraplate deformation. He applies in his research techniques from both geodesy and structural geology. This fall, he will start a new position as a structural geologist at Grand Valley State University, Michigan.

  19. [Evaluation of consequences of test use in validity theory].

    PubMed

    Padilla, José Luis; Gómez, Juana; Hildago, María Dolores; Muñiz, José

    2006-05-01

    There is little doubt about the importance of validity during the compilation and evaluation of tests. Nevertheless, intense debate has arisen with regard to incorporating the consequences of test use as a further source of evidence in the most recent edition of the AERA, APA, NCME Standards . After reviewing the historical antecedents of the issue and the main lines of approach of both defenders and critics, this paper sets out the arguments which may be used in answer to the question: 'At what point should the analysis of the consequences of test use become part of validation?' The response of the AERA, APA, NCME Standards has clear similarities with the perspective adopted towards the consideration of bias in tests as a problem of validity. Finally, the paper describes how consequence validation may be subject to tension arising from the evolution of notions of justice in test use.

  20. Teacher Shortages: Truth and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooredman, Kathryn J.

    This paper provides a broad overview of the teacher shortage situation and concludes that shortages may occur during the next 10 years, depending upon the factors of supply and demand. Demand, it appears, will increase until an additional 200,000 teachers will be needed by 1990. The supply of teachers may increase enough to met this demand, but…

  1. Observational Consequences of Galactic Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, Bruce F.; Cuzzi, Jeff C. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The normal mode oscillations of galaxies we reported recently are large enough to produce observational consequences. The two lowest order modes were both very strong and long lived: the fundamental is a "breathing" mode in which the entire galaxy expands and contracts homologously, while the second radial mode is spherically symmetrical and has one radial node. A sheet of neutral hydrogen in an oscillating galaxy partakes of the general oscillations, and the resulting velocity fields would normally be interpreted in terms of warps or oval distortions. More interestingly, the second radial mode might be a dynamical driver for bulges in early-type spiral galaxies. If bulges result from a dynamical process within the galaxy, there might be other observable properties driven by the same dynamical process. The hole often reported in neutral hydrogen in early type spiral galaxies is one such candidate. It has sometimes been reported to be about the same size as the bulge. We will discuss evidence from velocity fields concerning the fundamental mode and from the coincidence of bulge and HI hole sizes as evidence for the second mode.

  2. The Leader of the Future. New Visions, Strategies, and Practices for the Next Era. First Edition. Drucker Foundation Future Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesselbein, Frances, Ed.; And Others

    The 31 papers in this volume address the requirements and qualities of leadership and leaders in the organization of the future. Papers are grouped into the following categories: Leading the Organization of the Future, Future Leaders in Action, Learning to Lead for Tomorrow, and Executives on the Future of Leadership. Some of the papers included…

  3. Prosocial Consequences of Interpersonal Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The capacity to establish interpersonal synchrony is fundamental to human beings because it constitutes the basis for social connection and understanding. Interpersonal synchrony refers to instances when the movements or sensations of two or more people overlap in time and form. Recently, the causal influence of interpersonal synchrony on prosociality has been established through experiments. The current meta-analysis is the first to synthesize these isolated and sometimes contradictory experiments. We meta-analyzed 60 published and unpublished experiments that compared an interpersonal synchrony condition with at least one control condition. The results reveal a medium effect of interpersonal synchrony on prosociality with regard to both attitudes and behaviors. Furthermore, experimenter effects and intentionality moderate these effects. We discuss the strengths and limitations of our analysis, as well as its practical implications, and we suggest avenues for future research. PMID:28105388

  4. Unintended consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Dulciene MM; Rocha, Andreia MC; Crabtree, Jean E

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is predominantly acquired early in life. The prevalence of the infection in childhood is low in developed countries, whereas in developing countries most children are infected by 10 y of age. In poor resource settings, where malnutrition, parasitic/enteropathogen and H. pylori infection co-exist in young children, H. pylori might have potentially more diverse clinical outcomes. This paper reviews the impact of childhood H. pylori infection in developing countries that should now be the urgent focus of future research. The extra-gastric manifestations in early H. pylori infection in infants in poor resource settings might be a consequence of the infection associated initial hypochlorhydria. The potential role of H. pylori infection on iron deficiency, growth impairment, diarrheal disease, malabsorption and cognitive function is discussed in this review. PMID:23988829

  5. Peer victimization in adolescence: The nature, progression, and consequences of being bullied within a developmental context.

    PubMed

    Troop-Gordon, Wendy

    2017-02-01

    Since Dan Olweus's seminal work on bullying in the 1970's (Olweus, 1978), there has been a concerted effort by investigators to identify the confluence of factors that contribute to peer victimization and its role in psychosocial development. Although the cause and consequences of peer victimization may include underlying, age-invariant processes, the manifestation of these factors is, in part, driven by the developmental stage being studied. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of peer victimization requires an explicit developmental perspective. This paper examines how peer victimization in adolescence is unique from other developmental periods. Changes in the nature of peer victimization, associated risk factors, the contexts in which victimization is experienced, and the psychosocial outcomes affected are addressed. A primary focus is how maturational processes and interpersonal contexts characteristic of adolescence contribute to changes in victimization, with the objective of informing future research directions and the development of effective interventions.

  6. Metaperspectives for the Future: Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Ronald W.

    This paper discusses the link between technology and humanity and examines the possibility of using technology to transform man into a superintelligent species. The course of human development can be viewed as a consequence of technological development. If we can plot the course technology will take, then we can gain insight into the course…

  7. Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

  8. Legal Weapons of Mass Destruction Consequence Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    LEGAL WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION CONSEQUENCE MANAGEMENT SEMINAR REPORT Defense Threat Reduction Agency Advanced Systems ...guidance documents pertinent to WMD CM ; • Contribute to the development of a Federal Legal Reference Deskbook for WMD consequence management . The...of medical responders during a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)–Consequence Management ( CM ) event. Use of the Military Posse Comitatus

  9. Rose-colored beer goggles: the relation between experiencing alcohol consequences and perceived likelihood and valence.

    PubMed

    Logan, Diane E; Henry, Teague; Vaughn, Matthew; Luk, Jeremy W; King, Kevin M

    2012-06-01

    Although experiencing alcohol-related consequences has some influence on future drinking, this effect may be stronger based on the degree to which the consequence is viewed as positive versus negative, either by the individual or predefined by researchers. This study explored the relationship between experiencing positive and negative alcohol-related consequences and college students' perceptions of how likely those consequences were to occur in the future (i.e., likelihood), and their view of how positive or negative experiencing those consequences would be if they did experience them as a result of drinking (i.e., valence). Data were collected from 491 college students (mean age = 19.26; 56.4% female; 55.0% Caucasian; 33.2% Asian/Pacific Islander) through a computerized survey. Results indicated that experiencing more positive consequences in the past year was associated with viewing those consequences as both more likely to occur and more positive, while experiencing more negative consequences was associated with viewing them as less negative and no more likely to occur, except for those who had experienced the highest levels of negative consequences. These findings suggest that finding ways to reduce both perceptions as well as consequences themselves may be effective intervention tools.

  10. Rose-Colored Beer Goggles: The Relation between Experiencing Alcohol Consequences and Perceived Likelihood and Valence

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Diane E.; Henry, Teague; Vaughn, Matthew; Luk, Jeremy W.; King, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Although experiencing alcohol-related consequences has some influence on future drinking, this effect may be stronger based on the degree to which the consequence is viewed as positive versus negative, either by the individual or pre-defined by researchers. This study explored the relationship between experiencing positive and negative alcohol-related consequences and college students’ perceptions of how likely those consequences were to occur in the future (i.e. likelihood), and their view of how positive or negative experiencing those consequences would be if they did experience them as a result of drinking (i.e. valence). Data were collected from 491 college students (mean age = 19.26; 56.4% female; 55.0% Caucasian; 33.2% Asian/Pacific Islander) through a computerized survey. Results indicated that experiencing more positive consequences in the past year was associated with viewing those consequences as both more likely to occur and more positive, while experiencing more negative consequences was associated with viewing them as less negative and no more likely to occur, except for those who had experienced the highest levels of negative consequences. These findings suggest that finding ways to reduce both perceptions as well as consequences themselves may be effective intervention tools. PMID:21639598

  11. Potential Consequences Of Selection On Gestation Length On Holstein Performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper was to determine if genetic evaluations of Holstein gestation length (GL) were reliable and to assess potential consequences of selection for either shorter or longer GL by examining impact on performance in the subsequent lactation. Holstein bulls used to develop predict...

  12. Future Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Michael J.; Politi, Christina; Klonidis, Dimitrios; Nejabati, Reza; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents views on the future of optical networking. A historical look at the emergence of optical networking is first taken, followed by a discussion on the drivers pushing for a new and pervasive network, which is based on photonics and can satisfy the needs of a broadening base of residential, business, and scientific users. Regional plans and targets for optical networking are reviewed to understand which current approaches are judged important. Today, two thrusts are driving separate optical network infrastructure models, namely 1) the need by nations to provide a ubiquitous network infrastructure to support all the future services and telecommunication needs of residential and business users and 2) increasing demands by the scientific community for networks to support their requirements with respect to large-scale data transport and processing. This paper discusses these network models together with the key enabling technologies currently being considered for future implementation, including optical circuit, burst and packet switching, and optical code-division multiplexing. Critical subsystem functionalities are also reviewed. The discussion considers how these separate models might eventually merge to form a global optical network infrastructure.

  13. Future GPD Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Ralf

    2009-08-04

    Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs) have grown into one of the main topics in hadron physics. They are playing a central role in the physics of the JLab 12 GeV upgrade as well as in the future physics programme of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. This paper explores the future of GPD measurements in the short, medium and long term. The short term includes the analysis of already existing data from HERMES and JLab and planned measurements at JLab before the 12 GeV upgrade. In the medium term this concerns the JLab programme after the upgrade, measurements at COMPASS and at PANDA/FAIR. The EIC project or possible alternatives form the long term perspective. The main focus of the considerations lies on DVCS measurements and related experiments.

  14. Future Experiments in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement methodologies of astrophysics experiments reflect the enormous variation of the astrophysical radiation itself. The diverse nature of the astrophysical radiation, e.g. cosmic rays, electromagnetic radiation, and neutrinos, is further complicated by the enormous span in energy, from the 1.95 Kappa relic neutrino background to cosmic rays with energy greater than 10(exp 20)eV. The measurement of gravity waves and search for dark matter constituents are also of astrophysical interest. Thus, the experimental techniques employed to determine the energy of the incident particles are strongly dependent upon the specific particles and energy range to be measured. This paper summarizes some of the calorimetric methodologies and measurements planned by future astrophysics experiments. A focus will be placed on the measurement of higher energy astrophysical radiation. Specifically, future cosmic ray, gamma ray, and neutrino experiments will be discussed.

  15. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  16. Flexible holey graphene paper electrodes with enhanced rate capability for energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M; Kung, Mayfair C; Kung, Harold H

    2011-11-22

    The unique combination of high surface area, high electrical conductivity and robust mechanical integrity has attracted great interest in the use of graphene sheets for future electronics applications. Their potential applications for high-power energy storage devices, however, are restricted by the accessible volume, which may be only a fraction of the physical volume, a consequence of the compact geometry of the stack and the ion mobility. Here we demonstrated that remarkably enhanced power delivery can be realized in graphene papers for the use in Li-ion batteries by controlled generation of in-plane porosity via a mechanical cavitation-chemical oxidation approach. These flexible, holey graphene papers, created via facile microscopic engineering, possess abundant ion binding sites, enhanced ion diffusion kinetics, and excellent high-rate lithium-ion storage capabilities, and are suitable for high-performance energy storage devices.

  17. Biomolecule immobilization techniques for bioactive paper fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanzhi; Hu, Yim Fun

    2012-04-01

    Research into paper-based sensors or functional materials that can perform analytical functions with active recognition capabilities is rapidly expanding, and significant research effort has been made into the design and fabrication of bioactive paper at the biosensor level to detect potential health hazards. A key step in the fabrication of bioactive paper is the design of the experimental and operational procedures for the immobilization of biomolecules such as antibodies, enzymes, phages, cells, proteins, synthetic polymers and DNA aptamers on a suitably prepared paper membrane. The immobilization methods are concisely categorized into physical absorption, bioactive ink entrapment, bioaffinity attachment and covalent chemical bonding immobilization. Each method has individual immobilization characteristics. Although every biomolecule-paper combination has to be optimized before use, the bioactive ink entrapment method is the most commonly used approach owing to its general applicability and biocompatibility. Currently, there are four common applications of bioactive paper: (1) paper-based bioassay or paper-based analytical devices for sample conditioning; (2) counterfeiting and countertempering in the packaging and construction industries; (3) pathogen detection for food and water quality monitoring; and (4) deactivation of pathogenic bacteria using antimicrobial paper. This article reviews and compares the different biomolecule immobilization techniques and discusses current trends. Current, emerging and future applications of bioactive paper are also discussed.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF KRAFT PAPER.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    kraft paper. It was desired to obtain improved microbiological, oil, water and heat aging resistance. A commercially prepared kraft paper had good...chemically treated papers or commercially prepared kraft paper met all the desired requirements. In general, it is thought that the already sized...condition of the kraft paper substrate made the papers’ receptivity to treatment somewhat variable. (Author)

  19. Nuclear dynamics consequence analysis of SNF disposed in volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, L.C.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.; Taylor, L.L.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuels in a geologic repository. The analyses investigated criticality potential, criticality excursion consequences, and the probability frequency for nuclear criticality. Key findings include: expected number of fissions per excursion range from 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 20}, repeated rate of criticalities range from 3 to 30 per year, and the probability frequency for criticality initiators (based on rough-order-of-magnitude calculations) is 7{times}10{sup {minus}7}. Overall results indicate that criticality consequences are a minor contribution to the biological hazards caused by the disposal of spent nuclear material.

  20. Can We Power Future Mars Missions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Sturm, Erick J., II; Woolley, Ryan C.; Jordan, James F.

    2006-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration identified the exploration of Mars as one of the key pathways. In response, NASAs Mars Program Office is developing a detailed mission lineup for the next decade that would lead to future explorations. Mission architectures for the next decade include both orbiters and landers. Existing power technologies, which could include solar panels, batteries, radioisotope power systems, and in the future fission power, could support these missions. Second and third decade explorations could target human precursor and human in-situ missions, building on increasingly complex architectures. Some of these could use potential feed forward from earlier Constellation missions to the Moon, discussed in the ESAS study. From a potential Mars Sample Return mission to human missions the complexity of the architectures increases, and with it the delivered mass and power requirements also amplify. The delivered mass at Mars mostly depends on the launch vehicle, while the landed mass might be further limited by EDL technologies, including the aeroshell, parachutes, landing platform, and pinpoint landing. The resulting in-situ mass could be further divided into payload elements and suitable supporting power systems. These power systems can range from tens of watts to multi-kilowatts, influenced by mission type, mission configuration, landing location, mission duration, and season. Regardless, the power system design should match the power needs of these surface assets within a given architecture. Consequently, in this paper we will identify potential needs and bounds of delivered mass and architecture dependent power requirements to surface assets that would enable future in-situ exploration of Mars.

  1. A Review of Paper Quality and Paper Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Studies involving condition of paper in libraries are reviewed, noting the folding endurance test, paper quality, and the work of William Barrow in field of conservation and production of long-lasting paper. The theory of paper-making, types of degradation, and treatments for acid paper are included. Sixty references are cited. (EJS)

  2. Heroin overdose: causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Warner-Smith, M; Darke, S; Lynskey, M; Hall, W

    2001-08-01

    Over the past decade fatal opioid overdose has emerged as a major public health issue internationally. This paper examines the risk factors for overdose from a biomedical perspective. While significant risk factors for opioid overdose fatality are well recognized, the mechanism of fatal overdose remains unclear. Losses of tolerance and concomitant use of alcohol and other CNS depressants clearly play a major role in fatality; however, such risk factors do not account for the strong age and gender patterns observed consistently among victims of overdose. There is evidence that systemic disease may be more prevalent in users at greatest risk of overdose. We hypothesize that pulmonary and hepatic dysfunction resulting from such disease may increase susceptibility to both fatal and non-fatal overdose. Sequelae of non-fatal overdose are recognized in the clinical literature but few epidemiological data exist describing the burden of morbidity arising from such sequelae. The potential for overdose to cause persisting morbidity is reviewed.

  3. Evolutionary consequences of climate-induced range shifts in insects.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guillén, Rosa A; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex; Hansson, Bengt; Ott, Jürgen; Wellenreuther, Maren

    2016-11-01

    Range shifts can rapidly create new areas of geographic overlap between formerly allopatric taxa and evidence is accumulating that this can affect species persistence. We review the emerging literature on the short- and long-term consequences of these geographic range shifts. Specifically, we focus on the evolutionary consequences of novel species interactions in newly created sympatric areas by describing the potential (i) short-term processes acting on reproductive barriers between species and (ii) long-term consequences of range shifts on the stability of hybrid zones, introgression and ultimately speciation and extinction rates. Subsequently, we (iii) review the empirical literature on insects to evaluate which processes have been studied, and (iv) outline some areas that deserve increased attention in the future, namely the genomics of hybridisation and introgression, our ability to forecast range shifts and the impending threat from insect vectors and pests on biodiversity, human health and crop production. Our review shows that species interactions in de novo sympatric areas can be manifold, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing species diversity. A key issue that emerges is that climate-induced hybridisations in insects are much more widespread than anticipated and that rising temperatures and increased anthropogenic disturbances are accelerating the process of species mixing. The existing evidence only shows the tip of the iceberg and we are likely to see many more cases of species mixing following range shifts in the near future.

  4. Future Library Systems and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A. R. D.

    2010-10-01

    The paper attempts to provide brief answers to the questions: What will be the form of future libraries? Will there be libraries in the future? It presents an overview of the latest technologies such as digital libraries, metadata harvesters, SRU/SRW, and Web 2.0 along with some services provided by the Documentation Research and Training Centre of the Indian Statistical Institute. It also presents a brief sketch of future semantic web technology and the role of library and information professionals in providing web-based information services.

  5. The future is 'ambient'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugmayr, Artur

    2006-02-01

    The research field of ambient media starts to spread rapidly and first applications for consumer homes are on the way. Ambient media is the logical continuation of research around media. Media has been evolving from old media (e.g. print media), to integrated presentation in one form (multimedia - or new media), to generating a synthetic world (virtual reality), to the natural environment is the user-interface (ambient media), and will be evolving towards real/synthetic undistinguishable media (bio-media or bio-multimedia). After the IT bubble was bursting, multimedia was lacking a vision of potential future scenarios and applications. Within this research paper the potentials, applications, and market available solutions of mobile ambient multimedia are studied. The different features of ambient mobile multimedia are manifold and include wearable computers, adaptive software, context awareness, ubiquitous computers, middleware, and wireless networks. The paper especially focuses on algorithms and methods that can be utilized to realize modern mobile ambient systems.

  6. Unintended consequences and trade-offs of fish passage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    8. McLaughlin, Robert L.; Smyth, Eric R.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Jones, Michael L.; Koops, Marten A.; Pratt, Thomas C.; Vélez-Espino, Luis-Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We synthesized evidence for unintended consequences and trade-offs associated with the passage of fishes. Provisioning of fish passageways at dams and dam removals are being carried out increasingly as resource managers seek ways to reduce fragmentation of migratory fish populations and restore biodiversity and nature-like ecosystem services in tributaries altered by dams. The benefits of provisioning upstream passage are highlighted widely. Possible unwanted consequences and trade-offs of upstream passage are coming to light, but remain poorly examined and underappreciated. Unintended consequences arise when passage of native and desirable introduced fishes is delayed, undone (fallback), results in patterns of movement and habitat use that reduce Darwinian fitness (e.g. ecological traps), or is highly selective taxonomically and numerically. Trade-offs arise when passage decisions intended to benefit native species interfere with management decisions intended to control the unwanted spread of non-native fishes and aquatic invertebrates, or genes, diseases and contaminants carried by hatchery and wild fishes. These consequences and trade-offs will vary in importance from system to system and can result in large economic and environmental costs. For some river systems, decisions about how to manage fish passage involve substantial risks and could benefit from use of a formal, structured process that allows transparent, objective and, where possible, quantitative evaluation of these risks. Such a process can also facilitate the design of an adaptive framework that provides valuable insights into future decisions.

  7. Impact of near-future ocean acidification on echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Dupont, S; Ortega-Martínez, O; Thorndyke, M

    2010-03-01

    As a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO(2), the world's oceans are warming and slowly becoming more acidic (ocean acidification, OA) and profound changes in marine ecosystems are certain. Calcification is one of the primary targets for studies of the impact of CO(2)-driven climate change in the oceans and one of the key marine groups most likely to be impacted by predicted climate change events are the echinoderms. Echinoderms are a vital component of the marine environment with representatives in virtually every ecosystem, where they are often keystone ecosystem engineers. This paper reviews and analyses what is known about the impact of near-future ocean acidification on echinoderms. A global analysis of the literature reveals that echinoderms are surprisingly robust to OA and that important differences in sensitivity to OA are observed between populations and species. However, this is modulated by parameters such as (1) exposure time with rare longer term experiments revealing negative impacts that are hidden in short or midterm ones; (2) bottlenecks in physiological processes and life-cycle such as stage-specific developmental phenomena that may drive the whole species responses; (3) ecological feedback transforming small scale sub lethal effects into important negative effects on fitness. We hypothesize that populations/species naturally exposed to variable environmental pH conditions may be pre-adapted to future OA highlighting the importance to understand and monitor environmental variations in order to be able to to predict sensitivity to future climate changes. More stress ecology research is needed at the frontier between ecotoxicology and ecology, going beyond standardized tests using model species in order to address multiple water quality factors (e.g. pH, temperature, toxicants) and organism health. However, available data allow us to conclude that near-future OA will have negative impact on echinoderm taxa with likely significant consequences

  8. Behavioral and physiological consequences of sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F

    2007-08-15

    Adequate sleep is essential for general healthy functioning. This paper reviews recent research on the effects of chronic sleep restriction on neurobehavioral and physiological functioning and discusses implications for health and lifestyle. Restricting sleep below an individual's optimal time in bed (TIB) can cause a range of neurobehavioral deficits, including lapses of attention, slowed working memory, reduced cognitive throughput, depressed mood, and perseveration of thought. Neurobehavioral deficits accumulate across days of partial sleep loss to levels equivalent to those found after 1 to 3 nights of total sleep loss. Recent experiments reveal that following days of chronic restriction of sleep duration below 7 hours per night, significant daytime cognitive dysfunction accumulates to levels comparable to that found after severe acute total sleep deprivation. Additionally, individual variability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep restriction appears to be stable, suggesting a trait-like (possibly genetic) differential vulnerability or compensatory changes in the neurobiological systems involved in cognition. A causal role for reduced sleep duration in adverse health outcomes remains unclear, but laboratory studies of healthy adults subjected to sleep restriction have found adverse effects on endocrine functions, metabolic and inflammatory responses, suggesting that sleep restriction produces physiological consequences that may be unhealthy.

  9. Estimating Consequences of MMOD Penetrations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H.; Hyde, James; Christiansen, E.; Lear, D.

    2017-01-01

    The threat from micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts on space vehicles is often quantified in terms of the probability of no penetration (PNP). However, for large spacecraft, especially those with multiple compartments, a penetration may have a number of possible outcomes. The extent of the damage (diameter of hole, crack length or penetration depth), the location of the damage relative to critical equipment or crew, crew response, and even the time of day of the penetration are among the many factors that can affect the outcome. For the International Space Station (ISS), a Monte-Carlo style software code called Manned Spacecraft Crew Survivability (MSCSurv) is used to predict the probability of several outcomes of an MMOD penetration-broadly classified as loss of crew (LOC), crew evacuation (Evac), loss of escape vehicle (LEV), and nominal end of mission (NEOM). By generating large numbers of MMOD impacts (typically in the billions) and tracking the consequences, MSCSurv allows for the inclusion of a large number of parameters and models as well as enabling the consideration of uncertainties in the models and parameters. MSCSurv builds upon the results from NASA's Bumper software (which provides the probability of penetration and critical input data to MSCSurv) to allow analysts to estimate the probability of LOC, Evac, LEV, and NEOM. This paper briefly describes the overall methodology used by NASA to quantify LOC, Evac, LEV, and NEOM with particular emphasis on describing in broad terms how MSCSurv works and its capabilities and most significant models.

  10. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  11. Tier 3 Toxicity Value White Paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this white paper is to articulate the issues pertaining to Tier 3 toxicity values and provide recommendations on processes that will improve the transparency and consistency of identifying, evaluating, selecting, and documenting Tier 3 toxicity values for use in the Superfund and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) programs. This white paper will be used to assist regional risk assessors in selecting Tier 3 toxicity values as well as provide the foundation for future regional and national efforts to improve guidance and policy on Tier 3 toxicity values.

  12. The Future of Butyric Acid in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Park, Jae-Yeon; Mitchell, Robert J.; Sang, Byoung-In

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the different applications of butyric acid and its current and future production status are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on the biofuels industry. As such, this paper discusses different issues regarding butyric acid fermentations and provides suggestions for future improvements and their approaches. PMID:22593687

  13. Trends toward the Future in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massengale, John D., Ed.

    This collection of papers probes the current trends likely to have the greatest impact on the field of physical education. Contributors explore the future of physical education regarding scholarship, teaching, women faculty, sport management, and wellness programs. The following papers are included: (1) "Considering the Future of Physical…

  14. Future of PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchdoerfer, Richard G.

    1997-05-01

    This paper attempts to forecast tow to five years to understand the future PACS environment and is the result of reviews of literature and interviews with nearly thirty organization sand individuals representing the PACS community. Two to five years was set as a realistic limit to projections although thoughts for the future of digital medical imaging beyond five years are included. The variance in projections even in the short term is significant and any projection beyond five years will be even more uncertain. The organizations that contributed to the interviews include academic centers, the federal government, consultants and vendors of PACS technology. The vendor products span the industry to include capture of images at the modality level, image management and distribution systems, services, and speech recognition. This paper will place the changes that will occur in PACS within the context of the larger changes that are occurring in health care, the practice of image acquisition and interpretation, and information systems. Selected technologies that will influence PACS are reviewed in more depth with a view towards the affect that they will have on PACS and the interpretation of images.

  15. The Great Paper Towel Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Wayne R.

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a class project in which students explore characteristics of paper towels and paper towel advertising. Students design a variety of experiments related to paper towels and their claims. Provides four activities. (DDR)

  16. Wood and Paper Manufacturing Sectors

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find EPA regulatory information for the wood product and paper manufacturing sectors, including paper, pulp and lumber. Information includes NESHAPs and effluent guidelines for pulp and paper rulemaking, and compliance guidelines

  17. Consequence and Resilience Modeling for Chemical Supply Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamber, Kevin L.; Vugrin, Eric D.; Ehlen, Mark A.; Sun, Amy C.; Warren, Drake E.; Welk, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. chemical sector produces more than 70,000 chemicals that are essential material inputs to critical infrastructure systems, such as the energy, public health, and food and agriculture sectors. Disruptions to the chemical sector can potentially cascade to other dependent sectors, resulting in serious national consequences. To address this concern, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) tasked Sandia National Laboratories to develop a predictive consequence modeling and simulation capability for global chemical supply chains. This paper describes that capability , which includes a dynamic supply chain simulation platform called N_ABLE(tm). The paper also presents results from a case study that simulates the consequences of a Gulf Coast hurricane on selected segments of the U.S. chemical sector. The case study identified consequences that include impacted chemical facilities, cascading impacts to other parts of the chemical sector. and estimates of the lengths of chemical shortages and recovery . Overall. these simulation results can DHS prepare for and respond to actual disruptions.

  18. 40 CFR 1502.16 - Environmental consequences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Environmental consequences. 1502.16 Section 1502.16 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.16 Environmental consequences. This section forms the scientific and analytic basis for...

  19. 40 CFR 1502.16 - Environmental consequences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Environmental consequences. 1502.16 Section 1502.16 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.16 Environmental consequences. This section forms the scientific and analytic basis for...

  20. Effects of Anticipated Consequences on ERA Opinion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Glenna; Huber, Joan

    1982-01-01

    Studies the effect of background factors on beliefs about the consequences of the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). What types of people fear or welcome the ERA, what their reasons are, and where they obtain information about its possible consequences are examined. (AM)

  1. The vanishing forest. The human consequences of deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report highlights the rapid destruction of the world's remaining tropical rainforests. It stresses the devastating consequences, both in the short-term, as developers take over the forests from their indigenous inhabitants, and in the long-term, as deforestation threatens to destroy the vital natural resource, to bring out irreversible climatic changes, and to cause the loss of gene pools needed for future agricultural and medical progress. What we urgently need, this report argues, are policy changes that make forest conversion a vehicle of sustainable development so that human civilization can continue in the tropics, and so that forest areas of particular ecological value are preserved.

  2. [The psychosocial consequences of infertility and fertility treatment].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lone; Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal

    2012-10-08

    Infertility and its treatment are severe, chronic, low-control stressors. Among women unsuccessful treatment is associated with increased risk of developing depressive symptoms. Among men infertility is associated with more negative emotional responses. Lifelong involuntary childlessness is associated with reduced mental well-being. It is recommended in the future to integrate mental health professionals at fertility clinics in Denmark in order to secure that also the psychosocial consequences of infertility and fertility treatment are taken care of with the highest professional standard based on scientific knowledge within this field.

  3. A Field Investigation of the Effects of Drinking Consequences on Young Adults’ Readiness to Change

    PubMed Central

    Usala, Julie M.; Celio, Mark A.; Lisman, Stephen A.; Day, Anne M.; Spear, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    In the research on readiness to change (RTC) one’s drinking, there has been little assessment of the influence of positive drinking consequences or other potential moderating variables. To address these limitations, we examined how young adults’ RTC their alcohol consumption shortly following a drinking episode was associated with self-reported drinking consequences, as well as any potential moderating effects of gender and Breath Alcohol Concentration (BrAC). In street interviews outside bars, 238 young adults were administered questionnaires about their drinking, including a measure examining participants’ current readiness to reduce their alcohol consumption. Within 72 hours of their drinking episode, 67 participants (36 males; Entire Sample Mage = 20.90 years, Range = 18–26 years) completed an online survey, once again measuring RTC as well as positive and negative drinking consequences. Consistent with our hypothesis, positive drinking consequences were negatively associated with participants’ changes in RTC. Additionally, a three-way interaction of gender x BrAC x Positive Drinking Consequences on RTC showed that females with low BrACs reported higher RTC scores when they had endorsed fewer positive drinking consequences. Interestingly, negative drinking consequences alone did not impact individuals’ RTC. Because positive drinking consequences were a significantly better predictor of RTC than were negative drinking consequences, researchers are advised to examine both types of consequences in future studies. Finally, effective alcohol education programs for those who have never consumed alcohol as well as social drinkers should include consideration of the experience of positive outcomes. PMID:25452061

  4. Health information systems - past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Haux, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    In 1984, Peter Reichertz gave a lecture on the past, present and future of hospital information systems. In the meantime, there has been a tremendous progress in medicine as well as in informatics. One important benefit of this progress is that our life expectancy is nowadays significantly higher than it would have been even some few decades ago. This progress, leading to aging societies, is of influence to the organization of health care and to the future development of its information systems. Twenty years later, referring to Peter Reichertz' lecture, but now considering health information systems (HIS), two questions are discussed: which were lines of development in health information systems from the past until today? What are consequences for health information systems in the future? The following lines of development for HIS were considered as important: (1) the shift from paper-based to computer-based processing and storage, as well as the increase of data in health care settings; (2) the shift from institution-centered departmental and, later, hospital information systems towards regional and global HIS; (3) the inclusion of patients and health consumers as HIS users, besides health care professionals and administrators; (4) the use of HIS data not only for patient care and administrative purposes, but also for health care planning as well as clinical and epidemiological research; (5) the shift from focusing mainly on technical HIS problems to those of change management as well as of strategic information management; (6) the shift from mainly alpha-numeric data in HIS to images and now also to data on the molecular level; (7) the steady increase of new technologies to be included, now starting to include ubiquitous computing environments and sensor-based technologies for health monitoring. As consequences for HIS in the future, first the need for institutional and (inter-) national HIS-strategies is seen, second the need to explore new (transinstitutional

  5. Electronic Paper Turns the Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that, rather than the electronic book, the technology that is most likely to transform reading and writing will be electronic paper (e-paper). Traces the evolution of e-paper from its prototype created by Xerox PARC's Nick Sheridon in 1975 to the E Ink/Lucent e-paper made from e-ink and plastic transistors. Highlights future…

  6. Solar Energy - An Option for Future Energy Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the exponential growth of energy consumption and future consequences. Possible methods of converting solar energy to power such as direct energy conversion, focusing collectors, selective rediation absorbers, ocean thermal gradient, and space solar power are considered. (DF)

  7. Optogenetics: Past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashish; Kumar, Arun

    2013-06-01

    Integration of optics with genetics to control any events within particular cells of living tissue is known as optogenetics. Term `Optogenetics' was introduced in early 1970's. It is the marriage between optics and genetics to control specific cells of living tissue. This paper introduces the field of optogenetics and its emergence from biophotonics and summarizes the role of optics in the field of optogenetics. This paper also provides a brief survey of some of the ongoing and future research on Optogenetics.

  8. Consequences of migration and remittances for Mexican transnational communities.

    PubMed

    Conway, D; Cohen, J H

    1998-01-01

    "Our aims in this paper are to broaden explanation of remittance expenditures and to evaluate the positive contributions of remittances, return migrants, or circulating sojourners. Specifically focusing on the situation in ¿home' communities, we illustrate the multifaceted consequences of remittances and migration, emphasizing positive nonmonetary and social impacts." Data are from ethnographic research carried out in 1992-1993 in Santa Ana del Valle, Oaxaca, Mexico.

  9. Lead based remedies for empacho: patterns and consequences.

    PubMed

    Baer, R D; Garcia de Alba, J; Cueto, L M; Ackerman, A; Davison, S

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses research designed to investigate the patterns and consequences of the use of lead based folk remedies in the treatment of some gastrointestinal problems in Mexico. Use of lead is seen in 35% of the population sampled in Guadalajara who treated the folk illness empacho, and 5% of a similar population in Oaxaca. Lead use seems to be associated with mestizo ethnic background, and with lower levels of parental education and income.

  10. Vocational Education and Training: A Review of World Bank Investment. World Bank Discussion Papers 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, John; Demsky, Terry

    A study of a representative sample of 121 World Bank-funded vocational education and training components suggests that the level of economic development and consequent size and dynamism of industrial employment powerfully influence the outcome of such education and training. Consequently, future investment strategies should differ among countries…

  11. Maxwell Paper Anthology. Award-Winning Papers AY 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    DECLINE IN THE US MILITARY’S INFECTIOUS-DISEASE VACCINE PROGRAM 17 Col Kenneth E. Hall, USAF 50 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS OF THE DECISION...consequences for the US vaccination program. He concludes that we are all at great risk because of inattention to common diseases that affect our...Northwest African Tactical Air Force The Dangerous Decline in the US Military’s Infectious-Disease Vaccine Program Col Kenneth E. Hall, USAF* For over

  12. Papers in Nonphonology. Working Papers in Linguistics, No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicky, Arnold M., Ed.

    The eight papers in this issue are addressed to issues in pragmatics, semantics, syntax, discourse analysis, morphology, and particularly to issues touching on two or more of these areas at once. The final paper touches on phonology as well. The papers are: "The Myth of Semantic Presupposition," by Steven Boer and William Lycan; "A…

  13. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation: Part 5. Permanent Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Henry A.

    2007-01-01

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose accounts for the deterioration of paper in library books and other written records. To combat this threat to our written heritage, new permanent papers have been developed that are relatively chemically stable and undergo a very slow rate of deterioration. Many of these new papers are manufactured from…

  14. Papers Based Electrochemical Biosensors: From Test Strips to Paper-Based Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bingwen; Du, Dan; Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-05-08

    Papers based biosensors such as lateral flow test strips and paper-based microfluidic devices (or paperfluidics) are inexpensive, rapid, flexible, and easy-to-use analytical tools. An apparent trend in their detection is to interpret sensing results from qualitative assessment to quantitative determination. Electrochemical detection plays an important role in quantification. This review focuses on electrochemical (EC) detection enabled biosensors. The first part provides detailed examples in paper test strips. The second part gives an overview of paperfluidics engaging EC detections. The outlook and recommendation of future directions of EC enabled biosensors are discussed in the end.

  15. Evolution of the scientific paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The first papers reporting original research results in technical periodicals and proceedings appeared in the late 17th century. Since that time, the typical scientific paper has evolved from a fairly simple document, accessible to a general audience, to a much more complex one, aimed at a specialized audience. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of what the first scientific papers were like and how they evolved to their present form and style. To facilitate this discussion, the scientific paper`s development has arbitrarily been divided into four stages: the origin and formative years of the scientific paper (1665-1765), emergence of scientific papers written for specialized publications (1765-1865), development of the modem scientific paper (1865-1965), and hyperspecialization and computerization of the modem scientific paper (1965-?).

  16. Present Vision--Future Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitterman, L. Jeffrey

    This paper addresses issues of current and future technology use for and by individuals with visual impairments and blindness in Florida. Present technology applications used in vision programs in Florida are individually described, including video enlarging, speech output, large inkprint, braille print, paperless braille, and tactual output…

  17. Predicting the importance of current papers.

    SciTech Connect

    Klavans, Richard; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how well one can predict the importance of a current paper (a paper that is recently published in the literature). We look at three factors--journal importance, reference importance and author reputation. Citation-based measures of importance are used for all variables. We find that journal importance is the best predictor (explaining 22.3% out of a potential 29.1% of the variance in the data), and that this correlation value varies significantly by discipline. Journal importance is a better predictor of citation in Computer Science than in any other discipline. While the finding supports the present policy of using journal impact statistics as a surrogate for the importance of current papers, it calls into question the present policy of equally weighting current documents in text-based analyses. We suggest that future researchers take into account the expected importance of a document when attempting to describe the cognitive structure of a field.

  18. Biosensing with Paper-Based Miniaturized Printed Electrodes–A Modern Trend

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Célia M.; Monteiro, Tiago; Almeida, Maria Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    From the bench-mark work on microfluidics from the Whitesides’s group in 2007, paper technology has experienced significant growth, particularly regarding applications in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. Besides the structural properties supporting microfluidics, other advantageous features of paper materials, including their versatility, disposability and low cost, show off the great potential for the development of advanced and eco-friendly analytical tools. Consequently, paper was quickly employed in the field of electrochemical sensors, being an ideal material for producing custom, tailored and miniaturized devices. Stencil-, inkjet-, or screen-printing are the preferential techniques for electrode manufacturing. Not surprisingly, we witnessed a rapid increase in the number of publications on paper based screen-printed sensors at the turn of the past decade. Among the sensing strategies, various biosensors, coupling electrochemical detectors with biomolecules, have been proposed. This work provides a critical review and a discussion on the future progress of paper technology in the context of miniaturized printed electrochemical biosensors. PMID:27690119

  19. [Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Sewerin, I

    2001-10-22

    The Chernobyl accident in 1986 has been and still is the subject of great interest. Journalistic reports often contain exaggerations and undocumented statements and much uncertainty about the true consequences of the accident prevails in the population. This article reviews the current literature with the focus on reports from official commissions and documentation in the form of controlled studies. The fatal deterministic consequences comprise about 30 victims. The most important outcome is a marked increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in children and adolescents in the most heavily contaminated area. Furthermore, pronounced psychosocial problems are dominant in the population of the contaminated area. Other significant and documented health consequences are not seen.

  20. High Consequence System Surety process description

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, G.T.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents work-in-progress accomplished prior to programmatic changes that negated bringing this effort to conclusion as originally intended. The High Consequence System Surety (HCS{sup 2}) project pulls together a multi-disciplinary team to integrate the elements of surety safety, security, control, reliability and quality--into a new, encompassing process. The benefit of using this process is enhanced surety in the design of a high consequence system through an up-front, designed-in approach. This report describes the integrated, high consequence surety process and includes a hypothetical example to illustrate the process.

  1. Cross-Cultural and Historical Perspectives on the Developmental Consequences of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine efforts to understand the developmental consequences, particularly the cognitive consequences, of children spending large amounts of time in formal schools where their activity is separated from the daily life of the rest of the community and mediated by technologies of literacy and numeracy as well as…

  2. Recent development on thermal papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo; Kisaka, Ryuichi

    1993-06-01

    The first thermal paper technology was developed in the 1930s. Since then, thermal recording systems have branched into two main groups, two-component systems and heat-transfer systems. In the 1960s, the leuco dye system was developed by NCR. This type of system has been used mainly in thermal recording systems. The leuco dye system however has some drawbacks such as poor image stability and an artificial texture. In a recent development, a compound with an epoxy functional group was added to the thermal sensitive layer of a leuco dye thermal paper to obtain good stability. A special overcoat layer gives the product the texture of plain paper. In addition to this product, other special thermal papers have been developed, such as two-color thermal paper, IR readable thermal paper, high resolution thermal paper, and translucent thermal paper.

  3. Evolution of the scientific paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The first papers reporting original research results in technical periodicals and proceedings appeared in the late 17th century. Since that time, the typical scientific paper has evolved from a fairly simple document, accessible to a general audience, to a much more complex one, aimed at a specialized audience. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of what the first scientific papers were like and how they evolved to their present form and style. To facilitate this discussion, the scientific paper's development has arbitrarily been divided into four stages: the origin and formative years of the scientific paper (1665-1765), emergence of scientific papers written for specialized publications (1765-1865), development of the modem scientific paper (1865-1965), and hyperspecialization and computerization of the modem scientific paper (1965- ).

  4. Designing future photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The large scale use of photovoltaic systems to generate our electricity is a dream for the future; but if this dream is to be realized, we must understand these systems today. As a result, there has been extensive research into the design and economic tradeoffs of utility interconnected photovoltaic applications. The understanding gained in this process has shown that photovoltaic system design can be a very simple and straight-forward endeavor. This paper reviews those past studies and shows how we have reached the present state of system design evolution. The concept of the utility interactive PV system with energy value determined by the utility's avoided cost will be explored. This concept simplifies the screening of potential applications for economic viability, and we will present several rules-of-thumb for this purpose.

  5. Future switching satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campanella, S. Joseph; Pontano, Benjamin A.; Chalmers, Harvey

    1988-01-01

    Communications satellites of the future are likely to use much narrower beams in order to increase the uplink G/T and the downlink EIRP so that small earth terminals of the VSAT class can achieve full mesh connectivity. These satellites will need onboard switches to route traffic from originating upbeams to destination downbeams. This paper presents a new approach to accomplishing this rerouting using destination-directed packets that inherently carry the information needed to control the onboard switch connections and to adjust the traffic flow among the beams and the stations. The method also inherently provides channel multiplication and DAMA advantages which result in maximally efficient utilization of the space segment resource.

  6. After Fukushima: managing the consequences of a radiological release.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Joe; Wollner, Samuel B; Adalja, Amesh A; Morhard, Ryan; Cicero, Anita; Inglesby, Thomas V

    2012-06-01

    Even amidst the devastation following the earthquake and tsunami in Japan that killed more than 20,000 people, it was the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that led the country's prime minister, Naoto Kan, to fear for "the very existence of the Japanese nation." While accidents that result in mass radiological releases have been rare throughout the operating histories of existing nuclear power plants, the growing number of plants worldwide increases the likelihood that such releases will occur again in the future. Nuclear power is an important source of energy in the U.S. and will be for the foreseeable future. Accidents far smaller in scale than the one in Fukushima could have major societal consequences. Given the extensive, ongoing Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry assessment of nuclear power plant safety and preparedness issues, the Center for Biosecurity of UPMC focused on offsite policies and plans intended to reduce radiation exposure to the public in the aftermath of an accident. This report provides an assessment of Japan's efforts at nuclear consequence management; identifies concerns with current U.S. policies and practices for "outside the fence" management of such an event in the U.S.; and makes recommendations for steps that can be taken to strengthen U.S. government, industry, and community response to large-scale accidents at nuclear power plants.

  7. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  8. Student Papers in Local History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Johnson County Center for Local History.

    Thirteen papers on Kansas and Johnson County, Kansas history are presented. The papers were written by students in a course at the Johnson County Center for Local History or for independent study in local history. The papers are: "Conditions and Construction of Gardner Lake"; "The History of St. Joseph's Church, Shawnee,…

  9. RMP Guidance for Offsite Consequence Analysis - Appendices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Assists owners/operators of processes covered by Chemical Accident Prevention Program rule in analysis of offsite consequences for toxic or flammable substances. Includes methods and tables for calculating worst-case/alternative scenarios and endpoints.

  10. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-05-31

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  11. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  12. RMP Guidance for Offsite Consequence Analysis

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Offsite consequence analysis (OCA) consists of a worst-case release scenario and alternative release scenarios. OCA is required from facilities with chemicals above threshold quantities. RMP*Comp software can be used to perform calculations described here.

  13. Causes and Consequences of Partial Migration in a Passerine Bird.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Arne; Marra, Peter P; Tieleman, B Irene

    2015-10-01

    Many animal species have populations in which some individuals migrate and others remain on the breeding grounds. This phenomenon is called partial migration. Despite substantial theoretical work, empirical data on causes and consequences of partial migration remain scarce, mainly because of difficulties associated with tracking individuals over large spatial scales. We used stable hydrogen isotopes in claw material to determine whether skylarks Alauda arvensis from a single breeding population in the Netherlands had migrated or remained resident in the previous winter and investigated whether there were causes or consequences of either strategy. Age and sex had no influence on the propensity to migrate, but larger individuals were more likely to be residents. The wintering strategy was not fixed within individuals. Up to 45% of individuals measured in multiple years switched strategies. Reproductive parameters were not related to the wintering strategy, but individuals that wintered locally experienced lower future return rates, and this was directly correlated with two independent measures of immune function. Our results suggest that partial migration in skylarks is based neither on genetic dimorphism nor on an age- and sex-dependent condition. Instead, the wintering strategy is related to structural size and immune function. These new insights on causes and consequences of partial migration advance our understanding of the ecology, evolution, and coexistence of different life-history strategies.

  14. Host manipulation in the face of environmental changes: Ecological consequences

    PubMed Central

    Labaude, Sophie; Rigaud, Thierry; Cézilly, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Several parasite species, particularly those having complex life-cycles, are known to induce phenotypic alterations in their hosts. Most often, such alterations appear to increase the fitness of the parasites at the expense of that of their hosts, a phenomenon known as “host manipulation”. Host manipulation can have important consequences, ranging from host population dynamics to ecosystem engineering. So far, the importance of environmental changes for host manipulation has received little attention. However, because manipulative parasites are embedded in complex systems, with many interacting components, changes in the environment are likely to affect those systems in various ways. Here, after reviewing the ecological importance of manipulative parasites, we consider potential causes and consequences of changes in host manipulation by parasites driven by environmental modifications. We show that such consequences can extend to trophic networks and population dynamics within communities, and alter the ecological role of manipulative parasites such as their ecosystem engineering. We suggest that taking them into account could improve the accuracy of predictions regarding the effects of global change. We also propose several directions for future studies. PMID:26835252

  15. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation. Part 5. Permanent Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Henry A.

    2007-12-01

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose accounts for the deterioration of paper in library books and other written records. To combat this threat to our written heritage, new permanent papers have been developed that are relatively chemically stable and undergo a very slow rate of deterioration. Many of these new papers are manufactured from mechanical pulps that contain large amounts of lignin, and are stable when a calcium carbonate buffer is present. Based on the performance involving accelerated aging of the papers, the inclusion of lignin has been accepted in the standards for permanent paper by Canada and Germany, providing that a calcium carbonate buffer is present. Other countries are still reluctant to make the change in standards to include lignin. Research needs to be done to define optical properties and their requirements for the standards. The applications of the chemistry of paper preservation to teaching are also discussed.

  16. Consequences of use of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Marcel J; Blake, Kathleen; Griffith, Jill; Yates, Andrew; Copley, LaRae M

    2007-08-01

    Whether providing anticipatory guidance to the young adolescent patient, conducting a preparticipation examination on a young athlete, or treating a sick user of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), the primary care physician must be familiar with the adverse consequences of the use of these compounds. This article reviews the endocrine, cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatic, and miscellaneous effects of AASs, highlighting effects reported in children and adolescents, and relying on consequences in adults when pediatric data is unavailable.

  17. An unusual case of xylophagia (paper-eating)

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Mahesh; Patel, Bhavin M.; Preeti, S.; Chandrasekar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Xylophagia is a condition involving the consumption of paper and form of eating disorder known as pica. Pica is an unusual craving for ingestion of either edible or inedible substances. Inhalants are volatile substances, which produce chemical vapors that can be inhaled to induce a psycho-active or mind altering effect. Although, pica is not linked to solvent abuse, here we report an adolescent case of paper-eating with solvent dependence. PMID:25535449

  18. Some Aspects of Futurism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangchai, Samporn

    1975-01-01

    The article, an overview, surveys various schools of futures research with reference to futurism's dimensions (methodologies, typologies, and distance in time); planning for alternative futures; orientations; and inner-future orientations (mysticism vs. science). Developing nations are advised to adapt developed nations' learnings selectively, and…

  19. Ecological Concern Among High School Seniors: 1976-1979. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series, Paper 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John D.; Bachman, Jerald G.

    Examined are the environmental attitudes of United States high school senior classes of 1976-1979. Multi-item indices of concern about pollution, overpopulation, energy conservation, other people, and the importance of material things were administered to about 17,000 students in approximately 130 high schools each year. The four classes of…

  20. Drinking Water Consequences Tools. A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualini, Donatella

    2016-05-12

    In support of the goals of Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) National Protection and Programs Directorate and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the DHS Office of Science and Technology is seeking to develop and/or modify consequence assessment tools to enable drinking water systems owner/operators to estimate the societal and economic consequences of drinking water disruption due to the threats and hazards. This work will expand the breadth of consequence estimation methods and tools using the best-available data describing water distribution infrastructure, owner/assetlevel economic losses, regional-scale economic activity, and health. In addition, this project will deploy the consequence methodology and capability within a Web-based platform. This report is intended to support DHS effort providing a review literature review of existing assessment tools of water and wastewater systems consequences to disruptions. The review includes tools that assess water systems resilience, vulnerability, and risk. This will help to understand gaps and limitations of these tools in order to plan for the development of the next-generation consequences tool for water and waste water systems disruption.

  1. On Constructing Seminal Paper Genealogy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Duck-Ho; Hwang, Se-Mi; Kim, Sang-Wook; Faloutsos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Let us consider that someone is starting a research on a topic that is unfamiliar to them. Which seminal papers have influenced the topic the most? What is the genealogy of the seminal papers in this topic? These are the questions that they can raise, which we try to answer in this paper. First, we propose an algorithm that finds a set of seminal papers on a given topic. We also address the performance and scalability issues of this sophisticated algorithm. Next, we discuss the measures to decide how much a paper is influenced by another paper. Then, we propose an algorithm that constructs a genealogy of the seminal papers by using the influence measure and citation information. Finally, through extensive experiments with a large volume of a real-world academic literature data, we show the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach.

  2. The APA classification of mental disorders: future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Regier, Darrel A; Narrow, William E; First, Michael B; Marshall, Tina

    2002-01-01

    After 8-10 years of experience with the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) and the tenth edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), it is an ideal time to begin looking at the clinical and research consequences of these diagnostic systems. The American Psychiatric Association, in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health, has initiated a research development process intended to accelerate an evaluation of existing criteria while developing and testing hypotheses that would improve the validity of our diagnostic concepts. Over the past year, a multidisciplinary, international panel has developed a series of six white papers which define research opportunities in the following broad areas: Nomenclature, Disability and Impairment, Personality Disorders, Relational Disorders, Developmental Psychopathology, Neuroscience, and Cross-Cultural aspects of Psychopathology. Recommendations for future national and international research in each of these areas will be discussed.

  3. Asian-Pacific Papers. Occasional Papers Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Brian, Ed.

    Sixteen papers are presented. Topics covered include language teaching, discourse analysis, code switching, phonetics, language and cultural identity, and descriptive and comparative studies. All presenters were from the Asia-Pacific area of the world. Papers include: "The Baba Malay Lexicon: Hokkien Loanwords in Baba Malay" (Anne…

  4. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation Part 4. Alkaline Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Henry A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the inherent instability of paper due to the presence of acids that catalyze the hydrolytic degradation of cellulose. Focuses on the chemistry involved in the sizing of both acid and alkaline papers and the types of fillers used. Discusses advantages and problems of alkaline papermaking. Contains 48 references. (JRH)

  5. The future of space medicine.

    PubMed

    Nicogossian, A; Pober, D

    2001-01-01

    In November 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its partners in the International Space Station (ISS) ushered in a new era of space flight: permanent human presence in low-Earth orbit. As the culmination of the last four decades of human space flight activities. the ISS focuses our attention on what we have learned to date. and what still must be learned before we can embark on future exploration endeavors. Space medicine has been a primary part of our past success in human space flight, and will continue to play a critical role in future ventures. To prepare for the day when crews may leave low-Earth orbit for long-duration exploratory missions, space medicine practitioners must develop a thorough understanding of the effects of microgravity on the human body, as well as ways to limit or prevent them. In order to gain a complete understanding and create the tools and technologies needed to enable successful exploration. space medicine will become even more of a highly collaborative discipline. Future missions will require the partnership of physicians, biomedical scientists, engineers, and mission planners. This paper will examine the future of space medicine as it relates to human space exploration: what is necessary to keep a crew alive in space, how we do it today, how we will accomplish this in the future, and how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) plans to achieve future goals.

  6. Adverse rotorcraft pilot couplings—Past, present and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Marilena D.; Jump, Michael; Dang-Vu, Binh; Masarati, Pierangelo; Gennaretti, Massimo; Ionita, Achim; Zaichik, Larisa; Smaili, Hafid; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Yilmaz, Deniz; Jones, Michael; Serafini, Jacopo; Malecki, Jacek

    2013-10-01

    Fixed and rotary wing pilots alike are familiar with potential instabilities or with annoying limit cycle oscillations that arise from the effort of controlling aircraft with high response actuation systems. Understanding, predicting and suppressing these inadvertent and sustained aircraft oscillations, known as aircraft (rotorcraft)-pilot couplings (A/RPCs) is a challenging problem for the designers. The goal of the present paper is to give an overview on the state-of-the-art in RPC problem, underlining the future challenges in this field. It is shown that, exactly as in the case of fixed wing APCs, RPCs existed from the beginning of rotorcraft development and that the problem of eliminating them is not yet solved: the current rotorcraft modelling for RPC analysis is rather limited to the particular case analysed and there is a lack of quantitative pilot behavioural models to analyse RPCs. The paper underlines the importance of involuntary pilot control actions, generally attributed to biodynamic couplings in predicting RPCs in rotorcraft. It is also shown that recent experiences demonstrate that modern rotorcraft seem to embed tendencies predisposing the flight control system FCS system towards dangerous RPCs. As the level of automation is likely to increase in future designs, extending to smaller aircraft and to different kinds of operation, the consequences of the pilot ‘fighting’ the FCS system and inducing A/RPCs needs to be eradicated. In Europe, the ARISTOTEL project (2010-2013) has been launched with the aim of understanding and predicting modern aircraft's susceptibility to A/RPC. The present paper gives an overview of future challenges to be solved for RPC-free design and some new solutions herein.

  7. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the

  8. Jordanian industrial sector future energy consumption: Potential savings and environmental impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallat, Yousef; Al-Ghandoor, Ahmed; Salaymah, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    This paper analyzes and evaluates impacts of introducing some efficient measures on the future fuel and electricity demands and associated reduction in GHG emissions. Without employing most effective energy conservation measures, energy demand is expected to rise by approximately 38% within 12 years time. Consequently, associated GHG emissions resulting from activities within the industrial sector are predicted to rise by 33% for the same period. However, if recommended energy management measures are implemented on a gradual basis, electricity and fuel consumptions as well as GHG emissions are forecasted to increase at a lower rate.

  9. Paper surface modification by lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekou, E.; Kotsifaki, D. G.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2010-10-01

    Lasers can provide a precious tool to conservation process due to their accuracy and the controlled energy they deliver, especially to fragile organic material such as paper. The current study concerns laser modification such as paper cleaning, initially of test papers artificially soiled and then of an original book of the early 20th Century. The test objects were A4 copier paper, newspaper, and paper Whatman No.1056. During the experiments, ink of a pen, pencil and ink from a stamp was mechanically employed on each paper surface. Laser cleaning was applied using a Q-switched Nd:YAG operating at 532 nm and CO2 laser at 10.6 μm for various fluences. The experimental results were presented by using optical microscopy. Eventually, laser cleaning of ink was performed to a book of 1934, by choosing the best conditions and parameters from cleaning the test samples, like Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm.

  10. Anaerobic digestion of pulp and paper mill wastewater and sludge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-15

    sludge) and primary sludge is still in its infancy. Current research is mainly focused on developing efficient pretreatment methods that enable fast hydrolysis of complex organic matter, shorter sludge residence times and as a consequence, smaller sludge digesters. Previous experimental studies indicate that the anaerobic digestibility of non-pretreated biosludge from pulp and paper mills varies widely, with volatile solids (VS) removal rates of 21-55% and specific methane yields ranging between 40 and 200 mL g(-1) VS fed. Pretreatment can increase the digestibility to some extent, however in almost all reported cases, the specific methane yield of pretreated biosludge did not exceed 200 mL g(-1) VS fed. Increases in specific methane yield mostly range between 0 and 90% compared to non-pretreated biosludge, whereas larger improvements were usually achieved with more difficult-to-digest biosludge. Thermal treatment and microwave treatment are two of the more effective methods. The heat required for the elevated temperatures applied in both methods may be provided from surplus heat that is often available at pulp and paper mills. Given the large variability in specific methane yield of non-pretreated biosludge, future research should focus on the links between anaerobic digestibility and sludge properties. Research should also involve mill-derived primary sludge. Although biosludge has been the main target in previous studies, primary sludge often constitutes the bulk of mill-generated sludge, and co-digestion of a mixture between both types of sludge may become practical. The few laboratory studies that have included mill primary sludge indicate that, similar to biosludge, the digestibility can range widely. Long-term studies should be conducted to explore the potential of microbial adaptation to lignocellulosic material which can constitute more than half of the organic matter in pulp and paper mill sludge.

  11. Misuse of "study drugs:" prevalence, consequences, and implications for policy

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Steve; Pentz, Mary Ann; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Miller, Toby

    2006-01-01

    Background Non-medical/illegal use of prescription stimulants popularly have been referred to as "study drugs". This paper discusses the current prevalence and consequences of misuse of these drugs and implications of this information for drug policy. Results Study drugs are being misused annually by approximately 4% of older teens and emerging adults. Yet, there are numerous consequences of misuse of prescription stimulants including addiction, negative reactions to high dosages, and medical complications. Policy implications include continuing to limit access to study drugs, finding more safe prescription drug alternatives, interdiction, and public education. Conclusion Much more work is needed on prescription stimulant misuse assessment, identifying the extent of the social and economic costs of misuse, monitoring and reducing access, and developing prevention and cessation education efforts. PMID:16764722

  12. Socioeconomic consequences of blinding onchocerciasis in west Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Onchocerciasis or river blindness, a major cause of irreversible blindness among adults, has been the focus of international disease control efforts for over 20 years in West Africa. This paper employs the international classification of impairment, disability and handicap (ICIDH) to interpret results from a field study to assess the socioeconomic consequences of onchocerciasis in Guinea in 1987. In a sample of 136 blind, 94 visually impaired and 89 well-sighted persons, decreasing visual acuity is strongly associated with mobility, occupational and marital handicaps. Individual, household and disease correlates were explored. The implications of these findings for the ICIDH concept of handicap are discussed with particular emphasis on the need to extend analysis beyond the individual when assessing the socioeconomic consequences of disabling disease. PMID:7554022

  13. Toward a political analysis of the consequences of a world climate change produced by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schware, R.

    1980-01-01

    It was Hegel's extraordinarily deep and perceptive insight that mankind is caught up in a drama that cannot be fully understood until it has been played out. The owl of Minewa spreads its wings only with the falling of the dusk. On the more hopeful side is the fact that, although we cannot know the consequences of future interactions between climate and society, we can begin to work toward political solutions and gird ourselves for ominous trends that are now coming into view. The purpose of this paper is to identify one such trend, namely the increase of atmospheric temperatures due to increased carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) and lay some initial groundwork for political research related to climate-societal interactions.

  14. On Biomedical Research Policy in the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    0 ON BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH POLICY IN THE FUTURE Albert P. Williams January 1989 DTIC ELECTE P-7520 "’T,, . The RAND Corporation Papers are issued by...BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH POLICY IN THE FUTURE[l] Mr. Walden, members of the Science Policy Task Force, I am honored to be invited to appear on this panel and...to offer my thoughts on future biomedical research policy . My perspective is that of an outsider with a longstanding interest in federal biomedical

  15. Future sensor system needs for staring arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John Lester

    2011-05-01

    This is a systems application paper regarding how sensor systems may use future technology FPAs. A historical perspective is discussed along with lessons learned from previous technologies. Future system requirements for strained super-lattice (SLS), quantum dots (QDOT) and traditional quantum well infrared photo-diodes (QWIP) arrays will be presented from both a commercial and military perspective. New potential markets will open up in the future if certain FPA technologies can reduce cost and provide higher sensitivities at higher operating temperatures.

  16. GIS analysis of effects of future Baltic sea level rise on the island of Gotland, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Karin; Ekstedt, Karin; Jarsjö, Jerker

    2016-07-01

    Future sea level rise as a consequence of global warming will affect the world's coastal regions. Even though the pace of sea level rise is not clear, the consequences will be severe and global. Commonly the effects of future sea level rise are investigated for relatively vulnerable development countries; however, a whole range of varying regions needs to be considered in order to improve the understanding of global consequences. In this paper we investigate consequences of future sea level rise along the coast of the Baltic Sea island of Gotland, Sweden, with the aim to fill knowledge gaps regarding comparatively well-suited areas in developed countries. We study both the quantity of the loss of features of infrastructure, cultural, and natural value in the case of a 2 m sea level rise of the Baltic Sea and the effects of climate change on seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers, which indirectly cause saltwater intrusion in wells. We conduct a multi-criteria risk analysis by using lidar data on land elevation and GIS-vulnerability mapping, which gives the application of distance and elevation parameters formerly unimaginable precision. We find that in case of a 2 m sea level rise, 3 % of the land area of Gotland, corresponding to 99 km2, will be inundated. The features most strongly affected are items of touristic or nature value, including camping places, shore meadows, sea stack areas, and endangered plants and species habitats. In total, 231 out of 7354 wells will be directly inundated, and the number of wells in the high-risk zone for saltwater intrusion in wells will increase considerably. Some valuable features will be irreversibly lost due to, for example, inundation of sea stacks and the passing of tipping points for seawater intrusion into coastal aquifers; others might simply be moved further inland, but this requires considerable economic means and prioritization. With nature tourism being one of the main income sources of Gotland, monitoring and

  17. Of Climate Change and Crystal Balls: The Future Consequences of Climate Change in Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Database– Europe . Map by Kaiba White, Climate Change and African Political Stability Program , November 2011.) Conclusion To the extent that our vulnerability...The appropriate Program Manager over the agreement (under which all these documents were funded) has reviewed these documents and concurs that there...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911NF-09-1-0077 611103 Form Approved OMB NO

  18. Joint European Torus results with both fast and lower-hybrid wave consequences for future devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinot, J.; Bures, M.

    1992-07-01

    Heating and current drive studies were performed during the JET [Phys Fluids B 3, 2209 (1991)] 1990/91 operation using two large systems capable of generating either fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or slow waves at a frequency above the lower-hybrid resonance (LH). The maximum wave power coupled to the torus reached 22 MW for ICRH and 2.4 MW for LH. The results obtained in plasma heating experiments qualify ICRH as a prime candidate for heating reactor grade plasmas. A centrally localized deposition profile in the cyclotron damping regime was demonstrated in a wide range of plasma density resulting in (i) record value nd τE Ti0 ≂ 7.8 × 1020 m-3 sec keV in ``thermal'' conditions Ti = Te ≂ 11 keV at high central densities generated by pellet injection; (ii) large normalized confinement 2.5 ≤ τE/τGoldston≤4. The large values of τE/τGoldston are reached in H-mode discharges (I≤1.5 MA) with large bootstrap current fraction IBS/I ≤ 0.7 ± 0.2; (iii) the highest to date D-3He fusion power (140 kW) generated with 10-14 MW of ICRH in the L-mode regime at the 3He cyclotron frequency. All specific impurity generations have been reduced to negligible levels by proper antenna design and the generic difficulty of wave-plasma coupling has been greatly reduced using feedback loops controlling in real time the antenna circuits and the plasma position. Current drive efficiencies γ=ICDR/P ≂ 0.4 × 1020 m-2 A/W have been reached in 1.5 MA L-mode plasma with zero loop voltage by combining LHCD and ICRH. Fast electrons are driven by LHCD alone to tail temperatures of up to 70 keV. The fast electron density is peaked in the plasma center at lower densities (ne0 ≤ 2.6 × 1019 m-3) and high field (Bφ ˜ 3.1 T). In these conditions, the fast electrons are further accelerated (even at zero loop voltage) to tail temperatures above 150 keV by heating the plasma with ICRF in monopole phasing. Direct electron damping of the fast wave on the fast electrons created by LH appears to be the driving mechanism of this synergism which produces fast wave current drive even without phasing the ICRH antennas. Finally, the first results obtained in the minority current drive regime are reported. The sawtooth instability is considerably modified when the resonance is located near the q=1 resonance. The effect is reversed from stabilization to destabilization when the phase of the ICRH antennas is reversed from +90° to -90°.

  19. Technical Progress of Inkjet Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Yukio

    This article overviews the development of Ink Jet Paper along with that of ink jet printing technology. Structure and composition of various ink jet paper grades are summarized with the technical needs behind (e.g. dot size control, absorption speed, absorption capacity, and image stability).

  20. Paper Airplanes: A Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Richard A.

    1976-01-01

    A learning experience is described for upper elementary or junior high students involving the manufacture, transportation, and marketing of a product for consumers. Steps are given and roles are assigned for students to convert raw material (paper) to a finished product (paper airplanes) and to sell it. (AV)

  1. Learning by Sharing Graded Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisin, Gail

    1990-01-01

    Discusses using students' graded papers as a "text" to be read and commented upon by other students. Notes that sharing students' papers (and the teacher's comments) (1) reassures the students that they are not the only ones making errors; (2) deepens their understanding of literature; and (3) increases their awareness of writing styles and…

  2. Drug Education: A Position Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Drug Education, 1971

    1971-01-01

    New York State's drug education Position Paper clearly demonstrates a commitment to the youth of the State and certainly one that other states might consider for its youth. Many aspects of the program are presented in this paper which have implications for teachers, school administrators, and community leaders. (Author)

  3. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  4. Paper: Too Valuable to Buy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a simplified version of the commercial papermaking process as an activity for students to make new paper from the recycling of used paper. Describes the necessary equipment and ingredients and the steps in the papermaking process that extend over several days. (MCO)

  5. Happy Birthday with Handmade Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Making paper in the blender is always exciting for students. When coupled with using the paper to make a mural for a birthday celebration, the excitement swells. Eric Carle is a great inspiration to children with the books he has written and illustrated, such as "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" and "The Very Busy Spider." In this article, the author…

  6. [Papers of the ELF Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip; And Others

    The five papers in this collection discuss various aspects of the Electronic Learning-Package Factory (ELF) project at the University of Bradford in England. In the first paper, "Adoption of CAL in Higher Education: A Cooperative Approach to Research, Development and Implementation," Philip Barker considers the opportunities for…

  7. Mexican-Origin Women's Employment Instability. Working Paper No. 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    This paper compares the causes and consequences of employment instability among Mexican-origin women, White women, and White men. Data came from the work experience supplement in the March 1995 file of the Current Population Survey for a sample that included 1,399 Mexican-origin women, 17,092 White women, and 24,440 White men. All were experienced…

  8. Logo Burn-In. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Microcomputing Program.

    This paper describes a hot-stamping operation undertaken at Drexel University in an attempt to prevent computer theft on campus. The program was initiated in response to the University's anticipated receipt of up to 3,000 Macintosh microcomputers per year and the consequent publicity the university was receiving. All clusters of computers (e.g.,…

  9. Nuclear Power: The Fifth Horseman. Worldwatch Paper 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Denis

    This publication is the sixth in a series of papers on global environmental issues. This paper evaluates the future of nuclear power, subjecting it to several tests: (1) economics; (2) safety; (3) adequacy of fuel supplies; (4) environmental impact; and (5) both national and international security. Section headings include: (1) The nuclear fuel…

  10. Community Parity in Federally Funded Programs. A Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recruitment Leadership and Training Inst., Philadelphia, PA.

    This paper supports the contention that community parity is an essential condition for the successful implementation of all projects supported by the U.S. Office of Education. The paper begins with a summary of the reasoning underlying this position, followed by some recommendations designed to guide planners of future government programs in…

  11. Voyaging from the Past, to the Present, and into the Future: Knowing Your Heritage. Selected Papers from PIALA 2003, Pacific Islands Association of Libraries, Archives and Museums Annual Conference (13th, Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, November 4-6, 2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Paul B., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This publication follows the tradition of publishing selected papers from Pacific Islands Association of Libraries, Archives and Museums (PIALA) annual conferences. This 13th annual conference was held in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, November 4-6, 2003. The volume begins with a listing of the members of the PIALA 2003 Planning &…

  12. Libraries, Archives, and Museums Helping Create Futures: Building on Culture, Knowledge, and Information through Collaboration and Resource Sharing. Selected Papers from PIALA 2010, Pacific Islands Association of Libraries, Archives, and Museums Annual Conference (20th, Weno, Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia, November 15-19, 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Paul B., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This publication follows the tradition of publishing selected papers from Pacific Islands Association of Libraries, Archives and Museums (PIALA) annual conferences. This 20th annual conference was held in Weno, Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia, November 15-19, 2010. The volume begins with a listing of the members of the PIALA 2010…

  13. Bacterial community diversity in paper mills processing recycled paper.

    PubMed

    Granhall, Ulf; Welsh, Allana; Throbäck, Ingela Noredal; Hjort, Karin; Hansson, Mikael; Hallin, Sara

    2010-10-01

    Paper mills processing recycled paper suffer from biofouling causing problems both in the mill and final product. The total bacterial community composition and identification of specific taxa in the process water and biofilms at the stock preparation and paper machine areas in a mill with recycled paper pulp was described by using a DNA-based approach. Process water in a similar mill was also analyzed to investigate if general trends can be found between mills and over time. Bacterial community profiles, analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in process water showed that the dominant peaks in the profiles were similar between the two mills, although the overall composition was unique for each mill. When comparing process water and biofilm at different locations within one of the mills, we observed a separation according to location and sample type, with the biofilm from the paper machine being most different. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were generated and 404 clones were screened by RFLP analysis. Grouping of RFLP patterns confirmed that the biofilm from the paper machine was most different. A total of 99 clones representing all RFLP patterns were analyzed, resulting in sequences recovered from nine bacterial phyla, including two candidate phyla. Bacteroidetes represented 45% and Actinobacteria 23% of all the clones. Sequences with similarity to organisms implicated in biofouling, like Chryseobacterium spp. and Brevundimonas spp., were recovered from all samples even though the mill had no process problems during sampling, suggesting that they are part of the natural paper mill community. Moreover, many sequences showed little homology to as yet uncultivated bacteria implying that paper mills are interesting for isolation of new organisms, as well as for bioprospecting.

  14. Software development methodology for high consequence systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, L.S.; Bouchard, J.F.; Collins, E.W.; Eisenhour, M.; Neidigk, D.D.; Shortencarier, M.J.; Trellue, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes a Software Development Methodology for High Consequence Systems. A High Consequence System is a system whose failure could lead to serious injury, loss of life, destruction of valuable resources, unauthorized use, damaged reputation or loss of credibility or compromise of protected information. This methodology can be scaled for use in projects of any size and complexity and does not prescribe any specific software engineering technology. Tasks are described that ensure software is developed in a controlled environment. The effort needed to complete the tasks will vary according to the size, complexity, and risks of the project. The emphasis of this methodology is on obtaining the desired attributes for each individual High Consequence System.

  15. Cardiovascular and Ventilatory Consequences of Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Tamara M; Giraud, George D; Togioka, Brandon M; Jones, Daniel B; Cigarroa, Joaquin E

    2017-02-14

    Although laparoscopic surgery accounts for >2 million surgical procedures every year, the current preoperative risk scores and guidelines do not adequately assess the risks of laparoscopy. In general, laparoscopic procedures have a lower risk of morbidity and mortality compared with operations requiring a midline laparotomy. During laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide insufflation may produce significant hemodynamic and ventilatory consequences such as increased intraabdominal pressure and hypercarbia. Hemodynamic insults secondary to increased intraabdominal pressure include increased afterload and preload and decreased cardiac output, whereas ventilatory consequences include increased airway pressures, hypercarbia, and decreased pulmonary compliance. Hemodynamic effects are accentuated in patients with cardiovascular disease such as congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, and congenital heart disease. Prevention of cardiovascular complications may be accomplished through a sound understanding of the hemodynamic and physiological consequences of laparoscopic surgery as well as a defined operative plan generated by a multidisciplinary team involving the preoperative consultant, anesthesiologist, and surgeon.

  16. Functional consequences of blood clotting in insects.

    PubMed

    Haine, Eleanor R; Rolff, Jens; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2007-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies have revealed several important aspects of the biochemical and cellular processes involved in insect blood clotting. However, in vivo empirical studies of the functional consequences of clotting are lacking, despite the role of coagulation in wound-healing, preventing infection, and its homology with vertebrate wound repair. Here we present results of the in vivo effects of haemolymph coagulation and its consequences on the spatial disposition of immune activity, in the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. Our results demonstrate that clotting: (1) localises immune effectors in the vicinity of a breach of the cuticle; (2) restricts the spread of invasive particles across the haemocoel, and (3) is greater when wounding is associated with non-self. Our results demonstrate that haemolymph coagulation has major functional consequences, the most important of which is the compartmentalisation of the open haemocoel.

  17. Images of the Future and Their Educational Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Jake A.

    This paper examines future time perspective in relation to its influence on the present and on learning. Images of the future are culturally and socially created from past experience and knowledge, present circumstances, and views of future events which are believed to be possible. These future images are an integral part of our network of values…

  18. The futures of climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Sean

    2017-01-01

    This piece examines the need to interrogate the role of the conceptions of the future, as embedded in academic papers, policy documents, climate models, and other artifacts that serve as currencies of the science-society interface, in shaping scientific and policy agendas in climate engineering. Growing bodies of work on framings, metaphors, and models in the past decade serve as valuable starting points, but can benefit from integration with science and technology studies work on the sociology of expectations, imaginaries, and visions. Potentially valuable branches of work to come might be the anticipatory use of the future: the design of experimental spaces for exploring the future of an engineered climate in service of responsible research and innovation, and the integration of this work within the unfolding context of the Paris Agreement.

  19. Normative Perceptions and Past-year Consequences as Predictors of Subjective Evaluations and Weekly Drinking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Jennifer E.; Read, Jennifer P.; Colder, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Problem drinking during the college years continues to be an important area of study. Subjective evaluations of consequences have recently been demonstrated to predict future drinking behavior; however, what predicts those evaluations is yet unknown. Social Learning Theory (SLT) provides a guiding framework in this study with primary aims to investigate whether individual differences in past experience with and normative perceptions of alcohol consequences predict subjective evaluations (i.e., the extent to which consequences are perceived as negative, aversive, or severe) and weekly drinking behavior. We also test whether evaluations mediate the influence of past consequences and norms on weekly drinking behavior. Following a baseline assessment, participants (N=96 regularly drinking college students, 52% female) completed ten weekly web-based surveys on previous week alcohol use, consequences, and subjective evaluations of those consequences. A series of hierarchical linear models were used to test hypotheses. Most mediational pathways were not supported – weekly level evaluations do not appear to fully explain the effect of norms or past experience on weekly level drinking behavior. However, results demonstrated that normative perceptions of and past experience with consequences were associated with both weekly drinking behavior and subjective evaluations, and evaluations remained significant predictors of alcohol use behavior after accounting for these important between-person influences. Findings support the importance placed by SLT on cognition in drinking behavior, and suggest that norms for consequences and subjective evaluations may be appropriate targets of intervention in college students. PMID:23899424

  20. The Future, Extraterrestrial Space Humanization and Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDaniel, William E.

    This paper suggests that sociologists should become actively involved with the study of the future as a means for revitalizing the profession of sociology. One aspect of the future that may be most exciting and challenging is the development of human society and culture in extraterrestrial human communities. A unique combination of technological…