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Sample records for conservative maxwellian preserving

  1. On the Maxwellian distribution, symmetric form, and entropy conservation for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    The Euler equations of gas dynamics have some very interesting properties in that the flux vector is a homogeneous function of the unknowns and the equations can be cast in symmetric hyperbolic form and satisfy the entropy conservation. The Euler equations are the moments of the Boltzmann equation of the kinetic theory of gases when the velocity distribution function is a Maxwellian. The present paper shows the relationship between the symmetrizability and the Maxwellian velocity distribution. The entropy conservation is in terms of the H-function, which is a slight modification of the H-function first introduced by Boltzmann in his famous H-theorem. In view of the H-theorem, it is suggested that the development of total H-diminishing (THD) numerical methods may be more profitable than the usual total variation diminishing (TVD) methods for obtaining wiggle-free solutions.

  2. Preservation and Conservation in the School Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedinger, Theresa

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the necessity of preservation and conservation activities in school libraries to save materials such as school newspapers, programs of events, censorship records, board activities, yearbooks, and student projects. Topics discussed include brittle, deteriorating paper; monitoring the physical environment, including heat, light, humidity,…

  3. Conservation, Preservation and Restoration in Nigerian Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojo-Igbinoba, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    Addresses problems involved with the conservation, preservation, and restoration of library materials in Nigeria. Topics discussed include insect pests; light, heat, and humidity; atmospheric pollution and dust; natural disasters including fire and floods; theft and vandalism; acidity of paper; binding and mending; and trained personnel. (15…

  4. The Tucker technique: conservative molar inlays preserving the transverse ridge.

    PubMed

    Hess, T A; Wadhwani, C P K

    2012-01-01

    Conservation of healthy tooth structure should be the aim of any restorative procedure. Two inlays may be an ideal choice for the treatment of maxillary molars to preserve the transverse ridge and maintain structural integrity.

  5. Micro-Preservation: Conserving the Small Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert; DeCandido, GraceAnne A.

    1985-01-01

    Offers suggestions and outlines procedures for the preservation of the resources of a small library. Brief sections discuss environment (temperature, humidity, housekeeping, light); library binding; simple in-house repairs; other protective measures (enclosures, microfilming); the care of unique objects; and disaster planning. A 21-item…

  6. Citrus conservation at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation maintains the base collection of genetic resources for the National Plant Germplasm System, a network of federal plant collections focused on conserving crops key to American agriculture. NCGRP research scientists have found ways to con...

  7. Guidelines for Preservation, Conservation, and Restoration of Local History and Local Genealogical Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RQ, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents guidelines adopted by the American Library Association (ALA) relating to the preservation, conservation, and restoration of local history and local genealogical materials. Topics addressed include assessing preservation needs; developing a plan; choosing appropriate techniques, including microduplication, photoduplication, electronic…

  8. Principles for the Preservation and Conservation of Library Materials. IFLA Professional Reports, No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dureau, J. M.; Clements, D. W. G.

    This statement of principles embodies a general approach to the nature and objectives of preservation and conservation work relating to library materials. It does not aim to provide a comprehensive list of detailed methods and practices, but is intended to establish a responsible attitude toward preservation and conservation by librarians. The…

  9. A Brief Look at Recent Developments in the Preservation and Conservation of Special Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hain, Jennifer E.

    2003-01-01

    Highlights some of the skills and technological advances that have changed the way special collections are preserved in reference to two approaches: item-level conservation and collections conservation. Discusses mechanical paper splitting; computer imaging and mechanization; mass deacidification; controlling temperature, humidity, pests, and…

  10. Preserving oak (Quercus sp.) germplasm to promote ex situ conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germplasm banks are increasingly used as an ex situ conservation strategy. Germplasm banks are able to maintain extraordinary levels of diversity for long periods at relatively low cost. Studies using seeds – the preferred propagules in plant germplasm banks – have revealed the underlying reasons wh...

  11. Conservation of stone built cultural heritage and preservation of memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antônio

    2016-04-01

    Certainly, the main justification for the conservation of cultural heritage built, lies in the meanings that these buildings have, either to the history of nations, either as part of the cultural heritage of humanity. On the other hand, and taking into account the use of stone, it can be said that in addition to cultural and aesthetic values usually associated with these monuments or architectural ensembles that make up this heritage, the presence of stone materials gives another dimension to those constructions, which is the geo-memory. This means that, due to the presence of this material, where each has its own history, it is also possible to identify geo-memories for each of these monuments or architectural ensembles that make up this heritage, either the genesis point of view, involving environments and processes, either regarding the formation ages of these materials. At the same time and due to the use of these materials can be said that each monument or group of monuments is a reflection of the geo-diversity of a determined region or territory. In Brazil, due to its large territory, this geo-diversity includes a wide range of geological environments, phenomena and processes, giving rise to diverse stone materials, which can be observed in the monuments that are part of your built heritage. Thus in old buildings of historic sites located in particular in the southern and southeastern regions of Brazil, this geo-diversity is present because many types of rocks were used, igneous, metamorphic or sedimentary compositions and of very different ages. Of these types stands out, for example, granites and gneisses, which were used in the states of Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, where they are very common. In such cases, the rocks were formed, or end of the Paleoproterozoic, or at the end of the Neoproterozoic and have different textures, sometimes with predominance of biotite, among mica, sometimes amphibole, as hornblende, or with garnet. They were often used in

  12. Tests of Maxwellian-Weighted Basis Functions in a Discontinuous Galerkin Kinetic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammett, G. W.; Hakim, A.; Shi, E. L.

    2013-10-01

    Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) algorithms have been very actively studied and used in the applied math and computational fluid dynamics communities in the past decade. They combine certain attractive properties of finite element methods (like high accuracy per interpolation point) and finite volume methods (like locality of calculation for parallel computers and flexibility for limiters). Higher-order methods also have more floating point operations per data point, and so can be more efficient on modern computers that are often bandwidth limited. The flexibility of DG allows one to consider various types of Maxwellian-weighted basis functions while preserving important conservation properties of the underlying system. One can think of this either as a modified inner-product norm or a Petrov-Galerkin approach. Here we explore some ways of using Maxwellian-Weighted Basis functions and test them on paradigm problems using the Gkeyll code, which is being developed for edge gyrokinetic simulations. In addition to the formal order of accuracy in the asymptotic limit as a grid is refined, we are also interested in robust reasonable solutions on coarser grids. This work was supported by the Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Striking a Balance: Preserving Nature, Conserving Culture in the Alaska Ecosystem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Don

    1999-01-01

    In Alaska's extensive parks and preserves, the National Park Service is in the difficult position of mediating between traditional Native subsistence practices and Western concepts of environmental conservation. Ethnographic research has raised awareness of the importance of harvest practices to rural Native groups for survival, cultural…

  14. Preservation and Conservation of Information Resources in the University of Zambia Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanyengo, Christine Wamunyima

    2009-01-01

    Preservation and conservation of library materials is an important aspect of library and information management. Their importance and necessity are more paramount in countries where resources are limited and libraries need to balance them with the needs of an ever increasing number of students hoping to use them. This article reports on the…

  15. Preservation and Conservation and Their Teaching: The Methodology of Vienna '86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejo, Rosa M.

    This paper discusses a seminar on the Teaching of Conservation and Preservation Management for Librarians, Archivists, and Information Scientists, which was organized jointly by the FID (Federation Internationale de Documentation), the ICA (International Council of Archives), and IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations) and held in…

  16. Mass Conservation and Positivity Preservation with Ensemble-type Kalman Filter Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Tijana; McLaughlin, Dennis B.; Cohn, Stephen E.; Verlaan, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Maintaining conservative physical laws numerically has long been recognized as being important in the development of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In the broader context of data assimilation, concerted efforts to maintain conservation laws numerically and to understand the significance of doing so have begun only recently. In order to enforce physically based conservation laws of total mass and positivity in the ensemble Kalman filter, we incorporate constraints to ensure that the filter ensemble members and the ensemble mean conserve mass and remain nonnegative through measurement updates. We show that the analysis steps of ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) algorithm and ensemble Kalman filter algorithm (EnKF) can conserve the mass integral, but do not preserve positivity. Further, if localization is applied or if negative values are simply set to zero, then the total mass is not conserved either. In order to ensure mass conservation, a projection matrix that corrects for localization effects is constructed. In order to maintain both mass conservation and positivity preservation through the analysis step, we construct a data assimilation algorithm based on quadratic programming and ensemble Kalman filtering. Mass and positivity are both preserved by formulating the filter update as a set of quadratic programming problems that incorporate constraints. Some simple numerical experiments indicate that this approach can have a significant positive impact on the posterior ensemble distribution, giving results that are more physically plausible both for individual ensemble members and for the ensemble mean. The results show clear improvements in both analyses and forecasts, particularly in the presence of localized features. Behavior of the algorithm is also tested in presence of model error.

  17. Mass Conservation and Positivity Preservation with Ensemble-type Kalman Filter Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janjic, Tijana; McLaughlin, Dennis B.; Cohn, Stephen E.; Verlaan, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining conservative physical laws numerically has long been recognized as being important in the development of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In the broader context of data assimilation, concerted efforts to maintain conservation laws numerically and to understand the significance of doing so have begun only recently. In order to enforce physically based conservation laws of total mass and positivity in the ensemble Kalman filter, we incorporate constraints to ensure that the filter ensemble members and the ensemble mean conserve mass and remain nonnegative through measurement updates. We show that the analysis steps of ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) algorithm and ensemble Kalman filter algorithm (EnKF) can conserve the mass integral, but do not preserve positivity. Further, if localization is applied or if negative values are simply set to zero, then the total mass is not conserved either. In order to ensure mass conservation, a projection matrix that corrects for localization effects is constructed. In order to maintain both mass conservation and positivity preservation through the analysis step, we construct a data assimilation algorithms based on quadratic programming and ensemble Kalman filtering. Mass and positivity are both preserved by formulating the filter update as a set of quadratic programming problems that incorporate constraints. Some simple numerical experiments indicate that this approach can have a significant positive impact on the posterior ensemble distribution, giving results that are more physically plausible both for individual ensemble members and for the ensemble mean. The results show clear improvements in both analyses and forecasts, particularly in the presence of localized features. Behavior of the algorithm is also tested in presence of model error.

  18. An Audit of Skills and Qualifications in Preservation and Conservation Techniques: The Case of the University of Zambia Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shameenda, Kimbo Lemmy; Kanyengo, Christine Wamunyima

    2012-01-01

    This article establishes the level of skills and experience in preservation and conservation management using a case study methodological approach conducted in the 3 university libraries at the University of Zambia. The findings revealed that 20 (57%) of the library staff had not received formal training in preservation and conservation of library…

  19. A Guide to the Literature on Deterioration, Conservation, and Preservation of Library Material. RR-81-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Richard G., Jr.

    This annotated, sometimes critical, bibliography is directed to those wishing to acquire a background in the conservation and preservation of library and archive materials. The bibliography lists general works, technical works, disaster planning literature, other preservation bibliographies, automated preservation information sources, periodicals…

  20. A monotonicity preserving conservative sharp interface flow solver for high density ratio two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Le Chenadec, Vincent; Pitsch, Heinz

    2013-09-15

    This paper presents a novel approach for solving the conservative form of the incompressible two-phase Navier–Stokes equations. In order to overcome the numerical instability induced by the potentially large density ratio encountered across the interface, the proposed method includes a Volume-of-Fluid type integration of the convective momentum transport, a monotonicity preserving momentum rescaling, and a consistent and conservative Ghost Fluid projection that includes surface tension effects. The numerical dissipation inherent in the Volume-of-Fluid treatment of the convective transport is localized in the interface vicinity, enabling the use of a kinetic energy conserving discretization away from the singularity. Two- and three-dimensional tests are presented, and the solutions shown to remain accurate at arbitrary density ratios. The proposed method is then successfully used to perform the detailed simulation of a round water jet emerging in quiescent air, therefore suggesting the applicability of the proposed algorithm to the computation of realistic turbulent atomization.

  1. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on: Preservation and Conservation Issues in Digital Printing and Digital Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, A.; Green, P.

    2010-04-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 4th International Conference on: Preservation and Conservation Issues in Digital Printing and Digital Photography. The conference was held at the Institute of Physics, London, UK on 27th-28th May 2010. Previous conferences in this series took place in 2000, 2003 and 2006. The aim of this conference series is to inform those responsible for the preservation of digitally printed materials about developments in digital photography and printing technologies. We aim to examine progress in research on inks and substrates and their significance for conservation and preservation issues and techniques. We also hope to develop links between related industries and the conservation/preservation world. Research areas explored in this conference include current developments and future trends in digital printing and photographic technologies; the effect of environmental, storage and salvage conditions on the durability of digital prints and photographs; image processing techniques; image permanence considerations and standards for fastness, permanence and the role of scanning and file formats. We would like to thank all participants for their contribution to the conference programme and these proceedings. Our thanks go to Ms C. Gu and Mr M. Sandy for chairing conference sessions. We are also grateful to Dawn Stewart and the Institute of Physics Conference Team for their invaluable support and assistance in arranging the conference and reception. Finally we would like to extend our thanks to the Society of Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T) for their sponsorship support. The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Ms A Fricker and Dr. P Green (London College of Communication, University of the Arts London). Proceedings edited and compiled by Ms A Fricker and Dr. P Green.

  2. Sperm preservation by freeze-drying for the conservation of wild animals.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito; Ito, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Hidefusa; Onuma, Manabu; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-01-01

    Sperm preservation is a useful technique for the maintenance of biological resources in experimental and domestic animals, and in wild animals. A new preservation method has been developed that enables sperm to be stored for a long time in a refrigerator at 4 °C. Sperm are freeze-dried in a solution containing 10 mM Tris and 1 mM EDTA. Using this method, liquid nitrogen is not required for the storage and transportation of sperm. We demonstrate that chimpanzee, giraffe, jaguar, weasel and the long-haired rat sperm remain viable after freeze-drying. In all species, pronuclei were formed after the injection of freeze-dried sperm into the mouse oocytes. Although preliminary, these results may be useful for the future establishment of "freeze-drying zoo" to conserve wild animals.

  3. Sperm preservation by freeze-drying for the conservation of wild animals.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito; Ito, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Hidefusa; Onuma, Manabu; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-01-01

    Sperm preservation is a useful technique for the maintenance of biological resources in experimental and domestic animals, and in wild animals. A new preservation method has been developed that enables sperm to be stored for a long time in a refrigerator at 4 °C. Sperm are freeze-dried in a solution containing 10 mM Tris and 1 mM EDTA. Using this method, liquid nitrogen is not required for the storage and transportation of sperm. We demonstrate that chimpanzee, giraffe, jaguar, weasel and the long-haired rat sperm remain viable after freeze-drying. In all species, pronuclei were formed after the injection of freeze-dried sperm into the mouse oocytes. Although preliminary, these results may be useful for the future establishment of "freeze-drying zoo" to conserve wild animals. PMID:25409172

  4. Sperm Preservation by Freeze-Drying for the Conservation of Wild Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Takehito; Ito, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Hidefusa; Onuma, Manabu; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-01-01

    Sperm preservation is a useful technique for the maintenance of biological resources in experimental and domestic animals, and in wild animals. A new preservation method has been developed that enables sperm to be stored for a long time in a refrigerator at 4°C. Sperm are freeze-dried in a solution containing 10 mM Tris and 1 mM EDTA. Using this method, liquid nitrogen is not required for the storage and transportation of sperm. We demonstrate that chimpanzee, giraffe, jaguar, weasel and the long-haired rat sperm remain viable after freeze-drying. In all species, pronuclei were formed after the injection of freeze-dried sperm into the mouse oocytes. Although preliminary, these results may be useful for the future establishment of “freeze-drying zoo” to conserve wild animals. PMID:25409172

  5. Conservation of Mass and Preservation of Positivity with Ensemble-Type Kalman Filter Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janjic, Tijana; Mclaughlin, Dennis; Cohn, Stephen E.; Verlaan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the incorporation of constraints to enforce physically based conservation laws in the ensemble Kalman filter. In particular, constraints are used to ensure that the ensemble members and the ensemble mean conserve mass and remain nonnegative through measurement updates. In certain situations filtering algorithms such as the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) yield updated ensembles that conserve mass but are negative, even though the actual states must be nonnegative. In such situations if negative values are set to zero, or a log transform is introduced, the total mass will not be conserved. In this study, mass and positivity are both preserved by formulating the filter update as a set of quadratic programming problems that incorporate non-negativity constraints. Simple numerical experiments indicate that this approach can have a significant positive impact on the posterior ensemble distribution, giving results that are more physically plausible both for individual ensemble members and for the ensemble mean. In two examples, an update that includes a non-negativity constraint is able to properly describe the transport of a sharp feature (e.g., a triangle or cone). A number of implementation questions still need to be addressed, particularly the need to develop a computationally efficient quadratic programming update for large ensemble.

  6. The Key Role of Cultural Preservation in Maize Diversity Conservation in the Argentine Yungas

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Norma I.; Zamudio, Fernando; Cariola, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    Farmers' decisions on what to grow and why can contribute in understanding the conservation of agrobiodiversity. Culture and ethnicity are indicated as first-class factors leading preservation of heirloom cultivars but this has been little considered in studies examining factors that influence the loss or preservation of agrobiodiversity. We propose that corn's ethnotaxa of less diverse uses, which are also key partners in local cultural reproduction, are usually cultivated by a few households. We analyse if there is a relationship between uses and richness of cultivated ethnotaxa at household level and describe corn's medicinal and ritual uses. We found 25 cultivated ethnotaxa, heterogeneously distributed in the region, and we also found that ethnotaxa with less diverse uses are cultivated in fewer households. We identified that, at regional scale, richness is related with food use diversity. The most frequently cited medicinal uses were urinary and tract infections, diarrhoea, and liver disorders. Medicinal recipes involve combinations with other elements. Maize is an indispensable resource in the rituals that propitiate productive activity, to augur prosperity or misfortune according to signals. We have identified the vulnerability in preserving the richness of corn in the region and the factors that shape its cultivation at different scales. PMID:24078829

  7. The key role of cultural preservation in maize diversity conservation in the argentine yungas.

    PubMed

    Hilgert, Norma I; Zamudio, Fernando; Furlan, Violeta; Cariola, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    Farmers' decisions on what to grow and why can contribute in understanding the conservation of agrobiodiversity. Culture and ethnicity are indicated as first-class factors leading preservation of heirloom cultivars but this has been little considered in studies examining factors that influence the loss or preservation of agrobiodiversity. We propose that corn's ethnotaxa of less diverse uses, which are also key partners in local cultural reproduction, are usually cultivated by a few households. We analyse if there is a relationship between uses and richness of cultivated ethnotaxa at household level and describe corn's medicinal and ritual uses. We found 25 cultivated ethnotaxa, heterogeneously distributed in the region, and we also found that ethnotaxa with less diverse uses are cultivated in fewer households. We identified that, at regional scale, richness is related with food use diversity. The most frequently cited medicinal uses were urinary and tract infections, diarrhoea, and liver disorders. Medicinal recipes involve combinations with other elements. Maize is an indispensable resource in the rituals that propitiate productive activity, to augur prosperity or misfortune according to signals. We have identified the vulnerability in preserving the richness of corn in the region and the factors that shape its cultivation at different scales.

  8. Phylogenetic diversity meets conservation policy: small areas are key to preserving eucalypt lineages

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Laura J.; Rosauer, Dan F.; Thornhill, Andrew H.; Kujala, Heini; Crisp, Michael D.; Miller, Joseph T.; McCarthy, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary and genetic knowledge is increasingly being valued in conservation theory, but is rarely considered in conservation planning and policy. Here, we integrate phylogenetic diversity (PD) with spatial reserve prioritization to evaluate how well the existing reserve system in Victoria, Australia captures the evolutionary lineages of eucalypts, which dominate forest canopies across the state. Forty-three per cent of remaining native woody vegetation in Victoria is located in protected areas (mostly national parks) representing 48% of the extant PD found in the state. A modest expansion in protected areas of 5% (less than 1% of the state area) would increase protected PD by 33% over current levels. In a recent policy change, portions of the national parks were opened for development. These tourism development zones hold over half the PD found in national parks with some species and clades falling entirely outside of protected zones within the national parks. This approach of using PD in spatial prioritization could be extended to any clade or area that has spatial and phylogenetic data. Our results demonstrate the relevance of PD to regional conservation policy by highlighting that small but strategically located areas disproportionally impact the preservation of evolutionary lineages. PMID:25561668

  9. Phylogenetic diversity meets conservation policy: small areas are key to preserving eucalypt lineages.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Laura J; Rosauer, Dan F; Thornhill, Andrew H; Kujala, Heini; Crisp, Michael D; Miller, Joseph T; McCarthy, Michael A

    2015-02-19

    Evolutionary and genetic knowledge is increasingly being valued in conservation theory, but is rarely considered in conservation planning and policy. Here, we integrate phylogenetic diversity (PD) with spatial reserve prioritization to evaluate how well the existing reserve system in Victoria, Australia captures the evolutionary lineages of eucalypts, which dominate forest canopies across the state. Forty-three per cent of remaining native woody vegetation in Victoria is located in protected areas (mostly national parks) representing 48% of the extant PD found in the state. A modest expansion in protected areas of 5% (less than 1% of the state area) would increase protected PD by 33% over current levels. In a recent policy change, portions of the national parks were opened for development. These tourism development zones hold over half the PD found in national parks with some species and clades falling entirely outside of protected zones within the national parks. This approach of using PD in spatial prioritization could be extended to any clade or area that has spatial and phylogenetic data. Our results demonstrate the relevance of PD to regional conservation policy by highlighting that small but strategically located areas disproportionally impact the preservation of evolutionary lineages.

  10. Preserving and Using Germplasm and Dissociated Embryonic Cells for Conserving Caribbean and Pacific Coral

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Mary; Carter, Virginia; Martorana, Kelly; Paresa, Malia K.; Acker, Jason; Baums, Iliana B.; Borneman, Eric; Brittsan, Michael; Byers, Michael; Henley, Michael; Laterveer, Michael; Leong, Jo-Ann; McCarthy, Megan; Meyers, Stuart; Nelson, Brian D.; Petersen, Dirk; Tiersch, Terrence; Uribe, Rafael Cuevas; Woods, Erik; Wildt, David

    2012-01-01

    Coral reefs are experiencing unprecedented degradation due to human activities, and protecting specific reef habitats may not stop this decline, because the most serious threats are global (i.e., climate change), not local. However, ex situ preservation practices can provide safeguards for coral reef conservation. Specifically, modern advances in cryobiology and genome banking could secure existing species and genetic diversity until genotypes can be introduced into rehabilitated habitats. We assessed the feasibility of recovering viable sperm and embryonic cells post-thaw from two coral species, Acropora palmata and Fungia scutaria that have diffferent evolutionary histories, ecological niches and reproductive strategies. In vitro fertilization (IVF) of conspecific eggs using fresh (control) spermatozoa revealed high levels of fertilization (>90% in A. palmata; >84% in F. scutaria; P>0.05) that were unaffected by tested sperm concentrations. A solution of 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at cooling rates of 20 to 30°C/min most successfully cryopreserved both A. palmata and F. scutaria spermatozoa and allowed producing developing larvae in vitro. IVF success under these conditions was 65% in A. palmata and 53% in F. scutaria on particular nights; however, on subsequent nights, the same process resulted in little or no IVF success. Thus, the window for optimal freezing of high quality spermatozoa was short (∼5 h for one night each spawning cycle). Additionally, cryopreserved F. scutaria embryonic cells had∼50% post-thaw viability as measured by intact membranes. Thus, despite some differences between species, coral spermatozoa and embryonic cells are viable after low temperature (−196°C) storage, preservation and thawing. Based on these results, we have begun systematically banking coral spermatozoa and embryonic cells on a large-scale as a support approach for preserving existing bio- and genetic diversity found in reef systems. PMID:22413020

  11. Preserving and using germplasm and dissociated embryonic cells for conserving Caribbean and Pacific coral.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; Carter, Virginia; Martorana, Kelly; Paresa, Malia K; Acker, Jason; Baums, Iliana B; Borneman, Eric; Brittsan, Michael; Byers, Michael; Henley, Michael; Laterveer, Michael; Leong, Jo-Ann; McCarthy, Megan; Meyers, Stuart; Nelson, Brian D; Petersen, Dirk; Tiersch, Terrence; Uribe, Rafael Cuevas; Woods, Erik; Wildt, David

    2012-01-01

    Coral reefs are experiencing unprecedented degradation due to human activities, and protecting specific reef habitats may not stop this decline, because the most serious threats are global (i.e., climate change), not local. However, ex situ preservation practices can provide safeguards for coral reef conservation. Specifically, modern advances in cryobiology and genome banking could secure existing species and genetic diversity until genotypes can be introduced into rehabilitated habitats. We assessed the feasibility of recovering viable sperm and embryonic cells post-thaw from two coral species, Acropora palmata and Fungia scutaria that have diffferent evolutionary histories, ecological niches and reproductive strategies. In vitro fertilization (IVF) of conspecific eggs using fresh (control) spermatozoa revealed high levels of fertilization (>90% in A. palmata; >84% in F. scutaria; P>0.05) that were unaffected by tested sperm concentrations. A solution of 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at cooling rates of 20 to 30°C/min most successfully cryopreserved both A. palmata and F. scutaria spermatozoa and allowed producing developing larvae in vitro. IVF success under these conditions was 65% in A. palmata and 53% in F. scutaria on particular nights; however, on subsequent nights, the same process resulted in little or no IVF success. Thus, the window for optimal freezing of high quality spermatozoa was short (∼5 h for one night each spawning cycle). Additionally, cryopreserved F. scutaria embryonic cells had∼50% post-thaw viability as measured by intact membranes. Thus, despite some differences between species, coral spermatozoa and embryonic cells are viable after low temperature (-196°C) storage, preservation and thawing. Based on these results, we have begun systematically banking coral spermatozoa and embryonic cells on a large-scale as a support approach for preserving existing bio- and genetic diversity found in reef systems. PMID:22413020

  12. Noah’s Ark Conservation Will Not Preserve Threatened Ecological Communities under Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Rebecca Mary Bernadette; Carter, Oberon; Gilfedder, Louise; Porfirio, Luciana Laura; Lee, Greg; Bindoff, Nathaniel Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective conservation of threatened ecological communities requires knowledge of where climatically suitable habitat is likely to persist into the future. We use the critically endangered Lowland Grassland community of Tasmania, Australia as a case study to identify options for management in cases where future climatic conditions become unsuitable for the current threatened community. Methods We model current and future climatic suitability for the Lowland Themeda and the Lowland Poa Grassland communities, which make up the listed ecological community. We also model climatic suitability for the structurally dominant grass species of these communities, and for closely related grassland and woodland communities. We use a dynamically downscaled regional climate model derived from six CMIP3 global climate models, under the A2 SRES emissions scenario. Results All model projections showed a large reduction in climatically suitable area by mid-century. Outcomes are slightly better if closely related grassy communities are considered, but the extent of suitable area is still substantially reduced. Only small areas within the current distribution are projected to remain climatically suitable by the end of the century, and very little of that area is currently in good condition. Conclusions As the climate becomes less suitable, a gradual change in the species composition, structure and habitat quality of the grassland communities is likely. Conservation management will need to focus on maintaining diversity, structure and function, rather than attempting to preserve current species composition. Options for achieving this include managing related grassland types to maintain grassland species at the landscape-scale, and maximising the resilience of grasslands by reducing further fragmentation, weed invasion and stress from other land uses, while accepting that change is inevitable. Attempting to maintain the status quo by conserving the current structure and

  13. The New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials. Conservation Environment Guidelines for Libraries and Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, William P.; Banks, Paul N.

    These guidelines are intended to orient the library/archives professional in New York to the common issues, language, pitfalls, and opportunities involved in dealing with the built environment and its impact on the conservation and preservation of a valuable collection. Although developed for the climate typical in New York State, many aspects…

  14. Designing conservation strategies to preserve the genetic diversity of Astragalus edulis Bunge, an endangered species from western Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Peñas, Julio; Barrios, Sara; Bobo-Pinilla, Javier; Lorite, Juan; Martínez-Ortega, M Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus edulis (Fabaceae) is an endangered annual species from the western Mediterranean region that colonized the SE Iberian Peninsula, NE and SW Morocco, and the easternmost Macaronesian islands (Lanzarote and Fuerteventura). Although in Spain some conservation measures have been adopted, it is still necessary to develop an appropriate management plan to preserve genetic diversity across the entire distribution area of the species. Our main objective was to use population genetics as well as ecological and phylogeographic data to select Relevant Genetic Units for Conservation (RGUCs) as the first step in designing conservation plans for A. edulis. We identified six RGUCs for in situ conservation, based on estimations of population genetic structure and probabilities of loss of rare alleles. Additionally, further population parameters, i.e. occupation area, population size, vulnerability, legal status of the population areas, and the historical haplotype distribution, were considered in order to establish which populations deserve conservation priority. Three populations from the Iberian Peninsula, two from Morocco, and one from the Canary Islands represent the total genetic diversity of the species and the rarest allelic variation. Ex situ conservation is recommended to complement the preservation of A. edulis, given that effective in situ population protection is not feasible in all cases. The consideration of complementary phylogeographic and ecological data is useful for management efforts to preserve the evolutionary potential of the species. PMID:26844014

  15. Designing conservation strategies to preserve the genetic diversity of Astragalus edulis Bunge, an endangered species from western Mediterranean region

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Sara; Bobo-Pinilla, Javier; Lorite, Juan; Martínez-Ortega, M. Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus edulis (Fabaceae) is an endangered annual species from the western Mediterranean region that colonized the SE Iberian Peninsula, NE and SW Morocco, and the easternmost Macaronesian islands (Lanzarote and Fuerteventura). Although in Spain some conservation measures have been adopted, it is still necessary to develop an appropriate management plan to preserve genetic diversity across the entire distribution area of the species. Our main objective was to use population genetics as well as ecological and phylogeographic data to select Relevant Genetic Units for Conservation (RGUCs) as the first step in designing conservation plans for A. edulis. We identified six RGUCs for in situ conservation, based on estimations of population genetic structure and probabilities of loss of rare alleles. Additionally, further population parameters, i.e. occupation area, population size, vulnerability, legal status of the population areas, and the historical haplotype distribution, were considered in order to establish which populations deserve conservation priority. Three populations from the Iberian Peninsula, two from Morocco, and one from the Canary Islands represent the total genetic diversity of the species and the rarest allelic variation. Ex situ conservation is recommended to complement the preservation of A. edulis, given that effective in situ population protection is not feasible in all cases. The consideration of complementary phylogeographic and ecological data is useful for management efforts to preserve the evolutionary potential of the species. PMID:26844014

  16. Designing conservation strategies to preserve the genetic diversity of Astragalus edulis Bunge, an endangered species from western Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Peñas, Julio; Barrios, Sara; Bobo-Pinilla, Javier; Lorite, Juan; Martínez-Ortega, M Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus edulis (Fabaceae) is an endangered annual species from the western Mediterranean region that colonized the SE Iberian Peninsula, NE and SW Morocco, and the easternmost Macaronesian islands (Lanzarote and Fuerteventura). Although in Spain some conservation measures have been adopted, it is still necessary to develop an appropriate management plan to preserve genetic diversity across the entire distribution area of the species. Our main objective was to use population genetics as well as ecological and phylogeographic data to select Relevant Genetic Units for Conservation (RGUCs) as the first step in designing conservation plans for A. edulis. We identified six RGUCs for in situ conservation, based on estimations of population genetic structure and probabilities of loss of rare alleles. Additionally, further population parameters, i.e. occupation area, population size, vulnerability, legal status of the population areas, and the historical haplotype distribution, were considered in order to establish which populations deserve conservation priority. Three populations from the Iberian Peninsula, two from Morocco, and one from the Canary Islands represent the total genetic diversity of the species and the rarest allelic variation. Ex situ conservation is recommended to complement the preservation of A. edulis, given that effective in situ population protection is not feasible in all cases. The consideration of complementary phylogeographic and ecological data is useful for management efforts to preserve the evolutionary potential of the species.

  17. Preservation and Conservation of Library Documents: A Unesco/IFLA/ICA Enquiry into the Current State of the World's Patrimony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, D. W. G.

    Designed to present a broad picture that characterizes the current world situation with respect to preservation and conservation of library and archival documents, this report is based on a March 1986 survey on the state of the world's patrimony which was funded by Unesco and undertaken jointly by IFLA (the International Federation of Library…

  18. Maxwellians and the Remaking of Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    Although James Clerk Maxwell first formulated his theory of the electromagnetic field in the early 1860s, it went through important changes before it gained general acceptance in the 1890s. Those changes were largely the work of a group of younger physicists, the Maxwellians, led by G. F. FitzGerald in Ireland, Oliver Lodge and Oliver Heaviside in England, and Heinrich Hertz in Germany. Together, they extended, refined, tested, and confirmed Maxwell's theory, and recast it into the set of four vector equations known ever since as ``Maxwell's equations.'' By tracing how the Maxwellians remade and disseminated Maxwell's theory between the late 1870s and the mid-1890s, we can gain a clearer understanding not just of how the electromagnetic field was understood at the end of the 19th century, but of the collaborative nature of work at the frontiers of physics.

  19. Conserving and Preserving Library Materials. Papers Presented at the Allerton Park Institute (Urbana, Illinois, November 15-18, 1981). Allerton Park Institute Number 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Kathryn Luther, Ed.; Henderson, William T., Ed.

    Papers presented at the 1981 Allerton Park Institute include: (1) "Conservation: What We should Do Until the Conservator and the Twenty-first Century Arrive," by Robert H. Patterson; (2) "Expanding Preservation Resources: The Corps of Practitioners and the Core of Knowledge," by Pamela W. Darling; (3) "National Preservation Planning and Regional…

  20. Conservation and Preservation of Humanities Research Collections. Essays on Treatment and Care of Rare Books, Manuscripts, Photography, and Art on Paper and Canvas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliphant, Dave, Ed.

    The 10 essays in this collection describe conservation and preservation projects conducted at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Eight of the 10 essays, each of which is written by a member of the Center's staff, address conservation treatments and issues. Two essays deal with preserving materials by…

  1. An admissibility and asymptotic-preserving scheme for systems of conservation laws with source term on 2D unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachère, F.; Turpault, R.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design explicit finite volumes schemes for specific systems of conservations laws with stiff source terms, which degenerate into diffusion equations. We propose a general framework to design an asymptotic preserving scheme, that is stable and consistent under a classical hyperbolic CFL condition in both hyperbolic and diffusive regime, for any two-dimensional unstructured mesh. Moreover, the scheme developed also preserves the set of admissible states, which is mandatory to keep physical solutions in stiff configurations. This construction is achieved by using a non-linear scheme as a target scheme for the diffusive equation, which gives the form of the global scheme for the complete system of conservation laws. Numerical results are provided to validate the scheme in both regimes.

  2. A conservative, positivity preserving scheme for reactive solute transport problems in moving domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabuza, Sibusiso; Kuzmin, Dmitri; Čanić, Sunčica; Bukač, Martina

    2014-11-01

    We study the mathematical models and numerical schemes for reactive transport of a soluble substance in deformable media. The medium is a channel with compliant adsorbing walls. The solutes are dissolved in the fluid flowing through the channel. The fluid, which carries the solutes, is viscous and incompressible. The reactive process is described as a general physico-chemical process taking place on the compliant channel wall. The problem is modeled by a convection-diffusion adsorption-desorption equation in moving domains. We present a conservative, positivity preserving, high resolution ALE-FCT scheme for this problem in the presence of dominant transport processes and wall reactions on the moving wall. A Patankar type time discretization is presented, which provides conservative treatment of nonlinear reactive terms. We establish CFL-type constraints on the time step, and show the mass conservation of the time discretization scheme. Numerical simulations are performed to show validity of the schemes against effective models under various scenarios including linear adsorption-desorption, irreversible wall reaction, infinite adsorption kinetics, and nonlinear Langmuir kinetics. The grid convergence of the numerical scheme is studied for the case of fixed meshes and moving meshes in fixed domains. Finally, we simulate reactive transport in moving domains under linear and nonlinear chemical reactions at the wall, and show that the motion of the compliant channel wall enhances adsorption of the solute from the fluid to the channel wall. Consequences of this result are significant in the area of, e.g., nano-particle cancer drug delivery. Our result shows that periodic excitation of the cancerous tissue using, e.g., ultrasound, may enhance adsorption of cancer drugs carried by nano-particles via the human vasculature. For Taylor dispersion and for other convection dominated flows, numerical schemes for solute transport may lead to undesirable numerical artefacts. These

  3. Non-Maxwellian to Maxwellian transitions of atmospheric microplasmas at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. U.; Jeong, S. Y.; Won, I. H.; Sung, S. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations and numerical analysis of a single particle motion are performed for atmospheric He microplasmas at microwave frequencies to determine the characteristics of non-Maxwellian to Maxwellian transition. The left and the right regimes of Paschen curve, divided by this transition, reveal that the transition frequencies depend on the gap of electrodes and the neutral gas pressure to follow scaling laws for a new extended Paschen law. The fluid models are reasonable at the right-side regime of Paschen breakdown areas, but not on the left side, which is highly kinetic for electrons. The plasmas driven by weaker electric fields of high enough frequencies at the right-side Paschen regime breed more energetic electrons.

  4. Identifying functional thermodynamics in autonomous Maxwellian ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Alexander B.; Mandal, Dibyendu; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a family of Maxwellian Demons for which correlations among information bearing degrees of freedom can be calculated exactly and in compact analytical form. This allows one to precisely determine Demon functional thermodynamic operating regimes, when previous methods either misclassify or simply fail due to approximations they invoke. This reveals that these Demons are more functional than previous candidates. They too behave either as engines, lifting a mass against gravity by extracting energy from a single heat reservoir, or as Landauer erasers, consuming external work to remove information from a sequence of binary symbols by decreasing their individual uncertainty. Going beyond these, our Demon exhibits a new functionality that erases bits not by simply decreasing individual-symbol uncertainty, but by increasing inter-bit correlations (that is, by adding temporal order) while increasing single-symbol uncertainty. In all cases, but especially in the new erasure regime, exactly accounting for informational correlations leads to tight bounds on Demon performance, expressed as a refined Second Law of thermodynamics that relies on the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for dynamical processes and not on changes purely in system configurational entropy, as previously employed. We rigorously derive the refined Second Law under minimal assumptions and so it applies quite broadly—for Demons with and without memory and input sequences that are correlated or not. We note that general Maxwellian Demons readily violate previously proposed, alternative such bounds, while the current bound still holds. As such, it broadly describes the minimal energetic cost of any computation by a thermodynamic system.

  5. Simple sperm preservation by freeze-drying for conserving animal strains.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito

    2015-01-01

    Freeze-drying spermatozoa is the ultimate method for the maintenance of animal strains, in that the gametes can be preserved for a long time in a refrigerator at 4 °C. Furthermore, it is possible to realize easy and safe transportation of spermatozoa at an ambient temperature that requires neither liquid nitrogen nor dry ice. Freeze-drying spermatozoa has been established as a new method for storing genetic resources instead of cryopreservation using liquid nitrogen. This chapter introduces our latest protocols for freeze-drying of mouse and rat spermatozoa, and the anticipated results of the fertilizing ability of these gametes following long-term preservation or transportation. PMID:25408416

  6. Bound-preserving discontinuous Galerkin methods for conservative phase space advection in curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endeve, Eirik; Hauck, Cory D.; Xing, Yulong; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    We extend the positivity-preserving method of Zhang and Shu [49] to simulate the advection of neutral particles in phase space using curvilinear coordinates. The ability to utilize these coordinates is important for non-equilibrium transport problems in general relativity and also in science and engineering applications with specific geometries. The method achieves high-order accuracy using Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization of phase space and strong stability-preserving, Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) time integration. Special care is taken to ensure that the method preserves strict bounds for the phase space distribution function f; i.e., f ∈ [ 0 , 1 ]. The combination of suitable CFL conditions and the use of the high-order limiter proposed in [49] is sufficient to ensure positivity of the distribution function. However, to ensure that the distribution function satisfies the upper bound, the discretization must, in addition, preserve the divergence-free property of the phase space flow. Proofs that highlight the necessary conditions are presented for general curvilinear coordinates, and the details of these conditions are worked out for some commonly used coordinate systems (i.e., spherical polar spatial coordinates in spherical symmetry and cylindrical spatial coordinates in axial symmetry, both with spherical momentum coordinates). Results from numerical experiments - including one example in spherical symmetry adopting the Schwarzschild metric - demonstrate that the method achieves high-order accuracy and that the distribution function satisfies the maximum principle.

  7. Some green for some green in West Virginia: An overview of the West Virginia Conservation and Preservation Easements Act

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The West Virginia Conservation and Preservation Act is a land management device whose time has come in West Virginia. Wise use of this tool by lawyers, property owners and holding entities can help the state to achieve a balance between the wise use of its natural resources and the promotion of tourism. Although not appropriate in every situation where it could potentially be applied, the West Virginia Act is a device by which economic and environmental interests can converge for the benefit of both parties.

  8. Maxwellian Eye Fixation during Natural Scene Perception

    PubMed Central

    Duchesne, Jean; Bouvier, Vincent; Guillemé, Julien; Coubard, Olivier A.

    2012-01-01

    When we explore a visual scene, our eyes make saccades to jump rapidly from one area to another and fixate regions of interest to extract useful information. While the role of fixation eye movements in vision has been widely studied, their random nature has been a hitherto neglected issue. Here we conducted two experiments to examine the Maxwellian nature of eye movements during fixation. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to perform free viewing of natural scenes displayed on a computer screen while their eye movements were recorded. For each participant, the probability density function (PDF) of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed the law established by Maxwell for describing molecule velocity in gas. Only the mean amplitude of eye movements varied with expertise, which was lower in experts than novice participants. In Experiment 2, two participants underwent fixed time, free viewing of natural scenes and of their scrambled version while their eye movements were recorded. Again, the PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed Maxwell's law for each participant and for each scene condition (normal or scrambled). The results suggest that eye fixation during natural scene perception describes a random motion regardless of top-down or of bottom-up processes. PMID:23226987

  9. Maxwellian eye fixation during natural scene perception.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Jean; Bouvier, Vincent; Guillemé, Julien; Coubard, Olivier A

    2012-01-01

    When we explore a visual scene, our eyes make saccades to jump rapidly from one area to another and fixate regions of interest to extract useful information. While the role of fixation eye movements in vision has been widely studied, their random nature has been a hitherto neglected issue. Here we conducted two experiments to examine the Maxwellian nature of eye movements during fixation. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to perform free viewing of natural scenes displayed on a computer screen while their eye movements were recorded. For each participant, the probability density function (PDF) of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed the law established by Maxwell for describing molecule velocity in gas. Only the mean amplitude of eye movements varied with expertise, which was lower in experts than novice participants. In Experiment 2, two participants underwent fixed time, free viewing of natural scenes and of their scrambled version while their eye movements were recorded. Again, the PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed Maxwell's law for each participant and for each scene condition (normal or scrambled). The results suggest that eye fixation during natural scene perception describes a random motion regardless of top-down or of bottom-up processes. PMID:23226987

  10. Conservation Strategies for Orangutans: Reintroduction versus Habitat Preservation and the Benefits of Sustainably Logged Forest

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Howard B.; Meijaard, Erik; Venter, Oscar; Ancrenaz, Marc; Possingham, Hugh P.

    2014-01-01

    The Sumatran orangutan is currently listed by the IUCN as critically endangered and the Bornean species as endangered. Unless effective conservation measures are enacted quickly, most orangutan populations without adequate protection face a dire future. Two main strategies are being pursued to conserve orangutans: (i) rehabilitation and reintroduction of ex-captive or displaced individuals; and (ii) protection of their forest habitat to abate threats like deforestation and hunting. These strategies are often mirrored in similar programs to save other valued and endangered mega-fauna. Through GIS analysis, collating data from across the literature, and combining this information within a modelling and decision analysis framework, we analysed which strategy or combination of strategies is the most cost-effective at maintaining wild orangutan populations, and under what conditions. We discovered that neither strategy was optimal under all circumstances but was dependent on the relative cost per orangutan, the timescale of management concern, and the rate of deforestation. Reintroduction, which costs twelve times as much per animal as compared to protection of forest, was only a cost-effective strategy at very short timescales. For time scales longer than 10–20 years, forest protection is the more cost-efficient strategy for maintaining wild orangutan populations. Our analyses showed that a third, rarely utilised strategy is intermediate: introducing sustainable logging practices and protection from hunting in timber production forest. Maximum long-term cost-efficiency is achieved by working in conservation forest. However, habitat protection involves addressing complex conservation issues and conflicting needs at the landscape level. We find a potential resolution in that well-managed production forests could achieve intermediate conservation outcomes. This has broad implications for sustaining biodiversity more generally within an economically productive landscape

  11. Conservation strategies for orangutans: reintroduction versus habitat preservation and the benefits of sustainably logged forest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Howard B; Meijaard, Erik; Venter, Oscar; Ancrenaz, Marc; Possingham, Hugh P

    2014-01-01

    The Sumatran orangutan is currently listed by the IUCN as critically endangered and the Bornean species as endangered. Unless effective conservation measures are enacted quickly, most orangutan populations without adequate protection face a dire future. Two main strategies are being pursued to conserve orangutans: (i) rehabilitation and reintroduction of ex-captive or displaced individuals; and (ii) protection of their forest habitat to abate threats like deforestation and hunting. These strategies are often mirrored in similar programs to save other valued and endangered mega-fauna. Through GIS analysis, collating data from across the literature, and combining this information within a modelling and decision analysis framework, we analysed which strategy or combination of strategies is the most cost-effective at maintaining wild orangutan populations, and under what conditions. We discovered that neither strategy was optimal under all circumstances but was dependent on the relative cost per orangutan, the timescale of management concern, and the rate of deforestation. Reintroduction, which costs twelve times as much per animal as compared to protection of forest, was only a cost-effective strategy at very short timescales. For time scales longer than 10-20 years, forest protection is the more cost-efficient strategy for maintaining wild orangutan populations. Our analyses showed that a third, rarely utilised strategy is intermediate: introducing sustainable logging practices and protection from hunting in timber production forest. Maximum long-term cost-efficiency is achieved by working in conservation forest. However, habitat protection involves addressing complex conservation issues and conflicting needs at the landscape level. We find a potential resolution in that well-managed production forests could achieve intermediate conservation outcomes. This has broad implications for sustaining biodiversity more generally within an economically productive landscape

  12. Ion-dust streaming instability with non-Maxwellian ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kählert, Hanno

    2015-07-15

    The influence of non-Maxwellian ions on the ion-dust streaming instability in a complex plasma is investigated. The ion susceptibility employed for the calculations self-consistently accounts for the acceleration of the ions by a homogeneous background electric field and their collisions with neutral gas particles via a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision term [e.g., A. V. Ivlev et al., Phys. Rev. E 71, 016405 (2005)], leading to significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian distribution. The dispersion relation and the properties of the most unstable mode are studied in detail and compared with the Maxwellian case. The largest deviations occur at low to intermediate ion-neutral damping. In particular, the growth rate of the instability for ion streaming below the Bohm speed is found to be lower than in the case of Maxwellian ions, yet remains on a significant level even for fast ion flows above the Bohm speed.

  13. Preservation or development. A Rhetorical analysis of the American conservation debate, 1980-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Short, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    In the late 1970s, America's commitment to an ecological view of public land management was challenged by a reinvigorated conservative movement. The Sagebrush Rebellion and the New Right attempted to convince the public that environmentalism threatened the nation's well-being. This study focuses upon the recent debate over the direction of federal land policy. Examining speeches, essays, pamphlets, and other forms of persuasive discourse, the author identifies two distinct workviews at the center of the controversy. The view of the New Right, often advanced by Ronald Reagan and James Watt, envisioned a growth economy in which the market place dictated how natural resources would be allocated. An opposing ecological perspective promoted active federal management with multiple-use guidelines and environmental impact statements serving to protect the public lands from any lasting reminders of human development. The study reviews the historical and political context of the conservation debate and reveals how the debate affected the nation's view of wilderness. While conservatives argued from a human-centered view of nature emphasizing economic needs, environmentalists supported an ecological view, granting certain rights to all members of the ecosystem. An understanding of recurring rhetorical strategies illuminates the growing schism over how America's public land should be used and maintained.

  14. A Polytropic Model for Space and Laboratory Plasmas Described by Bi-Maxwellian Electron Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-09-01

    Non-local electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) are shown to have an important effect on the thermodynamic behavior of plasmas in the context of solar wind and laboratory plasmas. A conservation relation is held for electron enthalpy and plasma potential during the electron transport. For an adiabatic system governed by non-local electron dynamics, the correlation between electron temperature and density can be approximated by a polytropic relation, with different indexes demonstrated using three cases of bi-Maxwellian EEPFs. This scenario differs from a local thermodynamic equilibrium having a single polytropic index of 5/3 for adiabaticity.

  15. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation: Part 2. The Yellowing of Paper and Conservation Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Henry A.

    1996-11-01

    The discoloration of paper on aging is of interest to the archival community and also to the pulp and paper industry where new and improved mechanical pulps are being developed. The yellowing of paper on aging can be attributed to the presence of chromophores found in some of the products formed from the degradation of one or more components of paper. This study identifies the nature of the chromophores found in cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. The photooxidation of lignin-containing papers and the mechanism for photoyellowing are discussed. This is followed by a description of the basic principles of conservation bleaching which involves chemically treating papers in order to remove unwanted discoloration or stains. The washing of paper and the use of oxidizing and reducing bleaches are presented. The discussion on oxidizing bleaches includes hydrogen peroxide, alkaline hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide and sunlight. The chemistry of reducing bleaches focuses on dithionites and borohydrides.

  16. Area-preserving dynamics of a long slender finger by curvature: a test case for globally conserved phase ordering.

    PubMed

    Peleg, A; Meerson, B; Vilenkin, A; Conti, M

    2001-06-01

    A long and slender finger can serve as a simple "test bed" for different phase-ordering models. In this work, the globally conserved, interface-controlled dynamics of a long finger is investigated, analytically and numerically, in two dimensions. An important limit is considered when the finger dynamics is reducible to area-preserving motion by curvature. A free boundary problem for the finger shape is formulated. An asymptotic perturbation theory is developed that uses the finger aspect ratio as a small parameter. The leading-order approximation is a modification of the Mullins finger (a well-known analytic solution) whose width is allowed to slowly vary with time. This time dependence is described, in the leading order, by an exponential law with the characteristic time proportional to the (constant) finger area. The subleading terms of the asymptotic theory are also calculated. Finally, the finger dynamics is investigated numerically, employing the Ginzburg-Landau equation with a global conservation law. The theory is in very good agreement with the numerical solution.

  17. Second order symmetry-preserving conservative Lagrangian scheme for compressible Euler equations in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Juan; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2014-09-01

    In applications such as astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion, there are many three-dimensional cylindrical-symmetric multi-material problems which are usually simulated by Lagrangian schemes in the two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. For this type of simulation, a critical issue for the schemes is to keep spherical symmetry in the cylindrical coordinate system if the original physical problem has this symmetry. In the past decades, several Lagrangian schemes with such symmetry property have been developed, but all of them are only first order accurate. In this paper, we develop a second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving compressible Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates, based on the control volume discretizations, which is designed to have uniformly second order accuracy and capability to preserve one-dimensional spherical symmetry in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry when computed on an equal-angle-zoned initial grid. The scheme maintains several good properties such as conservation for mass, momentum and total energy, and the geometric conservation law. Several two-dimensional numerical examples in cylindrical coordinates are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the scheme in terms of accuracy, symmetry, non-oscillation and robustness. The advantage of higher order accuracy is demonstrated in these examples.

  18. Preserving the Impossible: Conservation of Soft-Sediment Hominin Footprint Sites and Strategies for Three-Dimensional Digital Data Capture

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Matthew R.; Falkingham, Peter; Morse, Sarita A.; Bates, Karl; Crompton, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Human footprints provide some of the most publically emotive and tangible evidence of our ancestors. To the scientific community they provide evidence of stature, presence, behaviour and in the case of early hominins potential evidence with respect to the evolution of gait. While rare in the geological record the number of footprint sites has increased in recent years along with the analytical tools available for their study. Many of these sites are at risk from rapid erosion, including the Ileret footprints in northern Kenya which are second only in age to those at Laetoli (Tanzania). Unlithified, soft-sediment footprint sites such these pose a significant geoconservation challenge. In the first part of this paper conservation and preservation options are explored leading to the conclusion that to ‘record and digitally rescue’ provides the only viable approach. Key to such strategies is the increasing availability of three-dimensional data capture either via optical laser scanning and/or digital photogrammetry. Within the discipline there is a developing schism between those that favour one approach over the other and a requirement from geoconservationists and the scientific community for some form of objective appraisal of these alternatives is necessary. Consequently in the second part of this paper we evaluate these alternative approaches and the role they can play in a ‘record and digitally rescue’ conservation strategy. Using modern footprint data, digital models created via optical laser scanning are compared to those generated by state-of-the-art photogrammetry. Both methods give comparable although subtly different results. This data is evaluated alongside a review of field deployment issues to provide guidance to the community with respect to the factors which need to be considered in digital conservation of human/hominin footprints. PMID:23613743

  19. Comparison of solutions to bi-Maxwellian and Maxwellian transport equations for subsonic flows. [in terrestrial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Conditions corresponding to the steady state subsonic flow of a fully ionized electron-proton plasma in the terrestrial ionosphere are presently characterized by systematically comparing the solutions to the bi-Maxwellian-based 16-moment and Maxwellian-based 13-moment transport equations. The former can account for large temperature anisotropies and the flow of both parallel and perpendicular thermal energy, while the latter account for small temperature anisotropies and only a total heat flow. The comparison is conducted for 2000-10,000 K lower boundary temperatures and 1-4-K/km temperature gradients, over the 1500-13,000-km altitude range.

  20. Numerical Loading of a Maxwellian Probability Distribution Function

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. V. Lewandowski

    2003-03-24

    A renormalization procedure for the numerical loading of a Maxwellian probability distribution function (PDF) is formulated. The procedure, which involves the solution of three coupled nonlinear equations, yields a numerically loaded PDF with improved properties for higher velocity moments. This method is particularly useful for low-noise particle-in-cell simulations with electron dynamics.

  1. On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.

    2009-05-15

    Collisional momentum and energy transport in bi-Maxwellian plasmas with a drift velocity along the ambient magnetic field are calculated from both the Fokker-Planck and Boltzmann integral approximations. The transport coefficients obtained from the two approaches are identical to the leading order (proportional to the Coulomb logarithm) and are presented here in a closed form involving generalized double hypergeometric functions.

  2. Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions for bi-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinger, Petr

    2010-07-20

    Langevin model corresponding to the Fokker-Planck equation for bi-Maxwellian particle distribution functions is developed. Rosenbluth potentials and their derivatives are derived in the form of triple hypergeometric functions. The Langevin model is tested in the case of relaxation of the proton temperature anisotropy and implemented into the hybrid expanding box model. First results of this code are presented and discussed.

  3. Conservation and Preservation Programs for the University of California Libraries: Problems, Programs, and Costs. RR-80-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Richard G., Jr.

    Designed to provide background for the planning of collection preservation programs in the libraries of the University of California, this paper presents an overview of the preservation problem, makes specific recommendations for further programs within the University of California library system, and assesses the needs of the system with regard…

  4. Nonlocal heat transport by non-Maxwellian electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, K.; Short, R.W.

    1984-03-30

    The generalization of the Spitzer-Harm solution to steep density and temperature gradients requires the computation of the appropriate non-Maxwellian isotropic part of the electron distribution. We develop analytic solutions for a steady state, high-Z plasma, employing the diffusion approximation. Applications of our solution include computation of the resulting heat flux, thermal smoothing of transverse temperature perturbations, and modification of linear heat flow instabilities.

  5. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  6. A New Approach for Documentation, Conservation and Preservation of the Monolithic Statues in San Agustín as Pilot for Outdoor Cultural Heritage Documentation in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estela, A.; Hamacher, J.

    2014-06-01

    The "Instituto Colombiano de Antropología e Historia" (ICANH) started a new conservation project for the "San Agustín Archaeological Park" (Huila, Colombia) in 2013. The objectives of this project are the documentation, conservation, and preservation of the numerous monolithic statues mainly by integrating the use of new technologies (3D models). A first phase of the project has been completed, resulting in three-dimensional models of 66 of the monolithic sculptures in San Agustín. The methodology developed in this first phase will show the way for other heritage sites in Colombia and for subsequent phases applied to the archaeological park. The 3D data has been obtained using two types of data acquisition technology: the Mantis Vision F5 using infrared structured-light (SL) and a laser scanner based on the phase shift (PS) technology, the Z+F Imager 5010. The results show that future phases need improvement in data acquisition. Mainly the data obtained with the hand held scanner shows many lacunae. This article presents the observations during data processing on the basis of one sculpture, "Escultura 23". In conclusion, this first phase showed where to improve for the succeeding ones, for instance the detail of the meshes need to be increased if the models are to be used for detailed conservation and preservation purposes.

  7. Landau damping of Langmuir waves in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2011-11-15

    As free electrons move in the nearest neighbour ion's potential well, the equilibrium velocity departs from Maxwell distribution. The effect of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function (NMVDF) on many properties of the plasma such as the transport coefficients, the kinetic energy, and the degree of ionization is found to be noticeable. A correction to the Langmuir wave dispersion relation is proved to arise due to the NMVDF as well [Phys. Plasmas 17, 052105 (2010)]. The study is extended hereafter to include the effect of NMVDF on the Landau damping of Langmuir wave.

  8. L2-stability of the Landau equation near global Maxwellians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Xiao, Qinghua

    2015-08-01

    We present an L2-stability of the kinetic Landau equation for a single species charged plasma with an inverse power-law interaction force in the perturbative regime of global Maxwellians. Our result demonstrates that the L2-distance between two classical solutions to the Landau equation can be controlled by that between corresponding initial data in a Lipschitz manner. The Coulomb interaction is known to be the singular and marginal case of the theory of the Boltzmann equation where the grazing collisions are the dominant. For some class of classical solutions, we show that our L2-stability result can provide a uniform L2-stability.

  9. Maxwellian theory of gravitational waves and their mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.

    2014-02-01

    We present a theory in Maxwellian form for gravitational waves in a flat background. This requires us to identify the gravitational analogues of the electric and magnetic fields for light. An important novelty, however, is that our analogues are not vector fields but rather rank-two tensor fields; in place of a three-component vector at each point in space, as in electromagnetism, our fields are three by three symmetric matrices at each point. The resulting Maxwell-like equations lead directly to a Poynting theorem for the local energy density associated with a gravitational wave and to associated local properties including densities of momentum and angular momentum.

  10. Langmuir wave dispersion relation in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2010-05-15

    The Langmuir wave dispersion relation is derived in partially ionized plasmas, where free electrons are confined to move in a nearest neighbor ions' potential well. The equilibrium velocity distribution function experiences then, a departure from Maxwell distribution function. The effect of the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function on the Langmuir phase and group velocities as well as the phase matching conditions and the nonlinear growth rate of decay instability is investigated. The proposed Langmuir wave dispersion relation is relevant to dense and cryogenic plasmas.

  11. Plasma Dielectric Tensor for Non-Maxwellian Distributions in the FLR Limit

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips; A. Pletzer; R.J. Dumont; D.N. Smithe

    2003-07-08

    Previous analytical and numerical studies have noted that the presence of fully non-Maxwellian plasma species can significantly alter the dynamics of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas. In this paper, a general form for the hot plasma dielectric tensor for non-Maxwellian distributions is derived that is valid in the finite Larmor radius approximation. This model provides some insight into understanding the limitations on representing non-Maxwellian plasma species with equivalent Maxwellian components in modeling radio-frequency wave propagation and absorption.

  12. Analog and Digitgal Simulations of Maxwellian Plasmas for Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Savin, D W; Badnell, N R; Beiersdorfer, P; Beck, B R; Brown, G V; Bryans, P; Gorczyca, T W; Gu, M F; Kahn, S M; Laming, J M; Liedahl, D A; Mitthumsiri, W; Scofield, J H; Wong, K L

    2007-02-24

    Many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas possess Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) electron energy distributions (EEDs). Interpreting or predicting the properties of these plasmas requires accurate knowledge of atomic processes such as radiative lifetimes, electron impact excitation and de-excitation, electron impact ionization, radiative recombination, dielectronic recombination, and charge transfer for thousands of levels or more. Plasma models cannot include all of the needed levels and atomic data. Hence approximations need to be made to make the models tractable. Here we report on an 'analog' technique we have developed for simulating a Maxwellian EED using an electron beam ion trap and review some recent results using this method. A subset of the atomic data needed for modeling Maxwellian plasmas relates to calculating the ionization balance. Accurate fractional abundance calculations for the different ionization stages of the various elements in the plasma are needed to reliably interpret or predict the properties of the gas. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and are often highly suspect. Here we will also review our recent updating of the recommended atomic data for 'digital' computer simulations of MB plasmas in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), describe the changes relative to previously recommended CIE calculations, and discuss what further recombination and ionization data are needed to improve this latest set of recommended CIE calculations.

  13. Multiscale Conservation Laws Driven by Lévy Stable and Linnik Diffusions: Asymptotics, Shock Creation, Preservation and Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaratnam, B.; Woyczyński, W. A.

    2015-07-01

    Recent work has shown that the solutions of the fractal conservation laws driven by Lévy -stable diffusions exhibit shocks for bounded, odd, and convex on the positive half-line, initial data when the parameter We study the analogous situation for the Lévy -Linnik diffusions in which case the local behavior is strikingly different, although we are able to establish analytically that the large time behavior of the two types of conservation laws are similar. But the main new insights obtained via large-scale numerical experiments is that, for any , the conservation laws driven by -Linnik diffusions display shocks that do not dissipate over time, while those for -stable diffusion () do. We formulate rigorous conjectures based on these numerical experiments.

  14. Connecting to the World's Collections: Making the Case for the Conservation and Preservation of Our Cultural Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Joyce Hill

    2009-01-01

    Sixty cultural heritage leaders from thirty-two countries, including representatives from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, South America, Australia, Europe, and North America gathered in October 2009 in Salzburg, Austria, to develop a series of practical recommendations to ensure optimal collections conservation worldwide. Convened at Schloss…

  15. Pulsar radiation in post-Maxwellian vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. I.; Shvilkin, B. N.; Sokolov, V. A.; Vasili'ev, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics are most clearly pronounced in a strong electromagnetic field close to Schwinger limit. Electromagnetic fields of such intensity can be obtained in laboratory conditions only on very few extreme laser facilities and during a short time interval. At the same time, the astrophysical compact objects with a strong electromagnetic field such as pulsars and magnetars are the best suited to study the effects of nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics. We present analytical calculations for pulsar proper radiation in parametrized post-Maxwellian nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics. Based on the obtained solutions, the effect of nonlinear vacuum corrections to pulsar spin down is being investigated. The analysis of torque functions show that the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics corrections to the electromagnetic radiation for some pulsars may be comparable to the energy loss by gravitational radiation.

  16. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  17. A Fully Conservative and Entropy Preserving Cut-Cell Method for Incompressible Viscous Flows on Staggered Cartesian Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Chenadec, Vincent; Bay, Yong Yi

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of complex geometries in Computational Fluid Dynamics applications is a challenging endeavor, which immersed boundary and cut-cell techniques can significantly simplify by alleviating the meshing process required by body-fitted meshes. These methods also introduce new challenges, in that the formulation of accurate and well-posed discrete operators is not trivial. A cut-cell method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is proposed for staggered Cartesian grids. In both scalar and vector cases, the emphasis is set on the structure of the discrete operators, designed to mimic the properties of the continuous ones while retaining a nearest-neighbor stencil. For convective transport, different forms are proposed (divergence, advective and skew-symmetric), and shown to be equivalent when the discrete continuity equation is satisfied. This ensures mass, momentum and kinetic energy conservation. For diffusive transport, conservative and symmetric operators are proposed for both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Symmetry ensures the existence of a sink term (viscous dissipation) in the discrete kinetic energy budget, which is beneficial for stability. The accuracy of method is finally assessed in standard test cases.

  18. ICE911 Research: Floating Safe Inert Materials to Preserve Ice and Conserve Water in Order to Mitigate Climate Change Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Manzara, A.; Chetty, S.; Venkatesh, S.; Scholtz, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ice911 Research has conducted years of field testing to develop and test localized reversible engineering techniques to mitigate the negative impacts of polar ice melt. The technology uses environmentally safe materials to reflect energy in carefully selected, limited areas from summertime polar sun. The technology is now being adapted to help with California's drought. We have tested the albedo modification technique on a small scale over seven Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, a Canadian lake, and a small artificial pond in Minnesota about 100 ft in diameter and 6 ft deep at the center, using various materials and an evolving array of instrumentation. On the pond in Minnesota, this year's test results for ice preservation, using hollow glass spheres deployed over our largest test areas yet, showed that glass bubbles can provide an effective material for increasing albedo, significantly reducing the melting rate of ice. This year Ice911 also undertook its first small Arctic field test in Barrow, Alaska on a lake in Barrow's BEO area, and results are still coming in. The technology that Ice911 has been developing for ice preservation has also been shown to keep small test areas of water cooler, in various small-scale tests spanning years. We believe that with some adaptations of the technology, the materials can be applied to reservoirs and lakes to help stretch these precious resources further in California's ongoing drought. There are several distinct advantages for this method over alternatives such as large reverse osmosis projects or building new reservoirs, which could possibly allow a drought-stricken state to build fewer of these more-costly alternatives. First, applying an ecologically benign surface treatment of Ice911's materials can be accomplished within a season, at a lower cost, with far less secondary environmental impact, than such capital-and-time-intensive infrastructure projects. Second, keeping

  19. Breast-Conservative Surgery With Close or Positive Margins: Can the Breast Be Preserved With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost?

    SciTech Connect

    Guinot, Jose Luis . E-mail: jguinot@fivo.org; Roldan, Susana; Maronas, Maria; Tortajada, Isabel; Carrascosa, Maria; Chust, Maria Luisa; Estornell, Marian; Mengual, Jose Luis; Arribas, Leoncio

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the likelihood of preserving the breast in women who show close or positive margins after conservative surgery for early breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Since 1996, 125 women with less than 5 mm or positive margins and positive separate cavity margin sampling were entered in a prospective trial with high-dose radiotherapy. A standard dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast was followed by a high-dose-rate brachytherapy application delivering 3 fractions of 4.4 Gy in 24 hours. The median follow-up was 84 months. Results: There were only seven local recurrences, with an actuarial local control rate of 95.8% at 5 years and 91.1% at 9 years. Actuarial overall and cause-specific survival rates were 92.6% and 95% at 5 years and 86.7% and 90.4% at 9 years, respectively. Late fibrosis was the most common complication, in 30% of patients, with good or excellent cosmetic results in 77%. The final result was that 95.2% of breasts were preserved. Conclusions: Close or positive-margin breast cancer can be well managed with a high-dose boost in a wide tumor bed by means of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This technique can avoid mastectomy or poor cosmetic resection, with minimal risk of local or general failure.

  20. The Use of Langmuir Probes in Non-Maxwellian Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Brace, Larry H.

    1998-01-01

    Disturbance of the Maxwellian plasma may occur in the vicinity of a spacecraft due to photoemission, interactions between the spacecraft and thermospheric gases, or electron emissions from other devices on the spacecraft. Significant non-maxwellian plasma distributions may also occur in nature as a mixture of ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas or secondaries produced by photoionization in the thermosphere or auroral precipitation. The general formulas for current collection (volt-ampere curves) by planar, cylindrical, and spherical Langmuir probes in isotropic and anisotropic non-maxwellian plasmas are examined. Examples are given of how one may identify and remove the non-maxwellian components in the Langmuir probe current to permit the ionospheric parameters to be determined. Theoretical volt-ampere curves presented for typical examples of non-maxwellian distributions include: two-temperature plasmas and a thermal plasma with an energetic electron beam. If the non-ionospheric electrons are Maxwellian at a temperature distinct from that of the ionosphere electrons, the volt-ampere curves can be fitted directly to obtain the temperatures and densities of both electron components without resorting to differenting the current. For an arbitrary isotropic distribution, the current for retarded particles is shown to be identical for the three geometries. For anisotropic distributions, the three probe geometries are not equally suited for measuring the ionospheric electron temperature and density or for determining the distribution function in the presence of non-maxwellian back-round electrons.

  1. The pedagogical implications of Maxwellian electromagnetic models: a case study from Victorian-Era physics.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Shawn Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the late Victorian Era, a group of British physicists devoted their time to interpreting and extending the work of James Clerk Maxwell. There has been considerable discussion about the ways in which these "Maxwellian" physicists used mechanical models by in the for research purposes; less attention has been paid to the relevance of their mechanical models for pedagogical purposes. Drawing from educational research literature, I begin from the premise that understanding a scientist's self-identity in its historical context is crucial to understanding how she or he enacts particular pedagogical approaches. I aim to extend Bruce Hunt's seminal work on the Maxwellians by providing a pedagogical analysis of one of Sir Oliver Lodge's lectures. In so doing, I claim that Lodge drew on his identity as a Maxwellian as an organizing framework for his lecture and that he attempted to engage his audience in Maxwellian thought by exposing them to many mechanical models. I conclude that Lodge's self-concept as a teacher and his apparent broad appeal as a public educationist were deeply embedded in his life history as a member of the Maxwellians. Sir Oliver Lodge's identities as a Maxwellian and a pedagogue are inextricably linked. PMID:25261114

  2. The pedagogical implications of Maxwellian electromagnetic models: a case study from Victorian-Era physics.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Shawn Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the late Victorian Era, a group of British physicists devoted their time to interpreting and extending the work of James Clerk Maxwell. There has been considerable discussion about the ways in which these "Maxwellian" physicists used mechanical models by in the for research purposes; less attention has been paid to the relevance of their mechanical models for pedagogical purposes. Drawing from educational research literature, I begin from the premise that understanding a scientist's self-identity in its historical context is crucial to understanding how she or he enacts particular pedagogical approaches. I aim to extend Bruce Hunt's seminal work on the Maxwellians by providing a pedagogical analysis of one of Sir Oliver Lodge's lectures. In so doing, I claim that Lodge drew on his identity as a Maxwellian as an organizing framework for his lecture and that he attempted to engage his audience in Maxwellian thought by exposing them to many mechanical models. I conclude that Lodge's self-concept as a teacher and his apparent broad appeal as a public educationist were deeply embedded in his life history as a member of the Maxwellians. Sir Oliver Lodge's identities as a Maxwellian and a pedagogue are inextricably linked.

  3. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R.; Faust, Jennifer A.; Skinner, J. L.; Nathanson, Gilbert M.

    2016-01-01

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4-8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232-252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He-water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He-water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  4. Experimental investigation of the Boltzmann relation for a bi-Maxwellian distribution in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Jin Young; Chung, Chin Wook

    2009-09-15

    In plasma, the Boltzmann relation is often used to connect the electron density to the plasma potential because it is not easy to calculate electric potentials on the basis of the Poisson equation due to the quasineutrality. From the Boltzmann relation, the electric potential can be simply obtained from the electron density or vice versa. However, the Boltzmann relation assumes that electrons are in thermal equilibrium and have a Maxwellian distribution, so it cannot be applied to non-Maxwellian distributions. In this paper, the Boltzmann relation for bi-Maxwellian distributions was newly derived from fluid equations and the comparison with the experimental results was given by measuring electron energy probability functions in an inductively coupled plasma. It was found that the spatial distribution of the electron density in bulk plasma is governed by the effective electron temperature, while that of the cold and hot electrons are governed by each electron temperature.

  5. Experimental investigation on the floating potential of cylindrical Langmuir probes in non-Maxwellian electron distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chin Wook

    2005-12-15

    [Chen and Arnush Phys. Plasmas 8, 5051 (2001)] theoretically showed that the floating potential is not constant but a function of electron density and the potential difference between the floating potential and the plasma potential differs significantly from the plane probe approximation. The electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in an inductively coupled plasma are measured to investigate the effect of the EEDF on the floating potential at argon pressures of 2 and 10 mTorr with respect to rf power. It is found that the measured EEDFs at 2 mTorr were bi-Maxwellian EEDFs with a high-energy tail and the potential differences were governed by the high electron temperatures. In the case of 10 mTorr, the measured EEDFs were nearly Maxwellian EEDFs at 10 mTorr and the potential difference agrees qualitatively with the theory of Chen and Arnush assuming that the electron energy distribution is a Maxwellian EEDF.

  6. Modeling of laser induced plasma expansion in the presence of non-Maxwellian electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Djebli, M.

    2010-07-15

    The one-dimensional expansion into vacuum of ion-electron plasma produced by laser ablation is investigated. The ions considered as an ideal fluid are governed by a fluid model where charge quasineutrality is assumed to prevail, while electron density follows a non-Maxwellian distribution. Showing that the expansion can be described by a self-similar solution, the resulting nonlinear Euler equations are solved numerically. It is found that the deviation of the electrons from Maxwellian distribution gives rise to new asymptotic solutions of physical interest affecting the density and velocity of plasma expansion.

  7. Solutions to bi-Maxwellian transport equations for the polar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Schunk, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, polar wind solutions are obtained for a broad range of O(+) density, H(+) drift velocity, electron temperature and H(+) temperature boundary conditions. The bi-Maxwellian-based 16-moment set of transport equations is used, since this set is expected to be superior to Maxwellian-based equations in describing large temperature anisotropies and heat flows. The present solutions corroborate earlier results when similar boundary conditions are used. Also, for previously unexplored combinations of boundary conditions, the present solutions are often qualitatively different from any obtained before.

  8. Global Solutions of the Boltzmann Equation Over {{R}^D} Near Global Maxwellians with Small Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardos, Claude; Gamba, Irene M.; Golse, François; Levermore, C. David

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics defined by the Boltzmann equation set in the Euclidean space {{R}^D} in the vicinity of global Maxwellians with finite mass. A global Maxwellian is a special solution of the Boltzmann equation for which the collision integral vanishes identically. In this setting, the dispersion due to the advection operator quenches the dissipative effect of the Boltzmann collision integral. As a result, the large time limit of solutions of the Boltzmann equation in this regime is given by noninteracting, freely transported states and can be described with the tools of scattering theory.

  9. Electrostatic ion waves in non-Maxwellian pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif; Mahmood, S.

    2010-12-15

    The electrostatic ion waves are studied for non-Maxwellian or Lorentzian distributed unmagnetized pair-ion plasmas. The Vlasov equation is solved and damping rates are calculated for electrostatic waves in Lorentzian pair-ion plasmas. The damping rates of the electrostatic ion waves are studied for the equal and different ion temperatures of pair-ion species. It is found that the Landau damping rate of the ion plasma wave is increased in Lorentzian plasmas in comparison with Maxwellian pair-ion plasmas. The numerical results are also presented for illustration by taking into account the parameters reported in fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  10. Global Solutions of the Boltzmann Equation Over {{R}^D} Near Global Maxwellians with Small Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardos, Claude; Gamba, Irene M.; Golse, François; Levermore, C. David

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamics defined by the Boltzmann equation set in the Euclidean space {{R}^D} in the vicinity of global Maxwellians with finite mass. A global Maxwellian is a special solution of the Boltzmann equation for which the collision integral vanishes identically. In this setting, the dispersion due to the advection operator quenches the dissipative effect of the Boltzmann collision integral. As a result, the large time limit of solutions of the Boltzmann equation in this regime is given by noninteracting, freely transported states and can be described with the tools of scattering theory.

  11. Ionisation Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron n-Distributions in Solar Flares: Updated Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-12-01

    We use the latest available atomic data to calculate the ionisation and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian n-distributions, which were shown previously to provide a good fit to the enhanced intensities of dielectronic satellite lines during solar flares. The ionisation and recombination coefficients are subsequently used to derive the ionisation equilibrium. To do so, we consider odd values of n ranging from 1 to 19, i.e., from Maxwellian to strongly non-Maxwellian cases. These calculations involve all elements with proton number up to 30, i.e., H to Zn. The n-distributions modify both the ionisation and the recombination rates. The ionisation rates decrease more steeply at lower pseudo-temperatures, while the radiative recombination rate is reduced due to a lower number of low-energy electrons. The peaks of the dielectronic recombination rates become narrower. These changes are reflected in the ionisation equilibrium. Ion abundance peaks become narrower and can also be shifted, mostly towards higher temperatures. The He-like ions are an important exception, as they are formed in a larger temperature range than that for the Maxwellian distribution. The ions Si xiii - xiv used previously for the diagnostics of the n-distributions are affected only weakly, confirming the determination of n. The ionisation equilibria are available as the electronic supplementary material in a format compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  12. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV. PMID:21585113

  13. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  14. L2-stability of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system near global Maxwellians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Xiao, Qinghua; Xiong, Linjie; Zhao, Huijiang

    2013-12-01

    We present a L2-stability theory of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system for the two-species collisional plasma. We show that in a perturbative regime of a global Maxwellian, the L2-distance between two strong solutions can be controlled by that between initial data in a Lipschitz manner. Our stability result extends earlier results [Ha, S.-Y. and Xiao, Q.-H., "A revisiting to the L2-stability theory of the Boltzmann equation near global Maxwellians," (submitted) and Ha, S.-Y., Yang, X.-F., and Yun, S.-B., "L2 stability theory of the Boltzmann equation near a global Maxwellian," Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 197, 657-688 (2010)] on the L2-stability of the Boltzmann equation to the Boltzmann equation coupled with self-consistent external forces. As a direct application of our stability result, we show that classical solutions in Duan et al. ["Optimal large-time behavior of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system in the whole space," Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 24, 1497-1546 (2011)] and Guo ["The Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system near Maxwellians," Invent. Math. 153(3), 593-630 (2003)] satisfy a uniform L2-stability estimate. This is the first result on the L2-stability of the Boltzmann equation coupled with self-consistent field equations in three dimensions.

  15. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main results, it

  16. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-02

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basismore » sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main

  17. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 2: The effect of non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions on ionization equilibrium calculations for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions, previously computed for Dupree's model of the solar transition region are used to calculate ionization rates for ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Ionization equilibrium populations for these ions are then computed and compared with similar calculations assuming Maxwellian distribution functions for the electrons. The results show that the ion populations change (compared to the values computed with a Maxwellian) in some cases by several orders of magnitude depending on the ion and its temperature of formation.

  18. Solutions to bi-Maxwellian transport equations for SAR-arc conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Schunk, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The first subsonic solutions of the bi-Maxwellian-based 16-moment set of transport equations for stable auroral red (SAR) arc conditions are presented. These are compared with the solutions obtained from the Maxwellian-based 13-moment transport equations for the same boundary conditions. Close agreement between the 16-moment and 13-moment solutions was obtained for the drift velocity, total electron temperature, total proton heat flow, and total electron heat flow profiles. On the other hand, significant discrepancies were found. Thus, the 16-moment density profile falls off more rapidly with increasing altitude than that computed with the 13-moment equations; the total proton temperature is less in the 16-moment case than in the 13-moment case by several thousand degrees at most altitudes; and differences exist in the ratios of the proton and electron temperature anisotropies with the altitude. A simplified set of transport equations was obtained by dropping terms which remain relatively small at all altitudes.

  19. Sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation of simple gases from liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kann, Z. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian evaporation of light atoms and molecules (particles) such as He and H2 from liquids has been observed experimentally. In this work, we use simulations to study systematically the evaporation of Lennard-Jones particles from liquid water. We find instances of sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation, depending on the mass of the particle and the particle-water interaction strength. The observed trends are in qualitative agreement with experiment. We interpret these trends in terms of the potential of mean force and the effectiveness and frequency of collisions during the evaporation process. The angular distribution of evaporating particles is also analyzed, and it is shown that trends in the energy from velocity components tangential and normal to the liquid surface must be understood separately in order to interpret properly the angular distributions.

  20. Sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation of simple gases from liquid water.

    PubMed

    Kann, Z R; Skinner, J L

    2016-04-21

    Non-Maxwellian evaporation of light atoms and molecules (particles) such as He and H2 from liquids has been observed experimentally. In this work, we use simulations to study systematically the evaporation of Lennard-Jones particles from liquid water. We find instances of sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation, depending on the mass of the particle and the particle-water interaction strength. The observed trends are in qualitative agreement with experiment. We interpret these trends in terms of the potential of mean force and the effectiveness and frequency of collisions during the evaporation process. The angular distribution of evaporating particles is also analyzed, and it is shown that trends in the energy from velocity components tangential and normal to the liquid surface must be understood separately in order to interpret properly the angular distributions. PMID:27389228

  1. Sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation of simple gases from liquid water.

    PubMed

    Kann, Z R; Skinner, J L

    2016-04-21

    Non-Maxwellian evaporation of light atoms and molecules (particles) such as He and H2 from liquids has been observed experimentally. In this work, we use simulations to study systematically the evaporation of Lennard-Jones particles from liquid water. We find instances of sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation, depending on the mass of the particle and the particle-water interaction strength. The observed trends are in qualitative agreement with experiment. We interpret these trends in terms of the potential of mean force and the effectiveness and frequency of collisions during the evaporation process. The angular distribution of evaporating particles is also analyzed, and it is shown that trends in the energy from velocity components tangential and normal to the liquid surface must be understood separately in order to interpret properly the angular distributions.

  2. H to Zn Ionization Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron κ-distributions: Updated Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, E.; Dudík, J.

    2013-05-01

    New data for the calculation of ionization and recombination rates have been published in the past few years, most of which are included in the CHIANTI database. We used these data to calculate collisional ionization and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian κ-distributions with an enhanced number of particles in the high-energy tail, which have been detected in the solar transition region and the solar wind. Ionization equilibria for elements H to Zn are derived. The κ-distributions significantly influence both the ionization and recombination rates and widen the ion abundance peaks. In comparison with the Maxwellian distribution, the ion abundance peaks can also be shifted to lower or higher temperatures. The updated ionization equilibrium calculations result in large changes for several ions, notably Fe VIII-Fe XIV. The results are supplied in electronic form compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  3. On heat conduction in multicomponent, non-Maxwellian spherically symmetric solar wind plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuperman, S.; Dryer, M.

    1985-01-01

    A generalized expression for the steady-state heat flux in multicomponent, moderately non-Maxwellian spherically symmetric plasmas is presented and discussed. The work was motivated by the inability of the simple, Fourier-type formula for the thermal conductivity to explain the observed correlations in the solar wind. The results hold for situations not far from local thermodynamic equilibrium. The generalized expression includes not only correlations that have been observed but also correlations not sought for previously.

  4. Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2013-12-15

    Quasi-linear acceleration and heating rates are derived for drifting bi-Maxwellian distribution functions in a general nonrelativistic case for arbitrary wave vectors, propagation angles, and growth/damping rates. The heating rates in a proton-electron plasma due to ion-cyclotron/kinetic Alfvén and mirror waves for a wide range of wavelengths, directions of propagation, and growth or damping rates are explicitly computed.

  5. L{sup 2}-stability of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system near global Maxwellians

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Seung-Yeal Xiao, Qinghua; Xiong, Linjie Zhao, Huijiang

    2013-12-15

    We present a L{sup 2}-stability theory of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system for the two-species collisional plasma. We show that in a perturbative regime of a global Maxwellian, the L{sup 2}-distance between two strong solutions can be controlled by that between initial data in a Lipschitz manner. Our stability result extends earlier results [Ha, S.-Y. and Xiao, Q.-H., “A revisiting to the L{sup 2}-stability theory of the Boltzmann equation near global Maxwellians,” (submitted) and Ha, S.-Y., Yang, X.-F., and Yun, S.-B., “L{sup 2} stability theory of the Boltzmann equation near a global Maxwellian,” Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 197, 657–688 (2010)] on the L{sup 2}-stability of the Boltzmann equation to the Boltzmann equation coupled with self-consistent external forces. As a direct application of our stability result, we show that classical solutions in Duan et al. [“Optimal large-time behavior of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system in the whole space,” Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 24, 1497–1546 (2011)] and Guo [“The Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system near Maxwellians,” Invent. Math. 153(3), 593–630 (2003)] satisfy a uniform L{sup 2}-stability estimate. This is the first result on the L{sup 2}-stability of the Boltzmann equation coupled with self-consistent field equations in three dimensions.

  6. Plasma sheath in the presences of non-Maxwellian energetic electrons and secondary emission electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jing; Lin, Binbin; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Yang, Youlei

    2016-07-01

    The formation of a sheath in front of a carbon or tungsten material plane immersed in a plasma containing non-Maxwellian energetic electrons and secondary emission electrons is studied using a 1D model. In the model, energetic electrons are described by the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and secondary electron emission (SEE) is produced by the electrons impinging on the wall. It is found that SEE coefficient depends on not only the sheath potential but also the EEDF profile of energetic electrons when a non-Maxwellian energetic electron component is present. The energetic electrons and associated secondary emission electrons can strongly modify ion velocity at sheath edge, floating potential and I–V probe characteristic. Due to the interdependence between SEE coefficient originating from the impact of non-Maxwellian energetic electrons on the wall and the sheath potential, with the increase in the energy of energetic electrons, a sudden jump phenomenon can be found in the profiles of SEE coefficient and other quantities such as floating potential and ion velocity at the sheath edge for tungsten wall, while for carbon wall they are the continuous variation. To begin with, the energetic electron component does not dominate the sheath, and I–V probe characteristic depends on both the EEDF profile of energetic electrons and material properties. Once the energetic electron component dominates the sheath, the analysis of I–V probe characteristic will yield the energy of energetic electrons.

  7. A Revisiting of the -Stability Theory of the Boltzmann Equation Near Global Maxwellians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Xiao, Qinghua

    2015-07-01

    We study the -stability theory of the Boltzmann equation near a global Maxwellian. When an initial datum is a perturbation of a global Maxwellian, we show that the -distance between two classical solutions can be controlled by the initial data in a Lipschitz manner, which illustrates the Lipschitz continuity of the solution operator for the Boltzmann equation in -topology. Our local-in-time -stability results cover cutoff very soft potentials as well as non-cutoff hard and soft potentials. These cases were not treated in the previous work (Ha et al. in Arch Ration Mech Anal 197:657-688, 2010). Thus, our results together with the results in Ha et al. (2010) complete the -stability theory for the Boltzmann equation near a global Maxwellian. For this -stability estimate, we use the coercivity estimate of the linearized collision operator, the smallness of perturbation in a mixed Lebesgue norm, and Strichartz-type estimates of perturbation. We also show that for all classical solutions available in the literature, the Lipschitz constant can be chosen as independent of time to obtain the uniform -stability of the Boltzmann equation.

  8. Global model analysis of negative ion generation in low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasmas with bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Jung, Bong-Ki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Yong-Seok; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-03-15

    A global model was developed to investigate the densities of negative ions and the other species in a low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasma with a bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution. Compared to a Maxwellian plasma, bi-Maxwellian plasmas have higher populations of low-energy electrons and highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are generated efficiently by high-energy electrons. This leads to a higher reaction rate of the dissociative electron attachment responsible for negative ion production. The model indicated that the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution at low pressures is favorable for the creation of negative ions. In addition, the electron temperature, electron density, and negative ion density calculated using the model were compared with the experimental data. In the low-pressure regime, the model results of the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions agreed well quantitatively with the experimental measurements, unlike those of the assumed Maxwellian electron energy distributions that had discrepancies.

  9. Energy Conservation and Historic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Donna

    1986-01-01

    Explains some of the finer details in the requirements and the responsibilities grantees of Institutional Conservation Program's (ICP) funding have to building preservation of historic or potentially historic buildings under the National Historic Preservation Act. (MD)

  10. Solutions to bi-Maxwellian transport equations for radial solar wind beyond 28 R(S)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Schunk, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents solar wind solutions for radial flow between 28 solar radii and 1 AU using the bi-Maxwellian-based 16-moment set of transport equations. In addition to the number density, drift velocity, and parallel and perpendicular temperatures, the 16-moment equations account for the transport of both longitudinal and transverse thermal energies as well as stress. Also, using the 16-moment approximation for the distribution function and assuming plasma parameter values characteristic of the solar wind, contour plots are generated for the proton velocity distribution function. It is shown how the shape of these plots depends on various macroscopic plasma parameters.

  11. Electromagnetic fire-hose instability in a fully relativistic bi-Maxwellian plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed properties of the classical hydromagnetic Alfven wave and the fire-hose instability, driven by an excess in the parallel energy are well understood in the nonrelativistic regime. In this brief communication, the analysis is extended to the fully relativistic regime. The analysis is carried out for fully relativistic bi-Maxwellian distributions of electrons and ions (or positrons). It is shown that the relativistic effect has a nonnegligible effect on the wave and stability properties of the low-frequency modes under certain conditions.

  12. Linear theory of low frequency magnetosonic instabilities in counterstreaming bi-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2015-09-01

    An effect of the bi-Maxwellian counterstreaming distribution function is analyzed with regard to the linear low frequency instabilities in magnetized homogeneous collisionless plasmas. New analytical marginal instability conditions for the firehose and the mirror modes have been obtained. Presence of counterstreams along the ambient magnetic field causes a huge effect on the instability conditions of those modes. The instability conditions very sensitively depend on the functional dependence of the counterstreaming parameter P. The theoretically predicted results might give a full potential explanation for the observed solar wind temperature anisotropy diagram in A- β∥ plane [S. D. Bale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 211101 (2009)].

  13. Kinetics of metastable atoms and non-Maxwellian electrons in two-temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical and analytical solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation in two-temperature steady-state helium plasma are studied in a broad range of conditions T(a) = 5,000-20,000 K, T(e) = 10,000-20,000 K; N(a) = 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 18th per cu cm. The WKB analytical solution is found to be satisfactory in most situations. The deviation of the electron distribution from Maxwellian and a possibility of raising of the tail of the distribution in presence of sources of fast electrons is also discussed.

  14. Interaction of impurity ions with a weakly non-Maxwellian simple hydrogenic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William K.

    1990-08-01

    The average acceleration of an ensemble of ``test particles'' in a plasma is called the ``dynamical friction''; the average rate at which their velocity vectors spread out in velocity space is expressed in a velocity-space diffusion-rate tensor. These quantities have been derived for impurity ions interacting with a weakly non-Maxwellian simple hydrogenic plasma. The derivation is sketched briefly in this Brief Communication; for details, the reader is referred to a supplementary report (see NTIS Document No. DE88017137).

  15. Theory of gyroresonance and free-free emissions from non-Maxwellian quasi-steady-state electron distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.

    2014-02-01

    Currently there is a concern about the ability of the classical thermal (Maxwellian) distribution to describe quasi-steady-state plasma in the solar atmosphere, including active regions. In particular, other distributions have been proposed to better fit observations, for example, kappa- and n-distributions. If present, these distributions will generate radio emissions with different observable properties compared with the classical gyroresonance (GR) or free-free emission, which implies a way of remotely detecting these non-Maxwellian distributions in the radio observations. Here we present analytically derived GR and free-free emissivities and absorption coefficients for the kappa- and n-distributions, and discuss their properties, which are in fact remarkably different from each other and from the classical Maxwellian plasma. In particular, the radio brightness temperature from a gyrolayer increases with the optical depth τ for kappa-distribution, but decreases with τ for n-distribution. This property has a remarkable consequence allowing a straightforward observational test: the GR radio emission from the non-Maxwellian distributions is supposed to be noticeably polarized even in the optically thick case, where the emission would have strictly zero polarization in the case of Maxwellian plasma. This offers a way of remote probing the plasma distribution in astrophysical sources, including solar active regions as a vivid example.

  16. Whale Preservation. Grades Five to Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racicot, Darlene

    Dedicated to the conservation and preservation of whales, dolphins, and porpoises through public education, this instructional unit for grades 5-9 provides current (1993) facts, lesson plans, activities, and conservation and preservation techniques. Interdisciplinary activities involve students in debates, critical thinking, research, and…

  17. Preservation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term preservation of digital entities requires mechanisms to manage the authenticity of massive data collections that are written to archival storage systems. Preservation environments impose authenticity constraints and manage the evolution of the storage system technology by building infrastructure independent solutions. This seeming paradox, the need for large archives, while avoiding dependence upon vendor specific solutions, is resolved through use of data grid technology. Data grids provide the storage repository abstractions that make it possible to migrate collections between vendor specific products, while ensuring the authenticity of the archived data. Data grids provide the software infrastructure that interfaces vendor-specific storage archives to preservation environments.

  18. Urine Preservative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M. (Inventor); Nillen, Jeannie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is CPG, a combination of a chlorhexidine salt (such as chlorhexidine digluconate, chlorhexidine diacetate, or chlorhexidine dichloride) and n-propyl gallate that can be used at ambient temperatures as a urine preservative.

  19. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Georgios; Livadiotis, George

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the difference of the derived temperature as a function of the kappa index. We further consider the concept of using a forward model of a typical plasma instrument to fit its observations. We find that the relative error of the derived temperature is highly depended on the kappa index and occasionally on the instrument's field of view and response.

  20. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A. El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M. E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  1. Nonlinear density excitations in a magnetorotating relativistic plasma with warm ions and non-Maxwellian electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ali; Masood, W.

    2016-05-01

    Linear and nonlinear electrostatic ion acoustic waves in a weakly relativistic magnetorotating plasma in the presence of non-Maxwellian electrons and warm ions have been examined. The system under consideration has yielded two solutions, namely, the fast and slow acoustic modes which have been observed to depend on the streaming velocity, ion to electron temperature ratio, and the nonthermality parameter of the non-Maxwellian electrons. Using the multiple time scale analysis, we have derived the three dimensional nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation and also presented its solution. Both compressive and rarefactive solitary structures have been found in consonance with the satellite observations. It has been observed that although the linear dispersion relation gives both fast and slow ion acoustic waves, the solitary structures form only for the fast acoustic mode. The dependence of the characteristics of the solitary structures on several plasma parameters has also been explored. The present investigation may be beneficial to understanding the rotating plasma environments such as those found in the planetary magnetospheres of Saturn and Jupiter.

  2. Updated calculations of the ionization equilibrium for the non-Maxwellian electron n-distributions in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifcakova, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    Observed flare high intensities of the Si XIId satellite lines in comparison with the Si XIII allowed lines cannot be interpreted under the assumption of a Maxwellian distribution. This behavior of the relative line intensities can be explained by the presence of n-distribution with a higher and narrower shape than the Maxwellian one. This distribution can be formed in flaring plasma in the electric double layers and its presence is associated with type III radio bursts.The latest atomic data to calculate the ionization equilibrium for the non-thermal n-distributions with n ranging from 1 to 19 were used. These calculations involve each of elements with atomic number up to 30. The n-distributions influence both the ionization and recombination rates and make the ion abundance peaks narrower. They can also shift the maxima of the ion abundance peaks in comparison with the Maxwellian distribution and can influence the temperature diagnostics.

  3. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  4. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-01

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature Te is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain Te by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature Te obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures Teff derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  5. Complete calculation of evaluated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for s-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.

    2010-07-19

    Present contribution represents a significant improvement of our previous calculation of Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates. Addition of newly-evaluated neutron reaction libraries, such as ROSFOND and Low-Fidelity Covariance Project, and improvements in data processing techniques allowed us to extend it for entire range of sprocess nuclei, calculate Maxwellian-averaged cross section uncertainties for the first time, and provide additional insights on all currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations using ENDF libraries and current Java technologies will be discussed and new results will be presented.

  6. An asymptotic preserving Monte Carlo method for the multispecies Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hong; Jin, Shi

    2016-01-01

    An asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme is efficient in solving multiscale kinetic equations with a wide range of the Knudsen number. In this paper, we generalize the asymptotic preserving Monte Carlo method (AP-DSMC) developed in [25] to the multispecies Boltzmann equation. This method is based on the successive penalty method [26] originated from the BGK-penalization-based AP scheme developed in [7]. For the multispecies Boltzmann equation, the penalizing Maxwellian should use the unified Maxwellian as suggested in [12]. We give the details of AP-DSMC for multispecies Boltzmann equation, show its AP property, and verify through several numerical examples that the scheme can allow time step much larger than the mean free time, thus making it much more efficient for flows with possibly small Knudsen numbers than the classical DSMC.

  7. Conservation of Library Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Libraries, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Twelve articles cover books as artifacts; workstations for conservation of library materials; care of scrapbooks, albums, and photographs; map preservation; library environment; flood recovery; disaster prevention and preparedness; incorporating preservation into library organization; and bibliography of Chester Public Library (Illinois) First…

  8. Conservation and gene banking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant conservation has several objectives the main ones include safeguarding our food supply, preserving crop wild relatives for breeding and selection of new cultivars, providing material for industrial and pharmaceutical uses and preserving the beauty and diversity of our flora for generations to ...

  9. Digital Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakel, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on digital preservation issues, including born-digital and digitally recreated documents. Discusses electronic records research; metadata and other standards; electronic mail; Web-based documents; moving images media; selection of materials for digitization, including primary sources; administrative issues; media stability…

  10. Preservation & Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue on preservation and restoration presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that include Web sites, CD-ROM and software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources as well as classroom activities. Age levels are specified for most materials. I Sidebars discuss restoring a masterpiece, a bug's life,…

  11. Preservation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noriega, Chon A.

    2005-01-01

    One must undertake multi-institutional efforts that include universities, archives, museums, libraries and community-based arts organizations and the artists to preserve Latino art history. Arts infrastructure can be strengthened by various Chicano Studies Research Center projects that are concerned with archive building and scholarship, and with…

  12. Digitizing Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of digital imaging technology focuses on its potential use for preservation of library materials. Topics addressed include converting microfilm to digital; the high cost of conversion from paper or microfilm; quality; indexing; database management issues; incompatibility among imaging systems; longevity; cooperative pilot projects; and…

  13. Collisional Effect on Weibel Instability with Semi-Relativistic Maxwellian Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Khanzadeh, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Coulomb collisional effect of electron-ion on the growth rate of Weibel instability is investigated based on the semi-relativistic Maxwellian distribution function in dense and unmagnetized plasma. An analytical expression was derived for the dispersion relation of Weibel instability for two limit cases |ξ = ω'/k‖ T‖|≫ 1 and |ξ| ≪ 1. In limit |ξ| ≫ 1 the dispersion relation only includes a real part and in limit |ξ| ≪ 1 the imaginary part of the frequency of waves' instability plays a role in the dispersion relation. In limit |ξ| ≪ 1, the two quantities μ and η, that are due to the relativistic and collisional effects, will appear in the growth rate of Weibel instability. The growth rate of Weible istability will be increased through decreasing the Coulomb collisional frequency and also increasing the temperature anisotropic parameter in strong relativistic limit.

  14. Collisional effect on the Weibel instability with the bi-Maxwellian distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Khanzadeh, H.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the Coulomb collision effect of electron-ion is investigated based on the equilibrium bi-Maxwellian anisotropic distribution function in dense and unmagnetized plasma. An analytical expression is derived for the real frequency and the growth rate of the Weibel instability for two limiting cases |ξ=ω/'k||θ|||≫1 and |ξ |≪1. In the limit |ξ|≪1, the quantity η that is due to a collisional term will appear in the growth and condition of the rate of the Weibel instability, which leads to a constraining condition of the growth rate. When η increases, the growth rate will increase and the wave instability will be distant from its own damping mode.

  15. X-ray analysis of nonMaxwellian distributions (current drive)

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W.

    1983-06-01

    The plasma bremsstrahlung emission is utilized to determine the shape of the electron velocity distribution in situations where it deviates strongly from a Maxwellian distribution. The instrumentation used to measure the hard x-ray emission is briefly discussed. Model calculations show that polarization measurements give best results for unrelativistic tails with tail temperatures T/sub b/ < 50 keV, whereas measurements of the angular distribution of the x-ray emission based on the forward scattering of bremsstrahlung for relativistic electrons yields the best information for T/sub b/ > 50 keV. The techniques were originally developed in order to analyze runaway discharges. Recently, they found new interest because of the formation of energetic electron tails during current drive. The first x-ray results from the current drive during LH heating on PLT are discussed.

  16. Collisional relaxation of bi-Maxwellian plasma temperatures in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2016-07-01

    In the literature, collisional processes are customarily discussed within the context of the Boltzmann-Balescu-Lenard-Landau type of collision integral, but such an equation is strictly valid for unmagnetized plasmas. For plasmas immersed in the ambient magnetic field, the foundational equation that describes binary collisions must be generalized to include the effects of magnetic field. The present paper makes use of such an equation in order to describe the collisional relaxation of temperatures under the assumption of bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The formalism derived in the present paper may be useful for studying the effects of binary collisions on the isotropization of temperatures in the solar wind plasma, among possible applications.

  17. Two-stream Maxwellian kinetic theory of cloud droplet growth by condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, N. F.; Scott, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    A new growth rate formula (NGRF) is developed for the rate of growth of cloud droplets by condensation. The theory used is a modification of the Lees-Shankar theory in which the two-stream Maxwellian distribution function of Lees is used in Maxwell's method of moments to determine the transport of water vapor to and heat away from the droplet. Boundary conditions at the droplet are the usual conditions set in terms of accommodation coefficients, and the solution passes smoothly into diffusion flow in the far region. Comparisons are given between NGRF and the conventional formula showing close agreement (approximately 0.1%) for large radii with significant difference (approximately 5%) for small radii (not greater than 1 micron). Growth times for haze droplets in a Laktionov chamber are computed.

  18. Electron acoustic wave driven vortices with non-Maxwellian hot electrons in magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Zakir, U.

    2014-07-15

    Linear dispersion characteristics of the Electron Acoustic Wave (EAW) and the corresponding vortex structures are investigated in a magnetoplasma in the presence of non-Maxwellian hot electrons. In this regard, kappa and Cairns distributed hot electrons are considered. It is noticed that the nonthermal distributions affect the phase velocity of the EAW. Further, it is found that the phase velocity of EAW increases for Cairns and decreases for kappa distributed hot electrons. Nonlinear solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are also obtained for both stationary and non-stationary ions in the presence of kappa distributed hot electrons and dynamic cold electrons. It is found that the amplitude of the nonlinear vortex structures also reduces with kappa factor like the electron acoustic solitons.

  19. Exact evaluation of the quadratic longitudinal response function for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Percival, D. J.

    2012-07-15

    The quadratic longitudinal response function describes the second-order nonlinear response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. An explicit expression for this function in the weak-turbulence regime requires the evaluation of velocity-space integrals involving the velocity distribution function and various resonant denominators. Previous calculations of the quadratic longitudinal response function were performed by approximating the resonant denominators to facilitate the integration. Here, we evaluate these integrals exactly for a non-relativistic collisionless unmagnetized isotropic Maxwellian plasma in terms of generalized plasma dispersion functions, and correct certain aspects of expressions previously derived for these functions. We show that in the appropriate limits the exact expression reduces to the approximate form used for interactions between two fast waves and one slow wave, such as the electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir waves and ion sound waves, and the scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions.

  20. Deviation from a Maxwellian velocity distribution in regions of interstellar molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.; Levy, M.

    1976-01-01

    The deviation from a Maxwellian velocity distribution caused by excitation of the J = 2 rotational level of parahydrogen (followed by radiative decay) in a molecular hydrogen gas is investigated. It is noted that inelastic collisions deplete the high-velocity tail of the distribution, while elastic collisions tend to refill it; the resulting steady-state distribution has a small depletion in the tail which slightly reduces the cooling rate of the gas. The elastic-collision transport is approximated by a continuous process, a simplified expression is obtained for the inelastic-collision operator, and the Boltzmann equation is then solved analytically. A correction to the inelastic-collision rate is evaluated, and it is found that the relative magnitude of the effect of tail depletion on the inelastic-collision rate is strongly temperature-dependent. The critical molecular density above which the J = 2 level deexcites by superelastic collisions is shown to be a weak function of temperature.

  1. Measurement of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions in a reflex discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phipps, C. R., Jr.; Bershader, D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a ruby laser Thomson scattering study of the space and time-resolved electron velocity distributions in a pulsed Penning discharge in hydrogen are presented. Electron densities were to the order of 10 to the 13th/cu cm and temperatures were roughly 3 eV. This point is just prior to the cessation of the discharge ohmic heating pulse. For magnetic strengths less than 200 G, Maxwellian distributions were found over an energy range six times thermal energy. Temperatures agreed with Langmuir probe data. For fields of 450 G, chaotic plasma potentials were observed to be unstable and the Thomson scattering showed that the electron velocity distributions had central temperatures of 2 eV and wing temperatures of 15-12 eV.

  2. Momentum and energy exchange collision terms for interpenetrating bi-Maxwellian gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    For application to aeronomy and space physics problems involving strongly magnetized plasma flows, we derived momentum and energy exchange collision terms for interpenetrating bi-Maxwellian gases. Collision terms were derived for Coulomb, Maxwell molecule, and constant collision cross-section interaction potentials. The collision terms are valid for arbitrary flow velocity differences and temperature differences between the interacting gases as well as for arbitrary temperature anisotropies. The collision terms had to be evaluated numerically and the appropriate coefficients are presented in tables. However, the collision terms were also fitted with simplified expressions, the accuracy of which depends on both the interaction potential and the temperature anisotropy. In addition, we derived the closed set of transport equations that are associated with the momentum and energy collision terms.

  3. Observation of Non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions in th e NSTX Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Jaworski, et. al.

    2013-03-07

    The scrape-off layer plasma at the tokamak region is characterized by open field lines and often contains large variations in plasma properties along these field-lines. Proper characterization of local plasma conditions is critical to assessing plasma-material interaction processes occuring at the target. Langmuir probes are frequently employed in tokamak divertors but are challenging to interpretation. A kinetic interpretation for Langmuir probes in NSTX has yielded non-Maxwellian electron distributions in the divertor characterized by cool bulk populations and energetic tail populations with temperatures of 2-4 times the bulk. Spectroscopic analysis and modeling confirms the bulk plasma temperature and density which can only be obtained with the kinetic interpretation

  4. Art Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A new class of polyimides, synthesized by Langley Research Center, has been evaluated by the Getty Conservation Institute's Materials Science Group for possible art conservation applications. Polyimides are noted for resistance to high temperature, wear and radiation. They are thermally stable and soluble in some common solvents. After testing under simulated exposures for changes in color, permeability and flexibility, one coating, ODPA-3, 3-ODA may be used to protect bronze statues from corrosion. A test on stained glass windows was unsuccessful.

  5. Whistler Cyclotron Electromagnetic Fluctuations in a Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Moya, P. S.; Navarro, R.; Araneda, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Observed electron velocity distributions in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind exhibit a variety of non-thermal features which deviate from thermal equilibrium, for example, in the form of temperature anisotropies, suprathermal tail extensions, and field aligned beams. The state close to thermal equilibrium and its departure from it provides a source for spontaneous emissions of electromagnetic fluctuations, such as the whistler. Here we present a comparative analysis of whistler-cyclotron fluctuations based upon anisotropic plasma modeled with Maxwellian and Tsallis kappa-like particle distributions, to explain the correspondence relationship of the magnetic fluctuations as a function of the electron temperature and thermal anisotropy in the solar wind and magnetosphere plasmas. The analysis presented here considers correlation theory of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the dispersion relation of transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature anisotropic thermal bi-Maxwellian and non-thermal Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron-proton plasma. Dispersion analysis and stability thresholds are derived for these thermal and non-thermal distributions using plasma and field parameters relevant to the solar wind and magnetosphere environments. Our results indicate that there is an enhancement of the fluctuations level in the case of non-thermal distributions due to the effective higher-temperature and the excess of suprathermal particles. These results suggest that a comparison of the electromagnetic fluctuations due to thermal and non-thermal distributions provides a diagnostic signature by which inferences about the nature of the particle velocity distribution function can be ascertained without in-situ particle measurements.

  6. Dormant bud preservation for germplasm conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The suitability of dormant buds (DB) for cryopreservation of different plant species has been demonstrated in several reports. For the majority of the species, processing DB for long-term liquid nitrogen storage does not involve establishing tissue cultures and the time for growing out post-cryo mat...

  7. The Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system with a uniform ionic background near Maxwellians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuanjie; Zhao, Huijiang

    2016-02-01

    The two-species Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system is an important model for plasma physics describing the time evolution of dilute charged particles consisting of electrons and ions under the influence of the self-consistent internally generated Lorentz forces. In physical situations the ion mass is usually much larger than the electron mass so that the electrons move much faster than the ions. Thus, the ions are often described by a fixed ion background and only the electrons move. For such a simple case, the two-species Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system is reduced to the one-species Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system. Although the one-species Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system is a simplified model of the two-species Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system, its global well-posedness theory near a given global Maxwellian in the perturbative framework is more difficult than the two-species case, which is partially due to the slow-decay of the electromagnetic field and up to now, the problem on the construction of global in time solutions near a given global Maxwellian in the perturbative framework for the Cauchy problem of the one-species Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system with cutoff non-hard sphere intermolecular collisions remains unsolved. It is shown in this paper that the Cauchy problem of the one-species Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system with cutoff non-hard sphere intermolecular collisions including the cutoff inverse power law potentials is globally well-posed provided that the perturbative initial data satisfies certain regularity, smallness, and integrability conditions. Our analysis is based on a new time-velocity weighted energy method with two key technical parts: one is to introduce the exponentially weighted estimates into the cutoff Boltzmann operator and the other is to design a delicate temporal energy X (t)-norm to obtain its uniform bound. As a by-product of our analysis, we can also deduce certain temporal decay estimates on the global solutions constructed above

  8. Amplification of Collective Magnetic Fluctuations in Magnetized Bi-Maxwellian Plasmas for Parallel Wave Vectors. I. Electron-Proton Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-09-01

    The general electromagnetic fluctuation theory is a powerful tool to analyze the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of a plasma. Recent works utilizing this theory for a magnetized non-relativistic isotropic Maxwellian electron-proton plasma have demonstrated that the equilibrium ratio of | δ B| /{B}0 can be as high as 10-12. This value results from the balance between spontaneous emission of fluctuations and their damping, and it is considerably smaller than the observed value | δ B| /{B}0 in the solar wind at 1 au, where {10}-3≲ | δ B| /{B}0≲ {10}-1. In the present manuscript, we consider an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian distribution function to investigate the effect of plasma instabilities on the magnetic field fluctuations. We demonstrate that these instabilities strongly amplify the magnetic field fluctuations and provide a sufficient mechanism to explain the observed value of | δ B| /{B}0 in the solar wind at 1 au.

  9. Electron temperature gradient mode instability and stationary vortices with elliptic and circular boundary conditions in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Zakir, U.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode along with parallel electron dynamics is investigated by considering hydrodynamic electrons and non-Maxwellian ions. It is noticed that the growth rate of η{sub e}-mode driven linear instability decreases by increasing the value of spectral index and increases by reducing the ion/electron temperature ratio along the magnetic field lines. The eigen mode dispersion relation is also found in the ballooning mode limit. Stationary solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are obtained for both circular and elliptic boundary conditions. It is shown that the dynamics of both circular and elliptic vortices changes with the inclusion of inhomogeneity and non-Maxwellian effects.

  10. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions by direct laser acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toncian, T.; Wang, C.; Arefiev, A.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Blakeney, J.; Chester, C.; Roycroft, R.; Fu, H.; Yan, X. Q.; Schreiber, J.; Pomerantz, I.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Ditmire, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The irradiation of few nm thick targets by a finite-contrast high-intensity short-pulse laser results in a strong pre-expansion of these targets at the arrival time of the main pulse. The targets will decompress to near and lower than critical electron densities plasmas extending over lengths of few micrometers. The laser-matter interaction of the main pulse with such a highly localized but inhomogeneous the target leads to the generation of a channel and further self focussing of the laser beam. As measured in a experiment conducted with the GHOST laser system at UT Austin, 2D PIC simulations predict Direct Laser Acceleration of non-Maxwellian electron distribution in the laser propagation direction for such targets. The hereby high density electron bunches have potential applications as injector beams for a further wakefield acceleration stage. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the DARPA's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014) and the AFOSR (FA9550-14-1-0045).

  11. Application of multivariate Maxwellian mixture model to plasma velocity distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Genta; Nakamura, Nagatomo; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Machida, Shinobu; Araki, Tohru; Saito, Yoshifumi; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2001-11-01

    Recent space plasma observations have provided us with three-dimensional velocity distributions having multiple peaks. We propose a method for analyzing such velocity distributions via a multivariate Maxwellian mixture model where each component of the model represents each of the multiple peaks. The parameters of the model are determined through an iterative nonlinear optimization technique, specifically the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. For the automatic judgment of the preferable number of components in the mixture model, we introduce a method of examining the number of extrema of a resulting mixture model. We show applications of our method to ion observations in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) and in the central plasma sheet (CPS) of the Earth's magnetotail. From an analysis of the PSBL and CPS, low-energy ions that have properties similar to those of lobe ions were detected also in the PSBL and CPS. In the PSBL, middle-energy ion component which is flowing dawnward and directed the neutral sheet was extracted. We suggested that magnetic field fluctuations in the PSBL can be explained only when the two ion components were properly treated.

  12. Application of multivariate Maxwellian mixture model to plasma velocity distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, G.; Nakamura, N.; Higuchi, T.; Tsuchiya, T.; Machida, S.; Araki, T.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2001-12-01

    Recent space plasma observations have provided us with three-di\\-men\\-sion\\-al velocity distributions having multiple peaks. We propose a method for analyzing such velocity distributions via a multivariate Max\\-wellian mixture model where each component of the model represents each of the multiple peaks. The parameters of the model are determined through an iterative nonlinear optimization technique, specifically the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. For the automatic judgment of the preferable number of components in the mixture model, we introduce a method of examining the number of extrema of a resulting mixture model. We show applications of our method to ion observations in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) and in the central plasma sheet (CPS) of the Earth's magnetotail. From an analysis of the PSBL and CPS, low-energy ions that have properties similar to those of lobe ions were detected also in the PSBL and CPS. In the PSBL, middle-energy ion component which is flowing dawnward and directed the neutral sheet was extracted. We suggested that magnetic field fluctuations in the PSBL can be explained only when the two ion components were properly treated.

  13. Dust-ion-acoustic Gardner solitons in a dusty plasma with bi-Maxwellian electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Masud, M. M.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2012-10-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) waves in a dusty plasma with bi-Maxwellian electrons, namely, lower and higher temperature electrons (composed of negatively charged stationary dust, inertial ions, and non-inertial two-temperature-electrons) is investigated by deriving the Gardner equation using the reductive perturbation technique. The basic features (amplitude, width, etc.) of the hump (positive potential) and dip (negative potential) shaped DIA solitons (Gardner solitons, i.e., GSs) are found to exist beyond the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) limit. These DIA-GSs are qualitatively different from the K-dV and modified K-dV solitons. It is also shown that depending on the parameter {sigma} (where {sigma}=T{sub e1}/T{sub e2}, T{sub e1} and T{sub e2} being the temperatures of two distinct electrons and T{sub e1} Much-Less-Than T{sub e2}), the DIA-GSs exhibit hump and dip shape solitary structures. The implications of our results in understanding the localized nonlinear electrostatic perturbations observed in double-plasma machines, rf discharge plasma, noctilucent cloud region in Earths atmosphere, etc., where population of two thermal electrons can significantly dominate the wave dynamics, are also briefly addressed.

  14. Thomson Scattering Observation of Non-Maxwellian EEDF and the Effect of Local Electron Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, A.; Funahashi, H.

    2001-10-01

    Laser Thomson scattering measurements were carried out to study electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of inductively coupled plasmas using C_4F_8/Ar and CF_4/Ar mixture gases. The plasma was produced using a one-turn coil antenna immersed in the plasma at a total pressure of 25 mTorr. A specially designed triple-grating spectrometer was used, which produces Thomson spectra on the output focal plane with the interfering Rayleigh and stray components highly suppressed; an ICCD camera operated in the photon-counting mode was used for multichannel detection of the spectrum. At a RF (13.56 MHz) input power of 300 W in the case of pure Ar plasma, EEDF was Maxwellian with an enectron density >10^12 cm-3. Upon mixing of C_4F8 as well as CF_4, decrease in the electron density and upward bend of the plot of the Thomson spectrum (energy vs. logarithmic scattering intensity) at energies around 5 eV was observed. The mechanism for producing this bend was studied via Monte-Carlo particle simulation. The results indicate that electron heating in a uniform electric field does not lead to upward bend; electrons should be heated locally near the antenna surface where the RF electric field is strong and cooled in other part of the plasma by inelastic collisions.

  15. Evolution of ion-acoustic solitary waves in Maxwellian dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G. C.; Choudhury, Balen; Bora, M. P.

    2010-12-15

    The nonlinear wave phenomena in the vicinity of Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation have been derived to study the salient features of solitons in a complex plasma consisting of Maxwellian electrons, ions, and cold dust with the effect of dust charge fluctuation. The reductive perturbation method has been applied to the dynamical system causeway and the derived KdV equation predicts different natures of solitons in complex plasma. The dynamics of the soliton propagation in the considered plasma constituents in ionospheric auroral regions exhibits rarefactive solitons, which is an interesting feature. The dust charge fluctuation by the increasing impact of electrons leads the nonlinear effect to be tending to zero. Because of which, the formation of a narrow solitary wave packet with the generation of high energy becomes possible and results in the phenomena of soliton radiation. In order to probe this further, we derive a modified KdV equation to study soliton propagation which, in turn, indicates the possibility of the shock formation in solitary waves.

  16. On the high Mach number shock structure singularity caused by overreach of Maxwellian molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Myong, R. S.

    2014-05-15

    The high Mach number shock structure singularity arising in moment equations of the Boltzmann equation was investigated. The source of the singularity is shown to be the unbalanced treatment between two high order kinematic and dissipation terms caused by the overreach of Maxwellian molecule assumption. In compressive gaseous flow, the high order stress-strain coupling term of quadratic nature will grow far faster than the strain term, resulting in an imbalance with the linear dissipation term and eventually a blow-up singularity in high thermal nonequilibrium. On the other hand, the singularity arising from unbalanced treatment does not occur in the case of velocity shear and expansion flows, since the high order effects are cancelled under the constraint of the free-molecular asymptotic behavior. As an alternative method to achieve the balanced treatment, Eu's generalized hydrodynamics, consistent with the second law of thermodynamics, was revisited. After introducing the canonical distribution function in exponential form and applying the cumulant expansion to the explicit calculation of the dissipation term, a natural platform suitable for the balanced treatment was derived. The resulting constitutive equation with the nonlinear factor was then shown to be well-posed for all regimes, effectively removing the high Mach number shock structure singularity.

  17. Shielding effect and wakefield pattern of a moving test charge in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Khan, S.

    2013-07-15

    By using the Vlasov-Poisson equations, we calculate an expression for the electrostatic potential caused by a test charge in an unmagnetized non-Maxwellian dusty plasma, whose constituents are the superthermal hot-electrons, the mobile cold-electrons with a neutralizing background of cold ions, and charge fluctuating isolated dust grains. The superthermality effects due to hot electrons not only modify the dielectric constant of the electron-acoustic waves but also significantly affect the electrostatic potential. The latter can be decomposed into the Debye-Hückel and oscillatory wake potentials. Analytical and numerical results reveal that the Debye-Hückel and wakefield potentials converge to the Maxwellian case for large values of superthermality parameter. Furthermore, the plasma parameters play a vital role in the formation of shielding and wakefield pattern in a two-electron temperature plasma. The present results should be important for laboratory and space dusty plasmas, where hot-electrons can be assumed to follow the non-Maxwellian distribution function.

  18. Ion-cyclotron instability in current-carrying Lorentzian (kappa) and Maxwellian plasmas with anisotropic temperatures: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Grossbard, N. J.

    2011-09-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability has so far been studied for Maxwellian plasma with isotropic and anisotropic temperatures. Since satellite-measured particle velocity distributions in space are often better modeled by the generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distributions and since temperature anisotropy is quite common in space plasmas, theoretical analysis of the current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability is carried out in this paper for electron-proton plasma with anisotropic temperatures, where the particle parallel velocity distributions are modeled by kappa distributions and the perpendicular velocity distributions are modeled by Maxwellian distributions. Stability properties of the excited ion cyclotron modes and, in particular, their dependence on electron to ion temperature ratio and ion temperature anisotropy are presented in more detail. For comparison, the corresponding results for bi-Maxwellian plasma are also presented. Although the stability properties of the ion cyclotron modes in the two types of plasmas are qualitatively similar, significant quantitative differences can arise depending on the values of {kappa}{sub e} and {kappa}{sub i}. The comparative study is based on the numerical solutions of the respective linear dispersion relations. Quasilinear estimates of the resonant ion heating rates due to ion-cyclotron turbulence in the two types of plasma are also presented for comparison.

  19. Planning for Preservation during Mass Digitization Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teper, Jennifer Hain; Shaw, Emily F.

    2011-01-01

    In anticipation of current and future mass digitization projects in which the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Library will participate, the Library's Conservation Unit began to gather data on the "scannability" of our general book collections to anticipate potential effects on conservation and preservation work flows. The findings…

  20. Preservation of Digital Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to preservation of digital objects: practical examples; stakeholders; recordkeeping standards; genre-specific problems; trusted repository standards; preservation methods; preservation metadata standards; and future directions. (Contains 82 references.) (MES)

  1. The extended Maxwellian view (BIGMAX): a high-intensity, high-saturation color display for clinical diagnosis and vision research.

    PubMed

    Beer, R Dirk; MacLeod, Donald I A; Miller, Timothy P

    2005-08-01

    We describe a device that can display very high intensity (up to 400,000 cd/m2), high-resolution visual stimuli. The device is inexpensive, is easily controlled by a conventional computer and video card, and can be calibrated for use in vision research or clinical applications. The display is capable of presenting highly saturated, near spectral colors. Unlike Maxwellian view optical systems, our display can be viewed binocularly and does not require exacting head restraint. We describe the construction, give a design example, and describe our calibration procedure. Furthermore, we report measurements of the color gamut, spatial resolution, temporal characteristics, and the dynamic range of light intensity.

  2. Conservation of fern spores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferns are a diverse and important group of plants, but diversity of species and populations are at risk from increasing social pressures, loss of habitat and climate change. Ex situ conservation is a useful strategy to limit decline in genetic diversity and requires technologies to preserve fern ger...

  3. Ion acceleration and non-Maxwellian electron distributions in a low collisionality, high power helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Sung, Yung-Ta; Scharer, John

    2015-11-01

    Ion acceleration through plasma double layer and non-Maxwellian two temperature electron distributions have been observed in Madison Helicon Experiment (MadHeX) operated in high RF power (>1000 W) and low Ar pressure (0.17 mtorr) inductive mode. By applying Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) cross-checked with an RF-compensated Langmuir probe (at 13.56 MHz and its second and third harmonics), the fast (>80 eV), untrapped electrons downstream of the double layer have a higher temperature of 13 eV than the trapped bulk electrons upstream with a temperature of 4 eV. The reduction of plasma potential and density observed in the double layer region require an upstream temperature ten times the measured 4 eV if occurring via Boltzmann ambipolar expansion. The hot tail electrons of the non-Maxwellian electron distribution affect the formation and the potential drop of the double layer region. The mechanism behind this has been explored via several non-invasive plasma diagnostics tools. The OES measured electron temperatures and densities are also cross-checked with Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) and a millimeter wave interferometer respectively. The IEDF is measured by a four-grid RPA and also cross-checked with argon 668 nm Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An emissive probe has been used to measure the plasma potential.

  4. Measurements of thermal electron heating and the formation of a non-Maxwellian energy distribution due to ion acoustic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III Device. P-polarized microwaves (f = 1.2 GHz, P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 5 KW) are incident on an essentially collisionless plasma with a long scale length in an oversized waveguide. For modest powers, large amplitude ion acoustic turbulence is observed on the underdense plasma shelf due to a combination of the parametric decay and the electron drift instabilities. Suprathermal and thermal electrons are strongly heated in this region with the thermal heating due to scattering with the ion turbulence. Since the cross section for interaction decreases rapidly as the electron energy increases, the low energy electrons are preferentially heated. The electron distribution function is measured and agrees with theory; the power absorption is reduced by up to a factor of two compared to a Maxwellian distribution. After the microwaves have been measured to decay, the electron distribution function is seen to relax back to its initial Maxwellian form. This occurs, as theory predicts, roughly on the electron-electron collision time scale.

  5. The Data Conservancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, S.; Duerr, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    NSF's Sustainable Digital Data Preservation and Access Network Partners program is an ambitious attempt to integrate a wide variety of expertise and infrastructure into a network for providing "reliable digital preservation, access, integration, and analysis capabilities for science." One of the first two DataNet award recipients, the Data Conservancy, is itself a network of widely diverse partners led by the libraries at the Johns Hopkins University. The Data Conservancy is built on existing exemplar scientific projects, communities, and virtual organizations that have deep engagement with their user communities, and extensive experience with large-scale distributed system development. Data Conservancy members embrace a shared vision that data curation is not an end, but rather a means to collect, organize, validate, and preserve data needed to address the grand research challenges that face society. Data Conservancy members holdings encompass the entire range of earth, life, and space science data. New to the Data Conservancy is the concept that University libraries will be part of the distributed network of data centers and that data science will become a path in the library and information science curricula. As noted by Winston Tabb (JHU Dean of Libraries) "Data Centers are the new library stacks."

  6. Conservative mastectomies: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Maurizio Bruno; Catanuto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomies provide removal of the entire breast parenchyma, saving the outer covering of the mammary gland with the possibility of performing an immediate reconstruction preserving women body image. We rationalised and systematically organized our reconstructive algorythms giving a new different light to mastectomies, the so-called “conservative mastectomies”, an oxymoron indicating skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM), nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomies (NSM) and skin-reducing mastectomies (SRM). Eventhough randomized controlled trials comparing conservative mastectomies with traditional mastectomy and breast conserving surgery would be auspicable in order to achieve higher levels of evidence, we could confidently conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmesis and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645000

  7. PHYSICAL BASIS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Femtosecond Maxwellian solitons. II. Verification of a model of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation in the theory of optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkin, Vladimir N.; Schmidt, E. M.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Marti-Panameno, E.; Salazar, H.

    1997-11-01

    Methods for direct numerical integration of a system of nonlinear Maxwell's equations are used to establish a quantitative criterion of the validity of the method of slowly varying amplitudes and of a generalised model of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation in a description of the dynamics of femtosecond optical solitons. It is shown that Schroedinger solitons may be converted nonlinearly into Maxwellian wave solitons, whose special property is motion not only in the usual space and time, but also in the spectral space. Moreover, it should be possible to generate a pulse of duration amounting to one period of oscillations of the electromagnetic field in the course of amplification of a Maxwellian soliton.

  8. Preservation of the biomedical literature: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, M M

    1989-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine began to preserve its collection many years ago. This article presents a brief review of NLM's early conservation and microfilming programs, and describes the current activities of the library's new Preservation Section. Also mentioned are the complementary efforts of NLM staff who are involved in research into electronic imaging and the campaign to increase the use of alkaline paper in medical and scientific publishing. Goals of the National Preservation Plan for the Biomedical Literature are summarized and a report on progress in implementing the plan is provided. Results of the preservation needs assessment described in the accompanying article by Kirkpatrick are briefly analyzed. Recent efforts of the Commission on Preservation and Access, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Research Libraries Group, and several international associations are described in terms of their potential benefit to preservation of the biomedical literature. The need to monitor new preservation technologies and preserve materials in audiovisual and electronic formats is emphasized. It is argued that with enough coordination, cooperation, and willingness among health sciences libraries to share the costs, the goal of preserving all of the important biomedical literature can be accomplished. PMID:2758180

  9. Exact evaluation of the rates of electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    Electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir and ion sound waves (L→L′+S) and scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions (L+i→L′+i′, also called “nonlinear Landau damping”) are important nonlinear weak-turbulence processes. The rates for these processes depend on the quadratic longitudinal response function α{sup (2)} (or, equivalently, the quadratic longitudinal susceptibility χ{sup (2)}), which describes the second-order response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. Previous calculations of these rates for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma have relied upon an approximate form for α{sup (2)} that is valid where two of the wave fields are fast (i.e., v{sub φ}=ω/k≫V{sub e} where ω is the angular frequency, k is the wavenumber, and V{sub e} is the electron thermal speed) and one is slow (v{sub φ}≪V{sub e}). Recently, an exact expression was derived for α{sup (2)} that is valid for any phase speeds of the three waves in an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma. Here, this exact α{sup (2)} is applied to the calculation of the three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions, and the resulting exact rates are compared with the approximate rates. The calculations are performed using previously derived three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay given in terms of a general α{sup (2)}, and newly derived three-dimensional rates for scattering off thermal ions; the scattering rate is derived assuming a Maxwellian ion distribution, and both rates are derived assuming arc distributions for the wave spectra. For most space plasma conditions, the approximate rate is found to be accurate to better than 20%; however, for sufficiently low Langmuir phase speeds (v{sub φ}/V{sub e}≈3) appropriate to some spatial domains of the foreshock regions of planetary bow shocks and type II solar radio bursts, the use of the exact rate may be necessary for accurate calculations. The relative rates of electrostatic decay

  10. Existence regimes for the formation of nonlinear dissipative structures in inhomogeneous magnetoplasmas with non-Maxwellian electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Zahoor, Sara; Gul-e-Ali, Ahmad, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear dissipative structures are studied in one and two dimensions in nonuniform magnetized plasmas with non-Maxwellian electrons. The dissipation is incorporated in the system through ion-neutral collisions. Employing the drift approximation, nonlinear drift waves are derived in 1D, whereas coupled drift-ion acoustic waves are derived in 2D in the weak nonlinearity limit. It is found that the ratio of the diamagnetic drift velocity to the velocity of nonlinear structure determines the nature (compressive or rarefactive) of the shock structure. The upper and lower bounds for velocity of the nonlinear shock structures are also found. It is noticed that the existence regimes for the drift shock waves in one and two dimensions for Cairns distributed electrons are very distinct from those with kappa distributed electrons. Interestingly, it is found that both compressive and rarefactive shock structures could be obtained for the one dimensional drift waves with kappa distributed electrons.

  11. Differential emission measure analysis of active region cores and quiet Sun for the non-Maxwellian κ-distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackovjak, Š.; Dzifčáková, E.; Dudík, J.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The non-Maxwellian κ-distributions have been detected in the solar wind and can explain intensities of some transition region lines. Presence of such distributions in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere influences the ionization and excitation equilibrium and widens the line contribution functions. This behavior may be reflected on the reconstructed differential emission measure (DEM). Aims: We aim to investigate the influence of κ-distributions on the reconstructed DEMs. Methods: We perform DEM reconstruction for three active region cores and a quiet Sun region using the Withbroe-Sylwester method and the regularization method. Results: We find that the reconstructed DEMs depend on the value of κ. The DEMs of the active region cores show similar behavior with decreasing κ, or an increasing departure from the Maxwellian distribution. For lower κ, the peaks of the DEMs are typically shifted to higher temperatures and the DEMs themselves become more concave. This is caused by the less steep high-temperature slopes for lower κ. However, the low-temperature slopes do not change significantly even for extremely low κ. The behavior of the quiet-Sun DEM distribution is different. It becomes progressively less multithermal for lower κ with the EM-loci plots that indicate near-isothermal plasma for κ = 2. Conclusions: The κ-distributions can influence the reconstructed DEMs. The slopes of the DEM, however, do not change with κ significantly enough to produce different constraints on the heating mechanism in terms of frequency of coronal heating events.

  12. Electromagnetic fluctuations of the whistler-cyclotron and firehose instabilities in a Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Navarro, Roberto E.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro; Araneda, Jaime A.; Muñoz, Víctor

    2015-05-01

    Observed electron velocity distributions in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind exhibit a variety of nonthermal features which deviate from thermal equilibrium, for example, in the form of temperature anisotropies, suprathermal tail extensions, and field-aligned beams. The state close to thermal equilibrium and its departure from it provides a source for spontaneous emissions of electromagnetic fluctuations, such as the whistler. Here we present a comparative analysis of the electron whistler-cyclotron and firehose fluctuations based upon anisotropic plasma modeled with Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like particle distributions, to explain the correspondence relationship of the magnetic fluctuations as a function of the electron temperature and thermal anisotropy in the solar wind and magnetosphere plasmas. The analysis presented here considers correlation theory of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the dispersion relation of transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature anisotropic thermal bi-Maxwellian and nonthermal Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron-proton plasma. Dispersion analysis and stability thresholds are derived for these thermal and nonthermal distributions using plasma and field parameters relevant to the solar wind and magnetosphere environments. Our results indicate that there is an enhancement of the fluctuations level in the case of nonthermal distributions due to the effective higher temperature and the excess of suprathermal particles. These results suggest that a comparison of the electromagnetic fluctuations due to thermal and nonthermal distributions provides a diagnostic signature by which inferences about the nature of the particle velocity distribution function can be ascertained without in situ particle measurements.

  13. Formax Preserved Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Philip

    1978-01-01

    A quick, simple method for preserving bird specimens using borax and a formalin solution is described. Procedures for injecting and mounting the specimens are given along with certain restrictions on preserving specimens. (MA)

  14. Current Trends in Preservation Research and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunha, George Martin

    1990-01-01

    Overview of current trends in the preservation of library materials discusses collections conservation and management; climate control; insect and mold control; fire control; the effects of compact shelving; freezing and freeze-drying; space drying; alkaline paper; recycled paper; mass deacidification; and paper strengthening. (27 notes and…

  15. Moment preserving adaptive particle weights using octree velocity distributions for PIC simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Robert Scott; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-11-27

    The ratio of computational to physical particles is of primary concern to statistical particle based simulations such as DSMC and PIC. An adaptive computational particle weight algorithm is presented that conserves mass, momentum, and energy. This algorithm is then enhanced with an octree adaptive mesh in velocity space to mitigate artificial thermalization. The new octree merge is compared to a merge that randomly selects merge partners for a bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution. Results for crossing beams in a fixed potential well along with an electrostatic PIC version with and without MCC collisions based ionizing breakdown show the advantages of the merge algorithm to both fixed particle weights and randomly selected merge partners.

  16. 15 CFR 923.22 - Areas for preservation or restoration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Special Management Areas § 923.22 Areas for... designated for the purpose of preserving or restoring them for their conservation, recreational,...

  17. 15 CFR 923.22 - Areas for preservation or restoration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Special Management Areas § 923.22 Areas for... designated for the purpose of preserving or restoring them for their conservation, recreational,...

  18. 15 CFR 923.22 - Areas for preservation or restoration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Special Management Areas § 923.22 Areas for... designated for the purpose of preserving or restoring them for their conservation, recreational,...

  19. Regulatory effectiveness study for the Christmas Bay Coastal Preserve

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Windsor, D.

    1991-12-01

    The report contains a description and evaluation of essential regulatory activities governing Armand Bayou and its watershed. The report will be used in management planning for the preserve, and will also contribute to the baseline regulatory data for developing the Galveston Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan. A companion report was prepared for the Christmas Bay Coastal Preserve.

  20. Regulatory effectiveness study for the Armand Bayou Coastal Preserve

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Windsor, D.

    1991-12-01

    The report contains a description and evaluation of essential regulatory activities governing Christmas Bay and its watershed. The report will be used in management planning for the preserve, and will also contribute to the baseline regulatory data for developing the Galveston Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan. A companion report was prepared for the Armand Bayou Coastal Preserve.

  1. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age. PMID:23866841

  2. [CORPSE CONSERVATION: ATTILIO MAGGIA'S PREPARATIONS].

    PubMed

    Porro, Alessandro; Franchini, Antonia Francesca; Galimberti, Paolo M; Lorusso, Lorenzo; Falconi, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyze Attilio Maggia's method of corpse conservation. His method was based on development of formaline vapours and preservation of corpse into a hermetically closed coffin (U.S.Patent 1150688 - Aug. 17, 1915). The corpses preserved could also be hardened after the treatment, exposing them to the air. Attilio Maggia (1864-1945) treated the corpse of italian writer Giovanni Verga (1840-1922). Some Maggia's preparations were preserved into obstetrical museum at Milan University: they are lost, but some records remain (an old inventory register) and attest us the industry of this physician.

  3. [Preservatives in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Messmer, E M

    2012-11-01

    Preservatives are a legal requirement for eye drops in multidose containers. Moreover, they are necessary for stabilization and intraocular penetration for a number of ophthalmic preparations. Most preservatives act in a relatively unspecific manner as detergents or by oxidative mechanisms and thereby cause side effects at the ocular surface. They may also affect the lens, trabecular meshwork and the retina. Benzalkonium chloride is the most commonly used preservative in ophthalmology and is more toxic than other or newer preservatives, such as polyquaternium-1 (Polyquad), sodium perborate, oxychloro-complex (Purite®) and SofZia. Preservative-free topical medication is highly recommended for patients with ocular surface disease, frequent eye drop administration, proven allergy to preservatives and contact lens wear.

  4. [Preservatives in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Messmer, E M

    2012-11-01

    Preservatives are a legal requirement for eye drops in multidose containers. Moreover, they are necessary for stabilization and intraocular penetration for a number of ophthalmic preparations. Most preservatives act in a relatively unspecific manner as detergents or by oxidative mechanisms and thereby cause side effects at the ocular surface. They may also affect the lens, trabecular meshwork and the retina. Benzalkonium chloride is the most commonly used preservative in ophthalmology and is more toxic than other or newer preservatives, such as polyquaternium-1 (Polyquad), sodium perborate, oxychloro-complex (Purite®) and SofZia. Preservative-free topical medication is highly recommended for patients with ocular surface disease, frequent eye drop administration, proven allergy to preservatives and contact lens wear. PMID:23179809

  5. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions due to self-generated turbulence in collisionless guide-field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Büchner, J.

    2016-10-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity space distribution functions (EVDFs) are useful signatures of plasma conditions and non-local consequences of collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the past, EVDFs were obtained mainly for antiparallel reconnection and under the influence of weak guide-fields in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. EVDFs are, however, not well known, yet, for oblique (or component-) reconnection in case and in dependence on stronger guide-magnetic fields and for the exhaust (outflow) region of reconnection away from the diffusion region. In view of the multi-spacecraft Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), we derived the non-Maxwellian EVDFs of collisionless magnetic reconnection in dependence on the guide-field strength bg from small ( b g ≈ 0 ) to very strong (bg = 8) guide-fields, taking into account the feedback of the self-generated turbulence. For this sake, we carried out 2.5D fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations using the ACRONYM code. We obtained anisotropic EVDFs and electron beams propagating along the separatrices as well as in the exhaust region of reconnection. The beams are anisotropic with a higher temperature in the direction perpendicular rather than parallel to the local magnetic field. The beams propagate in the direction opposite to the background electrons and cause instabilities. We also obtained the guide-field dependence of the relative electron-beam drift speed, threshold, and properties of the resulting streaming instabilities including the strongly non-linear saturation of the self-generated plasma turbulence. This turbulence and its non-linear feedback cause non-adiabatic parallel electron acceleration. We further obtained the resulting EVDFs due to the non-linear feedback of the saturated self-generated turbulence near the separatrices and in the exhaust region of reconnection in dependence on the guide field strength. We found that the influence of the self-generated plasma turbulence

  6. Conservation of helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    Helicity arises as a special conserved quantity in ideal fluids, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. As a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines, Helicity provides an important tool for studying a wide variety of physical systems such as plasmas and turbulent fluids. Superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, making it natural to ask whether their knottedness is similarly preserved. We address the conservation of helicity in superfluids theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  7. Kinetic models in n-dimensional Euclidean spaces: From the Maxwellian to the Poisson kernel.

    PubMed

    Zadehgol, Abed

    2015-06-01

    In this work, minimal kinetic theories based on unconventional entropy functions, H∼ln f (Burg entropy) for 2D and H∼f(1-2/n) (Tsallis entropy) for nD with n≥3, are studied. These entropy functions were originally derived by Boghosian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 68, 025103 (2003)] as a basis for discrete-velocity and lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible fluid dynamics. The present paper extends the entropic models of Boghosian et al. and shows that the explicit form of the equilibrium distribution function (EDF) of their models, in the continuous-velocity limit, can be identified with the Poisson kernel of the Poisson integral formula. The conservation and Navier-Stokes equations are recovered at low Mach numbers, and it is shown that rest particles can be used to rectify the speed of sound of the extended models. Fourier series expansion of the EDF is used to evaluate the discretization errors of the model. It is shown that the expansion coefficients of the Fourier series coincide with the velocity moments of the model. Employing two-, three-, and four-dimensional (2D, 3D, and 4D) complex systems, the real velocity space is mapped into the hypercomplex spaces and it is shown that the velocity moments can be evaluated, using the Poisson integral formula, in the hypercomplex space. For the practical applications, a 3D projection of the 4D model is presented, and the existence of an H theorem for the discrete model is investigated. The theoretical results have been verified by simulating the following benchmark problems: (1) the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of thin shear layers in a doubly periodic domain and (2) the 3D flow of incompressible fluid in a lid-driven cubic cavity. The present results are in agreement with the previous works, while they show better stability of the proposed kinetic model, as compared with the BGK type (with single relaxation time) lattice Boltzmann models. PMID:26172826

  8. On the existence and stability of electrostatic structures in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.; Kourakis, I.

    2013-12-15

    Electrostatic solitary waves in plasmas are the focus of many current studies of localized electrostatic disturbances in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Here, an investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of plasma evolving in two dimensions, in the presence of excess superthermal background electrons and positrons, is undertaken. We investigate the effect of a magnetic field on weakly nonlinear ion acoustic waves. Deviation from the Maxwellian distribution is effectively modelled by the kappa model. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and a decrease in frequency and phase speed in both parallel and perpendicular modes can be seen, when the proportion of positrons to electrons increases. We show that ion acoustic solitary waves can be generated during the nonlinear evolution of a plasma fluid, and their nonlinear propagation is governed by a Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) type equation. A multiple scales perturbation technique is used to derive the ZK equation. The solitary wave structures are dependent on the relation between the system parameters, specifically the superthermality of the system, the proportion of positron content, magnetic field strength, and the difference between electron and positron temperature. The parametric effect of these on electrostatic shock structures is investigated. In particular, we find that stronger superthermality leads to narrower excitations with smaller potential amplitudes. Increased positron concentration also suppresses both the amplitude and the width of solitary wave structures. However, the structures are only weakly affected by temperature differentials between electrons and positrons in our model.

  9. Self-consistent full-wave and Fokker-Planck calculations for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Ahern, S. D.; Barrett, R. F.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; D'Azevedo, E. F.; Moore, R. D.; Harvey, R. W.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Dumont, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Okuda, H.; Smithe, D. N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Choi, M.

    2006-05-01

    Magnetically confined plasmas can contain significant concentrations of nonthermal plasma particles arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave-driven diffusion in velocity space. Initial studies in one-dimensional and experimental results show that nonthermal energetic ions can significantly affect wave propagation and heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In addition, these ions can absorb power at high harmonics of the cyclotron frequency where conventional two-dimensional global-wave models are not valid. In this work, the all-orders global-wave solver AORSA [E. F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001 (2003)] is generalized to treat non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Quasilinear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the wave fields and used to calculate energetic ion velocity distributions with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992 (USDOC NTIS Document No. DE93002962)]. For comparison, the quasilinear coefficients can be calculated numerically by integrating the Lorentz force equations along particle orbits. Self-consistency between the wave electric field and resonant ion distribution function is achieved by iterating between the global-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.

  10. Towards including finite orbit effects in self-consistent calculations of ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Choi, M.

    2008-11-01

    In burning plasma experiments, the combination of neutral beam injection, high power electromagnetic heating and fusion products give rise to significant non-thermal ion populations. The resulting non-Maxwellian plasma affects ICRF wave propagation and heating. Self-consistent simulation of these effects has been achieved by an iterative coupling of a full-wave electromagnetic solver with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (F-P) code under the zero banana width approximation. Investigating the effects of finite width particle orbits is possible by iterating with a Monte-Carlo calculation of the ion distribution function in place of the F-P code. Here we present progress towards coupling the all-orders global wave solver AORSA with the ORBIT-RF Monte-Carlo code. ORBIT-RF solves the Hamiltonian guiding center equations under coulomb collisions and ICRF quasi-linear (QL) heating taking the QL diffusion coefficients calculated from the AORSA wave fields as inputs. However, completing the self-consistent, time dependent calculation requires adapting the resulting Monte-Carlo particle list to a distribution function suitable for input to AORSA. Issues associated with calculating the differentiable bounce-averaged distribution function from discrete particle data will be discussed. E. F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. of Plasmas, 13, 056101-1, 2006

  11. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 1: Estimate of the electron velocity distribution functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    It was shown that, in the presence of the steep temperature gradients characteristic of EUV models of the solar transition region, the electron and proton velocity distribution functions are non-Maxwellian and are characterized by high energy tails. The magnitude of these tails are estimated for a model of the transition region and the heat flux is calculated at a maximum of 30 percent greater than predicted by collision-dominated theory.

  12. Modes of fossil preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schopf, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The processes of geologic preservation are important for understanding the organisms represented by fossils. Some fossil differences are due to basic differences in organization of animals and plants, but the interpretation of fossils has also tended to be influenced by modes of preservation. Four modes of preservation generally can be distinguished: (1) Cellular permineralization ("petrifaction") preserves anatomical detail, and, occasionally, even cytologic structures. (2) Coalified compression, best illustrated by structures from coal but characteristic of many plant fossils in shale, preserves anatomical details in distorted form and produces surface replicas (impressions) on enclosing matrix. (3) Authigenic preservation replicates surface form or outline (molds and casts) prior to distortion by compression and, depending on cementation and timing, may intergrade with fossils that have been subject to compression. (4) Duripartic (hard part) preservation is characteristic of fossil skeletal remains, predominantly animal. Molds, pseudomorphs, or casts may form as bulk replacements following dissolution of the original fossil material, usually by leaching. Classification of the kinds of preservation in fossils will aid in identifying the processes responsible for modifying the fossil remains of both animals and plants. ?? 1975.

  13. Preservation--Everybody's Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schobernd, Elizabeth M.

    1999-01-01

    Outlines concepts essential for library material preservation. Describes the following components of a formal preservation program: (1) environmental control; (2) repair; (3) binding; (4) deacidification; (5) reformatting; (6) disaster preparedness; (7) education; and (8) administration. Suggests that libraries can improve their preservation…

  14. Departures of the electron energy distribution from a Maxwellian in hydrogen. I - Formulation and solution of the electron kinetic equation. II - Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoub, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of calculating the steady-state free-electron energy distribution in a hydrogen gas is considered in order to study departures of that distribution from a Maxwellian at sufficiently low degrees of ionization. A model kinetic equation is formulated and solved analytically for the one-particle electron distribution function in a steady-state partially ionized hydrogen gas, and it is shown that the formal solution can be accurately approximated by using the WKB method. The solutions obtained indicate that the high-energy tail of the distribution is susceptible to distortion by imbalanced inelastic collisions for ionization fractions not exceeding about 0.1 and that such departures from a Maxwellian can lead to significant changes in the collisional excitation and ionization rates of ground-state hydrogen atoms. Expressions for the electron-hydrogen collision rates are derived which explicitly display their dependence on the hydrogen departure coefficients. The results are applied in order to compare self-consistent predictions with those based on the a priori assumption of a Maxwellian distribution for models of the thermal ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in the optically thin limit, spectral-line formation by a gas consisting of two-level atoms, and radiative transfer in finite slabs by a gas of four-level hydrogen atoms.

  15. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  16. Hypersensitivity to preservatives.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Denis

    2004-01-01

    Preservatives are biocidal chemicals added to cosmetics, topical medicaments, consumer goods, foods, and industrial products to protect them against microbial spoilage and to protect the consumer against infection. The ideal preservative, both effective and devoid of irritant or sensitizing potential, is still to be discovered. The present paper reviews the most important classes of preservatives, namely parabens, formaldehyde-releasers, and isothiazolinones. The author also discusses newer agents such as Euxyl K 400 and isopropynyl butylcarbamate. Each preservative is described in terms of chemical and physical characteristics, antimicrobial efficacy, exposure, cutaneous adverse reactions, patch testing concentrations, patterns of cross-reactions, and reported rates of sensitization. The history of preservatives goes back to the 1930s, and ironically, the parabens, which the industry has sought to replace with "safer" alternatives, are still the most frequently used biocides in cosmetics and appear to be far less sensitizing than most of the newer agents.

  17. Kinetic models in n -dimensional Euclidean spaces: From the Maxwellian to the Poisson kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadehgol, Abed

    2015-06-01

    In this work, minimal kinetic theories based on unconventional entropy functions, H ˜lnf (Burg entropy) for 2D and H ˜f1 -2/n (Tsallis entropy) for n D with n ≥3 , are studied. These entropy functions were originally derived by Boghosian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 68, 025103 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevE.68.025103] as a basis for discrete-velocity and lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible fluid dynamics. The present paper extends the entropic models of Boghosian et al. and shows that the explicit form of the equilibrium distribution function (EDF) of their models, in the continuous-velocity limit, can be identified with the Poisson kernel of the Poisson integral formula. The conservation and Navier-Stokes equations are recovered at low Mach numbers, and it is shown that rest particles can be used to rectify the speed of sound of the extended models. Fourier series expansion of the EDF is used to evaluate the discretization errors of the model. It is shown that the expansion coefficients of the Fourier series coincide with the velocity moments of the model. Employing two-, three-, and four-dimensional (2D, 3D, and 4D) complex systems, the real velocity space is mapped into the hypercomplex spaces and it is shown that the velocity moments can be evaluated, using the Poisson integral formula, in the hypercomplex space. For the practical applications, a 3D projection of the 4D model is presented, and the existence of an H theorem for the discrete model is investigated. The theoretical results have been verified by simulating the following benchmark problems: (1) the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of thin shear layers in a doubly periodic domain and (2) the 3D flow of incompressible fluid in a lid-driven cubic cavity. The present results are in agreement with the previous works, while they show better stability of the proposed kinetic model, as compared with the BGK type (with single relaxation time) lattice Boltzmann models.

  18. Self-preserving cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Varvaresou, A; Papageorgiou, S; Tsirivas, E; Protopapa, E; Kintziou, H; Kefala, V; Demetzos, C

    2009-06-01

    Preservatives are added to products for two reasons: first, to prevent microbial spoilage and therefore to prolong the shelf life of the product; second, to protect the consumer from a potential infection. Although chemical preservatives prevent microbial growth, their safety is questioned by a growing segment of consumers. Therefore, there is a considerable interest in the development of preservative-free or self-preserving cosmetics. In these formulations traditional/chemical preservatives have been replaced by other cosmetic ingredients with antimicrobial properties that are not legislated as preservatives according to the Annex VI of the Commission Directive 76/768/EEC and the amending directives (2003/15/EC, 2007/17/EC and 2007/22/EC). 'Hurdle Technology', a technology that has been used for the control of product safety in the food industry since 1970s, has also been applied for the production of self-preserving cosmetics. 'Hurdle Technology' is a term used to describe the intelligent combination of different preservation factors or hurdles to deteriorate the growth of microorganisms. Adherence to current good manufacturing practice, appropriate packaging, careful choice of the form of the emulsion, low water activity and low or high pH values are significant variables for the control of microbial growth in cosmetic formulations. This paper describes the application of the basic principles of 'Hurdle Technology' in the production of self-preserving cosmetics. Multifunctional antimicrobial ingredients and plant-derived essential oils and extracts that are used as alternative or natural preservatives and are not listed in Annex VI of the Cosmetic Directive are also reported.

  19. 18 CFR 1312.12 - Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. 1312.12 Section 1312.12 Conservation of Power and Water... Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Issuance of a permit in accordance...

  20. 18 CFR 1312.12 - Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. 1312.12 Section 1312.12 Conservation of Power and Water... Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Issuance of a permit in accordance...

  1. 18 CFR 1312.12 - Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. 1312.12 Section 1312.12 Conservation of Power and Water... Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Issuance of a permit in accordance...

  2. 18 CFR 1312.12 - Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. 1312.12 Section 1312.12 Conservation of Power and Water... Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Issuance of a permit in accordance...

  3. 18 CFR 1312.12 - Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. 1312.12 Section 1312.12 Conservation of Power and Water... Relationship to section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Issuance of a permit in accordance...

  4. Analysis Preservation in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Kyle; Heinrich, Lukas; Jones, Roger; South, David M.

    2015-12-01

    Long before data taking, ATLAS established a policy that all analyses need to be preserved. In the initial data-taking period, this has been achieved by various tools and techniques. ATLAS is now reviewing the analysis preservation with the aim of bringing coherence and robustness to the process and with a clearer view of the level of reproducibility that is reasonably achievable. The secondary aim is to reduce the load on the analysts. Once complete, this will serve for our internal preservation needs but also provide a basis for any subsequent sharing of analysis results with external parties.

  5. 18 CFR 380.14 - Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... National Historic Preservation Act. 380.14 Section 380.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 380.14 Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. (a) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470(f)) (NHPA),......

  6. 18 CFR 380.14 - Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... National Historic Preservation Act. 380.14 Section 380.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 380.14 Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. (a) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470(f)) (NHPA),......

  7. 18 CFR 380.14 - Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... National Historic Preservation Act. 380.14 Section 380.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 380.14 Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. (a) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470(f)) (NHPA),......

  8. 18 CFR 380.14 - Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... National Historic Preservation Act. 380.14 Section 380.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 380.14 Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. (a) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470(f)) (NHPA),......

  9. 18 CFR 380.14 - Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... National Historic Preservation Act. 380.14 Section 380.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 380.14 Compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act. (a) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470(f)) (NHPA),......

  10. A Testbed for Advancing the Role of Digital Technologies for Library Preservation and Access. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Anne R.; Personius, Lynne K.

    In cooperation with the Commission on Preservation and Access, Xerox Corporation, Sun Microsystems, Inc., and the New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials, Cornell University (New York) studied and established the effectiveness of digital technology to preserve and make available research library…

  11. Cryopreservation for preservation of potato genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Niino, Takao; Arizaga, Miriam Valle

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is becoming a very important tool for the long-term storage of plant genetic resources and efficient cryopreservation protocols have been developed for a large number of plant species. Practical procedures, developed using in vitro tissue culture, can be a simple and reliable preservation option of potato genetic resources rather than maintaining by vegetative propagation in genebanks due their allogamous nature. Cryopreserved materials insure a long-term backup of field collections against loss of plant germplasm. Occurrence of genetic variation, in tissue culture cells during prolonged subcultures, can be avoided with suitable cryopreservation protocols that provide high regrowth, leading and facilitating a systematic and strategic cryo-banking of plant genetic resources. Cryopreservation protocols for potato reviewed here, can efficiently complement field and in vitro conservation, providing for preservation of genotypes difficult to preserve by other methods, wild types and other species decided as priority collections. PMID:25931979

  12. Testing the existence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions in H II regions after assessing atomic data accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, C.; Bautista, M. A. E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu

    2014-04-20

    The classic optical nebular diagnostics [N II], [O II], [O III], [S II], [S III], and [Ar III] are employed to search for evidence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions, namely κ distributions, in a sample of well-observed Galactic H II regions. By computing new effective collision strengths for all these systems and A-values when necessary (e.g., S II), and by comparing with previous collisional and radiative data sets, we have been able to obtain realistic estimates of the electron-temperature dispersion caused by the atomic data, which in most cases are not larger than ∼10%. If the uncertainties due to both observation and atomic data are then taken into account, it is plausible to determine for some nebulae a representative average temperature while in others there are at least two plasma excitation regions. For the latter, it is found that the diagnostic temperature differences in the high-excitation region, e.g., T{sub e} (O III), T{sub e} (S III), and T{sub e} (Ar III), cannot be conciliated by invoking κ distributions. For the low-excitation region, it is possible in some, but not all, cases to arrive at a common, lower temperature for [N II], [O II], and [S II] with κ ≈ 10, which would then lead to significant abundance enhancements for these ions. An analytic formula is proposed to generate accurate κ-averaged excitation rate coefficients (better than 10% for κ ≥ 5) from temperature tabulations of the Maxwell-Boltzmann effective collision strengths.

  13. Mechanism of entanglement preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Qingjun; An Junhong; Luo Honggang; Oh, C. H.

    2010-05-15

    We study the entanglement preservation of two qubits locally interacting with their reservoirs. We show that the existence of a bound state of the qubit and its reservoir and the non-Markovian effect are two essential ingredients and their interplay plays a crucial role in preserving the entanglement in the steady state. When the non-Markovian effect is neglected, the entanglement sudden death (ESD) is reproduced. On the other hand, when the non-Markovian is significantly strong but the bound state is absent, the phenomenon of the ESD and its revival is recovered. Our formulation presents a unified picture about the entanglement preservation and provides a clear clue on how to preserve the entanglement in quantum information processing.

  14. Tifft Farm Nature Preserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Thomas B.; Gannon, David J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are the creation, development, activities, and programs of Tifft Farm, a 264-acre nature preserve and environmental education center in Buffalo, New York, constructed on a sanitary landfill. (BT)

  15. Advances in lung preservation.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2013-12-01

    After a brief review of conventional lung preservation, this article discusses the rationale behind ex vivo lung perfusion and how it has shifted the paradigm of organ preservation from conventional static cold ischemia to the utilization of functional normothermia, restoring the lung's own metabolism and its reparative processes. Technical aspects and previous clinical experience as well as opportunities to address specific donor organ injuries in a personalized medicine approach are also reviewed. PMID:24206857

  16. Conservative management.

    PubMed

    Kruis, W; Leifeld, L; Pfützer, R

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of diverticulitis comprises at least two options: conservative or surgical management. There is a recent trend to limit surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis and to favor conservative management. This review addresses general aspects of conservative patient care with special focus on the treatment of patients with a first attack of diverticulitis. The presentation does not include a discussion of specific drugs which is given in other sections of this issue.

  17. Food Preservation beyond the Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Phyllis

    1992-01-01

    Examines how current scientific knowledge of food preservation emerged from traditions handed down through the generations. Discusses various methods of preservation, their history, and current application. (LZ)

  18. Conservation reaches new heights.

    PubMed

    Pepall, J; Khanal, P

    1992-10-01

    The conservation program with the management assistance of the Woodlands Mountain Institute in 2 contiguous parks, the Mount Everest National Park in Nepal and the Qomolangma Nature Reserve in China, in 2 countries is described. The focus is on conservation of the complex ecosystem with sustainable development by showing local people how to benefit from the park without environmental damage. Cultural diversity is as important as biological diversity. The area has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site with the "last pure ecological seed" of the Himalayas. The regional geography and culture are presented. Population growth has impacted natural resources through overgrazing, cultivation of marginal land, and deforestation; future plans to build a dam and road bordering the nature reserve pose other threats. Proposed management plans for the Makalu-Barun Nature Park (established in November 1991) and Conservation Area include a division of the park into nature reserve areas free of human activity, protected areas which permit traditional land use, and special sites and trail for tourists and religious pilgrims. The conservation area will act as a buffer for the park and provide economic opportunities; further subdivisions include land use for biodiversity protection, community forest and pasture, agroforestry, and agriculture and settlement. Efforts will be made to increase the welfare of women and local people; proposed projects include the introduction of higher milk-producing animals for stall feeding. Also proposed is a cultural and natural history museum. 70% of the project's resources will be directed to local community participation in consultation and park maintenance. The project is a model of how conservation and protection of natural resources can coexist with local economic development and participation; an integration of preservation of biological diversity, mountain wisdom, and the value of local people as resources for conservation.

  19. Conservation reaches new heights.

    PubMed

    Pepall, J; Khanal, P

    1992-10-01

    The conservation program with the management assistance of the Woodlands Mountain Institute in 2 contiguous parks, the Mount Everest National Park in Nepal and the Qomolangma Nature Reserve in China, in 2 countries is described. The focus is on conservation of the complex ecosystem with sustainable development by showing local people how to benefit from the park without environmental damage. Cultural diversity is as important as biological diversity. The area has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site with the "last pure ecological seed" of the Himalayas. The regional geography and culture are presented. Population growth has impacted natural resources through overgrazing, cultivation of marginal land, and deforestation; future plans to build a dam and road bordering the nature reserve pose other threats. Proposed management plans for the Makalu-Barun Nature Park (established in November 1991) and Conservation Area include a division of the park into nature reserve areas free of human activity, protected areas which permit traditional land use, and special sites and trail for tourists and religious pilgrims. The conservation area will act as a buffer for the park and provide economic opportunities; further subdivisions include land use for biodiversity protection, community forest and pasture, agroforestry, and agriculture and settlement. Efforts will be made to increase the welfare of women and local people; proposed projects include the introduction of higher milk-producing animals for stall feeding. Also proposed is a cultural and natural history museum. 70% of the project's resources will be directed to local community participation in consultation and park maintenance. The project is a model of how conservation and protection of natural resources can coexist with local economic development and participation; an integration of preservation of biological diversity, mountain wisdom, and the value of local people as resources for conservation. PMID

  20. Conservation successes at micro-, meso- and macroscales.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Navjot S; Butler, Rhett; Laurance, William F; Gibson, Luke

    2011-11-01

    Although large-scale biodiversity declines are ongoing, certain conservation actions have made a positive difference. Rates of extinction and endangerment of vertebrate species, for instance, have probably been reduced via conservation interventions. Such conservation actions operate at different spatial scales. Habitat preservation and endangered species recovery are examples of conservation successes at microscales. Mesoscale conservation includes regional cooperation among neighboring countries that has arrested population declines of endangered species, such as mountain gorillas. At macroscales, public pressure on multinational corporations has sometimes resulted in their abandoning environmentally damaging practices or suppliers with poor environmental records. Overall, conservation projects such as these need more long-term funding and greater political and popular support, and must also include provisions to evaluate and document their outcomes. As we discuss here, a focus on conservation successes achieved at different scales can help to promote these aims and guide future conservation victories.

  1. A History Worth Preserving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cynthia

    2008-04-01

    The Manhattan Project transformed the course of American and world history, science, politics and society. If we can read about this in books and watch History Channel documentaries, why do we need to preserve some of the properties of this enormous undertaking? The presentation, ``A History Worth Preserving,'' will address why some of the physical properties need to be preserved and which ones we are struggling to maintain for future generations. The story of this effort begins in 1997 as the Department of Energy was posed to demolish the last remaining Manhattan Project properties at the Los Alamos laboratory. Located deep behind security fences, the ``V Site's'' asbestos-shingled wooden buildings looked like humble garages with over-sized wooden doors. The ``V Site'' properties were almost lost twice, first to bulldozers and then the Cerro Grande fire of 2000. Now, visitors can stand inside the building where J. Robert Oppenheimer and his crew once worked and imagine the Trinity ``gadget'' hanging from its hoist shortly before it ushered in the Atomic Age on July 16, 1945. As Richard Rhodes has commented, we preserve what we value of the physical past because it specifically embodies our social past. But many challenge whether the Manhattan Project properties ought to be preserved. Rather than recognize the Manhattan Project as a great achievement worthy of commemoration, some see it as a regrettable event, producing an instrument to take man's inhumanity to man to extremes. While these divergent views will no doubt persist, the significance of the Manhattan Project in producing the world's first atomic bombs is irrefutable. Preserving some of its tangible remains is essential so that future generations can understand what the undertaking entailed from its humble wooden sheds to enormous first-of-a-kind industrial plants with 125,000 people working in secret and living in frontier-like communities. With continuing pressure for their demolition, what progress has

  2. Moving Image Preservation in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Stefano, Paula

    2003-01-01

    Examines the current practices of film and video preservation in libraries and examines barriers that have hindered the development of full-fledged preservation programs for them. Topics include advances in education and training; preservation paradigms; and mechanics of film production that affect preservation. (Author/LRW)

  3. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  4. Motivations for conserving urban biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, Donald C; Kark, Salit

    2010-04-01

    In a time of increasing urbanization, the fundamental value of conserving urban biodiversity remains controversial. How much of a fixed budget should be spent on conservation in urban versus nonurban landscapes? The answer should depend on the goals that drive our conservation actions, yet proponents of urban conservation often fail to specify the motivation for protecting urban biodiversity. This is an important shortcoming on several fronts, including a missed opportunity to make a stronger appeal to those who believe conservation biology should focus exclusively on more natural, wilder landscapes. We argue that urban areas do offer an important venue for conservation biology, but that we must become better at choosing and articulating our goals. We explored seven possible motivations for urban biodiversity conservation: preserving local biodiversity, creating stepping stones to nonurban habitat, understanding and facilitating responses to environmental change, conducting environmental education, providing ecosystem services, fulfilling ethical responsibilities, and improving human well-being. To attain all these goals, challenges must be faced that are common to the urban environment, such as localized pollution, disruption of ecosystem structure, and limited availability of land. There are, however, also challenges specific only to particular goals, meaning that different goals will require different approaches and actions. This highlights the importance of specifying the motivations behind urban biodiversity conservation. If the goals are unknown, progress cannot be assessed.

  5. Motivations for conserving urban biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, Donald C; Kark, Salit

    2010-04-01

    In a time of increasing urbanization, the fundamental value of conserving urban biodiversity remains controversial. How much of a fixed budget should be spent on conservation in urban versus nonurban landscapes? The answer should depend on the goals that drive our conservation actions, yet proponents of urban conservation often fail to specify the motivation for protecting urban biodiversity. This is an important shortcoming on several fronts, including a missed opportunity to make a stronger appeal to those who believe conservation biology should focus exclusively on more natural, wilder landscapes. We argue that urban areas do offer an important venue for conservation biology, but that we must become better at choosing and articulating our goals. We explored seven possible motivations for urban biodiversity conservation: preserving local biodiversity, creating stepping stones to nonurban habitat, understanding and facilitating responses to environmental change, conducting environmental education, providing ecosystem services, fulfilling ethical responsibilities, and improving human well-being. To attain all these goals, challenges must be faced that are common to the urban environment, such as localized pollution, disruption of ecosystem structure, and limited availability of land. There are, however, also challenges specific only to particular goals, meaning that different goals will require different approaches and actions. This highlights the importance of specifying the motivations behind urban biodiversity conservation. If the goals are unknown, progress cannot be assessed. PMID:19775276

  6. 43 CFR 5511.3-3 - Conservation practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conservation practices. 5511.3-3 Section... § 5511.3-3 Conservation practices. All free-use timber disposed of under the act shall be severed, or removed in accordance with sound forestry and conservation practices so as to preserve to the...

  7. 43 CFR 5511.3-3 - Conservation practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conservation practices. 5511.3-3 Section... § 5511.3-3 Conservation practices. All free-use timber disposed of under the act shall be severed, or removed in accordance with sound forestry and conservation practices so as to preserve to the...

  8. 43 CFR 5511.3-3 - Conservation practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conservation practices. 5511.3-3 Section... § 5511.3-3 Conservation practices. All free-use timber disposed of under the act shall be severed, or removed in accordance with sound forestry and conservation practices so as to preserve to the...

  9. 43 CFR 5511.3-3 - Conservation practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conservation practices. 5511.3-3 Section... § 5511.3-3 Conservation practices. All free-use timber disposed of under the act shall be severed, or removed in accordance with sound forestry and conservation practices so as to preserve to the...

  10. Preservation: Issues and Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Paul N., Ed.; Pilette, Roberta, Ed.

    A reference guide from leading experts in the field, this book covers the repair, maintenance, and preservation of library or archive collections, providing a definitive and authoritative analysis of how to plan for and ensure the long-term health of an institution's collection in this digital age. Chapters include: (1) "Defining the Library…

  11. Paints and Preservatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Larry E.; Miller, Larry E.

    The publication contains an outline for use by agriculture teachers in developing a teaching plan for a unit on paints and preservatives. The topics included are (1) recognizing, solving, and preventing paint problems and (2) operating and using power spray painting equipment. Items presented for each topic are: the situation, (intended to inform…

  12. Preserving Southwest Virginia's Folklore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgin, Ramond

    1997-01-01

    Describes Southwest Virginia's rich tradition of folklore and culture and the need for its preservation. Summarizes the author's time-consuming process of preparing an inventory and indexing the vast archival collections gathered by students in American Folklore classes at Mountain Empire Community College and by the Southwest Virginia Folklore…

  13. Electronic Technologies and Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Donald J.

    Digital imaging technology, which is used to take a computer picture of documents at the page level, has significant potential as a tool for preserving deteriorating library materials. Multiple reproductions can be made without loss of quality; the end product is compact; reproductions can be made in paper, microfilm, or CD-ROM; and access over…

  14. Sharing the Preservation Burden

    SciTech Connect

    Giaretta, D.

    2008-07-01

    Preserving digitally encoded information which is not just to be rendered, as a document, but which must processed, like data, is even harder than one might think, because understandability of the information which is encoded in the digital object(s) is what is required. Information about Nuclear Waste will include both documents as well as data. Moreover one must be able to understand the relationship between the many individual pieces of information. Furthermore the volume of information involved will require us to allow automated processing of such information. Preserving the ability to understand and process digitally encoded information over long periods of time is especially hard when so many things will change, including hardware, software, environment and the tacit and implicit knowledge that people have. Since we cannot predict these changes this cannot be just a one-off action; continued effort is required. However it seems reasonable to say that no organization, project or person can ever say for certain that their ability to provide this effort is going to last forever. What can be done? Can anything be guaranteed? Probably not guaranteed - but at least one can try to reduce the risk of losing the information. We argue that if no single organization, project or person can guarantee funding or effort (or even interest), then somehow we must share the 'preservation load', and this is more than a simple chain of preservation consisting of handing on the collection of bits from one holder to the next. Clearly the bits must be passed on (but may be transformed along the way), however something more is required - because of the need to maintain understandability, not just access. This paper describes the tools, techniques and infrastructure components which the CASPAR project is producing to help in sharing the preservation burden. In summary: CASPAR is attempting to use OAIS concepts rigorously and to the fullest extent possible, supplementing these where

  15. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; Le Diberder, Francois; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; Bellis, Matt; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; Lucchesi, Donatella; Denisov, Dmitri; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Li, Qizhong; Varnes, Erich; Jonckheere, Alan; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  16. KAPPA: A PACKAGE FOR SYNTHESIS OF OPTICALLY THIN SPECTRA FOR THE NON-MAXWELLIAN κ-DISTRIBUTIONS BASED ON THE CHIANTI DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Dzifcáková, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav; Kotrc, Pavel; Fárník, František; Zemanová, Alena

    2015-03-15

    Non-Maxwellian κ-distributions have been detected in the solar transition region and in flares. These distributions are characterized by a high-energy tail and a near-Maxwellian core and are known to have a significant impact on the resulting optically thin spectra arising from collisionally dominated astrophysical plasmas. We developed the KAPPA package for the synthesis of such line and continuum spectra. The package is based on the freely available CHIANTI database and software, and can be used in a similar manner. Ionization and recombination rates together with the ionization equilibria are provided for a range of κ values. Distribution-averaged collision strengths for excitation are obtained using an approximate method for all transitions in all ions available within CHIANTI. The validity of this approximate method is tested through a comparison with direct calculations. Typical precisions of better than 5% are found with all cases being within 10%. Tools for the calculation of synthetic line and continuum intensities are provided and described. Examples of the synthetic spectra and SDO/AIA responses to emission for the κ-distributions are given.

  17. Influence of relief on permanent preservation areas.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Alexandre Rosa; Chimalli, Tessa; Peluzio, João Batista Esteves; da Silva, Aderbal Gomes; dos Santos, Gleissy Mary Amaral Dino Alves; Lorenzon, Alexandre Simões; Teixeira, Thaisa Ribeiro; de Castro, Nero Lemos Martins; Soares Ribeiro, Carlos Antonio Alvares

    2016-01-15

    Many countries have environmental legislation to protecting natural resources on private property. In Brazil, the Brazilian Forestry Code determines specific areas to maintain with natural vegetation cover, known as areas of permanent preservation (APP). Currently, there are few studies that relate topographic variables on APP. In this context, we sought to evaluate the influence of relief on the conservation of areas of permanent preservation (APP) in the areas surrounding Caparaó National Park, Brazil. By using the chi-squared statistical test, we verified that the presence of forest cover is closely associated with altitude. The classes of APP in better conservation status are slopes in addition to hilltops and mountains, whereas APP streams and springs are among the areas most affected by human activities. The most deforested areas are located at altitudes below 1100.00 m and on slopes less than 45°. All orientations of the sides were significant for APP conservation status, with the southern, southeastern, and southwestern sides showing the lower degrees of impact. The methodology can be adjusted to environmental legislation to other countries. PMID:26476068

  18. Surgical strategies of fertility preservation in female cancers.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, M; Frydman, R

    2014-10-01

    Conservative and functional surgery is increasingly used in surgical oncology. Although radical surgery remains the gold standard for treatment of cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, conservative approaches have been developed, aiming at preserving the potential of fertility of young patients. These procedures are proposed to selected patients, depending on histological parameters and prognostic factors as well. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to weight the benefits and risks of fertility-sparing surgery. PMID:25245992

  19. Evolutionary preservation of redundant duplicated genes.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, D C; Nowak, M A

    1999-10-01

    Gene duplication events produce both perfect and imperfect copies of genes. Perfect copies are said to be functionally redundant when knockout of one gene produces no 'scoreable', phenotypic effects. Preserving identical, duplicate copies of genes is problematic as all copies are prone to accumulate neutral mutations as pseudogenes, or more rarely, evolve into new genes with novel functions. We summarise theoretical treatments for the invasion and subsequent evolutionary modification of functionally redundant genes. We then consider the preservation of functionally identical copies of a gene over evolutionary time. We present several models for conserving redundancy: asymmetric mutation, asymmetric efficacy, pleiotropy, developmental buffering, allelic competition and regulatory asymmetries. In all cases, some form of symmetry breaking is required to maintain functional redundancy indefinitely.

  20. Male adolescent fertility preservation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jared L; Choi, Andrew Wonho; Fitzgerald Keeter, Mary Kate; Brannigan, Robert E

    2016-02-01

    Until the 1960s, few adolescents and young adults (AYAs) survived their initial cancer diagnoses. Now, ∼12,400 AYA patients are diagnosed with cancer each year, and almost 80% will now achieve a long-term cure. This dramatic improvement in survival is primarily due to multimodal treatments and combined chemotherapeutic regimens. Unfortunately, the increase in survival is often accompanied by treatment-related toxicities due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgical procedures. Despite guidelines published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and numerous other professional organizations, high percentages of male AYA oncology patients are not properly counseled regarding their fertility preservation options before cancer treatment. Although administering fertility preservation care to adolescent males can be challenging in many ways, numerous studies show that this care can be delivered with high degrees of success and high levels of patient and parent satisfaction. The key to this success at many institutions has been the implementation of formalized integrated fertility preservation programs with infrastructure geared toward the delivery of comprehensive expedited care.

  1. A Hamiltonian preserving discontinuous Galerkin method for the generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailiang; Yi, Nianyu

    2016-09-01

    The invariant preserving property is one of the guiding principles for numerical algorithms in solving wave equations, in order to minimize phase and amplitude errors after long time simulation. In this paper, we design, analyze and numerically validate a Hamiltonian preserving discontinuous Galerkin method for solving the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. For the generalized KdV equation, the semi-discrete formulation is shown to preserve both the first and the third conserved integrals, and approximately preserve the second conserved integral; for the linearized KdV equation, all the first three conserved integrals are preserved, and optimal error estimates are obtained for polynomials of even degree. The preservation properties are also maintained by the fully discrete DG scheme. Our numerical experiments demonstrate both high accuracy of convergence and preservation of all three conserved integrals for the generalized KdV equation. We also show that the shape of the solution, after long time simulation, is well preserved due to the Hamiltonian preserving property.

  2. Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Amy A.

    This selection of class activities involves a sequence of 10 class sessions. The goal of the collection is to aid students in learning the concepts of energy conservation and to put this knowledge into practice. Attention is also given to the development of alternate energy sources. Each lesson includes an activity title, motivational hints,…

  3. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  4. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  5. Colorful Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  6. The Once and Future Book: The Preservation Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jay Ward

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of problem of paper deterioration in books highlights developments in paper industry, acidic and alkaline paper, demand for book paper by publishing industry, library material conservation, and preservation activities in three areas--deacidification (use of alkaline chemicals to neutralize acidic paper), microfilming, and…

  7. Why preserve and evaluate genetic resources in peanut?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanuts are produced in more than 100 countries with a total global total production in 2010 of 37,953,949 metric tons (FAO statistics, 2010). Because peanut is an important crop, it is imperative that its germplasm be preserved in order to conserve the genetic diversity and provide a resource to i...

  8. Preserving the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cynthia

    2014-03-01

    When future generations look back on the 20th century, few events will rival the harnessing of nuclear energy as a turning point in world history, science and society. Yet, the Department of Energy has not always embraced its Manhattan Project origins. The presentation will focus on the progress made over the last 20 years to preserve the properties and first-hand accounts that for decades have been threatened with demolition and indifference. Since the mid-1950s, most remaining Manhattan Project properties at the Los Alamos National Laboratory had been abandoned. Among them was a cluster of wooden buildings called the ``V Site.'' This is where scientists assembled the ``Gadget,'' the world's first atomic device tested on July 16, 1945. Regardless of its significance, the ``V Site'' buildings like all the rest were slated for demolition. The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) toured the properties in November 1998. Most could not believe that the world's first atomic bomb was designed in such humble structures. The properties were declared to be ``monumental in their lack of monumentality.'' A Save America's Treasures grant for 700,000 was awarded to restore the properties. To raise the required matching funds, I left the Federal government and soon founded the Atomic Heritage Foundation. The presentation will trace the progress made over the last decade to generate interest and support nationwide to preserve the Manhattan Project heritage. Saving both the physical properties and first-hand accounts of the men and women have been a priority. Perhaps our most significant achievement may be legislation now under consideration by Congress to create a Manhattan Project National Historical Park. Seventy years later, the Manhattan Project is finally getting the recognition it deserves.

  9. On preservation of symmetry in r-z staggered Lagrangian schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Váchal, Pavel; Wendroff, Burton

    2016-02-01

    In the focus of this work are symmetry preservation, conservation of energy and volume, and other important properties of staggered Lagrangian hydrodynamic schemes in cylindrical (r-z) geometry. It is well known that on quadrilateral cells in r-z, preservation of spherical symmetry, perfect satisfaction of the Geometrical Conservation Law (GCL), and total energy conservation are incompatible even on conforming grids. This paper suggests a novel staggered grid approach that preserves symmetry, conserves total energy by construction and tries to do its best by diminishing the GCL error to the order of entropy error. In particular, the forces from an existing volume consistent scheme are corrected so that spherical symmetry is preserved. The incorporation of subcell pressure mechanism to reduce spurious grid deformations is described and the relation of the new scheme to popular area-weighted and control volume approaches studied.

  10. Heron conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kushlan, J.A.; Hafner, H.

    2000-01-01

    Herons are large, popular and, in many cases, spectacular birds found in wetlands world-wide, both tropical and temperate, natural and man-made. Some populations are very small and localized, some have decreased, some have expanded their ranges, and a few are pests of human activities. In the fifteen years since the publication of the latest monographic treatment of the family, The Herons Handbook, there has been a tremendous increase in our knowledge of heron status and conservation requirements, set against a backdrop of increasing concern about the future of the world?s wetland habitats. This book provides a comprehensive update following two distinct threads. The status and conservation needs of herons are first presented on a regional basis, in a series of chapters set at a continental or subcontinental scale. Over 200 biologists and heron conservationists have contributed to the data summarized here, and the very latest census and survey results provide the most up-to-date and detailed picture of heron populations currently available. Chapters discussing several critical issues in heron conservation follow, tending to focus on the international nature of the problems.

  11. Preserving Perishables (Dormavac)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A new commercial product that can preserve perishable commodities for weeks without freezing, so that they can be shipped fresh without the cost of air freight, has been developed by Grumman Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York. The development benefited from the company's experience in developing the environmental control system for the Lunar Module, which delivered Apollo astronauts to the surface of the moon. Called Dormavac, the system provides a commodity-preserving environment within an aluminum container that can be transported by truck, rail or ship. Dormavac creates a cold-but above freezing-environment with high relative humidity and very low air pressure. The saturated air minimizes commodity weight loss and the air is automatically changed several times an hour to flush away odors and harmful gases released by the commodities. According to company literature, Dormavac significantly extends the transportation life of perishables. For example, pork has a normal cold storage life of about seven days, beef two weeks and tomatoes three weeks; with Dormavac, pork remains fresh for three weeks, beef more than six weeks and tomatoes seven weeks or more. Dormavac is manufactured and marketed by Grumman Allied Industries, Woodbury, New York. In developing the system, Grumman Allied drew upon the technological resources of another company subsidiary, Grumman Aerospace. Engineers who had earlier worked on Lunar Module environmental control brought their know-how and experience to the Dormavac development.

  12. Comparative genomics for biodiversity conservation.

    PubMed

    Grueber, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    Genomic approaches are gathering momentum in biology and emerging opportunities lie in the creative use of comparative molecular methods for revealing the processes that influence diversity of wildlife. However, few comparative genomic studies are performed with explicit and specific objectives to aid conservation of wild populations. Here I provide a brief overview of comparative genomic approaches that offer specific benefits to biodiversity conservation. Because conservation examples are few, I draw on research from other areas to demonstrate how comparing genomic data across taxa may be used to inform the characterisation of conservation units and studies of hybridisation, as well as studies that provide conservation outcomes from a better understanding of the drivers of divergence. A comparative approach can also provide valuable insight into the threatening processes that impact rare species, such as emerging diseases and their management in conservation. In addition to these opportunities, I note areas where additional research is warranted. Overall, comparing and contrasting the genomic composition of threatened and other species provide several useful tools for helping to preserve the molecular biodiversity of the global ecosystem.

  13. Comparative genomics for biodiversity conservation

    PubMed Central

    Grueber, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic approaches are gathering momentum in biology and emerging opportunities lie in the creative use of comparative molecular methods for revealing the processes that influence diversity of wildlife. However, few comparative genomic studies are performed with explicit and specific objectives to aid conservation of wild populations. Here I provide a brief overview of comparative genomic approaches that offer specific benefits to biodiversity conservation. Because conservation examples are few, I draw on research from other areas to demonstrate how comparing genomic data across taxa may be used to inform the characterisation of conservation units and studies of hybridisation, as well as studies that provide conservation outcomes from a better understanding of the drivers of divergence. A comparative approach can also provide valuable insight into the threatening processes that impact rare species, such as emerging diseases and their management in conservation. In addition to these opportunities, I note areas where additional research is warranted. Overall, comparing and contrasting the genomic composition of threatened and other species provide several useful tools for helping to preserve the molecular biodiversity of the global ecosystem. PMID:26106461

  14. Preserving reptiles for research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotte, Steve W.; Jacobs, Jeremy F.; Zug, George R.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    What are voucher specimens and why do we collect them? Voucher specimens are animals and/or their parts that are deposited in a research museum to document the occurrence of a taxon at a specific location in space and time (Pleijel et al., 2008; Reynolds and McDiarmid, 2012). For field biologists, vouchers are the repeatable element of a field study as they allow other biologists, now and in the future, to confirm the identity of species that were studied. The scientific importance of a voucher specimen or series of specimens is that other people are afforded the opportunity to examine the entire animal and confirm or correct identifications. A photographic record is somewhat useful for recording the occurrence of a species, but such records can be insufficient for reliable confirmation of specific identity. Even if a photo shows diagnostic characters of currently recognized taxa, it may not show characters that separate taxa that may be described in the future. Substantial cryptic biodiversity is being found in even relatively well-known herpetofaunas (Crawford et al., 2010), and specimens allow researchers to retroactively evaluate the true diversity in a study as understanding of taxonomy evolves. They enable biologists to study the systematic relationships of populations by quantifying variation in different traits. Specimens are also a source of biological data such as behaviour, ecology, epidemiology, and reproduction through examination of their anatomy, reproductive and digestive tracts, and parasites (Suarez and Tsutsui, 2004). Preserving reptiles as vouchers is not difficult, although doing it properly requires care, effort, and time. Poorly preserved vouchers can invalidate the results and conclusions of your study because of the inability to confirm the identity of your study animals. Good science requires repeatability of observations, and the absence of vouchers or poorly preserved ones prevents such confirmation. Due to space restrictions, we are

  15. Methods to preserve potentially toxigenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Lucas Costa; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Chalfoun, Sara Maria; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are a source of many high-value compounds which are useful to every living being, such as humans, plants and animals. Since the process of isolating and improving a microorganism can be lengthy and expensive, preserving the obtained characteristic is of paramount importance, so the process does not need to be repeated. Fungi are eukaryotic, achlorophyllous, heterotrophic organisms, usually filamentous, absorb their food, can be either macro or microscopic, propagate themselves by means of spores and store glycogen as a source of storage. Fungi, while infesting food, may produce toxic substances such as mycotoxins. The great genetic diversity of the Kingdom Fungi renders the preservation of fungal cultures for many years relevant. Several international reference mycological culture collections are maintained in many countries. The methodologies that are most fit for preserving microorganisms for extended periods are based on lowering the metabolism until it reaches a stage of artificial dormancy. The goal of this study was to analyze three methods for potentially toxigenic fungal conservation (Castellani's, continuous subculture and lyophilization) and to identify the best among them.

  16. Methods to preserve potentially toxigenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Lucas Costa; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Chalfoun, Sara Maria; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are a source of many high-value compounds which are useful to every living being, such as humans, plants and animals. Since the process of isolating and improving a microorganism can be lengthy and expensive, preserving the obtained characteristic is of paramount importance, so the process does not need to be repeated. Fungi are eukaryotic, achlorophyllous, heterotrophic organisms, usually filamentous, absorb their food, can be either macro or microscopic, propagate themselves by means of spores and store glycogen as a source of storage. Fungi, while infesting food, may produce toxic substances such as mycotoxins. The great genetic diversity of the Kingdom Fungi renders the preservation of fungal cultures for many years relevant. Several international reference mycological culture collections are maintained in many countries. The methodologies that are most fit for preserving microorganisms for extended periods are based on lowering the metabolism until it reaches a stage of artificial dormancy. The goal of this study was to analyze three methods for potentially toxigenic fungal conservation (Castellani’s, continuous subculture and lyophilization) and to identify the best among them. PMID:24948912

  17. Antarctic science preserve polluted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Geophysicists are alarmed at the electromagnetic pollution of a research site in the Antarctic specifically set aside to study the ionosphere and magnetosphere. A private New Zealand communications company called Telecom recently constructed a satellite ground station within the boundaries of this Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), protected since the mid-1970s. The placement of a commercial facility within this site sets an ominous precedent not only for the sanctity of other SSSIs, but also for Specially Protected Areas—preserves not even open to scientific research, such as certain penguin rookeries.The roughly rectangular, one-by-one-half mile site, located at Arrival Heights not far from McMurdo Station, is one of a number of areas protected under the Antarctic treaty for designated scientific activities. Many sites are set aside for geological or biological research, but this is the only one specifically for physical science.

  18. Energy Conservation Through Rational Architecture and Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, C. William

    1976-01-01

    Buildings can be designed in harmony with the natural environment, and new techniques of "active" solar design exist to collect and use solar energy for space heating and cooling. Preservation and reuse of existing buildings and neighborhoods are other ways to conserve energy. (Author/MLF)

  19. Energy Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, P.

    1995-06-01

    There are two fundamental reasons or motivations for energy conservation: (1) economics; and (2) consideration of energy - its sources and availability. Economics speaks for itself and needs little explanation: a project is undertaken, the cost is recovered in a given period of time (we hope) and our company realizes cost savings thereafter. We study and propose a project; we estimate the payback. If approved, we implement the project. Then, we eagerly watch for its effectiveness - for the proposed payback. The second consideration in regard to energy conservation might - in the foreseeable future - become by far the most important - that of availability. Very knowledgeable persons have stated that this - in reality - is the most serious problem facing our nation today. Readily available, reasonably priced energy has given to the US the high form of living experienced today. An interruption in this flow could catapult our nation in an awesome catastrophe. The energy shortage of the late 70`s might be a forerunner of such an experience.

  20. Conservative Remapper

    2006-03-31

    Conservative Remapper (CORE) is a C++ language software library for remapping cell masses and cell-averaged densities on unstructured two dimensional grids, maintaining conservation of total mass in the process. CORE contains implementation of two remapping algorithms: a new, efficient "swept region" algorithm, and a more traditional algorithm basedon the computation of cell intersections. Grids may be Cartesian or cylindrical, and cells may have three or more vertices, with no upper limit. CORE can run inmore » serial and in parallel, but in order to achieve wide applicability, CORE used no particular parallel communication library. Instead it achieves parallel communication through strategically placed, user defined callbacks. Users can also provide callbacks to redefine different parts or subcomponents of the remapping process. CORE allows the use of different data types, e.g. single-, double-, and quadruple- precision floating-point numbers, through the use of C++ templates. Using CORE is simple, and requires no configuration scripts or makefiles.« less

  1. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Management and Technology Division. Section: Conservation. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This document contains three papers on conservation which were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "The IFLA Conservation Section and the Core Programme for Preservation (PAC)," David W. G. Clements of the United Kingdom outlines the background of the Core Programme on Preservation and…

  2. Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions

    PubMed Central

    Lessmann, Janeth; Muñoz, Jesús; Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Ecuador has the largest number of species by area worldwide, but also a low representation of species within its protected areas. Here, we applied systematic conservation planning to identify potential areas for conservation in continental Ecuador, with the aim of increasing the representation of terrestrial species diversity in the protected area network. We selected 809 terrestrial species (amphibians, birds, mammals, and plants), for which distributions were estimated via species distribution models (SDMs), using Maxent. For each species we established conservation goals based on conservation priorities, and estimated new potential protected areas using Marxan conservation planning software. For each selected area, we determined their conservation priority and feasibility of establishment, two important aspects in the decision-making processes. We found that according to our conservation goals, the current protected area network contains large conservation gaps. Potential areas for conservation almost double the surface area of currently protected areas. Most of the newly proposed areas are located in the Coast, a region with large conservation gaps and irreversible changes in land use. The most feasible areas for conservation were found in the Amazon and Andes regions, which encompass more undisturbed habitats, and already harbor most of the current reserves. Our study allows defining a viable strategy for preserving Ecuador's biodiversity, by combining SDMs, GIS-based decision-support software, and priority and feasibility assessments of the selected areas. This approach is useful for complementing protected area networks in countries with great biodiversity, insufficient biological information, and limited resources for conservation. PMID:25360277

  3. Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions.

    PubMed

    Lessmann, Janeth; Muñoz, Jesús; Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2014-06-01

    Ecuador has the largest number of species by area worldwide, but also a low representation of species within its protected areas. Here, we applied systematic conservation planning to identify potential areas for conservation in continental Ecuador, with the aim of increasing the representation of terrestrial species diversity in the protected area network. We selected 809 terrestrial species (amphibians, birds, mammals, and plants), for which distributions were estimated via species distribution models (SDMs), using Maxent. For each species we established conservation goals based on conservation priorities, and estimated new potential protected areas using Marxan conservation planning software. For each selected area, we determined their conservation priority and feasibility of establishment, two important aspects in the decision-making processes. We found that according to our conservation goals, the current protected area network contains large conservation gaps. Potential areas for conservation almost double the surface area of currently protected areas. Most of the newly proposed areas are located in the Coast, a region with large conservation gaps and irreversible changes in land use. The most feasible areas for conservation were found in the Amazon and Andes regions, which encompass more undisturbed habitats, and already harbor most of the current reserves. Our study allows defining a viable strategy for preserving Ecuador's biodiversity, by combining SDMs, GIS-based decision-support software, and priority and feasibility assessments of the selected areas. This approach is useful for complementing protected area networks in countries with great biodiversity, insufficient biological information, and limited resources for conservation.

  4. Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions.

    PubMed

    Lessmann, Janeth; Muñoz, Jesús; Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2014-06-01

    Ecuador has the largest number of species by area worldwide, but also a low representation of species within its protected areas. Here, we applied systematic conservation planning to identify potential areas for conservation in continental Ecuador, with the aim of increasing the representation of terrestrial species diversity in the protected area network. We selected 809 terrestrial species (amphibians, birds, mammals, and plants), for which distributions were estimated via species distribution models (SDMs), using Maxent. For each species we established conservation goals based on conservation priorities, and estimated new potential protected areas using Marxan conservation planning software. For each selected area, we determined their conservation priority and feasibility of establishment, two important aspects in the decision-making processes. We found that according to our conservation goals, the current protected area network contains large conservation gaps. Potential areas for conservation almost double the surface area of currently protected areas. Most of the newly proposed areas are located in the Coast, a region with large conservation gaps and irreversible changes in land use. The most feasible areas for conservation were found in the Amazon and Andes regions, which encompass more undisturbed habitats, and already harbor most of the current reserves. Our study allows defining a viable strategy for preserving Ecuador's biodiversity, by combining SDMs, GIS-based decision-support software, and priority and feasibility assessments of the selected areas. This approach is useful for complementing protected area networks in countries with great biodiversity, insufficient biological information, and limited resources for conservation. PMID:25360277

  5. Accurate Monotonicity - Preserving Schemes With Runge-Kutta Time Stepping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Huynh, H. T.

    1997-01-01

    A new class of high-order monotonicity-preserving schemes for the numerical solution of conservation laws is presented. The interface value in these schemes is obtained by limiting a higher-order polynominal reconstruction. The limiting is designed to preserve accuracy near extrema and to work well with Runge-Kutta time stepping. Computational efficiency is enhanced by a simple test that determines whether the limiting procedure is needed. For linear advection in one dimension, these schemes are shown as well as the Euler equations also confirm their high accuracy, good shock resolution, and computational efficiency.

  6. Entanglement preservation by continuous distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Mundarain, D.; Orszag, M.

    2009-05-15

    We study the two-qubit entanglement preservation for a system in the presence of independent thermal baths. We use a combination of filtering operations and distillation protocols as a series of frequent measurements on the system. It is shown that a small fraction of the total amount of available copies of the system preserves or even improves its initial entanglement during the evolution.

  7. User Experience and Heritage Preservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orfield, Steven J.; Chapman, J. Wesley; Davis, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    In considering the heritage preservation of higher education campus buildings, much of the attention gravitates toward issues of selection, cost, accuracy, and value, but the model for most preservation projects does not have a clear method of achieving the best solutions for meeting these targets. Instead, it simply relies on the design team and…

  8. Collections Security: The Preservation Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patkus, Beth L.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the basic elements of library security and preservation programs as a background for an exploration of security/preservation issues, problems, and policies. Discusses environmental control, disaster preparedness, fire protection, storage and handling, and controlling access to collections. (AEF)

  9. The Preservation of Digital Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Michele Valerie; Sanett, Shelby

    2005-01-01

    The authors are conducting a three-part study to evaluate current trends in the preservation of digital content, with an emphasis on electronic records. The study emanated from the authors' work on the Preservation Task Force of the International Research on Permanent Authentic Records in Electronic Systems (InterPARES) project. This article…

  10. Preservation Methods for Digital Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajendran, L.; Venkatesan, M.; Kanthimathi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Going digital is the way to minimize handling of damaged materials, but the imaging process is demanding and must be done with oversight by preservation staff and with a high enough level of quality to ensure the reusability of the archival electronic file for as long as possible. This paper focuses on the scope and needs of digital preservation,…

  11. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of preserving a liquid biological sample, comprising the step of: contacting said liquid biological sample with a preservative comprising, sodium benzoate in an amount of at least about 0.15% of the sample (weight/volume) and citric acid in an amount of at least about 0.025% of the sample (weight/volume).

  12. Preserving Dignity in Later Life.

    PubMed

    São José, José Manuel

    2016-09-01

    This article examines how elders who receive social care in the community experience loss of dignity and how they preserve their dignity. Qualitative research revealed that loss of dignity is a major concern for these elders and that they preserve their dignity differently, ranging from actively engaging with life to detaching themselves from life. We conclude that, in later life, preserving dignity while receiving social care differs from preserving dignity in the context of health care, especially health care provided in institutional settings. Furthermore, preserving dignity in later life, while receiving social care, is a complex process, depending not only on performing activities and individual action and responsibility, but also on other actions, some of them involving a certain inactivity/passivity, and interactions with others, especially caregivers. This article offers some insights to developing better policies and care practices for promoting dignity in the context of community-based social care.

  13. Contact dermatitis caused by preservatives.

    PubMed

    Yim, Elizabeth; Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Preservatives are biocidal chemicals added to food, cosmetics, and industrial products to prevent the growth of microorganisms. They are usually nontoxic and inexpensive and have a long shelf life. Unfortunately, they commonly cause contact dermatitis. This article reviews the most important classes of preservatives physicians are most likely to encounter in their daily practice, specifically isothiazolinones, formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, methyldibromoglutaronitrile, and parabens. For each preservative mentioned, the prevalence of sensitization, clinical presentation of contact dermatitis, patch testing concentrations, cross reactions, and related legislation will be discussed. Mandatory labeling of preservatives is required in some countries, but not required in others. Until policies are made, physicians and patients must be proactive in identifying potential sensitizers and removing their use. We hope that this article will serve as a guide for policy makers in creating legislation and future regulations on the use and concentration of certain preservatives in cosmetics and industrial products.

  14. Preserving Dignity in Later Life.

    PubMed

    São José, José Manuel

    2016-09-01

    This article examines how elders who receive social care in the community experience loss of dignity and how they preserve their dignity. Qualitative research revealed that loss of dignity is a major concern for these elders and that they preserve their dignity differently, ranging from actively engaging with life to detaching themselves from life. We conclude that, in later life, preserving dignity while receiving social care differs from preserving dignity in the context of health care, especially health care provided in institutional settings. Furthermore, preserving dignity in later life, while receiving social care, is a complex process, depending not only on performing activities and individual action and responsibility, but also on other actions, some of them involving a certain inactivity/passivity, and interactions with others, especially caregivers. This article offers some insights to developing better policies and care practices for promoting dignity in the context of community-based social care. PMID:27456751

  15. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvén wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  16. Signatures of the non-Maxwellian κ-distributions in optically thin line spectra. I. Theory and synthetic Fe IX-XIII spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, J.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Dzifčáková, E.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the possibility of diagnosing the degree of departure from the Maxwellian distribution using single-ion spectra originating in astrophysical plasmas in collisional ionization equilibrium. Methods: New atomic data for excitation of Fe ix - Fe xiii are integrated under the assumption of a κ-distribution of electron energies. Diagnostic methods using lines of a single ion formed at any wavelength are explored. Such methods minimize uncertainties from the ionization and recombination rates, as well as the possible presence of non-equilibrium ionization. Approximations to the collision strengths are also investigated. Results: The calculated intensities of most of the Fe ix - Fe xiii EUV lines show consistent behaviour with κ at constant temperature. Intensities of these lines decrease with κ, with the vast majority of ratios of strong lines showing little or no sensitivity to κ. Several of the line ratios, especially involving temperature-sensitive lines, show a sensitivity to κ that is of the order of several tens of per cent, or, in the case of Fe ix, up to a factor of two. Forbidden lines in the near-ultraviolet, visible, or infrared parts of the spectrum are an exception, with smaller intensity changes or even a reverse behaviour with κ. The most conspicuous example is the Fe x 6378.26 Å red line, whose intensity incerases with κ. This line is a potentially strong indicator of departures from the Maxwellian distribution. We find that it is possible to perform density diagnostics independently of κ, with many Fe xi, Fe xii, and Fe xiii line ratios showing strong density-sensitivity and negligible sensitivity to κ and temperature. We also tested different averaging of the collision strengths. It is found that averaging over 0.01 interval in log(E [ Ryd ]) is sufficient to produce accurate distribution-averaged collision strengths Υ(T,κ) at temperatures of the ion formation in ionization equilibrium. Appendices are available in

  17. Targeting a portion of central European spider diversity for permanent preservation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Given the limited success of past and current conservation efforts, an alternative approach is to preserve tissues and genomes of targeted organisms in cryobanks to make them accessible for future generations. Our pilot preservation project aimed to obtain, expertly identify, and permanently preserve a quarter of the known spider species diversity shared between Slovenia and Switzerland, estimated at 275 species. We here report on the faunistic part of this project, which resulted in 324 species (227 in Slovenia, 143 in Switzerland) for which identification was reasonably established. This material is now preserved in cryobanks, is being processed for DNA barcoding, and is available for genomic studies. PMID:24723774

  18. [Conservative treatment of ectopic pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Odland, J O; Maltau, J M; Tollan, A

    1991-01-30

    During the last decades the incidence of ectopic pregnancy has been steadily rising. The chosen therapy has usually been unilateral salpingectomy. Recently, different conservative (tube-preserving) treatment-modalities have been introduced in clinical practice. We have tried conservative treatment by local injection of prostaglandin F2a (total dose 2-4 mg) directly into the tubal pregnancy and, if feasible, also into the corpus luteum graviditate. The treatment was successful in 13 out of 16 patients. In one patient laparotomia was performed because of pain, and revealed a haematoma in fossa Douglasi. Reinjection of prostaglandin was necessary in one patient because of rising HCG titres. One patient was hospitalized for four days because of nausea and pain. The treatment was otherwise successful. The method may be useful as a non-surgical alternative in haemodynamically stable patients without tubal rupture. Further studies are needed to evaluate the outcome in terms of future fertility.

  19. Conservative treatment modalities in retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Bhavna; Jain, Amit; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on various conservative treatment modalities available for the treatment of retinoblastoma and their effectiveness, when used alone or in combination. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library were searched through 2012 for published peer reviewed data on conservative treatment modalities for retinoblastoma. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumors, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermotherapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results. It is important to recognize that today, several treatment options are available that can obviate the need for enucleation, and cure the cancer with preservation of functional vision. A thorough knowledge and understanding of these conservative treatment modalities is essential for appropriate management. PMID:24104705

  20. Intergenerational equity and conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R. P.; Walton, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The issue of integenerational equity in the use of natural resources is discussed in the context of coal mining conversion. An attempt to determine if there is a clear-cut benefit to future generations in setting minimum coal extraction efficiency standards in mining is made. It is demonstrated that preserving fossil fuels beyond the economically efficient level is not necessarily beneficial to future generations even in terms of their own preferences. Setting fossil fuel conservation targets for intermediate products (i.e. energy) may increase the quantities of fossil fuels available to future generations and hence lower the costs, but there may be serious disadvantages to future generations as well. The use of relatively inexpensive fossil fuels in this generation may result in more infrastructure development and more knowledge production available to future generations. The value of fossil fuels versus these other endowments in the future depends on many factors which cannot possibly be evaluated at present. Since there is no idea of whether future generations are being helped or harmed, it is recommended that integenerational equity not be used as a factor in setting coal mine extraction efficiency standards, or in establishing requirements.

  1. NONCONVEX REGULARIZATION FOR SHAPE PRESERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARTRAND, RICK

    2007-01-16

    The authors show that using a nonconvex penalty term to regularize image reconstruction can substantially improve the preservation of object shapes. The commonly-used total-variation regularization, {integral}|{del}u|, penalizes the length of the object edges. They show that {integral}|{del}u|{sup p}, 0 < p < 1, only penalizes edges of dimension at least 2-p, and thus finite-length edges not at all. We give numerical examples showing the resulting improvement in shape preservation.

  2. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention related to the preservation of a liquid biological sample. The biological sample is exposed to a preservative containing at least about 0.15 g of sodium benzoate and at least about 0.025 g of citric acid per 100 ml of sample. The biological sample may be collected in a vessel or an absorbent mass. The biological sample may also be exposed to a substrate and/or a vehicle.

  3. Symmetries in Connection Preserving Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Christopher M.

    2011-05-01

    We wish to show that the root lattice of Bäcklund transformations of the q-analogue of the third and fourth Painlevé equations, which is of type (A2+A1)(1), may be expressed as a quotient of the lattice of connection preserving deformations. Furthermore, we will show various directions in the lattice of connection preserving deformations present equivalent evolution equations under suitable transformations. These transformations correspond to the Dynkin diagram automorphisms.

  4. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation.

    PubMed

    Nyanga, Loveness K; Nout, Martinus J R; Smid, Eddy J; Boekhout, Teun; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts during 6 months storage at 4 and 25 °C. None of the yeast cultures showed a significant loss in viable cell count during 6 months of storage at 4 °C upon lyophilisation and preservation in dry rice cakes. During storage at 25 °C in the dark, yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes, and lyophilised cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Issatchenkia orientalis showed no significant loss of viable cells up to 4 months of storage. Yeast cultures preserved in dry plant fibre strands had the greatest loss of viable count during the 6 months of storage at 25 °C. Preservation of yeasts cultures in dry rice cakes provided better survival during storage at 4 °C than lyophilisation. The current study demonstrated that traditional methods can be useful and effective for starter culture preservation in small-scale, low-tech applications.

  5. Preservation Programs of the New York Public Library. Part Two: From the 1930's to the '60s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The New York Public Library's preservation and conservation activities during the last three decades that are discussed include environmental control systems, collection use, binding, deacidification, microphotography, and cooperative microfilming. A list of 32 references is included. (CHC)

  6. New Reasons to Preserve the Amazon Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Historically, preservation of the rainforest was justified in terms of conservation of biodiversity, protection of indigenous people habitats and maintenance of carbon stocks. Most of these arguments are based on the direct effect of rainforest removal, and ignore second order effects of the presence of the rainforest, such as modulation of regional climate patterns. The rainforest helps define the regional climate of the region, in particular the regional temperature and precipitation patterns. Of course, any activity that depends on the local climate may be affected by changes in the rainforest. Recent evidence in the literature presented enough arguments to believe that the widespread removal of the rainforest will have economic consequences at least in agriculture output and hydroelectric power generation. Economic impacts may affect not only the agriculture and energy sectors, but also several other economic activities that are related to climate. As a country, we are counting with the climate of Amazonia as fixed, but if the present climate needs the presence of the rainforest, we need to quantify the economic value of the climate regulation service provided by the rainforest. Important questions to be answered: How much of the rainforest is needed to conserve the present climate? Where it should stand for best climate regulation? Answer to these questions may affect Brazil´s large-scale policy on land use.

  7. Advanced image analysis for the preservation of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Fenella G.; Christens-Barry, William; Toth, Michael B.; Boydston, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The Library of Congress' Preservation Research and Testing Division has established an advanced preservation studies scientific program for research and analysis of the diverse range of cultural heritage objects in its collection. Using this system, the Library is currently developing specialized integrated research methodologies for extending preservation analytical capacities through non-destructive hyperspectral imaging of cultural objects. The research program has revealed key information to support preservation specialists, scholars and other institutions. The approach requires close and ongoing collaboration between a range of scientific and cultural heritage personnel - imaging and preservation scientists, art historians, curators, conservators and technology analysts. A research project of the Pierre L'Enfant Plan of Washington DC, 1791 had been undertaken to implement and advance the image analysis capabilities of the imaging system. Innovative imaging options and analysis techniques allow greater processing and analysis capacities to establish the imaging technique as the first initial non-invasive analysis and documentation step in all cultural heritage analyses. Mapping spectral responses, organic and inorganic data, topography semi-microscopic imaging, and creating full spectrum images have greatly extended this capacity from a simple image capture technique. Linking hyperspectral data with other non-destructive analyses has further enhanced the research potential of this image analysis technique.

  8. Fertility preservation in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Michaël; Bidet, Maud; Benard, Julie; Poulain, Marine; Sonigo, Charlotte; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Polak, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency is a relatively rare condition that can appear early in life. In a non-negligible number of cases the ovarian dysfunction results from genetic diseases. Turner syndrome (TS), the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, is associated with an inevitable premature exhaustion of the follicular stockpile. The possible or probable infertility is a major concern for TS patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The severely reduced follicle pool even during prepubertal life represents the major limit for fertility preservation and is the root of numerous questions regarding the competence of gametes or ovarian tissue crybanked. In addition, patients suffering from TS show higher than usual rates of spontaneous abortion, fetal anomaly, and maternal morbidity and mortality, which should be considered at the time of fertility preservation and before reutilization of the cryopreserved gametes. Apart from fulfillment of the desire of becoming genetic parents, TS patients may be potential candidates for egg donation, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The present review discusses the different options for preserving female fertility in TS and the ethical questions raised by these approaches.

  9. Fertility preservation in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Michaël; Bidet, Maud; Benard, Julie; Poulain, Marine; Sonigo, Charlotte; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Polak, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency is a relatively rare condition that can appear early in life. In a non-negligible number of cases the ovarian dysfunction results from genetic diseases. Turner syndrome (TS), the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, is associated with an inevitable premature exhaustion of the follicular stockpile. The possible or probable infertility is a major concern for TS patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The severely reduced follicle pool even during prepubertal life represents the major limit for fertility preservation and is the root of numerous questions regarding the competence of gametes or ovarian tissue crybanked. In addition, patients suffering from TS show higher than usual rates of spontaneous abortion, fetal anomaly, and maternal morbidity and mortality, which should be considered at the time of fertility preservation and before reutilization of the cryopreserved gametes. Apart from fulfillment of the desire of becoming genetic parents, TS patients may be potential candidates for egg donation, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The present review discusses the different options for preserving female fertility in TS and the ethical questions raised by these approaches. PMID:26677790

  10. Conservation of diversity in forest trees

    SciTech Connect

    Ledig, F.T.

    1988-07-01

    This article discusses the threat to forest from population growth and concomitant poverty. Deforestation, pollution, and climatic change threaten forest diversity; and because forests are the habitats for diverse organisms, the threat extends to all flora and fauna associated with forests. Three different objectives included under the rubric of gene conservation are discussed: protection, particularly of domesticated plants, from genetic vulnerability; protection of endangered species; and preservation of genes for future use.

  11. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  12. New alternatives to cosmetics preservation.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, S; Varvaresou, A; Tsirivas, E; Demetzos, C

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there is a considerable interest in the development of preservative-free or self-preserving cosmetics. The aim of our work was to develop new cosmetic formulations by replacing chemical preservatives with ingredients with antimicrobial properties that are not legislated as preservatives according to Annex VI of Commission Directive 76/768/EEC. This paper describes the preservative efficacy of the well-known antimicrobial extracts of Lonicera caprifoleum and Lonicera japonica in combination with glyceryl caprylate and/or levulinic acid, p-anisic acid, and ethanol. We prepared a series of acidic (pH = 5.5) aqueous and O/W formulations, i.e., tonic lotion, shampoo, shower gel, conditioning cream, anticellulite cream, cleansing milk and peeling cream, containing (0.2% w/w) Lonicera extracts, alone in the case of tonic lotion and in combination with (1% w/w) glyceryl caprylate in the other products, and we performed challenge tests according to the European Pharmacopoeia procedures and criteria. Formulations such as shampoo, shower gel, and conditioning cream fulfilled criterion A, while tonic lotion, anticellulite cream, cleansing milk, and peeling cream fulfilled criterion B, in regard to contamination from A. niger. Furthermore, we evaluated the efficacy of the antimicrobial systems in two states of use: the intact product and after three weeks of consumer use. The results showed that A. niger was also detected during use by consumers in the products that satisfied only criterion B in challenge tests. The addition of antimicrobial fragrance ingredients such (< or = 0.3% w/w) levulinic acid or (0.1% w/w) p-anisic acid and/or (5% w/w) ethanol afforded products that met criterion A in challenge tests and were also microbiologically safe during use. The small quantity (5% w/w) of ethanol gave an important assistance in order to boost the self-preserving system and to produce stable and safe products.

  13. Preservation at Stony Brook. Preservation Planning Program. Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Donald C.; And Others

    This final report is a product of a Preservation Planning Program (PPP) self-study conducted by the State University of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, working with the Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) Office of Management Studies (OMS). The PPP is designed to put self-help tools into the hands of library staff responsible for developing…

  14. Cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Schreuders, P.D.; Cole, K.W.; Hall, J.W. ); Mahowald, A.P. )

    1992-12-18

    The inability to cryobiologically preserve the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has required that fly stocks be maintained by frequent transfer of adults. This method is costly in terms of time and can lead to loss of stocks. Traditional slow freezing methods do not succeed because the embryos are highly sensitive to chilling. With the procedures described here, 68 percent of precisely staged 15-hour Oregon R (wild-type) embryos hatch after vitrification at -205[degree]C, and 40 percent of the resulting larvae develop into normal adult flies. These embryos are among the most complex organisms successfully preserved by cryobiology.

  15. Portfolio conservation of metapopulations under climate change.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sean C; Moore, Jonathan W; McClure, Michelle M; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Cooper, Andrew B

    2015-03-01

    Climate change is likely to lead to increasing population variability and extinction risk. Theoretically, greater population diversity should buffer against rising climate variability, and this theory is often invoked as a reason for greater conservation. However, this has rarely been quantified. Here we show how a portfolio approach to managing population diversity can inform metapopulation conservation priorities in a changing world. We develop a salmon metapopulation model in which productivity is driven by spatially distributed thermal tolerance and patterns of short- and long-term climate change. We then implement spatial conservation scenarios that control population carrying capacities and evaluate the metapopulation portfolios as a financial manager might: along axes of conservation risk and return. We show that preserving a diversity of thermal tolerances minimizes risk, given environmental stochasticity, and ensures persistence, given long-term environmental change. When the thermal tolerances of populations are unknown, doubling the number of populations conserved may nearly halve expected metapopulation variability. However, this reduction in variability can come at the expense of long-term persistence if climate change increasingly restricts available habitat, forcing ecological managers to balance society's desire for short-term stability and long-term viability. Our findings suggest the importance of conserving the processes that promote thermal-tolerance diversity, such as genetic diversity, habitat heterogeneity, and natural disturbance regimes, and demonstrate that diverse natural portfolios may be critical for metapopulation conservation in the face of increasing climate variability and change.

  16. Conservation Biology and real-world conservation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John G

    2006-06-01

    In the 20 years since Conservation Biology was launched with the aim of disseminating scientific knowledge to help conserve biodiversity and the natural world, our discipline has hugely influenced the practice of conservation. But we have had less impact outside the profession itself and we have not transformed that practice into an enterprise large enough to achieve our conservation goals. As we look to the next 20 years, we need to become more relevant and important to the societies in which we live. To do so, the discipline of conservation biology must generate answers even when full scientific knowledge is lacking, structure scientific research around polices and debates that influence what we value as conservationists, go beyond the certitude of the biological sciences into the more contextual debates of the social sciences, engage scientifically with human-dominated landscapes, and address the question of how conservation can contribute to the improvement of human livelihoods and the quality of human life.

  17. Multidimensional discretization of conservation laws for unstructured polyhedral grids

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.

    1994-08-22

    To the extent possible, a discretized system should satisfy the same conservation laws as the physical system. The author considers the conservation properties of a staggered-grid Lagrange formulation of the hydrodynamics equations (SGH) which is an extension of a ID scheme due to von Neumann and Richtmyer (VNR). The term staggered refers to spatial centering in which position, velocity, and kinetic energy are centered at nodes, while density, pressure, and internal energy are at cell centers. Traditional SGH formulations consider mass, volume, and momentum conservation, but tend to ignore conservation of total energy, conservation of angular momentum, and requirements for thermodynamic reversibility. The author shows that, once the mass and momentum discretizations have been specified, discretization for other quantities are dictated by the conservation laws and cannot be independently defined. The spatial discretization method employs a finite volume procedure that replaces differential operators with surface integrals. The method is appropriate for multidimensional formulations (1D, 2D, 3D) on unstructured grids formed from polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) cells. Conservation equations can then be expressed in conservation form in which conserved currents are exchanged between control volumes. In addition to the surface integrals, the conservation equations include source terms derived from physical sources or geometrical considerations. In Cartesian geometry, mass and momentum are conserved identically. Discussion of volume conservation will be temporarily deferred. The author shows that the momentum equation leads to a form-preserving definition for kinetic energy and to an exactly conservative evolution equation for internal energy. Similarly, the author derives a form-preserving definition and corresponding conservation equation for a zone-centered angular momentum.

  18. Breast cancer and fertility preservation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. Samuel; Klemp, Jennifer; Fabian, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy given to women with breast cancer of reproductive age, its effects on fertility, and options for fertility preservation. Design Publications relevant to fertility preservation and breast cancer were identified through a PubMed database search. Conclusion(s) Most women who develop invasive breast cancer under age 40 will be advised to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy with or without extended antihormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy particularly with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide is gonadotoxic and markedly accelerates the rate of age-related ovarian follicle loss. Although loss of fertility is an important issue for young cancer survivors, there is often little discussion about fertility preservation before initiation of adjuvant therapy. Greater familiarity with prognosis and effects of different types of adjuvant therapy on the part of infertility specialists and fertility preservation options such cryopreservation of embryos, oocytes, and ovarian tissue on the part of oncologists would facilitate these discussions. Establishment of rapid fertility consultation links within cancer survivorship programs can help ensure that every young woman who is likely to undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment is counseled about the effects of therapy and options available to her to increase the likelihood of childbearing after cancer treatment. PMID:21272867

  19. Preservation and Archives in Vietnam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henchy, Judith

    This report, based on visits to Vietnamese libraries and archives between 1987 and 1997, examines the largely unexplored corpus of Vietnamese textual resources in research institutions and libraries there and elsewhere, the associated problems of bibliographic control, and issues of preservation. The following topics are addressed: the history of…

  20. Low-level efficacy of cosmetic preservatives.

    PubMed

    Lundov, M D; Johansen, J D; Zachariae, C; Moesby, L

    2011-04-01

    Preservation using combinations of preservatives has several advantages. This study shows that the concentration of some of the most frequently used allergenic preservatives can be markedly lowered when they are combined with phenoxyethanol. The antimicrobial efficacy of cosmetic preservatives and known allergens of various potency [diazolidinyl urea, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI), methylisothiazolinone (MI) and phenoxyethanol] was tested alone and in various combinations of two or three preservatives together. The preservatives were tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and possible synergy using fractional inhibitory concentration. MCI/MI was the only preservative showing low-level MIC against all four tested microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. Different combinations of the preservatives indicated additive effects against the microorganisms. No combination of preservatives showed any inhibitory action on each other. Challenge tests with different concentrations and combinations were performed in a cosmetic cream. Diazolidinyl urea and MCI/MI alone were ineffective against C. albicans in a challenge test at concentrations up to 16 times higher than the observed MIC values. When combining phenoxyethanol with either one of the allergenic preservatives diazolidinyl urea, MCI/MI or MI, the cosmetic cream was adequately preserved at concentrations well below the preservatives' MIC values as well as 10-20 times below the maximum permitted concentrations. By using combinations of preservatives, effective preservation can be achieved with lower concentrations of allergenic preservatives.

  1. Thermodynamic investigation of the interaction between cyclodextrins and preservatives - Application and verification in a mathematical model to determine the needed preservative surplus in aqueous cyclodextrin formulations.

    PubMed

    Holm, René; Olesen, Niels Erik; Alexandersen, Signe Dalgaard; Dahlgaard, Birgitte N; Westh, Peter; Mu, Huiling

    2016-05-25

    Preservatives are inactivated when added to conserve aqueous cyclodextrin (CD) formulations due to complex formation between CDs and the preservative. To maintain the desired conservation effect the preservative needs to be added in apparent surplus to account for this inactivation. The purpose of the present work was to establish a mathematical model, which defines this surplus based upon knowledge of stability constants and the minimal concentration of preservation to inhibit bacterial growth. The stability constants of benzoic acid, methyl- and propyl-paraben with different frequently used βCDs were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Based upon this knowledge mathematical models were constructed to account for the equilibrium systems and to calculate the required concentration of the preservations, which was evaluated experimentally based upon the USP/Ph. Eur./JP monograph. The mathematical calculations were able to predict the needed concentration of preservation in the presence of CDs; it clearly demonstrated the usefulness of including all underlying chemical equilibria in a mathematical model, such that the formulation design can be based on quantitative arguments.

  2. Fertility preservation in women with borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Giorgia; Somigliana, Edgardo; Giorgione, Veronica; Martinelli, Fabio; Filippi, Francesca; Petrella, Maria Cristina; Candiani, Massimo; Peccatori, Fedro

    2016-09-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) may occur in young women and have an excellent survival rate. Therefore, there is the obligation to put emphasis on fertility preservation in affected women. On the other hand, it has also been underlined that the disease should be managed with caution because these tumours can relapse and, albeit rare, malignant transformation can also occur. Unfortunately, evidence on fertility preservation in women with BOT is scanty. In this opinion paper, we tried to draw some clinical indications based on the few available studies on the clinical management of BOT and their possible relation with controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation (COH). We ultimately came to the following conclusions: (1) Fertility counselling should become an integral part of the clinical management of women with BOT. Conservative management without pre-surgical counselling may expose women without reasonable chances of future conceptions to undue risks. (2) Despite some epidemiological concerns on the possible relation between COH and BOT, the conservative surgical treatment should be associated to oocyte cryopreservation considering the high risk of recurrence of the disease. (3) Letrozole during COH should be considered to temper the theoretical risk of increased recurrences. (4) Pregnancy should not be delayed in women at low-moderate risk of recurrences. Fertility preservation may be avoided in these women provided that they start active pregnancy seeking early. (5) Albeit experimental, oocytes retrieval from affected ovaries removed at the time of surgery can be considered. Conversely, ovarian cortex cryopreservation is not justified given the possible risks of malignant reseeding.

  3. Hybrid Food Preservation Program Improves Food Preservation and Food Safety Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    The growing trend in home food preservation raises concerns about whether the resulting food products will be safe to eat. The increased public demand for food preservation information led to the development of the comprehensive food preservation program, Preserve the Taste of Summer (PTTS). PTTS is a comprehensive hybrid food preservation program…

  4. A systematic review of current and emerging approaches in the field of larynx preservation.

    PubMed

    Denaro, Nerina; Russi, Elvio Grazioso; Lefebvre, Jean Louis; Merlano, Marco Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options targeting laryngeal preservation include conservative surgery, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy, induction chemotherapy (IC) followed by radiotherapy (RT), and alternating chemo-radiation. The goal of this paper was to perform a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on current and emerging approaches in the field of larynx preservation. The search identified 36 papers of which 27 did not fall within the inclusion criteria (i.e. non-RCTs). IC followed by RT has been shown to allow laryngeal preservation in about two-thirds of pts with locally advanced laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer without compromising survival. IC is regarded as the landmark treatment of non-surgical larynx preservation approaches. Concomitant and alternating chemoradiotherapy treatments are also acceptable in larynx preservation.

  5. Conservation Education Today & Tomorrow: Resource Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Conservation, Springfield.

    This kit was developed by the Illinois Department of Conservation's Education Program with assistance from the State Board of Education, as a teaching tool which can be used to promote conservation awareness of young people. It is designed to enable educators to help students in grades 7-10 learn about Illinois' renewable natural resources through…

  6. High-order accurate physical-constraints-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for special relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kailiang; Tang, Huazhong

    2015-10-01

    The paper develops high-order accurate physical-constraints-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for special relativistic hydrodynamical (RHD) equations, built on the local Lax-Friedrichs splitting, the WENO reconstruction, the physical-constraints-preserving flux limiter, and the high-order strong stability preserving time discretization. They are extensions of the positivity-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for the non-relativistic Euler equations [20]. However, developing physical-constraints-preserving methods for the RHD system becomes much more difficult than the non-relativistic case because of the strongly coupling between the RHD equations, no explicit formulas of the primitive variables and the flux vectors with respect to the conservative vector, and one more physical constraint for the fluid velocity in addition to the positivity of the rest-mass density and the pressure. The key is to prove the convexity and other properties of the admissible state set and discover a concave function with respect to the conservative vector instead of the pressure which is an important ingredient to enforce the positivity-preserving property for the non-relativistic case. Several one- and two-dimensional numerical examples are used to demonstrate accuracy, robustness, and effectiveness of the proposed physical-constraints-preserving schemes in solving RHD problems with large Lorentz factor, or strong discontinuities, or low rest-mass density or pressure etc.

  7. The Importance of Research and Practice of Historical Photographic Processes in Photograph Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Mark

    It is essential in photograph conservation to have an understanding of the processes used to make photographic materials for the proper identification, treatment, preservation and display of photographic images.

  8. Preservation of adobe buildings. Study of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velosa, A.; Rocha, F.; Costa, C.; Varum, H.

    2012-04-01

    Adobe buildings are common in the central region of Portugal due to the lack of natural stone in the surrounding area. This type of construction technique lasted until the 20th Century, at which time cementitious materials, with faster hardening and greater structural capacity substituted traditional materials and techniques. Currently, a significant percentage of these buildings is vacant and many are degraded and in need of conservation actions. Adobes from central Portugal are distinctive as they are lightly coloured and made from air lime and quarry sand. Although some adobes were manufactured locally, most were produced almost 'industrially' and sold to nearby regions. In order to preserve this heritage, conservation actions must be undertaken. So as to ensure the adequacy of these actions and compatibility between original materials and new ones, a thorough study of adobe compostion is mandatory. The current study is an initial step in the characterization of earth based construction materials from central Portugal. Adobe samples were collected from residential buildings in two different locations. The determination of the composition of adobe blocks encompassed the determination of the binder fraction and of their chemical composition and also the particle size analysis of the aggregate. For this purpose FRX analysis, acid dissolution and dry sieving were performed. Methylene blue test was also executed in order to determine the clay fraction. Additionally, the mineral composition of powder samples and oriented samples was performed using XRD analysis in order to determine the clay minerals present in the blocks. As adobe blocks are extremely prone to the action of water the Geelong test was undertaken in order to provide information in terms of durability. It was concluded that air lime was generally used in adobe compositions. However, the clay content varies in adobes from different regions, providing distinct durability characteristics to these materials.

  9. Macroeconomic policy, growth, and biodiversity conservation.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Philip

    2008-12-01

    To successfully achieve biodiversity conservation, the amount of ecosystem structure available for economic production must be determined by, and subject to, conservation needs. As such, the scale of economic systems must remain within the limits imposed by the need to preserve critical ecosystems and the regenerative and waste assimilative capacities of the ecosphere. These limits are determined by biophysical criteria, yet macroeconomics involves the use of economic instruments designed to meet economic criteria that have no capacity to achieve biophysically based targets. Macroeconomic policy cannot, therefore, directly solve the biodiversity erosion crisis. Nevertheless, good macroeconomic policy is still important given that bad macroeconomy policy is likely to reduce human well-being and increase the likelihood of social upheaval that could undermine conservation efforts.

  10. Natural and Cultural Preservation - Complementary Endeavors through Soil Archive Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Oren; Frumin, Suembikya; Kolska Horwitz, Liora; Maeir, Aren M.; Weiss, Ehud; Zhevelev, Helena M.

    2016-04-01

    Soil is an excellent archive for the history of landscape components such as ancient topography, erosion and accumulation processes, and vegetation characterization. In special cases, the soil archive even preserves botanical faunal and mollusc assemblages, allowing for the production of an archive of organic species as well. Long-term human activities in the past have left their imprints on certain landscape systems, leading to the formation of landscapes composed of both cultural and natural assets. The aim of this presentation is to suggest a conceptual model, based on the soil archive, which enables the preservation and sustainability of such environments. The proposed area (eastern Mediterranean) underwent cycles of ancient site establishment and abandonment. When areas were occupied, the natural vegetation around settlements experienced human interventions such as woodcutting, grazing and horticulture. During site abandonment, these interventions ceased, resulting in vegetation regeneration, a reduction in biodiversity, increased fire hazard, etc. This ultimately led to the deterioration of the landscape system as well as the destruction of cultural assets such as ancient buildings and/or remnants. In order to preserve and restore these sites, a conceptual model that combines both modern natural conservation strategies and restoration of traditional land-use techniques is proposed. This model provides a complementary approach to existing natural and cultural preservation efforts.

  11. Bound-preserving discontinuous Galerkin methods for relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Tong; Shu, Chi-Wang; Yang, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method to solve the ideal special relativistic hydrodynamics (RHD) and design a bound-preserving (BP) limiter for this scheme by extending the idea in X. Zhang and C.-W. Shu, (2010) [56]. For RHD, the density and pressure are positive and the velocity is bounded by the speed of light. One difficulty in numerically solving the RHD in its conservative form is that the failure of preserving these physical bounds will result in ill-posedness of the problem and blowup of the code, especially in extreme relativistic cases. The standard way in dealing with this difficulty is to add extra numerical dissipation, while in doing so there is no guarantee of maintaining the high order of accuracy. Our BP limiter has the following features. It can theoretically guarantee to preserve the physical bounds for the numerical solution and maintain its designed high order accuracy. The limiter is local to the cell and hence is very easy to implement. Moreover, it renders L1-stability to the numerical scheme. Numerical experiments are performed to demonstrate the good performance of this bound-preserving DG scheme. Even though we only discuss the BP limiter for DG schemes, it can be applied to high order finite volume schemes, such as weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) finite volume schemes as well.

  12. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Paul C; Bud'ko, Sergey L

    2016-08-01

    A large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe2Zn20, PrAg2In, BaFe2As2, CaFe2As2, LaCrSb3 and LaCrGe3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples.

  13. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Paul C.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.

    2016-08-01

    A large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe2Zn20, PrAg2In, BaFe2As2, CaFe2As2, LaCrSb3 and LaCrGe3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples.

  14. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Paul C; Bud'ko, Sergey L

    2016-08-01

    A large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe2Zn20, PrAg2In, BaFe2As2, CaFe2As2, LaCrSb3 and LaCrGe3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples. PMID:27377181

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Preserve Function in Aging Axons

    PubMed Central

    Baltan, Selva

    2012-01-01

    Aging increases the vulnerability of aging white matter to ischemic injury. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors preserve young adult white matter structure and function during ischemia by conserving ATP and reducing excitotoxicity. In isolated optic nerve from 12 month old mice, deprived of oxygen and glucose, we show that pan- and Class I specific HDAC inhibitors promote functional recovery of axons. This protection correlates with preservation of axonal mitochondria. The cellular expression of HDAC 3, in the central nervous system (CNS) and HDAC 2 in optic nerve considerably changed with age expanding to more cytoplasmic domains from nuclear compartments suggesting that changes in glial cell protein acetylation may confer protection to aging axons. Our results indicate manipulation of HDAC activities in glial cells may have a universal potential for stroke therapy across age groups. PMID:23050648

  16. Technical Information/Website Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PintoRey, Christian R.

    2010-01-01

    This document reviews the work of the author in NASA's Motivating Undergraduates in Science and Technology (MUST) internship. The intern worked on the Space Shuttles hydraulic systems (i.e., Auxiliary Power Units (APU's) and Hydraulic Pump Units (HPU's)), and website preservation of the hydraulic technology captured in websites relating to the coming.the Space Shuttle Retirement. Several figures and pictures show an overview of the orbiter's hydraulic systems

  17. Phase-preserved optical elevator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Baile; Han, Tiancheng; Chen, Zhi; Duan, Yubo; Chu, Chia-Wei; Barbastathis, George; Qiu, Cheng Wei

    2013-01-01

    The unique superiority of transformation optics devices designed from coordinate transformation is their capability of recovering both ray trajectory and optical path length in light manipulation. However, very few experiments have been done so far to verify this dual-recovery property from viewpoints of both ray trajectory and optical path length simultaneously. The experimental difficulties arise from the fact that most previous optical transformation optics devices only work at the nano-scale; the lack of intercomparison between data from both optical path length and ray trajectory measurement in these experiments obscured the fact that the ray path was subject to a subwavelength lateral shift that was otherwise not easily perceivable and, instead, was pointed out theoretically [B. Zhang et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 233903, (2010)]. Here, we use a simple macroscopic transformation optics device of phase-preserved optical elevator, which is a typical birefringent optical phenomenon that can virtually lift an optical image by a macroscopic distance, to demonstrate decisively the unique optical path length preservation property of transformation optics. The recovery of ray trajectory is first determined with no lateral shift in the reflected ray. The phase preservation is then verified with incoherent white-light interferometry without ambiguity and phase unwrapping. PMID:23546046

  18. Nutritional aspects of food preservatives.

    PubMed

    Quattrucci, E; Masci, V

    1992-01-01

    Despite the benefits attributed to food preservatives, some concern still remains regarding their safety and possible influence on nutrients. Surprisingly, there is quite a lack of scientific knowledge in this field. In order to describe a few examples, the effects of the extensively used sulphite on thiamine, folates, pyridoxal and other nutrients have been reported. Among its antibrowning effects, inhibition of ascorbic acid browning is also considered. As far as sorbic acid is concerned, notwithstanding its easy reaction with protein, probably the acid environment of the stomach determines the breakdown of the sorbic-protein adducts. Detoxication of nitrite by tocopherol and ascorbic acid leads, in the last case, to dehydroascorbic acid and its oxidative products with loss of vitamin activity. Any oxidizing substance destroys ascorbic acid, vitamin E and free vitamin A. Phosphates are largely used with different aims, including preservation, in food processing. Their antimicrobial activity is due to both a direct effect and an interaction with other antimicrobials. Sequestering capacity of phosphates and its nutritional implications are discussed. Also mechanisms of action of organic acids are reported, focusing on sorbic acid effects on single amino acids and proteins. Finally, the little information available about the potential impact of food preservatives on nutritional functions is presented. PMID:1298657

  19. From conservation genetics to conservation genomics.

    PubMed

    Primmer, Craig R

    2009-04-01

    Although the application of population and evolutionary genetic theory and methods to address issues of conservation relevance has a long history, the formalization of conservation genetics as a research field is still relatively recent. One of the periodic catalysts for increased research effort in the field has been advances in molecular technologies, leading to an increasingly wider variety of molecular markers for application in conservation genetic studies. To date, genetic methods have been applied in conservation biology primarily as selectively neutral molecular tools for resolving questions of conservation relevance. However, there has been renewed interest in complementing the analysis of neutral markers with the assessment of loci that may be directly involved in responses to processes such as environmental change, with a view to identifying the genes involved in them. These kinds of studies are now possible due to the increase in availability of genomic resources for nonmodel organisms, and there will likely be an even more rapid increase in the near future due to the advent of new ultrahigh throughput-sequencing technologies. This review considers the implications of the most recent developments in genomic technologies and their potential for contributing to the conservation of populations and species. Three "conservation genomics" case studies are presented (Atlantic salmon, Salmo sala; the butterfly, Melitaea cinxia; and the California condor, Gymnogyps californianus) in order to demonstrate the diversity of applications now possible. While it is clear that genomics approaches in conservation will not replace other tried-and-true methods, these recent developments open up an exciting new range of possibilities that will enable further diversification of the application of genomics in conservation biology. PMID:19432656

  20. Meeting global conservation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-10-01

    Hot on the heels of last year's Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement, representatives from the global conservation community met to set the conservation agenda that will help to implement these targets.

  1. Wilderness preservation: a cross-cultural comparison of Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Dubasak, M.

    1987-01-01

    Conservation is an evolving, trans-national concept that incorporates a philosophy of resource use. Its expression takes different forms and reflects its host culture. This dissertation uses Canada and the United States to study the variations of conservation that exist in two national settings. It makes three main points: (1) cumulative effects of environmental neglect, a reassessment of values, and issues specific to each country were responsible for heightened interest in conservation during the 1960's; (2) characteristics of conservation and the means by which its goals were pursued were specific to national culture; in both countries, demands for citizen participation grew along with interest in conservation, but important differences in political culture mandated differences in strategy and tactics; and (3) Canadian conservationists looked to the United States for ideas and strategies, but they were not always appropriate to Canadian circumstances. Without a national preservation tradition, Canadian conservationist use of American examples was not always relevant to attempts to develop a Canadian constituency for preservations. This study focuses on wilderness preservation because it was the dominant component of conservation in the United States in the 1960s and experienced its first surge of interest in Canada at the same time.

  2. Conservation properties of numerical integration methods for systems of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    If a system of ordinary differential equations represents a property conserving system that can be expressed linearly (e.g., conservation of mass), it is then desirable that the numerical integration method used conserve the same quantity. It is shown that both linear multistep methods and Runge-Kutta methods are 'conservative' and that Newton-type methods used to solve the implicit equations preserve the inherent conservation of the numerical method. It is further shown that a method used by several authors is not conservative.

  3. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Management and Technology. Section on Conservation. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on conservation and preservation which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Mass Deacidification at the National Library of Canada" (Joyce M. Banks, National Library of Canada); (2) "The National Preservation Office in the British Library" (David W. G. Clements, The…

  4. PREDON Scientific Data Preservation 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaconu, C.; Kraml, S.; Surace, C.; Chateigner, D.; Libourel, T.; Laurent, A.; Lin, Y.; Schaming, M.; Benbernou, S.; Lebbah, M.; Boucon, D.; Cérin, C.; Azzag, H.; Mouron, P.; Nief, J.-Y.; Coutin, S.; Beckmann, V.

    Scientific data collected with modern sensors or dedicated detectors exceed very often the perimeter of the initial scientific design. These data are obtained more and more frequently with large material and human efforts. A large class of scientific experiments are in fact unique because of their large scale, with very small chances to be repeated and to superseded by new experiments in the same domain: for instance high energy physics and astrophysics experiments involve multi-annual developments and a simple duplication of efforts in order to reproduce old data is simply not affordable. Other scientific experiments are in fact unique by nature: earth science, medical sciences etc. since the collected data is "time-stamped" and thereby non-reproducible by new experiments or observations. In addition, scientific data collection increased dramatically in the recent years, participating to the so-called "data deluge" and inviting for common reflection in the context of "big data" investigations. The new knowledge obtained using these data should be preserved long term such that the access and the re-use are made possible and lead to an enhancement of the initial investment. Data observatories, based on open access policies and coupled with multi-disciplinary techniques for indexing and mining may lead to truly new paradigms in science. It is therefore of outmost importance to pursue a coherent and vigorous approach to preserve the scientific data at long term. The preservation remains nevertheless a challenge due to the complexity of the data structure, the fragility of the custom-made software environments as well as the lack of rigorous approaches in workflows and algorithms. To address this challenge, the PREDON project has been initiated in France in 2012 within the MASTODONS program: a Big Data scientific challenge, initiated and supported by the Interdisciplinary Mission of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). PREDON is a study group formed by

  5. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  6. Building robust conservation plans.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Piero; Joppa, Lucas

    2015-04-01

    Systematic conservation planning optimizes trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and human activities by accounting for socioeconomic costs while aiming to achieve prescribed conservation objectives. However, the most cost-efficient conservation plan can be very dissimilar to any other plan achieving the set of conservation objectives. This is problematic under conditions of implementation uncertainty (e.g., if all or part of the plan becomes unattainable). We determined through simulations of parallel implementation of conservation plans and habitat loss the conditions under which optimal plans have limited chances of implementation and where implementation attempts would fail to meet objectives. We then devised a new, flexible method for identifying conservation priorities and scheduling conservation actions. This method entails generating a number of alternative plans, calculating the similarity in site composition among all plans, and selecting the plan with the highest density of neighboring plans in similarity space. We compared our method with the classic method that maximizes cost efficiency with synthetic and real data sets. When implementation was uncertain--a common reality--our method provided higher likelihood of achieving conservation targets. We found that χ, a measure of the shortfall in objectives achieved by a conservation plan if the plan could not be implemented entirely, was the main factor determining the relative performance of a flexibility enhanced approach to conservation prioritization. Our findings should help planning authorities prioritize conservation efforts in the face of uncertainty about future condition and availability of sites.

  7. Conservation in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the physical concept of conservation as it is framed within the laws of conservation of mass, of momentum, and of energy. The derivation of Ohm's Law as a generalization of the relationship between the observed measurements of voltage and current serves as the exemplar of how conservation theories are formed. (JJK)

  8. Acid preservation systems for food products

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberio, J. E.; Cirigiano, M. C.

    1984-10-16

    Fumaric acid is used in combination with critical amounts of acetic acid to preserve acid containing food products from microbiological spoilage in the absence of or at reduced levels of chemical preservative.

  9. Asymptotic-preserving Boltzmann model equations for binary gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Liang, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    An improved system of Boltzmann model equations is developed for binary gas mixture. This system of model equations has a complete asymptotic preserving property that can strictly recover the Navier-Stokes equations in the continuum limit with the correct constitutive relations and the correct viscosity, thermal conduction, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients. In this equation system, the self- and cross-collision terms in Boltzmann equations are replaced by single relaxation terms. In monocomponent case, this system of equations can be reduced to the commonly used Shakhov equation. The conservation property and the H theorem which are important for model equations are also satisfied by this system of model equations. PMID:26986408

  10. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  11. Evaluation of the Preservation Value and Location of Farm Ponds in Yunlin County, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wen-Wen; Lee, Soen-Han; Wu, Chen-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Farm ponds in Yunlin County first appeared in 1,622 and have played roles in habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction. Farm ponds largely disappeared with the development of urban areas and the industrial sector; thus, effective preservation of the remaining ponds is critical. The criteria to evaluate the preservation value of farm ponds is established by expert questionnaires which follow the Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM) and Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP), and GIS, which are integrated into a spatial analysis of the remaining 481 farm ponds in Yunlin County. The results show that 28 ponds should be preserved to continue the cultural interaction between farm ponds and settlements; 36 ponds should preserved to connect coasts and streams, which are important habitats for birds; 30 ponds should be preserved to increase storage capacity, recharge groundwater, and reduce land subsidence; four ponds should be preserved as Feng-Shui ponds in front of temples in settlements or as recreation areas for local citizens; and four farms should be preserved (high priority) in agricultural production areas to support irrigation. In short, FAHP and GIS are integrated to evaluate the number and locations of farm ponds that provide water for habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction and maintain the overall preservation value in Yunlin County. The results could inform governmental departments when considering conservation policies. PMID:24384776

  12. Evaluation of the preservation value and location of farm ponds in Yunlin County, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Wen; Lee, Soen-Han; Wu, Chen-Fa

    2013-12-31

    Farm ponds in Yunlin County first appeared in 1,622 and have played roles in habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction. Farm ponds largely disappeared with the development of urban areas and the industrial sector; thus, effective preservation of the remaining ponds is critical. The criteria to evaluate the preservation value of farm ponds is established by expert questionnaires which follow the Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM) and Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP), and GIS, which are integrated into a spatial analysis of the remaining 481 farm ponds in Yunlin County. The results show that 28 ponds should be preserved to continue the cultural interaction between farm ponds and settlements; 36 ponds should preserved to connect coasts and streams, which are important habitats for birds; 30 ponds should be preserved to increase storage capacity, recharge groundwater, and reduce land subsidence; four ponds should be preserved as Feng-Shui ponds in front of temples in settlements or as recreation areas for local citizens; and four farms should be preserved (high priority) in agricultural production areas to support irrigation. In short, FAHP and GIS are integrated to evaluate the number and locations of farm ponds that provide water for habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction and maintain the overall preservation value in Yunlin County. The results could inform governmental departments when considering conservation policies.

  13. Evaluation Strategy. Paper Preservation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FMC Corp., Gastonia, NC. Lithium Div.

    After a decade of slow but steady progress, the pace of development of technologies to deacidify and strengthen deteriorating books and documents has quickened significantly. These developments accentuate the need for the conservation community to scientifically evaluate the technical merits of potential processes. This draft evaluation strategy…

  14. 32 CFR 174.18 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the regulations implementing the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR 800.5(a)(2)(vii)). One way... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Historic preservation. 174.18 Section 174.18... Historic preservation. (a) The transfer, lease, or sale of National Register-eligible historic property...

  15. 32 CFR 174.18 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the regulations implementing the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR 800.5(a)(2)(vii)). One way... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Historic preservation. 174.18 Section 174.18... Historic preservation. (a) The transfer, lease, or sale of National Register-eligible historic property...

  16. 32 CFR 174.18 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the regulations implementing the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR 800.5(a)(2)(vii)). One way... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Historic preservation. 174.18 Section 174.18... Historic preservation. (a) The transfer, lease, or sale of National Register-eligible historic property...

  17. 32 CFR 174.18 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the regulations implementing the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR 800.5(a)(2)(vii)). One way... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Historic preservation. 174.18 Section 174.18... Historic preservation. (a) The transfer, lease, or sale of National Register-eligible historic property...

  18. 32 CFR 174.18 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the regulations implementing the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR 800.5(a)(2)(vii)). One way... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Historic preservation. 174.18 Section 174.18... Historic preservation. (a) The transfer, lease, or sale of National Register-eligible historic property...

  19. Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    The Commission on Preservation and Access was established to foster and support collaboration among libraries and allied organizations in order to ensure the preservation of the published and documentary record in all formats and to provide enhanced access to scholarly information. The Commission's newsletter keeps preservation and access…

  20. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identity preservation. 782.14 Section 782.14... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be...

  1. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identity preservation. 782.14 Section 782.14... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be...

  2. Orthogonality preserving infinite dimensional quadratic stochastic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Akın, Hasan; Mukhamedov, Farrukh

    2015-09-18

    In the present paper, we consider a notion of orthogonal preserving nonlinear operators. We introduce π-Volterra quadratic operators finite and infinite dimensional settings. It is proved that any orthogonal preserving quadratic operator on finite dimensional simplex is π-Volterra quadratic operator. In infinite dimensional setting, we describe all π-Volterra operators in terms orthogonal preserving operators.

  3. Preservation Planning Program. Resource Notebook. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Pamela W., Comp.

    Designed to be used with the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) "Preservation Planning Program Manual," this notebook provides access to background and technical information needed for planning and carrying out a variety of preservation programs and activities. Its contents, all drawn from the body of preservation literature available in late…

  4. Preservation Impacts on Educational Facilities Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, James A.

    This paper examines the significance of facilities preservation for educational facilities planning and identifies various forms of facilities preservation applicable to educational facilities. It analyzes why educational facilities planners need to be aware of preservation considerations, reviews the relevant literature for preservation…

  5. Exactly conservation integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Bowman, J.C.; Morrison, P.J.

    1999-03-01

    Traditional explicit numerical discretizations of conservative systems generically predict artificial secular drifts of any nonlinear invariants. In this work the authors present a general approach for developing explicit nontraditional algorithms that conserve such invariants exactly. They illustrate the method by applying it to the three-wave truncation of the Euler equations, the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model, and the Kepler problem. The ideas are discussed in the context of symplectic (phase-space-conserving) integration methods as well as nonsymplectic conservative methods. They comment on the application of the method to general conservative systems.

  6. Conservation: Toward firmer ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of energy conservation were reviewed in order to place the problems in proper perspective: history and goals, conservation accounting-criteria, and a method to overcome obstacles. The effect of changing prices and available supplies of energy sources and their causes on consumption levels during the last few decades were described. Some examples of attainable conservation goals were listed and justified. A number of specific criteria applicable to conservation accounting were given. Finally, a discussion was presented to relate together the following aspects of energy conservation: widespread impact, involvement of government, industry, politics, moral and ethical aspects, urgency and time element.

  7. Exactly conservative integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Bowman, J.C.; Morrison, P.J.

    1995-07-19

    Traditional numerical discretizations of conservative systems generically yield an artificial secular drift of any nonlinear invariants. In this work we present an explicit nontraditional algorithm that exactly conserves invariants. We illustrate the general method by applying it to the Three-Wave truncation of the Euler equations, the Volterra-Lotka predator-prey model, and the Kepler problem. We discuss our method in the context of symplectic (phase space conserving) integration methods as well as nonsymplectic conservative methods. We comment on the application of our method to general conservative systems.

  8. Earth is a Marine Habitat. Habitat Conservation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This brochure is intended to educate the public about the need to conserve and preserve the earth's environment (man's habitat). It contains an introduction to the ocean world and threats to coastal habitat. Photos and narrative revolve around the theme "Earth is a Marine Habitat." Sections include: "The Web of Life,""Oceans and the United…

  9. Conservation Priorities when Species Interact: The Noah's Ark Metaphor Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Courtois, Pierre; Figuieres, Charles; Mulier, Chloé

    2014-01-01

    This note incorporates ecological interactions into the Noah's Ark problem. In doing so, we arrive at a general model for ranking in situ conservation projects accounting for species interrelations and provide an operational cost-effectiveness method for the selection of best preserving diversity projects under a limited budget constraint. PMID:25181514

  10. Conservation: evolutionary values for all 10,000 birds.

    PubMed

    Lovette, Irby J

    2014-05-19

    Many biologists and conservation practitioners believe that preserving evolutionary diversity should be a priority. An innovative new study measures the evolutionary distinctness of all the world's birds and identifies the species and locations that capture the highest fraction of avian evolutionary history.

  11. The Application of Chemistry to Conserve Cultural Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    During the past 50 years the amount of chemistry applied to the preservation of all sorts of materials, from wood, to ceramics, glass and metallic objects has increased dramatically as materials conservation laboratories became established around the world. In Australia, the finding of a series of historic shipwrecks of ships from the Dutch…

  12. 18 CFR 356.3 - Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for oil pipeline companies. 356.3 Section 356.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... OF RECORDS FOR OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES § 356.3 Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies... and other products stocks and movement pipelines only: (a) Records and receipts, deliveries,...

  13. 18 CFR 356.3 - Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for oil pipeline companies. 356.3 Section 356.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... OF RECORDS FOR OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES § 356.3 Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies... and other products stocks and movement pipelines only: (a) Records and receipts, deliveries,...

  14. 18 CFR 356.3 - Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for oil pipeline companies. 356.3 Section 356.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... OF RECORDS FOR OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES § 356.3 Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies... and other products stocks and movement pipelines only: (a) Records and receipts, deliveries,...

  15. 18 CFR 356.3 - Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for oil pipeline companies. 356.3 Section 356.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... OF RECORDS FOR OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES § 356.3 Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies... and other products stocks and movement pipelines only: (a) Records and receipts, deliveries,...

  16. 18 CFR 356.3 - Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for oil pipeline companies. 356.3 Section 356.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... OF RECORDS FOR OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES § 356.3 Preservation of records for oil pipeline companies... and other products stocks and movement pipelines only: (a) Records and receipts, deliveries,...

  17. Preserving mobility in older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, D M

    1997-01-01

    Age-related loss of strength contributes to impaired mobility and increases the risk of falls. Recent research has focused on 2 approaches to preventing age-related loss of strength--promoting physical activity and exercise (especially strength training) and using trophic factors to enhance muscle performance. Epidemiologic evidence strongly supports a role of regular physical activity in successful aging by preserving muscle performance, promoting mobility, and reducing fall risk. Randomized controlled trials provide convincing evidence that strength and endurance training improve muscle performance in older adults. Evidence is rapidly accumulating from randomized trials that endurance, strength, and balance training promote mobility and reduce fall risk, though exercise effects differ according to the type of exercise, details of the exercise program, and the target group of older adults. Because lifetime regular physical activity is recommended for all older adults, a reasonable strategy (especially for weak adults) is an activity program that includes strength training. In contrast, insufficient evidence exists to recommend the long-term use of trophic factors to preserve muscular performance. An intervention that merits additional study is avoiding the use of psychoactive drugs because drugs like benzodiazepines appear to be risk factors for inactivity and may have unrecognized direct effects on muscular performance. Because chronic illness is a risk factor for inactivity and disuse muscle atrophy, randomized trials comparing strength training with other interventions would be useful in understanding whether strength training has advantages in preserving muscle performance and improving health-related quality of life in a variety of chronic illnesses such as depressive illness. PMID:9348757

  18. Preserving continence during robotic prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ahlering, Thomas E; Gordon, Adam; Morales, Blanca; Skarecky, Douglas W

    2013-02-01

    Preservation of postoperative urinary continence remains the primary concern of all men and their surgeons following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Without doubt, continence is the most important quality of life issue following radical prostatectomy. Identification of difficulties and lessons learned over time has helped focus efforts in order to improve urinary quality of life and continence. This review will examine definitions of continence and urinary quality of life evaluation, technical aspects and the impact of patient-related factors affecting time to and overall continence.

  19. Preservation of sweet sorghum biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Jasberg, B.K.; Montgomery, R.R.; Anderson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Sweet sorghum stalks (42% sugar, dry basis (d.b.)) and bagasse (10% sugar, d.b.) from a cane mill were stored to preserve sugar. Bagasse and stalks were stored outdoors in sealed containers (anaerobic conditions). Treatments included using carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide atmospheres or surface spraying with propionic acid or aqueous ammonia. Stalks were also stored outdoors under aerobic conditions. Treatments included drying the stalks or spraying with propionic acid. After 200 days, propionic acid (anaerobic) and SO/sub 2/-treated stalks had 34% and 19% of the original sugar remaining, respectively. No other samples had more than 3% of the original sugar remaining. 28 references, 6 tables.

  20. Phenoxyethanol: protein preservative for taxonomists.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, M; Wilson, A C; Nolan, R A; Gorman, G C; Bailey, G S

    1969-02-14

    Pieces of chicken heart or skeletal muscle were placed in a dilute solution of the antimicrobial agent 2-phenoxyethanol and stored at room temperature. Under these conditions, the serum albumin, lactate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase in these tissues survived in easily detectable amounts for at least 2 weeks. The surviving proteins appeared to be identical with those of fresh tissues in physical, catalytic, and immunological properties. Phenoxyethanol also preserved heart and muscle proteins of representatives of other vertebrate classes. Tissue samples collected in the analysis by biochemical taxonomists.

  1. Guides to pollution prevention: Wood preserving industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The guide provides an overview of the wood preserving industry and presents options for minimizing waste generation through source reduction and recycling. Treatment with both oilborne and waterborne preservatives is discussed in the guide. However, because in the United States, the majority of wood is treated with chromated copper arsenate, the guide focuses on waterborne preservatives. Process wastewater surface runoff water, and sludge are possible sources of contamination in the wood preserving industry, although in waterborne processes the majority of wastewater is reused. Process wastewater includes water from conditioning, kiln drying, treated wood washing, accumulations in doors or retort sumps, preservative formulation recovery, and rinsing.

  2. Conservative Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rema, P; Ahmed, Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    There is a rising incidence of early cervical cancer in young patients as a result of screening and early detection. Treatment of cervical cancer by surgery or radiotherapy results in permanent infertility which affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Now with improved survival rates among early cervical cancer patients, conservative surgery aiming at fertility preservation in those desiring future pregnancy is an accepted treatment. Conservative surgery is possible in early cervical cancer including micro invasive cancer and stage IB cancers less than 2 cm. Stage IA1 cervical cancer is treated effectively by cervical conisation. In stage IA2 cancers and stage IB1 cancers less than 2 cm the fertility preservation surgery is radical trachelectomy. Radical trachelectomy removes the cervix with medial parametrium and upper 2 cm vaginal cuff retaining the uterus and adnexa to allow future pregnancy. Radical trachelectomy is a safe procedure in selected patients with cancer cervix with acceptable oncologic risks and promising obstetric outcome. It should be avoided in tumours larger than 2 cm and aggressive histologic types. This article focuses on the current options of conservative surgery in early cervical cancer. PMID:27651696

  3. Soil preservation by afforestation in changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galic, Z.; Orlovic, S.

    2012-04-01

    Observed climate changes in Vojvodina (northern part of Republic Serbia) are reflected in the increasing of average annual air temperature and decrasing of precipitation. The data suggest that the increase of average annual air temperature in the period 1998-2008 compared to period 1960-1991 was higher for 1°C. Reduction of rainfall was recorded for December, January, February and May. These decreasing of rainfall with an increase of average air temperature in the vegetation period (July 1.2°C and 1.7°C in August) leading to longer and more frequent dry periods. Forest aridity index (FAI) increase from period 1960-1991 continuously. In period 1960-1991 FAI for Vojvodina was 5,74 and in period from 2000-2010 the average FAI was 7,57. This increasing FAI means warmer and dryer weather in the main growth cycle and in the critical month. Longer and more frequent dry periods lead to unfavorable conditions for the growth of many tree species in region like Vojvodina. Soil erosion leads to the degradation of fertile soils in Vojvodina (about 83.24% of soils are used for agricultural production). The main soil type is chernozem. A significant role of chernozem protection and conservation is attributed to different forms of forest and non-forest greenery, such as protection forests, shelterbelts, tree rows, hunting preserves and other forms of amenity and ornamental greenery. This paper analyses the possibility of afforestation of tree and shurb species in different forms of protection forests, shelterbelts, tree rows, hunting preserves and other forms of amenity and ornamental greenery in Vojvodina considering future climate change. The selection of tree species is the base of establishment of different forms of «greenery» aimed at the prevention of destructive processes in future. Key words: climate change, soil degradation, afforestation Acknowledgement This paper was realized as a part of the project "Studying climate change and its influence on the environment

  4. Patient attitudes toward fertility preservation.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R

    2009-08-01

    The increased survival rates for pediatric cancer patients and for some malignancies that are common in young adults, such as testicular cancer and Hodgkin disease have led to an increased focus on preserving fertility. Research on the psychosocial aspects of cancer-related infertility is a recent development, but we know that both young men and women value parenthood after cancer. At least 75% of survivors who were childless at diagnosis would like future offspring. For those who do not become parents, long-term distress is common. Younger teens may have difficulty assessing whether parenthood will be important to them in the future, and informed consent protocols need to respect their desires rather than deferring too much to parents. We do not know whether parenting a non-biological child (adopted, conceived through third-party reproduction, or a stepchild) reduces distress as much as being able to have one's own genetic offspring. Survivors often have exaggerated concerns about their children's health risks, but still prefer to have biological children if possible. More research is needed on whether participating in fertility preservation reduces long-term distress about cancer-related fertility. Better evidence-based programs to educate families and reduce decisional conflict are needed.

  5. Allergic contact dermatitis to preservatives.

    PubMed

    Timm-Knudson, Vickie L; Johnson, Janis S; Ortiz, Karel J; Yiannias, James A

    2006-04-01

    In summary, a wide variety of skin care products contain preservatives. Patients who are allergic to one of these preservatives may have either localized or widespread dermatitis. Affected patients may find it difficult to avoid thimerosal without the help of the health care provider because the use of these allergens is so widespread. Patch testing is an invaluable tool for patients who struggle with dermatitis. Antigen-avoidance lists that facilitate patient education about what products to avoid are available from the manufacturers of patch test allergens (for example, TRUE Test or Chemotechnique). These lists are helpful starting points for patients in that they provide general categories (for example, shampoos, soaps, or creams) of products that the patient should avoid. With these printed guidelines alone, patients must read skin care product labels carefully, looking for the names of their allergens as identified by patch tests as well as for any synonyms and cross-reactors of these allergens. Thus, patients may feel overwhelmed by hearing the names of allergens that are long and complex. After an allergen has been identified, the nurse can play a key role in helping patients understand their dermatitis and its management. Nurses are in a unique position to spend time educating patients about how to uncover the sources of specific allergens and, subsequently, how to avoid them. The Contact Allergen Replacement Database can help in this educational process by giving patients a shopping list of specific items that are free of the specific allergens causing their allergic contact dermatitis.

  6. Land trust evaluation of progress toward conservation goals.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Louise; Hess, George R

    2012-02-01

    In the United States local land trusts preserve and conserve land to protect water quality and supply, farmlands, habitat for native plants and animals, areas of cultural or historical significance, and scenic views. We surveyed the 24 active, local land trusts in North Carolina (U.S.A.) to determine how they report progress toward attaining such conservation goals. Twenty-two land trusts responded to our survey. Of these, eight reported developing specific conservation goals for all of the properties they protect, five identified conservation targets on all properties, and two reported monitoring biological indicators on all of their protected properties. On the basis of these results, we believe most of the land trusts surveyed could not determine whether they were meeting conservation goals because most did not identify explicit, measurable goals and monitor progress toward them. Instead they reported success in terms of the amount of land protected and money raised. We think this is a lost opportunity for land trusts to build sound approaches to environmental management, engage the public, entice new donors, and attain funding for additional conservation activities. We propose conservation professionals help local land trusts adopt the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation, a framework developed by a consortium of international conservation organizations, to develop conservation goals and measure whether the goals are achieved.

  7. Behind the Public Face of Kew: Education and Conservation in the Millennium Seed Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Angela

    2010-01-01

    At its Wakehurst Place garden in West Sussex, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, has established the UK home of one of the world's largest conservation projects, the Millennium Seed Bank (MSB) partnership, a global project to conserve biodiversity by collecting and preserving seeds. This article describes what the MSB partnership does, how seeds are…

  8. Ethanol-Glycerin Fixation with Thymol Conservation: A Potential Alternative to Formaldehyde and Phenol Embalming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Niels; Loffler, Sabine; Feja, Christine; Sandrock, Mara; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Bechmann, Ingo; Steinke, Hanno

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical fixation and conservation are required to prevent specimens from undergoing autolysis and decomposition. While fixation is the primary arrest of the structures responsible for autolysis and decomposition, conservation preserves the state of fixation. Although commonly used, formaldehyde has been classified as carcinogenic to humans. For…

  9. Snakes. A Conservation Education Program of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Kelly; Theiss, Nancy S.

    The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is charged with the responsibility to preserve, protect, and perpetuate the fish and wildlife in Kentucky. Involved in this broad program are a number of services, including the Wildlife Conservation Education Program. During the months of September through April, Conservation Club leaders…

  10. Conservation: Toward firmer ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of energy conservation were discussed: conservation history and goals, conservation modes, conservation accounting-criteria, and a method to overcome obstacles. The conservation modes tested fall into one of the following categories: reduced energy consumption, increased efficiency of energy utilization, or substitution of one or more forms of energy for another which is in shorter supply or in some sense thought to be of more value. The conservation accounting criteria include net energy reduction, economic, and technical criteria. A method to overcome obstacles includes (approaches such as: direct personal impact (life style, income, security, aspiration), an element of crisis, large scale involvement of environmental, safety, and health issues, connections to big government, big business, big politics, involvement of known and speculative science and technology, appeal to moral and ethical standards, the transient nature of opportunities to correct the system.

  11. Conservation and behavioral neuroendocrinology.

    PubMed

    Cockrem, J F

    2005-11-01

    The total number of threatened species of vertebrates is likely to be more than 10,000, with approximately one quarter of the world's mammal species, one eighth of the birds and one third of the amphibians threatened with extinction. The rate of loss of animal species and hence of biodiversity is increasing and may become even greater as ecosystems become affected by climate change due to global warming. Behavioral neuroendocrinology, which considers interactions between behavior and neuroendocrine function in animals from all vertebrate taxa, can contribute to animal conservation. Research with laboratory animals can address questions in basic biology relevant to conservation and develop methods for use with threatened animals. Field work with free-living animals considers the basic biology of new species and the use of endocrine tools to assess the susceptibility of species to threats. Non-invasive measurements of hormone concentrations, especially fecal steroids, are extensively used to assess reproductive function and the stress status of animals in captive breeding programs and in the wild. Biodiversity and natural selection both depend on individual variation, and conservation programs often work with animals on an individual basis. The consideration of data from individuals is essential in conservation endocrinology. Direct contributions to conservation programs are challenging as study situations are determined by practical conservation concerns. Indirect contributions such as the provision of scientific input to conservation plans and participation in public education programs offer significant benefits for conservation programs. Directly and indirectly, there are many opportunities for behavioral neuroendocrinologists to contribute to conservation.

  12. A Challenge for Radioactive Waste Management: Memory Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Charton, P.; Ouzounian, G.

    2008-07-01

    ANDRA, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, is responsible for managing all radioactive waste in France over the long term. In the case of short-lived waste for which disposal facilities have a life expectancy of a few centuries, the Agency has set up a system for preserving the memory of those sites. Based on the historical analysis on a comparable timescale and on an appraisal of information-conservation means, a series of regulatory as well as technical provisions was made in order to ensure that sound information be transmitted to future generations. Requirements associated to the provisions deal mostly with legibility and a clear understanding of the information that must be decrypted and understood at least during the lifetime of the facilities (i.e., a few centuries). It must therefore be preserved throughout the same period. Responses to the requirements will be presented notably on various information-recording media, together with the information-diffusion strategy to the different authorities and structures within French society. A concrete illustration of the achievements made so far is the Centre de la Manche Disposal Facility, which was closed down in 1994 and is currently in its post-closure monitoring phase since 2003. In the case of deep geological repositories for long-lived radioactive waste, preserving memory takes a different aspect. First of all, timescales are much longer and are counted in hundreds of thousands of years. It is therefore much more difficult to consider how to maintain the richness of the information over such time periods than it is for short-lived waste. Both the nature and the form of the information to be transmitted must be revised. It would be risky indeed to base memory preservation over the long term on similar mechanisms beyond 1,000 years. Based on the heritage of a much more ancient history, we must seek to find appropriate means in order to develop surface markers and even more to ensure their

  13. Saliva Preservative for Diagnostic Purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is an important body fluid for diagnostic purposes. Glycoproteins, glucose, steroids, DNA, and other molecules of diagnostic value are found in saliva. It is easier to collect as compared to blood or urine. Unfortunately, saliva also contains large numbers of bacteria that can release enzymes, which can degrade proteins and nucleic acids. These degradative enzymes destroy or reduce saliva s diagnostic value. This innovation describes the formulation of a chemical preservative that prevents microbial growth and inactivates the degradative enzymes. This extends the time that saliva can be stored or transported without losing its diagnostic value. Multiple samples of saliva can be collected if needed without causing discomfort to the subject and it does not require any special facilities to handle after it is collected.

  14. Virtual Environments for Data Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Volker

    Data preservation in a wider sense includes also the ability to analyse data of past experiments. Because operation systems, such as Linux and Windows, are evolving rapidly, software packages can be outdated and not usable anymore already a few years after they have been written. Creating an image of the operation system is a way to be able to launch the analysis software on a computing infrastructure independent on the local operation system used. At the same time, virtualization also allows to launch the same software in collaborations across several institutes with very different computing infrastructure. At the François Arago Centre of the APC in Paris we provide user support for virtualization and computing environment access to the scientific community

  15. Abdominoplasty With Scarpa Fascia Preservation.

    PubMed

    Costa-Ferreira, António; Marco, Rebelo; Vásconez, Luis; Amarante, José

    2016-06-01

    The plane of dissection used during a full abdominoplasty has been implicated on the seroma rate. Avoiding the classic plane of dissection on top of the rectus fascia and using a more superficial plane of dissection has been suggested as a strategy to improve recovery and lower the complication rate. The authors have been applying this principle in their practice for more than a decade, and they performed 2 prospective comparative studies to evaluate the clinical effects of using a more superficial plane of dissection (with Scarpa fascia preservation) during a full abdominoplasty.The technique is presented and explained along with the results of both comparative studies.The results of both studies are discussed particularly the effects on drain volume (total and daily), the duration of drain usage and the avoidance of "long drainers." These are very relevant advantages of the technique that have not been discussed in the literature. The results and surgical strategies used by other authors which apply a more superficial plane of dissection are presented.Controversy still exits on the manipulation of the deep fat compartment by liposuction or direct fat excision. No manipulation is another option which should be considered but it has been questioned due to the risk of aesthetic compromise. A morphometric study performed on the surgical specimens of 41 female patients submitted to a full abdominoplasty validates that option.Based on this evidence, the authors recommend that surgeons consider performing abdominoplasties using a more superficial plane of dissection in the infraumbilical area with total preservation of Scarpa fascia and the deep fat compartment. The classic plane of dissection, on top of the deep fascia, should be avoided in the lower abdomen. PMID:27187249

  16. Fertility preservation in women with borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Giorgia; Somigliana, Edgardo; Giorgione, Veronica; Martinelli, Fabio; Filippi, Francesca; Petrella, Maria Cristina; Candiani, Massimo; Peccatori, Fedro

    2016-09-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) may occur in young women and have an excellent survival rate. Therefore, there is the obligation to put emphasis on fertility preservation in affected women. On the other hand, it has also been underlined that the disease should be managed with caution because these tumours can relapse and, albeit rare, malignant transformation can also occur. Unfortunately, evidence on fertility preservation in women with BOT is scanty. In this opinion paper, we tried to draw some clinical indications based on the few available studies on the clinical management of BOT and their possible relation with controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation (COH). We ultimately came to the following conclusions: (1) Fertility counselling should become an integral part of the clinical management of women with BOT. Conservative management without pre-surgical counselling may expose women without reasonable chances of future conceptions to undue risks. (2) Despite some epidemiological concerns on the possible relation between COH and BOT, the conservative surgical treatment should be associated to oocyte cryopreservation considering the high risk of recurrence of the disease. (3) Letrozole during COH should be considered to temper the theoretical risk of increased recurrences. (4) Pregnancy should not be delayed in women at low-moderate risk of recurrences. Fertility preservation may be avoided in these women provided that they start active pregnancy seeking early. (5) Albeit experimental, oocytes retrieval from affected ovaries removed at the time of surgery can be considered. Conversely, ovarian cortex cryopreservation is not justified given the possible risks of malignant reseeding. PMID:27428850

  17. Biodiversity Conservation and Conservation Biotechnology Tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue is dedicated to the in vitro tools and methods used to conserve the genetic diversity of rare and threatened species from around the world. Species that are on the brink of extinction, due to the rapid loss of genetic diversity and habitat, come mainly from resource poor areas the...

  18. Ocular preservatives: associated risks and newer options.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Lal, Shruti; Rana, Cheena; Kakkar, Shilpa; Singh, Harinder

    2009-01-01

    Presence of a preservative in an ocular medication has often been considered a culprit in damaging the epithelium. However, the inclusion of a preservative is equally necessary, especially in multiple-dose containers, in order to protect against dangerous organisms accidentally gaining access during instillation. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK), chlorobutanol, chlorhexidine acetate (CHA), and phenylmercuric nitrate or acetate are some commonly used preservatives in eye preparations. New preservatives with a wide range of activity and good safety profiles have been introduced in the market, such as stabilized oxychloro complex (SOC), sofZia, and sodium perborate. In the present review, we discuss various conventional and newly proposed and patented preservative molecules for ocular use. Reasons for discontinuing traditional preservatives and the need for less-toxic molecules are discussed at length, along with newer options coming up in this area.

  19. Female fertility preservation: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Mary E; Confino, Rafael; Steinberg, Marissa

    2016-08-01

    For patients with cancer, preserving the ability to start a family at a time of their choosing is especially important and may influence decisions pertaining to cancer treatment. For other women who have delayed childbearing for personal or professional reasons, fertility preservation offers the possibility of having a biological child regardless of age. Though these women may be interested in or benefit from fertility preservation, fertility preservation services remain underutilized. While embryo and oocyte cryopreservation remain the standard strategies for female fertility preservation recommended by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society of Medical Oncology, other strategies (e.g. pharmacological protection of the ovaries and ovarian tissue cryopreservation) are the subject of increasing research. This review will present new data that have become available over the past few years pertaining to all available methods of fertility preservation. PMID:26847846

  20. The Syntax of Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Charles H.

    This paper outlines the syntactic structures which represent a stage in the cognitive development of children, and focusses on an aspect of cognitive development known as conservation. The cognitive components of conservation are presented as the primordial base for the set of syntactic structures which map or mirror them. Piaget proposed four…

  1. Conservation: Threatened by Luxury.

    PubMed

    Webb, Thomas J

    2016-06-20

    When animals are traded in lucrative international luxury markets, individuals really do matter to conservation. Identifying the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that make some species especially vulnerable to this kind of threat helps set guidelines for more effective conservation. PMID:27326710

  2. Teaching Teachers Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, N. L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a two-week summer course for elementary and secondary teachers on soil and water conservation taught in Wisconsin. Discusses the efforts to recruit teachers for the course, the course content, the field trips, and the evaluation procedures. Stresses the cooperation between educators and conservation agencies in developing the course. (TW)

  3. Introducing conservation of momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-09-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton’s laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered for the case of a car hitting a child.

  4. Home Energy Conservation Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, V. William; And Others

    This guide was prepared to support a program of training for community specialists in contemporary and practical techniques of home energy conservation. It is designed to assist professionals in efficient operation of energy conservation programs and to provide ideas for expanding education operations. Eight major sections are presented: (1)…

  5. Conservation--Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Conservation Foundation, Parkville, Victoria.

    Developed by the Australian Conservation Foundation to meet the need for a general conservation bibliography, this booklet offers resources for a wide spectrum of possible users. Material selected is that which is relevant and helpful for conservationists in their various fields of activity and what is likely to be in print and obtainable without…

  6. Conservation and Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Mary Giafagleone

    In this study it was hypothesized that those students classified as conservers would score significantly higher on cloze passages related to the concepts of number, quantity, and volume than would those students classified as non-conservers. The subjects consisted of a group of 42 sixth grade urban public school students judged to be of low socio…

  7. Water Conservation Resource List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

  8. Conservation Tools for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Included are suggestions for integrating conservation concepts into the general curriculum, coordinating outdoor work with indoor activities, and for planning and implementing a sequential conservation curriculum. Guidelines given for training of teachers include sample workshop schedules. Minimum requirements for outdoor school sites are listed.…

  9. Creative Soil Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Take plant lessons outdoors with this engaging and inquiry-based activity in which third-grade students learn how to apply soil conservation methods to growing plants. They also collect data and draw conclusions about the effectiveness of their method of soil conservation. An added benefit to this activity is that the third-grade students played…

  10. Conservation in perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, A.; Goldsmith, F.B.; Goldsmith, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book reflects the changes that have taken place in the nature conservation movement over the last decade. It includes essays on issues of nature conservation itself, rather than on environmental issues. Habitats, elements of the ecosystem, and some of the political and organizational activity currently of interest are covered.

  11. Cultivating a conservation ethic

    SciTech Connect

    Edgar, G.R.; McKellar, B.J.; Harmelink, S.

    1995-11-01

    This article is review of the efforts of Wisconsin Public Power`s programmatic efforts in energy conservation. The design and implementation of the conservation program is discussed, and the residential, industrial, and commercial aspects of the program are noted. Results to date are mentioned.

  12. Energy: the conservation revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, J.H.; Chandler, W.U.

    1981-01-01

    This analysis of the energy conservation ethic and related government policy examines the contrasting approaches of administration policy. The basic thrust of the book is that energy conservation is a fundamentally important approach that is presently being ignored in favor of a more production-oriented philosophy.

  13. Youth Conservation Corps Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This document provides guidelines for operating Youth Conservation Corps programs under both the Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service. The guide contains 11 units that cover the following topics: (1) enrollees; (2) enrollee payroll; (3) enrollee problems; (4) Youth Conservation Corps staff; (5) accounting; (6) operations; (7)…

  14. Conservation in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-30

    A nationwide examination was made of grassroots energy conservation programs related to transportation. Information compiled from civic groups, trade associations, and corporations is included on driver awareness/mass transit; travel; and ride sharing. It is concluded that a willingness by the public to cooperate in transportation energy conservation exists and should be exploited. (LCL)

  15. On exactly conservative integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.C.; Shadwick, B.A.; Morrison, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    Traditional explicit numerical discretizations of conservative systems generically predict artificial secular drifts of nonlinear invariants. These algorithms are based on polynomial functions of the time step. The authors discuss a general approach for developing explicit algorithms that conserve such invariants exactly. They illustrate the method by applying it to the truncated two-dimensional Euler equations.

  16. Introducing Conservation of Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton's laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered…

  17. Resource Conservation Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    This glossary is a composite of terms selected from 13 technologies, and is the expanded revision of the original 1952 edition of "The Soil and Water Conservation Glossary." The terms were selected from these areas: agronomy, biology, conservation, ecology, economics, engineering, forestry, geology, hydrology, range, recreation, soils, and…

  18. Setting conservation priorities.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kerrie A; Carwardine, Josie; Possingham, Hugh P

    2009-04-01

    A generic framework for setting conservation priorities based on the principles of classic decision theory is provided. This framework encapsulates the key elements of any problem, including the objective, the constraints, and knowledge of the system. Within the context of this framework the broad array of approaches for setting conservation priorities are reviewed. While some approaches prioritize assets or locations for conservation investment, it is concluded here that prioritization is incomplete without consideration of the conservation actions required to conserve the assets at particular locations. The challenges associated with prioritizing investments through time in the face of threats (and also spatially and temporally heterogeneous costs) can be aided by proper problem definition. Using the authors' general framework for setting conservation priorities, multiple criteria can be rationally integrated and where, how, and when to invest conservation resources can be scheduled. Trade-offs are unavoidable in priority setting when there are multiple considerations, and budgets are almost always finite. The authors discuss how trade-offs, risks, uncertainty, feedbacks, and learning can be explicitly evaluated within their generic framework for setting conservation priorities. Finally, they suggest ways that current priority-setting approaches may be improved.

  19. Residential conservation service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. M.

    The Residential Conservation Services Program is a result of the 1978 National Energy Conservation Policy Act, Public Law 95-619 passed by congress to address the need for energy conservation in the residential sector. Large utility companies and fuel suppliers will be offering audits of their customers' homes to relay technical and economic data about conservation, solar, and wind measures. The impact on utility companies as a result of this program is to offer low cost audits ($15.00 charge for an audit costing approximately $100.00) and to assist their customers in reducing their consumption of electricity, gas, and oil through the use of conservation and renewables. The impact of RCS on wind turbine manufacturers and dealers is an opportunity to participate in a program which provides potential customers.

  20. Fertility Preservation in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Estes, Stephanie J

    2015-12-01

    Fertility preservation is the process by which either oocytes (eggs) or sperm undergo an intervention to preserve their use for future attempts at conception. Consideration of fertility preservation in the pediatric and adolescent population is important, as future childbearing is usually a central life goal. For postpubertal girls, both oocyte and embryo cryopreservation are standard of care and for postpubertal boys, sperm cryopreservation continues to be recommended. Although all the risks are unknown, it appears that fertility preservation in most cases does not worsen prognosis, allows for the birth of healthy children, and does not increase the chance of recurrence.

  1. The non-uniformity of fossil preservation.

    PubMed

    Holland, Steven M

    2016-07-19

    The fossil record provides the primary source of data for calibrating the origin of clades. Although minimum ages of clades are given by the oldest preserved fossil, these underestimate the true age, which must be bracketed by probabilistic methods based on multiple fossil occurrences. Although most of these methods assume uniform preservation rates, this assumption is unsupported over geological timescales. On geologically long timescales (more than 10 Myr), the origin and cessation of sedimentary basins, and long-term variations in tectonic subsidence, eustatic sea level and sedimentation rate control the availability of depositional facies that preserve the environments in which species lived. The loss of doomed sediments, those with a low probability of preservation, imparts a secular trend to fossil preservation. As a result, the fossil record is spatially and temporally non-uniform. Models of fossil preservation should reflect this non-uniformity by using empirical estimates of fossil preservation that are spatially and temporally partitioned, or by using indirect proxies of fossil preservation. Geologically, realistic models of preservation will provide substantially more reliable estimates of the origination of clades.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325828

  2. The non-uniformity of fossil preservation.

    PubMed

    Holland, Steven M

    2016-07-19

    The fossil record provides the primary source of data for calibrating the origin of clades. Although minimum ages of clades are given by the oldest preserved fossil, these underestimate the true age, which must be bracketed by probabilistic methods based on multiple fossil occurrences. Although most of these methods assume uniform preservation rates, this assumption is unsupported over geological timescales. On geologically long timescales (more than 10 Myr), the origin and cessation of sedimentary basins, and long-term variations in tectonic subsidence, eustatic sea level and sedimentation rate control the availability of depositional facies that preserve the environments in which species lived. The loss of doomed sediments, those with a low probability of preservation, imparts a secular trend to fossil preservation. As a result, the fossil record is spatially and temporally non-uniform. Models of fossil preservation should reflect this non-uniformity by using empirical estimates of fossil preservation that are spatially and temporally partitioned, or by using indirect proxies of fossil preservation. Geologically, realistic models of preservation will provide substantially more reliable estimates of the origination of clades.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  3. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  4. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  5. Energy/dissipation-preserving Birkhoffian multi-symplectic methods for Maxwell's equations with dissipation terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hongling; Li, Shengtai

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose two new energy/dissipation-preserving Birkhoffian multi-symplectic methods (Birkhoffian and Birkhoffian box) for Maxwell's equations with dissipation terms. After investigating the non-autonomous and autonomous Birkhoffian formalism for Maxwell's equations with dissipation terms, we first apply a novel generating functional theory to the non-autonomous Birkhoffian formalism to propose our Birkhoffian scheme, and then implement a central box method to the autonomous Birkhoffian formalism to derive the Birkhoffian box scheme. We have obtained four formal local conservation laws and three formal energy global conservation laws. We have also proved that both of our derived schemes preserve the discrete version of the global/local conservation laws. Furthermore, the stability, dissipation and dispersion relations are also investigated for the schemes. Theoretical analysis shows that the schemes are unconditionally stable, dissipation-preserving for Maxwell's equations in a perfectly matched layer (PML) medium and have second order accuracy in both time and space. Numerical experiments for problems with exact theoretical results are given to demonstrate that the Birkhoffian multi-symplectic schemes are much more accurate in preserving energy than both the exponential finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and traditional Hamiltonian scheme. We also solve the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) propagation problem and the numerical results show that the Birkhoffian scheme recovers the magnitude of the current source and reaction history very well even after long time propagation.

  6. (2289) Proposal to conserve the name Morchella semilibera against Phallus crassipes, P. gigas and P. undosus (Ascomycota)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    True morels (Morchella) are among the most highly prized and easily recognized edible mushrooms collected during spring throughout the Northern Hemisphere. To help ensure that commercial harvests are sustainable and species diversity is preserved, management practices and conservation policies need...

  7. Geospatial database for heritage building conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basir, W. N. F. W. A.; Setan, H.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A.

    2014-02-01

    Heritage buildings are icons from the past that exist in present time. Through heritage architecture, we can learn about economic issues and social activities of the past. Nowadays, heritage buildings are under threat from natural disaster, uncertain weather, pollution and others. In order to preserve this heritage for the future generation, recording and documenting of heritage buildings are required. With the development of information system and data collection technique, it is possible to create a 3D digital model. This 3D information plays an important role in recording and documenting heritage buildings. 3D modeling and virtual reality techniques have demonstrated the ability to visualize the real world in 3D. It can provide a better platform for communication and understanding of heritage building. Combining 3D modelling with technology of Geographic Information System (GIS) will create a database that can make various analyses about spatial data in the form of a 3D model. Objectives of this research are to determine the reliability of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) technique for data acquisition of heritage building and to develop a geospatial database for heritage building conservation purposes. The result from data acquisition will become a guideline for 3D model development. This 3D model will be exported to the GIS format in order to develop a database for heritage building conservation. In this database, requirements for heritage building conservation process are included. Through this research, a proper database for storing and documenting of the heritage building conservation data will be developed.

  8. Urban Water Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moomaw, Ronald L.

    According to its abstract, this book attempts ‘an assessment of various water conservation measures aimed at reducing residential water usage.’ Its intent is to develop a research program whose ‘ultimate goal is to engender a conservation ethic among water users and managers and develop a predictable array of conservation methodologies. …’ Professor Flack indeed has presented an excellent assessment of conservation methodologies, but I believe that the proposed research program is too limited.Following a brief introductory chapter, chapter II presents an extensive review of the water conservation literature published in the 1970's and earlier. It and chapter III, which describes Flack's systematic comparison of the technical, economic, and political aspects of each conservation methodology, are the heart of the book. Chapter IV is a brief discussion and analysis of conservation programs (with examples) that a water utility might adopt. Chapter V is essentially a pilot study of methods of assessing political and social feasibility. Finally, a set of recommendations is presented in chapter VI. All in all, this book is a nice blend of literature review and original research that deals with an important issue.

  9. RESEARCH: Prospects for Preservation and Restoration of Riparian Forests in the Sacramento Valley, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Hunter; B Willett K; McCoy; Quinn; Keller

    1999-07-01

    / This GIS-based study analyzes the distribution and management of woody riparian vegetation in California's Sacramento Valley and discusses the prospects for its conservation. Although forests were the predominant floodplain vegetation prior to extensive settlement, only 3.3% of floodplain was covered by forest in the late 1980s. This remaining forest was fragmented into 2607 patches with an average area of 3.1 ha. Only 180 patches were >10 ha, with three patches >100 ha. Despite over two decades of conservation efforts, these forests are essentially unpreserved: Only 14.5% of extant forests are in public ownership or on land managed primarily for biological conservation. Some privately owned forests represent opportunities for preservation, but owing to their small size and scattered distribution, reforestation would be necessary to obtain a high cover of forest over large areas. Additionally, high property values, existing land uses, and regulated hydrology constrain conservation efforts. As a consequence of these constraints, and current distribution and ownership patterns, preservation or restoration of substantial areas of riparian forest would be extremely expensive and would divert conservation resources from other habitats in this rapidly developing state. Therefore, efforts to conserve these forests should satisfy two criteria: (1) that the specific goals are attainable with available funding and existing human uses, and (2) funding the effort will result in more effective regional conservation than would funding the conservation of other habitats.KEY WORDS: Central Valley; Conservation; Floodplains; Geographic information systems; Riparian vegetationhttp://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00267/bibs/24n1p65.html PMID:10341063

  10. Importance of Preserving Raw Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Nagihara, S.; Williams, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Our effort to make the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) data, acquired from 1969 to 1977, readily available to current and future researchers, as reported in this session last year, has made us realize some potentially serious problems that may be common to legacy scientific data. One such problem was the loss of key information contained in the original data. This happened (a) when the original investigators thought it was enough to archive only the data of interest to contemporary researchers; (b) when the data were reformatted to make them readily decipherable to current researchers by someone who did not fully understand the details of the data, thus introducing incorrectly translated information; (c) when errors associated with reading of the original data were not corrected; and (d) simply due to a programming error in reformatting. The only sure way to avoid such a problem is to archive the raw experimental data in addition to the processed data, even though they may not be readily decipherable to most current researchers. For such raw data to be useful, it is also important that complete metadata necessary to interpret the raw data be preserved.

  11. Ceramic adhesive restorations and biomimetic dentistry: tissue preservation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Tirlet, Gil; Crescenzo, Hélène; Crescenzo, Dider; Bazos, Panaghiotis

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to sophisticated adhesive techniques in contemporary dentistry, and the development of composite and ceramic materials, it is possible to reproduce a biomimetic match between substitution materials and natural teeth substrates. Biomimetics or bio-emulation allows for the association of two fundamental parameters at the heart of current therapeutic treatments: tissue preservation and adhesion. This contemporary concept makes the retention of the integrity of the maximum amount of dental tissue possible, while offering exceptional clinical longevity, and maximum esthetic results. It permits the conservation of the biological, esthetic, biomechanical and functional properties of enamel and dentin. Today, it is clearly possible to develop preparations allowing for the conservation of the enamel and dentin in order to bond partial restorations in the anterior and posterior sectors therefore limiting, as Professor Urs Belser from Geneva indicates, "the replacement of previous deficient crowns and devitalized teeth whose conservation are justified but whose residual structural state are insufficient for reliable bonding."1 This article not only addresses ceramic adhesive restoration in the anterior area, the ambassadors of biomimetic dentistry, but also highlights the possibility of occasionally integrating one or two restorations at the heart of the smile as a complement to extensive rehabilitations that require more invasive treatment.

  12. Ceramic adhesive restorations and biomimetic dentistry: tissue preservation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Tirlet, Gil; Crescenzo, Hélène; Crescenzo, Dider; Bazos, Panaghiotis

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to sophisticated adhesive techniques in contemporary dentistry, and the development of composite and ceramic materials, it is possible to reproduce a biomimetic match between substitution materials and natural teeth substrates. Biomimetics or bio-emulation allows for the association of two fundamental parameters at the heart of current therapeutic treatments: tissue preservation and adhesion. This contemporary concept makes the retention of the integrity of the maximum amount of dental tissue possible, while offering exceptional clinical longevity, and maximum esthetic results. It permits the conservation of the biological, esthetic, biomechanical and functional properties of enamel and dentin. Today, it is clearly possible to develop preparations allowing for the conservation of the enamel and dentin in order to bond partial restorations in the anterior and posterior sectors therefore limiting, as Professor Urs Belser from Geneva indicates, "the replacement of previous deficient crowns and devitalized teeth whose conservation are justified but whose residual structural state are insufficient for reliable bonding."1 This article not only addresses ceramic adhesive restoration in the anterior area, the ambassadors of biomimetic dentistry, but also highlights the possibility of occasionally integrating one or two restorations at the heart of the smile as a complement to extensive rehabilitations that require more invasive treatment. PMID:25126616

  13. In vitro conservation of Dendrobium germplasm.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Zeng, Songjun; Galdiano, Renato Fernandes; Dobránszki, Judit; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Vendrame, Wagner A

    2014-09-01

    Dendrobium is a large genus in the family Orchidaceae that exhibits vast diversity in floral characteristics, which is of considerable importance to orchid breeders, biotechnologists and collectors. Native species have high value as a result of their medicinal properties, while their hybrids are important as ornamental commodities, either as cut flowers or potted plants and are thus veritable industrial crops. Thus, preservation of Dendrobium germplasm is valuable for species conservation, breeding programs and the floriculture industry. Cryopreservation represents the only safe, efficient and cost-effective long-term storage option to facilitate the conservation of genetic resources of plant species. This review highlights 16 years of literature related to the preservation of Dendrobium germplasm and comprises the most comprehensive assessment of thorough studies performed to date, which shows reliable and reproducible results. Air-drying, encapsulation-dehydration, encapsulation-vitrification, vitrification and droplet-vitrification are the current cryopreservation methodologies that have been used to cryopreserve Dendrobium germplasm. Mature seeds, pollen, protoplasts, shoot primordia, protocorms and somatic embryos or protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) have been cryopreserved with different levels of success. Encapsulation-vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration are the most used protocol, while PLBs represent the main explant explored.

  14. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be commingled with U.S.-produced wheat by the end user, or when loaded onto a conveyance for direct delivery to...

  15. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be commingled with U.S.-produced wheat by the end user, or when loaded onto a conveyance for direct delivery to...

  16. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be commingled with U.S.-produced wheat by the end user, or when loaded onto a conveyance for direct delivery to...

  17. Working Together: Case Studies in Cooperative Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Condict Gaye

    This report examines regional and/or state cooperative preservation programs and related activities. The major part of the report is given over to case studies that present a synopsis of the key structural and program elements of cooperative preservation initiatives. These case studies include the: Office of Library and Archival Materials…

  18. Preservation Film: Platform for Digital Access Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Lee

    Preservation efforts for an increasingly digitally oriented future have turned to advanced and improved methods of preservation on microfilm, which has a life expectancy of more than 500 years when properly prepared, stored, and managed, and can support a wide range of digital access systems. Computer controlled cameras can provide significantly…

  19. Preservation of Mohave History and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsosie, Michael

    This report represents a project required by the Americans for Indian Opportunity Ambassador Program. The project involved the preservation of Mohave culture for the Mohave tribe, one of four tribes of the Colorado River Indian Tribes reservation. Preservation requires equal access to information as well as the freedom to disseminate information…

  20. Historic Preservation Vocabulary, Designations, and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stacy D.

    2011-01-01

    Preservationists use a common language that had its beginnings in the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. This act created the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, which defined the terms and treatments that have become the standard for preservation projects and plans. These terms have been used…

  1. 20 CFR 638.304 - Historical preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Register of Historic Places” at 36 CFR part 800. ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Historical preservation. 638.304 Section 638... § 638.304 Historical preservation. The Job Corps Director shall review the “National Register...

  2. 20 CFR 638.304 - Historical preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Register of Historic Places” at 36 CFR part 800. ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Historical preservation. 638.304 Section 638... § 638.304 Historical preservation. The Job Corps Director shall review the “National Register...

  3. Home Food Preservation Training for Extension Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goard, Linnette Mizer; Hill, Melinda; Shumaker, Katharine; Warrix, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    During times of economic downturn, there has been an increased interest in home food preservation. As the primary resource for current research-based recommendations, a team of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences educators with specialization in food safety and food preservation responded to this demand by developing a standardized food…

  4. [Application on food preservative of antimicrobial peptides].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyan; Mu, Yu; Zhao, Baohua

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an integral component of the innate immune system, it can counteract outer membrane pathogen such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoan and so on. Owing to the sterilization and innocuity, it has the potential to be crude food preservative. In this paper the uses of antibacterial peptides in the food preservative were analyzed.

  5. Building a New Historic Preservation Trades Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeg, Rhonda L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of the program coordinator of a new two-year preservation trades program at Harford Community College in Bel Air, Maryland. The two-year associate in applied sciences degree offered at Harford Community College (HCC) is a Technical Professional Studies program in Building Preservation and Restoration (BPR).…

  6. Corn, alfalfa and grass silage preservation principles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensiling is the primary means of preserving moist forages for feeding livestock. In ensiling, the crop is stored anaerobically, and sugars in the crop are fermented by lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop. The crop is preserved by the combination of the acids produced by the lactic acid bacter...

  7. A Big Problem for Magellan: Food Preservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvao, Cecilia; Reis, Pedro; Freire, Sofia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present data related to how a Portuguese teacher developed the module "A big problem for Magellan: Food preservation." Students were asked to plan an investigation in order to identify which were the best food preservation methods in the XV and XVI centuries of Portuguese overseas navigation, and then establish a parallel between…

  8. SYNERGISTIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR REPLACEMENT OF CCA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential synergistic combinations of environmentally-safe biocides as wood preservatives. These wood preservatives could be potential replacements for the heavy-metal based CCA.

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride [DDAC] was...

  9. Preserving the Character of Historic Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepenoff, Bonnie

    1991-01-01

    Historic buildings, trails, and other camp features form the character of a particular camp and provide an escape to the past. Rehabilitating and preserving old camp structures requires attention to details and maintenance considerations. The U.S. Department of the Interior publishes guidelines for identifying and preserving historical properties.…

  10. Digital Preservation and Metadata: History, Theory, Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazinger, Susan S.

    This book addresses critical issues of digital preservation, providing guidelines for protecting resources from dealing with obsolescence, to responsibilities, methods of preservation, cost, and metadata formats. It also shows numerous national and international institutions that provide frameworks for digital libraries and archives. The first…

  11. Preservation of Scientific Serials: Three Current Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arms, William Y.

    2000-01-01

    Concentrates on three case studies as examples of typical publications where the definitive versions are already in electronic formats and maintained online, and discusses implications for long-term preservation selection; preservation requirements; publishers as archivists; stability for the next century; copyright; technology and standards;…

  12. Problems in the Preservation of Electronic Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lim Siew; Ramaiah, Chennupati K.; Wal, Pitt Kuan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the preservation of electronic records. Highlights include differences between physical and electronic records; volume of electronic records; physical media; authenticity; migration of electronic records; metadata; legal issues; improved storage media; and projects for preservation of electronic records. (LRW)

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of Tissue Preservation

    Cancer.gov

    Modern diagnostic pathology requires that both morphology and molecular integrity are preserved throughout processing and handling of the tissue. The major challenge for molecular analysis of breast cancer samples is to preserve the molecular integrity of the specimen while insuring the structural integrity needed for diagnostic pathology.

  14. Long-term preservation of Anammox bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deposit of useful microorganisms in culture collections requires long-term preservation and successful reactivation techniques. The goal of this study was to develop a simple preservation protocol for the long-term storage and reactivation of the anammox biomass. To achieve this, anammox biomass w...

  15. Preservation in the Age of Google: Digitization, Digital Preservation, and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The cultural heritage preservation community now functions largely within the environment of digital technologies. This article begins by juxtaposing definitions of the terms "digitization for preservation" and "digital preservation" within a sociotechnical environment for which Google serves as a relevant metaphor. It then reviews two reports…

  16. ESCRS Binkhorst lecture 2002: Pseudophakic preservative maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kensaku; Ibaraki, Nobuhiro; Goto, Yoko; Oogiya, Shin; Ishigaki, Junko; Ota, Ichiro; Miyake, Sampei

    2003-09-01

    Many antiglaucoma eyedrops are reported to cause cystoid macular edema (CME) in aphakia and pseudophakia. We review 4 clinical and laboratory studies that compare the incidence of CME in early postoperative pseudophakia in eyes that received preserved latanoprost and timolol, nonpreserved timolol, and the preserved and nonpreserved vehicle for these drugs and looked at the morphological damage to cells and the changes in the indicators of cytokine and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis caused by latanoprost and timolol and the preservative benzalkonium chloride. Based on the findings of these studies, which indicate that the preservative causes increased synthesis of PGs and other substances and intensified postoperative inflammation, the term pseudophakic preservative maculopathy is proposed for CME caused by antiglaucoma eyedrops.

  17. Land conservation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, F.R.; Van Lier, H.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book deals with the planning of the future uses of land with emphasis on land planning for multiple purposes (e.g. agriculture, outdoor recreation, nature preservation, landscaping, mining, housing etc.). Examples of planning are given. Several types of areas are covered such as newly reclaimed land, rural areas, mining areas, urban fringes, and coastal areas.

  18. Kansas urban conservation handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The contents are: the problem in Kansas; policies and procedures; urban conservation planning; stormwater management, erosion, and sediment control; control measure characteristics; site planning process; determine erosion and sedimentation control measures; procedure for input process of subdivision plans.

  19. Conservation among Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughston, George A.; Protinsky, Howard O.

    1979-01-01

    The majority of 63 elderly women were able to pass tests in the conservation of mass (98 percent), volume (100 percent), and surface area (65 percent). These results conflict with previous research about Piagetian abilities of elderly people. (RL)

  20. Conservation of wading birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kushlan, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The conservation and management of wading birds has received considerable attention over the past twenty years, through research, population monitoring, habitat protection, and through activities of specialist groups devoted to all three groups, the herons, ibises and allies, and flamingos. While populations are best known in North America, greatest advances in knowledge may have come in Australasia. The status of most species and many populations is now sufficiently known to allow assessment of risk. Conservation and management techniques allow creation of global and regional action plans for conservation of many species. Global action plans are being developed, but few regional plans have been undertaken. Management of nesting sites is now particularly well appreciated. Although known in broad stroke, much remains to be learned about managing feeding habitat. Problems related to disturbance, conflict with humans, habitat loss, contaminants and other environmental stresses remain for some species and many populations. New challenges lie in creating conservation action that account for genetic stocks.

  1. Fine Tuning Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1983

    1983-01-01

    An energy conservation program at a Massachusetts vocational technical high school uses a school-based time switch to program part of the heating system. In addition, some phases of the program provided practical experience for students. (MLF)

  2. Energy: Conservation, Energy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive energy conservation program at College of the Holy Cross has saved nearly one-third of the fuel oil and one-fifth of the electricity used at the college; briefs on boilers, lights, design. (Author/MLF)

  3. The Librarian as Conservator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, James W.; Krupp, Robert G.

    1970-01-01

    Guideposts for the librarian who seeks to establish a total conservation program: organizing the program and management in selection, screening, maintenance, treatment, personnel, costs, and cooperation. (Author/JS)

  4. Monitoring for conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Williams, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    Human-mediated environmental changes have resulted in appropriate concern for the conservation of ecological systems and have led to the development of many ecological monitoring programs worldwide. Many programs that are identified with the purpose of `surveillance? represent an inefficient use of conservation funds and effort. Here, we revisit the 1964 paper by Platt and argue that his recommendations about the conduct of science are equally relevant to the conduct of ecological monitoring programs. In particular, we argue that monitoring should not be viewed as a stand-alone activity, but instead as a component of a larger process of either conservation-oriented science or management. Corresponding changes in monitoring focus and design would lead to substantial increases in the efficiency and usefulness of monitoring results in conservation.

  5. IUCN Conservation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budowski, Gerardo

    1972-01-01

    Brief, but comprehensive, description of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), a non-governmental organization located in Morges, Switzerland. Presents its objectives, broad purpose and describes the specific activities of the organization. (LK)

  6. Reasons to Conserve Nature.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Richard G

    2016-05-01

    Is it sufficient to base arguments for conservation on the intrinsic value of nature, regardless of the services and economic benefits that biodiversity provides for humans? This question underlies much recent debate that has been at times acrimonious and has led to calls for a more inclusive approach to conservation. Yet melding different ideologies within a unified conceptual framework has proven difficult. Here I describe an approach that recognizes the importance of the level of biological organization and spatial extent in determining the strength of alternative arguments for why we should conserve nature. I argue that the framework helps reconcile contrasting viewpoints and brings clarity to when different conservation management approaches (for instance, regulation versus monetary valuation) are most appropriate. PMID:26936225

  7. Potential conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzinger, Michael; Popovych, Roman O.

    2008-10-15

    We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman et al. [J. Math. Phys. 47, 113505 (2006)]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings, and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of these results is given. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

  8. Effects of Cover Crop Systems on Soil Physical Properties and Carbon/Nitrogen Sequestration in Coastal Plain Soils Under Conservation Tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices are needed to prevent erosion and preserve soil and water quality. Conservation tillage has been found to be an effective environmental practice. Uncertainty exists concerning the impact of cover crops with conservation tillage on the total agricultural environment. A study...

  9. ON ENERGY CONSERVATION OF THE SIMPLIFIED TAKAHASHI-IMADA METHOD*, **

    PubMed Central

    Hairer, Ernst; McLachlan, Robert I.; Skeel, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    In long-time numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems, and especially in molecular dynamics simulation, it is important that the energy is well conserved. For symplectic integrators applied with sufficiently small step size, this is guaranteed by the existence of a modified Hamiltonian that is exactly conserved up to exponentially small terms. This article is concerned with the simplified Takahashi-Imada method, which is a modification of the Störmer-Verlet method that is as easy to implement but has improved accuracy. This integrator is symmetric and volume-preserving, but no longer symplectic. We study its long-time energy conservation and give theoretical arguments, supported by numerical experiments, which show the possibility of a drift in the energy (linear or like a random walk). With respect to energy conservation, this article provides empirical and theoretical data concerning the importance of using a symplectic integrator. PMID:20539750

  10. Rotator cuff tear: physical examination and conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Eiji

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common shoulder diseases. It is interesting that some rotator cuff tears are symptomatic, whereas others are asymptomatic. Pain is the most common symptom of patients with a tear. Even in patients with an asymptomatic tear, it may become symptomatic with an increase in tear size. Physical examination is extremely important to evaluate the presence, location, and extent of a tear. It also helps us to understand the mechanism of pain. Conservative treatment often works. Patients with well-preserved function of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus are the best candidates for conservative treatment. After a successful conservative treatment, the symptom once disappeared may come back again. This recurrence of symptoms is related to tear expansion. Those with high risk of tear expansion and those with less functional rotator cuff muscles are less likely to respond to conservative treatment. They may need a surgical treatment.

  11. Conservation Kickstart- Catalyzing Conservation Initiatives Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treinish, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) is a nonprofit organization that collects environmental data to catalyze conservation initiatives worldwide. Adventure athletes have the skills and motivation to reach the most remote corners of the world. ASC utilizes those skills to provide the scientific community with data while providing the outdoor community with purpose beyond the personal high of reaching a summit or rowing across an ocean. We carefully select projects, choosing partnerships that will maximize the impact of ASC volunteers. Each project must have a clear path to a tangible conservation outcome and demonstrate a clear need for our brand of volunteers. We partner with government agencies, universities, and independant reseachers to kickstart data collection efforts around the world. Last year, through a partnership with the Olympic National Forest, 20 volunteers from the Seattle area set up and monitored camera traps in an effort to survey for costal Pacific marten. Our work led to the species' listing as "critically imperiled" with NatureServe. A partnership with the inaugural Great Pacific Race, engaging trans-Pacific rowing teams, searched for microplastics in the Pacific Ocean as part of our ongoing microplastics campaign. In a multi-year partnership with the American Prairie Reserve (APR), ASC volunteer crews live and work on the Reserve collecting wildlife data year round. The data we obtain directly informs the Reserve's wildlife management decisions. On this project, our crews have safely and effectively navigated temperature extremes from -30 degrees to 100+ degrees while traveling in a remote location. We are currently scouting projects in the Okavango Delta of Botswana and the rainforest of Suriname where we will be able to cover large amounts of area in a short periord of time. ASC is at the crossroads of the adventure and coservation science communities. Our approach of answering specific questions by using highly skilled and

  12. Preservation for science: the ecological society of america and the campaign for glacier bay national monument.

    PubMed

    Rumore, Gina

    2012-01-01

    Between 1917 and 1945, the Ecological Society of America (ESA) housed a Committee for the Preservation of Natural Conditions specifically charged with identifying and taking political action toward the preservation of wilderness sites for scientific study. While several historians have analyzed the social and political contexts of the Preservation Committee, none has addressed the scientific context that gave rise to the Committee and to political activism by ESA members. Among the Preservation Committee's lobbying efforts, the naming of Glacier Bay, Alaska, as a national monument in 1925 stands out as a unique success. I argue that the campaign for the preservation of Glacier Bay reveals the methodological ambitions ecologists had for their science in the 1920s and 1930s and demonstrates how ecologists understood the role of place in biological field studies. It represented preservation for science. Most of the political activities undertaken by the ESA in the interwar years, however, turned out to be science for conservation, which rarely involved lobbying for the protection of active research sites. In conjunction with changes in ecological methodology in the 1940s, the Committee's unclear scientific mission contributed to its being disbanded in 1945.

  13. Psychological Counseling of Female Fertility Preservation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Angela K.; Klock, Susan C.; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Smith, Kristin N.; Kazer, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Young cancer patients are increasingly interested in preserving their fertility prior to undergoing gonadotoxic therapies. Although the medical safety and treatment protocols for fertility preservation have been well documented, limited research has addressed the emotional issues which arise in fertility preservation patients. We briefly review the literature on the psychosocial issues in adult female fertility preservation treatment and describe our experiences within this patient population patient. Our findings suggest that several important issues to be addressed during the psychological counseling of adult female fertility preservation patients include: 1) pre-existing psychological distress in patients undergoing treatment, 2) choice of fertility preservation strategy in the face of an uncertain relationship future, 3) decision making regarding use of third party reproduction (e.g., sperm/egg donation, gestational surrogacy), 4) treatment expectations regarding pregnancy and miscarriage, 5) ethical issues related to treatment including the creation, cryopreservation, and disposition of embryos/oocytes, and 6) decision regret from patients who declined fertility preservation. PMID:25996581

  14. Cracks preserve kimberlite melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, R. C.; Vigouroux-Caillibot, N.; Donovan, J. J.; Russell, K.

    2009-12-01

    The chemical composition of kimberlite melts has previously been estimated by measuring aphanitic intrusive rocks (deposit composition) or by partial melting experiments on carbonated lherzolites (source composition). Pervasively altered, degassed and contaminated material preclude the determination of the primitive melt composition. Here we present data on melt compositions trapped in unaltered olivine cracks that have been healed and overgrown prior to shallow level emplacement. During the ascent of kimberlite magma the prograding crack tip samples mantle peridotite xenoliths. Xenoliths rapidly disaggregate over the first few kilometers of transport producing a population of olivine xenocrysts that are released to the fluid-rich melt. Rapid ascent of the kimberlite magma causes depressurization and creates internal elastic stresses in the olivine crystals that can only be alleviated by volumetric expansion or brittle failure. On the time scales operative during kimberlite ascent volume expansion is negligible and brittle failure occurs. Small wetting angles between the fluid-rich melt and olivine allow infiltration of the melt into the crack. These very thin cracks (<5 µm) heal rapidly and preserve primary kimberlitic material en route to the surface. We use the electron microprobe with a focused beam (interaction volume less than 2 µm) to analyze the small volumes of material found in the healed cracks of the olivine. We analyzed for 18 elements including oxygen, which we obtained by utilizing a non-linear time dependent intensity acquisition and empirically determined mass absorption coefficients. By accurately knowing the amount of oxygen in a sample, we assign oxygen molecules to all other analyzed elements (e.g. MgO, Al2O3) and the remaining oxygen is assigned to hydrogen and carbon. The analysis total is used as a constraint on the proportion of each species. Mg/Ca ratios of the cracks vary from 0.6-5 indicating a compositional continuum between alkali

  15. Physiology in conservation translocations.

    PubMed

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R; Munn, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining 'success' as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall under a

  16. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  17. [Strategies for Conservation of Endangered Amphibian and Reptile Species].

    PubMed

    Anan'eva, N B; Uteshev, V K; Orlova, N L; Gakhova, E N

    2015-01-01

    Strategies for conservation of endangered amphibian and reptile species are discussed. One-fifth of all vertebrates belongs to the category of "endangered species," and amphibians are first on the list (41%). Every fifth reptile species is in danger of extinction, and insufficient information is characteristic of every other fifth. As has been demonstrated, efficient development of a network of nature conservation areas, cryopreservation, and methods for laboratory breeding and reintroduction play.the key roles in adequate strategies for preservation of amphibians and reptiles. PMID:26638239

  18. [Strategies for Conservation of Endangered Amphibian and Reptile Species].

    PubMed

    Anan'eva, N B; Uteshev, V K; Orlova, N L; Gakhova, E N

    2015-01-01

    Strategies for conservation of endangered amphibian and reptile species are discussed. One-fifth of all vertebrates belongs to the category of "endangered species," and amphibians are first on the list (41%). Every fifth reptile species is in danger of extinction, and insufficient information is characteristic of every other fifth. As has been demonstrated, efficient development of a network of nature conservation areas, cryopreservation, and methods for laboratory breeding and reintroduction play.the key roles in adequate strategies for preservation of amphibians and reptiles.

  19. Management of Labral and Chondral Disease in Hip Preservation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Salata, Michael J; Vasileff, William K

    2015-12-01

    The techniques utilized for the management of articular cartilage and labrum injuries during hip preservation surgery have changed dramatically recently. Conservative treatment may involve image-guided injection of cortisone or viscosupplementation in conjunction with oral NSAIDs and physical therapy. Damage to the labrum runs a broad spectrum, and the treatments are individualized, but span from debridement to repair and reconstruction. The overarching goal of labral treatment is to restore the native functions of the labrum to allow for more normal biomechanical function. Similarly, cartilage injuries can be managed a number of different ways, including with debridement, microfracture or drilling, cartilage transplants, and higher level restorative techniques. These cartilage restoration techniques have evolved rapidly as well, and may include the use of scaffolds, allograft cartilage cells, and other stem-cell-related procedures.

  20. Introduction: Female fertility preservation: innovations and questions.

    PubMed

    Frydman, René; Grynberg, Michaël

    2016-01-01

    Oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation represents one of the most important advances in the field of reproductive medicine and biology. Preserving a woman's potential for becoming a genetic mother is now possible for numerous diseases that could impair female fertility either by themselves or as a result of their treatments. However, female fertility preservation is still at the pioneering level and is thus often considered an experimental treatment either from a technical standpoint or in the clinical situation in which it is discussed. As a consequence, many ethics issues are raised with fertility preservation treatment in infants, adolescents, and young women.

  1. On orthogonality preserving quadratic stochastic operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Taha, Muhammad Hafizuddin Mohd

    2015-05-01

    A quadratic stochastic operator (in short QSO) is usually used to present the time evolution of differing species in biology. Some quadratic stochastic operators have been studied by Lotka and Volterra. In the present paper, we first give a simple characterization of Volterra QSO in terms of absolutely continuity of discrete measures. Further, we introduce a notion of orthogonal preserving QSO, and describe such kind of operators defined on two dimensional simplex. It turns out that orthogonal preserving QSOs are permutations of Volterra QSO. The associativity of genetic algebras generated by orthogonal preserving QSO is studied too.

  2. Introduction: Female fertility preservation: innovations and questions.

    PubMed

    Frydman, René; Grynberg, Michaël

    2016-01-01

    Oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation represents one of the most important advances in the field of reproductive medicine and biology. Preserving a woman's potential for becoming a genetic mother is now possible for numerous diseases that could impair female fertility either by themselves or as a result of their treatments. However, female fertility preservation is still at the pioneering level and is thus often considered an experimental treatment either from a technical standpoint or in the clinical situation in which it is discussed. As a consequence, many ethics issues are raised with fertility preservation treatment in infants, adolescents, and young women. PMID:26612064

  3. On orthogonality preserving quadratic stochastic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Taha, Muhammad Hafizuddin Mohd

    2015-05-15

    A quadratic stochastic operator (in short QSO) is usually used to present the time evolution of differing species in biology. Some quadratic stochastic operators have been studied by Lotka and Volterra. In the present paper, we first give a simple characterization of Volterra QSO in terms of absolutely continuity of discrete measures. Further, we introduce a notion of orthogonal preserving QSO, and describe such kind of operators defined on two dimensional simplex. It turns out that orthogonal preserving QSOs are permutations of Volterra QSO. The associativity of genetic algebras generated by orthogonal preserving QSO is studied too.

  4. Preserving a Piece of the True Cross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vorkin, David H.

    2013-01-01

    I will discuss shared concerns of Curators and Collections Management Specialists at the National Air and Space Museum over the proper methods for identifying, documenting and preserving astronomical instrumentation in the Museum's purview as well as in the realm of modern astronomical research. Questions of "what" and "how" will be raised and discussed, including the issue of preserving the historical character of instrumentation deemed still useful to astronomy. As part of this discussion, we will also consider: "why" make the effort to preserve? What is the value of a personal physical encounter with the "real thing?"

  5. Preservation Methods Utilized for Space Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vodovotz, Yael; Bourland, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Food for manned space flight has been provided by NASA-Johnson Space Center since 1962. The various mission scenarios and space craft designs dictated the type of food preservation methodologies required to meet mission objectives. The preservation techniques used in space flight include freeze-dehydration, thermostabilization, irradiation, freezing and moisture adjustment. Innovative packaging material and techniques enhanced the shelf-stability of the food items. Future space voyages may include extended duration exploration missions requiring new packaging materials and advanced preservation techniques to meet mission goals of up to 5-year shelf-life foods.

  6. Creative Conservation Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Jason

    2015-04-01

    I am a fellow with the International League of Conservation photographers (iLCP) and have been focused on photographing conservation dynamics at the intersection of social and environmental issues for a decade. Subjects have included traditional concerns such as deforestation, water conservation, endangered species, and fisheries. However, I rarely make photographs of the traditional nature, wildlife, landscapes, or environmental atrocities that most people think of when they think about environmentalism. Instead, I photograph people and how they live on the planet, as I believe passionately that without also considering social and cultural concerns, we will not be able to effectively and sustainably do conservation work or achieve positive environmental change. My presentation will share recent photography projects on forest conservation in Indonesian Borneo and fisheries management in Central America where I used a 'stakeholder profile-based' process to broadly survey the complexity of the issues while also making personal connections for these projects' diverse audiences. Through these case studies I will explore the opportunities and challenges of combining the authenticity, accuracy, and scientific validity of journalistic and documentary work with the emotional impact of the conventions of art and storytelling.

  7. An exceptionally preserved myodocopid ostracod from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Siveter, David J; Briggs, Derek E G; Siveter, Derek J; Sutton, Mark D

    2010-05-22

    An exceptionally preserved new ostracod crustacean from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK, represents only the third fully documented Palaeozoic ostracod with soft-part preservation. Appendages, gills, gut system, lateral compound eyes and even a medial eye with a Bellonci organ are preserved, allowing assignment of the fossil to a new genus and species of cylindroleberidid myodocope (Myodocopida, Cylindroleberididae). The Bellonci organ is recorded for the first time in fossil ostracods. The find also represents a rare occurrence of gills in fossil ostracods and confirms the earliest direct evidence of a respiratory-cum-circulatory system in the group. The species demonstrates remarkably conserved morphology within myodocopes over a period of 425 Myr. Its shell morphology more closely resembles several families of myodocopes other than the Cylindroleberididae, especially the Cypridinidae and Sarsiellidae, thus questioning the utility of the carapace alone in establishing the affinity of fossil ostracods.

  8. Using a curvilinear grid to construct symmetry-preserving discretizations for Lagrangian gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.; Shashkov, M.

    1999-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to construct discretizations for the equations of Lagrangian gas dynamics that preserve plane, cylindrical, and spherical symmetry in the solution of the original differential equations. The new method uses a curvilinear grid that is reconstructed from a given logically rectangular distribution of nodes. The sides of the cells of the reconstructed grid can be segments of straight lines or arcs of local circles. The procedure is exact for straight lines and circles; that is, it reproduces rectangular and polar grids exactly. The authors use the method of support operators to construct a conservative finite-difference method that they demonstrate will preserve spatial symmetries for certain choices of the initial grid. They also introduce a curvilinear version of artificial edge viscosity that also preserves symmetry. They present numerical examples to demonstrate their theoretical considerations and the robustness of the new method.

  9. High-resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurae scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme.

  10. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek S; Khatavkar, Roheet A

    2010-01-01

    Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use. PMID:20582212

  11. Fertility preservation and minimizing reproductive damage in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Mitwally, Mohamed F M

    2007-07-01

    Recent advances in oncology have helped in the survival and cure of increasing numbers of childhood cancer patients and those during their reproductive age period. This has increased the need to improve existing technology, and prompted the search for new technologies, to minimize the gonadotoxic effects of cancer treatment and preserve human fertility. Conservative surgical approaches for cancer treatment have been widely accepted following progress in early detection of cancer and accumulating long-term outcome safety data. Gonadal suppression to increase resistance to cancer treatment by gonadotropin analogues and sex hormones has been suggested. However, while this is unlikely to be effective in males, there is no general consensus on its success in the female. Fertility preservation options for both male and female patients include cryopreservation of embryos, gametes and gonads. While embryo cryopreservation is a well-established and successful technique, there are several obvious limitations. Gamete cryopreservation is very successful in males (sperm freezing) while still experimental in females (oocyte freezing), with growing evidence suggesting its potential success. Gonadal cryopreservation is still in its early stages of experimental development, both in males (testicular tissue cryopreservation and in vitro spermatogenesis) and female (ovarian tissue cryopreservation and in vitro follicular maturation).

  12. Radical reduction of upper extremity lymphedema with preservation of perforators.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Christopher J; Sassu, Paolo; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri; Spanio di Spilimbergo, Stefano; Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2009-09-01

    Excisional procedures have been successfully utilized by different authors in multistage treatment of upper extremity lymphedema. We have used microsurgical principles of perforator flap surgery in order to develop a one-stage procedure that enables a radical reduction of the lymphedematous tissue with preservation of the vascular supply to the overlying skin.Between March 2000 and February 2007, 11 patients affected by late stage II lymphedema underwent radical reduction of the affected tissues with preservation of perforators. Perforator vessels from the radial and posterior interosseous arteries were identified and through medial and lateral forearm incisions, skin flaps were raised off the underlying lymphedematous tissue and the affected tissue was removed off the deep fascia. At a mean follow-up of 17.8 months the average percentage reductions above and below the elbow, at the wrist, and the hand were 15.1%, 20.7%, 0.5%, and 3.6%, respectively. Statistical analysis showed significant circumference reduction above and below the elbow (P = 0.048 and 0.022, respectively) but not at the wrist and hand. There were no cases of wound breakdown, skin necrosis, or cellulitis in the postoperative period. Four patients complained of mild numbness confined to the vicinity of the surgical incisions.Microvascular principles applied to the radical excision of the subcutaneous tissue seems to offer a new promising one-stage surgical procedure in patients affected by upper extremity lymphedema that has failed conservative therapy. PMID:19692901

  13. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity.

    PubMed

    Saldaño, Tadeo E; Monzon, Alexander M; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  14. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  15. New challenges facing traditional nature reserves: Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) conservation in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Ma, Lichao; Feng, Limin

    2006-12-01

    Traditional conservation strategies can effectively preserve biodiversity within nature reserves, but may fail to mitigate the conflicts between rural development and wildlife conservation. This paper discusses the magnitude of the conflict and its development over time, focusing on elephant conservation and land resource management within and around nature reserves. We suggest that regulations alone can satisfy neither the demands to maintain biodiversity and ecosystem services nor the demands to achieve human welfare. More innovative tools such as informed land-use planning and integrated conservation development projects are called for to reduce the agricultural interface with elephant range, and therefore to alleviate the damage caused by the conflict.

  16. New challenges facing traditional nature reserves: Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) conservation in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Ma, Lichao; Feng, Limin

    2006-12-01

    Traditional conservation strategies can effectively preserve biodiversity within nature reserves, but may fail to mitigate the conflicts between rural development and wildlife conservation. This paper discusses the magnitude of the conflict and its development over time, focusing on elephant conservation and land resource management within and around nature reserves. We suggest that regulations alone can satisfy neither the demands to maintain biodiversity and ecosystem services nor the demands to achieve human welfare. More innovative tools such as informed land-use planning and integrated conservation development projects are called for to reduce the agricultural interface with elephant range, and therefore to alleviate the damage caused by the conflict. PMID:21396011

  17. Energy conservation in distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, T. W.; Dweck, J. S.; Weinberg, M.; Armstrong, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    An audit of major industrial and processes and key colums in each major process indicated that approximately twoquads of energy were consumed for distillation in the US in 1976. Energy usage by industry is included: petroleum refineries, 66% chemical (including petrochemical) industry, 29% natural gas liquids processing, 5%. Techniques and current practices for conserving distillation energy are reviewed, and guidelines indicating those process conditons which favor the use of each energy conserving technique are enumerated. Expressions for payout time for tray and control retrofit options are developed based on energy savings and increased throughput. Calculations for industrial colums suggested that both types of retrofits would frequently have short (,6 months) payout times based on either criterion. Extractive distillation is also discussed, and criteria enabling the estimation of the energy which may be conserved using this technique are developed. Good housekeeping practices and field techniques for checking the energy efficiency of industrial distillations are also discussed.

  18. Area, length and thickness conservation: Dogma or reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Isabelle; Callot, Jean Paul

    2012-08-01

    The basic assumption of quantitative structural geology is the preservation of material during deformation. However the hypothesis of volume conservation alone does not help to predict past or future geometries and so this assumption is usually translated into bed length in 2D (or area in 3D) and thickness conservation. When subsurface data are missing, geologists may extrapolate surface data to depth using the kink-band approach. These extrapolations, preserving both thicknesses and dips, lead to geometries which are restorable but often erroneous, due to both disharmonic deformation and internal deformation of layers. First, the Bolivian Sub-Andean Zone case is presented to highlight the evolution of the concepts on which balancing is based, and the important role played by a decoupling level in enhancing disharmony. Second, analogue models are analyzed to test the validity of the balancing techniques. Chamberlin's excess area approach is shown to be on average valid. However, neither the length nor the thicknesses are preserved. We propose that in real cases, the length preservation hypothesis during shortening could also be a wrong assumption. If the data are good enough to image the decollement level, the Chamberlin excess area method could be used to compute the bed length changes.

  19. Preserving electronic records: Not the easiest task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Fynnette

    1993-01-01

    The National Archives and Records Administration has had a program for accessioning, describing, preserving and providing reference service to the electronic records (machine-readable records) created by Federal agencies for more than twenty years. Although there have been many changes in the name of the office, its basic mission has remained the same: to preserve and make available those records created by Federal agencies that the National Archives has determined to have value beyond the short-term need of the originating agency. A phrase that was once coined for a preservation conference still applies: the National Archives, when it decides to accept the transfer of records into its custody, is committing itself to preserving these records for perpetuity.

  20. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  1. 36 CFR 910.32 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE... with the Secretary of the Interior's “Standards for Historic Preservation Projects”: (36 CFR part...

  2. 36 CFR 910.32 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE... with the Secretary of the Interior's “Standards for Historic Preservation Projects”: (36 CFR part...

  3. 36 CFR 910.14 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT AREA Urban Planning and Design Concerns § 910.14 Historic preservation. (a) The Development...

  4. 36 CFR 910.32 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE... with the Secretary of the Interior's “Standards for Historic Preservation Projects”: (36 CFR part...

  5. 36 CFR 910.32 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE... with the Secretary of the Interior's “Standards for Historic Preservation Projects”: (36 CFR part...

  6. Laboratory Exercise to Evaluate Hay Preservatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, R. L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a laboratory exercise designed to demonstrate the effects of moisture on hay preservation products in a manner that does not require large amounts of equipment or instructor time. Materials, procedures, and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  7. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, James D.; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of this series devoted to heart failure (HF), we review the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Gaps in knowledge and needed future research are discussed. PMID:24663384

  8. 36 CFR 910.32 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE... with the Secretary of the Interior's “Standards for Historic Preservation Projects”: (36 CFR part...

  9. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. PMID:24623991

  10. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-25

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  11. Hyperosmolar cold storage kidney preservative solution.

    PubMed

    Masuda, J Y; Bleich, R N; Beckerman, J H

    1975-04-01

    A hyperosmolar kidney preservative solution which can maintain kidneys from experimental animals viable for up to 72 hours is described. Using the criterion of a one-month failure rate, the cold storage preservation method was found to be superior to machine preservation methods. Sachs' solution was found to be superior to all other cold storage solutions. The most important aspect of the hyperosmolar kidney preservative solution appears to be its ability to maintain normal intracellular electrolyte composition and to prevent cellular damage due to swelling. The present formula requires that the basic solution and a magnesium chloride additive solution be prepared separately and combined before use. A stable combined solution is proposed which can be sterilized by membrane filtration. PMID:1130414

  12. 36 CFR 60.6 - Nominations by the State Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation programs. 60.6 Section 60.6 Parks... HISTORIC PLACES § 60.6 Nominations by the State Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation programs. (a) The State Historic Preservation Officer is responsible for identifying...

  13. 36 CFR 60.6 - Nominations by the State Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation programs. 60.6 Section 60.6 Parks... HISTORIC PLACES § 60.6 Nominations by the State Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation programs. (a) The State Historic Preservation Officer is responsible for identifying...

  14. 36 CFR 60.6 - Nominations by the State Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation programs. 60.6 Section 60.6 Parks... HISTORIC PLACES § 60.6 Nominations by the State Historic Preservation Officer under approved State Historic Preservation programs. (a) The State Historic Preservation Officer is responsible for identifying...

  15. Conservation of tidal marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Daiber, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the first attempt to examine collectively the various uses and the consequences of marsh conservation efforts. Author Franklin Daiber emphasizes tidal marsh conservation from a holistic perspective rather than from the perspective of a single purpose or special economic interest. He addresses a topic receiving increasing attention, namely the concept of open marsh management as a means of controlling mosquito production without harmful effects on other marsh organisms. Topics considered include: water management; dikes, impoundments, ponds and ditches; reclaimed land and impoundments; ditching and ponding for mosquito control; sewage disposal and waste treatment; dredge material for wetland restoration; insecticides; oil pollution; and petroleum hydrocarbon interactions.

  16. [Dismemberment with unusual preservation of cadaver parts].

    PubMed

    Madea, B

    1994-01-01

    Report on a case of criminal dismembering of a corpse and the effect of vinyl on postmortem changes. Two years after murder a dismembered body, the body parts wrapped into plastic bags, were found buried 30-50 cm deep into loose earth. The whole body as well as the inner organs were very well preserved. Obviously the air-proof conditions in the plastic bag were a supporting factor for the good preservation. PMID:8198432

  17. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  18. Preservation of food products by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McGivney, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    The use of irradiation to preserve food has the potential to significantly enhance our capacity to maximize the quality and quantity of the food we consume. In a world in which distribution of food occurs across continents and in which malnourished populations are in dire need of basic food products, any safe, effective, and efficient means of preserving food is more than welcome. Irradiation, as a method for food preservation, has been studied for more than 30 years. This discussion focuses on this most recent method for the preservation of food with particular emphasis on its effects on the safety, nutritive, and aesthetic values of the food preserved by irradiation. The use of ionizing radiation as a method to preserve foods is one that has been demonstrated to be effective for a variety of food classes. Irradiation offers a means to decontaminate, disinfest, and retard the spoilage of the food supply. At the same time, it appears that the wholesomeness of these food products is maintained. Nutritive value can be sustained by use of effective doses of radiation. Concerns over the safety of irradiated food are rooted in questions regarding the potential induction of radioactivity, harmful radiolytic products, and pathogenic radiation-resistant or mutant strains of microorganisms. Research findings have allayed concerns over safety. However, more research is necessary to conclusively resolve these safety issues. Food irradiation is a promising technology that has and will contribute to our ability to feed the people of this world. This technology is but one of many available ways to preserve our greatest natural resource, the food supply. Enhancement of the ability to preserve food by irradiation will facilitate the distribution of food from fertile developed regions to the malnourished peoples of underdeveloped countries. 21 references.

  19. Confronting and resolving competing values behind conservation objectives.

    PubMed

    Karp, Daniel S; Mendenhall, Chase D; Callaway, Elizabeth; Frishkoff, Luke O; Kareiva, Peter M; Ehrlich, Paul R; Daily, Gretchen C

    2015-09-01

    Diverse motivations for preserving nature both inspire and hinder its conservation. Optimal conservation strategies may differ radically depending on the objective. For example, creating nature reserves may prevent extinctions through protecting severely threatened species, whereas incentivizing farmland hedgerows may benefit people through bolstering pest-eating or pollinating species. Win-win interventions that satisfy multiple objectives are alluring, but can also be elusive. To achieve better outcomes, we developed and implemented a practical typology of nature conservation framed around seven common conservation objectives. Using an intensively studied bird assemblage in southern Costa Rica as a case study, we applied the typology in the context of biodiversity's most pervasive threat: habitat conversion. We found that rural habitats in a varied tropical landscape, comprising small farms, villages, forest fragments, and forest reserves, provided biodiversity-driven processes that benefit people, such as pollination, seed dispersal, and pest consumption. However, species valued for their rarity, endemism, and evolutionary distinctness declined in farmland. Conserving tropical forest on farmland increased species that international tourists value, but not species discussed in Costa Rican newspapers. Despite these observed trade-offs, our analyses also revealed promising synergies. For example, we found that maintaining forest cover surrounding farms in our study region would likely enhance most conservation objectives at minimal expense to others. Overall, our typology provides a framework for resolving the competing objectives of modern conservation. PMID:26283400

  20. Conservation laws and LETKF with 2D Shallow Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yuefei; Janjic, Tijana

    2016-04-01

    Numerous approaches have been proposed to maintain physical conservation laws in the numerical weather prediction models. However, to achieve a reliable prediction, adequate initial conditions are also necessary, which are produced by a data assimilation algorithm. If an ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) is used for this purpose, it has been shown that it could yield unphysical analysis ensemble that for example violates principles of mass conservation and positivity preservation (e.g. Janjic et al 2014) . In this presentation, we discuss the selection of conservation criteria for the analysis step, and start with testing the conservation of mass, energy and enstrophy. The simple experiments deal with nonlinear shallow water equations and simulated observations that are assimilated with LETKF (Localized Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, Hunt et al. 2007). The model is discretized in a specific way to conserve mass, angular momentum, energy and enstrophy. The effects of the data assimilation on the conserved quantities (of mass, energy and enstrophy) depend on observation covarage, localization radius, observed variable and observation operator. Having in mind that Arakawa (1966) and Arakawa and Lamb (1977) showed that the conservation of both kinetic energy and enstrophy by momentum advection schemes in the case of nondivergent flow prevents systematic and unrealistic energy cascade towards high wave numbers, a cause of excessive numerical noise and possible eventual nonlinear instability, we test the effects on prediction depending on the type of errors in the initial condition. The performance with respect to nonlinear energy cascade is assessed as well.