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Sample records for conserved actinobacteria-specific protein

  1. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Conserved Actinobacteria-Specific Protein (ASP1; SCO1997) from Streptomyces Coelicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, B.; Sugiman-Marangos, S; Junop, M; Gupta, R

    2009-01-01

    The Actinobacteria phylum represents one of the largest and most diverse groups of bacteria, encompassing many important and well-characterized organisms including Streptomyces, Bifidobacterium, Corynebacterium and Mycobacterium. Members of this phylum are remarkably diverse in terms of life cycle, morphology, physiology and ecology. Recent comparative genomic analysis of 19 actinobacterial species determined that only 5 genes of unknown function uniquely define this large phylum [1]. The cellular functions of these actinobacteria-specific proteins (ASP) are not known.

  2. Protein Sectors: Statistical Coupling Analysis versus Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Teşileanu, Tiberiu; Colwell, Lucy J.; Leibler, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Statistical coupling analysis (SCA) is a method for analyzing multiple sequence alignments that was used to identify groups of coevolving residues termed “sectors”. The method applies spectral analysis to a matrix obtained by combining correlation information with sequence conservation. It has been asserted that the protein sectors identified by SCA are functionally significant, with different sectors controlling different biochemical properties of the protein. Here we reconsider the available experimental data and note that it involves almost exclusively proteins with a single sector. We show that in this case sequence conservation is the dominating factor in SCA, and can alone be used to make statistically equivalent functional predictions. Therefore, we suggest shifting the experimental focus to proteins for which SCA identifies several sectors. Correlations in protein alignments, which have been shown to be informative in a number of independent studies, would then be less dominated by sequence conservation. PMID:25723535

  3. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity.

    PubMed

    Saldaño, Tadeo E; Monzon, Alexander M; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  4. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  5. Conservation and diversification of Msx protein in metazoan evolution.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Kamiya, Akiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi C; Saitou, Naruya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Msx (/msh) family genes encode homeodomain (HD) proteins that control ontogeny in many animal species. We compared the structures of Msx genes from a wide range of Metazoa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Nematoda, Arthropoda, Tardigrada, Platyhelminthes, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Annelida, Echiura, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata) to gain an understanding of the role of these genes in phylogeny. Exon-intron boundary analysis suggested that the position of the intron located N-terminally to the HDs was widely conserved in all the genes examined, including those of cnidarians. Amino acid (aa) sequence comparison revealed 3 new evolutionarily conserved domains, as well as very strong conservation of the HDs. Two of the three domains were associated with Groucho-like protein binding in both a vertebrate and a cnidarian Msx homolog, suggesting that the interaction between Groucho-like proteins and Msx proteins was established in eumetazoan ancestors. Pairwise comparison among the collected HDs and their C-flanking aa sequences revealed that the degree of sequence conservation varied depending on the animal taxa from which the sequences were derived. Highly conserved Msx genes were identified in the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, Hemichordata, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, and Anthozoa. The wide distribution of the conserved sequences in the animal phylogenetic tree suggested that metazoan ancestors had already acquired a set of conserved domains of the current Msx family genes. Interestingly, although strongly conserved sequences were recovered from the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, and Anthozoa, the sequences from the Urochordata and Hydrozoa showed weak conservation. Because the Vertebrata-Cephalochordata-Urochordata and Anthozoa-Hydrozoa represent sister groups in the Chordata and Cnidaria, respectively, Msx sequence diversification may have occurred differentially in the course of evolution. We speculate that selective loss of the conserved domains in Msx family

  6. Conservation and diversification of Msx protein in metazoan evolution.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Kamiya, Akiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi C; Saitou, Naruya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Msx (/msh) family genes encode homeodomain (HD) proteins that control ontogeny in many animal species. We compared the structures of Msx genes from a wide range of Metazoa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Nematoda, Arthropoda, Tardigrada, Platyhelminthes, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Annelida, Echiura, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata) to gain an understanding of the role of these genes in phylogeny. Exon-intron boundary analysis suggested that the position of the intron located N-terminally to the HDs was widely conserved in all the genes examined, including those of cnidarians. Amino acid (aa) sequence comparison revealed 3 new evolutionarily conserved domains, as well as very strong conservation of the HDs. Two of the three domains were associated with Groucho-like protein binding in both a vertebrate and a cnidarian Msx homolog, suggesting that the interaction between Groucho-like proteins and Msx proteins was established in eumetazoan ancestors. Pairwise comparison among the collected HDs and their C-flanking aa sequences revealed that the degree of sequence conservation varied depending on the animal taxa from which the sequences were derived. Highly conserved Msx genes were identified in the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, Hemichordata, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, and Anthozoa. The wide distribution of the conserved sequences in the animal phylogenetic tree suggested that metazoan ancestors had already acquired a set of conserved domains of the current Msx family genes. Interestingly, although strongly conserved sequences were recovered from the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, and Anthozoa, the sequences from the Urochordata and Hydrozoa showed weak conservation. Because the Vertebrata-Cephalochordata-Urochordata and Anthozoa-Hydrozoa represent sister groups in the Chordata and Cnidaria, respectively, Msx sequence diversification may have occurred differentially in the course of evolution. We speculate that selective loss of the conserved domains in Msx family

  7. CDD: a Conserved Domain Database for protein classification.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Anderson, John B; Cherukuri, Praveen F; DeWeese-Scott, Carol; Geer, Lewis Y; Gwadz, Marc; He, Siqian; Hurwitz, David I; Jackson, John D; Ke, Zhaoxi; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Liebert, Cynthia A; Liu, Chunlei; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Mullokandov, Mikhail; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Simonyan, Vahan; Song, James S; Thiessen, Paul A; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Yin, Jodie J; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H

    2005-01-01

    The Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is the protein classification component of NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system. CDD is linked to other Entrez databases such as Proteins, Taxonomy and PubMed, and can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=cdd. CD-Search, which is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi, is a fast, interactive tool to identify conserved domains in new protein sequences. CD-Search results for protein sequences in Entrez are pre-computed to provide links between proteins and domain models, and computational annotation visible upon request. Protein-protein queries submitted to NCBI's BLAST search service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST are scanned for the presence of conserved domains by default. While CDD started out as essentially a mirror of publicly available domain alignment collections, such as SMART, Pfam and COG, we have continued an effort to update, and in some cases replace these models with domain hierarchies curated at the NCBI. Here, we report on the progress of the curation effort and associated improvements in the functionality of the CDD information retrieval system. PMID:15608175

  8. Deep conservation of human protein tandem repeats within the eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Elke; Gascuel, Olivier; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are a major element of protein sequences in all domains of life. They are particularly abundant in mammals, where by conservative estimates one in three proteins contain a TR. High generation-scale duplication and deletion rates were reported for nucleic TR units. However, it is not known whether protein TR units can also be frequently lost or gained providing a source of variation for rapid adaptation of protein function, or alternatively, tend to have conserved TR unit configurations over long evolutionary times. To obtain a systematic picture, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of the mode of evolution for human protein TRs. For this purpose, we propose a novel method for the detection of orthologous TRs based on circular profile hidden Markov models. For all detected TRs, we reconstructed bispecies TR unit phylogenies across 61 eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Moreover, we performed additional analyses to correlate functional and structural annotations of human TRs with their mode of evolution. Surprisingly, we find that the vast majority of human TRs are ancient, with TR unit number and order preserved intact since distant speciation events. For example, ≥ 61% of all human TRs have been strongly conserved at least since the root of all mammals, approximately 300 Ma. Further, we find no human protein TR that shows evidence for strong recent duplications and deletions. The results are in contrast to the high generation-scale mutability of nucleic TRs. Presumably, most protein TRs fold into stable and conserved structures that are indispensable for the function of the TR-containing protein. All of our data and results are available for download from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/TRE.

  9. Deep Conservation of Human Protein Tandem Repeats within the Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, Elke; Gascuel, Olivier; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are a major element of protein sequences in all domains of life. They are particularly abundant in mammals, where by conservative estimates one in three proteins contain a TR. High generation-scale duplication and deletion rates were reported for nucleic TR units. However, it is not known whether protein TR units can also be frequently lost or gained providing a source of variation for rapid adaptation of protein function, or alternatively, tend to have conserved TR unit configurations over long evolutionary times. To obtain a systematic picture, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of the mode of evolution for human protein TRs. For this purpose, we propose a novel method for the detection of orthologous TRs based on circular profile hidden Markov models. For all detected TRs, we reconstructed bispecies TR unit phylogenies across 61 eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Moreover, we performed additional analyses to correlate functional and structural annotations of human TRs with their mode of evolution. Surprisingly, we find that the vast majority of human TRs are ancient, with TR unit number and order preserved intact since distant speciation events. For example, ≥61% of all human TRs have been strongly conserved at least since the root of all mammals, approximately 300 Ma. Further, we find no human protein TR that shows evidence for strong recent duplications and deletions. The results are in contrast to the high generation-scale mutability of nucleic TRs. Presumably, most protein TRs fold into stable and conserved structures that are indispensable for the function of the TR-containing protein. All of our data and results are available for download from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/TRE. PMID:24497029

  10. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Conserved EFhd2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Yancy Ferrer; Rodríguez Cruz, Eva N.; Vaquer, Ana del C.; Vega, Irving E.

    2013-01-01

    EFhd2 is a novel protein conserved from C. elegans to H. sapiens. This novel protein was originally identified in cells of the immune and central nervous systems. However, it is most abundant in the central nervous system, where it has been found associated with pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The physiological or pathological roles of EFhd2 are poorly understood. In this study, a functional and structural analysis was carried to characterize the molecular requirements for EFhd2’s calcium binding activity. The results showed that mutations of a conserved aspartate on either EF-hand motif disrupted the calcium binding activity, indicating that these motifs work in pair as a functional calcium binding domain. Furthermore, characterization of an identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that introduced a missense mutation indicates the importance of a conserved phenylalanine on EFhd2 calcium binding activity. Structural analysis revealed that EFhd2 is predominantly composed of alpha helix and random coil structures and that this novel protein is thermostable. EFhd2’s thermo stability depends on its N-terminus. In the absence of the N-terminus, calcium binding restored EFhd2’s thermal stability. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding on EFhd2 functional and structural properties, and introduce it into the family of canonical EF-hand domain containing proteins. PMID:22973849

  11. Conservation of protein structure over four billion years

    PubMed Central

    Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Delgado-Delgado, Asuncion; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Fernandez, Julio M.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Gavira, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known with certainty about the evolution of protein structures in general and the degree of protein structure conservation over planetary time scales in particular. Here we report the X-ray crystal structures of seven laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins dating back up to ~4 billion years before present. Despite considerable sequence differences compared with extant enzymes, the ancestral proteins display the canonical thioredoxin fold while only small structural changes have occurred over 4 billion years. This remarkable degree of structure conservation since a time near the last common ancestor of life supports a punctuated-equilibrium model of structure evolution in which the generation of new folds occurs over comparatively short periods of time and is followed by long periods of structural stasis. PMID:23932589

  12. Conservation of protein structure over four billion years.

    PubMed

    Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Delgado-Delgado, Asuncion; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Fernandez, Julio M; Gaucher, Eric A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Gavira, Jose A

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about the evolution of protein structures and the degree of protein structure conservation over planetary time scales. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of seven laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins dating up to approximately four billion years ago. Despite considerable sequence differences compared with extant enzymes, the ancestral proteins display the canonical thioredoxin fold, whereas only small structural changes have occurred over four billion years. This remarkable degree of structure conservation since a time near the last common ancestor of life supports a punctuated-equilibrium model of structure evolution in which the generation of new folds occurs over comparatively short periods and is followed by long periods of structural stasis. PMID:23932589

  13. Functional conservation of an ancestral Pellino protein in helminth species.

    PubMed

    Cluxton, Christopher D; Caffrey, Brian E; Kinsella, Gemma K; Moynagh, Paul N; Fares, Mario A; Fallon, Padraic G

    2015-01-01

    The immune system of H. sapiens has innate signaling pathways that arose in ancestral species. This is exemplified by the discovery of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using free-living model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The TLR pathway is ubiquitous and controls sensitivity to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in eukaryotes. There is, however, a marked absence of this pathway from the plathyhelminthes, with the exception of the Pellino protein family, which is present in a number of species from this phylum. Helminth Pellino proteins are conserved having high similarity, both at the sequence and predicted structural protein level, with that of human Pellino proteins. Pellino from a model helminth, Schistosoma mansoni Pellino (SmPellino), was shown to bind and poly-ubiquitinate human IRAK-1, displaying E3 ligase activity consistent with its human counterparts. When transfected into human cells SmPellino is functional, interacting with signaling proteins and modulating mammalian signaling pathways. Strict conservation of a protein family in species lacking its niche signalling pathway is rare and provides a platform to examine the ancestral functions of Pellino proteins that may translate into novel mechanisms of immune regulation in humans. PMID:26120048

  14. Functional conservation of an ancestral Pellino protein in helminth species.

    PubMed

    Cluxton, Christopher D; Caffrey, Brian E; Kinsella, Gemma K; Moynagh, Paul N; Fares, Mario A; Fallon, Padraic G

    2015-01-01

    The immune system of H. sapiens has innate signaling pathways that arose in ancestral species. This is exemplified by the discovery of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using free-living model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The TLR pathway is ubiquitous and controls sensitivity to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in eukaryotes. There is, however, a marked absence of this pathway from the plathyhelminthes, with the exception of the Pellino protein family, which is present in a number of species from this phylum. Helminth Pellino proteins are conserved having high similarity, both at the sequence and predicted structural protein level, with that of human Pellino proteins. Pellino from a model helminth, Schistosoma mansoni Pellino (SmPellino), was shown to bind and poly-ubiquitinate human IRAK-1, displaying E3 ligase activity consistent with its human counterparts. When transfected into human cells SmPellino is functional, interacting with signaling proteins and modulating mammalian signaling pathways. Strict conservation of a protein family in species lacking its niche signalling pathway is rare and provides a platform to examine the ancestral functions of Pellino proteins that may translate into novel mechanisms of immune regulation in humans.

  15. Functional conservation of an ancestral Pellino protein in helminth species

    PubMed Central

    Cluxton, Christopher D.; Caffrey, Brian E.; Kinsella, Gemma K.; Moynagh, Paul N.; Fares, Mario A.; Fallon, Padraic G.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system of H. sapiens has innate signaling pathways that arose in ancestral species. This is exemplified by the discovery of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using free-living model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The TLR pathway is ubiquitous and controls sensitivity to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in eukaryotes. There is, however, a marked absence of this pathway from the plathyhelminthes, with the exception of the Pellino protein family, which is present in a number of species from this phylum. Helminth Pellino proteins are conserved having high similarity, both at the sequence and predicted structural protein level, with that of human Pellino proteins. Pellino from a model helminth, Schistosoma mansoni Pellino (SmPellino), was shown to bind and poly-ubiquitinate human IRAK-1, displaying E3 ligase activity consistent with its human counterparts. When transfected into human cells SmPellino is functional, interacting with signaling proteins and modulating mammalian signaling pathways. Strict conservation of a protein family in species lacking its niche signalling pathway is rare and provides a platform to examine the ancestral functions of Pellino proteins that may translate into novel mechanisms of immune regulation in humans. PMID:26120048

  16. Defining and predicting structurally conserved regions in protein superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ivan K.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The structures of homologous proteins are generally better conserved than their sequences. This phenomenon is demonstrated by the prevalence of structurally conserved regions (SCRs) even in highly divergent protein families. Defining SCRs requires the comparison of two or more homologous structures and is affected by their availability and divergence, and our ability to deduce structurally equivalent positions among them. In the absence of multiple homologous structures, it is necessary to predict SCRs of a protein using information from only a set of homologous sequences and (if available) a single structure. Accurate SCR predictions can benefit homology modelling and sequence alignment. Results: Using pairwise DaliLite alignments among a set of homologous structures, we devised a simple measure of structural conservation, termed structural conservation index (SCI). SCI was used to distinguish SCRs from non-SCRs. A database of SCRs was compiled from 386 SCOP superfamilies containing 6489 protein domains. Artificial neural networks were then trained to predict SCRs with various features deduced from a single structure and homologous sequences. Assessment of the predictions via a 5-fold cross-validation method revealed that predictions based on features derived from a single structure perform similarly to ones based on homologous sequences, while combining sequence and structural features was optimal in terms of accuracy (0.755) and Matthews correlation coefficient (0.476). These results suggest that even without information from multiple structures, it is still possible to effectively predict SCRs for a protein. Finally, inspection of the structures with the worst predictions pinpoints difficulties in SCR definitions. Availability: The SCR database and the prediction server can be found at http://prodata.swmed.edu/SCR. Contact: 91huangi@gmail.com or grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics

  17. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  18. Conservation of side-chain dynamics within a protein family.

    PubMed

    Law, Anthony B; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Lee, Andrew L

    2009-05-13

    The question of protein dynamics and its relevance to function is currently a topic of great interest. Proteins are particularly dynamic at the side-chain level on the time scale of picoseconds to nanoseconds. Here, we present a comparison of NMR-monitored side-chain motion between three PDZ domains of approximately 30% sequence identity and show that the side-chain dynamics display nontrivial conservation. Methyl (2)H relaxation was carried out to determine side-chain order parameters (S(2)), which were found to be more similar than naively expected from sequence, local packing, or a combination of the two. Thus, the dynamics of a rather distant homologue appears to be an excellent predictor of a protein's side-chain dynamics and, on average, better than current structure-based methods. Fast side-chain dynamics therefore display a high level of organization associated with global fold. Beyond simple conservation, the analysis herein suggests that the pattern of side-chain flexibility has significant contributions from nonlocal elements of the PDZ fold, such as correlated motions, and that the conserved dynamics may directly support function.

  19. A protein trisulfide couples dissimilatory sulfate reduction to energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, André A.; Venceslau, Sofia S.; Grein, Fabian; Leavitt, William D.; Dahl, Christiane; Johnston, David T.; Pereira, Inês A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction has governed Earth’s biogeochemical sulfur cycle for at least 2.5 billion years. However, the enzymatic mechanisms behind this pathway are incompletely understood, particularly for the reduction of sulfite—a key intermediate in the pathway. This critical reaction is performed by DsrAB, a widespread enzyme also involved in other dissimilatory sulfur metabolisms. Using in vitro assays with an archaeal DsrAB, supported with genetic experiments in a bacterial system, we show that the product of sulfite reduction by DsrAB is a protein-based trisulfide, in which a sulfite-derived sulfur is bridging two conserved cysteines of DsrC. Physiological studies also reveal that sulfate reduction rates are determined by cellular levels of DsrC. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction couples the four-electron reduction of the DsrC trisulfide to energy conservation.

  20. An Abundant, Highly Conserved Tonoplast Protein in Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth D.; Herman, Eliot M.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated the membranes of the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies) from Phaseolus vulgaris cotyledons and purified an integral membrane protein with Mr 25,000 (TP 25). Antiserum to TP 25 recognizes an abundant polypeptide in the total cell extracts of many different seeds (monocots, dicots, and a gymnosperm), and specifically labels the vacuolar membranes of thin-sectioned soybean embryonic axes and cotyledons. TP 25 was not found in the starchy endosperm of barley and wheat or the seed coats of bean but was present in all seed parts examined that consist of living cells at seed maturity. The abundance of TP 25 was not correlated with the amount of storage protein in seed tissue, and the protein was not found in leaves that accumulate leaf storage protein. On the basis of its abundance, evolutionary conservation, and distribution in the plant, we propose that TP 25 may play a role in maintaining the integrity of the tonoplast during the dehydration/rehydration sequence of seeds. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:16667102

  1. [Interconnection between architecture of protein globule and disposition of conformational conservative oligopeptides in proteins from one protein family].

    PubMed

    Batianovskiĭ, A V; Filatov, I V; Namiot, V A; Esipova, N G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2012-01-01

    It was shown that selective interactions between helical segments of macromolecules can realize in globular proteins in the segments characterized by the same periodicities of charge distribution i.e. between conformationally conservative oligopeptides. It was found that in the macromolecules of alpha-helical proteins conformationally conservative oligopeptides are disposed at a distance being characteristic of direct interactions. For representatives of many structural families of alpha-type proteins specific disposition of conformationally conservative segments is observed. This disposition is inherent to a particular structural family. Disposition of conformationally conservative segments is not related to homology of the amino acid sequence but reflects peculiarities of native 3D-architectures of protein globules.

  2. Membrane Proteins Are Dramatically Less Conserved than Water-Soluble Proteins across the Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Sojo, Victor; Dessimoz, Christophe; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial in transport, signaling, bioenergetics, catalysis, and as drug targets. Here, we show that membrane proteins have dramatically fewer detectable orthologs than water-soluble proteins, less than half in most species analyzed. This sparse distribution could reflect rapid divergence or gene loss. We find that both mechanisms operate. First, membrane proteins evolve faster than water-soluble proteins, particularly in their exterior-facing portions. Second, we demonstrate that predicted ancestral membrane proteins are preferentially lost compared with water-soluble proteins in closely related species of archaea and bacteria. These patterns are consistent across the whole tree of life, and in each of the three domains of archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Our findings point to a fundamental evolutionary principle: membrane proteins evolve faster due to stronger adaptive selection in changing environments, whereas cytosolic proteins are under more stringent purifying selection in the homeostatic interior of the cell. This effect should be strongest in prokaryotes, weaker in unicellular eukaryotes (with intracellular membranes), and weakest in multicellular eukaryotes (with extracellular homeostasis). We demonstrate that this is indeed the case. Similarly, we show that extracellular water-soluble proteins exhibit an even stronger pattern of low homology than membrane proteins. These striking differences in conservation of membrane proteins versus water-soluble proteins have important implications for evolution and medicine. PMID:27501943

  3. Evolutionarily Conserved Network Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Nivedita; Kulkarni, Prakash; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a stable tertiary structure in isolation. Remarkably, however, a substantial portion of IDPs undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their cognate partners. Structural flexibility and binding plasticity enable IDPs to interact with a broad range of partners. However, the broader network properties that could provide additional insights into the functional role of IDPs are not known. Results Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of network properties of IDP-induced sub-networks in multiple species from yeast to human. Our results show that IDPs exhibit greater-than-expected modularity and are connected to the rest of the protein interaction network (PIN) via proteins that exhibit the highest betweenness centrality and connect to fewer-than-expected IDP communities, suggesting that they form critical communication links from IDP modules to the rest of the PIN. Moreover, we found that IDPs are enriched at the top level of regulatory hierarchy. Conclusion Overall, our analyses reveal coherent and remarkably conserved IDP-centric network properties, namely, modularity in IDP-induced network and a layer of critical nodes connecting IDPs with the rest of the PIN. PMID:25974317

  4. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  5. Identification of proteins that form specific complexes with the highly conserved protein Translin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Eliahoo, Elad; Litovco, Phyana; Ben Yosef, Ron; Bendalak, Keren; Ziv, Tamar; Manor, Haim

    2014-04-01

    Translin is a single-stranded DNA and RNA binding protein that has a high affinity for G-rich sequences. TRAX is a Translin paralog that associates with Translin. Both Translin and TRAX were highly conserved in eukaryotes. The nucleic acid binding form of Translin is a barrel-shaped homo-octamer. A Translin-TRAX hetero-octamer having a similar structure also binds nucleic acids. Previous reports suggested that Translin may be involved in chromosomal translocations, telomere metabolism and the control of mRNA transport and translation. More recent studies have indicated that Translin-TRAX hetero-octamers are involved in RNA silencing. To gain a further insight into the functions of Translin, we have undertaken to systematically search for proteins with which it forms specific complexes in living cells. Here we report the results of such a search conducted in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a suitable model system. This search was carried out by affinity purification and immuno-precipitation techniques, combined with differential labeling of the intracellular proteins with the stable isotopes ¹⁵N and ¹⁴N. We identified for the first time two proteins containing an RNA Recognition Motif (RRM), which are specifically associated with the yeast Translin: (1) the pre-mRNA-splicing factor srp1 that belongs to the highly conserved SR family of proteins and (2) vip1, a protein conserved in fungi. Our data also support the presence of RNA in these intracellular complexes. Our experimental approach should be generally applicable to studies of weak intracellular protein-protein interactions and provides a clear distinction between false positive vs. truly interacting proteins.

  6. Evolution and Conservation of Predicted Inclusion Membrane Proteins in Chlamydiae

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, Erika I.; Martens, Craig; Hackstadt, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that replicate within a vacuole termed the inclusion. Chlamydiae extensively modify the inclusion membrane via the insertion of chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins (Incs) which decorate the cytosolic face of the inclusion. We have assessed the overall relatedness and phylogeny of Incs in order to identify potential evolutionary trends. Despite a high degree of conservation among Incs within C. trachomatis serovars, phylogenetic analysis showed that some Incs cluster according to clinical groupings suggesting that certain Incs may contribute to tissue tropism. Bioinformatic predictions identified Incs in five chlamydial species: 55 in C. trachomatis, 68 in C. felis, 92 in C. pneumoniae, 79 in C. caviae, and 54 in C. muridarum. Inc homologues were compared between chlamydial species and 23 core Incs were identified as shared among all species. Genomic expansion of Incs was identified in C. pneumoniae, C. caviae, and C. felis but not C. trachomatis or C. muridarum. PMID:22454599

  7. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  8. ConPlex: a server for the evolutionary conservation analysis of protein complex structures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Sup; Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Jinho; Yang, Jae-Seong; Jeon, Jouhyun; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Sanguk

    2010-07-01

    Evolutionary conservation analyses are important for the identification of protein-protein interactions. For protein complex structures, sequence conservation has been applied to determine protein oligomerization states, to characterize native interfaces from non-specific crystal contacts, and to discriminate near-native structures from docking artifacts. However, a user-friendly web-based service for evolutionary conservation analysis of protein complexes has not been available. Therefore, we developed ConPlex (http://sbi.postech.ac.kr/ConPlex/) a web application that enables evolutionary conservation analyses of protein interactions within protein quaternary structures. Users provide protein complex structures; ConPlex automatically identifies protein interfaces and carries out evolutionary conservation analyses for the interface regions. Moreover, ConPlex allows the results of the residue-specific conservation analysis to be displayed on the protein complex structure and provides several options to customize the display output to fit each user's needs. We believe that ConPlex offers a convenient platform to analyze protein complex structures based on evolutionary conservation of protein-protein interface residues.

  9. Local Geometry and Evolutionary Conservation of Protein Surfaces Reveal the Multiple Recognition Patches in Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Laine, Elodie; Carbone, Alessandra

    2015-12-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential to all biological processes and they represent increasingly important therapeutic targets. Here, we present a new method for accurately predicting protein-protein interfaces, understanding their properties, origins and binding to multiple partners. Contrary to machine learning approaches, our method combines in a rational and very straightforward way three sequence- and structure-based descriptors of protein residues: evolutionary conservation, physico-chemical properties and local geometry. The implemented strategy yields very precise predictions for a wide range of protein-protein interfaces and discriminates them from small-molecule binding sites. Beyond its predictive power, the approach permits to dissect interaction surfaces and unravel their complexity. We show how the analysis of the predicted patches can foster new strategies for PPIs modulation and interaction surface redesign. The approach is implemented in JET2, an automated tool based on the Joint Evolutionary Trees (JET) method for sequence-based protein interface prediction. JET2 is freely available at www.lcqb.upmc.fr/JET2.

  10. Local Geometry and Evolutionary Conservation of Protein Surfaces Reveal the Multiple Recognition Patches in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Elodie; Carbone, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential to all biological processes and they represent increasingly important therapeutic targets. Here, we present a new method for accurately predicting protein-protein interfaces, understanding their properties, origins and binding to multiple partners. Contrary to machine learning approaches, our method combines in a rational and very straightforward way three sequence- and structure-based descriptors of protein residues: evolutionary conservation, physico-chemical properties and local geometry. The implemented strategy yields very precise predictions for a wide range of protein-protein interfaces and discriminates them from small-molecule binding sites. Beyond its predictive power, the approach permits to dissect interaction surfaces and unravel their complexity. We show how the analysis of the predicted patches can foster new strategies for PPIs modulation and interaction surface redesign. The approach is implemented in JET2, an automated tool based on the Joint Evolutionary Trees (JET) method for sequence-based protein interface prediction. JET2 is freely available at www.lcqb.upmc.fr/JET2. PMID:26690684

  11. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  12. Hierarchical Partitioning of Metazoan Protein Conservation Profiles Provides New Functional Insights

    PubMed Central

    Witztum, Jonathan; Persi, Erez; Horn, David; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Chor, Benny

    2014-01-01

    The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles). We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO) analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the “universal proteins”, those with homologues in all 17 other species, and of the “non-universal proteins”. A large number of GO terms are strongly enriched in both human and fly universal proteins. Most of these functions are known to be essential. A smaller number of GO terms, exhibiting markedly different properties, are enriched in both human and fly non-universal proteins. We further explore the non-universal proteins, whose conservation profiles are consistent with the “tree of life” (TOL consistent), as well as the TOL inconsistent proteins. Finally, we applied Quantum Clustering to the conservation profiles of the TOL consistent proteins. Each cluster is strongly associated with one or a small number of specific monophyletic clades in the tree of life. The proteins in many of these clusters exhibit strong functional enrichment associated with the “life style” of the related clades. Most previous approaches for studying function and conservation are “bottom up”, studying protein families one by one, and separately assessing the conservation of each. By way of contrast, our approach is “top down”. We globally partition the set of all proteins hierarchically, as described above, and then identify protein families enriched within different subdivisions. While supporting previous findings, our approach also provides a tool for discovering novel relations between protein conservation profiles, functionality, and evolutionary history as represented by the tree of life. PMID:24594619

  13. Structure-sequence based analysis for identification of conserved regions in proteins

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T; Zhou, Carol E; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2013-05-28

    Disclosed are computational methods, and associated hardware and software products for scoring conservation in a protein structure based on a computationally identified family or cluster of protein structures. A method of computationally identifying a family or cluster of protein structures in also disclosed herein.

  14. A survey of conservation of sea spider and Drosophila Hox protein activities.

    PubMed

    Saadaoui, Mehdi; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Macchi, Meiggie; Graba, Yacine; Maurel-Zaffran, Corinne

    2015-11-01

    Hox proteins have well-established functions in development and evolution, controlling the final morphology of bilaterian animals. The common phylogenetic origin of Hox proteins and the associated evolutionary diversification of protein sequences provide a unique framework to explore the relationship between changes in protein sequence and function. In this study, we aimed at questioning how sequence variation within arthropod Hox proteins influences function. This was achieved by exploring the functional impact of sequence conservation/divergence of the Hox genes, labial, Sex comb reduced, Deformed, Ultrabithorax and abdominalA from two distant arthropods, the sea spider and the well-studied Drosophila. Results highlight a correlation between sequence conservation within the homeodomain and the degree of functional conservation, and identify a novel functional domain in the Labial protein.

  15. Quantitative and Functional Characterization of the Hyper-Conserved Protein of Prochlorococcus and Marine Synechococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zorz, Jackie K.; Joy, Andrew P.; Barnett, David A.; Johnson, Milo S.; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Cockshutt, Amanda M.

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of any bacterial genome consists of hypothetical protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs). While most of these ORFs are present only in one or a few sequenced genomes, a few are conserved, often across large phylogenetic distances. Such conservation provides clues to likely uncharacterized cellular functions that need to be elucidated. Marine cyanobacteria from the Prochlorococcus/marine Synechococcus clade are dominant bacteria in oceanic waters and are significant contributors to global primary production. A Hyper Conserved Protein (PSHCP) of unknown function is 100% conserved at the amino acid level in genomes of Prochlorococcus/marine Synechococcus, but lacks homologs outside of this clade. In this study we investigated Prochlorococcus marinus strains MED4 and MIT 9313 and Synechococcus sp. strain WH 8102 for the transcription of the PSHCP gene using RT-Q-PCR, for the presence of the protein product through quantitative immunoblotting, and for the protein's binding partners in a pull down assay. Significant transcription of the gene was detected in all strains. The PSHCP protein content varied between 8±1 fmol and 26±9 fmol per ug total protein, depending on the strain. The 50 S ribosomal protein L2, the Photosystem I protein PsaD and the Ycf48-like protein were found associated with the PSHCP protein in all strains and not appreciably or at all in control experiments. We hypothesize that PSHCP is a protein associated with the ribosome, and is possibly involved in photosystem assembly. PMID:25360678

  16. Xylem sap protein composition is conserved among different plant species.

    PubMed

    Buhtz, Anja; Kolasa, Anna; Arlt, Kathleen; Walz, Christina; Kehr, Julia

    2004-08-01

    Xylem sap from broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. cv. Calabrais), rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Drakkar), pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch. cv. gelber Zentner) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Hoffmanns Giganta) was collected by root pressure exudation from the surface of cut stems of healthy, adult plants. Total protein concentrations were in the range of 100 microg ml(-1). One-dimensional gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) resulted in 10-20 visible protein bands in a molecular mass range from 10 to 100 kDa. The main bands were cut out, digested with trypsin, and analysed using tandem mass spectrometry. Fifty bands resulted in amino acid sequence information that was used to perform database similarity searches. Sequences from 30 bands showed high homology to proteins present in databases. Among them, we found mostly peroxidases, but could also identify the lectin-like xylem protein XSP30, a glycine-rich protein, serine proteases, an aspartyl protease family protein, chitinases, and a lipid transfer protein-like polypeptide. Sequence analysis predicted apoplastic secretion signals for all database entries similar to the partial xylem protein sequences. This and the lack of cross-reactivity with phloem protein-specific antibodies suggest that the proteins really originate from the xylem and do not result from phloem contamination. Most of the highly similar proteins probably function in repair and defence reactions. Some of the most abundant proteins (peroxidases, chitinases, serine proteases) were present in xylem exudate of all species analysed, often in more than one band. This indicates an important basic role of these proteins in maintaining xylem function. PMID:15064951

  17. Comparative analysis reveals conserved protein phosphorylation networks implicated in multiple diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chris Soon Heng; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Pasculescu, Adrian; Jovanovic, Marko; Hengartner, Michael O; Jørgensen, Claus; Bader, Gary D; Aebersold, Ruedi; Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases enable cellular information processing. Although numerous human phosphorylation sites and their dynamics have been characterized, the evolutionary history and physiological importance of many signaling events remain unknown. Using target phosphoproteomes determined with a similar experimental and computational pipeline, we investigated the conservation of human phosphorylation events in distantly related model organisms (fly, worm, and yeast). With a sequence-alignment approach, we identified 479 phosphorylation events in 344 human proteins that appear to be positionally conserved over approximately 600 million years of evolution and hence are likely to be involved in fundamental cellular processes. This sequence-alignment analysis suggested that many phosphorylation sites evolve rapidly and therefore do not display strong evolutionary conservation in terms of sequence position in distantly related organisms. Thus, we devised a network-alignment approach to reconstruct conserved kinase-substrate networks, which identified 778 phosphorylation events in 698 human proteins. Both methods identified proteins tightly regulated by phosphorylation as well as signal integration hubs, and both types of phosphoproteins were enriched in proteins encoded by disease-associated genes. We analyzed the cellular functions and structural relationships for these conserved signaling events, noting the incomplete nature of current phosphoproteomes. Assessing phosphorylation conservation at both site and network levels proved useful for exploring both fast-evolving and ancient signaling events. We reveal that multiple complex diseases seem to converge within the conserved networks, suggesting that disease development might rely on common molecular networks.

  18. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  19. A Fast Alignment-Free Approach for De Novo Detection of Protein Conserved Regions

    PubMed Central

    Abnousi, Armen; Broschat, Shira L.; Kalyanaraman, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying conserved regions in protein sequences is a fundamental operation, occurring in numerous sequence-driven analysis pipelines. It is used as a way to decode domain-rich regions within proteins, to compute protein clusters, to annotate sequence function, and to compute evolutionary relationships among protein sequences. A number of approaches exist for identifying and characterizing protein families based on their domains, and because domains represent conserved portions of a protein sequence, the primary computation involved in protein family characterization is identification of such conserved regions. However, identifying conserved regions from large collections (millions) of protein sequences presents significant challenges. Methods In this paper we present a new, alignment-free method for detecting conserved regions in protein sequences called NADDA (No-Alignment Domain Detection Algorithm). Our method exploits the abundance of exact matching short subsequences (k-mers) to quickly detect conserved regions, and the power of machine learning is used to improve the prediction accuracy of detection. We present a parallel implementation of NADDA using the MapReduce framework and show that our method is highly scalable. Results We have compared NADDA with Pfam and InterPro databases. For known domains annotated by Pfam, accuracy is 83%, sensitivity 96%, and specificity 44%. For sequences with new domains not present in the training set an average accuracy of 63% is achieved when compared to Pfam. A boost in results in comparison with InterPro demonstrates the ability of NADDA to capture conserved regions beyond those present in Pfam. We have also compared NADDA with ADDA and MKDOM2, assuming Pfam as ground-truth. On average NADDA shows comparable accuracy, more balanced sensitivity and specificity, and being alignment-free, is significantly faster. Excluding the one-time cost of training, runtimes on a single processor were 49s, 10,566s, and 456s

  20. Deep evolutionary conservation of an intramolecular protein kinase activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingfen; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Luebbering, Nathan; Singh, Aman; Sibbet, Gary; Ferguson, Michael A J; Cleghon, Vaughn

    2012-01-01

    DYRK-family kinases employ an intramolecular mechanism to autophosphorylate a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Once phosphorylated, DYRKs lose tyrosine kinase activity and function as serine/threonine kinases. DYRKs have been characterized in organisms from yeast to human; however, all entities belong to the Unikont supergroup, only one of five eukaryotic supergroups. To assess the evolutionary age and conservation of the DYRK intramolecular kinase-activation mechanism, we surveyed 21 genomes representing four of the five eukaryotic supergroups for the presence of DYRKs. We also analyzed the activation mechanism of the sole DYRK (class 2 DYRK) present in Trypanosoma brucei (TbDYRK2), a member of the excavate supergroup and separated from Drosophila by ∼850 million years. Bioinformatics showed the DYRKs clustering into five known subfamilies, class 1, class 2, Yaks, HIPKs and Prp4s. Only class 2 DYRKs were present in all four supergroups. These diverse class 2 DYRKs also exhibited conservation of N-terminal NAPA regions located outside of the kinase domain, and were shown to have an essential role in activation loop autophosphorylation of Drosophila DmDYRK2. Class 2 TbDYRK2 required the activation loop tyrosine conserved in other DYRKs, the NAPA regions were critical for this autophosphorylation event, and the NAPA-regions of Trypanosoma and human DYRK2 complemented autophosphorylation by the kinase domain of DmDYRK2 in trans. Finally, sequential deletion analysis was used to further define the minimal region required for trans-complementation. Our analysis provides strong evidence that class 2 DYRKs were present in the primordial or root eukaryote, and suggest this subgroup may be the oldest, founding member of the DYRK family. The conservation of activation loop autophosphorylation demonstrates that kinase self-activation mechanisms are also primitive.

  1. Conservation of domain structure in a fast-evolving heterochromatic SUUR protein in drosophilids.

    PubMed

    Yurlova, Anna A; Makunin, Igor V; Kolesnikova, Tatyana D; Posukh, Olga V; Belyaeva, Elena S; Zhimulev, Igor F

    2009-09-01

    Different genomic regions replicate at a distinct time during S-phase. The SuUR mutation alters replication timing and the polytenization level of intercalary and pericentric heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland polytene chromosomes. We analyzed SuUR in different insects, identified conserved regions in the protein, substituted conserved amino acid residues, and studied effects of the mutations on SUUR function. SuUR orthologs were identified in all sequenced drosophilids, and a highly divergent ortholog was found in the mosquito genome. We demonstrated that SUUR evolves at very high rate comparable with that of Transformer. Remarkably, upstream ORF within 5' UTR of the gene is more conserved than SUUR in drosophilids, but it is absent in the mosquito. The domain structure and charge of SUUR are maintained in drosophilids despite the high divergence of the proteins. The N-terminal part of SUUR with similarity to the SNF2/SWI2 proteins displays the highest level of conservation. Mutation of two conserved amino acid residues in this region impairs binding of SUUR to polytene chromosomes and reduces the ability of the protein to cause DNA underreplication. The least conserved middle part of SUUR interacting with HP1 retains positively and negatively charged clusters and nuclear localization signals. The C terminus contains interlacing conserved and variable motifs. Our results suggest that SUUR domains evolve with different rates and patterns but maintain their features.

  2. Functional Constraint Profiling of a Viral Protein Reveals Discordance of Evolutionary Conservation and Functionality.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nicholas C; Olson, C Anders; Du, Yushen; Le, Shuai; Tran, Kevin; Remenyi, Roland; Gong, Danyang; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Qi, Hangfei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2015-07-01

    Viruses often encode proteins with multiple functions due to their compact genomes. Existing approaches to identify functional residues largely rely on sequence conservation analysis. Inferring functional residues from sequence conservation can produce false positives, in which the conserved residues are functionally silent, or false negatives, where functional residues are not identified since they are species-specific and therefore non-conserved. Furthermore, the tedious process of constructing and analyzing individual mutations limits the number of residues that can be examined in a single study. Here, we developed a systematic approach to identify the functional residues of a viral protein by coupling experimental fitness profiling with protein stability prediction using the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit as the target protein. We identified a significant number of functional residues that were influenza type-specific and were evolutionarily non-conserved among different influenza types. Our results indicate that type-specific functional residues are prevalent and may not otherwise be identified by sequence conservation analysis alone. More importantly, this technique can be adapted to any viral (and potentially non-viral) protein where structural information is available.

  3. An Experimental Approach for the Identification of Conserved Secreted Proteins in Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Corrales, Rosa M.; Mathieu-Daudé, Françoise; Garcia, Déborah; Brenière, Simone F.; Sereno, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular factors produced by Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma brucei are important in the host-parasite relationship. Here, we describe a genome-based approach to identify putative extracellular proteins conserved among trypanosomatids that are likely involved in the classical secretory pathway. Potentially secreted proteins were identified by bioinformatic analysis of the T. cruzi genome. A subset of thirteen genes encoding unknown proteins with orthologs containing a signal peptide sequence in L. infantum, L. major, and T. brucei were transfected into L. infantum. Tagged proteins detected in the extracellular medium confirmed computer predictions in about 25% of the hits. Secretion was confirmed for two L. infantum orthologs proteins using the same experimental system. Infectivity studies of transgenic Leishmania parasites suggest that one of the secreted proteins increases parasite replication inside macrophages. This methodology can identify conserved secreted proteins involved in the classical secretory pathway, and they may represent potential virulence factors in trypanosomatids. PMID:20145711

  4. Analysis of evolutionary conservation patterns and their influence on identifying protein functional sites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chun; Noguchi, Tamotsu; Yamana, Hayato

    2014-10-01

    Evolutionary conservation information included in position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) has been widely adopted by sequence-based methods for identifying protein functional sites, because all functional sites, whether in ordered or disordered proteins, are found to be conserved at some extent. However, different functional sites have different conservation patterns, some of them are linear contextual, some of them are mingled with highly variable residues, and some others seem to be conserved independently. Every value in PSSMs is calculated independently of each other, without carrying the contextual information of residues in the sequence. Therefore, adopting the direct output of PSSM for prediction fails to consider the relationship between conservation patterns of residues and the distribution of conservation scores in PSSMs. In order to demonstrate the importance of combining PSSMs with the specific conservation patterns of functional sites for prediction, three different PSSM-based methods for identifying three kinds of functional sites have been analyzed. Results suggest that, different PSSM-based methods differ in their capability to identify different patterns of functional sites, and better combining PSSMs with the specific conservation patterns of residues would largely facilitate the prediction.

  5. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  6. TOPDOM: database of conservatively located domains and motifs in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The TOPDOM database—originally created as a collection of domains and motifs located consistently on the same side of the membranes in α-helical transmembrane proteins—has been updated and extended by taking into consideration consistently localized domains and motifs in globular proteins, too. By taking advantage of the recently developed CCTOP algorithm to determine the type of a protein and predict topology in case of transmembrane proteins, and by applying a thorough search for domains and motifs as well as utilizing the most up-to-date version of all source databases, we managed to reach a 6-fold increase in the size of the whole database and a 2-fold increase in the number of transmembrane proteins. Availability and implementation: TOPDOM database is available at http://topdom.enzim.hu. The webpage utilizes the common Apache, PHP5 and MySQL software to provide the user interface for accessing and searching the database. The database itself is generated on a high performance computer. Contact: tusnady.gabor@ttk.mta.hu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153630

  7. The Hsp90-Dependent Proteome Is Conserved and Enriched for Hub Proteins with High Levels of Protein–Protein Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Krishna B.S.; Yu, Jau-Song; Schuyler, Scott C.; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 is one of the most abundant and conserved proteins in the cell. Reduced levels or activity of Hsp90 causes defects in many cellular processes and also reveals genetic and nongenetic variation within a population. Despite information about Hsp90 protein–protein interactions, a global view of the Hsp90-regulated proteome in yeast is unavailable. To investigate the degree of dependency of individual yeast proteins on Hsp90, we used the “stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture” method coupled with mass spectrometry to quantify around 4,000 proteins in low-Hsp90 cells. We observed that 904 proteins changed in their abundance by more than 1.5-fold. When compared with the transcriptome of the same population of cells, two-thirds of the misregulated proteins were observed to be affected posttranscriptionally, of which the majority were downregulated. Further analyses indicated that the downregulated proteins are highly conserved and assume central roles in cellular networks with a high number of protein interacting partners, suggesting that Hsp90 buffers genetic and nongenetic variation through regulating protein network hubs. The downregulated proteins were enriched for essential proteins previously not known to be Hsp90-dependent. Finally, we observed that downregulation of transcription factors and mating pathway components by attenuating Hsp90 function led to decreased target gene expression and pheromone response, respectively, providing a direct link between observed proteome regulation and cellular phenotypes. PMID:25316598

  8. ConSurf 2005: the projection of evolutionary conservation scores of residues on protein structures.

    PubMed

    Landau, Meytal; Mayrose, Itay; Rosenberg, Yossi; Glaser, Fabian; Martz, Eric; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2005-07-01

    Key amino acid positions that are important for maintaining the 3D structure of a protein and/or its function(s), e.g. catalytic activity, binding to ligand, DNA or other proteins, are often under strong evolutionary constraints. Thus, the biological importance of a residue often correlates with its level of evolutionary conservation within the protein family. ConSurf (http://consurf.tau.ac.il/) is a web-based tool that automatically calculates evolutionary conservation scores and maps them on protein structures via a user-friendly interface. Structurally and functionally important regions in the protein typically appear as patches of evolutionarily conserved residues that are spatially close to each other. We present here version 3.0 of ConSurf. This new version includes an empirical Bayesian method for scoring conservation, which is more accurate than the maximum-likelihood method that was used in the earlier release. Various additional steps in the calculation can now be controlled by a number of advanced options, thus further improving the accuracy of the calculation. Moreover, ConSurf version 3.0 also includes a measure of confidence for the inferred amino acid conservation scores.

  9. Conservation of Transit Peptide-Independent Protein Import into the Mitochondrial and Hydrogenosomal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sriram; Stölting, Jan; Zimorski, Verena; Rada, Petr; Tachezy, Jan; Martin, William F.; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of protein import was a key step in the endosymbiotic acquisition of mitochondria. Though the main translocon of the mitochondrial outer membrane, TOM40, is ubiquitous among organelles of mitochondrial ancestry, the transit peptides, or N-terminal targeting sequences (NTSs), recognised by the TOM complex, are not. To better understand the nature of evolutionary conservation in mitochondrial protein import, we investigated the targeting behavior of Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and vice versa. Hydrogenosomes import yeast mitochondrial proteins even in the absence of their native NTSs, but do not import yeast cytosolic proteins. Conversely, yeast mitochondria import hydrogenosomal proteins with and without their short NTSs. Conservation of an NTS-independent mitochondrial import route from excavates to opisthokonts indicates its presence in the eukaryote common ancestor. Mitochondrial protein import is known to entail electrophoresis of positively charged NTSs across the electrochemical gradient of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Our present findings indicate that mitochondrial transit peptides, which readily arise from random sequences, were initially selected as a signal for charge-dependent protein targeting specifically to the mitochondrial matrix. Evolutionary loss of the electron transport chain in hydrogenosomes and mitosomes lifted the selective constraints that maintain positive charge in NTSs, allowing first the NTS charge, and subsequently the NTS itself, to be lost. This resulted in NTS-independent matrix targeting, which is conserved across the evolutionary divide separating trichomonads and yeast, and which we propose is the ancestral state of mitochondrial protein import. PMID:26338186

  10. Conservation and variation in enamel protein distribution during vertebrate tooth development.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Paul G; Anderton, Xochitl; Ryu, Okhee H; Luan, Xianghong; Ortega, Adam J; Opamen, Rene; Berman, Brett J; Witherspoon, David E; Gutmann, James L; Yamane, Akira; Zeichner-David, Margerita; Simmer, James P; Shuler, Charles F; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2002-08-15

    Vertebrate enamel formation is a unique synthesis of the function of highly specialized enamel proteins and their effect on the growth and organization of apatite crystals. Among tetrapods, the physical structure of enamel is highly conserved, while there is a greater variety of enameloid tooth coverings in fish. In the present study, we postulated that in enamel microstructures of similar organization, the principle components of the enamel protein matrix would have to be highly conserved. In order to identify the enamel proteins that might be most highly conserved and thus potentially most essential to the process of mammalian enamel formation, we used immunoscreening with enamel protein antibodies as a means to assay for degrees of homology to mammalian enamel proteins. Enamel preparations from mouse, gecko, frog, lungfish, and shark were screened with mammalian enamel protein antibodies, including amelogenin, enamelin, tuftelin, MMP20, and EMSP1. Our results demonstrated that amelogenin was the most highly conserved enamel protein associated with the enamel organ, enamelin featured a distinct presence in shark enameloid but was also present in the enamel organ of other species, while the other enamel proteins, tuftelin, MMP20, and EMSP1, were detected in both in the enamel organ and in other tissues of all species investigated. We thus conclude that the investigated enamel proteins, amelogenin, enamelin, tuftelin, MMP20, and EMSP1, were highly conserved in a variety of vertebrate species. We speculate that there might be a unique correlation between amelogenin-rich tetrapod and lungfish enamel with long and parallel crystals and enamelin-rich basal vertebrate enameloid with diverse patterns of crystal organization.

  11. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Brantley D; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T; Koelle, Michael R; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-03-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA-G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  12. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Brantley D.; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S.; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T.; Koelle, Michael R.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA–G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  13. Conservation of polyproline II helices in homologous proteins: implications for structure prediction by model building.

    PubMed Central

    Adzhubei, A. A.; Sternberg, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Left-handed polyproline II (PPII) helices commonly occur in globular proteins in segments of 4-8 residues. This paper analyzes the structural conservation of PPII-helices in 3 protein families: serine proteinases, aspartic proteinases, and immunoglobulin constant domains. Calculations of the number of conserved segments based on structural alignment of homologous molecules yielded similar results for the PPII-helices, the alpha-helices, and the beta-strands. The PPII-helices are consistently conserved at the level of 100-80% in the proteins with sequence identity above 20% and RMS deviation of structure alignments below 3.0 A. The most structurally important PPII segments are conserved below this level of sequence identity. These results suggest that the PPII-helices, in addition to the other 2 secondary structure classes, should be identified as part of structurally conserved regions in proteins. This is supported by similar values for the local RMS deviations of the aligned segments for the structural classes of PPII-helices, alpha-helices, and beta-strands. The PPII-helices are shown to participate in supersecondary elements such as PPII-helix/alpha-helix. The conservation of PPII-helices depends on the conservation of a supersecondary element as a whole. PPII-helices also form links, possibly flexible, in the interdomain regions. The role of the PPII-helices in model building by homology is 2-fold; they serve as additional conserved elements in the structure allowing improvement of the accuracy of a model and provide correct chain geometry for modeling of the segments equivalenced to them in a target sequence. The improvement in model building is demonstrated in 2 test studies. PMID:7756993

  14. Identification of the conserved hypothetical protein BPSL0317 in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Nur Syamimi; Damiri, Nadzirah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease which is endemic in Northern Australia and Southeastern Asia. The genome encodes several essential proteins including those currently annotated as hypothetical proteins. We studied the conservation and the essentiality of expressed hypothetical proteins in normal and different stress conditions. Based on the comparative genomics, we identified a hypothetical protein, BPSL0317, a potential essential gene that is being expressed in all normal and stress conditions. BPSL0317 is also phylogenetically conserved in the Burkholderiales order suggesting that this protein is crucial for survival among the order's members. BPSL0317 therefore has a potential to be a candidate antimicrobial drug target for this group of bacteria.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Pathogenic Fungi Reveals Highly Expressed Conserved Cell Wall Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Champer, Jackson; Ito, James I.; Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.; Kalkum, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a quantitative proteomics tally of the most commonly expressed conserved fungal proteins of the cytosol, the cell wall, and the secretome. It was our goal to identify fungi-typical proteins that do not share significant homology with human proteins. Such fungal proteins are of interest to the development of vaccines or drug targets. Protein samples were derived from 13 fungal species, cultured in rich or in minimal media; these included clinical isolates of Aspergillus, Candida, Mucor, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides species. Proteomes were analyzed by quantitative MSE (Mass Spectrometry—Elevated Collision Energy). Several thousand proteins were identified and quantified in total across all fractions and culture conditions. The 42 most abundant proteins identified in fungal cell walls or supernatants shared no to very little homology with human proteins. In contrast, all but five of the 50 most abundant cytosolic proteins had human homologs with sequence identity averaging 59%. Proteomic comparisons of the secreted or surface localized fungal proteins highlighted conserved homologs of the Aspergillus fumigatus proteins 1,3-β-glucanosyltransferases (Bgt1, Gel1-4), Crf1, Ecm33, EglC, and others. The fact that Crf1 and Gel1 were previously shown to be promising vaccine candidates, underlines the value of the proteomics data presented here. PMID:26878023

  16. Evolutionarily Conserved Binding of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein to Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1B*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huiwen; Gong, Weibin; Yao, Xingzhe; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an abundant protein that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. However, its primary function is still not clear. Human TCTP interacts with the metazoan-specific eukaryotic elongation factor 1Bδ (eEF1Bδ) and inhibits its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, but the structural mechanism remains unknown. The interaction between TCTP and eEF1Bδ was investigated by NMR titration, structure determination, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and HADDOCK docking. We first demonstrated that the catalytic GEF domain of eEF1Bδ is not responsible for binding to TCTP but rather a previously unnoticed central acidic region (CAR) domain in eEF1Bδ. The mutagenesis data and the structural model of the TCTP-eEF1Bδ CAR domain complex revealed the key binding residues. These residues are highly conserved in eukaryotic TCTPs and in eEF1B GEFs, including the eukaryotically conserved eEF1Bα, implying the interaction may be conserved in all eukaryotes. Interactions were confirmed between TCTP and the eEF1Bα CAR domain for human, fission yeast, and unicellular photosynthetic microalgal proteins, suggesting that involvement in protein translation through the conserved interaction with eEF1B represents a primary function of TCTP. PMID:25635048

  17. Ramachandran analysis of conserved glycyl residues in homologous proteins of known structure.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Balasubramanian; Sinduja, Chandrasekaran; Archunan, Govind; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-06-01

    High conservation of glycyl residues in homologous proteins is fairly frequent. It is commonly understood that glycine tends to be highly conserved either because of its unique Ramachandran angles or to avoid steric clash that would arise with a larger side chain. Using a database of aligned 3D structures of homologous proteins we identified conserved Gly in 288 alignment positions from 85 families. Ninety-six of these alignment positions correspond to conserved Gly residue with (φ, ψ) values allowed for non-glycyl residues. Reasons for this observation were investigated by in-silico mutation of these glycyl residues to Ala. We found in 94% of the cases a short contact exists between the C(β) atom of the introduced Ala with the atoms which are often distant in the primary structure. This suggests the lack of space even for a short side chain thereby explaining high conservation of glycyl residues even when they adopt (φ, ψ) values allowed for Ala. In 189 alignment positions, the conserved glycyl residues adopt (φ, ψ) values which are disallowed for Ala. In-silico mutation of these Gly residues to Ala almost always results in steric hindrance involving C(β) atom of Ala as one would expect by comparing Ramachandran maps for Ala and Gly. Rare occurrence of the disallowed glycyl conformations even in ultrahigh resolution protein structures are accompanied by short contacts in the crystal structures and such disallowed conformations are not conserved in the homologues. These observations raise the doubt on the accuracy of such glycyl conformations in proteins. PMID:24687432

  18. The nucleolar RNA-binding protein B-36 is highly conserved among plants.

    PubMed

    Guiltinan, M J; Schelling, M E; Ehtesham, N Z; Thomas, J C; Christensen, M E

    1988-08-01

    The nucleolar protein B-36 is an RNA-associated protein which has a number of properties in common with pre-mRNA-binding proteins (hnRNP proteins). Like the hnRNP proteins, B-36 appears to be evolutionarily conserved among various eukaryotes (protists and several animal species). The conservation of B-36 throughout the plant kingdom has been investigated using a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies previously shown to recognize a minimum of four different epitopes in Physarum B-36, the protein used to generate the monoclonal antibodies. Two of the epitopes (I and III) are widely conserved in 34 kDa proteins (presumably B-36 homologues) from the various species tested (Chlamydomonas, moss, fern, oat, onion, carrot, and bean). Using immunofluorescence localization in moss and carrot protoplasts, the cross-reacting proteins were shown to be restricted to the nucleolus, further confirming their probable homology to B-36. Epitopes I and III are also unique to the B-36 homologues as demonstrated by the failure of any other bands to cross-react. Another epitope (IV) was specifically recognized in the plant B-36 homologues but exhibited greatly reduced affinity for the monoclonal antibody relative to Physarum B-36. The remaining epitope (II), unlike the others, exhibited variable conservation in the plant B-36 homologues and, in addition, was present in several other seemingly unrelated proteins. Finally, several of the plant species exhibited two cross-reacting variants at roughly the 34 kDa position and in at least one of these cases a single monoclonal antibody was able to distinguish between the two variants, a result indicating that the variants do have bona fide structural differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Screening and expression of selected taxonomically conserved and unique hypothetical proteins in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhir, Nor Azurah Mat; Nadzirin, Nurul; Mohamed, Rahmah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Hypothetical proteins of bacterial pathogens represent a large numbers of novel biological mechanisms which could belong to essential pathways in the bacteria. They lack functional characterizations mainly due to the inability of sequence homology based methods to detect functional relationships in the absence of detectable sequence similarity. The dataset derived from this study showed 550 candidates conserved in genomes that has pathogenicity information and only present in the Burkholderiales order. The dataset has been narrowed down to taxonomic clusters. Ten proteins were selected for ORF amplification, seven of them were successfully amplified, and only four proteins were successfully expressed. These proteins will be great candidates in determining the true function via structural biology.

  20. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  1. Acquisition, Conservation, and Loss of Dual-Targeted Proteins in Land Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Carrie, Chris; Law, Simon R.; Murcha, Monika W.; Whelan, James

    2013-01-01

    The dual-targeting ability of a variety of proteins from Physcomitrella patens, rice (Oryza sativa), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was tested to determine when dual targeting arose and to what extent it was conserved in land plants. Overall, the targeting ability of over 80 different proteins from rice and P. patens, representing 42 dual-targeted proteins in Arabidopsis, was tested. We found that dual targeting arose early in land plant evolution, as it was evident in many cases with P. patens proteins that were conserved in rice and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we found that the acquisition of dual-targeting ability is still occurring, evident in P. patens as well as rice and Arabidopsis. The loss of dual-targeting ability appears to be rare, but does occur. Ascorbate peroxidase represents such an example. After gene duplication in rice, individual genes encode proteins that are targeted to a single organelle. Although we found that dual targeting was generally conserved, the ability to detect dual-targeted proteins differed depending on the cell types used. Furthermore, it appears that small changes in the targeting signal can result in a loss (or gain) of dual-targeting ability. Overall, examination of the targeting signals within this study did not reveal any clear patterns that would predict dual-targeting ability. The acquisition of dual-targeting ability also appears to be coordinated between proteins. Mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly protein40, a protein involved in oxidative folding in mitochondria and peroxisomes, provides an example where acquisition of dual targeting is accompanied by the dual targeting of substrate proteins. PMID:23257241

  2. Acquisition, conservation, and loss of dual-targeted proteins in land plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Carrie, Chris; Law, Simon R; Murcha, Monika W; Whelan, James

    2013-02-01

    The dual-targeting ability of a variety of proteins from Physcomitrella patens, rice (Oryza sativa), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was tested to determine when dual targeting arose and to what extent it was conserved in land plants. Overall, the targeting ability of over 80 different proteins from rice and P. patens, representing 42 dual-targeted proteins in Arabidopsis, was tested. We found that dual targeting arose early in land plant evolution, as it was evident in many cases with P. patens proteins that were conserved in rice and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we found that the acquisition of dual-targeting ability is still occurring, evident in P. patens as well as rice and Arabidopsis. The loss of dual-targeting ability appears to be rare, but does occur. Ascorbate peroxidase represents such an example. After gene duplication in rice, individual genes encode proteins that are targeted to a single organelle. Although we found that dual targeting was generally conserved, the ability to detect dual-targeted proteins differed depending on the cell types used. Furthermore, it appears that small changes in the targeting signal can result in a loss (or gain) of dual-targeting ability. Overall, examination of the targeting signals within this study did not reveal any clear patterns that would predict dual-targeting ability. The acquisition of dual-targeting ability also appears to be coordinated between proteins. Mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly protein40, a protein involved in oxidative folding in mitochondria and peroxisomes, provides an example where acquisition of dual targeting is accompanied by the dual targeting of substrate proteins.

  3. The ConSurf-DB: pre-calculated evolutionary conservation profiles of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Ofir; Erez, Elana; Nimrod, Guy; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2009-01-01

    ConSurf-DB is a repository for evolutionary conservation analysis of the proteins of known structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Sequence homologues of each of the PDB entries were collected and aligned using standard methods. The evolutionary conservation of each amino acid position in the alignment was calculated using the Rate4Site algorithm, implemented in the ConSurf web server. The algorithm takes into account the phylogenetic relations between the aligned proteins and the stochastic nature of the evolutionary process explicitly. Rate4Site assigns a conservation level for each position in the multiple sequence alignment using an empirical Bayesian inference. Visual inspection of the conservation patterns on the 3D structure often enables the identification of key residues that comprise the functionally important regions of the protein. The repository is updated with the latest PDB entries on a monthly basis and will be rebuilt annually. ConSurf-DB is available online at http://consurfdb.tau.ac.il/

  4. Mapping of the gene for a major penicillin-binding protein to a genetically conserved region of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and conservation of the protein among related species of Bacillus.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C E; Gustafson, A

    1991-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 is the most abundant penicillin-binding protein in the vegetative membranes of Bacillus subtilis and accounts for 95% of the D,D-carboxypeptidase activity of the cell. The structural gene for penicillin-binding protein 5 was mapped to a genetically conserved region near guaB at 0 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome, and immunoassays revealed that there is conservation of this major penicillin-binding protein among related species. Images PMID:1900282

  5. Sequence-related human proteins cluster by degree of evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed

    Mrowka, Ralf; Patzak, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Holste, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Gene duplication followed by adaptive evolution is thought to be a central mechanism for the emergence of novel genes. To illuminate the contribution of duplicated protein-coding sequences to the complexity of the human genome, we study the connectivity of pairwise sequence-related human proteins and construct a network (N) of linked protein sequences with shared similarities. We find that (i) the connectivity distribution P (k) for k sequence-related proteins decays as a power law P (k) approximately k(-gamma) with gamma approximately 1.2 , (ii) the top rank of N consists of a single large cluster of proteins ( approximately 70%) , while bottom ranks consist of multiple isolated clusters, and (iii) structural characteristics of N show both a high degree of clustering and an intermediate connectivity ("small-world" features). We gain further insight into structural properties of N by studying the relationship between the connectivity distribution and the phylogenetic conservation of proteins in bacteria, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. We find that (iv) the proportion of sequence-related proteins increases with increasing extent of evolutionary conservation. Our results support that small-world network properties constitute a footprint of an evolutionary mechanism and extend the traditional interpretation of protein families.

  6. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  7. Sequence-related human proteins cluster by degree of evolutionary conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrowka, Ralf; Patzak, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Holste, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Gene duplication followed by adaptive evolution is thought to be a central mechanism for the emergence of novel genes. To illuminate the contribution of duplicated protein-coding sequences to the complexity of the human genome, we study the connectivity of pairwise sequence-related human proteins and construct a network (N) of linked protein sequences with shared similarities. We find that (i) the connectivity distribution P(k) for k sequence-related proteins decays as a power law P(k)˜k-γ with γ≈1.2 , (ii) the top rank of N consists of a single large cluster of proteins (≈70%) , while bottom ranks consist of multiple isolated clusters, and (iii) structural characteristics of N show both a high degree of clustering and an intermediate connectivity (“small-world” features). We gain further insight into structural properties of N by studying the relationship between the connectivity distribution and the phylogenetic conservation of proteins in bacteria, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. We find that (iv) the proportion of sequence-related proteins increases with increasing extent of evolutionary conservation. Our results support that small-world network properties constitute a footprint of an evolutionary mechanism and extend the traditional interpretation of protein families.

  8. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J; Hirakis, Sophia P; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-01-01

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ∼90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant 'reading head' in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M-C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design. PMID:27595425

  9. The evolutionarily conserved Krueppel-associated box domain defines a subfamily of eukaryotic multifingered proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bellefroid, E.J.; Poncelet, D.A.; Lecocq, P.J.; Revelant, O.; Martial, J.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that the human genome includes hundreds of genes coding for putative factors related to the Krueppel zinc-finger protein, which regulates Drosophila segmentation. They report herein that about one-third of these genes code for proteins that share a very conserved region of about 75 amino acids in their N-terminal nonfinger portion. Homologous regions are found in a number of previously described finger proteins, including mouse Zfp-1 and Xenopus Xfin. They named this region the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB). This domain has the potential to form two amphipathic {alpha}-helices. Southern blot analysis of zoo blots suggests that the Krueppel-associated box is highly conserved during evolution. Northern blot analysis shows that these genes are expressed in most adult tissues and are down-regulated during in vitro terminal differentiation of human myeloid cells.

  10. ConSurf 2010: calculating evolutionary conservation in sequence and structure of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Erez, Elana; Martz, Eric; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2010-07-01

    It is informative to detect highly conserved positions in proteins and nucleic acid sequence/structure since they are often indicative of structural and/or functional importance. ConSurf (http://consurf.tau.ac.il) and ConSeq (http://conseq.tau.ac.il) are two well-established web servers for calculating the evolutionary conservation of amino acid positions in proteins using an empirical Bayesian inference, starting from protein structure and sequence, respectively. Here, we present the new version of the ConSurf web server that combines the two independent servers, providing an easier and more intuitive step-by-step interface, while offering the user more flexibility during the process. In addition, the new version of ConSurf calculates the evolutionary rates for nucleic acid sequences. The new version is freely available at: http://consurf.tau.ac.il/.

  11. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein–protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures. PMID:26311309

  12. Conserved primary sequences of the DNA terminal proteins of five different human adenovirus groups.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Brackmann, K; Wold, W S; Cartas, M; Thornton, H; Elder, J H

    1979-09-01

    The 31 human adenoviruses (Ad) from five groups (A-E) whose DNAs are <20% homologous by molecular hybridization. Ad5 (group C) DNA contains a 55,000-dalton protein probably covalently bound to each 5' terminus. This covalently bound protein may be analogous to polypeptides found in other viral and nonviral systems that are covalently bound to genomic DNAs or RNAs and that are thought to function in DNA or RNA replication. Because of the importance of proteins linked to nucleic acids, we have investigated whether DNAs from all five groups of human adenoviruses have terminal proteins, as well as the peptide relationships among the different terminal proteins. We show here that DNAs from Ad12, 7, 2, 19, and 4, representing Ad groups A-E, respectively, all contain covalently bound proteins of about 55,000 daltons. To investigate the peptide relatedness among the terminal proteins, we prepared microgram quantities of covalently bound protein from Ads in groups A-E and compared their chymotryptic and tryptic (125)I-labeled peptide maps. We find that the covalently bound protein maps of the five Ad groups are highly related and possibly identical. On the other hand, the tryptic and chymotryptic peptide maps of the major virion protein II and the core proteins V and VII of groups B, C, and E Ads show considerable heterology. Assuming that the covalently bound protein is virally coded, the conserved primary sequence of these proteins suggests a major functional role for the protein in Ad replication. Because the genetic origin of the Ad covalently bound proteins is not established, our data are also consistent with the possibility that the protein is coded by a cellular gene.

  13. Interaction network containing conserved and essential protein complexes in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butland, Gareth; Peregrín-Alvarez, José Manuel; Li, Joyce; Yang, Wehong; Yang, Xiaochun; Canadien, Veronica; Starostine, Andrei; Richards, Dawn; Beattie, Bryan; Krogan, Nevan; Davey, Michael; Parkinson, John; Greenblatt, Jack; Emili, Andrew

    2005-02-01

    Proteins often function as components of multi-subunit complexes. Despite its long history as a model organism, no large-scale analysis of protein complexes in Escherichia coli has yet been reported. To this end, we have targeted DNA cassettes into the E. coli chromosome to create carboxy-terminal, affinity-tagged alleles of 1,000 open reading frames (~ 23% of the genome). A total of 857 proteins, including 198 of the most highly conserved, soluble non-ribosomal proteins essential in at least one bacterial species, were tagged successfully, whereas 648 could be purified to homogeneity and their interacting protein partners identified by mass spectrometry. An interaction network of protein complexes involved in diverse biological processes was uncovered and validated by sequential rounds of tagging and purification. This network includes many new interactions as well as interactions predicted based solely on genomic inference or limited phenotypic data. This study provides insight into the function of previously uncharacterized bacterial proteins and the overall topology of a microbial interaction network, the core components of which are broadly conserved across Prokaryota.

  14. Conserved and variable correlated mutations in the plant MADS protein network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant MADS domain proteins are involved in a variety of developmental processes for which their ability to form various interactions is a key requisite. However, not much is known about the structure of these proteins or their complexes, whereas such knowledge would be valuable for a better understanding of their function. Here, we analyze those proteins and the complexes they form using a correlated mutation approach in combination with available structural, bioinformatics and experimental data. Results Correlated mutations are affected by several types of noise, which is difficult to disentangle from the real signal. In our analysis of the MADS domain proteins, we apply for the first time a correlated mutation analysis to a family of interacting proteins. This provides a unique way to investigate the amount of signal that is present in correlated mutations because it allows direct comparison of mutations in various family members and assessing their conservation. We show that correlated mutations in general are conserved within the various family members, and if not, the variability at the respective positions is less in the proteins in which the correlated mutation does not occur. Also, intermolecular correlated mutation signals for interacting pairs of proteins display clear overlap with other bioinformatics data, which is not the case for non-interacting protein pairs, an observation which validates the intermolecular correlated mutations. Having validated the correlated mutation results, we apply them to infer the structural organization of the MADS domain proteins. Conclusion Our analysis enables understanding of the structural organization of the MADS domain proteins, including support for predicted helices based on correlated mutation patterns, and evidence for a specific interaction site in those proteins. PMID:20979667

  15. Conservation and Variability of Dengue Virus Proteins: Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asif M.; Miotto, Olivo; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Srinivasan, K. N.; Heiny, A. T.; Zhang, Guang Lan; Marques, E. T.; Tan, Tin Wee; Brusic, Vladimir; Salmon, Jerome; August, J. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic variation and rapid evolution are hallmarks of RNA viruses, the result of high mutation rates in RNA replication and selection of mutants that enhance viral adaptation, including the escape from host immune responses. Variability is uneven across the genome because mutations resulting in a deleterious effect on viral fitness are restricted. RNA viruses are thus marked by protein sites permissive to multiple mutations and sites critical to viral structure-function that are evolutionarily robust and highly conserved. Identification and characterization of the historical dynamics of the conserved sites have relevance to multiple applications, including potential targets for diagnosis, and prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a large-scale identification and analysis of evolutionarily highly conserved amino acid sequences of the entire dengue virus (DENV) proteome, with a focus on sequences of 9 amino acids or more, and thus immune-relevant as potential T-cell determinants. DENV protein sequence data were collected from the NCBI Entrez protein database in 2005 (9,512 sequences) and again in 2007 (12,404 sequences). Forty-four (44) sequences (pan-DENV sequences), mainly those of nonstructural proteins and representing ∼15% of the DENV polyprotein length, were identical in 80% or more of all recorded DENV sequences. Of these 44 sequences, 34 (∼77%) were present in ≥95% of sequences of each DENV type, and 27 (∼61%) were conserved in other Flaviviruses. The frequencies of variants of the pan-DENV sequences were low (0 to ∼5%), as compared to variant frequencies of ∼60 to ∼85% in the non pan-DENV sequence regions. We further showed that the majority of the conserved sequences were immunologically relevant: 34 contained numerous predicted human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertype-restricted peptide sequences, and 26 contained T-cell determinants identified by studies with HLA-transgenic mice and

  16. A conserved family of proteins facilitates nascent lipid droplet budding from the ER

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Vineet; Ojha, Namrata; Golden, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in all cells and play critical roles in lipid metabolism. De novo LD biogenesis occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but is not well understood. We imaged early stages of LD biogenesis using electron microscopy and found that nascent LDs form lens-like structures that are in the ER membrane, raising the question of how these nascent LDs bud from the ER as they grow. We found that a conserved family of proteins, fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT) proteins, is required for proper budding of LDs from the ER. Elimination or reduction of FIT proteins in yeast and higher eukaryotes causes LDs to remain in the ER membrane. Deletion of the single FIT protein in Caenorhabditis elegans is lethal, suggesting that LD budding is an essential process in this organism. Our findings indicated that FIT proteins are necessary to promote budding of nascent LDs from the ER. PMID:26504167

  17. MCD4 Encodes a Conserved Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Protein Essential for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Synthesis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, Erin C.; Mondésert, Guillaume; Grimme, Stephen J.; Reed, Steve I.; Orlean, Peter; Emr, Scott D.

    1999-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are cell surface-localized proteins that serve many important cellular functions. The pathway mediating synthesis and attachment of the GPI anchor to these proteins in eukaryotic cells is complex, highly conserved, and plays a critical role in the proper targeting, transport, and function of all GPI-anchored protein family members. In this article, we demonstrate that MCD4, an essential gene that was initially identified in a genetic screen to isolate Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective for bud emergence, encodes a previously unidentified component of the GPI anchor synthesis pathway. Mcd4p is a multimembrane-spanning protein that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and contains a large NH2-terminal ER lumenal domain. We have also cloned the human MCD4 gene and found that Mcd4p is both highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and has two yeast homologues. Mcd4p’s lumenal domain contains three conserved motifs found in mammalian phosphodiesterases and nucleotide pyrophosphases; notably, the temperature-conditional MCD4 allele used for our studies (mcd4–174) harbors a single amino acid change in motif 2. The mcd4–174 mutant (1) is defective in ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins (i.e., Gas1p) while other proteins (i.e., CPY) are unaffected; (2) secretes and releases (potentially up-regulated cell wall) proteins into the medium, suggesting a defect in cell wall integrity; and (3) exhibits marked morphological defects, most notably the accumulation of distorted, ER- and vesicle-like membranes. mcd4–174 cells synthesize all classes of inositolphosphoceramides, indicating that the GPI protein transport block is not due to deficient ceramide synthesis. However, mcd4–174 cells have a severe defect in incorporation of [3H]inositol into proteins and accumulate several previously uncharacterized [3H]inositol-labeled lipids whose properties are consistent with their being GPI precursors

  18. Conservation of Outer Membrane Protein E among Strains of Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Brauer, Aimee L.; Yuskiw, Norine; McNamara, Erin R.; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2001-01-01

    Outer membrane protein E (OMP E) is a 50-kDa protein of Moraxella catarrhalis which has several features that suggest that the protein may be an effective vaccine antigen. To assess the conservation of OMP E among strains of M. catarrhalis, 22 isolates were studied with eight monoclonal antibodies which recognize epitopes on different regions of the protein. Eighteen of 22 strains were reactive with all eight antibodies. The sequences of ompE from 16 strains of M. catarrhalis were determined, including the 4 strains which were nonreactive with selected monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of sequences indicate a high degree of conservation among strains, with sequence differences clustered in limited regions of the gene. To assess the stability of ompE during colonization of the human respiratory tract, the sequences of ompE of isolates collected from patients colonized with the same strain for 3 to 9 months were determined. The sequences remained unchanged. These results indicate that OMP E is highly conserved among strains of M. catarrhalis, and preliminary studies indicate that the gene which encodes OMP E remains stable during colonization of the human respiratory tract. PMID:11349016

  19. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  20. Conserved lamin A protein expression in differentiated cells in the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae.

    PubMed

    Kalidas, Ramamoorthy M; Raja, Subramanian Elaiya; Mydeen, Sheik Abdul Kader Nagoor Meeran; Samuel, Selvan Christyraj Johnson Retnaraj; Durairaj, Selvan Christyraj Jackson; Nino, Gopi D; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Vaithi, Arumugaswami; Sudhakar, Sivasubramaniam

    2015-09-01

    Lamin A is an intermediate filament protein found in most of the differentiated vertebrate cells but absent in stem cells. It shapes the skeletal frame structure beneath the inner nuclear membrane of the cell nucleus. As there are few studies of the expression of lamin A in invertebrates, in the present work, we have analyzed the sequence, immunochemical conservation and expression pattern of lamin A protein in the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae, a model organism for tissue regeneration. The expression of lamin A has been confirmed in E. eugeniae by immunoblot. Its localization in the nuclear membrane has been observed by immunohistochemistry using two different rabbit anti-sera raised against human lamin A peptides, which are located at the C-terminus of the lamin A protein. These two antibodies detected 70 kDa lamin A protein in mice and a single 65 kDa protein in the earthworm. The Oct-4 positive undifferentiated blastemal tissues of regenerating earthworm do not express lamin A, while the Oct-4 negative differentiated cells express lamin A. This pattern was also confirmed in the earthworm prostate gland. The present study is the first evidence for the immunochemical identification of lamin A and Oct-4 in the earthworm. Along with the partial sequence obtained from the earthworm genome, the present results suggest that lamin A protein and its expression pattern is conserved from the earthworm to humans.

  1. Conserved lamin A protein expression in differentiated cells in the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae.

    PubMed

    Kalidas, Ramamoorthy M; Raja, Subramanian Elaiya; Mydeen, Sheik Abdul Kader Nagoor Meeran; Samuel, Selvan Christyraj Johnson Retnaraj; Durairaj, Selvan Christyraj Jackson; Nino, Gopi D; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Vaithi, Arumugaswami; Sudhakar, Sivasubramaniam

    2015-09-01

    Lamin A is an intermediate filament protein found in most of the differentiated vertebrate cells but absent in stem cells. It shapes the skeletal frame structure beneath the inner nuclear membrane of the cell nucleus. As there are few studies of the expression of lamin A in invertebrates, in the present work, we have analyzed the sequence, immunochemical conservation and expression pattern of lamin A protein in the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae, a model organism for tissue regeneration. The expression of lamin A has been confirmed in E. eugeniae by immunoblot. Its localization in the nuclear membrane has been observed by immunohistochemistry using two different rabbit anti-sera raised against human lamin A peptides, which are located at the C-terminus of the lamin A protein. These two antibodies detected 70 kDa lamin A protein in mice and a single 65 kDa protein in the earthworm. The Oct-4 positive undifferentiated blastemal tissues of regenerating earthworm do not express lamin A, while the Oct-4 negative differentiated cells express lamin A. This pattern was also confirmed in the earthworm prostate gland. The present study is the first evidence for the immunochemical identification of lamin A and Oct-4 in the earthworm. Along with the partial sequence obtained from the earthworm genome, the present results suggest that lamin A protein and its expression pattern is conserved from the earthworm to humans. PMID:25858151

  2. Functional Advantages of Conserved Intrinsic Disorder in RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Zsolyomi, Fruzsina; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Proteins form large macromolecular assemblies with RNA that govern essential molecular processes. RNA-binding proteins have often been associated with conformational flexibility, yet the extent and functional implications of their intrinsic disorder have never been fully assessed. Here, through large-scale analysis of comprehensive protein sequence and structure datasets we demonstrate the prevalence of intrinsic structural disorder in RNA-binding proteins and domains. We addressed their functionality through a quantitative description of the evolutionary conservation of disordered segments involved in binding, and investigated the structural implications of flexibility in terms of conformational stability and interface formation. We conclude that the functional role of intrinsically disordered protein segments in RNA-binding is two-fold: first, these regions establish extended, conserved electrostatic interfaces with RNAs via induced fit. Second, conformational flexibility enables them to target different RNA partners, providing multi-functionality, while also ensuring specificity. These findings emphasize the functional importance of intrinsically disordered regions in RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26439842

  3. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  4. A predicted protein interactome identifies conserved global networks and disease resistance subnetworks in maize

    PubMed Central

    Musungu, Bryan; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Brown, Robert L.; Fakhoury, Ahmad M.; Geisler, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Interactomes are genome-wide roadmaps of protein-protein interactions. They have been produced for humans, yeast, the fruit fly, and Arabidopsis thaliana and have become invaluable tools for generating and testing hypotheses. A predicted interactome for Zea mays (PiZeaM) is presented here as an aid to the research community for this valuable crop species. PiZeaM was built using a proven method of interologs (interacting orthologs) that were identified using both one-to-one and many-to-many orthology between genomes of maize and reference species. Where both maize orthologs occurred for an experimentally determined interaction in the reference species, we predicted a likely interaction in maize. A total of 49,026 unique interactions for 6004 maize proteins were predicted. These interactions are enriched for processes that are evolutionarily conserved, but include many otherwise poorly annotated proteins in maize. The predicted maize interactions were further analyzed by comparing annotation of interacting proteins, including different layers of ontology. A map of pairwise gene co-expression was also generated and compared to predicted interactions. Two global subnetworks were constructed for highly conserved interactions. These subnetworks showed clear clustering of proteins by function. Another subnetwork was created for disease response using a bait and prey strategy to capture interacting partners for proteins that respond to other organisms. Closer examination of this subnetwork revealed the connectivity between biotic and abiotic hormone stress pathways. We believe PiZeaM will provide a useful tool for the prediction of protein function and analysis of pathways for Z. mays researchers and is presented in this paper as a reference tool for the exploration of protein interactions in maize. PMID:26089837

  5. Novel hexamerization motif is discovered in a conserved cytoplasmic protein from Salmonella typhimurium.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, T.; Cuff, M.; Wu, R.; Kim, Y.; Holzle, D.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Inst. of Mathematical Problems of Biology

    2007-01-01

    The cytoplasmic protein Stm3548 of unknown function obtained from a strain of Salmonella typhimurium was determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 2.25 A. The asymmetric unit contains a hexamer of structurally identical monomers. The monomer is a globular domain with a long beta-hairpin protrusion that distinguishes this structure. This beta-hairpin occupies a central position in the hexamer, and its residues participate in the majority of interactions between subunits of the hexamer. We suggest that the structure of Stm3548 presents a new hexamerization motif. Because the residues participating in interdomain interactions are highly conserved among close members of protein family DUF1355 and buried solvent accessible area for the hexamer is significant, the hexamer is most likely conserved as well. A light scattering experiment confirmed the presence of hexamer in solution.

  6. S-Bacillithiolation Protects Conserved and Essential Proteins Against Hypochlorite Stress in Firmicutes Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Bui Khanh; Roberts, Alexandra A.; Huyen, Tran Thi Thanh; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Albrecht, Dirk; Hamilton, Chris J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein S-bacillithiolations are mixed disulfides between protein thiols and the bacillithiol (BSH) redox buffer that occur in response to NaOCl in Bacillus subtilis. We used BSH-specific immunoblots, shotgun liquid chromatography (LC)–tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis and redox proteomics to characterize the S-bacillithiolomes of B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. pumilus, B. amyloliquefaciens, and Staphylococcus carnosus and also measured the BSH/oxidized bacillithiol disulfide (BSSB) redox ratio after NaOCl stress. Results: In total, 54 proteins with characteristic S-bacillithiolation (SSB) sites were identified, including 29 unique proteins and eight proteins conserved in two or more of these bacteria. The methionine synthase MetE is the most abundant S-bacillithiolated protein in Bacillus species after NaOCl exposure. Further, S-bacillithiolated proteins include the translation elongation factor EF-Tu and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ThrS), the DnaK and GrpE chaperones, the two-Cys peroxiredoxin YkuU, the ferredoxin–NADP+ oxidoreductase YumC, the inorganic pyrophosphatase PpaC, the inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase GuaB, proteins involved in thiamine biosynthesis (ThiG and ThiM), queuosine biosynthesis (QueF), biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids (AroA and AroE), serine (SerA), branched-chain amino acids (YwaA), and homocysteine (LuxS and MetI). The thioredoxin-like proteins, YphP and YtxJ, are S-bacillithiolated at their active sites, suggesting a function in the de-bacillithiolation process. S-bacillithiolation is accompanied by a two-fold increase in the BSSB level and a decrease in the BSH/BSSB redox ratio in B. subtilis. Innovation: Many essential and conserved proteins, including the dominant MetE, were identified in the S-bacillithiolome of different Bacillus species and S. carnosus using shotgun-LC-MS/MS analyses. Conclusion: S-bacillithiolation is a widespread redox control mechanism among Firmicutes bacteria that protects

  7. Conserved Hydration Sites in Pin1 Reveal a Distinctive Water Recognition Motif in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Smitherman, Crystal; Souffrant, Michael; Gadda, Giovanni; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-25

    Structurally conserved water molecules are important for biomolecular stability, flexibility, and function. X-ray crystallographic studies of Pin1 have resolved a number of water molecules around the enzyme, including two highly conserved water molecules within the protein. The functional role of these localized water molecules remains unknown and unexplored. Pin1 catalyzes cis/trans isomerizations of peptidyl prolyl bonds that are preceded by a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue. Pin1 is involved in many subcellular signaling processes and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several life threatening diseases. Here, we investigate the significance of these structurally conserved water molecules in the catalytic domain of Pin1 using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, analysis of X-ray crystal structures, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. MD simulations and free energy calculations suggest the tighter binding water molecule plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and stability of a critical hydrogen-bonding network in the active site. The second water molecule is exchangeable with bulk solvent and is found in a distinctive helix-turn-coil motif. Structural bioinformatics analysis of nonredundant X-ray crystallographic protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) suggest this motif is present in several other proteins and can act as a water site, akin to the calcium EF hand. CD experiments suggest the isolated motif is in a distorted PII conformation and requires the protein environment to fully form the α-helix-turn-coil motif. This study provides valuable insights into the role of hydration in the structural integrity of Pin1 that can be exploited in protein engineering and drug design. PMID:26651388

  8. Cytoskeletal proteins participate in conserved viral strategies across kingdoms of life.

    PubMed

    Erb, Marcella L; Pogliano, Joe

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of tubulin-like cytoskeletal proteins carried on the genomes of bacteriophages that are actively used for phage propagation during both the lytic and lysogenic cycle have revealed that there at least two ways that viruses can utilize a cytoskeleton; co-opt the host cytoskeleton or bring their own homologues. Either strategy underscores the deep evolutionary relationship between viruses and cytoskeletal proteins and points to a conservation of viral strategies that crosses the kingdoms of life. Here we review some of the most recent discoveries about tubulin cytoskeletal elements encoded by phages and compare them to some of the strategies utilized by the gammaherpesvirues of mammalian cells. PMID:24055040

  9. Computational Design of Proteins Targeting the Conserved Stem Region of Influenza Hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Sarel J.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Corn, Jacob E.; Strauch, Eva-Maria; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David

    2011-09-28

    We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that bind a surface patch of interest on a target macromolecule. Favorable interactions between disembodied amino acid residues and the target surface are identified and used to anchor de novo designed interfaces. The method was used to design proteins that bind a conserved surface patch on the stem of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) from the 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus. After affinity maturation, two of the designed proteins, HB36 and HB80, bind H1 and H5 HAs with low nanomolar affinity. Further, HB80 inhibits the HA fusogenic conformational changes induced at low pH. The crystal structure of HB36 in complex with 1918/H1 HA revealed that the actual binding interface is nearly identical to that in the computational design model. Such designed binding proteins may be useful for both diagnostics and therapeutics.

  10. Peptide Vocabulary Analysis Reveals Ultra-Conservation and Homonymity in Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gatherer, Derek

    2007-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for vocabulary analysis (word detection) in texts of human origin. It performs at 60%–70% overall accuracy and greater than 80% accuracy for longer words, and approximately 85% sensitivity on Alice in Wonderland, a considerable improvement on previous methods. When applied to protein sequences, it detects short sequences analogous to words in human texts, i.e. intolerant to changes in spelling (mutation), and relatively context-independent in their meaning (function). Some of these are homonyms of up to 7 amino acids, which can assume different structures in different proteins. Others are ultra-conserved stretches of up to 18 amino acids within proteins of less than 40% overall identity, reflecting extreme constraint or convergent evolution. Different species are found to have qualitatively different major peptide vocabularies, e.g. some are dominated by large gene families, while others are rich in simple repeats or dominated by internally repetitive proteins. This suggests the possibility of a peptide vocabulary signature, analogous to genome signatures in DNA. Homonyms may be useful in detecting convergent evolution and positive selection in protein evolution. Ultra-conserved words may be useful in identifying structures intolerant to substitution over long periods of evolutionary time. PMID:20066129

  11. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states. PMID:25004958

  12. Conserved RNA-Binding Proteins Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Antonacci, Simona; Forand, Daniel; Wolf, Margaret; Tyus, Courtney; Barney, Julia; Kellogg, Leah; Simon, Margo A.; Kerr, Genevieve; Wells, Kristen L.; Younes, Serena; Mortimer, Nathan T.; Olesnicky, Eugenia C.; Killian, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of dendritic branching is critical for sensory reception, cell−cell communication within the nervous system, learning, memory, and behavior. Defects in dendrite morphology are associated with several neurologic disorders; thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern dendrite morphogenesis is important. Recent investigations of dendrite morphogenesis have highlighted the importance of gene regulation at the posttranscriptional level. Because RNA-binding proteins mediate many posttranscriptional mechanisms, we decided to investigate the extent to which conserved RNA-binding proteins contribute to dendrite morphogenesis across phyla. Here we identify a core set of RNA-binding proteins that are important for dendrite morphogenesis in the PVD multidendritic sensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homologs of each of these genes were previously identified as important in the Drosophila melanogaster dendritic arborization sensory neurons. Our results suggest that RNA processing, mRNA localization, mRNA stability, and translational control are all important mechanisms that contribute to dendrite morphogenesis, and we present a conserved set of RNA-binding proteins that regulate these processes in diverse animal species. Furthermore, homologs of these genes are expressed in the human brain, suggesting that these RNA-binding proteins are candidate regulators of dendrite development in humans. PMID:25673135

  13. The conserved KNOX domain mediates specificity of tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Nishimura, A; Tamaoki, M; Kuba, M; Tanaka, H; Iwahori, S; Matsuoka, M

    1999-01-01

    Overproduction of the tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23 in transgenic tobacco plants causes mild, severe, and no morphological alterations, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the homeodomains and adjacent ELK domains are highly conserved, and the N-terminal KNOX domains also are moderately conserved. To investigate the contributions of both the conserved and divergent regions to the severity of morphological alterations, we generated chimeric proteins by exchanging different regions of NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23. The severity of the abnormal phenotype was dependent upon the synergistic action of both the N terminus, containing the KNOX domain, and the C terminus, containing the ELK homeodomain. Detailed analysis focusing on the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal half of the ELK domain is more effective in inducing the abnormal phenotypes than are the homeodomains. For the N terminus, severe morphological alterations were induced by exchanging a part of the KNOX domain of NTH1 with the corresponding region of NTH15. This limited region in the KNOX domain of all homeodomain proteins includes a predicted alpha-helical region, but only that in NTH15 is predicted to form a typical amphipathic structure. We discuss the possibility, based on these results, that the secondary structure of the KNOX domain is important for the induction of abnormal morphology in transgenic tobacco plants. PMID:10449577

  14. Evolutionarily conserved autoregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing by ribosomal protein L10a

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Satomi; Togo-Ohno, Marina; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs can regulate expression of protein-coding genes by generating unproductive mRNAs rapidly degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Many of the genes directly regulated by alternative splicing coupled with NMD (AS-NMD) are related to RNA metabolism, but the repertoire of genes regulated by AS-NMD in vivo is to be determined. Here, we analyzed transcriptome data of wild-type and NMD-defective mutant strains of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and demonstrate that eight of the 82 cytoplasmic ribosomal protein (rp) genes generate unproductively spliced mRNAs. Knockdown of any of the eight rp genes exerted a dynamic and compensatory effect on alternative splicing of its own transcript and inverse effects on that of the other rp genes. A large subunit protein L10a, termed RPL-1 in nematodes, directly and specifically binds to an evolutionarily conserved 39-nt stretch termed L10ARE between the two alternative 5′ splice sites in its own pre-mRNA to switch the splice site choice. Furthermore, L10ARE-mediated splicing autoregulation of the L10a-coding gene is conserved in vertebrates. These results indicate that L10a is an evolutionarily conserved splicing regulator and that homeostasis of a subset of the rp genes are regulated at the level of pre-mRNA splicing in vivo. PMID:26961311

  15. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  16. Identification of human proteins functionally conserved with the yeast putative adaptors ADA2 and GCN5.

    PubMed Central

    Candau, R; Moore, P A; Wang, L; Barlev, N; Ying, C Y; Rosen, C A; Berger, S L

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional adaptor proteins are required for full function of higher eukaryotic acidic activators in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that this pathway of activation is evolutionarily conserved. Consistent with this view, we have identified possible human homologs of yeast ADA2 (yADA2) and yeast GCN5 (yGCN5), components of a putative adaptor complex. While there is overall sequence similarity between the yeast and human proteins, perhaps more significant is conservation of key sequence features with other known adaptors. We show several functional similarities between the human and yeast adaptors. First, as shown for yADA2 and yGCN5, human ADA2 (hADA2) and human GCN5 (hGCN5) interacted in vivo in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, hGCN5 interacted with yADA2 in this assay, suggesting that the human proteins form similar complexes. Second, both yADA2 and hADA2 contain cryptic activation domains. Third, hGCN5 and yGCN5 had similar stabilizing effects on yADA2 in vivo. Furthermore, the region of yADA2 that interacted with yGCN5 mapped to the amino terminus of yADA2, which is highly conserved in hADA2. Most striking, is the behavior of the human proteins in human cells. First, GAL4-hADA2 activated transcription in HeLa cells, and second, either hADA2 or hGCN5 augmented GAL4-VP16 activation. These data indicated that the human proteins correspond to functional homologs of the yeast adaptors, suggesting that these cofactors play a key role in transcriptional activation. PMID:8552087

  17. Crystal structure of AFV3-109, a highly conserved protein from crenarchaeal viruses.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jenny; Leulliot, Nicolas; Cambillau, Christian; Campanacci, Valérie; Porciero, Stéphanie; Prangishvili, David; Forterre, Patrick; Cortez, Diego; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2007-01-01

    The extraordinary morphologies of viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea clearly distinguish them from bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. Moreover, their genomes code for proteins that to a large extend have no related sequences in the extent databases. However, a small pool of genes is shared by overlapping subsets of these viruses, and the most conserved gene, exemplified by the ORF109 of the Acidianus Filamentous Virus 3, AFV3, is present on genomes of members of three viral familes, the Lipothrixviridae, Rudiviridae, and "Bicaudaviridae", as well as of the unclassified Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus, STIV. We present here the crystal structure of the protein (Mr = 13.1 kD, 109 residues) encoded by the AFV3 ORF 109 in two different crystal forms at 1.5 and 1.3 A resolution. The structure of AFV3-109 is a five stranded beta-sheet with loops on one side and three helices on the other. It forms a dimer adopting the shape of a cradle that encompasses the best conserved regions of the sequence. No protein with a related fold could be identified except for the ortholog from STIV1, whose structure was deposited at the Protein Data Bank. We could clearly identify a well bound glycerol inside the cradle, contacting exclusively totally conserved residues. This interaction was confirmed in solution by fluorescence titration. Although the function of AFV3-109 cannot be deduced directly from its structure, structural homology with the STIV1 protein, and the size and charge distribution of the cavity suggested it could interact with nucleic acids. Fluorescence quenching titrations also showed that AFV3-109 interacts with dsDNA. Genomic sequence analysis revealed bacterial homologs of AFV3-109 as a part of a putative previously unidentified prophage sequences in some Firmicutes.

  18. Ser/Thr Motifs in Transmembrane Proteins: Conservation Patterns and Effects on Local Protein Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; White, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    We combined systematic bioinformatics analyses and molecular dynamics simulations to assess the conservation patterns of Ser and Thr motifs in membrane proteins, and the effect of such motifs on the structure and dynamics of α-helical transmembrane (TM) segments. We find that Ser/Thr motifs are often present in β-barrel TM proteins. At least one Ser/Thr motif is present in almost half of the sequences of α-helical proteins analyzed here. The extensive bioinformatics analyses and inspection of protein structures led to the identification of molecular transporters with noticeable numbers of Ser/Thr motifs within the TM region. Given the energetic penalty for burying multiple Ser/Thr groups in the membrane hydrophobic core, the observation of transporters with multiple membrane-embedded Ser/Thr is intriguing and raises the question of how the presence of multiple Ser/Thr affects protein local structure and dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations of four different Ser-containing model TM peptides indicate that backbone hydrogen bonding of membrane-buried Ser/Thr hydroxyl groups can significantly change the local structure and dynamics of the helix. Ser groups located close to the membrane interface can hydrogen bond to solvent water instead of protein backbone, leading to an enhanced local solvation of the peptide. PMID:22836667

  19. Functional conservation among members of the Salmonella typhimurium InvA family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, C C; Galán, J E

    1995-02-01

    InvA, which is essential for Salmonella spp. to enter cultured epithelial cells, is a member of a family of proteins involved in either flagellar biosynthesis or the secretion of virulence determinants by a number of plant and mammalian pathogens. The predicted overall secondary structures of these proteins show significant similarities and indicate a modular construction with a hydrophobic amino-terminal half, consisting of six to eight potential transmembrane domains, and a hydrophilic carboxy terminus which is predicted to reside in the cytoplasm. These proteins can be aligned over the entire length of their polypeptide sequences, with the highest degree of homology found in the amino terminus and clusters of conserved residues in the carboxy terminus. We examined the functional conservation among members of this protein family by assessing the ability of MxiA of Shigella flexneri and LcrD of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to restore invasiveness to an invA mutant of Salmonella typhimurium. We found that MxiA was able to complement the entry defect of the invA mutant strain of S. typhimurium. In contrast, LcrD failed to complement the same strain. However, a plasmid carrying a gene encoding a chimeric protein consisting of the amino terminus of LcrD and the carboxy terminus of InvA complemented the defect of the Salmonella invA mutant. These results indicate that the secretory systems in which these proteins participate are functionally similar and that the Salmonella and Shigella systems are very closely related. These data also suggest that determinants of specificity may be located at the carboxy termini of these proteins.

  20. Naegleria gruberi de novo basal body assembly occurs via stepwise incorporation of conserved proteins.

    PubMed

    Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Assaf, Zoe June; Chen, Sean; Cande, W Zacheus

    2010-06-01

    Centrioles and basal bodies are discrete structures composed of a cylinder of nine microtubule triplets and associated proteins. Metazoan centrioles can be found at mitotic spindle poles and are called basal bodies when used to organize microtubules to form the core structure of flagella. Naegleria gruberi, a unicellular eukaryote, grows as an amoeba that lacks a cytoplasmic microtubule cytoskeleton. When stressed, Naegleria rapidly (and synchronously) differentiates into a flagellate, forming a complete cytoplasmic cytoskeleton de novo, including two basal bodies and flagella. Here, we show that Naegleria has genes encoding conserved centriole proteins. Using novel antibodies, we describe the localization of three centrosomal protein homologs (SAS-6, gamma-tubulin, and centrin-1) during the assembly of the flagellate microtubule cytoskeleton. We also used these antibodies to show that Naegleria expresses the proteins in the same order as their incorporation into basal bodies, with SAS-6 localizing first, followed by centrin and finally gamma-tubulin. The similarities between basal body assembly in Naegleria and centriole assembly in animals indicate that mechanisms of assembly, as well as structure, have been conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. PMID:20400468

  1. Regulation of flagellar motility by the conserved flagellar protein CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Cochran, Deborah A.; Gargano, Mary D.; King, Iryna; Samhat, Nayef K.; Burger, Benjain P.; Sabourin, Katherine R.; Hou, Yuqing; Awata, Junya; Parry, David A.D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Witman, George B.; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are vital sensory and motile organelles. The calcium channel PKD2 mediates sensory perception on cilia and flagella, and defects in this can contribute to ciliopathic diseases. Signaling from Pkd2-dependent Ca2+ rise in the cilium to downstream effectors may require intermediary proteins that are largely unknown. To identify these proteins, we carried out genetic screens for mutations affecting Drosophila melanogaster sperm storage, a process mediated by Drosophila Pkd2. Here we show that a new mutation lost boys (lobo) encodes a conserved flagellar protein CG34110, which corresponds to vertebrate Ccdc135 (E = 6e-78) highly expressed in ciliated respiratory epithelia and sperm, and to FAP50 (E = 1e-28) in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar proteome. CG34110 localizes along the fly sperm flagellum. FAP50 is tightly associated with the outer doublet microtubules of the axoneme and appears not to be a component of the central pair, radial spokes, dynein arms, or structures defined by the mbo waveform mutants. Phenotypic analyses indicate that both Pkd2 and lobo specifically affect sperm movement into the female storage receptacle. We hypothesize that the CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50 family of conserved flagellar proteins functions within the axoneme to mediate Pkd2-dependent processes in the sperm flagellum and other motile cilia. PMID:21289096

  2. Subdominant Outer Membrane Antigens in Anaplasma marginale: Conservation, Antigenicity, and Protective Capacity Using Recombinant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ducken, Deirdre R.; Brown, Wendy C.; Alperin, Debra C.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Reif, Kathryn E.; Turse, Joshua E.; Palmer, Guy H.; Noh, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are several knowledge gaps limiting progress in vaccine development. First, are these OMPs conserved among the diversity of A. marginale strains circulating in endemic regions? Second, are the most highly conserved outer membrane proteins in the immunogens recognized by immunized and protected animals? Lastly, can this subset of OMPs recognized by antibody from protected vaccinates and conserved among strains recapitulate the protection of outer membrane vaccines? To address the first goal, genes encoding OMPs AM202, AM368, AM854, AM936, AM1041, and AM1096, major subdominant components of the outer membrane, were cloned and sequenced from geographically diverse strains and isolates. AM202, AM936, AM854, and AM1096 share 99.9 to 100% amino acid identity. AM1041 has 97.1 to 100% and AM368 has 98.3 to 99.9% amino acid identity. While all four of the most highly conserved OMPs were recognized by IgG from animals immunized with outer membranes, linked surface protein complexes, or unlinked surface protein complexes and shown to be protected from challenge, the highest titers and consistent recognition among vaccinates were to AM854 and AM936. Consequently, animals were immunized with recombinant AM854 and AM936 and challenged. Recombinant vaccinates and purified outer membrane vaccinates had similar IgG and IgG2 responses to both proteins. However, the recombinant vaccinates developed higher bacteremia after challenge as compared to adjuvant-only controls and outer membrane vaccinates. These results provide the first evidence that vaccination with specific antigens may exacerbate disease. Progressing from the protective capacity of outer membrane formulations to recombinant vaccines

  3. A conserved protein interaction network involving the yeast MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1.

    PubMed

    Kusari, Anasua B; Molina, Douglas M; Sabbagh, Walid; Lau, Chang S; Bardwell, Lee

    2004-01-19

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 bind to multiple regulators and substrates. We show that mutations in a conserved docking site in these MAPKs (the CD/7m region) disrupt binding to an important subset of their binding partners, including the Ste7 MAPK kinase, the Ste5 adaptor/scaffold protein, and the Dig1 and Dig2 transcriptional repressors. Supporting the possibility that Ste5 and Ste7 bind to the same region of the MAPKs, they partially competed for Fus3 binding. In vivo, some of the MAPK mutants displayed reduced Ste7-dependent phosphorylation, and all of them exhibited multiple defects in mating and pheromone response. The Kss1 mutants were also defective in Kss1-imposed repression of Ste12. We conclude that MAPKs contain a structurally and functionally conserved docking site that mediates an overall positively acting network of interactions with cognate docking sites on their regulators and substrates. Key features of this interaction network appear to have been conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:14734536

  4. Haem homeostasis is regulated by the conserved and concerted functions of HRG-1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Rao, Anita U; Amigo, Julio; Tian, Meng; Upadhyay, Sanjeev K; Hall, Caitlin; Uhm, Suji; Mathew, M K; Fleming, Mark D; Paw, Barry H; Krause, Michael; Hamza, Iqbal

    2008-06-19

    Haems are metalloporphyrins that serve as prosthetic groups for various biological processes including respiration, gas sensing, xenobiotic detoxification, cell differentiation, circadian clock control, metabolic reprogramming and microRNA processing. With a few exceptions, haem is synthesized by a multistep biosynthetic pathway comprising defined intermediates that are highly conserved throughout evolution. Despite our extensive knowledge of haem biosynthesis and degradation, the cellular pathways and molecules that mediate intracellular haem trafficking are unknown. The experimental setback in identifying haem trafficking pathways has been the inability to dissociate the highly regulated cellular synthesis and degradation of haem from intracellular trafficking events. Caenorhabditis elegans and related helminths are natural haem auxotrophs that acquire environmental haem for incorporation into haemoproteins, which have vertebrate orthologues. Here we show, by exploiting this auxotrophy to identify HRG-1 proteins in C. elegans, that these proteins are essential for haem homeostasis and normal development in worms and vertebrates. Depletion of hrg-1, or its paralogue hrg-4, in worms results in the disruption of organismal haem sensing and an abnormal response to haem analogues. HRG-1 and HRG-4 are previously unknown transmembrane proteins, which reside in distinct intracellular compartments. Transient knockdown of hrg-1 in zebrafish leads to hydrocephalus, yolk tube malformations and, most strikingly, profound defects in erythropoiesis-phenotypes that are fully rescued by worm HRG-1. Human and worm proteins localize together, and bind and transport haem, thus establishing an evolutionarily conserved function for HRG-1. These findings reveal conserved pathways for cellular haem trafficking in animals that define the model for eukaryotic haem transport. Thus, uncovering the mechanisms of haem transport in C. elegans may provide insights into human disorders of haem

  5. Conservation of antigen components from two recombinant hybrid proteins protective against malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, B; Nau, U; Hundt, E

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that two hybrid proteins carrying partial sequences of the blood-stage antigens SERP, HRPII, and MSAI from Plasmodium falciparum confer protective immunity on Aotus monkeys against an experimental parasite infection (B. Knapp, E. Hundt, B. Enders, and H. A. Küpper, Infect. Immun. 60:2397-2401, 1992). The malarial components of the hybrid proteins consist of amino acid residues 630 to 892 of SERP, amino acid residues 146 to 260 of MSAI, and the 189 C-terminal residues of HRPII. We have studied the diversity of these protein regions in field isolates of P. falciparum. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood of six donors from two different areas where malaria is endemic. The gene regions of SERP and MSAI coding for the corresponding sequences of the protective hybrid proteins and the exon II region of the HRPII gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. All three regions were found to be highly conserved. In the 262-amino-acid fragment of SERP, one single conservative amino acid substitution was found. The exon II region of HRPII showed only a slight variability in number and arrangement of the repeat units. The 115-amino-acid fragment of MSAI which is located within an N-terminal region known to be conserved among different parasite strains was shown to be the most variable among the vaccine components: amino acid substitutions were found in 14 different positions of this MSAI region when both laboratory strains and field isolates were compared. PMID:8432609

  6. Ancient conserved regions in new gene sequences and the protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R. ); Lipman, D.; States, D.; Claverie, J.M. )

    1993-03-19

    Sets of new gene sequences from human, nematode, and yeast were compared with each other and with a set of Escherichia coli genes in order to detect ancient evolutionarily conserved regions (ACRs) in the encoded proteins. Nearly all of the ACRs so identified were found to be homologous to sequences in the protein databases. This suggests that currently known proteins may already include representatives of most ACRs and that new sequences not similar to any database sequence are unlikely to contain ACRs. Preliminary analyses indicate that moderately expressed genes may be more likely to contain ACRs than rarely expressed genes. It is estimated that there are fewer than 900 ACRs in all. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Structure of a Conserved Golgi Complex-targeting Signal in Coronavirus Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Surya, Wahyu; Claudine, Stephanie; Torres, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Coronavirus envelope (CoV E) proteins are ∼100-residue polypeptides with at least one channel-forming α-helical transmembrane (TM) domain. The extramembrane C-terminal tail contains a completely conserved proline, at the center of a predicted β-coil-β motif. This hydrophobic motif has been reported to constitute a Golgi-targeting signal or a second TM domain. However, no structural data for this or other extramembrane domains in CoV E proteins is available. Herein, we show that the E protein in the severe acute respiratory syndrome virus has only one TM domain in micelles, whereas the predicted β-coil-β motif forms a short membrane-bound α-helix connected by a disordered loop to the TM domain. However, complementary results suggest that this motif is potentially poised for conformational change or in dynamic exchange with other conformations. PMID:24668816

  8. Expression of the highly conserved vaccinia virus E6 protein is required for virion morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Wolfgang; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2009-04-10

    The vaccinia virus E6R gene (VACVWR062) is conserved in all members of the poxvirus family and encodes a protein associated with the mature virion. We confirmed this association and provided evidence for an internal location. An inducible mutant that conditionally expresses E6 was constructed. In the absence of inducer, plaque formation and virus production were severely inhibited in several cell lines, whereas some replication occurred in others. This difference could be due to variation in the stringency of repression, since we could not isolate a stable deletion mutant even in the more 'permissive' cells. Under non-permissive conditions, viral late proteins were synthesized but processing of core proteins was inefficient, indicative of an assembly block. Transmission electron microscopy of sections of cells infected with the mutant in the absence of inducer revealed morphogenetic defects with crescents and empty immature virions adjacent to dense inclusions of viroplasm. Mature virions were infrequent and cores appeared to have lucent centers.

  9. A conserved streptococcal membrane protein, LsrS, exhibits a receptor-like function for lantibiotics.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saswati; Biswas, Indranil

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans strain GS-5 produces a two-peptide lantibiotic, Smb, which displays inhibitory activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, including other streptococci. For inhibition, lantibiotics must recognize specific receptor molecules present on the sensitive bacterial cells. However, so far no such receptor proteins have been identified for any lantibiotics. In this study, using a powerful transposon mutagenesis approach, we have identified in Streptococcus pyogenes a gene that exhibits a receptor-like function for Smb. The protein encoded by that gene, which we named LsrS, is a membrane protein belonging to the CAAX protease family. We also found that nisin, a monopeptide lantibiotic, requires LsrS for its optimum inhibitory activity. However, we found that LsrS is not required for inhibition by haloduracin and galolacticin, both of which are two-peptide lantibiotics closely related to Smb. LsrS appears to be a well-conserved protein that is present in many streptococci, including S. mutans. Inactivation of SMU.662, an LsrS homolog, in S. mutans strains UA159 and V403 rendered the cells refractory to Smb-mediated killing. Furthermore, overexpression of LsrS in S. mutans created cells more susceptible to Smb. Although LsrS and its homolog contain the CAAX protease domain, we demonstrate that inactivation of the putative active sites on the LsrS protein has no effect on its receptor-like function. This is the first report describing a highly conserved membrane protein that displays a receptor-like function for lantibiotics. PMID:24509319

  10. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  11. Cep295 is a conserved scaffold protein required for generation of a bona fide mother centriole

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Yuki; Yoshiba, Satoko; Gupta, Akshari; Watanabe, Koki; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM) serve as the core structure of the centrosome. A newly formed daughter centriole grows into a functional mother centriole. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Cep295, an evolutionarily conserved protein, is required for generation of a bona fide mother centriole organizing a functional centrosome. We find that Cep295 is recruited to the proximal centriole wall in the early stages of procentriole assembly. Cep295 then acts as a scaffold for the proper assembly of the daughter centriole. We also find that Cep295 binds directly to and recruits Cep192 onto the daughter centriole wall, which presumably endows the function of the new mother centriole for PCM assembly, microtubule-organizing centre activity and the ability for centriole formation. These findings led us to propose that Cep295 acts upstream of the conserved pathway for centriole formation and promotes the daughter-to-mother centriole conversion. PMID:27562453

  12. Cep295 is a conserved scaffold protein required for generation of a bona fide mother centriole.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuki; Yoshiba, Satoko; Gupta, Akshari; Watanabe, Koki; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM) serve as the core structure of the centrosome. A newly formed daughter centriole grows into a functional mother centriole. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Cep295, an evolutionarily conserved protein, is required for generation of a bona fide mother centriole organizing a functional centrosome. We find that Cep295 is recruited to the proximal centriole wall in the early stages of procentriole assembly. Cep295 then acts as a scaffold for the proper assembly of the daughter centriole. We also find that Cep295 binds directly to and recruits Cep192 onto the daughter centriole wall, which presumably endows the function of the new mother centriole for PCM assembly, microtubule-organizing centre activity and the ability for centriole formation. These findings led us to propose that Cep295 acts upstream of the conserved pathway for centriole formation and promotes the daughter-to-mother centriole conversion. PMID:27562453

  13. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  14. Cep295 is a conserved scaffold protein required for generation of a bona fide mother centriole.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuki; Yoshiba, Satoko; Gupta, Akshari; Watanabe, Koki; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2016-08-26

    Centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM) serve as the core structure of the centrosome. A newly formed daughter centriole grows into a functional mother centriole. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Cep295, an evolutionarily conserved protein, is required for generation of a bona fide mother centriole organizing a functional centrosome. We find that Cep295 is recruited to the proximal centriole wall in the early stages of procentriole assembly. Cep295 then acts as a scaffold for the proper assembly of the daughter centriole. We also find that Cep295 binds directly to and recruits Cep192 onto the daughter centriole wall, which presumably endows the function of the new mother centriole for PCM assembly, microtubule-organizing centre activity and the ability for centriole formation. These findings led us to propose that Cep295 acts upstream of the conserved pathway for centriole formation and promotes the daughter-to-mother centriole conversion.

  15. A conserved OmpA-like protein in Legionella pneumophila required for efficient intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Ian P; Kumova, Ogan K; Ninio, Shira

    2016-08-01

    The OmpA-like protein domain has been associated with peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and is often found in virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes for six proteins that contain the OmpA-like domain, among them the highly conserved uncharacterized protein we named CmpA. Here we set out to characterize the CmpA protein and determine its contribution to intracellular survival of L. pneumophila Secondary structure analysis suggests that CmpA is an inner membrane protein with a peptidoglycan-binding domain at the C-teminus. A cmpA mutant was able to replicate normally in broth, but failed to compete with an isogenic wild-type strain in an intracellular growth competition assay. The cmpA mutant also displayed significant intracellular growth defects in both the protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii and in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, where uptake into the cells was also impaired. The cmpA phenotypes were completely restored upon expression of CmpA in trans The data presented here establish CmpA as a novel virulence factor of L. pneumophila that is required for efficient intracellular replication in both mammalian and protozoan hosts. PMID:27421957

  16. Conserved interdomain linker promotes phase separation of the multivalent adaptor protein Nck

    PubMed Central

    Banjade, Sudeep; Wu, Qiong; Mittal, Anuradha; Peeples, William B.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of membranes, the cytosol, and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells can be controlled through phase separation of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Collective interactions of multivalent molecules mediated by modular binding domains can induce gelation and phase separation in several cytosolic and membrane-associated systems. The adaptor protein Nck has three SRC-homology 3 (SH3) domains that bind multiple proline-rich segments in the actin regulatory protein neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and an SH2 domain that binds to multiple phosphotyrosine sites in the adhesion protein nephrin, leading to phase separation. Here, we show that the 50-residue linker between the first two SH3 domains of Nck enhances phase separation of Nck/N-WASP/nephrin assemblies. Two linear motifs within this element, as well as its overall positively charged character, are important for this effect. The linker increases the driving force for self-assembly of Nck, likely through weak interactions with the second SH3 domain, and this effect appears to promote phase separation. The linker sequence is highly conserved, suggesting that the sequence determinants of the driving forces for phase separation may be generally important to Nck functions. Our studies demonstrate that linker regions between modular domains can contribute to the driving forces for self-assembly and phase separation of multivalent proteins. PMID:26553976

  17. LBP/BPI proteins and their relatives: Conservation over evolution and roles in mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Krasity, Benjamin C.; Troll, Joshua V.; Weiss, Jerrold P.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2013-01-01

    LBP [LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein] and BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein) are components of the immune system that have been principally studied in mammals for their involvement in defense against bacterial pathogens. These proteins share a basic architecture and residues involved in LPS binding. Putative orthologues, i.e., proteins encoded by similar genes that diverged from a common ancestor, have been found in a number of non-mammalian vertebrate species and several non-vertebrates. Similar to other aspects of immunity, such as the activity of Toll-like receptors and NOD (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain) proteins, analysis of the conservation of LBPs and BPIs in the invertebrates promises to provide insight into features essential to the form and function of these molecules. This review considers state-of-the-art knowledge in the diversity of the LBP/BPI proteins across the eukaryotes and also considers their role in mutualistic symbioses. Recent studies of the LBPs and BPIs in an invertebrate model of beneficial associations, the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes’ alliance with the marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri, are discussed as an example of the use of non-vertebrate models for the study of LBPs and BPIs. PMID:21787344

  18. Meiotic recombination protein Rec12: functional conservation, crossover homeostasis and early crossover/non-crossover decision.

    PubMed

    Kan, Fengling; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2011-03-01

    In fission yeast and other eukaryotes, Rec12 (Spo11) is thought to catalyze the formation of dsDNA breaks (DSBs) that initiate homologous recombination in meiosis. Rec12 is orthologous to the catalytic subunit of topoisomerase VI (Top6A). Guided by the crystal structure of Top6A, we engineered the rec12 locus to encode Rec12 proteins each with a single amino acid substitution in a conserved residue. Of 21 substitutions, 10 significantly reduced or abolished meiotic DSBs, gene conversion, crossover recombination and the faithful segregation of chromosomes. Critical residues map within the metal ion-binding pocket toprim (E179A, D229A, D231A), catalytic region 5Y-CAP (R94A, D95A, Y98F) and the DNA-binding interface (K201A, G202E, R209A, K242A). A subset of substitutions reduced DSBs but maintained crossovers, demonstrating crossover homeostasis. Furthermore, a strong separation of function mutation (R304A) suggests that the crossover/non-crossover decision is established early by a protein-protein interaction surface of Rec12. Fission yeast has multiple crossovers per bivalent, and chromosome segregation was robust above a threshold of about one crossover per bivalent, below which non-disjunction occurred. These results support structural and functional conservation among Rec12/Spo11/Top6A family members for the catalysis of DSBs, and they reveal how Rec12 regulates other features of meiotic chromosome dynamics. PMID:21030440

  19. Interactions between the Conserved Hydrophobic Region of the Prion Protein and Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles*

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, Simon; Buijs, Daniel; Gingras, Geneviève; Aubin, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of PrP110–136, a peptide encompassing the conserved hydrophobic region of the human prion protein, has been determined at high resolution in dodecylphosphocholine micelles by NMR. The results support the conclusion that the CtmPrP, a transmembrane form of the prion protein, adopts a different conformation than the reported structures of the normal prion protein determined in solution. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement studies with gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid indicated that the conserved hydrophobic region peptide is not inserted symmetrically in the micelle, thus suggesting the presence of a guanidium-phosphate ion pair involving the side chain of the terminal arginine and the detergent headgroup. Titration of dodecylphosphocholine into a solution of PrP110–136 revealed the presence of a surface-bound species. In addition, paramagnetic probes located the surface-bound peptide somewhere below the micelle-water interface when using the inserted helix as a positional reference. This localization of the unknown population would allow a similar ion pair interaction. PMID:22128151

  20. Golgi Anti-apoptotic Proteins Are Highly Conserved Ion Channels That Affect Apoptosis and Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guia; Saraiva, Nuno; Parsons, Maddy; Byrne, Bernadette; Prole, David L.; Taylor, Colin W.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Golgi anti-apoptotic proteins (GAAPs) are multitransmembrane proteins that are expressed in the Golgi apparatus and are able to homo-oligomerize. They are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and are present in some prokaryotes and orthopoxviruses. Within eukaryotes, GAAPs regulate the Ca2+ content of intracellular stores, inhibit apoptosis, and promote cell adhesion and migration. Data presented here demonstrate that purified viral GAAPs (vGAAPs) and human Bax inhibitor 1 form ion channels and that vGAAP from camelpox virus is selective for cations. Mutagenesis of vGAAP, including some residues conserved in the recently solved structure of a related bacterial protein, BsYetJ, altered the conductance (E207Q and D219N) and ion selectivity (E207Q) of the channel. Mutation of residue Glu-207 or -178 reduced the effects of GAAP on cell migration and adhesion without affecting protection from apoptosis. In contrast, mutation of Asp-219 abrogated the anti-apoptotic activity of GAAP but not its effects on cell migration and adhesion. These results demonstrate that GAAPs are ion channels and define residues that contribute to the ion-conducting pore and affect apoptosis, cell adhesion, and migration independently. PMID:25713081

  1. The complex multidomain organization of SCO-spondin protein is highly conserved in mammals.

    PubMed

    Meiniel, Olivier; Meiniel, Annie

    2007-02-01

    The multidomain organization of SCO-spondin protein is a special feature of the chordate phylum. This protein is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) from the time a dorsal neural tube appears in the course of phylogenetical evolution. With the advance of the systematic whole genomes sequencing, we were able to determine the SCO-spondin amino acid sequence in four mammalian species using the Wise2 software. From the ClustalW alignment of bovine (Bos taurus), human (Homo sapiens), murine (Mus musculus) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) proteins, a consensus sequence for mammalian SCO-spondin was determined and further validated with the dog (Canis familiaris) SCO-spondin sequence. The analysis of this consensus sequence is consistent with a very high degree of conservation in the amino acids composition and multidomain organization of SCO-spondin in mammals. In addition, the identification of conserved domains, namely, Emilin (EMI), von Willebrand factor D (vWD), low-density lipoprotein receptor type A (LDLrA) domains, SCO repeats (SCOR), thrombospondin type 1 repeats (TSR), a coagulation factor 5/8 type C (FA5-8C) or discoidin motif and a C-terminal cystine knot (CTCK) domain, provides a greater insight into the putative function of this multidomain protein. SCO-spondin belongs to the TSR superfamily given the presence of a great number of TSR (26). A finer classification of the TSR motifs in groups 1, 2 and 3 is proposed on the basis of different cysteine patterns. Interestingly, group 2 TSR are present in a number of CNS developmental proteins including R-spondins, F-spondins and Mindins.

  2. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  3. Phylogeny, sequence conservation, and functional complementation of the SBDS protein family.

    PubMed

    Boocock, G R B; Marit, M R; Rommens, J M

    2006-06-01

    The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) protein family occurs widely in nature, although its function has not been determined. Comprehensive database searches revealed SBDS homologues from 159 species, including examples from all sequenced archaeal and eukaryotic genomes and all eukaryotic kingdoms. Sequence alignment with ClustalX and MUSCLE algorithms led to the identification of conserved residues that occurred predominantly in the amino-terminal FYSH domain where they appeared to contribute to protein folding or stability. Only SBDS residue Gly91 was invariant in all species. Four distantly related protists were found to have two divergent SBDS genes in their genomes. In each case, phylogenetic analyses and the identification of shared sequence features suggested that one gene was derived from lateral gene transfer. We also identified a shared C-terminal zinc finger domain fusion in flowering plants and chromalveolates that may shed light on the function of the protein family and the evolutionary histories of these kingdoms. To assess the extent of SBDS functional conservation, we carried out complementation studies of SBDS homologues and interspecies chimeras in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined that the FYSH domain was widely interchangeable among eukaryotes, while domain 2 imparted species specificity to protein function. Domain 3 was largely dispensable for function in our yeast complementation assay. Overall, the phylogeny of SBDS was shared with a group of proteins that were markedly enriched for RNA metabolism and/or ribosome-associated functions. These findings link Shwachman-Diamond syndrome to other bone marrow failure syndromes with defects in nucleolus-associated processes, including Diamond-Blackfan anemia, cartilage-hair hypoplasia, and dyskeratosis congenita.

  4. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  5. Eukaryotic RNAse H shares a conserved domain with caulimovirus proteins that facilitate translation of polycistronic RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Mushegian, A R; Edskes, H K; Koonin, E V

    1994-01-01

    RNAse H (RNH1 protein) from the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata has a functionally uncharacterized N-terminal domain dispensable for the RNAse H activity. Using computer methods for database search and multiple alignment, we show that the N-terminal domains of RNH1 and its homologue encoded by a cDNA from chicken lens are related to the conserved domain in caulimovirus ORF VI product that facilitates translation of polycistronic virus RNA in plant cells. We hypothesize that the N-terminal domain of eukaryotic RNAse H performs an as yet uncharacterized regulatory function, possibly in mRNA translation or turnover. PMID:7937142

  6. QuasiMotiFinder: protein annotation by searching for evolutionarily conserved motif-like patterns.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Roee; Berezin, Carine; Wollman, Roy; Rosenberg, Yossi; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2005-07-01

    Sequence signature databases such as PROSITE, which include amino acid segments that are indicative of a protein's function, are useful for protein annotation. Lamentably, the annotation is not always accurate. A signature may be falsely detected in a protein that does not carry out the associated function (false positive prediction, FP) or may be overlooked in a protein that does carry out the function (false negative prediction, FN). A new approach has emerged in which a signature is replaced with a sequence profile, calculated based on multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of homologous proteins that share the same function. This approach, which is superior to the simple pattern search, essentially searches with the sequence of the query protein against an MSA library. We suggest here an alternative approach, implemented in the QuasiMotiFinder web server (http://quasimotifinder.tau.ac.il/), which is based on a search with an MSA of homologous query proteins against the original PROSITE signatures. The explicit use of the average evolutionary conservation of the signature in the query proteins significantly reduces the rate of FP prediction compared with the simple pattern search. QuasiMotiFinder also has a reduced rate of FN prediction compared with simple pattern searches, since the traditional search for precise signatures has been replaced by a permissive search for signature-like patterns that are physicochemically similar to known signatures. Overall, QuasiMotiFinder and the profile search are comparable to each other in terms of performance. They are also complementary to each other in that signatures that are falsely detected in (or overlooked by) one may be correctly detected by the other.

  7. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-01

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A. PMID:26393783

  8. Conserved and nonconserved proteins for meiotic DNA breakage and repair in yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer A; Hyppa, Randy W; Smith, Gerald R

    2004-01-01

    During meiosis DNA double-strand breaks initiate recombination in the distantly related budding and fission yeasts and perhaps in most eukaryotes. Repair of broken meiotic DNA is essential for formation of viable gametes. We report here distinct but overlapping sets of proteins in these yeasts required for formation and repair of double-strand breaks. Meiotic DNA breakage in Schizosaccharomyces pombe did not require Rad50 or Rad32, although the homologs Rad50 and Mre11 are required in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; these proteins are required for meiotic DNA break repair in both yeasts. DNA breakage required the S. pombe midmeiosis transcription factor Mei4, but the structurally unrelated midmeiosis transcription factor Ndt80 is not required for breakage in S. cerevisiae. Rhp51, Swi5, and Rad22 + Rti1 were required for full levels of DNA repair in S. pombe, as are the related S. cerevisiae proteins Rad51, Sae3, and Rad52. Dmc1 was not required for repair in S. pombe, but its homolog Dmc1 is required in the well-studied strain SK1 of S. cerevisiae. Additional proteins required in one yeast have no obvious homologs in the other yeast. The occurrence of conserved and nonconserved proteins indicates potential diversity in the mechanism of meiotic recombination and divergence of the machinery during the evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:15238514

  9. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  10. The presence of disulfide bonds reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism involved in mitochondrial protein translocase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lidia; Sokol, Anna M.; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is crucial for the biogenesis and structure of many proteins that are localized in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The importance of disulfide bond formation within mitochondrial proteins was extended beyond soluble intermembrane space proteins. Tim22, a membrane protein and core component of the mitochondrial translocase TIM22, forms an intramolecular disulfide bond in yeast. Tim22 belongs to the Tim17/Tim22/Tim23 family of protein translocases. Here, we present evidence of the high evolutionary conservation of disulfide bond formation in Tim17 and Tim22 among fungi and metazoa. Topological models are proposed that include the location of disulfide bonds relative to the predicted transmembrane regions. Yeast and human Tim22 variants that are not oxidized do not properly integrate into the membrane complex. Moreover, the lack of Tim17 oxidation disrupts the TIM23 translocase complex. This underlines the importance of disulfide bond formation for mature translocase assembly through membrane stabilization of weak transmembrane domains. PMID:27265872

  11. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Puf RNA Binding Proteins and Their mRNA Targets.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Gregory J; Brown, Patrick O; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming of a gene's expression pattern by acquisition and loss of sequences recognized by specific regulatory RNA binding proteins may be a major mechanism in the evolution of biological regulatory programs. We identified that RNA targets of Puf3 orthologs have been conserved over 100-500 million years of evolution in five eukaryotic lineages. Focusing on Puf proteins and their targets across 80 fungi, we constructed a parsimonious model for their evolutionary history. This model entails extensive and coordinated changes in the Puf targets as well as changes in the number of Puf genes and alterations of RNA binding specificity including that: 1) Binding of Puf3 to more than 200 RNAs whose protein products are predominantly involved in the production and organization of mitochondrial complexes predates the origin of budding yeasts and filamentous fungi and was maintained for 500 million years, throughout the evolution of budding yeast. 2) In filamentous fungi, remarkably, more than 150 of the ancestral Puf3 targets were gained by Puf4, with one lineage maintaining both Puf3 and Puf4 as regulators and a sister lineage losing Puf3 as a regulator of these RNAs. The decrease in gene expression of these mRNAs upon deletion of Puf4 in filamentous fungi (N. crassa) in contrast to the increase upon Puf3 deletion in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) suggests that the output of the RNA regulatory network is different with Puf4 in filamentous fungi than with Puf3 in budding yeast. 3) The coregulated Puf4 target set in filamentous fungi expanded to include mitochondrial genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and other nuclear-encoded RNAs with mitochondrial function not bound by Puf3 in budding yeast, observations that provide additional evidence for substantial rewiring of post-transcriptional regulation. 4) Puf3 also expanded and diversified its targets in filamentous fungi, gaining interactions with the mRNAs encoding the mitochondrial electron transport

  12. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Puf RNA Binding Proteins and Their mRNA Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Gregory J.; Brown, Patrick O.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming of a gene’s expression pattern by acquisition and loss of sequences recognized by specific regulatory RNA binding proteins may be a major mechanism in the evolution of biological regulatory programs. We identified that RNA targets of Puf3 orthologs have been conserved over 100–500 million years of evolution in five eukaryotic lineages. Focusing on Puf proteins and their targets across 80 fungi, we constructed a parsimonious model for their evolutionary history. This model entails extensive and coordinated changes in the Puf targets as well as changes in the number of Puf genes and alterations of RNA binding specificity including that: 1) Binding of Puf3 to more than 200 RNAs whose protein products are predominantly involved in the production and organization of mitochondrial complexes predates the origin of budding yeasts and filamentous fungi and was maintained for 500 million years, throughout the evolution of budding yeast. 2) In filamentous fungi, remarkably, more than 150 of the ancestral Puf3 targets were gained by Puf4, with one lineage maintaining both Puf3 and Puf4 as regulators and a sister lineage losing Puf3 as a regulator of these RNAs. The decrease in gene expression of these mRNAs upon deletion of Puf4 in filamentous fungi (N. crassa) in contrast to the increase upon Puf3 deletion in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) suggests that the output of the RNA regulatory network is different with Puf4 in filamentous fungi than with Puf3 in budding yeast. 3) The coregulated Puf4 target set in filamentous fungi expanded to include mitochondrial genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and other nuclear-encoded RNAs with mitochondrial function not bound by Puf3 in budding yeast, observations that provide additional evidence for substantial rewiring of post-transcriptional regulation. 4) Puf3 also expanded and diversified its targets in filamentous fungi, gaining interactions with the mRNAs encoding the mitochondrial electron transport

  13. Nmf9 Encodes a Highly Conserved Protein Important to Neurological Function in Mice and Flies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxiao; Ross, Kevin D.; Seidner, Glen A.; Gorman, Michael R.; Poon, Tiffany H.; Wang, Xiaobo; Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Lee, Patricia N.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Joiner, William J.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-coding genes identified by genome sequencing remain without functional annotation or biological context. Here we define a novel protein-coding gene, Nmf9, based on a forward genetic screen for neurological function. ENU-induced and genome-edited null mutations in mice produce deficits in vestibular function, fear learning and circadian behavior, which correlated with Nmf9 expression in inner ear, amygdala, and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Homologous genes from unicellular organisms and invertebrate animals predict interactions with small GTPases, but the corresponding domains are absent in mammalian Nmf9. Intriguingly, homozygotes for null mutations in the Drosophila homolog, CG45058, show profound locomotor defects and premature death, while heterozygotes show striking effects on sleep and activity phenotypes. These results link a novel gene orthology group to discrete neurological functions, and show conserved requirement across wide phylogenetic distance and domain level structural changes. PMID:26131556

  14. Insights into Antiparallel Microtubule Crosslinking by PRC1, a Conserved Nonmotor Microtubule Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Radhika; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Arthur, Christopher P.; Bick, Matthew J.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Darst, Seth A.; Milligan, Ronald A.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2010-09-03

    Formation of microtubule architectures, required for cell shape maintenance in yeast, directional cell expansion in plants and cytokinesis in eukaryotes, depends on antiparallel microtubule crosslinking by the conserved MAP65 protein family. Here, we combine structural and single molecule fluorescence methods to examine how PRC1, the human MAP65, crosslinks antiparallel microtubules. We find that PRC1's microtubule binding is mediated by a structured domain with a spectrin-fold and an unstructured Lys/Arg-rich domain. These two domains, at each end of a homodimer, are connected by a linkage that is flexible on single microtubules, but forms well-defined crossbridges between antiparallel filaments. Further, we show that PRC1 crosslinks are compliant and do not substantially resist filament sliding by motor proteins in vitro. Together, our data show how MAP65s, by combining structural flexibility and rigidity, tune microtubule associations to establish crosslinks that selectively mark antiparallel overlap in dynamic cytoskeletal networks.

  15. A New DNA Binding Protein Highly Conserved in Diverse Crenarchaeal Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.T.; Eilers, B.J.; Reiter, D.; Ortmann, A.C.; Young, M.J.; Lawrence, C.M.; /Montana State U. /Tubingen U.

    2007-07-09

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) infects Sulfolobus species found in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Its 37 open reading frames (ORFs) generally lack sequence similarity to other genes. One exception, however, is ORF B116. While its function is unknown, orthologs are found in three additional crenarchaeal viral families. Due to the central importance of this protein family to crenarchaeal viruses, we have undertaken structural and biochemical studies of B116. The structure reveals a previously unobserved fold consisting of a five-stranded beta-sheet flanked on one side by three alpha helices. Two subunits come together to form a homodimer with a 10-stranded mixed beta-sheet, where the topology of the central strands resembles an unclosed beta-barrel. Highly conserved loops rise above the surface of the saddle-shaped protein and suggest an interaction with the major groove of DNA. The predicted B116-DNA interaction is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

  16. A Conserved Myc Protein Domain, MBIV, Regulates DNA Binding, Apoptosis, Transformation, and G2 Arrest†

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    The myc family of oncogenes is well conserved throughout evolution. Here we present the characterization of a domain conserved in c-, N-, and L-Myc from fish to humans, N-Myc317-337, designated Myc box IV (MBIV). A deletion of this domain leads to a defect in Myc-induced apoptosis and in some transformation assays but not in cell proliferation. Unlike other Myc mutants, MycΔMBIV is not a simple loss-of-function mutant because it is hyperactive for G2 arrest in primary cells. Microarray analysis of genes regulated by N-MycΔMBIV reveals that it is weakened for transactivation and repression but not nearly as defective as N-MycΔMBII. Although the mutated region is not part of the previously defined DNA binding domain, we find that N-MycΔMBIV has a significantly lower affinity for DNA than the wild-type protein in vitro. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation shows reduced binding of N-MycΔMBIV to some target genes in vivo, which correlates with the defect in transactivation. Thus, this conserved domain has an unexpected role in Myc DNA binding activity. These data also provide a novel separation of Myc functions linked to the modulation of DNA binding activity. PMID:16705173

  17. Conserved and Variant Epitopes of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein as Targets of Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ntumngia, Francis B.; Schloegel, Jesse; Barnes, Samantha J.; McHenry, Amy M.; Singh, Sanjay; King, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    The Duffy binding protein (DBP) is a vital ligand for Plasmodium vivax blood-stage merozoite invasion, making the molecule an attractive vaccine candidate against vivax malaria. Similar to other blood-stage vaccine candidates, DBP allelic variation eliciting a strain-specific immunity may be a major challenge for development of a broadly effective vaccine against vivax malaria. To understand whether conserved epitopes can be the target of neutralizing anti-DBP inhibition, we generated a set of monoclonal antibodies to DBP and functionally analyzed their reactivity to a panel of allelic variants. Quantitative analysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) determined that some monoclonal antibodies reacted strongly with epitopes conserved on all DBP variants tested, while reactivity of others was allele specific. Qualitative analysis characterized by anti-DBP functional inhibition using an in vitro erythrocyte binding inhibition assay indicated that there was no consistent correlation between the endpoint titers and functional inhibition. Some monoclonal antibodies were broadly inhibitory while inhibition of others varied significantly by target allele. These data demonstrate a potential for vaccine-elicited immunization to target conserved epitopes but optimization of DBP epitope target specificity and immunogenicity may be necessary for protection against diverse P. vivax strains. PMID:22215740

  18. Vaccine-elicited Human T Cells Recognizing Conserved Protein Regions Inhibit HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, Nicola; Ahmed, Tina; Ondondo, Beatrice; Hayes, Peter; Rose, Annie; Ebrahimsa, Umar; Hayton, Emma-Jo; Black, Antony; Bridgeman, Anne; Rosario, Maximillian; Hill, Adrian VS; Berrie, Eleanor; Moyle, Sarah; Frahm, Nicole; Cox, Josephine; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gilmour, Jill; McMichael, Andrew J; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Virus diversity and escape from immune responses are the biggest challenges to the development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1. We hypothesized that T-cell vaccines targeting the most conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which are common to most variants and bear fitness costs when mutated, will generate effectors that efficiently recognize and kill virus-infected cells early enough after transmission to potentially impact on HIV-1 replication and will do so more efficiently than whole protein-based T-cell vaccines. Here, we describe the first-ever administration of conserved immunogen vaccines vectored using prime-boost regimens of DNA, simian adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus Ankara to uninfected UK volunteers. The vaccine induced high levels of effector T cells that recognized virus-infected autologous CD4+ cells and inhibited HIV-1 replication by up to 5.79 log10. The virus inhibition was mediated by both Gag- and Pol- specific effector CD8+ T cells targeting epitopes that are typically subdominant in natural infection. These results provide proof of concept for using a vaccine to target T cells at conserved epitopes, showing that these T cells can control HIV-1 replication in vitro. PMID:24166483

  19. Conservation of structural fluctuations in homologous protein kinases and its implications on functional sites.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Raju; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to explore the similarities in structural fluctuations of homologous kinases. Gaussian Network Model based Normal Mode Analysis was performed on 73 active conformation structures in Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase superfamily. Categories of kinases with progressive evolutionary divergence, viz. (i) Same kinase with many crystal structures, (ii) Within-Subfamily, (iii) Within-Family, (iv) Within-Group, and (v) Across-Group, were analyzed. We identified a flexibility signature conserved in all kinases involving residues in and around the catalytic loop with consistent low-magnitude fluctuations. However, the overall structural fluctuation profiles are conserved better in closely related kinases (Within-Subfamily and Within-family) than in distant ones (Within-Group and Across-Group). A substantial 65.4% of variation in flexibility was not accounted by variation in sequences or structures. Interestingly, we identified substructural residue-wise fluctuation patterns characteristic of kinases of different categories. Specifically, we recognized statistically significant fluctuations unique to families of protein kinase A, cyclin-dependent kinases, and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. These fluctuation signatures localized to sites known to participate in protein-protein interactions typical of these kinase families. We report for the first time that residues characterized by fluctuations unique to the group/family are involved in interactions specific to the group/family. As highlighted for Src family, local regions with differential fluctuations are proposed as attractive targets for drug design. Overall, our study underscores the importance of consideration of fluctuations, over and above sequence and structural features, in understanding the roles of sites characteristic of kinases. Proteins 2016; 84:957-978. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028938

  20. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  1. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  2. Prediction of functional sites in proteins using conserved functional group analysis.

    PubMed

    Innis, C Axel; Anand, A Prem; Sowdhamini, R

    2004-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of a protein's functional site is an absolute prerequisite for understanding its mode of action at the molecular level. However, the rapid pace at which sequence and structural information is being accumulated for proteins greatly exceeds our ability to determine their biochemical roles experimentally. As a result, computational methods are required which allow for the efficient processing of the evolutionary information contained in this wealth of data, in particular that related to the nature and location of functionally important sites and residues. The method presented here, referred to as conserved functional group (CFG) analysis, relies on a simplified representation of the chemical groups found in amino acid side-chains to identify functional sites from a single protein structure and a number of its sequence homologues. We show that CFG analysis can fully or partially predict the location of functional sites in approximately 96% of the 470 cases tested and that, unlike other methods available, it is able to tolerate wide variations in sequence identity. In addition, we discuss its potential in a structural genomics context, where automation, scalability and efficiency are critical, and an increasing number of protein structures are determined with no prior knowledge of function. This is exemplified by our analysis of the hypothetical protein Ydde_Ecoli, whose structure was recently solved by members of the North East Structural Genomics consortium. Although the proposed active site for this protein needs to be validated experimentally, this example illustrates the scope of CFG analysis as a general tool for the identification of residues likely to play an important role in a protein's biochemical function. Thus, our method offers a convenient solution to rapidly and automatically process the vast amounts of data that are beginning to emerge from structural genomics projects. PMID:15033369

  3. 3dLOGO: a web server for the identification, analysis and use of conserved protein substructures.

    PubMed

    Via, Allegra; Peluso, Daniele; Gherardini, Pier Federico; de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Colombo, Teresa; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2007-07-01

    3dLOGO is a web server for the identification and analysis of conserved protein 3D substructures. Given a set of residues in a PDB (Protein Data Bank) chain, the server detects the matching substructure(s) in a set of user-provided protein structures, generates a multiple structure alignment centered on the input substructures and highlights other residues whose structural conservation becomes evident after the defined superposition. Conserved residues are proposed to the user for highlighting functional areas, deriving refined structural motifs or building sequence patterns. Residue structural conservation can be visualized through an expressly designed Java application, 3dProLogo, which is a 3D implementation of a sequence logo. The 3dLOGO server, with related documentation, is available at http://3dlogo.uniroma2.it/ PMID:17488847

  4. Weak oligomerization of low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase is conserved from mammals to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Jascha; Bernadó, Pau; Xu, Huimin; Jin, Changwen; Pons, Miquel

    2009-08-01

    The well-characterized self-association of a mammalian low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (lmwPTP) produces inactive oligomers that are in equilibrium with active monomers. A role of the inactive oligomers as supramolecular proenzymes has been suggested. The oligomerization equilibrium of YwlE, a lmwPTP from Bacillus subtilis, was studied by NMR. Chemical shift data and NMR relaxation confirm that dimerization takes place through the enzyme's active site, and is fully equivalent to the dimerization previously characterized in a eukaryotic low-molecular-weight phosphatase, with similarly large dissociation constants. The similarity between the oligomerization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic phosphatases extends beyond the dimer and involves higher order oligomers detected by NMR relaxation analysis at high protein concentrations. The conservation across different kingdoms of life suggests a physiological role for lmwPTP oligomerization in spite of the weak association observed in vitro. Structural data suggest that substrate modulation of the oligomerization equilibrium could be a regulatory mechanism leading to the generation of signaling pulses. The presence of a phenylalanine residue in the dimerization site of YwlE, replacing a tyrosine residue conserved in all eukaryotic lmwPTPs, demonstrates that lmwPTP regulation by oligomerization can be independent from tyrosine phosphorylation.

  5. Meiotic recombination protein Rec12: functional conservation, crossover homeostasis and early crossover/non-crossover decision

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Fengling; Davidson, Mari K.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2011-01-01

    In fission yeast and other eukaryotes, Rec12 (Spo11) is thought to catalyze the formation of dsDNA breaks (DSBs) that initiate homologous recombination in meiosis. Rec12 is orthologous to the catalytic subunit of topoisomerase VI (Top6A). Guided by the crystal structure of Top6A, we engineered the rec12 locus to encode Rec12 proteins each with a single amino acid substitution in a conserved residue. Of 21 substitutions, 10 significantly reduced or abolished meiotic DSBs, gene conversion, crossover recombination and the faithful segregation of chromosomes. Critical residues map within the metal ion-binding pocket toprim (E179A, D229A, D231A), catalytic region 5Y-CAP (R94A, D95A, Y98F) and the DNA-binding interface (K201A, G202E, R209A, K242A). A subset of substitutions reduced DSBs but maintained crossovers, demonstrating crossover homeostasis. Furthermore, a strong separation of function mutation (R304A) suggests that the crossover/non-crossover decision is established early by a protein–protein interaction surface of Rec12. Fission yeast has multiple crossovers per bivalent, and chromosome segregation was robust above a threshold of about one crossover per bivalent, below which non-disjunction occurred. These results support structural and functional conservation among Rec12/Spo11/Top6A family members for the catalysis of DSBs, and they reveal how Rec12 regulates other features of meiotic chromosome dynamics. PMID:21030440

  6. Conserved Arabidopsis ECHIDNA protein mediates trans-Golgi-network trafficking and cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Delphine; Oh, Jaesung; Boutté, Yohann; Best, Jacob G; Samuels, Lacey; Nilsson, Robert; Uemura, Tomohiro; Marchant, Alan; Bennett, Malcolm J; Grebe, Markus; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2011-05-10

    Multiple steps of plant growth and development rely on rapid cell elongation during which secretory and endocytic trafficking via the trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role. Here, we identify the ECHIDNA (ECH) protein from Arabidopsis thaliana as a TGN-localized component crucial for TGN function. ECH partially complements loss of budding yeast TVP23 function and a Populus ECH complements the Arabidopsis ech mutant, suggesting functional conservation of the genes. Compared with wild-type, the Arabidopsis ech mutant exhibits severely perturbed cell elongation as well as defects in TGN structure and function, manifested by the reduced association between Golgi bodies and TGN as well as mislocalization of several TGN-localized proteins including vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit a1 (VHA-a1). Strikingly, ech is defective in secretory trafficking, whereas endocytosis appears unaffected in the mutant. Some aspects of the ech mutant phenotype can be phenocopied by treatment with a specific inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases, concanamycin A, indicating that mislocalization of VHA-a1 may account for part of the defects in ech. Hence, ECH is an evolutionarily conserved component of the TGN with a central role in TGN structure and function. PMID:21512130

  7. Conservation of structure and function of DNA replication protein A in the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G W; Melendy, T E; Ray, D S

    1992-01-01

    Human replication protein A (RP-A) is a three-subunit protein that is required for simian virus 40 (SV40) replication in vitro. The trypanosome homologue of RP-A has been purified from Crithidia fasciculata. It is a 1:1:1 complex of three polypeptides of 51, 28, and 14 kDa, binds single-stranded DNA via the large subunit, and is localized within the nucleus. C. fasciculata RP-A substitutes for human RP-A in the large tumor antigen-dependent unwinding of the SV40 origin of replication and stimulates both DNA synthesis and DNA priming by human DNA polymerase alpha/primase, but it does not support efficient SV40 DNA replication in vitro. This extraordinary conservation of structure and function between human and trypanosome RP-A suggests that the mechanism of DNA replication, at both the initiation and the elongation level, is conserved in organisms that diverged from the main eukaryotic lineage very early in evolution. Images PMID:1332038

  8. Frataxin, a conserved mitochondrial protein, in the hydrogenosome of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Pavel; Dancis, Andrew; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Sutak, Róbert; Hrdý, Ivan; Embley, T Martin; Tachezy, Jan

    2007-08-01

    Recent data suggest that frataxin plays a key role in eukaryote cellular iron metabolism, particularly in mitochondrial heme and iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster biosynthesis. We have now identified a frataxin homologue (T. vaginalis frataxin) from the human parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Instead of mitochondria, this unicellular eukaryote possesses hydrogenosomes, peculiar organelles that produce hydrogen but nevertheless share common ancestry with mitochondria. T. vaginalis frataxin contains conserved residues implicated in iron binding, and in silico, it is predicted to form a typical alpha-beta sandwich motif. The short N-terminal extension of T. vaginalis frataxin resembles presequences that target proteins to hydrogenosomes, a prediction confirmed by the results of overexpression of T. vaginalis frataxin in T. vaginalis. When expressed in the mitochondria of a frataxin-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, T. vaginalis frataxin partially restored defects in heme and FeS cluster biosynthesis. Although components of heme synthesis or heme-containing proteins have not been found in T. vaginalis to date, T. vaginalis frataxin was also shown to interact with S. cerevisiae ferrochelatase by using a Biacore assay. The discovery of conserved iron-metabolizing pathways in mitochondria and hydrogenosomes provides additional evidence not only of their common evolutionary history, but also of the fundamental importance of this pathway for eukaryotes. PMID:17573543

  9. Division protein interaction web: identification of a phylogenetically conserved common interactome between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Silvia; Massidda, Orietta; Luzi, Giuseppe; Fadda, Daniela; Paolozzi, Luciano; Ghelardini, Patrizia

    2008-10-01

    The ability of each of the 11 Streptococcus pneumoniae division proteins to interact with itself and with each of the remaining proteins was studied in 66 combinations of protein pairs, using a bacterial two-hybrid system. Interactions (homo- or hetero-dimerizations) were detected between 37 protein pairs, whereas 29 protein pairs did not interact. In some cases, positive interactions of the S. pneumoniae proteins were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments in Escherichia coli. Comparison between the S. pneumoniae division protein interaction web and that of E. coli, the only micro-organisms for which the whole division interactome has been described systematically, was also performed. At least nine division proteins, ZapA, FtsZ, FtsA, FtsK, FtsQ/DivIB, FtsB/DivIC, FtsL, FtsI and FtsW, are believed to have a conserved function between these bacteria and thus we may say that a significant part of the interactions are conserved. Out of 45 protein pairs tested in both bacteria, 30 showed the same behaviour: 23 interacted while seven did not. In agreement with these results, cross-interactions between S. pneumoniae proteins and the corresponding E. coli orthologues were observed. Taken together, these results suggest a phylogenetically conserved minimal common interactome of the division proteins.

  10. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  11. Phylogenomic evaluation of members above the species level within the phylum Firmicutes based on conserved proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Lu, Zhitang

    2015-04-01

    Currently, numerous taxonomic units above species level of the phylum Firmicutes are ambiguously placed in the phylogeny determined by 16S rRNA gene. Here, we evaluated the use of 16S rRNA gene compared with 81 conserved proteins (CPs) or 41 ribosomal proteins (RPs) as phylogenetic markers and applied this to the analysis of the phylum Firmicutes. Results show that the phylogenetic trees constructed are in good agreement with each other; however, the protein-based trees are able to resolve the relationships between several branches where so far only ambiguous classifications are possible. Thus, the phylogeny deduced based on concatenated proteins provides significant basis for re-classifying members in this phylum. It indicates that the genera Coprothermobacter and Thermodesulfobium represent two new phyla; the families Paenibacillaceae and Alicyclobacillaceae should be elevated to order level; and the families Bacillaceae and Thermodesulfobiaceae should be separated to 2 and 3 families respectively. We also suggest that four novel families should be proposed in the orders Clostridiales and Bacillales, and 11 genera should be moved to other existing families different from the current classification status. Moreover, notably, RPs are a well-suited subset of CPs that could be applied to Firmicutes phylogenetic analysis instead of the 16S rRNA gene.

  12. Conserved cellular function and stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María E; Alfonso, Julieta; Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C

    2010-05-01

    Chronic stress causes morphological alterations in the hippocampus of rodents and tree shrews, including atrophy of CA3 dendrites and loss of synapses. The molecular mechanisms underlying these structural changes remain largely unknown. We have previously identified M6a as a stress responsive gene and shown that M6a is involved in filopodium/spine outgrowth and, likely, synapse formation. M6a belongs to the proteolipid protein (PLP) family, all of their members having four transmembrane domains that allow their localization at the plasma membrane. In the present work, we analyzed other members of this family, the closely related M6b as well as PLP and its splice variant DM20. We found that chronic restraint stress in mice reduces M6b and DM20, but not PLP, mRNA levels in the hippocampus. In addition, M6b and DM20, but again not PLP, induce filopodium formation in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Several M6b protein isoforms were studied, all of them having similar effects except for the one lacking the transmembrane domains. Our results reveal a conserved cellular function and a stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family, suggesting an involvement of proteolipid proteins in the stress response. PMID:19937804

  13. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    PubMed Central

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  14. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams, M.J.; Lapis, P.; Lautenberger, J.A.; Schweinfest, C.W.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, the authors have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is >95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published finding indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains.

  15. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization.

    PubMed

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  16. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization.

    PubMed

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  17. Development of a protein-ligand-binding site prediction method based on interaction energy and sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Hiroto; Sato, Kenta; Wei, Cao; Saad, Gul; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Shugo; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for predicting protein-ligand-binding sites based on protein three-dimensional structure and amino acid conservation. This method involves calculation of the van der Waals interaction energy between a protein and many probes placed on the protein surface and subsequent clustering of the probes with low interaction energies to identify the most energetically favorable locus. In addition, it uses amino acid conservation among homologous proteins. Ligand-binding sites were predicted by combining the interaction energy and the amino acid conservation score. The performance of our prediction method was evaluated using a non-redundant dataset of 348 ligand-bound and ligand-unbound protein structure pairs, constructed by filtering entries in a ligand-binding site structure database, LigASite. Ligand-bound structure prediction (bound prediction) indicated that 74.0 % of predicted ligand-binding sites overlapped with real ligand-binding sites by over 25 % of their volume. Ligand-unbound structure prediction (unbound prediction) indicated that 73.9 % of predicted ligand-binding residues overlapped with real ligand-binding residues. The amino acid conservation score improved the average prediction accuracy by 17.0 and 17.6 points for the bound and unbound predictions, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined use of the interaction energy and amino acid conservation in the ligand-binding site prediction. PMID:27400687

  18. Conservation of the E8 CDS of the E8^E2 protein among mammalian papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Puustusmaa, Mikk; Abroi, Aare

    2016-09-01

    Papillomaviridae are small dsDNA viruses with a limited coding capacity. To fulfill all of the functional requirements for propagation and spreading, papillomaviruses use double coding and alternative protein isoforms. E8 ^ E2 is an alternative E2 protein isoform that is generated by fusing the short E8 CDS that completely overlaps E1 to the 'hinge' and the DNA-binding region of the E2 protein via alternative transcription/splicing. The papillomaviruses in which E8 ^ E2 mRNA sequences have been described exhibit a sparse phylogenomic distribution. Thus, it is not clear whether E8 ^ E2 is an ancestral protein that has not been described for other papillomavirus types or whether it randomly appears because of the conservation of the E1 protein and occurs only coincidentally. We searched for potential E8 coding sequences in a non-redundant set of papillomaviruses and applied SynPlot2 and an in-house-developed algorithm (cRegions) to determine the most plausible of the above-mentioned scenarios. Beginning with nine experimentally described E8 ^ E2 mRNAs, we predicted the potential E8 CDSs for more than 300 mammalian papillomavirus genomes. According to our analysis, E8 ^ E2 is not a result of E1 coding and represents a protein in its own right, and it most likely has an ancestral origin that precedes the divergence of major mammalian papillomavirus genera.

  19. Conservation of the E8 CDS of the E8^E2 protein among mammalian papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Puustusmaa, Mikk; Abroi, Aare

    2016-09-01

    Papillomaviridae are small dsDNA viruses with a limited coding capacity. To fulfill all of the functional requirements for propagation and spreading, papillomaviruses use double coding and alternative protein isoforms. E8 ^ E2 is an alternative E2 protein isoform that is generated by fusing the short E8 CDS that completely overlaps E1 to the 'hinge' and the DNA-binding region of the E2 protein via alternative transcription/splicing. The papillomaviruses in which E8 ^ E2 mRNA sequences have been described exhibit a sparse phylogenomic distribution. Thus, it is not clear whether E8 ^ E2 is an ancestral protein that has not been described for other papillomavirus types or whether it randomly appears because of the conservation of the E1 protein and occurs only coincidentally. We searched for potential E8 coding sequences in a non-redundant set of papillomaviruses and applied SynPlot2 and an in-house-developed algorithm (cRegions) to determine the most plausible of the above-mentioned scenarios. Beginning with nine experimentally described E8 ^ E2 mRNAs, we predicted the potential E8 CDSs for more than 300 mammalian papillomavirus genomes. According to our analysis, E8 ^ E2 is not a result of E1 coding and represents a protein in its own right, and it most likely has an ancestral origin that precedes the divergence of major mammalian papillomavirus genera. PMID:27325292

  20. Molecular Characterization and Immune Protection of a New Conserved Hypothetical Protein of Eimeria tenella

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Qi; Huang, Bing; Dong, Hui; Zhao, Qiping; Zhu, Shunhai; Liang, Siting; Li, Sha; Yang, Sihan; Han, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of Eimeria tenella have been sequenced, but >70% of these genes are currently categorized as having an unknown function or annotated as conserved hypothetical proteins, and few of them have been studied. In the present study, a conserved hypothetical protein gene of E. tenella, designated EtCHP559, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA 5'-ends (5'RACE) based on the expressed sequence tag (EST). The 1746-bp full-length cDNA of EtCHP559 contained a 1224-bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a 407-amino acid polypeptide with the predicted molecular weight of 46.04 kDa. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that EtCHP559 was expressed at higher levels in sporozoites than in the other developmental stages (unsporulated oocysts, sporulated oocysts and second generation merozoites). The ORF was inserted into pCold-TF to produce recombinant EtCHP559. Using western blotting, the recombinant protein was successfully recognized by rabbit serum against E. tenella sporozoites. Immunolocalization by using EtCHP559 antibody showed that EtCHP559 was mainly distributed on the parasite surface in free sporozoites and became concentrated in the anterior region after sporozoites were incubated in complete medium. The EtCHP559 became uniformly dispersed in immature and mature schizonts. Inhibition of EtCHP559 function using anti-rEtCHP559 polyclonal antibody reduced the ability of E. tenella sporozoites to invade host cells by >70%. Animal challenge experiments demonstrated that the recombinant EtCHP559 significantly increased the average body weight gain, reduced the oocyst outputs, alleviated cecal lesions of the infected chickens, and resulted in anticoccidial index >160 against E. tenella. These results suggest that EtCHP559 plays an important role in sporozoite invasion and could be an effective candidate for the development of a new vaccine against E. tenella. PMID:27309852

  1. Recognition of distantly related protein sequences using conserved motifs and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Frishman, D; Argos, P

    1992-12-01

    A sensitive technique for protein sequence motif recognition based on neural networks has been developed. It involves three major steps. (1) At each appropriate alignment position of a set of N matched sequences, a set of N aligned oligopeptides is specified with preselected window length. N neural nets are subsequently and successively trained on N-1 amino acid spans after eliminating each ith oligopeptide. A test for recognition of each of the ith spans is performed. The average neural net recognition over N such trials is used as a measure of conservation for the particular windowed region of the multiple alignment. This process is repeated for all possible spans of given length in the multiple alignment. (2) The M most conserved regions are regarded as motifs and the oligopeptides within each are used to train intensively M individual neural networks. (3) The M networks are then applied in a search for related primary structures in a databank of known protein sequences. The oligopeptide spans in the database sequence with strongest neural net output for each of the M networks are saved and then scored according to the output signals and the proper combination that follows the expected N- to C-terminal sequence order. The motifs from the database with highest similarity scores can then be used to retrain the M neural nets, which can be subsequently utilized for further searches in the databank, thus providing even greater sensitivity to recognize distant familial proteins. This technique was successfully applied to the integrase, DNA-polymerase and immunoglobulin families.

  2. Functional significance of conserved residues in the phosphohydrolase module of Escherichia coli MutT protein.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, H; Fujii, Y; Furuichi, M; Sekiguchi, M; Nakabeppu, Y

    2000-09-01

    Escherichia coli MutT protein hydrolyzes 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-dGTP (8-oxo-dGTP) to the monophosphate, thus avoiding the incorporation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-G) into nascent DNA. Bacterial and mammalian homologs of MutT protein share the phosphohydrolase module (MutT: Gly37-->Gly59). By saturation mutagenesis of conserved residues in the MutT module, four of the 10 conserved residues (Gly37, Gly38, Glu53 and Glu57) were revealed to be essential to suppress spontaneous A:T-->C:G transversion mutation in a mutT(-) mutator strain. For the other six residues (Lys39, Glu44, Thr45, Arg52, Glu56 and Gly59), many positive mutants which can suppress the spontaneous mutation were obtained; however, all of the positive mutants for Glu44 and Arg52 either partially or inefficiently suppressed the mutation, indicating that these two residues are also important for MutT function. Several positive mutants for Lys39, Thr45, Glu56 and Gly59 efficiently decreased the elevated spontaneous mutation rate, as seen with the wild-type, hence, these four residues are non-essential for MutT function. As Lys38 and Glu55 in human MTH1, corresponding to the non-essential residues Lys39 and Glu56 in MutT, could not be replaced by any other residue without loss of function, different structural features between the two modules of MTH1 and MutT proteins are evident. PMID:10954591

  3. Molecular Characterization and Immune Protection of a New Conserved Hypothetical Protein of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qi; Huang, Bing; Dong, Hui; Zhao, Qiping; Zhu, Shunhai; Liang, Siting; Li, Sha; Yang, Sihan; Han, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of Eimeria tenella have been sequenced, but >70% of these genes are currently categorized as having an unknown function or annotated as conserved hypothetical proteins, and few of them have been studied. In the present study, a conserved hypothetical protein gene of E. tenella, designated EtCHP559, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA 5'-ends (5'RACE) based on the expressed sequence tag (EST). The 1746-bp full-length cDNA of EtCHP559 contained a 1224-bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a 407-amino acid polypeptide with the predicted molecular weight of 46.04 kDa. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that EtCHP559 was expressed at higher levels in sporozoites than in the other developmental stages (unsporulated oocysts, sporulated oocysts and second generation merozoites). The ORF was inserted into pCold-TF to produce recombinant EtCHP559. Using western blotting, the recombinant protein was successfully recognized by rabbit serum against E. tenella sporozoites. Immunolocalization by using EtCHP559 antibody showed that EtCHP559 was mainly distributed on the parasite surface in free sporozoites and became concentrated in the anterior region after sporozoites were incubated in complete medium. The EtCHP559 became uniformly dispersed in immature and mature schizonts. Inhibition of EtCHP559 function using anti-rEtCHP559 polyclonal antibody reduced the ability of E. tenella sporozoites to invade host cells by >70%. Animal challenge experiments demonstrated that the recombinant EtCHP559 significantly increased the average body weight gain, reduced the oocyst outputs, alleviated cecal lesions of the infected chickens, and resulted in anticoccidial index >160 against E. tenella. These results suggest that EtCHP559 plays an important role in sporozoite invasion and could be an effective candidate for the development of a new vaccine against E. tenella. PMID:27309852

  4. The SWIRM domain: a conserved module found in chromosomal proteins points to novel chromatin-modifying activities

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2002-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic chromosomal components, especially histones, are subject to a wide array of covalent modifications and catalytic reorganization. These modifications have an important role in the regulation of chromatin structure and are mediated by large multisubunit complexes that contain modular proteins with several conserved catalytic and noncatalytic adaptor domains. Results Using computational sequence-profile analysis methods, we identified a previously uncharacterized, predicted α-helical domain of about 85 residues in chromosomal proteins such as Swi3p, Rsc8p, Moira and several other uncharacterized proteins. This module, termed the SWIRM domain, is predicted to mediate specific protein-protein interactions in the assembly of chromatin-protein complexes. In one group of proteins, which are highly conserved throughout the crown-group eukaryotes, the SWIRM domain is linked to a catalytic domain related to the monoamine and polyamine oxidases. Another human protein has the SWIRM domain linked to a JAB domain that is involved in protein degradation through the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions Identification of the SWIRM domain could help in directed experimental analysis of specific interactions in chromosomal proteins. We predict that the proteins in which it is combined with an amino-oxidase domain define a novel class of chromatin-modifying enzymes, which are likely to oxidize either the amino group of basic residues in histones and other chromosomal proteins or the polyamines in chromatin, and thereby alter the charge distribution. Other forms, such as KIAA1915, may link chromatin modification to ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. PMID:12186646

  5. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio D.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of

  6. Deorphanization and target validation of cross-tick species conserved novel Amblyomma americanum tick saliva protein

    PubMed Central

    Mulenga, Albert; Kim, Tae Kwon; Ibelli, Adriana Mércia Guaratini

    2013-01-01

    We previously identified a cross-tick species conserved tick feeding stimuli responsive Amblyomma americanum (Aam) AV422 gene. This study demonstrates that AamAV422 belongs to a novel group of arthropod proteins that is characterized by 14 cysteine amino acid residues: C23-X7/9-C33-X23/24-C58-C8-C67X7-X75-X23-C99-X15-C115-X10-C126X24/25/33-C150C151-X7-C159-X8-X168-X23/24-C192-X9/10-C202 predicted to form seven disulfide bonds. We show that AamAV422 protein is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is injected into the host within the first 24 h of the tick attaching onto the host as revealed by western blotting analyses of recombinant (r)AamAV422, tick saliva and dissected tick organ protein extracts using antibodies to 24 h and 48 h tick saliva proteins (TSPs). Native AamAV422 is apparently involved with mediating tick anti-hemostasis and anti-complement functions in that rAamAV422 delayed plasma clotting time in a dose responsive manner by up to ~160 s, prevented platelet aggregation by up to ~16% and caused ~24% reduction in production of terminal complement complexes. Target validation analysis revealed that rAamAV422 is a potential candidate for a cocktail or multivalent tick vaccine preparation in that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of AamAV422 mRNA caused a statistically significant (~44%) reduction in tick engorgement weights, which is proxy for amounts of ingested blood. We speculate that AamAV422 is a potential target antigen for development of the highly desired universal tick vaccine in that consistent with high conservation among ticks, antibodies to 24 h Ixodes scapularis TSPs specifically bound rAamAV422. We discuss data in this study in the context of advancing the biology of tick feeding physiology and discovery of potential target antigens for tick vaccine development. PMID:23428900

  7. Conserved Immune Recognition Hierarchy of Mycobacterial PE/PPE Proteins during Infection in Natural Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Vordermeier, H. Martin; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Gideon, Hannah P.; Young, Douglas B.; Sampson, Samantha L.

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains two large gene families encoding proteins of unknown function, characterized by conserved N-terminal proline and glutamate (PE and PPE) motifs. The presence of a large number of PE/PPE proteins with repetitive domains and evidence of strain variation has given rise to the suggestion that these proteins may play a role in immune evasion via antigenic variation, while emerging data suggests that some family members may play important roles in mycobacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we examined cellular immune responses to a panel of 36 PE/PPE proteins during human and bovine infection. We observed a distinct hierarchy of immune recognition, reflected both in the repertoire of PE/PPE peptide recognition in individual cows and humans and in the magnitude of IFN-γ responses elicited by stimulation of sensitized host cells. The pattern of immunodominance was strikingly similar between cattle that had been experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis and humans naturally infected with clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. The same pattern was maintained as disease progressed throughout a four-month course of infection in cattle, and between humans with latent as well as active tuberculosis. Detailed analysis of PE/PPE responses at the peptide level suggests that antigenic cross-reactivity amongst related family members is a major determinant in the observed differences in immune hierarchy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a subset of PE/PPE proteins are major targets of the cellular immune response to tuberculosis, and are recognized at multiple stages of infection and in different disease states. Thus this work identifies a number of novel antigens that could find application in vaccine development, and provides new insights into PE/PPE biology. PMID:22870206

  8. Global Alignment of Pairwise Protein Interaction Networks for Maximal Common Conserved Patterns

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Wenhong; Samatova, Nagiza F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of tools for the alignment of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have laid the foundation for PPI network analysis. Most of alignment tools focus on finding conserved interaction regions across the PPI networks through either local or global mapping of similar sequences. Researchers are still trying to improve the speed, scalability, and accuracy of network alignment. In view of this, we introduce a connected-components based fast algorithm, HopeMap, for network alignment. Observing that the size of true orthologs across species is small comparing to the total number of proteins in all species, we take a different approach basedmore » on a precompiled list of homologs identified by KO terms. Applying this approach to S. cerevisiae (yeast) and D. melanogaster (fly), E. coli K12 and S. typhimurium , E. coli K12 and C. crescenttus , we analyze all clusters identified in the alignment. The results are evaluated through up-to-date known gene annotations, gene ontology (GO), and KEGG ortholog groups (KO). Comparing to existing tools, our approach is fast with linear computational cost, highly accurate in terms of KO and GO terms specificity and sensitivity, and can be extended to multiple alignments easily.« less

  9. The functional conservation of proteins in evolutionary alleles and the dominant role of enhancers in evolution.

    PubMed

    Xue, L; Noll, M

    1996-07-15

    Drosophila paired- embryos can be rescued to viable adults by the evolutionary alleles prd-Gsb and prd-Pax3, which express the Drosophila Gooseberry and mouse Pax3 proteins under the control of the paired cis-regulatory region. As prd-Gsb uncovers a prd function involved in the proper abdominal segmentation of adults, evolutionary alleles, defined and constructed in this manner, may often be weak and thus serve to discover hitherto unknown functions of a gene. Our findings show that the Gooseberry and Pax3 proteins have conserved most or all functions of the related Drosophila Paired protein although their C-terminal halves appear unrelated in sequence but not in 3-D structure essential for function. It follows that the acquisition of new cis-regulatory regions rather than the divergence of the C-terminal coding regions has been the primary device for the functional diversification of the Drosophila genes paired and gooseberry and the mouse Pax3 gene. The operation of this mechanism in insects as well as vertebrates suggests a major role in evolution.

  10. Solution structure of villin 14T, a domain conserved among actin-severing proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Markus, M. A.; Nakayama, T.; Matsudaira, P.; Wagner, G.

    1994-01-01

    The solution structure of the N-terminal domain of the actin-severing protein villin has been determined by multidimensional heteronuclear resonance spectroscopy. Villin is a member of a family of actin-severing proteins that regulate the organization of actin in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Members of this family are built from 3 or 6 homologous repeats of a structural domain of approximately 130 amino acids that is unrelated to any previously known structure. The N-terminal domain of villin (14T) contains a central beta-sheet with 4 antiparallel strands and a fifth parallel strand at one edge. This sheet is sandwiched between 2 helices on one side and a 2-stranded parallel beta-sheet with another helix on the other side. The strongly conserved sequence characteristic of the protein family corresponds to internal hydrophobic residues. Calcium titration experiments suggest that there are 2 binding sites for Ca2+, a stronger site near the N-terminal end of the longest helix, with a Kd of 1.8 +/- 0.4 mM, and a weaker site near the C-terminal end of the same helix, with a Kd of 11 +/- 2 mM. Mutational and biochemical studies of this domain in several members of the family suggest that the actin monomer binding site is near the parallel strand at the edge of the central beta-sheet. PMID:8142900

  11. Mitochondrial protein import pathways are functionally conserved among eukaryotes despite compositional diversity of the import machineries.

    PubMed

    Eckers, Elisabeth; Cyrklaff, Marek; Simpson, Larry; Deponte, Marcel

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial protein import (MPI) is essential for the biogenesis of mitochondria in all eukaryotes. Current models of MPI are predominantly based on experiments with one group of eukaryotes, the opisthokonts. Although fascinating genome database-driven hypotheses on the evolution of the MPI machineries have been published, previous experimental research on non-opisthokonts usually focused on the analysis of single pathways or components in, for example, plants and parasites. In this study, we have established the kinetoplastid parasite Leishmania tarentolae as a model organism for the comprehensive analysis of non-opisthokont MPI into all four mitochondrial compartments. We found that opisthokont marker proteins are efficiently imported into isolated L. tarentolae mitochondria. Vice versa, L. tarentolae marker proteins of all compartments are also imported into mitochondria from yeast. The results are remarkable because only a few of the more than 25 classical components of the opisthokont MPI machineries are found in parasite genome databases. Our results demonstrate that different MPI pathways are functionally conserved among eukaryotes despite significant compositional differences of the MPI machineries. Moreover, our model system could lead to the identification of significantly altered or even novel MPI components in non-opisthokonts. Such differences might serve as starting points for drug development against parasitic protists.

  12. In vivo functional mapping of the conserved protein domains within murine Themis1.

    PubMed

    Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Lee, Jan; El-Khoury, Dalal; Barr, Valarie; Akpan, Itoro; Samelson, Lawrence; Love, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    Thymocyte development requires the coordinated input of signals that originate from numerous cell surface molecules. Although the majority of thymocyte signal-initiating receptors are lineage-specific, most trigger 'ubiquitous' downstream signaling pathways. T-lineage-specific receptors are coupled to these signaling pathways by lymphocyte-restricted adapter molecules. We and others recently identified a new putative adapter protein, Themis1, whose expression is largely restricted to the T lineage. Mice lacking Themis1 exhibit a severe block in thymocyte development and a striking paucity of mature T cells revealing a critical role for Themis1 in T-cell maturation. Themis1 orthologs contain three conserved domains: a proline-rich region (PRR) that binds to the ubiquitous cytosolic adapter Grb2, a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), and two copies of a novel cysteine-containing globular (CABIT) domain. In the present study, we evaluated the functional importance of each of these motifs by retroviral reconstitution of Themis1(-/-) progenitor cells. The results demonstrate an essential requirement for the PRR and NLS motifs but not the conserved CABIT cysteines for Themis1 function.

  13. A structure-specific nucleic acid-binding domain conserved among DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Aaron C.; Rambo, Robert P.; Greer, Briana; Pritchett, Michael; Tainer, John A.; Cortez, David; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2014-01-01

    SMARCAL1, a DNA remodeling protein fundamental to genome integrity during replication, is the only gene associated with the developmental disorder Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD). SMARCAL1-deficient cells show collapsed replication forks, S-phase cell cycle arrest, increased chromosomal breaks, hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents, and chromosomal instability. The SMARCAL1 catalytic domain (SMARCAL1CD) is composed of an SNF2-type double-stranded DNA motor ATPase fused to a HARP domain of unknown function. The mechanisms by which SMARCAL1 and other DNA translocases repair replication forks are poorly understood, in part because of a lack of structural information on the domains outside of the common ATPase motor. In the present work, we determined the crystal structure of the SMARCAL1 HARP domain and examined its conformation and assembly in solution by small angle X-ray scattering. We report that this domain is conserved with the DNA mismatch and damage recognition domains of MutS/MSH and NER helicase XPB, respectively, as well as with the putative DNA specificity motif of the T4 phage fork regression protein UvsW. Loss of UvsW fork regression activity by deletion of this domain was rescued by its replacement with HARP, establishing the importance of this domain in UvsW and demonstrating a functional complementarity between these structurally homologous domains. Mutation of predicted DNA-binding residues in HARP dramatically reduced fork binding and regression activities of SMARCAL1CD. Thus, this work has uncovered a conserved substrate recognition domain in DNA repair enzymes that couples ATP-hydrolysis to remodeling of a variety of DNA structures, and provides insight into this domain’s role in replication fork stability and genome integrity. PMID:24821763

  14. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hage, Rosemary; Zhao, Wanying; Soto-Hernández, Jaricelis; Lee, Sang Yeol; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Boone, Charles; Coplin, David L.; Mackey, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B’ regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000), associates with specific PP2A B’ subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B’ subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B’ subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B’ subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family. PMID:27191168

  15. The Unique Morgue Ubiquitination Protein Is Conserved in a Diverse but Restricted Set of Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Carpenter, Zachary W.; Brennan, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila Morgue is a unique ubiquitination protein that facilitates programmed cell death and associates with DIAP1, a critical cell death inhibitor with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Morgue possesses a unique combination of functional domains typically associated with distinct types of ubiquitination enzymes. This includes an F box characteristic of the substrate-binding subunit in Skp, Cullin, and F box (SCF)-type ubiquitin E3 ligase complexes and a variant ubiquitin E2 conjugase domain where the active site cysteine is replaced by a glycine. Morgue also contains a single C4-type zinc finger motif. This architecture suggests potentially novel ubiquitination activities for Morgue. In this study, we address the evolutionary origins of this distinctive protein utilizing a combination of bioinformatics and molecular biology approaches. We find that Morgue exhibits widespread but restricted phylogenetic distribution among metazoans. Morgue proteins were identified in a wide range of Protostome phyla, including Arthropoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Nematoda, and Platyhelminthes. However, with one potential exception, Morgue was not detected in Deuterostomes, including Chordates, Hemichordates, or Echinoderms. Morgue was also not found in Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, or Porifera. Characterization of Morgue sequences within specific animal lineages suggests that gene deletion or acquisition has occurred during divergence of nematodes and that at least one arachnid expresses an atypical form of Morgue consisting only of the variant E2 conjugase domain. Analysis of the organization of several morgue genes suggests that exon-shuffling events have contributed to the evolution of the Morgue protein. These results suggest that Morgue mediates conserved and distinctive ubiquitination functions in specific cell death pathways. PMID:19602541

  16. Yeast Irc6p is a novel type of conserved clathrin coat accessory factor related to small G proteins.

    PubMed

    Gorynia, Sabine; Lorenz, Todd C; Costaguta, Giancarlo; Daboussi, Lydia; Cascio, Duilio; Payne, Gregory S

    2012-11-01

    Clathrin coat accessory proteins play key roles in transport mediated by clathrin-coated vesicles. Yeast Irc6p and the related mammalian p34 are putative clathrin accessory proteins that interact with clathrin adaptor complexes. We present evidence that Irc6p functions in clathrin-mediated traffic between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, linking clathrin adaptor complex AP-1 and the Rab GTPase Ypt31p. The crystal structure of the Irc6p N-terminal domain revealed a G-protein fold most related to small G proteins of the Rab and Arf families. However, Irc6p lacks G-protein signature motifs and high-affinity GTP binding. Also, mutant Irc6p lacking candidate GTP-binding residues retained function. Mammalian p34 rescued growth defects in irc6 cells, indicating functional conservation, and modeling predicted a similar N-terminal fold in p34. Irc6p and p34 also contain functionally conserved C-terminal regions. Irc6p/p34-related proteins with the same two-part architecture are encoded in genomes of species as diverse as plants and humans. Together these results define Irc6p/p34 as a novel type of conserved clathrin accessory protein and founding members of a new G protein-like family.

  17. Comparative biology of the pentraxin protein family: evolutionarily conserved component of innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is based on the actions of the collection of specialized immune defense cells and their secreted proteins and peptides that defend the host against infection by parasites. Parasites are organisms that live part or all of their lives in close physical association with the host and extract nutrients from the host and, by releasing toxins and virulence factors, cause disease with the potential for injury and premature death of that host. Parasites of the metazoa can be viruses, eubacteria, fungi, protozoans, and other metazoans. The immune system operates to kill or eliminate parasites and eliminate or detoxify their toxins and virulence factors. Although some of the elements of immune systems are specific to a particular phylum of metazoans, others show extensive evolutionary conservation, being present in several or all major phyla of the metazoa. The pentraxins display this latter character in their roles in immune defense. Pentraxins have been documented in vertebrates, nonvertebrate chordates, arthropods, and mollusks and may be present in other taxa of metazoans. Presumably the pentraxins appeared early in the evolution of metazoa, prior to their evolutionary divergence in the Precambrian epoch into many phyla present today, and have been preserved for the 542 million years since that explosive evolutionary radiation. The fidelity with which these phyla have preserved the pentraxins suggests that the functions of these proteins are important for survival of the members of these diverse taxa of animals.

  18. Exploring the Conserved Role of MANF in the Unfolded Protein Response in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Riitta; Lindholm, Päivi; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Palgi, Mari; Saarma, Mart; Heino, Tapio I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in the homeostasis of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) referred to as ER stress is involved in a variety of human diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular mechanism the purpose of which is to restore ER homeostasis. Previous studies show that Mesencephalic Astrocyte-derived Neurotrophic Factor (MANF) is an important novel component in the regulation of UPR. In vertebrates, MANF is upregulated by ER stress and protects cells against ER stress-induced cell death. Biochemical studies have revealed an interaction between mammalian MANF and GRP78, the major ER chaperone promoting protein folding. In this study we discovered that the upregulation of MANF expression in response to drug-induced ER stress is conserved between Drosophila and mammals. Additionally, by using a genetic in vivo approach we found genetic interactions between Drosophila Manf and genes encoding for Drosophila homologues of GRP78, PERK and XBP1, the key components of UPR. Our data suggest a role for Manf in the regulation of Drosophila UPR. PMID:26975047

  19. Exploring the Conserved Role of MANF in the Unfolded Protein Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Riitta; Lindholm, Päivi; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Palgi, Mari; Saarma, Mart; Heino, Tapio I

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in the homeostasis of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) referred to as ER stress is involved in a variety of human diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular mechanism the purpose of which is to restore ER homeostasis. Previous studies show that Mesencephalic Astrocyte-derived Neurotrophic Factor (MANF) is an important novel component in the regulation of UPR. In vertebrates, MANF is upregulated by ER stress and protects cells against ER stress-induced cell death. Biochemical studies have revealed an interaction between mammalian MANF and GRP78, the major ER chaperone promoting protein folding. In this study we discovered that the upregulation of MANF expression in response to drug-induced ER stress is conserved between Drosophila and mammals. Additionally, by using a genetic in vivo approach we found genetic interactions between Drosophila Manf and genes encoding for Drosophila homologues of GRP78, PERK and XBP1, the key components of UPR. Our data suggest a role for Manf in the regulation of Drosophila UPR.

  20. Nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C and Polycomb group of proteins: An evolutionarily conserved interplay

    PubMed Central

    Marullo, F.; Cesarini, E.; Antonelli, L.; Gregoretti, F.; Oliva, G.; Lanzuolo, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear lamins are the main components of the nuclear lamina at the nuclear periphery, providing mechanical support to the nucleus. However, recent findings suggest that lamins also reside in the nuclear interior, as a distinct and dynamic pool with critical roles in transcriptional regulation. In our work we found a functional and evolutionary conserved crosstalk between Lamin A/C and the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, this being required for the maintenance of the PcG repressive functions. Indeed, Lamin A/C knock-down causes PcG foci dispersion and defects in PcG-mediated higher order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG mediated transcriptional repression. By using ad-hoc algorithms for image analysis and PLA approaches we hereby show that PcG proteins are preferentially located in the nuclear interior where they interact with nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C. Taken together, our findings suggest that nuclear components, such as Lamin A/C, functionally interact with epigenetic factors to ensure the correct transcriptional program maintenance. PMID:26930442

  1. Conserved function of core clock proteins in the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst).

    PubMed

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    From studies of the circadian clock in the plant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of important properties and components have emerged. These include the genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), GIGANTEA (GI), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1 also known as PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PRR1)) that via gene expression feedback loops participate in the circadian clock. Here, we present results from ectopic expression of four Norway spruce (Picea abies) putative homologs (PaCCA1, PaGI, PaZTL and PaPRR1) in Arabidopsis, their flowering time, circadian period length, red light response phenotypes and their effect on endogenous clock genes were assessed. For PaCCA1-ox and PaZTL-ox the results were consistent with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. For PaGI consistent results were obtained when expressed in the gi2 mutant, while PaGI and PaPRR1 expressed in wild type did not display the expected phenotypes. These results suggest that protein function of PaCCA1, PaGI and PaZTL are at least partly conserved compared to Arabidopsis homologs, however further studies are needed to reveal the protein function of PaPRR1. Our data suggest that components of the three-loop network typical of the circadian clock in angiosperms were present before the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  2. Effects of Mutation in the Conserved GTSRH Sequence of the Motor Protein Prestin on Its Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, Shun; Iida, Koji; Murakoshi, Michio; Naito, Naoyuki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kumagai, Izumi; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Wada, Hiroshi

    Prestin is a motor protein responsible for the outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility which amplifies the vibration of the organ of Corti in the inner ear. Identification of the functional significance of particular amino acids is necessary to characterize prestin. In this study, an attempt was made to clarify the role of the GTSRH sequence at positions 127-131 in prestin conserved in six proteins of the solute carrier (SLC) 26 family of which prestin is a member. To elucidate what role that sequence plays in the characteristics of prestin, mutations were introduced into the sequence and the characteristics of the constructed point mutants were investigated by Western blotting, immunofluorescence experiments and the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The localization of T128A was altered, the anion transport function of H131A and that of S129T were lost and such functions of G127A, T128A, S129A and R130A declined. These results suggest that the GTSRH sequence plays an important role in the localization of prestin, as well as in its anion transport function.

  3. Conserved Function of Core Clock Proteins in the Gymnosperm Norway Spruce (Picea abies L. Karst)

    PubMed Central

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    From studies of the circadian clock in the plant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of important properties and components have emerged. These include the genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), GIGANTEA (GI), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1 also known as PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PRR1)) that via gene expression feedback loops participate in the circadian clock. Here, we present results from ectopic expression of four Norway spruce (Picea abies) putative homologs (PaCCA1, PaGI, PaZTL and PaPRR1) in Arabidopsis, their flowering time, circadian period length, red light response phenotypes and their effect on endogenous clock genes were assessed. For PaCCA1-ox and PaZTL-ox the results were consistent with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. For PaGI consistent results were obtained when expressed in the gi2 mutant, while PaGI and PaPRR1 expressed in wild type did not display the expected phenotypes. These results suggest that protein function of PaCCA1, PaGI and PaZTL are at least partly conserved compared to Arabidopsis homologs, however further studies are needed to reveal the protein function of PaPRR1. Our data suggest that components of the three-loop network typical of the circadian clock in angiosperms were present before the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms. PMID:23555899

  4. Comparative biology of the pentraxin protein family: evolutionarily conserved component of innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is based on the actions of the collection of specialized immune defense cells and their secreted proteins and peptides that defend the host against infection by parasites. Parasites are organisms that live part or all of their lives in close physical association with the host and extract nutrients from the host and, by releasing toxins and virulence factors, cause disease with the potential for injury and premature death of that host. Parasites of the metazoa can be viruses, eubacteria, fungi, protozoans, and other metazoans. The immune system operates to kill or eliminate parasites and eliminate or detoxify their toxins and virulence factors. Although some of the elements of immune systems are specific to a particular phylum of metazoans, others show extensive evolutionary conservation, being present in several or all major phyla of the metazoa. The pentraxins display this latter character in their roles in immune defense. Pentraxins have been documented in vertebrates, nonvertebrate chordates, arthropods, and mollusks and may be present in other taxa of metazoans. Presumably the pentraxins appeared early in the evolution of metazoa, prior to their evolutionary divergence in the Precambrian epoch into many phyla present today, and have been preserved for the 542 million years since that explosive evolutionary radiation. The fidelity with which these phyla have preserved the pentraxins suggests that the functions of these proteins are important for survival of the members of these diverse taxa of animals. PMID:25805121

  5. Exploring the Conserved Role of MANF in the Unfolded Protein Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Riitta; Lindholm, Päivi; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Palgi, Mari; Saarma, Mart; Heino, Tapio I

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in the homeostasis of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) referred to as ER stress is involved in a variety of human diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular mechanism the purpose of which is to restore ER homeostasis. Previous studies show that Mesencephalic Astrocyte-derived Neurotrophic Factor (MANF) is an important novel component in the regulation of UPR. In vertebrates, MANF is upregulated by ER stress and protects cells against ER stress-induced cell death. Biochemical studies have revealed an interaction between mammalian MANF and GRP78, the major ER chaperone promoting protein folding. In this study we discovered that the upregulation of MANF expression in response to drug-induced ER stress is conserved between Drosophila and mammals. Additionally, by using a genetic in vivo approach we found genetic interactions between Drosophila Manf and genes encoding for Drosophila homologues of GRP78, PERK and XBP1, the key components of UPR. Our data suggest a role for Manf in the regulation of Drosophila UPR. PMID:26975047

  6. Nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C and Polycomb group of proteins: An evolutionarily conserved interplay.

    PubMed

    Marullo, F; Cesarini, E; Antonelli, L; Gregoretti, F; Oliva, G; Lanzuolo, C

    2016-04-25

    Nuclear lamins are the main components of the nuclear lamina at the nuclear periphery, providing mechanical support to the nucleus. However, recent findings suggest that lamins also reside in the nuclear interior, as a distinct and dynamic pool with critical roles in transcriptional regulation. In our work we found a functional and evolutionary conserved crosstalk between Lamin A/C and the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, this being required for the maintenance of the PcG repressive functions. Indeed, Lamin A/C knock-down causes PcG foci dispersion and defects in PcG-mediated higher order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG mediated transcriptional repression. By using ad-hoc algorithms for image analysis and PLA approaches we hereby show that PcG proteins are preferentially located in the nuclear interior where they interact with nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C. Taken together, our findings suggest that nuclear components, such as Lamin A/C, functionally interact with epigenetic factors to ensure the correct transcriptional program maintenance. PMID:26930442

  7. The Number, Organization, and Size of Polymorphic Membrane Protein Coding Sequences as well as the Most Conserved Pmp Protein Differ within and across Chlamydia Species.

    PubMed

    Van Lent, Sarah; Creasy, Heather Huot; Myers, Garry S A; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    Variation is a central trait of the polymorphic membrane protein (Pmp) family. The number of pmp coding sequences differs between Chlamydia species, but it is unknown whether the number of pmp coding sequences is constant within a Chlamydia species. The level of conservation of the Pmp proteins has previously only been determined for Chlamydia trachomatis. As different Pmp proteins might be indispensible for the pathogenesis of different Chlamydia species, this study investigated the conservation of Pmp proteins both within and across C. trachomatis,C. pneumoniae,C. abortus, and C. psittaci. The pmp coding sequences were annotated in 16 C. trachomatis, 6 C. pneumoniae, 2 C. abortus, and 16 C. psittaci genomes. The number and organization of polymorphic membrane coding sequences differed within and across the analyzed Chlamydia species. The length of coding sequences of pmpA,pmpB, and pmpH was conserved among all analyzed genomes, while the length of pmpE/F and pmpG, and remarkably also of the subtype pmpD, differed among the analyzed genomes. PmpD, PmpA, PmpH, and PmpA were the most conserved Pmp in C. trachomatis,C. pneumoniae,C. abortus, and C. psittaci, respectively. PmpB was the most conserved Pmp across the 4 analyzed Chlamydia species.

  8. Protein subcellular localization prediction based on compartment-specific features and structure conservation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Lo, Allan; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein subcellular localization is crucial for genome annotation, protein function prediction, and drug discovery. Determination of subcellular localization using experimental approaches is time-consuming; thus, computational approaches become highly desirable. Extensive studies of localization prediction have led to the development of several methods including composition-based and homology-based methods. However, their performance might be significantly degraded if homologous sequences are not detected. Moreover, methods that integrate various features could suffer from the problem of low coverage in high-throughput proteomic analyses due to the lack of information to characterize unknown proteins. Results We propose a hybrid prediction method for Gram-negative bacteria that combines a one-versus-one support vector machines (SVM) model and a structural homology approach. The SVM model comprises a number of binary classifiers, in which biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways are incorporated. In the structural homology approach, we employ secondary structure alignment for structural similarity comparison and assign the known localization of the top-ranked protein as the predicted localization of a query protein. The hybrid method achieves overall accuracy of 93.7% and 93.2% using ten-fold cross-validation on the benchmark data sets. In the assessment of the evaluation data sets, our method also attains accurate prediction accuracy of 84.0%, especially when testing on sequences with a low level of homology to the training data. A three-way data split procedure is also incorporated to prevent overestimation of the predictive performance. In addition, we show that the prediction accuracy should be approximately 85% for non-redundant data sets of sequence identity less than 30%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways yield a significant

  9. A DNA-centric protein interaction map of ultraconserved elements reveals contribution of transcription factor binding hubs to conservation.

    PubMed

    Viturawong, Tar; Meissner, Felix; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-10-31

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) have been the subject of great interest because of their extreme sequence identity and their seemingly cryptic and largely uncharacterized functions. Although in vivo studies of UCE sequences have demonstrated regulatory activity, protein interactors at UCEs have not been systematically identified. Here, we combined high-throughput affinity purification, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and SILAC quantification to map intrinsic protein interactions for 193 UCE sequences. The interactome contains over 400 proteins, including transcription factors with known developmental roles. We demonstrate based on our data that UCEs consist of strongly conserved overlapping binding sites. We also generated a fine-resolution interactome of a UCE, confirming the hub-like nature of the element. The intrinsic interactions mapped here are reflected in open chromatin, as indicated by comparison with existing ChIP data. Our study argues for a strong contribution of protein-DNA interactions to UCE conservation and provides a basis for further functional characterization of UCEs.

  10. Multi-signal sedimentation velocity analysis with mass conservation for determining the stoichiometry of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Padrick, Shae B; Schuck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Multi-signal sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (MSSV) is a powerful tool for the determination of the number, stoichiometry, and hydrodynamic shape of reversible protein complexes in two- and three-component systems. In this method, the evolution of sedimentation profiles of macromolecular mixtures is recorded simultaneously using multiple absorbance and refractive index signals and globally transformed into both spectrally and diffusion-deconvoluted component sedimentation coefficient distributions. For reactions with complex lifetimes comparable to the time-scale of sedimentation, MSSV reveals the number and stoichiometry of co-existing complexes. For systems with short complex lifetimes, MSSV reveals the composition of the reaction boundary of the coupled reaction/migration process, which we show here may be used to directly determine an association constant. A prerequisite for MSSV is that the interacting components are spectrally distinguishable, which may be a result, for example, of extrinsic chromophores or of different abundances of aromatic amino acids contributing to the UV absorbance. For interacting components that are spectrally poorly resolved, here we introduce a method for additional regularization of the spectral deconvolution by exploiting approximate knowledge of the total loading concentrations. While this novel mass conservation principle does not discriminate contributions to different species, it can be effectively combined with constraints in the sedimentation coefficient range of uncomplexed species. We show in theory, computer simulations, and experiment, how mass conservation MSSV as implemented in SEDPHAT can enhance or even substitute for the spectral discrimination of components. This should broaden the applicability of MSSV to the analysis of the composition of reversible macromolecular complexes.

  11. WXG100 Protein Superfamily Consists of Three Subfamilies and Exhibits an α-Helical C-Terminal Conserved Residue Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Christian; Panjikar, Santosh; Holton, Simon J.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Song, Young-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Members of the WXG100 protein superfamily form homo- or heterodimeric complexes. The most studied proteins among them are the secreted T-cell antigens CFP-10 (10 kDa culture filtrate protein, EsxB) and ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secreted antigen target, EsxA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are encoded on an operon within a gene cluster, named as ESX-1, that encodes for the Type VII secretion system (T7SS). WXG100 proteins are secreted in a full-length form and it is known that they adopt a four-helix bundle structure. In the current work we discuss the evolutionary relationship between the homo- and heterodimeric WXG100 proteins, the basis of the oligomeric state and the key structural features of the conserved sequence pattern of WXG100 proteins. We performed an iterative bioinformatics analysis of the WXG100 protein superfamily and correlated this with the atomic structures of the representative WXG100 proteins. We find, firstly, that the WXG100 protein superfamily consists of three subfamilies: CFP-10-, ESAT-6- and sagEsxA-like proteins (EsxA proteins similar to that of Streptococcus agalactiae). Secondly, that the heterodimeric complexes probably evolved from a homodimeric precursor. Thirdly, that the genes of hetero-dimeric WXG100 proteins are always encoded in bi-cistronic operons and finally, by combining the sequence alignments with the X-ray data we identify a conserved C-terminal sequence pattern. The side chains of these conserved residues decorate the same side of the C-terminal α-helix and therefore form a distinct surface. Our results lead to a putatively extended T7SS secretion signal which combines two reported T7SS recognition characteristics: Firstly that the T7SS secretion signal is localized at the C-terminus of T7SS substrates and secondly that the conserved residues YxxxD/E are essential for T7SS activity. Furthermore, we propose that the specific α-helical surface formed by the conserved sequence pattern including YxxxD/E motif is a key

  12. Identification of an ideal-like fingerprint for a protein fold using overlapped conserved residues based approach.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Amit; Sokalingam, Sriram; Hwang, Kyu-Suk; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2014-07-10

    Design of an efficient fingerprint that detects homologous proteins at distant sequence identity has been a great challenge. This paper proposes a strategy to extract an ideal-like fingerprint with high specificity and sensitivity from a group of sequences related to a fold. The approach is devised based on the assumptions that the critical residues for a protein fold may be conserved in three aspects, i.e. sequence, structure, and intramolecular interaction, and embedded in secondary structures. We hypothesized that the residues satisfying such conditions simultaneously may work as an efficient fingerprint. This idea was tested on protein folds of various classes, such as beta-strand rich, alpha + beta proteins and alpha/beta proteins with discrete sequence similarities. The fingerprint for each fold was generated by selecting the overlapped conserved residues (OCR) from the conserved residues obtained using independent three alignment methods, i.e. multiple sequence alignment, structure-based alignment, and alignment based on the interstrand hydrogen-bonds. The OCR fingerprints showed more than 90% detection efficiency for all the folds tested and were identified to be almost the minimal fingerprints composed of only critical residues. This study is expected to provide an important conceptual improvement in the identification or design of ideal fingerprints for a protein fold.

  13. Conservation of inner nuclear membrane targeting sequences in mammalian Pom121 and yeast Heh2 membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kralt, Annemarie; Jagalur, Noorjahan B.; van den Boom, Vincent; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Steen, Anton; Cingolani, Gino; Fornerod, Maarten; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum–synthesized membrane proteins traffic through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) en route to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Although many membrane proteins pass the NPC by simple diffusion, two yeast proteins, ScSrc1/ScHeh1 and ScHeh2, are actively imported. In these proteins, a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an intrinsically disordered linker encode the sorting signal for recruiting the transport factors for FG-Nup and RanGTP-dependent transport through the NPC. Here we address whether a similar import mechanism applies in metazoans. We show that the (putative) NLSs of metazoan HsSun2, MmLem2, HsLBR, and HsLap2β are not sufficient to drive nuclear accumulation of a membrane protein in yeast, but the NLS from RnPom121 is. This NLS of Pom121 adapts a similar fold as the NLS of Heh2 when transport factor bound and rescues the subcellular localization and synthetic sickness of Heh2ΔNLS mutants. Consistent with the conservation of these NLSs, the NLS and linker of Heh2 support INM localization in HEK293T cells. The conserved features of the NLSs of ScHeh1, ScHeh2, and RnPom121 and the effective sorting of Heh2-derived reporters in human cells suggest that active import is conserved but confined to a small subset of INM proteins. PMID:26179916

  14. Mammalian actin-related protein 2/3 complex localizes to regions of lamellipodial protrusion and is composed of evolutionarily conserved proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Machesky, L M; Reeves, E; Wientjes, F; Mattheyse, F J; Grogan, A; Totty, N F; Burlingame, A L; Hsuan, J J; Segal, A W

    1997-01-01

    Human neutrophils contain a complex of proteins similar to the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex of Acanthamoeba. We have obtained peptide sequence information for each member of the putative seven-protein complex previously described for Acanthamoeba and human platelets. From the peptide sequences we have identified cDNA species encoding three novel proteins in this complex. We find that in addition to Arp2 and Arp3, this complex contains a relative of the human (Suppressor of Profilin) SOP2Hs protein and four previously unknown proteins. These proteins localize in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts that lack lamellipodia, but are enriched in lamellipodia on stimulation with serum or platelet-derived growth factor. We propose a conserved and dynamic role for this complex in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9359840

  15. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  16. Localization of an evolutionarily conserved protein proton pyrophosphatase in evolutionarily distant plants oryza sativa and physcomitrella patens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proton Pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein that is prevalent in the plant kingdom. One of the salient features of H+-PPase expression pattern, at least in vascular plants like Arabidopsis, is its conspicuous localization in both actively dividing cells and the phl...

  17. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  18. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  19. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  20. Trichohyalin-like proteins have evolutionarily conserved roles in the morphogenesis of skin appendages

    PubMed Central

    Mlitz, Veronika; Strasser, Bettina; Jaeger, Karin; Hermann, Marcela; Ghannadan, Minoo; Buchberger, Maria; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    S100 fused-type proteins (SFTPs) such as filaggrin, trichohyalin and cornulin are differentially expressed in cornifying keratinocytes of the epidermis and various skin appendages. To determine evolutionarily conserved, and thus presumably important, features of SFTPs, we characterized non-mammalian SFTPs and compared their amino acid sequences and expression patterns to those of mammalian SFTPs. We identified an ortholog of cornulin and a previously unknown SFTP, termed scaffoldin, in reptiles and birds, whereas filaggrin was confined to mammals. In contrast to mammalian SFTPs, both cornulin and scaffoldin of the chicken are expressed in the embryonic periderm. However, scaffoldin resembles mammalian trichohyalin with regard to its expression in the filiform papillae of the tongue and in the epithelium underneath the forming tips of the claws. Furthermore, scaffoldin is expressed in the epithelial sheath around growing feathers, reminiscent of trichohyalin expression in the inner root sheath of hair. The results of this study show that SFTP-positive epithelia function as scaffolds for the growth of diverse skin appendages such as claws, nails, hair and feathers, indicating of a common evolutionary origin. PMID:24780931

  1. A conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is required for mating in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangye; Chen, Jing; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping

    2002-12-01

    Candida albicans had been thought to lack a mating process until the recent discovery of a mating type-like locus and mating between MTLa and MTL(alpha) strains. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate mating in C. albicans, we examined the function of Cph1 and its upstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway in mating, as they are homologues of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that overexpressing CPH1 in MTLa, but not in MTLa/alpha strains, induced the transcription of orthologues of S. cerevisiae pheromone-induced genes and also increased mating efficiency. Furthermore, cph1 and hst7 mutants were completely defective in mating, and cst20 and cek1 mutants showed reduced mating efficiency, as in S. cerevisiae. The partial mating defect in cek1 results from the presence of a functionally redundant MAP kinase, Cek2. CEK2 complemented the mating defect of a fus3 kss1 mutant of S. cerevisiae and was expressed only in MTLa or MTL(alpha), but not in MTLa/alpha cell types. Moreover, a cek1 cek2 double mutant was completely defective in mating. Our data suggest that the conserved MAP kinase pathway regulates mating in C. albicans. We also observed that C. albicans mating efficiency was greatly affected by medium composition, indicating the potential involvement of nutrient-sensing pathways in mating in addition to the MAP kinase pathway. PMID:12453219

  2. De Novo Structural Modeling and Conserved Epitopes Prediction of Zika Virus Envelop Protein for Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Ahmed, Bilal

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (Zika V) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus that is transmitted by mosquito bites. Zika V Envelop protein is antigenic and is involved in fusion and entry of viral particles into the cell. Till date, there is no vaccine and antiviral drug available against Zika V. Thus, there is a need to develop a vaccine against Zika V. This study was designed for the prediction of B cell and T cell epitopes that can be helpful in diagnosis and vaccine designing against this emerging threat. For this purpose, several B cell and T cell epitopes were predicted that are conserved among Zika virus genomes taken from 12 different countries. Peptides QTLTPVGRL, in case of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, and IRCIGVSNRDFV, in case of MHC class II, are highly antigenic among T cell epitopes. Molecular docking was performed to study the interactions of B cell epitopes with HLA-B7. However, these predicted epitopes could play a constructive role in designing of a vaccine against Zika V.

  3. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2015-10-16

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa.

  4. Multiple cellular proteins interact with LEDGF/p75 through a conserved unstructured consensus motif.

    PubMed

    Tesina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Procházková, Kateřina; Fábry, Milan; Sharma, Subhalakshmi; Christ, Frauke; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; De Rijck, Jan; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2015-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is an epigenetic reader and attractive therapeutic target involved in HIV integration and the development of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL1) fusion-driven leukaemia. Besides HIV integrase and the MLL1-menin complex, LEDGF/p75 interacts with various cellular proteins via its integrase binding domain (IBD). Here we present structural characterization of IBD interactions with transcriptional repressor JPO2 and domesticated transposase PogZ, and show that the PogZ interaction is nearly identical to the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with MLL1. The interaction with the IBD is maintained by an intrinsically disordered IBD-binding motif (IBM) common to all known cellular partners of LEDGF/p75. In addition, based on IBM conservation, we identify and validate IWS1 as a novel LEDGF/p75 interaction partner. Our results also reveal how HIV integrase efficiently displaces cellular binding partners from LEDGF/p75. Finally, the similar binding modes of LEDGF/p75 interaction partners represent a new challenge for the development of selective interaction inhibitors.

  5. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion.

  6. Specific Prenylation of Tomato Rab Proteins by Geranylgeranyl Type-II Transferase Requires a Conserved Cysteine-Cysteine Motif.

    PubMed

    Yalovsky, S.; Loraine, A. E.; Gruissem, W.

    1996-04-01

    Posttranslational isoprenylation of some small GTP-binding proteins is required for their biological activity. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (Rab GGTase) uses geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to modify Rab proteins, its only known substrates. Geranylgeranylation of Rabs is believed to promote their association with target membranes and interaction with other proteins. Plants, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab-like proteins that are associated with intracellular membranes. However, to our knowledge, the geranylgeranylation of Rab proteins has not yet been characterized from any plant source. This report presents an activity assay that allows the characterization of prenylation of Rab-like proteins in vitro, by protein extracts prepared from plants. Tomato Rab1 proteins and mammalian Rab1a were modified by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by farnesyl pyrophosphate. This modification required a conserved cysteine-cysteine motif. A mutant form lacking the cysteine-cysteine motif could not be modified, but inhibited the geranylgeranylation of its wild-type homolog. The tomato Rab proteins were modified in vitro by protein extract prepared from yeast, but failed to become modified when the protein extract was prepared from a yeast strain containing a mutant allele for the [alpha] subunit of yeast Rab GGTase (bet4 ts). These results demonstrate that plant cells, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab GGTase-like activity.

  7. Identification of a Conserved Non-Protein-Coding Genomic Element that Plays an Essential Role in Alphabaculovirus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kikhno, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Highly homologous sequences 154–157 bp in length grouped under the name of “conserved non-protein-coding element” (CNE) were revealed in all of the sequenced genomes of baculoviruses belonging to the genus Alphabaculovirus. A CNE alignment led to the detection of a set of highly conserved nucleotide clusters that occupy strictly conserved positions in the CNE sequence. The significant length of the CNE and conservation of both its length and cluster architecture were identified as a combination of characteristics that make this CNE different from known viral non-coding functional sequences. The essential role of the CNE in the Alphabaculovirus life cycle was demonstrated through the use of a CNE-knockout Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) bacmid. It was shown that the essential function of the CNE was not mediated by the presumed expression activities of the protein- and non-protein-coding genes that overlap the AcMNPV CNE. On the basis of the presented data, the AcMNPV CNE was categorized as a complex-structured, polyfunctional genomic element involved in an essential DNA transaction that is associated with an undefined function of the baculovirus genome. PMID:24740153

  8. The role of a conserved tyrosine residue in high-potential iron sulfur proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Iwagami, S. G.; Creagh, A. L.; Haynes, C. A.; Borsari, M.; Felli, I. C.; Piccioli, M.; Eltis, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    Conserved tyrosine-12 of Ectothiorhodospira halophila high-potential iron sulphur protein (HiPIP) iso-I was substituted with phenylalanine (Y12F), histidine (Y12H), tryptophan (Y12W), isoleucine (Y12I), and alanine (Y12A). Variants Y12A and Y12I were expressed to reasonable levels in cells grown at lower temperatures, but decomposed during purification. Variants Y12F, Y12H, and Y12W were substantially destabilized with respect to the recombinant wild-type HiPIP (rcWT) as determined by differential scanning calorimetry over a pH range of 7.0-11.0. Characterization of the Y12F variant by NMR indicates that the principal structural differences between this variant and the rcWT HiPIP result from the loss of the two hydrogen bonds of the Tyr-12 hydroxyl group with Asn-14 O delta 1 and Lys-59 NH, respectively. The effect of the loss of the latter interaction is propagated through the Lys-59/Val-58 peptide bond, thereby perturbing Gly-46. The delta delta GDapp of Y12F of 2.3 kcal/mol with respect to rcWT HiPIP (25 degrees C, pH 7.0) is entirely consistent with the contribution of these two hydrogen bonds to the stability of the latter. CD measurements show that Tyr-12 influences several electronic transitions within the cluster. The midpoint reduction potentials of variants Y12F, Y12H, and Y12W were 17, 19, and 22 mV (20 mM MOPS, 0.2 M sodium chloride, pH 6.98, 25 degrees C), respectively, higher than that of rcWT HiPIP. The current results indicate that, although conserved Tyr-12 modulates the properties of the cluster, its principle function is to stabilize the HiPIP through hydrogen bonds involving its hydroxyl group and electrostatic interactions involving its aromatic ring. PMID:8580847

  9. Crystal structure of a conserved domain in the intermembrane space region of the plastid division protein ARC6.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Su, Chih-Chia; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Yu, Edward W

    2016-02-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is composed of numerous proteins that assemble as a large complex to divide double-membraned chloroplasts through binary fission. A key mediator of division-complex formation is ARC6, a chloroplast inner envelope protein and evolutionary descendant of the cyanobacterial cell division protein Ftn2. ARC6 connects stromal and cytosolic contractile rings across the two membranes through interaction with an outer envelope protein within the intermembrane space (IMS). The ARC6 IMS region bears a structurally uncharacterized domain of unknown function, DUF4101, that is highly conserved among ARC6 and Ftn2 proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of this domain from Arabidopsis thaliana ARC6. The domain forms an α/β barrel open towards the outer envelope membrane but closed towards the inner envelope membrane. These findings provide new clues into how ARC6 and its homologs contribute to chloroplast and cyanobacterial cell division.

  10. Crystal structure of a conserved domain in the intermembrane space region of the plastid division protein ARC6.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Su, Chih-Chia; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Yu, Edward W

    2016-02-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is composed of numerous proteins that assemble as a large complex to divide double-membraned chloroplasts through binary fission. A key mediator of division-complex formation is ARC6, a chloroplast inner envelope protein and evolutionary descendant of the cyanobacterial cell division protein Ftn2. ARC6 connects stromal and cytosolic contractile rings across the two membranes through interaction with an outer envelope protein within the intermembrane space (IMS). The ARC6 IMS region bears a structurally uncharacterized domain of unknown function, DUF4101, that is highly conserved among ARC6 and Ftn2 proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of this domain from Arabidopsis thaliana ARC6. The domain forms an α/β barrel open towards the outer envelope membrane but closed towards the inner envelope membrane. These findings provide new clues into how ARC6 and its homologs contribute to chloroplast and cyanobacterial cell division. PMID:26452626

  11. Conservation of the Protein Composition and Electron Microscopy Structure of Drosophila melanogaster and Human Spliceosomal Complexes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Nadine; Will, Cindy L.; Wolf, Elmar; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive proteomics analyses of spliceosomal complexes are currently limited to those in humans, and thus, it is unclear to what extent the spliceosome's highly complex composition and compositional dynamics are conserved among metazoans. Here we affinity purified Drosophila melanogaster spliceosomal B and C complexes formed in Kc cell nuclear extract. Mass spectrometry revealed that their composition is highly similar to that of human B and C complexes. Nonetheless, a number of Drosophila-specific proteins were identified, suggesting that there may be novel factors contributing specifically to splicing in flies. Protein recruitment and release events during the B-to-C transition were also very similar in both organisms. Electron microscopy of Drosophila B complexes revealed a high degree of structural similarity with human B complexes, indicating that higher-order interactions are also largely conserved. A comparison of Drosophila spliceosomes formed on a short versus long intron revealed only small differences in protein composition but, nonetheless, clear structural differences under the electron microscope. Finally, the characterization of affinity-purified Drosophila mRNPs indicated that exon junction complex proteins are recruited in a splicing-dependent manner during C complex formation. These studies provide insights into the evolutionarily conserved composition and structure of the metazoan spliceosome, as well as its compositional dynamics during catalytic activation. PMID:18981222

  12. Inter-phylum structural conservation of the magnetosome-associated TPR-containing protein, MamA.

    PubMed

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Baran, Dror; Davidov, Geula; Zarivach, Raz

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria enclose the magnetosome, a unique prokaryotic sub-cellular organelle that allows the biomineralization of magnetic nano-crystals. Membrane-coated magnetosomes are arranged into a linear chain that permits magnetotactic bacteria to navigate geomagnetic fields. Magnetosome assembly and biomineralization are controlled by conserved magnetosome-associated proteins, including MamA, a tetra-trico-peptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein that was shown to coat the magnetosome membrane. In this study, two MamA structures from Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Mbav) were determined via X-ray crystallography. These structures confirm that Mbav MamA folds as a sequential TPR protein and shares a high degree of structural similarity with homologous MamA proteins from Magnetospirillum species. Furthermore, the two TPR-containing domains of MamA are separated by an interphylum-conserved region containing a flexible hinge that is involved in ligand binding and recognition. Finally, substantial differences were found in the local stabilization of the MamA N-terminal domain as a result of the loss of an evolutionary conserved salt bridge.

  13. Inter-phylum structural conservation of the magnetosome-associated TPR-containing protein, MamA.

    PubMed

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Baran, Dror; Davidov, Geula; Zarivach, Raz

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria enclose the magnetosome, a unique prokaryotic sub-cellular organelle that allows the biomineralization of magnetic nano-crystals. Membrane-coated magnetosomes are arranged into a linear chain that permits magnetotactic bacteria to navigate geomagnetic fields. Magnetosome assembly and biomineralization are controlled by conserved magnetosome-associated proteins, including MamA, a tetra-trico-peptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein that was shown to coat the magnetosome membrane. In this study, two MamA structures from Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Mbav) were determined via X-ray crystallography. These structures confirm that Mbav MamA folds as a sequential TPR protein and shares a high degree of structural similarity with homologous MamA proteins from Magnetospirillum species. Furthermore, the two TPR-containing domains of MamA are separated by an interphylum-conserved region containing a flexible hinge that is involved in ligand binding and recognition. Finally, substantial differences were found in the local stabilization of the MamA N-terminal domain as a result of the loss of an evolutionary conserved salt bridge. PMID:22917855

  14. Ancient conserved domains shared by animal soluble guanylyl cyclases and bacterial signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclases (SGCs) are dimeric enzymes that transduce signals downstream of nitric oxide (NO) in animals. They sense NO by means of a heme moiety that is bound to their N-terminal extensions. Results Using sequence profile searches we show that the N-terminal extensions of the SGCs contain two globular domains. The first of these, the HNOB (Heme NO Binding) domain, is a predominantly α-helical domain and binds heme via a covalent linkage to histidine. Versions lacking this conserved histidine and are likely to interact with heme non-covalently. We detected HNOB domains in several bacterial lineages, where they occur fused to methyl accepting domains of chemotaxis receptors or as standalone proteins. The standalone forms are encoded by predicted operons that also contain genes for two component signaling systems and GGDEF-type nucleotide cyclases. The second domain, the HNOB associated (HNOBA) domain occurs between the HNOB and the cyclase domains in the animal SGCs. The HNOBA domain is also detected in bacteria and is always encoded by a gene, which occurs in the neighborhood of a gene for a HNOB domain. Conclusion The HNOB domain is predicted to function as a heme-dependent sensor for gaseous ligands, and transduce diverse downstream signals, in both bacteria and animals. The HNOBA domain functionally interacts with the HNOB domain, and possibly binds a ligand, either in cooperation, or independently of the latter domain. Phyletic profiles and phylogenetic analysis suggest that the HNOB and HNOBA domains were acquired by the animal lineage via lateral transfer from a bacterial source. PMID:12590654

  15. RNA-binding proteins in eye development and disease: implication of conserved RNA granule components.

    PubMed

    Dash, Soma; Siddam, Archana D; Barnum, Carrie E; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Lachke, Salil A

    2016-07-01

    The molecular biology of metazoan eye development is an area of intense investigation. These efforts have led to the surprising recognition that although insect and vertebrate eyes have dramatically different structures, the orthologs or family members of several conserved transcription and signaling regulators such as Pax6, Six3, Prox1, and Bmp4 are commonly required for their development. In contrast, our understanding of posttranscriptional regulation in eye development and disease, particularly regarding the function of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), is limited. We examine the present knowledge of RBPs in eye development in the insect model Drosophila as well as several vertebrate models such as fish, frog, chicken, and mouse. Interestingly, of the 42 RBPs that have been investigated for their expression or function in vertebrate eye development, 24 (~60%) are recognized in eukaryotic cells as components of RNA granules such as processing bodies, stress granules, or other specialized ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. We discuss the distinct developmental and cellular events that may necessitate potential RBP/RNA granule-associated RNA regulon models to facilitate posttranscriptional control of gene expression in eye morphogenesis. In support of these hypotheses, three RBPs and RNP/RNA granule components Tdrd7, Caprin2, and Stau2 are linked to ocular developmental defects such as congenital cataract, Peters anomaly, and microphthalmia in human patients or animal models. We conclude by discussing the utility of interdisciplinary approaches such as the bioinformatics tool iSyTE (integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery) to prioritize RBPs for deriving posttranscriptional regulatory networks in eye development and disease. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:527-557. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27133484

  16. An ER-directed transcriptional response to unfolded protein stress in the absence of conserved sensor-transducer proteins in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Spycher, Cornelia; Herman, Emily K; Morf, Laura; Qi, Weihong; Rehrauer, Hubert; Aquino Fournier, Catharine; Dacks, Joel B; Hehl, Adrian B

    2013-05-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia has a minimized organelle repertoire, and most strikingly lacks a classical stacked Golgi apparatus. Nevertheless, Giardia trophozoites constitutively secrete variant surface proteins, and dramatically increase the volume of protein secretion during differentiation to cysts. Eukaryotic cells have evolved an elaborate system for quality control (QC) of protein folding and capacity in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Upon ER-overload, an unfolded protein response (UPR) is triggered on transcriptional/translational level aiming at alleviating ER stress. In Giardia, a minimized secretory machinery and absence of glycan-dependent QC suggests that a genetically conserved UPR (or functional equivalent) to cope with insults to the secretory system has been eliminated. We tested this hypothesis of UPR elimination by profiling the transcriptional response during induced ER-folding stress. We show that on the contrary, ER-folding stress triggers a stressor-specific, ER-directed response with upregulation of only ~ 30 genes, with different kinetics and scope compared with the UPR of other eukaryotes. Computational genomics revealed conserved cis-acting motifs in upstream regions of responder genes capable of stressor-specific gene regulation in transfected cells. Interestingly, the sensors/transducers of folding stress, well conserved in model eukaryotes, are absent in Giardia suggesting the presence of a novel version of this essential eukaryotic function. PMID:23617761

  17. The Conserved Candida albicans CA3427 Gene Product Defines a New Family of Proteins Exhibiting the Generic Periplasmic Binding Protein Structural Fold

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Mouz, Nicolas; Rousselle, Tristan; Maza, Caroline; Monchois, Vincent; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial diseases due to Candida albicans infections are in constant rise in hospitals, where they cause serious complications to already fragile intensive care patients. Antifungal drug resistance is fast becoming a serious issue due to the emergence of strains resistant to currently available antifungal agents. Thus the urgency to identify new potential protein targets, the function and structure of which may guide the development of new antifungal drugs. In this context, we initiated a comparative genomics study in search of promising protein coding genes among the most conserved ones in reference fungal genomes. The CA3427 gene was selected on the basis of its presence among pathogenic fungi contrasting with its absence in the non pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report the crystal 3D-structure of the Candida albicans CA3427 protein at 2.1 Å resolution. The combined analysis of its sequence and structure reveals a structural fold originally associated with periplasmic binding proteins. The CA3427 structure highlights a binding site located between the two protein domains, corresponding to a sequence segment conserved among fungi. Two crystal forms of CA3427 were found, suggesting that the presence or absence of a ligand at the proposed binding site might trigger a “Venus flytrap” motion, coupled to the previously described activity of bacterial periplasmic binding proteins. The conserved binding site defines a new subfamily of periplasmic binding proteins also found in many bacteria of the bacteroidetes division, in a choanoflagellate (a free-living unicellular and colonial flagellate eukaryote) and in a placozoan (the closest multicellular relative of animals). A phylogenetic analysis suggests that this gene family originated in bacteria before its horizontal transfer to an ancestral eukaryote prior to the radiation of fungi. It was then lost by the Saccharomycetales which include Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:21494601

  18. Conserved protein YecM from Escherichia coli shows structural homology to metal-binding isomerases and oxygenases.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Laskowski, R.; Evdokimova, E.; Skarina, T.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network; Birbeck Coll.

    2003-01-01

    The crystal structure of protein YecM{sup 1} has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution as a part of the ongoing structural genomics initiative (http://www.mcsg.anl.gov). The YecM is a conserved, hypothetical Escherichia coli protein with sequence homologs found exclusively in bacteria, including Salmonella typhimunium, Yersinia pestis, Vibrio cholerae, Haemophilus influenza, and Pasteurella multocida. YecM (188 residues) shows also sequence similarity to proteins in COG database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/COG/palox-?COG3102). YecM (Pfam-B domain 24546) was selected as a structural genomics target it shows no sequence similarity with proteins of known three-dimensional structure and therefore, may contain a previously unobserved field.

  19. MadR1, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell cycle stress response protein that is a member of a widely conserved protein class of prokaryotic, eukaryotic and archeal origin.

    PubMed

    Crew, Rebecca; Ramirez, Melissa V; England, Kathleen; Slayden, Richard A

    2015-05-01

    Stress-induced molecular programs designed to stall division progression are nearly ubiquitous in bacteria, with one well-known example being the participation of the SulA septum inhibiting protein in the SOS DNA damage repair response. Mycobacteria similarly demonstrate stress-altered growth kinetics, however no such regulators have been found in these organisms. We therefore set out to identify SulA-like regulatory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A bioinformatics modeling-based approach led to the identification of rv2216 as encoding for a protein with weak similarity to SulA, further analysis distinguished this protein as belonging to a group of uncharacterized growth promoting proteins. We have named the mycobacterial protein encoded by rv2216 morphology altering division regulator protein 1, MadR1. Overexpression of madR1 modulated cell length while maintaining growth kinetics similar to wild-type, and increased the proportion of bent or V-form cells in the population. The presence of MadR1-GFP at regions of cellular elongation (poles) and morphological differentiation (V-form) suggests MadR1 involvement in phenotypic heterogeneity and longitudinal cellular growth. Global transcriptional analysis indicated that MadR1 functionality is linked to lipid editing programs required for growth and persistence. This is the first report to differentiate the larger class of these conserved proteins from SulA proteins and characterizes MadR1 effects on the mycobacterial cell. PMID:25829286

  20. MadR1, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell cycle stress response protein that is a member of a widely conserved protein class of prokaryotic, eukaryotic and archaeal origin

    PubMed Central

    Crew, Rebecca; Ramirez, Melissa V.; England, Kathleen; Slayden, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Stress-induced molecular programs designed to stall division progression are nearly ubiquitous in bacteria, with one well-known example being the participation of the SulA septum inhibiting protein in the SOS DNA damage repair response. Mycobacteria similarly demonstrate stress-altered growth kinetics, however no such regulators have been found in these organisms. We therefore set out to identify SulA-like regulatory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A bioinformatics modeling-based approach led to the identification of rv2216 as encoding for a protein with weak similarity to SulA, further analysis distinguished this protein as belonging to a group of previously uncharacterized growth promoting proteins. We have named the mycobacterial protein encoded by rv2216 morphology altering division regulator protein 1, MadR1. Overexpression of madR1 modulated cell length while maintaining growth kinetics similar to wild-type, and increased the proportion of bent or V-form cells in the population. The presence of MadR1-GFP at regions of cellular elongation (poles) and morphological differentiation (V-form) suggests MadR1 involvement in phenotypic herterogeneity and longitudinal cellular growth. Global transcriptional analysis indicated that MadR1 functionality is linked to lipid editing programs required for growth and persistence. This is the first report to differentiate the larger class of these conserved proteins from SulA proteins and characterizes MadR1 effects on the mycobacterial cell. PMID:25829286

  1. Inhibition of protein synthesis by TOR inactivation revealed a conserved regulatory mechanism of the BiP chaperone in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Pérez-Martín, Marta; Moes, Suzette; Jeno, Paul; Florencio, Francisco J; Crespo, José L

    2011-10-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase integrates nutritional and stress signals to coordinately control cell growth in all eukaryotes. TOR associates with highly conserved proteins to constitute two distinct signaling complexes termed TORC1 and TORC2. Inactivation of TORC1 by rapamycin negatively regulates protein synthesis in most eukaryotes. Here, we report that down-regulation of TOR signaling by rapamycin in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced phosphorylation of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP. Our results indicated that Chlamydomonas TOR regulates BiP phosphorylation through the control of protein synthesis, since rapamycin and cycloheximide have similar effects on BiP modification and protein synthesis inhibition. Modification of BiP by phosphorylation was suppressed under conditions that require the chaperone activity of BiP, such as heat shock stress or tunicamycin treatment, which inhibits N-linked glycosylation of nascent proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. A phosphopeptide localized in the substrate-binding domain of BiP was identified in Chlamydomonas cells treated with rapamycin. This peptide contains a highly conserved threonine residue that might regulate BiP function, as demonstrated by yeast functional assays. Thus, our study has revealed a regulatory mechanism of BiP in Chlamydomonas by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events and assigns a role to the TOR pathway in the control of BiP modification.

  2. Improving homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors through multiple-template derived conserved inter-residue interactions.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Rajan; Heim, Andrew J; Li, Zhijun

    2015-05-01

    Evidenced by the three-rounds of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) Dock competitions, improving homology modeling methods of helical transmembrane proteins including the GPCRs, based on templates of low sequence identity, remains an eminent challenge. Current approaches addressing this challenge adopt the philosophy of "modeling first, refinement next". In the present work, we developed an alternative modeling approach through the novel application of available multiple templates. First, conserved inter-residue interactions are derived from each additional template through conservation analysis of each template-target pairwise alignment. Then, these interactions are converted into distance restraints and incorporated in the homology modeling process. This approach was applied to modeling of the human β2 adrenergic receptor using the bovin rhodopsin and the human protease-activated receptor 1 as templates and improved model quality was demonstrated compared to the homology model generated by standard single-template and multiple-template methods. This method of "refined restraints first, modeling next", provides a fast and complementary way to the current modeling approaches. It allows rational identification and implementation of additional conserved distance restraints extracted from multiple templates and/or experimental data, and has the potential to be applicable to modeling of all helical transmembrane proteins.

  3. Molecular analysis of Xenopus laevis SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine). A highly conserved acidic calcium-binding extracellular-matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Damjanovski, S; Liu, F; Ringuette, M

    1992-01-01

    SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine) is expressed as a 1.6 kb mRNA in Xenopus laevis. On the basis of cDNA sequence analysis, Xenopus SPARC has a core Mr of 32643, with one potential N-glycosylation site. Western analysis of SPARC isolated from Xenopus long bone indicates that the mature protein has an Mr of 43,000. At the amino acid level, Xenopus SPARC has 78-79% sequence similarity to mouse, bovine and human SPARC. The least-conserved region is found within the N-terminal glutamic acid-rich domain, with the C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain being the most conserved. Adult Xenopus tissues show the same pattern of tissue-specific distribution of SPARC mRNAs as adult mouse. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:1736898

  4. Biochemical and Structural Studies of Conserved Maf Proteins Revealed Nucleotide Pyrophosphatases with a Preference for Modified Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Tchigvintsev, Dmitri; Flick, Robert; Popovic, Ana; Dong, Aiping; Xu, Xiaohui; Brown, Greg; Lu, Wenyun; Wu, Hong; Cui, Hong; Dombrowski, Ludmila; Joo, Jeong Chan; Beloglazova, Natalia; Min, Jinrong; Savchenko, Alexei; Caudy, Amy A.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Maf (for multicopy associated filamentation) proteins represent a large family of conserved proteins implicated in cell division arrest but whose biochemical activity remains unknown. Here, we show that the prokaryotic and eukaryotic Maf proteins exhibit nucleotide pyrophosphatase activity against 5-methyl-UTP, pseudo-UTP, 5-methyl-CTP, and 7-methyl-GTP, which represent the most abundant modified bases in all organisms, as well as against canonical nucleotides dTTP, UTP, and CTP. Overexpression of the Maf protein YhdE in E. coli cells increased intracellular levels of dTMP and UMP, confirming that dTTP and UTP are the in vivo substrates of this protein. Crystal structures and site-directed mutagenesis of Maf proteins revealed the determinants of their activity and substrate specificity. Thus, pyrophosphatase activity of Maf proteins toward canonical and modified nucleotides might provide the molecular mechanism for a dual role of these proteins in cell division arrest and house cleaning. PMID:24210219

  5. Conservation and variability of synaptonemal complex proteins in phylogenesis of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Grishaeva, Tatiana M; Bogdanov, Yuri F

    2014-01-01

    The problems of the origin and evolution of meiosis include the enigmatic variability of the synaptonemal complexes (SCs) which, being morphology similar, consist of different proteins in different eukaryotic phyla. Using bioinformatics methods, we monitored all available eukaryotic proteomes to find proteins similar to known SC proteins of model organisms. We found proteins similar to SC lateral element (LE) proteins and possessing the HORMA domain in the majority of the eukaryotic taxa and assume them the most ancient among all SC proteins. Vertebrate LE proteins SYCP2, SYCP3, and SC65 proved to have related proteins in many invertebrate taxa. Proteins of SC central space are most evolutionarily variable. It means that different protein-protein interactions can exist to connect LEs. Proteins similar to the known SC proteins were not found in Euglenophyta, Chrysophyta, Charophyta, Xanthophyta, Dinoflagellata, and primitive Coelomata. We conclude that different proteins whose common feature is the presence of domains with a certain conformation are involved in the formation of the SC in different eukaryotic phyla. This permits a targeted search for orthologs of the SC proteins using phylogenetic trees. Here we consider example of phylogenetic trees for protozoans, fungi, algae, mosses, and flowering plants. PMID:25147749

  6. Conservation and Variability of Synaptonemal Complex Proteins in Phylogenesis of Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Grishaeva, Tatiana M.; Bogdanov, Yuri F.

    2014-01-01

    The problems of the origin and evolution of meiosis include the enigmatic variability of the synaptonemal complexes (SCs) which, being morphology similar, consist of different proteins in different eukaryotic phyla. Using bioinformatics methods, we monitored all available eukaryotic proteomes to find proteins similar to known SC proteins of model organisms. We found proteins similar to SC lateral element (LE) proteins and possessing the HORMA domain in the majority of the eukaryotic taxa and assume them the most ancient among all SC proteins. Vertebrate LE proteins SYCP2, SYCP3, and SC65 proved to have related proteins in many invertebrate taxa. Proteins of SC central space are most evolutionarily variable. It means that different protein-protein interactions can exist to connect LEs. Proteins similar to the known SC proteins were not found in Euglenophyta, Chrysophyta, Charophyta, Xanthophyta, Dinoflagellata, and primitive Coelomata. We conclude that different proteins whose common feature is the presence of domains with a certain conformation are involved in the formation of the SC in different eukaryotic phyla. This permits a targeted search for orthologs of the SC proteins using phylogenetic trees. Here we consider example of phylogenetic trees for protozoans, fungi, algae, mosses, and flowering plants. PMID:25147749

  7. Conservation and variability of synaptonemal complex proteins in phylogenesis of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Grishaeva, Tatiana M; Bogdanov, Yuri F

    2014-01-01

    The problems of the origin and evolution of meiosis include the enigmatic variability of the synaptonemal complexes (SCs) which, being morphology similar, consist of different proteins in different eukaryotic phyla. Using bioinformatics methods, we monitored all available eukaryotic proteomes to find proteins similar to known SC proteins of model organisms. We found proteins similar to SC lateral element (LE) proteins and possessing the HORMA domain in the majority of the eukaryotic taxa and assume them the most ancient among all SC proteins. Vertebrate LE proteins SYCP2, SYCP3, and SC65 proved to have related proteins in many invertebrate taxa. Proteins of SC central space are most evolutionarily variable. It means that different protein-protein interactions can exist to connect LEs. Proteins similar to the known SC proteins were not found in Euglenophyta, Chrysophyta, Charophyta, Xanthophyta, Dinoflagellata, and primitive Coelomata. We conclude that different proteins whose common feature is the presence of domains with a certain conformation are involved in the formation of the SC in different eukaryotic phyla. This permits a targeted search for orthologs of the SC proteins using phylogenetic trees. Here we consider example of phylogenetic trees for protozoans, fungi, algae, mosses, and flowering plants.

  8. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, R.L.; Mackenzie, J.M.

    2015-07-15

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNV{sub KUN} replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNV{sub KUN} replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein.

  9. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Karunadharma, Pabalu P.; Basisty, Nathan; Chiao, Ying Ann; Dai, Dao-Fu; Drake, Rachel; Levy, Nick; Koh, William J.; Emond, Mary J.; Kruse, Shane; Marcinek, David; Maccoss, Michael J.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) produces most of the cellular ATP and requires strict quality-control mechanisms. To examine RC subunit proteostasis in vivo, we measured RC protein half-lives (HLs) in mice by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with metabolic [2H3]-leucine heavy isotope labeling under divergent conditions. We studied 7 tissues/fractions of young and old mice on control diet or one of 2 diet regimens (caloric restriction or rapamycin) that altered protein turnover (42 conditions in total). We observed a 6.5-fold difference in mean HL across tissues and an 11.5-fold difference across all conditions. Normalization to the mean HL of each condition showed that relative HLs were conserved across conditions (Spearman’s ρ = 0.57; P < 10–4), but were highly heterogeneous between subunits, with a 7.3-fold mean range overall, and a 2.2- to 4.6-fold range within each complex. To identify factors regulating this conserved distribution, we performed statistical analyses to study the correlation of HLs to the properties of the subunits. HLs significantly correlated with localization within the mitochondria, evolutionary origin, location of protein-encoding, and ubiquitination levels. These findings challenge the notion that all subunits in a complex turnover at comparable rates and suggest that there are common rules governing the differential proteolysis of RC protein subunits under divergent cellular conditions.—Karunadharma, P. P., Basisty, N., Chiao, Y. A., Dai, D.-F., Drake, R., Levy, N., Koh, W. J., Emond, M. J., Kruse, S., Marcinek, D., Maccoss, M. J., Rabinovitch, P. S. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments. PMID:25977255

  10. The viral transactivator HBx protein exhibits a high potential for regulation via phosphorylation through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) encodes an oncogenic factor, HBx, which is a multifunctional protein that can induce dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways, transcription, and cell cycle progression, among other processes, through interactions with target host factors. The subcellular localization of HBx is both cytoplasmic and nuclear. This dynamic distribution of HBx could be essential to the multiple roles of the protein at different stages during HBV infection. Transactivational functions of HBx may be exerted both in the nucleus, via interaction with host DNA-binding proteins, and in the cytoplasm, via signaling pathways. Although there have been many studies describing different pathways altered by HBx, and its innumerable binding partners, the molecular mechanism that regulates its different roles has been difficult to elucidate. Methods In the current study, we took a bioinformatics approach to investigate whether the viral protein HBx might be regulated via phosphorylation by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Results We found that the phylogenetically conserved residues Ser25 and Ser41 (both within the negative regulatory domain), and Thr81 (in the transactivation domain) are predicted to be phosphorylated. By molecular 3D modeling of HBx, we further show these residues are all predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein, making them easily accesible to these types of modifications. Furthermore, we have also identified Yin Yang sites that might have the potential to be phosphorylated and O-β-GlcNAc interplay at the same residues. Conclusions Thus, we propose that the different roles of HBx displayed in different subcellular locations might be regulated by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranslational modification, via phosphorylation. PMID:23079056

  11. Scaffolding function of the Chlamydomonas procentriole protein CRC70, a member of the conserved Cep70 family.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kamiya, Ritsu; Hirono, Masafumi

    2011-09-01

    Centriole duplication occurs once per cell cycle through the assembly of daughter centrioles on the side wall of pre-existing centrioles. Little is known about the molecules involved in the assembly of new centrioles. Here, we identify CRC70 as a Chlamydomonas protein with an important role in the accumulation of centriole proteins at the site of assembly. CRC70 contains a highly conserved ~50-amino-acid sequence shared by mammalian Cep70 and preferentially localizes to immature centrioles (the procentrioles). This localization is maintained in the mutant bld10, in which centriole formation is blocked before the assembly of centriolar microtubules. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of CRC70 produces flagella-less cells and inhibits the recruitment of other centriole components, such as SAS-6 and Bld10p to the centriole. Overexpression of CRC70 induces an accumulation of these proteins in discrete spots in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of EGFP-tagged CRC70 in mouse NIH3T3 cells causes the formation of structures apparently related to centrioles. These findings suggest that CRC70 is a member of a conserved protein family and functions as a scaffold for the assembly of the centriole precursor.

  12. BAR-SH3 sorting nexins are conserved interacting proteins of Nervous wreck that organize synapses and promote neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Ukken, Fiona P; Bruckner, Joseph J; Weir, Kurt L; Hope, Sarah J; Sison, Samantha L; Birschbach, Ryan M; Hicks, Lawrence; Taylor, Kendra L; Dent, Erik W; Gonsalvez, Graydon B; O'Connor-Giles, Kate M

    2016-01-01

    Nervous wreck (Nwk) is a conserved F-BAR protein that attenuates synaptic growth and promotes synaptic function in Drosophila. In an effort to understand how Nwk carries out its dual roles, we isolated interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. We report a conserved interaction between Nwk proteins and BAR-SH3 sorting nexins, a family of membrane-binding proteins implicated in diverse intracellular trafficking processes. In mammalian cells, BAR-SH3 sorting nexins induce plasma membrane tubules that localize NWK2, consistent with a possible functional interaction during the early stages of endocytic trafficking. To study the role of BAR-SH3 sorting nexins in vivo, we took advantage of the lack of genetic redundancy in Drosophila and employed CRISPR-based genome engineering to generate null and endogenously tagged alleles of SH3PX1. SH3PX1 localizes to neuromuscular junctions where it regulates synaptic ultrastructure, but not synapse number. Consistently, neurotransmitter release was significantly diminished in SH3PX1 mutants. Double-mutant and tissue-specific-rescue experiments indicate that SH3PX1 promotes neurotransmitter release presynaptically, at least in part through functional interactions with Nwk, and might act to distinguish the roles of Nwk in regulating synaptic growth and function.

  13. BAR-SH3 sorting nexins are conserved interacting proteins of Nervous wreck that organize synapses and promote neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Ukken, Fiona P.; Bruckner, Joseph J.; Weir, Kurt L.; Hope, Sarah J.; Sison, Samantha L.; Birschbach, Ryan M.; Hicks, Lawrence; Taylor, Kendra L.; Dent, Erik W.; Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; O'Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nervous wreck (Nwk) is a conserved F-BAR protein that attenuates synaptic growth and promotes synaptic function in Drosophila. In an effort to understand how Nwk carries out its dual roles, we isolated interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. We report a conserved interaction between Nwk proteins and BAR-SH3 sorting nexins, a family of membrane-binding proteins implicated in diverse intracellular trafficking processes. In mammalian cells, BAR-SH3 sorting nexins induce plasma membrane tubules that localize NWK2, consistent with a possible functional interaction during the early stages of endocytic trafficking. To study the role of BAR-SH3 sorting nexins in vivo, we took advantage of the lack of genetic redundancy in Drosophila and employed CRISPR-based genome engineering to generate null and endogenously tagged alleles of SH3PX1. SH3PX1 localizes to neuromuscular junctions where it regulates synaptic ultrastructure, but not synapse number. Consistently, neurotransmitter release was significantly diminished in SH3PX1 mutants. Double-mutant and tissue-specific-rescue experiments indicate that SH3PX1 promotes neurotransmitter release presynaptically, at least in part through functional interactions with Nwk, and might act to distinguish the roles of Nwk in regulating synaptic growth and function. PMID:26567222

  14. Tight junction protein Par6 interacts with an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1/stardust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hurd, Toby W; Margolis, Ben

    2004-07-16

    Tight junctions are the structures in mammalian epithelial cells that separate the apical and basolateral membranes and may also be important in the establishment of cell polarity. Two evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complexes, Crumbs-PALS1 (Stardust)-PATJ and Cdc42-Par6-Par3-atypical protein kinase C, have been implicated in the assembly of tight junctions and in polarization of Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. These two complexes have been linked physically and functionally by an interaction between PALS1 and Par6. Here we identify an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1 as the Par6 binding site and identify valine and aspartic acid residues in this region as essential for interacting with the PDZ domain of Par6. We have also characterized, in more detail, the amino terminus of Drosophila Stardust and demonstrate that the interaction mechanism between Stardust and Drosophila Par6 is evolutionarily conserved. Par6 interferes with PATJ in binding PALS1, and these two interactions do not appear to function synergistically. Taken together, these results define the molecular mechanisms linking two conserved polarity complexes.

  15. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  16. Mutational studies on resurrected ancestral proteins reveal conservation of site-specific amino acid preferences throughout evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Local protein interactions ("molecular context" effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations.

  17. Mutational studies on resurrected ancestral proteins reveal conservation of site-specific amino acid preferences throughout evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Local protein interactions ("molecular context" effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  18. A conserved Glu-Arg salt bridge connects coevolved motifs that define the eukaryotic protein kinase fold.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Jian; Steichen, Jon M; Kornev, Alexandr P; Deal, Michael S; Li, Sheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Woods, Virgil L; Taylor, Susan S

    2012-01-27

    Eukaryotic protein kinases (EPKs) feature two coevolved structural segments, the Activation segment, which starts with the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) and ends with the Ala-Pro-Glu (APE) motifs, and the helical GHI subdomain that comprises αG-αH-αI helices. Eukaryotic-like kinases have a much shorter Activation segment and lack the GHI subdomain. They thus lack the conserved salt bridge interaction between the APE Glu and an Arg from the GHI subdomain, a hallmark signature of EPKs. Although the conservation of this salt bridge in EPKs is well known and its implication in diseases has been illustrated by polymorphism analysis, its function has not been carefully studied. In this work, we use murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) as the model enzyme (Glu208 and Arg280) to examine the role of these two residues. We showed that Ala replacement of either residue caused a 40- to 120-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency of the enzyme due to an increase in K(m)(ATP) and a decrease in k(cat). Crystal structures, as well as solution studies, also demonstrate that this ion pair contributes to the hydrophobic network and stability of the enzyme. We show that mutation of either Glu or Arg to Ala renders both mutant proteins less effective substrates for upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1. We propose that the Glu208-Arg280 pair serves as a center hub of connectivity between these two structurally conserved elements in EPKs. Mutations of either residue disrupt communication not only between the two segments but also within the rest of the molecule, leading to altered catalytic activity and enzyme regulation.

  19. Structural determinants of Rab and Rab Escort Protein interaction: Rab family motifs define a conserved binding surface.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Leal, José B; Strom, Molly; Godfrey, Richard F; Seabra, Miguel C

    2003-01-31

    Rab proteins are a large family of monomeric GTPases with 60 members identified in the human genome. Rab GTPases require an isoprenyl modification to their C-terminus for membrane association and function in the regulation of vesicular trafficking pathways. This reaction is catalysed by Rab geranylgeranyl transferase, which recognises as protein substrate any given Rab in a 1:1 complex with Rab Escort Protein (REP). REP is therefore able to bind many distinct Rab proteins but the molecular basis for this activity is still unclear. We recently identified conserved motifs in Rabs termed RabF motifs, which we proposed to mediate a conserved mode of interaction between Rabs and REPs. Here, we tested this hypothesis. We first used REP1 as a bait in the yeast two-hybrid system and isolated strictly full-length Rabs, suggesting that REP recognises multiple regions within and properly folded Rabs. We introduced point mutations in Rab3a as a model Rab and assessed the ability of the mutants to interact with REP using the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro prenylation assay. We identified several residues that affect REP:Rab binding in the RabF1, RabF3, and RabF4 regions (which include parts of the switch I and II regions), but not other RabF regions. These results support the hypothesis that Rabs bind REP via conserved RabF motifs and provide a molecular explanation for the preferential recognition of the GDP-bound conformation of Rab by REP. PMID:12535645

  20. The highly conserved orthopoxvirus 68k ankyrin-like protein is part of a cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Karin M; Schwantes, Astrid; Schnierle, Barbara S; Sutter, Gerd

    2008-05-10

    The 68k ankyrin-like protein (68k-ank) of unknown function is highly conserved among orthopoxviruses and contains ankyrin repeats and an F-box-like domain. We performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with 68k-ank to find interacting proteins. From a human and a murine cDNA library, 99% of the interaction partners were S-phase kinase-associated protein 1a (Skp1a), a part of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. 68k-ank co-immunoprecipitated with components of the endogenous, mammalian SCF ubiquitin ligase. This interaction was F-box domain dependent and could also be observed in infected cells, indicating that SCF complex formation might be important for the viral life cycle.

  1. Immune evasion activities of accessory proteins Vpu, Nef and Vif are conserved in acute and chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Mlcochova, Petra; Apolonia, Luis; Kluge, Silvia F; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Kirchhoff, Frank; Malim, Michael H; Sauter, Daniel; Gupta, Ravindra K

    2015-08-01

    Heterosexual HIV-1 transmission has been identified as a genetic bottleneck and a single transmitted/founder (T/F) variant with reduced sensitivity to type I interferon initiates productive infection in most cases. We hypothesized that particularly active accessory protein(s) may confer T/F viruses with a selective advantage in establishing HIV infection. Thus, we tested vpu, vif and nef alleles from six T/F and six chronic (CC) viruses in assays for 9 immune evasion activities involving the counteraction of interferon-stimulated genes and modulation of ligands known to activate innate immune cells. All functions were highly conserved with no significant differences between T/F and CC viruses, suggesting that these accessory protein functions are important throughout the course of infection.

  2. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  3. Conservation of the WD-repeat, microtubule-binding protein, EMAP, in sea urchins, humans, and the nematode C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Suprenant, K A; Tuxhorn, J A; Daggett, M A; Ahrens, D P; Hostetler, A; Palange, J M; VanWinkle, C E; Livingston, B T

    2000-01-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP) is the most abundant microtubule-binding protein in the first cleavage mitotic apparatus in sea urchin embryos. The first goal of this study was to determine whether there is sufficient EMAP in the egg and embryo to modify microtubule dynamics during the early cleavages divisions and whether EMAP functions at a specific time or place in the embryo. To accomplish this goal, we examined the relative abundance, tissue distribution, and temporal pattern of EMAP expression during embryonic development. The second goal of this study was to identify important functional domains within the EMAP coding sequence. A conserved sequence might reveal a potential microtubule-binding domain. We cloned, sequenced and compared overlapping EMAP cDNAs from two different sea urchin species that diverged approximately 80 million years ago, and compared these with cDNA sequences from a vertebrate and nematode species. From quantitative immunoblots, we determined the EMAP concentration in eggs to be 4 microM. The steady-state levels of EMAP mRNA and protein accumulated during development, and all three germ layers expressed EMAP. During the early stages of development, EMAP and tubulin were both abundant in the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. However, during late gastrulation and the formation of the early pluteus larvae, EMAP was enriched in the mesoderm, while tubulin staining was most abundant in the archenteron. These results indicate that EMAP may have tissue-specific functions in the late stage embryo. To identify conserved functional domains, we compared the predicted amino acid sequence encoded by Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus EMAP cDNAs, and determined that these two sea urchin EMAPs were 95% conserved and shared an identical domain organization. A parsimonious analysis of these sea urchin protein sequences, as well as human and C. elegans EMAP sequences was used to construct a gene tree. Together

  4. FUS regulates genes coding for RNA-binding proteins in neurons by binding to their highly conserved introns

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Tadashi; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Maragkakis, Manolis; Chang, Alexandra; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2013-01-01

    Dominant mutations and mislocalization or aggregation of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS), an RNA-binding protein (RBP), cause neuronal degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD), two incurable neurological diseases. However, the function of FUS in neurons is not well understood. To uncover the impact of FUS in the neuronal transcriptome, we used high-throughput sequencing of immunoprecipitated and cross-linked RNA (HITS–CLIP) of FUS in human brains and mouse neurons differentiated from embryonic stem cells, coupled with RNA-seq and FUS knockdowns. We report conserved neuronal RNA targets and networks that are regulated by FUS. We find that FUS regulates splicing of genes coding for RBPs by binding to their highly conserved introns. Our findings have important implications for understanding the impact of FUS in neurodegenerative diseases and suggest that perturbations of FUS can impact the neuronal transcriptome via perturbations of RBP transcripts. PMID:23389473

  5. Highly conserved base A55 of 16S ribosomal RNA is important for the elongation cycle of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Khade, Prashant K; Joseph, Simpson

    2013-09-24

    Accurate decoding of mRNA requires the precise interaction of protein factors and tRNAs with the ribosome. X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy have provided detailed structural information about the 70S ribosome with protein factors and tRNAs trapped during translation. Crystal structures showed that one of the universally conserved 16S rRNA bases, A55, in the shoulder domain of the 30S subunit interacts with elongation factors Tu and G (EF-Tu and EF-G, respectively). The exact functional role of A55 in protein synthesis is not clear. We changed A55 to U and analyzed the effect of the mutation on the elongation cycle of protein synthesis using functional assays. Expression of 16S rRNA with the A55U mutation in cells confers a dominant lethal phenotype. Additionally, ribosomes with the A55U mutation in 16S rRNA show substantially reduced in vitro protein synthesis activity. Equilibrium binding studies showed that the A55U mutation considerably inhibited the binding of the EF-Tu·GTP·tRNA ternary complex to the ribosome. Furthermore, the A55U mutation slightly inhibited the peptidyl transferase reaction, the binding of EF-G·GTP to the ribosome, and mRNA-tRNA translocation. These results indicate that A55 is important for fine-tuning the activity of the ribosome during the elongation cycle of protein synthesis.

  6. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Plant-Interacting Fungi: Distinct Messages from Conserved Messengers[W

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Nicole, Marie-Claude; Duplessis, Sébastien; Ellis, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that function as key signal transduction components in fungi, plants, and mammals. During interaction between phytopathogenic fungi and plants, fungal MAPKs help to promote mechanical and/or enzymatic penetration of host tissues, while plant MAPKs are required for activation of plant immunity. However, new insights suggest that MAPK cascades in both organisms do not operate independently but that they mutually contribute to a highly interconnected molecular dialogue between the plant and the fungus. As a result, some pathogenesis-related processes controlled by fungal MAPKs lead to the activation of plant signaling, including the recruitment of plant MAPK cascades. Conversely, plant MAPKs promote defense mechanisms that threaten the survival of fungal cells, leading to a stress response mediated in part by fungal MAPK cascades. In this review, we make use of the genomic data available following completion of whole-genome sequencing projects to analyze the structure of MAPK protein families in 24 fungal taxa, including both plant pathogens and mycorrhizal symbionts. Based on conserved patterns of sequence diversification, we also propose the adoption of a unified fungal MAPK nomenclature derived from that established for the model species Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, we summarize current knowledge of the functions of MAPK cascades in phytopathogenic fungi and highlight the central role played by MAPK signaling during the molecular dialogue between plants and invading fungal pathogens. PMID:22517321

  7. Conserved function of the lysine-based KXD/E motif in Golgi retention for endomembrane proteins among different organisms

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Cheuk Hang; Gao, Caiji; Yu, Ping; Tu, Linna; Meng, Zhaoyue; Banfield, David K.; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Jiang, Liwen

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a new COPI-interacting KXD/E motif in the C-terminal cytosolic tail (CT) of Arabidopsis endomembrane protein 12 (AtEMP12) as being a crucial Golgi retention mechanism for AtEMP12. This KXD/E motif is conserved in CTs of all EMPs found in plants, yeast, and humans and is also present in hundreds of other membrane proteins. Here, by cloning selective EMP isoforms from plants, yeast, and mammals, we study the localizations of EMPs in different expression systems, since there are contradictory reports on the localizations of EMPs. We show that the N-terminal and C-terminal GFP-tagged EMP fusions are localized to Golgi and post-Golgi compartments, respectively, in plant, yeast, and mammalian cells. In vitro pull-down assay further proves the interaction of the KXD/E motif with COPI coatomer in yeast. COPI loss of function in yeast and plants causes mislocalization of EMPs or KXD/E motif–containing proteins to vacuole. Ultrastructural studies further show that RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of coatomer expression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological changes in the Golgi. Taken together, our results demonstrate that N-terminal GFP fusions reflect the real localization of EMPs, and KXD/E is a conserved motif in COPI interaction and Golgi retention in eukaryotes. PMID:26378254

  8. Characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein, highly conserved in metazoans, and essential for embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qiongmei; Huang, C.-H. . E-mail: chuang@nybloodcenter.org; Peng Jianbin; Hashmi, Sarwar; Ye Tianzhang; Chen Ying

    2007-04-15

    We report here the identification and characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein that contains a G-patch, a coiled-coil, and several short tryptophan-tryptophan repeats highly conserved in metazoan species. To analyze their functional role in vivo, we cloned nematode stip-1 genes and determined the spatiotemporal pattern of Caenorhabditis elegans STIP-1 protein. RNA analyses and Western blots revealed that stip-1 mRNA was produced via trans-splicing and translated as a 95-kDa protein. Using reporter constructs, we found STIP-1 to be expressed at all developmental stages and in many tissue/cell types including worm oocyte nuclei. We found that STIP-1 is targeted to the nucleus and forms large polymers with a rod-like shape when expressed in mammalian cells. Using deletion mutants, we mapped the regions of STIP-1 involved in nuclear import and polymer assembly. We further showed that knockdown of C. elegans stip-1 by RNA interference arrested development and resulted in morphologic abnormalities around the 16-cell stage followed by 100% lethality, suggesting its essential role in worm embryogenesis. Importantly, the embryonic lethal phenotype could be faithfully rescued with Drosophila and human genes via transgenic expression. Our data provide the first direct evidence that STIP have a conserved essential nuclear function across metazoans from worms to humans.

  9. Conserved Determinants for Membrane Association of Nonstructural Protein 5A from Hepatitis C Virus and Related Viruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Volker; Pal, Zsuzsanna; Sapay, Nicolas; Deléage, Gilbert; Blum, Hubert E.; Penin, François; Moradpour, Darius

    2007-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is a membrane-associated essential component of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex. An N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix mediates in-plane membrane association of HCV NS5A and at the same time is likely involved in specific protein-protein interactions required for the assembly of a functional replication complex. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants for membrane association of NS5A from the related GB viruses and pestiviruses. Although primary amino acid sequences differed considerably, putative membrane anchor domains with amphipathic features were predicted in the N-terminal domains of NS5A proteins from these viruses. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, as well as membrane flotation analyses, demonstrated that NS5As from GB virus B (GBV-B), GBV-C, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, the prototype pestivirus, display membrane association characteristics very similar to those of HCV NS5A. The N-terminal 27 to 33 amino acid residues of these NS5A proteins were sufficient for membrane association. Circular dichroism analyses confirmed the capacity of these segments to fold into alpha helices upon association with lipid-like molecules. Despite structural conservation, only very limited exchanges with sequences from related viruses were tolerated in the context of functional HCV RNA replication, suggesting virus-specific interactions of these segments. In conclusion, membrane association of NS5A by an N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix is a feature shared by HCV and related members of the family Flaviviridae. This observation points to conserved roles of the N-terminal amphipathic alpha helices of NS5A in replication complex formation. PMID:17192310

  10. Short-tailed stx phages exploit the conserved YaeT protein to disseminate Shiga toxin genes among enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren L; James, Chloë E; Sergeant, Martin J; Yaxian, Yan; Saunders, Jon R; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2007-10-01

    Infection of Escherichia coli by Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages (Stx phages) was the pivotal event in the evolution of the deadly Shiga toxin-encoding E. coli (STEC), of which serotype O157:H7 is the most notorious. The number of different bacterial species and strains reported to produce Shiga toxin is now more than 500, since the first reported STEC infection outbreak in 1982. Clearly, Stx phages are spreading rapidly, but the underlying mechanism for this dissemination has not been explained. Here we show that an essential and highly conserved gene product, YaeT, which has an essential role in the insertion of proteins in the gram-negative bacterial outer membrane, is the surface molecule recognized by the majority (ca. 70%) of Stx phages via conserved tail spike proteins associated with a short-tailed morphology. The yaeT gene was initially identified through complementation, and its role was confirmed in phage binding assays with and without anti-YaeT antiserum. Heterologous cloning of E. coli yaeT to enable Stx phage adsorption to Erwinia carotovora and the phage adsorption patterns of bacterial species possessing natural yaeT variants further supported this conclusion. The use of an essential and highly conserved protein by the majority of Stx phages is a strategy that has enabled and promoted the rapid spread of shigatoxigenic potential throughout multiple E. coli serogroups and related bacterial species. Infection of commensal bacteria in the mammalian gut has been shown to amplify Shiga toxin production in vivo, and the data from this study provide a platform for the development of a therapeutic strategy to limit this YaeT-mediated infection of the commensal flora.

  11. Evolutionary Conservation and Expression of Human RNA-Binding Proteins and Their Role in Human Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerstberger, Stefanie; Hafner, Markus; Ascano, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are effectors and regulators of posttranscriptional gene regulation (PTGR). RBPs regulate stability, maturation, and turnover of all RNAs, often binding thousands of targets at many sites. The importance of RBPs is underscored by their dysregulation or mutations causing a variety of developmental and neurological diseases. This chapter globally discusses human RBPs and provides a brief introduction to their identification and RNA targets. We review RBPs based on common structural RNA-binding domains, study their evolutionary conservation and expression, and summarize disease associations of different RBP classes. PMID:25201102

  12. Evolutionary conservation and expression of human RNA-binding proteins and their role in human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Gerstberger, Stefanie; Hafner, Markus; Ascano, Manuel; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are effectors and regulators of posttranscriptional gene regulation (PTGR). RBPs regulate stability, maturation, and turnover of all RNAs, often binding thousands of targets at many sites. The importance of RBPs is underscored by their dysregulation or mutations causing a variety of developmental and neurological diseases. This chapter globally discusses human RBPs and provides a brief introduction to their identification and RNA targets. We review RBPs based on common structural RNA-binding domains, study their evolutionary conservation and expression, and summarize disease associations of different RBP classes.

  13. NMR structure and dynamics of Q4D059, a kinetoplastid-specific and conserved protein from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pons, Tirso; Pires, José R

    2015-04-01

    Q4D059 (UniProt accession number), is an 86-residue protein from Trypanosoma cruzi, conserved in the related kinetoplastid parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major. These pathogens are the causal agents of the neglected diseases: Chagas, sleeping sickness and leishmaniases respectively and had recently their genomes sequenced. Q4D059 shows low sequence similarity with mammal proteins and because of its essentiality demonstrated in T. brucei, it is a potential target for anti-parasitic drugs. The 11 hypothetical proteins homologous to Q4D059 are all uncharacterized proteins of unknown function. Here, the solution structure of Q4D059 was solved by NMR and its backbone dynamics was characterized by (15)N relaxation parameters. The structure is composed by a parallel/anti-parallel three-stranded β-sheet packed against four helical regions. The structure is well defined by ca. 9 NOEs per residue and a backbone rmsd of 0.50±0.05 Å for the representative ensemble of 20 lowest-energy structures. The structure is overall rigid except for N-terminal residues A(9) to D(11) at the beginning of β1, K(38), V(39) at the end of helix H3 with rapid motion in the ps-ns timescale and G(25) (helix H2), I(68) (β2) and V(78) (loop 3) undergoing internal motion in the μs-ms timescale. Limited structural similarities were found in protein structures deposited in the PDB, therefore functional inferences based on protein structure information are not clear. Q4D059 adopts a α/β fold that is slightly similar to the ATPase sub-domain IIB of the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and to the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L11. PMID:25748338

  14. A conserved domain of previously unknown function in Gap1 mediates protein-protein interaction and is required for biogenesis of a serine-rich streptococcal adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yirong; Chen, Yabing; Huang, Xiang; Zhou, Meixian; Wu, Ren; Dong, Shengli; Pritchard, David G.; Fives-Taylor, Paula; Wu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Summary Fap1-like serine-rich proteins are a new family of bacterial adhesins found in a variety of streptococci and staphylococci that have been implicated in bacterial pathogenesis. A gene cluster encoding glycosyltransferases and accessory Sec components is required for Fap1 glycosylation and biogenesis in Streptococcus parasanguinis. Here we report that the glycosylation-associated protein, Gap1, contributes to glycosylation and biogenesis of Fap1 by interacting with another glycosylation-associated protein, Gap3. Gap1 shares structural homology with glycosyltransferases. The gap1 mutant, like the gap3 mutant, produced an aberrantly-glycosylated Fap1 precursor and failed to produce mature Fap1, suggesting that Gap1 and Gap3 might function in concert in the Fap1 glycosylation and biogenesis. Indeed, Gap1 interacted with Gap3 in vitro and in vivo. A Gap1 amino-terminal motif, within a highly conserved domain of unknown function (DUF1975) identified in many bacterial glycosyltrasnferases, was required for the Gap1-Gap3 interaction. Deletion of one, four, and nine amino acids within the conserved motif gradually inhibited the Gap1-Gap3 interaction and diminished production of mature Fap1 and concurrently increased production of the Fap1 precursor. Consequently, bacterial adhesion to an in vitro tooth model was also reduced. These data demonstrate that the Gap1-Gap3 interaction is required for Fap1 biogenesis and Fap1-dependent bacterial adhesion. PMID:18826412

  15. Subdominant outer membrane antigens in anaplasma marginale: conservation, antigenicity, and protective capacity using recombinant protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a well- defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are seve...

  16. A predicted protein interactome identifies conserved global networks and disease resistance subnetworks in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An interactome is the genome-wide roadmap of protein-protein interactions that occur within an organism. Interactomes for humans, the fruit fly, and now plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa have been generated using high throughput experimental methods. It is possible to use these ...

  17. The conserved amino-terminal domain of hSRP1 alpha is essential for nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Ryder, U; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear proteins are targeted through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in an energy-dependent reaction. The import reaction is mediated by nuclear localization sequences (NLS) in the substrate which are recognized by heterodimeric cytoplasmic receptors. hSRP1 alpha is an NLS-binding subunit of the human NLS receptor complex and is complexed in vivo with a second subunit of 97 kDa (p97). We show here that a short amino-terminal domain in hSRP1 alpha is necessary and sufficient for its interaction with p97. This domain is conserved in other SRP1-like proteins and its fusion to a cytoplasmic reporter protein is sufficient to promote complete nuclear import, circumventing the usual requirement for an NLS receptor interaction. The same amino-terminal domain inhibits import of NLS-containing proteins when added to an in vitro nuclear transport assay. While full-length hSRP alpha is able to leave the nucleus, the amino-terminal domain alone is not sufficient to promote exit. We conclude that hSRP1 alpha functions as an adaptor to tether NLS-containing substrates to the protein import machinery. Images PMID:8617227

  18. From Arabidopsis to cereal crops: Conservation of chloroplast protein degradation by autophagy indicates its fundamental role in plant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Masanori; Hidema, Jun; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process leading to the degradation of intracellular components in eukaryotes, which is important for nutrient recycling especially in response to starvation conditions. Nutrient recycling is an essential process that underpins productivity in crop plants, such that remobilized nitrogen derived from older organs supports the formation of new organs or grain-filling within a plant. We extended our understanding of autophagy in a model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, to an important cereal, rice (Oryza sativa). Through analysis of transgenic rice plants stably expressing fluorescent marker proteins for autophagy or chloroplast stroma, we revealed that chloroplast proteins are partially degraded in the vacuole via Rubisco-containing bodies (RCBs), a type of autophagosomes containing stroma. We further reported evidence that the RCB pathway functions during natural leaf senescence to facilitate subsequent nitrogen remobilization into newly expanding leaves. Thus, our recent studies establish the importance of autophagy in biomass production of cereals. PMID:26440746

  19. Potential Conservation of Circadian Clock Proteins in the phylum Nematoda as Revealed by Bioinformatic Searches

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Andrés; Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Goya, María Eugenia; Ghiringhelli, Pablo Daniel; Golombek, Diego Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Although several circadian rhythms have been described in C. elegans, its molecular clock remains elusive. In this work we employed a novel bioinformatic approach, applying probabilistic methodologies, to search for circadian clock proteins of several of the best studied circadian model organisms of different taxa (Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Synechoccocus elongatus) in the proteomes of C. elegans and other members of the phylum Nematoda. With this approach we found that the Nematoda contain proteins most related to the core and accessory proteins of the insect and mammalian clocks, which provide new insights into the nematode clock and the evolution of the circadian system. PMID:25396739

  20. Potential conservation of circadian clock proteins in the phylum Nematoda as revealed by bioinformatic searches.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Andrés; Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Goya, María Eugenia; Ghiringhelli, Pablo Daniel; Golombek, Diego Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Although several circadian rhythms have been described in C. elegans, its molecular clock remains elusive. In this work we employed a novel bioinformatic approach, applying probabilistic methodologies, to search for circadian clock proteins of several of the best studied circadian model organisms of different taxa (Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Synechoccocus elongatus) in the proteomes of C. elegans and other members of the phylum Nematoda. With this approach we found that the Nematoda contain proteins most related to the core and accessory proteins of the insect and mammalian clocks, which provide new insights into the nematode clock and the evolution of the circadian system.

  1. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  2. Essential role of conserved DUF177A protein in plastid 23S rRNA accumulation and plant embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiani; Suzuki, Masaharu; McCarty, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    DUF177 proteins are nearly universally conserved in bacteria and plants except the Chlorophyceae algae. Thus far, duf177 mutants in bacteria have not established a function. In contrast, duf177a mutants have embryo lethal phenotypes in maize and Arabidopsis. In maize inbred W22, duf177a mutant embryos arrest at an early transition stage, whereas the block is suppressed in the B73 inbred background, conditioning an albino seedling phenotype. Background-dependent embryo lethal phenotypes are characteristic of maize plastid gene expression mutants. Consistent with the plastid gene expression hypothesis, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a significant reduction of 23S rRNA in an Escherichia coli duf177 knockout. Plastid 23S rRNA contents of duf177a mutant tissues were also markedly reduced compared with the wild-type, whereas plastid 16S, 5S, and 4.5S rRNA contents were less affected, indicating that DUF177 is specifically required for accumulation of prokaryote-type 23S rRNA. An AtDUF177A–green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene controlled by the native AtDUF177A promoter fully complemented the Arabidopsis atduf177a mutant. Transient expression of AtDUF177A–GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that the protein was localized in chloroplasts. The essential role of DUF177A in chloroplast–ribosome formation is reminiscent of IOJAP, another highly conserved ribosome-associated protein, suggesting that key mechanisms controlling ribosome formation in plastids evolved from non-essential pathways for regulation of the prokaryotic ribosome. PMID:27574185

  3. Interchangeability of Themis1 and Themis2 in thymocyte development reveals two related proteins with conserved molecular function

    PubMed Central

    Lesourne, Renaud; Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Song, Ki-Duk; El-Khoury, Dalal; Uehara, Shoji; Barr, Valarie A.; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Love, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Themis1, a recently identified T cell protein, has a critical function in the generation of mature CD4+CD8− and CD4−CD8+ (CD4- and CD8- single positive; SP) thymocytes and T cells. Although Themis1 has been shown to bind to the adapter proteins LAT and Grb2, previous studies have yielded conflicting results regarding whether or not thymocytes from Themis−/− mice exhibit TCR-mediated signaling defects. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of Themis1, TCR-mediated signaling is selectively impaired in CD4 SP and CD8 SP thymocytes but is not affected in CD4+CD8+ Double Positive (DP) thymocytes despite high expression of Themis1 in DP thymocytes. Like Themis1, Themis2, a related member of the Themis family, which is expressed in B cells and macrophages, contains two conserved cysteine-based domains, a proline rich region (PRR) and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). To determine if Themis1 and Themis2 can perform similar functions in vivo, we analyzed T cell development and TCR-mediated signaling in Themis1−/− mice reconstituted with either Themis1 or Themis2 transgenes. Notably, Themis1 and Themis2 exhibited the same potential to restore T cell development and TCR-mediated signaling in Themis1−/− mice. Both proteins were tyrosine phosphorylated and were recruited within Grb2 signaling complexes to LAT following TCR engagement. These results suggest that conserved molecular features of the Themis1 and Themis2 proteins are important for their biological activity and predict that Themis1 and Themis2 may perform similar functions in T and B cells, respectively. PMID:22732588

  4. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting inmore » a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.« less

  5. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting in a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.

  6. Conserved proline-directed phosphorylation regulates SR protein conformation and splicing function.

    PubMed

    Keshwani, Malik M; Aubol, Brandon E; Fattet, Laurent; Ma, Chen-Ting; Qiu, Jinsong; Jennings, Patricia A; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A

    2015-03-01

    The alternative splicing of human genes is dependent on SR proteins, a family of essential splicing factors whose name derives from a signature C-terminal domain rich in arginine-serine dipeptide repeats (RS domains). Although the SRPKs (SR-specific protein kinases) phosphorylate these repeats, RS domains also contain prolines with flanking serines that are phosphorylated by a second family of protein kinases known as the CLKs (Cdc2-like kinases). The role of specific serine-proline phosphorylation within the RS domain has been difficult to assign since CLKs also phosphorylate arginine-serine dipeptides and, thus, display overlapping residue specificities with the SRPKs. In the present study, we address the effects of discrete serine-proline phosphorylation on the conformation and cellular function of the SR protein SRSF1 (SR protein splicing factor 1). Using chemical tagging and dephosphorylation experiments, we show that modification of serine-proline dipeptides broadly amplifies the conformational ensemble of SRSF1. The induction of these new structural forms triggers SRSF1 mobilization in the nucleus and alters its binding mechanism to an exonic splicing enhancer in precursor mRNA. These physical events correlate with changes in the alternative splicing of over 100 human genes based on a global splicing assay. Overall, these studies draw a direct causal relationship between a specific type of chemical modification in an SR protein and the regulation of alternative gene splicing programmes.

  7. Ice-binding site of snow mold fungus antifreeze protein deviates from structural regularity and high conservation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hidemasa; Hanada, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Garnham, Christopher P; Davies, Peter L; Tsuda, Sakae

    2012-06-12

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in organisms ranging from fish to bacteria, where they serve different functions to facilitate survival of their host. AFPs that protect freeze-intolerant fish and insects from internal ice growth bind to ice using a regular array of well-conserved residues/motifs. Less is known about the role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species, which might be to beneficially alter the structure of ice in or around the host. Here we report the 0.95-Å high-resolution crystal structure of a 223-residue secreted AFP from the snow mold fungus Typhula ishikariensis. Its main structural element is an irregular β-helix with six loops of 18 or more residues that lies alongside an α-helix. β-Helices have independently evolved as AFPs on several occasions and seem ideally structured to bind to several planes of ice, including the basal plane. A novelty of the β-helical fold is the nonsequential arrangement of loops that places the N- and C termini inside the solenoid of β-helical coils. The ice-binding site (IBS), which could not be predicted from sequence or structure, was located by site-directed mutagenesis to the flattest surface of the protein. It is remarkable for its lack of regularity and its poor conservation in homologs from psychrophilic diatoms and bacteria and other fungi.

  8. Ice-binding site of snow mold fungus antifreeze protein deviates from structural regularity and high conservation

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hidemasa; Hanada, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Garnham, Christopher P.; Davies, Peter L.; Tsuda, Sakae

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in organisms ranging from fish to bacteria, where they serve different functions to facilitate survival of their host. AFPs that protect freeze-intolerant fish and insects from internal ice growth bind to ice using a regular array of well-conserved residues/motifs. Less is known about the role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species, which might be to beneficially alter the structure of ice in or around the host. Here we report the 0.95-Å high-resolution crystal structure of a 223-residue secreted AFP from the snow mold fungus Typhula ishikariensis. Its main structural element is an irregular β-helix with six loops of 18 or more residues that lies alongside an α-helix. β-Helices have independently evolved as AFPs on several occasions and seem ideally structured to bind to several planes of ice, including the basal plane. A novelty of the β-helical fold is the nonsequential arrangement of loops that places the N- and C termini inside the solenoid of β-helical coils. The ice-binding site (IBS), which could not be predicted from sequence or structure, was located by site-directed mutagenesis to the flattest surface of the protein. It is remarkable for its lack of regularity and its poor conservation in homologs from psychrophilic diatoms and bacteria and other fungi. PMID:22645341

  9. The Conserved VPS-50 Protein Functions in Dense-Core Vesicle Maturation and Acidification and Controls Animal Behavior.

    PubMed

    Paquin, Nicolas; Murata, Yasunobu; Froehlich, Allan; Omura, Daniel T; Ailion, Michael; Pender, Corinne L; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Horvitz, H Robert

    2016-04-01

    The modification of behavior in response to experience is crucial for animals to adapt to environmental changes. Although factors such as neuropeptides and hormones are known to function in the switch between alternative behavioral states, the mechanisms by which these factors transduce, store, retrieve, and integrate environmental signals to regulate behavior are poorly understood. The rate of locomotion of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans depends on both current and past food availability. Specifically, C. elegans slows its locomotion when it encounters food, and animals in a food-deprived state slow even more than animals in a well-fed state. The slowing responses of well-fed and food-deprived animals in the presence of food represent distinct behavioral states, as they are controlled by different sets of genes, neurotransmitters, and neurons. Here we describe an evolutionarily conserved C. elegans protein, VPS-50, that is required for animals to assume the well-fed behavioral state. Both VPS-50 and its murine homolog mVPS50 are expressed in neurons, are associated with synaptic and dense-core vesicles, and control vesicle acidification and hence synaptic function, likely through regulation of the assembly of the V-ATPase complex. We propose that dense-core vesicle acidification controlled by the evolutionarily conserved protein VPS-50/mVPS50 affects behavioral state by modulating neuropeptide levels and presynaptic neuronal function in both C. elegans and mammals. PMID:26948874

  10. Genetic and functional interaction of evolutionarily conserved regions of the Prp18 protein and the U5 snRNA.

    PubMed

    Bacíková, Dagmar; Horowitz, David S

    2005-03-01

    Both the Prp18 protein and the U5 snRNA function in the second step of pre-mRNA splicing. We identified suppressors of mutant prp18 alleles in the gene for the U5 snRNA (SNR7). The suppressors' U5 snRNAs have either a U4-to-A or an A8-to-C mutation in the evolutionarily invariant loop 1 of U5. Suppression is specific for prp18 alleles that encode proteins with mutations in a highly conserved region of Prp18 which forms an unstructured loop in crystals of Prp18. The snr7 suppressors partly restored the pre-mRNA splicing activity that was lost in the prp18 mutants. The close functional relationship of Prp18 and U5 is emphasized by the finding that two snr7 alleles, U5A and U6A, are dominant synthetic lethal with prp18 alleles. Our results support the idea that Prp18 and the U5 snRNA act in concert during the second step of pre-mRNA splicing and suggest a model in which the conserved loop of Prp18 acts to stabilize the interaction of loop 1 of the U5 snRNA with the splicing intermediates.

  11. Conservation and innovation in Tetrahymena membrane traffic: proteins, lipids, and compartments.

    PubMed

    Nusblat, Alejandro D; Bright, Lydia J; Turkewitz, Aaron P

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has seen a significant expansion in our understanding of membrane traffic in Tetrahymena thermophila, facilitated by the development of new experimental tools and by the availability of the macronuclear genome sequence. Here we review studies on multiple pathways of uptake and secretion, as well as work on metabolism of membrane lipids. We discuss evidence for conservation versus innovation in the mechanisms used in ciliates compared with those in other eukaryotic lineages, and raise the possibility that existing gene expression databases can be exploited to analyze specific pathways of membrane traffic in these cells.

  12. Conserved Residues in the UL24 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Are Important for Dispersal of the Nucleolar Protein Nucleolin ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Luc; Leiva-Torres, Gabriel André; Hyjazie, Huda; Pearson, Angela

    2010-01-01

    The UL24 family of proteins is widely conserved among herpesviruses. We demonstrated previously that UL24 of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is important for the dispersal of nucleolin from nucleolar foci throughout the nuclei of infected cells. Furthermore, the N-terminal portion of UL24 localizes to nuclei and can disperse nucleolin in the absence of any other viral proteins. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that highly conserved residues in UL24 are important for the ability of the protein to modify the nuclear distribution of nucleolin. We constructed a panel of substitution mutations in UL24 and tested their effects on nucleolin staining patterns. We found that modified UL24 proteins exhibited a range of subcellular distributions. Mutations associated with a wild-type localization pattern for UL24 correlated with high levels of nucleolin dispersal. Interestingly, mutations targeting two regions, namely, within the first homology domain and overlapping or near the previously identified PD-(D/E)XK endonuclease motif, caused the most altered UL24 localization pattern and the most drastic reduction in its ability to disperse nucleolin. Viral mutants corresponding to the substitutions G121A and E99A/K101A both exhibited a syncytial plaque phenotype at 39°C. vUL24-E99A/K101A replicated to lower titers than did vUL24-G121A or KOS. Furthermore, the E99A/K101A mutation caused the greatest impairment of HSV-1-induced dispersal of nucleolin. Our results identified residues in UL24 that are critical for the ability of UL24 to alter nucleoli and further support the notion that the endonuclease motif is important for the function of UL24 during infection. PMID:19864385

  13. Conserved Features in the Structure, Mechanism, and Biogenesis of the Inverse Autotransporter Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Stubenrauch, Christopher J.; Grinter, Rhys; Croft, Nathan P.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Strugnell, Richard A.; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell surface proteins intimin and invasin are virulence factors that share a common domain structure and bind selectively to host cell receptors in the course of bacterial pathogenesis. The β-barrel domains of intimin and invasin show significant sequence and structural similarities. Conversely, a variety of proteins with sometimes limited sequence similarity have also been annotated as “intimin-like” and “invasin” in genome datasets, while other recent work on apparently unrelated virulence-associated proteins ultimately revealed similarities to intimin and invasin. Here we characterize the sequence and structural relationships across this complex protein family. Surprisingly, intimins and invasins represent a very small minority of the sequence diversity in what has been previously the “intimin/invasin protein family”. Analysis of the assembly pathway for expression of the classic intimin, EaeA, and a characteristic example of the most prevalent members of the group, FdeC, revealed a dependence on the translocation and assembly module as a common feature for both these proteins. While the majority of the sequences in the grouping are most similar to FdeC, a further and widespread group is two-partner secretion systems that use the β-barrel domain as the delivery device for secretion of a variety of virulence factors. This comprehensive analysis supports the adoption of the “inverse autotransporter protein family” as the most accurate nomenclature for the family and, in turn, has important consequences for our overall understanding of the Type V secretion systems of bacterial pathogens. PMID:27190006

  14. NMR Structure of Conserved Eukaryotic Protein ZK652.3 from C. elegans: a Ubiquitin-like Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R. ); Chiang, Yiwen; Zheng, Deyou; Kennedy, Michael A. ); Montelione, Gaetano

    2002-09-01

    Structural proteomics aims to provide one or more representative 3D structures for every structural domain family in nature. As part of an international effort in structural proteomics, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium has targeted clusters of strongly conserved eukaryotic protein families for structural and functional analysis. On this basis, protein ZK652.3 (nesg WR41 / YOY3{_}CAEEL / Swiss-Prot P34661 / gi|17557033) from Caenorhabditis elegans was selected for structure determination. Expression of the ZK652.3 gene has been observed in a transcriptional profile of C. elegans genes, where it was one of a cluster of 89 genes whose expression levels co-varied during development1. The biochemical function of this protein is presently unknown. Sequencing of cDNA libraries shows that homologues of ZK652.3 occur widely in vertebrates and plants (Fig. 1). However, ZK652.3 homologues are conspicuously absent from the yeast and Drosophila genomes. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure of ZK652.3 determined by NMR spectroscopy and discuss structural similarities with other proteins which provide clues to potential biochemical functions.

  15. Conserved and divergent expression patterns of the proteolipid protein gene family in the amphibian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Shan, W S; Colman, D R

    1999-07-01

    The recent discovery of a proteolipid protein gene family has revealed that its members are in fact widely distributed and are not exclusively associated with myelination. To date, three different gene products, DMalpha/DM-20/PLP, DMbeta/M6a, and DMgamma/M6b, have been isolated from certain primitive fish species, mouse, and human central nervous system (CNS). We cloned Xenopus laevis orthologues of DMbeta/M6a and DMgamma/M6b and investigated the expression patterns of these gene transcripts as well as that of PLP in developing Xenopus CNS. As is the case in shark and mouse, the mRNA encoding the major myelin integral protein, PLP, is first detected at stage 42/43 in tadpoles and is exclusively found in morphologically recognizable oligodendrocytes throughout the brain, while DMbeta mRNA is solely expressed in young presumptive neurons in the gray matter. There exist two distinct DMgamma mRNAs and, in contrast to these evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, DMgamma mRNAs distribute uniquely within the ventricular zone in young tadpoles (stage 25) through maturity. Furthermore, both DMbeta and DMgamma are expressed in the developing retina, and their distributions are different from one other. In Xenopus CNS, therefore, the expression patterns of three proteolipid proteins, PLP, DMbeta, and DMgamma, are distinct from each other, implying very different roles for their protein products within the cell populations in which they are expressed. PMID:10397631

  16. A Highly Conserved Cysteine of Neuronal Calcium-sensing Proteins Controls Cooperative Binding of Ca2+ to Recoverin*

    PubMed Central

    Ranaghan, Matthew J.; Kumar, Ramasamy P.; Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Buosi, Vanessa; Kern, Dorothee; Oprian, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Recoverin, a 23-kDa Ca2+-binding protein of the neuronal calcium sensing (NCS) family, inhibits rhodopsin kinase, a Ser/Thr kinase responsible for termination of photoactivated rhodopsin in rod photoreceptor cells. Recoverin has two functional EF hands and a myristoylated N terminus. The myristoyl chain imparts cooperativity to the Ca2+-binding sites through an allosteric mechanism involving a conformational equilibrium between R and T states of the protein. Ca2+ binds preferentially to the R state; the myristoyl chain binds preferentially to the T state. In the absence of myristoylation, the R state predominates, and consequently, binding of Ca2+ to the non-myristoylated protein is not cooperative. We show here that a mutation, C39A, of a highly conserved Cys residue among NCS proteins, increases the apparent cooperativity for binding of Ca2+ to non-myristoylated recoverin. The binding data can be explained by an effect on the T/R equilibrium to favor the T state without affecting the intrinsic binding constants for the two Ca2+ sites. PMID:24189072

  17. Conserved Proline-Directed Phosphorylation Regulates SR Protein Conformation and Splicing Function

    PubMed Central

    Keshwani, Malik M.; Aubol, Brandon E.; Fattet, Laurent; Ma, Chen-Ting; Qiu, Jinsong; Jennings, Patricia A.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The alternative splicing of human genes is dependent on SR proteins, a family of essential splicing factors whose name derives from a signature C-terminal domain rich in arginine-serine dipeptide repeats (RS domains). Although the SRPKs (SR-specific protein kinases) phosphorylate these repeats, RS domains also contain prolines with flanking serines that are phosphorylated by a second family of protein kinases known as the CLKs (Cdc2-like kinases). The role of specific serine-proline phosphorylation within the RS domain has been difficult to assign since CLKs also phosphorylate arginine-serine dipeptides and, thus, display overlapping residue specificities with the SRPKs. In this study, we address the effects of discrete serine-proline phosphorylation on the conformation and cellular function of the SR protein SRSF1. Using chemical tagging and dephosphorylation experiments, we show that modification of serine-proline dipeptides broadly amplifies the conformational ensemble of SRSF1. The induction of these new structural forms triggers SRSF1 mobilization in the nucleus and alters its binding mechanism to an exonic splicing enhancer in precursor mRNA. These physical events correlate with changes in the alternative splicing of over one hundred human genes based on a global splicing assay. Overall, these studies draw a direct causal relationship between a specific type of chemical modification in an SR protein and the regulation of alternative gene splicing programs. PMID:25529026

  18. Plant and mammalian sorting signals for protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum contain a conserved epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Denecke, J; De Rycke, R; Botterman, J

    1992-01-01

    We studied protein sorting signals which are responsible for the retention of reticuloplasmins in the lumen of the plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A non-specific passenger protein, previously shown to be secreted by default, was used as a carrier for such signals. Tagging with C-terminal tetrapeptide sequences of mammalian (KDEL) and yeast (HDEL) reticuloplasmins led to effective accumulation of the protein chimeras in the lumen of the plant ER. Some single amino acid substitutions within the tetrapeptide tag (-SDEL, -KDDL, -KDEI and -KDEV) can cause a complete loss of its function as a retention signal, demonstrating the high specificity of the retention machinery. However, other modifications confer efficient (-RDEL) or partial (-KEEL) retention. It is also shown that the efficiency of protein retention is not significantly impaired by an increased ligand concentration in plants. The efficiently retained chimeras (-KDEL, -HDEL and -RDEL) were shown to be recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus of the mammalian reticuloplasmin protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). The recognized epitope is also present in several putative reticuloplasmins in microsomal fractions of plant and mammalian cells, suggesting that the antibodies recognize an important structural determinant of the retention signal. In addition, data are discussed which support the view that upstream sequences beyond the C-terminal tetrapeptide can influence or may be part of the structure of reticuloplasmin retention signals. Images PMID:1376250

  19. Evolutionarily conserved intercalated disc protein Tmem65 regulates cardiac conduction and connexin 43 function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parveen; Abbasi, Cynthia; Lazic, Savo; Teng, Allen C T; Wang, Dingyan; Dubois, Nicole; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Wong, Victoria; Liu, Jun; Araki, Toshiyuki; Tiburcy, Malte; Ackerley, Cameron; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Hamilton, Robert; Sun, Yu; Liu, Peter P; Keller, Gordon; Stagljar, Igor; Scott, Ian C; Kislinger, Thomas; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial to heart function and development. Here we combine cationic silica-bead coating with shotgun proteomics to enrich for and identify plasma membrane-associated proteins from primary mouse neonatal and human fetal ventricular cardiomyocytes. We identify Tmem65 as a cardiac-enriched, intercalated disc protein that increases during development in both mouse and human hearts. Functional analysis of Tmem65 both in vitro using lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown in mouse cardiomyocytes and in vivo using morpholino-based knockdown in zebrafish show marked alterations in gap junction function and cardiac morphology. Molecular analyses suggest that Tmem65 interaction with connexin 43 (Cx43) is required for correct localization of Cx43 to the intercalated disc, since Tmem65 deletion results in marked internalization of Cx43, a shorter half-life through increased degradation, and loss of Cx43 function. Our data demonstrate that the membrane protein Tmem65 is an intercalated disc protein that interacts with and functionally regulates ventricular Cx43.

  20. Human metapneumovirus G protein is highly conserved within but not between genetic lineages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chin-Fen; Wang, Chiaoyin K.; Tollefson, Sharon J.; Lintao, Linda D.; Liem, Alexis; Chu, Marla; Williams, John V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is an important cause of acute respiratory illnesses in children. HMPV encodes two major surface glycoproteins, fusion (F) and glycoprotein (G). The function of G has not been fully established, though it is dispensable for in vitro and in vivo replication. Methods We analyzed 87 full-length HMPV G sequences from isolates collected over 20 years. Results The G sequences fell into four subgroups with a mean 63% amino acid identity (minimum 29%). The length of G varied from 217 to 241 residues. Structural features such as proline content and N- and O-glycosylation sites were present in all strains but quite variable between subgroups. There was minimal drift within the subgroups over 20 years. The estimated time to the most recent common ancestor was 215 years. Conclusions HMPV G was conserved within lineages over 20 years, suggesting functional constraints on diversity. However, G was poorly conserved between subgroups, pointing to potentially distinct roles for G among different viral lineages. PMID:23385328

  1. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, R L; Mackenzie, J M

    2015-07-01

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNVKUN) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNVKUN replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNVKUN replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication.

  2. Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis: a protein fold conserved in several pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; López-Díaz, Jazmin A; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria produce different insecticidal proteins known as Cry and Cyt toxins. Among them the Cyt toxins represent a special and interesting group of proteins. Cyt toxins are able to affect insect midgut cells but also are able to increase the insecticidal damage of certain Cry toxins. Furthermore, the Cyt toxins are able to overcome resistance to Cry toxins in mosquitoes. There is an increasing potential for the use of Cyt toxins in insect control. However, we still need to learn more about its mechanism of action in order to define it at the molecular level. In this review we summarize important aspects of Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, including current knowledge of their mechanism of action against mosquitoes and also we will present a primary sequence and structural comparison with related proteins found in other pathogenic bacteria and fungus that may indicate that Cyt toxins have been selected by several pathogenic organisms to exert their virulence phenotypes.

  3. The many blades of the β-propeller proteins: conserved but versatile.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cammy K-M; Chan, Nei-Li; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2011-10-01

    The β-propeller is a highly symmetrical structure with 4-10 repeats of a four-stranded antiparallel β-sheet motif. Although β-propeller proteins with different blade numbers all adopt disc-like shapes, they are involved in a diverse set of functions, and defects in this family of proteins have been associated with human diseases. However, it has remained ambiguous how variations in blade number could alter the function of β-propellers. In addition to the regularly arranged β-propeller topology, a recently discovered β-pinwheel propeller has been found. Here, we review the structural and functional diversity of β-propeller proteins, including β-pinwheels, as well as recent advances in the typical and atypical propeller structures.

  4. Evolutionarily Conserved Pattern of Interactions in a Protein Revealed by Local Thermal Expansion Properties.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Mariano; Caro, Jose A; Roche, Julien; Fossat, Martin; Barthe, Philippe; García-Moreno E, Bertrand; Royer, Catherine A; Roumestand, Christian

    2015-07-29

    The way in which the network of intramolecular interactions determines the cooperative folding and conformational dynamics of a protein remains poorly understood. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to examine this problem because it combines the site-specific resolution of the NMR experiments with the local character of pressure perturbations. Here we report on the temperature dependence of the site-specific volumetric properties of various forms of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), including three variants with engineered internal cavities, as measured with high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The strong temperature dependence of pressure-induced unfolding arises from poorly understood differences in thermal expansion between the folded and unfolded states. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the global thermal expansion of the folded proteins and the number of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined by the temperature coefficient of the backbone amide chemical shifts. Comparison of the identity of these strong H-bonds with the co-evolution of pairs of residues in the SNase protein family suggests that the architecture of the interactions detected in the NMR experiments could be linked to a functional aspect of the protein. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the residue-specific volume changes of unfolding yielded residue-specific differences in expansivity and revealed how mutations impact intramolecular interaction patterns. These results show that intramolecular interactions in the folded states of proteins impose constraints against thermal expansion and that, hence, knowledge of site-specific thermal expansivity offers insight into the patterns of strong intramolecular interactions and other local determinants of protein stability, cooperativity, and potentially also of function.

  5. A conserved quality-control pathway that mediates degradation of unassembled ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Porras-Yakushi, Tanya R; Reitsma, Justin M; Huber, Ferdinand M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hoelz, André; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Overproduced yeast ribosomal protein (RP) Rpl26 fails to assemble into ribosomes and is degraded in the nucleus/nucleolus by a ubiquitin-proteasome system quality control pathway comprising the E2 enzymes Ubc4/Ubc5 and the ubiquitin ligase Tom1. tom1 cells show reduced ubiquitination of multiple RPs, exceptional accumulation of detergent-insoluble proteins including multiple RPs, and hypersensitivity to imbalances in production of RPs and rRNA, indicative of a profound perturbation to proteostasis. Tom1 directly ubiquitinates unassembled RPs primarily via residues that are concealed in mature ribosomes. Together, these data point to an important role for Tom1 in normal physiology and prompt us to refer to this pathway as ERISQ, for excess ribosomal protein quality control. A similar pathway, mediated by the Tom1 homolog Huwe1, restricts accumulation of overexpressed hRpl26 in human cells. We propose that ERISQ is a key element of the quality control machinery that sustains protein homeostasis and cellular fitness in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19105.001 PMID:27552055

  6. A conserved quality-control pathway that mediates degradation of unassembled ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Porras-Yakushi, Tanya R; Reitsma, Justin M; Huber, Ferdinand M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hoelz, André; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Overproduced yeast ribosomal protein (RP) Rpl26 fails to assemble into ribosomes and is degraded in the nucleus/nucleolus by a ubiquitin-proteasome system quality control pathway comprising the E2 enzymes Ubc4/Ubc5 and the ubiquitin ligase Tom1. tom1 cells show reduced ubiquitination of multiple RPs, exceptional accumulation of detergent-insoluble proteins including multiple RPs, and hypersensitivity to imbalances in production of RPs and rRNA, indicative of a profound perturbation to proteostasis. Tom1 directly ubiquitinates unassembled RPs primarily via residues that are concealed in mature ribosomes. Together, these data point to an important role for Tom1 in normal physiology and prompt us to refer to this pathway as ERISQ, for excess ribosomal protein quality control. A similar pathway, mediated by the Tom1 homolog Huwe1, restricts accumulation of overexpressed hRpl26 in human cells. We propose that ERISQ is a key element of the quality control machinery that sustains protein homeostasis and cellular fitness in eukaryotes. PMID:27552055

  7. Conserved differences in protein sequence determine the human pathogenicity of Ebolaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Morena; Juliá, Miguel; Howard, Mark J.; Rossman, Jeremy S.; Michaelis, Martin; Wass, Mark N.

    2016-01-01

    Reston viruses are the only Ebolaviruses that are not pathogenic in humans. We analyzed 196 Ebolavirus genomes and identified specificity determining positions (SDPs) in all nine Ebolavirus proteins that distinguish Reston viruses from the four human pathogenic Ebolaviruses. A subset of these SDPs will explain the differences in human pathogenicity between Reston and the other four ebolavirus species. Structural analysis was performed to identify those SDPs that are likely to have a functional effect. This analysis revealed novel functional insights in particular for Ebolavirus proteins VP40 and VP24. The VP40 SDP P85T interferes with VP40 function by altering octamer formation. The VP40 SDP Q245P affects the structure and hydrophobic core of the protein and consequently protein function. Three VP24 SDPs (T131S, M136L, Q139R) are likely to impair VP24 binding to human karyopherin alpha5 (KPNA5) and therefore inhibition of interferon signaling. Since VP24 is critical for Ebolavirus adaptation to novel hosts, and only a few SDPs distinguish Reston virus VP24 from VP24 of other Ebolaviruses, human pathogenic Reston viruses may emerge. This is of concern since Reston viruses circulate in domestic pigs and can infect humans, possibly via airborne transmission. PMID:27009368

  8. Characterization of the conserved interaction between GATA and FOG family proteins.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Kasper; Liew, Chu Kong; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-09-20

    The N-terminal zinc finger (ZnF) from GATA transcription factors mediates interactions with FOG family proteins. In FOG proteins, the interacting domains are also ZnFs; these domains are related to classical CCHH fingers but have an His --> Cys substitution at the final zinc-ligating position. Here we demonstrate that different CCHC fingers in the FOG family protein U-shaped contact the N-terminal ZnF of GATA-1 in the same fashion although with different affinities. We also show that these interactions are of moderate affinity, which is interesting given the presumed low concentrations of these proteins in the nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the variant CCHC topology enhances binding affinity, although the His --> Cys change is not essential for the formation of a stably folded domain. To ascertain the structural basis for the contribution of the CCHC arrangement, we have determined the structure of a CCHH mutant of finger nine from U-shaped. The structure is very similar overall to the wild-type domain, with subtle differences at the C terminus that result in loss of the interaction in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the CCHC zinc binding topology is required for the integrity of GATA-FOG interactions and that weak interactions can play important roles in vivo.

  9. Contribution of the highly conserved EaeH surface protein to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Luo, Qingwei; Roy, Koushik; Shabaan, Salwa; Kumar, Pardeep; Qadri, Firdausi; Fleckenstein, James M

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness worldwide. These pathogens disproportionately afflict children in developing countries, where they cause substantial morbidity and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Although these organisms are important targets for enteric vaccines, most development efforts to date have centered on a subset of plasmid-encoded fimbrial adhesins known as colonization factors and heat-labile toxin (LT). Emerging data suggest that ETEC undergoes considerable changes in its surface architecture, sequentially deploying a number of putative adhesins during its interactions with the host. We demonstrate here that one putative highly conserved, chromosomally encoded adhesin, EaeH, engages the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to bacterial adhesion, LT delivery, and colonization of the small intestine. PMID:24935979

  10. Mnd1p: an evolutionarily conserved protein required for meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Gerton, Jennifer L; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2002-05-14

    We used a functional genomics approach to identify a gene required for meiotic recombination, YGL183c or MND1. MND1 was spliced in meiotic cells, extending the annotated YGL183c ORF N terminus by 45 aa. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mnd1-1 mutants, in which the majority of the MND1 coding sequence was removed, arrested before the first meiotic division with a phenotype reminiscent of dmc1 mutants. Physical and genetic analysis showed that these cells initiated recombination, but did not form heteroduplex DNA or double Holliday junctions, suggesting that Mnd1p is involved in strand invasion. Orthologs of MND1 were identified in protists, several yeasts, plants, and mammals, suggesting that its function has been conserved throughout evolution.

  11. The major low-molecular-weight heat shock protein in chloroplasts shows antigenic conservation among diverse higher plant species.

    PubMed

    Vierling, E; Harris, L M; Chen, Q

    1989-02-01

    Several plant species are known to synthesize low-molecular-weight nucleus-encoded heat shock proteins (HSPs) which localize to chloroplasts. DNA sequence analysis of chloroplast HSP cDNAs from pea (Pisum sativum) and soybean (Glycine max) has shown that the carboxyl-terminal halves of these proteins are homologous to low-molecular-weight HSPs from a wide range of eucaryotes (E. Vierling, R. T. Nagao, A. E. DeRocher, and L. M. Harris, EMBO J. 7:575-581, 1988). We used a pea cDNA to construct fusion proteins containing either the carboxyl-terminal heat shock domain or the amino-terminal domain of the chloroplast HSP. The fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and used to produce choloroplast HSP-specific polyclonal antibodies. The carboxyl-terminal antibodies recognized chloroplast HSP precursor proteins from pea and from three divergent plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, petunia (Petunia hybrida), and maize (Zea mays). The amino-terminal antibodies recognized effectively only the pea precursor. When intact plants of each species were subjected to a heat stress regime mimicking field growth conditions, significant levels of the mature forms of the chloroplast HSPs accumulated in pea, A. thaliana, and maize. The levels of accumulated HSPs remained unchanged for 12 h following the stress treatment. We conclude that the synthesis of chloroplast-localized HSPs is an important component of the stree response in all higher plants and that chloroplast HSPs from dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants have a conserved carboxyl-terminal domain.

  12. Moving Fe2+ from ferritin ion channels to catalytic OH centers depends on conserved protein cage carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    Ferritin biominerals are protein-caged metabolic iron concentrates used for iron-protein cofactors and oxidant protection (Fe(2+) and O2 sequestration). Fe(2+) passage through ion channels in the protein cages, like membrane ion channels, required for ferritin biomineral synthesis, is followed by Fe(2+) substrate movement to ferritin enzyme (Fox) sites. Fe(2+) and O2 substrates are coupled via a diferric peroxo (DFP) intermediate, λmax 650 nm, which decays to [Fe(3+)-O-Fe(3+)] precursors of caged ferritin biominerals. Structural studies show multiple conformations for conserved, carboxylate residues E136 and E57, which are between ferritin ion channel exits and enzymatic sites, suggesting functional connections. Here we show that E136 and E57 are required for ferritin enzyme activity and thus are functional links between ferritin ion channels and enzymatic sites. DFP formation (Kcat and kcat/Km), DFP decay, and protein-caged hydrated ferric oxide accumulation decreased in ferritin E57A and E136A; saturation required higher Fe(2+) concentrations. Divalent cations (both ion channel and intracage binding) selectively inhibit ferritin enzyme activity (block Fe(2+) access), Mn(2+) < Co(2+) < Cu(2+) < Zn(2+), reflecting metal ion-protein binding stabilities. Fe(2+)-Cys126 binding in ferritin ion channels, observed as Cu(2+)-S-Cys126 charge-transfer bands in ferritin E130D UV-vis spectra and resistance to Cu(2+) inhibition in ferritin C126S, was unpredicted. Identifying E57 and E136 links in Fe(2+) movement from ferritin ion channels to ferritin enzyme sites completes a bucket brigade that moves external Fe(2+) into ferritin enzymatic sites. The results clarify Fe(2+) transport within ferritin and model molecular links between membrane ion channels and cytoplasmic destinations. PMID:24843174

  13. Moving Fe2+ from ferritin ion channels to catalytic OH centers depends on conserved protein cage carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    Ferritin biominerals are protein-caged metabolic iron concentrates used for iron-protein cofactors and oxidant protection (Fe(2+) and O2 sequestration). Fe(2+) passage through ion channels in the protein cages, like membrane ion channels, required for ferritin biomineral synthesis, is followed by Fe(2+) substrate movement to ferritin enzyme (Fox) sites. Fe(2+) and O2 substrates are coupled via a diferric peroxo (DFP) intermediate, λmax 650 nm, which decays to [Fe(3+)-O-Fe(3+)] precursors of caged ferritin biominerals. Structural studies show multiple conformations for conserved, carboxylate residues E136 and E57, which are between ferritin ion channel exits and enzymatic sites, suggesting functional connections. Here we show that E136 and E57 are required for ferritin enzyme activity and thus are functional links between ferritin ion channels and enzymatic sites. DFP formation (Kcat and kcat/Km), DFP decay, and protein-caged hydrated ferric oxide accumulation decreased in ferritin E57A and E136A; saturation required higher Fe(2+) concentrations. Divalent cations (both ion channel and intracage binding) selectively inhibit ferritin enzyme activity (block Fe(2+) access), Mn(2+) < Co(2+) < Cu(2+) < Zn(2+), reflecting metal ion-protein binding stabilities. Fe(2+)-Cys126 binding in ferritin ion channels, observed as Cu(2+)-S-Cys126 charge-transfer bands in ferritin E130D UV-vis spectra and resistance to Cu(2+) inhibition in ferritin C126S, was unpredicted. Identifying E57 and E136 links in Fe(2+) movement from ferritin ion channels to ferritin enzyme sites completes a bucket brigade that moves external Fe(2+) into ferritin enzymatic sites. The results clarify Fe(2+) transport within ferritin and model molecular links between membrane ion channels and cytoplasmic destinations.

  14. Repurposing of conserved autophagy-related protein ATG8 in a divergent eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Maude F; Nguyen, Hoa Mai; Besteiro, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and other apicomplexan parasites contain a peculiar non-photosynthetic plastid called the apicoplast, which is essential for their survival. The localization of autophagy-related protein ATG8 to the apicoplast in several apicomplexan species and life stages has recently been described, and we have shown this protein is essential for proper inheritance of this complex plastid into daughter cells during cell division. Although the mechanism behind ATG8 association to the apicoplast in T. gondii is related to the canonical conjugation system leading to autophagosome formation, its singular role seems independent from the initial catabolic purpose of autophagy. Here we also discuss further the functional evolution and innovative adaptations of the autophagy machinery to maintain this organelle during parasite division. PMID:27574540

  15. Repurposing of conserved autophagy-related protein ATG8 in a divergent eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Lévêque, Maude F.; Nguyen, Hoa Mai; Besteiro, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii and other apicomplexan parasites contain a peculiar non-photosynthetic plastid called the apicoplast, which is essential for their survival. The localization of autophagy-related protein ATG8 to the apicoplast in several apicomplexan species and life stages has recently been described, and we have shown this protein is essential for proper inheritance of this complex plastid into daughter cells during cell division. Although the mechanism behind ATG8 association to the apicoplast in T. gondii is related to the canonical conjugation system leading to autophagosome formation, its singular role seems independent from the initial catabolic purpose of autophagy. Here we also discuss further the functional evolution and innovative adaptations of the autophagy machinery to maintain this organelle during parasite division. PMID:27574540

  16. Autophagy, a Conserved Mechanism for Protein Degradation, Responds to Heat, and Other Abiotic Stresses in Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yufei; Guo, Meng; Wang, Hu; Lu, Jinping; Liu, Jinhong; Zhang, Chong; Gong, Zhenhui; Lu, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses negatively affect plants growth and development by inducing protein denaturation, and autophagy degrades the damaged proteins to alleviate their toxicity, however, little is known about the involvement of autophagy in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) tolerances to abiotic stresses. In this study, we identified autophagy-related gene (ATG) members in the whole genome of pepper by HMM method and analyzed their expression profiles in response to heat and other abiotic stresses by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the CaATG contained 15 core ATG members including 29 ATG proteins with their respective conserved functional domains, involving the whole process of autophagy. Under normal environmental condition, the expression of CaATG genes showed tissue- and developmental stage-specific patterns, while under abiotic stresses of salt, drought, heat, cold and carbohydrate starvation, the accumulation of autophagosome punctate increased and the expression level of CaATG genes changed with stress type-dependent pattern, which indicates the linkage of autophagy in pepper response to abiotic stresses. After treated with heat stress, both the number of up-regulated CaATG genes and the increment of autophagosome punctate were higher in pepper thermotolerant line R9 than those in thermosensitive line B6, implying an association of autophagy with heat tolerance. In addition, CaATG6 was predicted to interact with CaHSP90 family members. Our study suggests that autophagy is connected to pepper tolerances to heat and other abiotic stresses. PMID:26904087

  17. Molecular analysis of muskelin identifies a conserved discoidin-like domain that contributes to protein self-association.

    PubMed

    Prag, Soren; Collett, Georgina D M; Adams, Josephine C

    2004-07-15

    Muskelin is an intracellular protein with a C-terminal kelch-repeat domain that was initially characterized as having functional involvement in cell spreading on the extracellular matrix glycoprotein thrombospondin-1. As one approach to understanding the functional properties of muskelin, we have combined bioinformatic and biochemical studies. Through analysis of a new dataset of eight animal muskelins, we showed that the N-terminal region of the polypeptide corresponds to a predicted discoidin-like domain. This domain architecture is conserved in fungal muskelins and reveals a structural parallel between the muskelins and certain extracellular fungal galactose oxidases, although the phylogeny of the two groups appears distinct. In view of the fact that a number of kelch-repeat proteins have been shown to self-associate, co-immunoprecipitation, protein pull-down assays and studies of cellular localization were carried out with wild-type, deletion mutant and point mutant muskelins to investigate the roles of the discoidin-like and kelch-repeat domains. We obtained evidence for cis- and trans-interactions between the two domains. These studies provide evidence that muskelin self-associates through a head-to-tail mechanism involving the discoidin-like domain. PMID:15084145

  18. A differential proteomic approach reveals an evolutionary conserved regulation of Nme proteins by Fe65 in C. elegans and mouse.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Francesco; D'Angelo, Fulvio; Bimonte, Marida; Perrina, Valeria; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Russo, Tommaso; Zambrano, Nicola

    2008-12-01

    The function of the APP-Fe65 complex is still not definitively understood. To address this point we studied the phenotype of Fe65 (feh-1) ablation, which results in severe developmental defects in C. elegans, including embryonic and larval arrests. To shed light on the complex phenotype of embryonic arrest, we undertook a systematic approach, aiming at the definition of the altered proteomic profile of feh-1 null worms. We defined a panel of 27 regulated proteins, 16 of which actually participating to embryonic development processes in the nematode. Protein spots corresponding to the products of the F25H2.5 gene, the nematode orthologue of mammalian Nm23/Nme gene family members, were consistently up-regulated in feh-1 -/- embryos. We observed similar up-regulation of Nme1 and Nme2 genes, both at the transcript and the protein levels, in the brain of Fe65 knock-out mice, thus highlighting the occurrence of evolutionary conserved mechanisms of Nme expression in nematodes and mammals.

  19. Molecular analysis of muskelin identifies a conserved discoidin-like domain that contributes to protein self-association

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Muskelin is an intracellular protein with a C-terminal kelch-repeat domain that was initially characterized as having functional involvement in cell spreading on the extracellular matrix glycoprotein thrombospondin-1. As one approach to understanding the functional properties of muskelin, we have combined bioinformatic and biochemical studies. Through analysis of a new dataset of eight animal muskelins, we showed that the N-terminal region of the polypeptide corresponds to a predicted discoidin-like domain. This domain architecture is conserved in fungal muskelins and reveals a structural parallel between the muskelins and certain extracellular fungal galactose oxidases, although the phylogeny of the two groups appears distinct. In view of the fact that a number of kelch-repeat proteins have been shown to self-associate, co-immunoprecipitation, protein pull-down assays and studies of cellular localization were carried out with wild-type, deletion mutant and point mutant muskelins to investigate the roles of the discoidin-like and kelch-repeat domains. We obtained evidence for cis- and trans-interactions between the two domains. These studies provide evidence that muskelin self-associates through a head-to-tail mechanism involving the discoidin-like domain. PMID:15084145

  20. Manganese toxicity and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mam3p, a member of the ACDP (ancient conserved domain protein) family.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Jensen, Laran T; Gardner, Allison J; Culotta, Valeria C

    2005-03-15

    Manganese is an essential, but potentially toxic, trace metal in biological systems. Overexposure to manganese is known to cause neurological deficits in humans, but the pathways that lead to manganese toxicity are largely unknown. We have employed the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to identify genes that contribute to manganese-related damage. In a genetic screen for yeast manganese-resistance mutants, we identified S. cerevisiae MAM3 as a gene which, when deleted, would increase cellular tolerance to toxic levels of manganese and also increased the cell's resistance towards cobalt and zinc. By sequence analysis, Mam3p shares strong similarity with the mammalian ACDP (ancient conserved domain protein) family of polypeptides. Mutations in human ACDP1 have been associated with urofacial (Ochoa) syndrome. However, the functions of eukaryotic ACDPs remain unknown. We show here that S. cerevisiae MAM3 encodes an integral membrane protein of the yeast vacuole whose expression levels directly correlate with the degree of manganese toxicity. Surprisingly, Mam3p contributes to manganese toxicity without any obvious changes in vacuolar accumulation of metals. Furthermore, through genetic epistasis studies, we demonstrate that MAM3 operates independently of the well-established manganese-trafficking pathways in yeast, involving the manganese transporters Pmr1p, Smf2p and Pho84p. This is the first report of a eukaryotic ACDP family protein involved in metal homoeostasis. PMID:15498024

  1. Autophagy, a Conserved Mechanism for Protein Degradation, Responds to Heat, and Other Abiotic Stresses in Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yufei; Guo, Meng; Wang, Hu; Lu, Jinping; Liu, Jinhong; Zhang, Chong; Gong, Zhenhui; Lu, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses negatively affect plants growth and development by inducing protein denaturation, and autophagy degrades the damaged proteins to alleviate their toxicity, however, little is known about the involvement of autophagy in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) tolerances to abiotic stresses. In this study, we identified autophagy-related gene (ATG) members in the whole genome of pepper by HMM method and analyzed their expression profiles in response to heat and other abiotic stresses by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the CaATG contained 15 core ATG members including 29 ATG proteins with their respective conserved functional domains, involving the whole process of autophagy. Under normal environmental condition, the expression of CaATG genes showed tissue- and developmental stage-specific patterns, while under abiotic stresses of salt, drought, heat, cold and carbohydrate starvation, the accumulation of autophagosome punctate increased and the expression level of CaATG genes changed with stress type-dependent pattern, which indicates the linkage of autophagy in pepper response to abiotic stresses. After treated with heat stress, both the number of up-regulated CaATG genes and the increment of autophagosome punctate were higher in pepper thermotolerant line R9 than those in thermosensitive line B6, implying an association of autophagy with heat tolerance. In addition, CaATG6 was predicted to interact with CaHSP90 family members. Our study suggests that autophagy is connected to pepper tolerances to heat and other abiotic stresses.

  2. Characterization of the fibronectin-attachment protein of Mycobacterium avium reveals a fibronectin-binding motif conserved among mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Schorey, J S; Holsti, M A; Ratliff, T L; Allen, P M; Brown, E J

    1996-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen and a major opportunistic infectious agent observed in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Evidence suggests that the initial portal of infection by M. avium is often the gastrointestinal tract. However, the mechanism by which the M. avium crosses the epithelial barrier is unclear. A possible mechanism is suggested by the ability of M. avium to bind fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein that is a virulence factor for several extracellular pathogenic bacteria which bind to mucosal surfaces. To further characterize fibronectin binding by M. avium, we have cloned the M. avium fibronectin-attachment protein (FAP). The M. avium FAP (FAP-A) has an unusually large number of Pro and Ala residues (40% overall) and is 50% identical to FAP of both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using recombinant FAP-A and FAP-A peptides, we show that two non-continuous regions in FAP-A bind fibronectin. Peptides from these regions and homologous sequences from M. leprae FAP inhibit fibronectin binding by both M. avium and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). These regions have no homology to eukaryotic fibronectin-binding proteins and are only distantly related to fibronectin-binding peptides of Gram-positive bacteria. Nevertheless, these fibronectin-binding regions are highly conserved among the mycobacterial FAPs, suggesting an essential function for this interaction in mycobacteria infection of their metazoan hosts.

  3. Volume-conserving trans-cis isomerization pathways in photoactive yellow protein visualized by picosecond X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yang Ouk; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Joonghan; Schmidt, Marius; Moffat, Keith; Šrajer, Vukica; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2013-02-03

    Trans-to-cis isomerization, the key reaction in photoactive proteins, usually cannot occur through the standard one-bond-flip mechanism. Owing to spatial constraints imposed by a protein environment, isomerization probably proceeds through a volume-conserving mechanism in which highly choreographed atomic motions are expected, the details of which have not yet been observed directly. Here we employ time-resolved X-ray crystallography to visualize structurally the isomerization of the p-coumaric acid chromophore in photoactive yellow protein with a time resolution of 100 ps and a spatial resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure of the earliest intermediate (IT) resembles a highly strained transition state in which the torsion angle is located halfway between the trans- and cis-isomers. The reaction trajectory of IT bifurcates into two structurally distinct cis intermediates via hula-twist and bicycle-pedal pathways. The bifurcating reaction pathways can be controlled by weakening the hydrogen bond between the chromophore and an adjacent residue through E46Q mutation, which switches off the bicycle-pedal pathway.

  4. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase: Multifaceted functions of an evolutionarily conserved enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Santi, Alice; Mugnaioni, Camilla; Toti, Alessandra; Camici, Guido; Cirri, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Originally identified as a low molecular weight acid phosphatase, LMW-PTP is actually a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts on many phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins that are primarily involved in signal transduction. Differences in sequence, structure, and substrate recognition as well as in subcellular localization in different organisms enable LMW-PTP to exert many different functions. In fact, during evolution, the LMW-PTP structure adapted to perform different catalytic actions depending on the organism type. In bacteria, this enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of group 1 and 4 capsules, but it is also a virulence factor in pathogenic strains. In yeast, LMW-PTPs dephosphorylate immunophilin Fpr3, a peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase member of the protein chaperone family. In humans, LMW-PTP is encoded by the ACP1 gene, which is composed of three different alleles, each encoding two active enzymes produced by alternative RNA splicing. In animals, LMW-PTP dephosphorylates a number of growth factor receptors and modulates their signalling processes. The involvement of LMW-PTP in cancer progression and in insulin receptor regulation as well as its actions as a virulence factor in a number of pathogenic bacterial strains may promote the search for potent, selective and bioavailable LMW-PTP inhibitors. PMID:27421795

  5. STT3, a highly conserved protein required for yeast oligosaccharyl transferase activity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, R; Knauer, R; Burda, P; Stagljar, I; te Heesen, S; Lehle, L; Aebi, M

    1995-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification, and is essential for viability in eukaryotic cells. A lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide is assembled at the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum and transferred to selected asparagine residues of nascent polypeptide chains by the oligosaccharyl transferase (OTase) complex. Based on the synthetic lethal phenotype of double mutations affecting the assembly of the lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide and the OTase activity, we have performed a novel screen for mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with altered N-linked glycosylation. Besides novel mutants deficient in the assembly of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg mutants), we identified the STT3 locus as being required for OTase activity in vivo. The essential STT3 protein is approximately 60% identical in amino acid sequence to its human homologue. A mutation in the STT3 locus affects substrate specificity of the OTase complex in vivo and in vitro. In stt3-3 cells very little glycosyl transfer occurs from incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharide, whereas the transfer of full-length Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 is hardly affected as compared with wild-type cells. Depletion of the STT3 protein results in loss of transferase activity in vivo and a deficiency in the assembly of OTase complex. Images PMID:7588624

  6. The Drosophila Homologue of the Amyloid Precursor Protein Is a Conserved Modulator of Wnt PCP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Okray, Zeynep; Janovska, Pavlina; Tmejová, Kateřina; Reynaud, Elodie; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; De Strooper, Bart; Dura, Jean-Maurice; Bryja, Vítězslav; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2013-01-01

    Wnt Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a universal regulator of polarity in epithelial cells, but it regulates axon outgrowth in neurons, suggesting the existence of axonal modulators of Wnt-PCP activity. The Amyloid precursor proteins (APPs) are intensely investigated because of their link to Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP's in vivo function in the brain and the mechanisms underlying it remain unclear and controversial. Drosophila possesses a single APP homologue called APP Like, or APPL. APPL is expressed in all neurons throughout development, but has no established function in neuronal development. We therefore investigated the role of Drosophila APPL during brain development. We find that APPL is involved in the development of the Mushroom Body αβ neurons and, in particular, is required cell-autonomously for the β-axons and non-cell autonomously for the α-axons growth. Moreover, we find that APPL is a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway required for axonal outgrowth, but not cell polarity. Molecularly, both human APP and fly APPL form complexes with PCP receptors, thus suggesting that APPs are part of the membrane protein complex upstream of PCP signaling. Moreover, we show that APPL regulates PCP pathway activation by modulating the phosphorylation of the Wnt adaptor protein Dishevelled (Dsh) by Abelson kinase (Abl). Taken together our data suggest that APPL is the first example of a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway specifically required for axon outgrowth. PMID:23690751

  7. Quantitation of Human Metallothionein Isoforms: A Family of Small, Highly Conserved, Cysteine-rich Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mehus, Aaron A.; Muhonen, Wallace W.; Garrett, Scott H.; Somji, Seema; Sens, Donald A.; Shabb, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Human metallothioneins (MTs) are important regulators of metal homeostasis and protectors against oxidative damage. Their altered mRNA expression has been correlated with metal toxicity and a variety of cancers. Current immunodetection methods lack the specificity to distinguish all 12 human isoforms. Each, however, can be distinguished by the mass of its acetylated, cysteine-rich, hydrophilic N-terminal tryptic peptides. These properties were exploited to develop a bottom-up MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS-based method for their simultaneous quantitation. Key features included enrichment of N-terminal acetylated peptides by strong cation exchange chromatography, optimization of C18 reversed-phase chromatography, and control of methionine oxidation. Combinations of nine isoforms were identified in seven cell lines and two tissues. Relative quantitation was accomplished by comparing peak intensities of peptides generated from pooled cytosolic proteins alkylated with 14N- or 15N-iodoacetamide. Absolute quantitation was achieved using 15N-iodoacetamide-labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards. The method was applied to the cadmium induction of MTs in human kidney HK-2 epithelial cells expressing recombinant MT-3. Seven isoforms were detected with abundances spanning almost 2 orders of magnitude and inductions up to 12-fold. The protein-to-mRNA ratio for MT-1E was one-tenth that of other MTs, suggesting isoform-specific differences in protein expression efficiency. Differential expression of MT-1G1 and MT-1G2 suggested tissue- and cell-specific alternative splicing for the MT-1G isoform. Protein expression of MT isoforms was also evaluated in human breast epithelial cancer cell lines. Estrogen-receptor-positive cell lines expressed only MT-2 and MT-1X, whereas estrogen-receptor-negative cell lines additionally expressed MT-1E. The combined expression of MT isoforms was 38-fold greater in estrogen-receptor-negative cell lines than in estrogen-receptor-positive cells. These

  8. Novel parasitic nematode-specific protein of bovine filarial parasite Setaria digitata displays conserved gene structure and ubiquitous expression.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, W W; Dassanayake, R S; Weerasena, S J; Silva Gunawardene, Y I

    2014-09-01

    Setaria digitata is an animal filarial parasite, which can cause fatal diseases to livestock such as cattle, sheep, goat, buffaloes, horses etc. inflicting considerable economic losses to livelihood of livestock farmers. In spite of this, the biology and parasitic nature of this organism is largely unknown. As a step towards understanding these, we screened the cDNA library of S. digitata and identified an open reading frame that code for parasitic nematode-specific protein, which showed a significant homology to functionally and structurally unannotated sequences of parasitic nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa etc., suggesting its role in parasitism. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the S. digitata novel gene (SDNP) is expressed in adult female and male, and microfilariae. Southern hybridization studies revealed that this gene is a single-copy gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic region obtained from overlapping PCR amplification indicated that the size of the genomic region is 1819 bp in which four exons encoding 205 amino acids were interrupted by three introns of varying lengths of 419, 659 and 123 bp, and also the expansion of the size of the introns of S. digitata compared to its orthologues by integrating micro and mini-satellite containing sequence. Sequences around the splice junctions were conserved and agreed with the general GT-AG splicing rule. The gene was found to be AT rich with a GC content of 38.1%. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the gene structure of SDNP and its orthologues is conserved and it expressed ubiqutously in all the stages of nematode's life cycle. Therefore, taking these outcomes together, it can be concluded that SDNP is a parasitic nematode-specific, single copy gene having conserved gene structure of four exons interrupted by three introns and that the gene is expressed ubiquitously throughout nematode's life cycle. PMID:25382479

  9. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine.

  10. The conserved Bud20 zinc finger protein is a new component of the ribosomal 60S subunit export machinery.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Jochen; Klein, Isabella; Schmidt, Claudia; Kallas, Martina; Thomson, Emma; Wagner, Maria Anna; Bradatsch, Bettina; Rechberger, Gerald; Strohmaier, Heimo; Hurt, Ed; Bergler, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    The nuclear export of the preribosomal 60S (pre-60S) subunit is coordinated with late steps in ribosome assembly. Here, we show that Bud20, a conserved C(2)H(2)-type zinc finger protein, is an unrecognized shuttling factor required for the efficient export of pre-60S subunits. Bud20 associates with late pre-60S particles in the nucleoplasm and accompanies them into the cytoplasm, where it is released through the action of the Drg1 AAA-ATPase. Cytoplasmic Bud20 is then reimported via a Kap123-dependent pathway. The deletion of Bud20 induces a strong pre-60S export defect and causes synthetic lethality when combined with mutant alleles of known pre-60S subunit export factors. The function of Bud20 in ribosome export depends on a short conserved N-terminal sequence, as we observed that mutations or the deletion of this motif impaired 60S subunit export and generated the genetic link to other pre-60S export factors. We suggest that the shuttling Bud20 is recruited to the nascent 60S subunit via its central zinc finger rRNA binding domain to facilitate the subsequent nuclear export of the preribosome employing its N-terminal extension.

  11. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians.

    PubMed

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-08-09

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans.

  12. The highly conserved MraZ protein is a transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Eraso, Jesus M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Orr, Galya; Margolin, William

    2014-05-05

    The mraZ and mraW genes are highly conserved in bacteria, both in sequence and location at the head of the division and cell wall (dcw) gene cluster. Although MraZ has structural similarity to the AbrB transition state regulator and the MazE antitoxin, and MraW is known to methylate ribosomal RNA, mraZ and mraW null mutants have no detectable growth phenotype in any species tested to date, hampering progress in understanding their physiological role. Here we show that overproduction of Escherichia coli MraZ perturbs cell division and the cell envelope, is more lethal at high levels or in minimal growth medium, and that MraW antagonizes these effects. MraZGFP localizes to the nucleoid, suggesting that it binds DNA. Indeed, purified MraZ directly binds a region upstream from its own promoter containing three direct repeats to regulate its own expression and that of downstream cell division and cell wall genes. MraZ-LacZ fusions are repressed by excess MraZ but not when DNA binding by MraZ is inhibited. RNAseq analysis indicates that MraZ is a global transcriptional regulator with numerous targets in addition to dcw genes. One of these targets, mioC, is directly bound by MraZ in a region with three direct repeats.

  13. Rewiring yeast sugar transporter preference through modifying a conserved protein motif

    PubMed Central

    Young, Eric M.; Tong, Alice; Bui, Hang; Spofford, Caitlin; Alper, Hal S.

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of exogenous sugars found in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates, such as xylose, must be improved before yeast can serve as an efficient biofuel and biochemical production platform. In particular, the first step in this process, the molecular transport of xylose into the cell, can serve as a significant flux bottleneck and is highly inhibited by other sugars. Here we demonstrate that sugar transport preference and kinetics can be rewired through the programming of a sequence motif of the general form G-G/F-XXX-G found in the first transmembrane span. By evaluating 46 different heterologously expressed transporters, we find that this motif is conserved among functional transporters and highly enriched in transporters that confer growth on xylose. Through saturation mutagenesis and subsequent rational mutagenesis, four transporter mutants unable to confer growth on glucose but able to sustain growth on xylose were engineered. Specifically, Candida intermedia gxs1 Phe38Ile39Met40, Scheffersomyces stipitis rgt2 Phe38 and Met40, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae hxt7 Ile39Met40Met340 all exhibit this phenotype. In these cases, primary hexose transporters were rewired into xylose transporters. These xylose transporters nevertheless remained inhibited by glucose. Furthermore, in the course of identifying this motif, novel wild-type transporters with superior monosaccharide growth profiles were discovered, namely S. stipitis RGT2 and Debaryomyces hansenii 2D01474. These findings build toward the engineering of efficient pentose utilization in yeast and provide a blueprint for reprogramming transporter properties. PMID:24344268

  14. NOA36 protein contains a highly conserved nucleolar localization signal capable of directing functional proteins to the nucleolus, in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Ivan S; Jimenez-Nuñez, Maria D; Iglesias, Concepción; Campos-Caro, Antonio; Moreno-Sanchez, David; Ruiz, Felix A; Bolívar, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    NOA36/ZNF330 is an evolutionarily well-preserved protein present in the nucleolus and mitochondria of mammalian cells. We have previously reported that the pro-apoptotic activity of this protein is mediated by a characteristic cysteine-rich domain. We now demonstrate that the nucleolar localization of NOA36 is due to a highly-conserved nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) present in residues 1-33. This NoLS is a sequence containing three clusters of two or three basic amino acids. We fused the amino terminal of NOA36 to eGFP in order to characterize this putative NoLS. We show that a cluster of three lysine residues at positions 3 to 5 within this sequence is critical for the nucleolar localization. We also demonstrate that the sequence as found in human is capable of directing eGFP to the nucleolus in several mammal, fish and insect cells. Moreover, this NoLS is capable of specifically directing the cytosolic yeast enzyme polyphosphatase to the target of the nucleolus of HeLa cells, wherein its enzymatic activity was detected. This NoLS could therefore serve as a very useful tool as a nucleolar marker and for directing particular proteins to the nucleolus in distant animal species.

  15. Novel coiled-coil proteins regulate exocyst association with cortical microtubules in xylem cells via the conserved oligomeric golgi-complex 2 protein.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshihisa; Iida, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoshinobu; Sugiyama, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-02-01

    Xylem vessel cells develop secondary cell walls in distinct patterns. Cortical microtubules are rearranged into distinct patterns and regulate secondary cell wall deposition; however, it is unclear how exocytotic membrane trafficking is linked to cortical microtubules. Here, we show that the novel coiled-coil proteins vesicle tethering 1 (VETH1) and VETH2 recruit EXO70A1, an exocyst subunit essential for correct patterning of secondary cell wall deposition, to cortical microtubules via the conserved oligomeric Golgi complex (COG) 2 protein. VETH1 and VETH2 encode an uncharacterized domain of an unknown function designated DUF869, and were preferentially up-regulated in xylem cells. VETH1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and VETH2-GFP co-localized at novel vesicle-like small compartments, which exhibited microtubule plus-end-directed and end-tracking dynamics. VETH1 and VETH2 interacted with COG2, and this interaction promoted the association between cortical microtubules and EXO70A1 These results suggest that the VETH-COG2 complex ensures the correct secondary cell wall deposition pattern by recruiting exocyst components to cortical microtubules.

  16. Conserved cis-elements bind a protein complex that regulates Drosophila ras2/rop bidirectional expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, K.; Maltby, L.; Duarte, R.; Veale, R.; Segev, O.

    1994-01-01

    The Drosophila ras2 promoter region exhibits bidirectional activity, as has been demonstrated for the human c-Ha-ras1 and the mouse c-Ki-ras. Here we address a unique case of ras regulation, as Drosophila ras2 provides the only example to date in which the flanking gene (rop) and its product have been isolated. A linking mechanism of control suggests a mutual interaction between the two gene products. Our studies indicate that the Drosophila ras2 promoter region shares with the human c-Ha-ras1 promoter a CACCC box and an AP-1-like sequence. A 14 bp promoter fragment which holds a CACCC element is demonstrated to interact with a specific transcription factor (factor B). This CACCC promoter element represents a stretch of imperfect palindrome. We present evidence that this factor can form a complex with another specific DNA-binding protein (factor A). The binding sites (A + B) for these protein factors are essential for 95% expression of both genes flanking the promoter (ras2 and rop). Region A consists of four overlapping consensus sequences: a TATA-like element, a DSE-like motif (the core sequence of the serum response element), a DRE octamer, which has been shown to play a role in cell proliferation, and a 5 bp direct repeat representing the GATA consensus sequence. Factor A has a very weak affinity to the full promoter region, but when complexed with factor B binding efficiency is enhanced. We also show that alterations of DNA-protein binding specificities can be achieved by supplementing the growth media with different sera. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8297724

  17. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species’ cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

  18. Covalent protein modification with ISG15 via a conserved cysteine in the hinge region.

    PubMed

    Bade, Veronika N; Nickels, Jochen; Keusekotten, Kirstin; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 (interferon-stimulated gene of 15 kDa) is strongly induced by type I interferons and displays antiviral activity. As other ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls), ISG15 is post-translationally conjugated to substrate proteins by an isopeptide bond between the C-terminal glycine of ISG15 and the side chains of lysine residues in the substrates (ISGylation). ISG15 consists of two ubiquitin-like domains that are separated by a hinge region. In many orthologs, this region contains a single highly reactive cysteine residue. Several hundred potential substrates for ISGylation have been identified but only a few of them have been rigorously verified. In order to investigate the modification of several ISG15 substrates, we have purified ISG15 conjugates from cell extracts by metal-chelate affinity purification and immunoprecipitations. We found that the levels of proteins modified by human ISG15 can be decreased by the addition of reducing agents. With the help of thiol blocking reagents, a mutational analysis and miRNA mediated knock-down of ISG15 expression, we revealed that this modification occurs in living cells via a disulphide bridge between the substrates and Cys78 in the hinge region of ISG15. While the ISG15 activating enzyme UBE1L is conjugated by ISG15 in the classical way, we show that the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme Ubc13 can either be classically conjugated by ISG15 or can form a disulphide bridge with ISG15 at the active site cysteine 87. The latter modification would interfere with its function as ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. However, we found no evidence for an ISG15 modification of the dynamin-like GTPases MxA and hGBP1. These findings indicate that the analysis of potential substrates for ISG15 conjugation must be performed with great care to distinguish between the two types of modification since many assays such as immunoprecipitation or metal-chelate affinity purification are performed with little or no reducing agent

  19. Conserved YjgF protein family deaminates reactive enamine/imine intermediates of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Jennifer A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Downs, Diana M

    2012-01-27

    The YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins is conserved in all domains of life, suggesting that the role of these proteins arose early and was maintained throughout evolution. Metabolic consequences of lacking this protein in Salmonella enterica and other organisms have been described, but the biochemical function of YjgF remained unknown. This work provides the first description of a conserved biochemical activity for the YjgF protein family. Our data support the conclusion that YjgF proteins have enamine/imine deaminase activity and accelerate the release of ammonia from reactive enamine/imine intermediates of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent threonine dehydratase (IlvA). Results from structure-guided mutagenesis experiments suggest that YjgF lacks a catalytic residue and that it facilitates ammonia release by positioning a critical water molecule in the active site. YjgF is renamed RidA (reactive intermediate/imine deaminase A) to reflect the conserved activity of the protein family described here. This study, combined with previous physiological studies on yjgF mutants, suggests that intermediates of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-mediated reactions may have metabolic consequences in vivo that were previously unappreciated. The conservation of the RidA/YjgF family suggests that reactive enamine/imine metabolites are of concern to all organisms.

  20. The Cysteine-Rich Interdomain Region from the Highly Variable Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein-1 Exhibits a Conserved Structure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua-Poo; Makobongo, Morris O.; Moore, Jaime M.; Singh, Sanjay; Miller, Louis H.; Garboczi, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites, living in red blood cells, express proteins of the erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP1) family on the red blood cell surface. The binding of PfEMP1 molecules to human cell surface receptors mediates the adherence of infected red blood cells to human tissues. The sequences of the 60 PfEMP1 genes in each parasite genome vary greatly from parasite to parasite, yet the variant PfEMP1 proteins maintain receptor binding. Almost all parasites isolated directly from patients bind the human CD36 receptor. Of the several kinds of highly polymorphic cysteine-rich interdomain region (CIDR) domains classified by sequence, only the CIDR1α domains bind CD36. Here we describe the CD36-binding portion of a CIDR1α domain, MC179, as a bundle of three α-helices that are connected by a loop and three additional helices. The MC179 structure, containing seven conserved cysteines and 10 conserved hydrophobic residues, predicts similar structures for the hundreds of CIDR sequences from the many genome sequences now known. Comparison of MC179 with the CIDR domains in the genome of the P. falciparum 3D7 strain provides insights into CIDR domain structure. The CIDR1α three-helix bundle exhibits less than 20% sequence identity with the three-helix bundles of Duffy-binding like (DBL) domains, but the two kinds of bundles are almost identical. Despite the enormous diversity of PfEMP1 sequences, the CIDR1α and DBL protein structures, taken together, predict that a PfEMP1 molecule is a polymer of three-helix bundles elaborated by a variety of connecting helices and loops. From the structures also comes the insight that DBL1α domains are approximately 100 residues larger and that CIDR1α domains are approximately 100 residues smaller than sequence alignments predict. This new understanding of PfEMP1 structure will allow the use of better-defined PfEMP1 domains for functional studies, for the design of candidate vaccines, and for understanding the

  1. A conserved salt bridge in the G loop of multiple protein kinases is important for catalysis and for in vivo Lyn function.

    PubMed

    Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Che, Jianwei; Lee, Christian C; Yang, Yating; Herman, Ann; Jia, Yong; Velentza, Anastasia; Watson, James; Sternberg, Luise; Kim, Sunjun; Ziaee, Niusha; Miller, Andrew; Jackson, Carie; Fujimoto, Manabu; Young, Mike; Batalov, Serge; Liu, Yi; Warmuth, Markus; Wiltshire, Tim; Cooke, Michael P; Sauer, Karsten

    2009-01-16

    The glycine-rich G loop controls ATP binding and phosphate transfer in protein kinases. Here we show that the functions of Src family and Abl protein tyrosine kinases require an electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged amino acids within their G loops that is conserved in multiple other phylogenetically distinct protein kinases, from plants to humans. By limiting G loop flexibility, it controls ATP binding, catalysis, and inhibition by ATP-competitive compounds such as Imatinib. In WeeB mice, mutational disruption of the interaction results in expression of a Lyn protein with reduced catalytic activity, and in perturbed B cell receptor signaling. Like Lyn(-/-) mice, WeeB mice show profound defects in B cell development and function and succumb to autoimmune glomerulonephritis. This demonstrates the physiological importance of the conserved G loop salt bridge and at the same time distinguishes the in vivo requirement for the Lyn kinase activity from other potential functions of the protein. PMID:19150426

  2. On the interconnection of stable protein complexes: inter-complex hubs and their conservation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens networks.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Concettina

    2015-01-01

    Protein complexes are key molecular entities that perform a variety of essential cellular functions. The connectivity of proteins within a complex has been widely investigated with both experimental and computational techniques. We developed a computational approach to identify and characterise proteins that play a role in interconnecting complexes. We computed a measure of inter-complex centrality, the crossroad index, based on disjoint paths connecting proteins in distinct complexes and identified inter-complex hubs as proteins with a high value of the crossroad index. We applied the approach to a set of stable complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Homo sapiens. Just as done for hubs, we evaluated the topological and biological properties of inter-complex hubs addressing the following questions. Do inter-complex hubs tend to be evolutionary conserved? What is the relation between crossroad index and essentiality? We found a good correlation between inter-complex hubs and both evolutionary conservation and essentiality.

  3. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  4. Identification of microtubule growth deceleration and its regulation by conserved and novel proteins.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Benjamin; Ryan, Joël; Dumont, Julien; Maddox, Paul S; Maddox, Amy S

    2016-05-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are cytoskeletal polymers that participate in diverse cellular functions, including cell division, intracellular trafficking, and templating of cilia and flagella. MTs undergo dynamic instability, alternating between growth and shortening via catastrophe and rescue events. The rates and frequencies of MT dynamic parameters appear to be characteristic for a given cell type. We recently reported that all MT dynamic parameters vary throughout differentiation of a smooth muscle cell type in intact Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we describe local differences in MT dynamics and a novel MT behavior: an abrupt change in growth rate (deceleration) of single MTs occurring in the cell periphery of these cells. MT deceleration occurs where there is a decrease in local soluble tubulin concentration at the cell periphery. This local regulation of tubulin concentration and MT deceleration are dependent on two novel homologues of human cylicin. These novel ORFs, which we name cylc-1 and -2, share sequence homology with stathmins and encode small, very basic proteins containing several KKD/E repeats. The TOG domain-containing protein ZYG-9(TOGp) is responsible for the faster polymerization rate within the cell body. Thus we have defined two contributors to the molecular regulation for this novel MT behavior. PMID:26985017

  5. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Ribardo, Deborah A.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; Jensen, Grant J.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  6. Evolutionarily conserved Galphabetagamma binding surfaces support a model of the G protein-receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtarge, O; Bourne, H R; Cohen, F E

    1996-01-01

    The pivotal role of G proteins in sensory, hormonal, inflammatory, and proliferative responses has provoked intense interest in understanding how they interact with their receptors and effectors. Nonetheless, the locations of the receptors and effector binding sites remain poorly characterized, although nearly complete structures of the alphabetagamma heterotrimeric complex are available. Here we apply evolutionary trace (ET) analysis [Lichtarge, O., Bourne, H. R. & Cohen, F. E. (1996) J. Mol. Biol. 257, 342-358] to propose plausible locations for these sites. On each subunit, ET identifies evolutionarily selected surfaces composed of residues that do not vary within functional subgroups and that form spatial clusters. Four clusters correctly identify subunit interfaces, and additional clusters on Galpha point to likely receptor or effector binding sites. Our results implicate the conformationally variable region of Galpha in an effector binding role. Furthermore the range of predicted interactions between the receptor and Galphabetagamma, is sufficiently limited that we can build a low resolution and testable model of the receptor-G protein complex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8755504

  7. Identification of microtubule growth deceleration and its regulation by conserved and novel proteins.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Benjamin; Ryan, Joël; Dumont, Julien; Maddox, Paul S; Maddox, Amy S

    2016-05-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are cytoskeletal polymers that participate in diverse cellular functions, including cell division, intracellular trafficking, and templating of cilia and flagella. MTs undergo dynamic instability, alternating between growth and shortening via catastrophe and rescue events. The rates and frequencies of MT dynamic parameters appear to be characteristic for a given cell type. We recently reported that all MT dynamic parameters vary throughout differentiation of a smooth muscle cell type in intact Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we describe local differences in MT dynamics and a novel MT behavior: an abrupt change in growth rate (deceleration) of single MTs occurring in the cell periphery of these cells. MT deceleration occurs where there is a decrease in local soluble tubulin concentration at the cell periphery. This local regulation of tubulin concentration and MT deceleration are dependent on two novel homologues of human cylicin. These novel ORFs, which we name cylc-1 and -2, share sequence homology with stathmins and encode small, very basic proteins containing several KKD/E repeats. The TOG domain-containing protein ZYG-9(TOGp) is responsible for the faster polymerization rate within the cell body. Thus we have defined two contributors to the molecular regulation for this novel MT behavior.

  8. Identification of microtubule growth deceleration and its regulation by conserved and novel proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Benjamin; Ryan, Joël; Dumont, Julien; Maddox, Paul S.; Maddox, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are cytoskeletal polymers that participate in diverse cellular functions, including cell division, intracellular trafficking, and templating of cilia and flagella. MTs undergo dynamic instability, alternating between growth and shortening via catastrophe and rescue events. The rates and frequencies of MT dynamic parameters appear to be characteristic for a given cell type. We recently reported that all MT dynamic parameters vary throughout differentiation of a smooth muscle cell type in intact Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we describe local differences in MT dynamics and a novel MT behavior: an abrupt change in growth rate (deceleration) of single MTs occurring in the cell periphery of these cells. MT deceleration occurs where there is a decrease in local soluble tubulin concentration at the cell periphery. This local regulation of tubulin concentration and MT deceleration are dependent on two novel homologues of human cylicin. These novel ORFs, which we name cylc-1 and -2, share sequence homology with stathmins and encode small, very basic proteins containing several KKD/E repeats. The TOG domain–containing protein ZYG-9TOGp is responsible for the faster polymerization rate within the cell body. Thus we have defined two contributors to the molecular regulation for this novel MT behavior. PMID:26985017

  9. Characterization of Protective Epitopes in a Highly Conserved Plasmodium falciparum Antigenic Protein Containing Repeats of Acidic and Basic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Balwan; Bharadwaj, Ashima; Sailaja, V. Naga; Adak, T.; Kushwaha, Ashima; Malhotra, Pawan; Chauhan, V. S.

    1998-01-01

    The delineation of putatively protective and immunogenic epitopes in vaccine candidate proteins constitutes a major research effort towards the development of an effective malaria vaccine. By virtue of its role in the formation of the immune clusters of merozoites, its location on the surface of merozoites, and its highly conserved nature both at the nucleotide sequence level and the amino acid sequence level, the antigen which contains repeats of acidic and basic residues (ABRA) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represents such an antigen. Based upon the predicted amino acid sequence of ABRA, we synthesized eight peptides, with six of these (AB-1 to AB-6) ranging from 12 to 18 residues covering the most hydrophilic regions of the protein, and two more peptides (AB-7 and AB-8) representing its repetitive sequences. We found that all eight constructs bound an appreciable amount of antibody in sera from a large proportion of P. falciparum malaria patients; two of these peptides (AB-1 and AB-3) also elicited a strong proliferation response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all 11 human subjects recovering from malaria. When used as carrier-free immunogens, six peptides induced a strong, boostable, immunoglobulin G-type antibody response in rabbits, indicating the presence of both B-cell determinants and T-helper-cell epitopes in these six constructs. These antibodies specifically cross-reacted with the parasite protein(s) in an immunoblot and in an immunofluorescence assay. In another immunoblot, rabbit antipeptide sera also recognized recombinant fragments of ABRA expressed in bacteria. More significantly, rabbit antibodies against two constructs (AB-1 and AB-5) inhibited the merozoite reinvasion of human erythrocytes in vitro up to ∼90%. These results favor further studies so as to determine possible inclusion of these two constructs in a multicomponent subunit vaccine against asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. PMID:9596765

  10. Alternative splicing modulated by genetic variants demonstrates accelerated evolution regulated by highly conserved proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yun-Hua Esther; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lin, Xianzhi; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wang, Rena; Xiao, Xinshu

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional genetic variants and elucidation of their regulatory mechanisms represent significant challenges of the post-genomic era. A poorly understood topic is the involvement of genetic variants in mediating post-transcriptional RNA processing, including alternative splicing. Thus far, little is known about the genomic, evolutionary, and regulatory features of genetically modulated alternative splicing (GMAS). Here, we systematically identified intronic tag variants for genetic modulation of alternative splicing using RNA-seq data specific to cellular compartments. Combined with our previous method that identifies exonic tags for GMAS, this study yielded 622 GMAS exons. We observed that GMAS events are highly cell type independent, indicating that splicing-altering genetic variants could have widespread function across cell types. Interestingly, GMAS genes, exons, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) all demonstrated positive selection or accelerated evolution in primates. We predicted that GMAS SNVs often alter binding of splicing factors, with SRSF1 affecting the most GMAS events and demonstrating global allelic binding bias. However, in contrast to their GMAS targets, the predicted splicing factors are more conserved than expected, suggesting that cis-regulatory variation is the major driving force of splicing evolution. Moreover, GMAS-related splicing factors had stronger consensus motifs than expected, consistent with their susceptibility to SNV disruption. Intriguingly, GMAS SNVs in general do not alter the strongest consensus position of the splicing factor motif, except the more than 100 GMAS SNVs in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms reported by genome-wide association studies. Our study reports many GMAS events and enables a better understanding of the evolutionary and regulatory features of this phenomenon. PMID:26888265

  11. The Conservation and Application of Three Hypothetical Protein Coding Gene for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lianhua; Gao, Shihui; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Ruijuan; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate and early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is of major importance in the control of TB. One of the most important technical advances in diagnosis of tuberculosis is the development of nucleic acid amplification (NAA) tests. However, the choice of the target sequence remains controversial in NAA tests. Recently, interesting alternatives have been found in hypothetical protein coding sequences from mycobacterial genome. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain rational biomarker for TB diagnosis, the conservation of three hypothetical genes was firstly evaluated in 714 mycobacterial strains. The results showed that SCAR1 (Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region) based on Rv0264c coding gene showed the highest conservation (99.8%) and SCAR2 based on Rv1508c gene showed the secondary high conservation (99.7%) in M. tuberculosis (MTB) strains. SCAR3 based on Rv2135c gene (3.2%) and IS6110 (8%) showed relatively high deletion rate in MTB strains. Secondly, three SCAR markers were evaluated in 307 clinical sputum from patients in whom TB was suspected or patients with diseases other than TB. The amplification of IS6110 and 16SrRNA sequences together with both clinical and bacteriological identification was as a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of SCAR markers. The sensitivities and specificities, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of all NAA tests were higher than those of bacteriological detection. In four NAA tests, IS6110 and SCAR3 showed the highest PPV (100%) and low NPV (70% and 68.8%, respectively), and SCAR1 and SCAR2 showed the relatively high PPV and NPV (97% and 82.6%, 95.6% and 88.8%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance Our result indicated that SCAR1 and SCAR2 with a high degree of sequence conservation represent efficient and promising alternatives as NAA test targets in identification of MTB. Moreover, the targets developed from this study may provide more alternative targets for the development of a

  12. Structural sequences are conserved in the genes coding for the alpha, alpha' and beta-subunits of the soybean 7S seed storage protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, M A; Ladin, B F; Pollaco, J C; Freyer, G; Beachy, R N

    1982-01-01

    Cloned DNAs encoding four different proteins have been isolated from recombinant cDNA libraries constructed with Glycine max seed mRNAs. Two cloned DNAs code for the alpha and alpha'-subunits of the 7S seed storage protein (conglycinin). The other cloned cDNAs code for proteins which are synthesized in vitro as 68,000 d., 60,000 d. or 53,000 d. polypeptides. Hybrid selection experiments indicate that, under low stringency hybridization conditions, all four cDNAs hybridize with mRNAs for the alpha and alpha'-subunits and the 68,000 d., 60,000 d. and 53,000 d. in vitro translation products. Within three of the mRNA, there is a conserved sequence of 155 nucleotides which is responsible for this hybridization. The conserved nucleotides in the alpha and alpha'-subunit cDNAs and the 68,000 d. polypeptide cDNAs span both coding and noncoding sequences. The differences in the coding nucleotides outside the conserved region are extensive. This suggests that selective pressure to maintain the 155 conserved nucleotides has been influenced by the structure of the seed mRNA. RNA blot hybridizations demonstrate that mRNA encoding the other major subunit (beta) of the 7S seed storage protein also shares sequence homology with the conserved 155 nucleotide sequence of the alpha and alpha'-subunit mRNAs, but not with other coding sequences. Images PMID:6897678

  13. Seminal-type ribonuclease genes in ruminants, sequence conservation without protein expression?

    PubMed

    Kleineidam, R G; Jekel, P A; Beintema, J J; Situmorang, P

    1999-04-29

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is an interesting enzyme both for functional and structural reasons. The enzyme is the product of a gene duplication that occurred in an ancestral ruminant. It is possible to demonstrate the presence of seminal-type genes in all other investigated ruminant species, but they are not expressed and show features of pseudogenes. In this paper we report the determination of two pancreatic and one seminal-type ribonuclease gene sequences of swamp-type water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The two pancreatic sequences encode proteins with identical amino acid sequences as previously determined for the enzymes isolated from swamp-type and river-type water buffalo, respectively. The seminal-type sequence has no pseudogene features and codes for an enzyme with no unusual features compared with the active bovine enzyme, except for the replacement of one of the cysteines which takes part in the two intersubunit disulfide bridges. However, Western blotting demonstrates the presence of only small amounts of the pancreatic enzymes in water buffalo semen, suggesting that also in this species the seminal-type sequence is not expressed. But it is still possible that the gene is expressed somewhere else in the body or during development. Reconstruction of seminal-type ribonuclease sequences in ancestors of Bovinae and Bovidae indicates no serious abnormalities in the encoded proteins and leads us to the hypothesis that the ruminant seminal-type ribonuclease gene has not come to expression during most of its evolutionary history, but did not exhibit a high evolutionary rate that is generally observed in pseudogenes.

  14. Disparate Regulatory Mechanisms Control Fat3 and P75NTR Protein Transport through a Conserved Kif5-Interaction Domain

    PubMed Central

    Birkness, Jacqueline E.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    Directed transport delivers proteins to specific cellular locations and is one mechanism by which cells establish and maintain polarized cellular architectures. The atypical cadherin Fat3 directs the polarized extension of dendrites in retinal amacrine cells by influencing the distribution of cytoskeletal regulators during retinal development, however the mechanisms regulating the distribution of Fat3 remain unclear. We report a novel Kinesin/Kif5 Interaction domain (Kif5-ID) in Fat3 that facilitates Kif5B binding, and determines the distribution of Fat3 cytosolic domain constructs in neurons and MDCK cells. The Kif5-ID sequence is conserved in the neurotrophin receptor P75NTR, which also binds Kif5B, and Kif5-ID mutations similarly result in P75NTR mislocalization. Despite these similarities, Kif5B-mediated protein transport is differentially regulated by these two cargos. For Fat3, the Kif5-ID is regulated by alternative splicing, and the timecourse of splicing suggests that the distribution of Fat3 may switch between early and later stages of retinal development. In contrast, P75NTR binding to Kif5B is enhanced by tyrosine phosphorylation and thus has the potential to be dynamically regulated on a more rapid time scale. PMID:27788242

  15. Mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in eukaryotes: a highly conserved subunit composition highlighted by mining of protein databases.

    PubMed

    Cardol, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Compared to its bacterial counterpart which encompasses 14-17 subunits, mitochondrial complex I has almost tripled its subunit composition during evolution of eukaryotes, by recruitment of so-called accessory subunits, part of them being specific to distinct evolutionary lineages. The increasing availability of numerous broadly sampled eukaryotic genomes now enables the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of this large protein complex. Here, a combination of profile-based sequence comparisons and basic structural properties analyses at the protein level enabled to pinpoint homology relationships between complex I subunits from fungi, mammals or green plants, previously identified as "lineage-specific" subunits. In addition, homologs of at least 40 mammalian complex I subunits are present in representatives of all major eukaryote assemblages, half of them having not been investigated so far (Excavates, Chromalveolates, Amoebozoa). This analysis revealed that complex I was subject to a phenomenal increase in size that predated the diversification of extant eukaryotes, followed by very few lineage-specific additions/losses of subunits. The implications of this subunit conservation for studies of complex I are discussed. PMID:21749854

  16. Conserved small protein associates with the multidrug efflux pump AcrB and differentially affects antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Errett C.; Yin, Xuefeng; Paul, Brian J.; Astarita, Jillian L.; Storz, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    The AcrAB–TolC multidrug efflux pump confers resistance to a wide variety of antibiotics and other compounds in Escherichia coli. Here we show that AcrZ (formerly named YbhT), a 49-amino-acid inner membrane protein, associates with the AcrAB-TolC complex. Co-purification of AcrZ with AcrB, in the absence of both AcrA and TolC, two-hybrid assays and suppressor mutations indicate that this interaction occurs through the inner membrane protein AcrB. The highly conserved acrZ gene is coregulated with acrAB through induction by the MarA, Rob, and SoxS transcription regulators. In addition, mutants lacking AcrZ are sensitive to many, but not all, of the antibiotics transported by AcrAB–TolC. This differential antibiotic sensitivity suggests that AcrZ may enhance the ability of the AcrAB–TolC pump to export certain classes of substrates. PMID:23010927

  17. Structural conservation of prion strain specificities in recombinant prion protein fibrils in real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazunori; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    A major unsolved issue of prion biology is the existence of multiple strains with distinct phenotypes and this strain phenomenon is postulated to be associated with the conformational diversity of the abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QUIC) assay that uses Escherichia coli-derived recombinant prion protein (rPrP) for the sensitive detection of PrP(Sc) results in the formation of rPrP-fibrils seeded with various strains. We demonstrated that there are differences in the secondary structures, especially in the β-sheets, and conformational stability between 2 rPrP-fibrils seeded with either Chandler or 22L strains in the first round of RT-QUIC. In particular, the differences in conformational properties of these 2 rPrP-fibrils were common to those of the original PrP(Sc). However, the strain specificities of rPrP-fibrils seen in the first round were lost in subsequent rounds. Instead, our findings suggest that nonspecific fibrils became the major species, probable owing to their selective growth advantage in the RT-QUIC. This study shows that at least some strain-specific conformational properties of the original PrP(Sc) can be transmitted to rPrP-fibrils in vitro, but further conservation appears to require unknown cofactors or environmental conditions or both.

  18. A conserved flagella-associated protein in Chlamydomonas, FAP234, is essential for axonemal localization of tubulin polyglutamylase TTLL9.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Yanagisawa, Haru-aki; Liu, Zhongmei; Shibuya, Rie; Hirono, Masafumi; Kamiya, Ritsu

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin undergoes various posttranslational modifications, including polyglutamylation, which is catalyzed by enzymes belonging to the tubulin tyrosine ligase-like protein (TTLL) family. A previously isolated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant, tpg1, carries a mutation in a gene encoding a homologue of mammalian TTLL9 and displays lowered motility because of decreased polyglutamylation of axonemal tubulin. Here we identify a novel tpg1-like mutant, tpg2, which carries a mutation in the gene encoding FAP234, a flagella-associated protein of unknown function. Immunoprecipitation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation experiments show that FAP234 and TTLL9 form a complex. The mutant tpg1 retains FAP234 in the cell body and flagellar matrix but lacks it in the axoneme. In contrast, tpg2 lacks both TTLL9 and FAP234 in all fractions. In fla10, a temperature-sensitive mutant deficient in intraflagellar transport (IFT), both TTLL9 and FAP234 are lost from the flagellum at nonpermissive temperatures. These and other results suggest that FAP234 functions in stabilization and IFT-dependent transport of TTLL9. Both TTLL9 and FAP234 are conserved in most ciliated organisms. We propose that they constitute a polyglutamylation complex specialized for regulation of ciliary motility. PMID:24196831

  19. Recombinant Envelope-Proteins with Mutations in the Conserved Fusion Loop Allow Specific Serological Diagnosis of Dengue-Infections.

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, Alexandra; Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Niedrig, Matthias; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus and a major international public health concern in many tropical and sub-tropical areas worldwide. DENV is divided into four major serotypes, and infection with one serotype leads to immunity against the same, but not the other serotypes. The specific diagnosis of DENV-infections via antibody-detection is problematic due to the high degree of cross-reactivity displayed by antibodies against related flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), Yellow Fever virus (YFV) or Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). Especially in areas where several flaviviruses co-circulate or in the context of vaccination e.g. against YFV or TBEV, this severely complicates diagnosis and surveillance. Most flavivirus cross-reactive antibodies are produced against the highly conserved fusion loop (FL) domain in the viral envelope (E) protein. We generated insect-cell derived recombinant E-proteins of the four DENV-serotypes which contain point mutations in the FL domain. By using specific mixtures of these mutant antigens, cross-reactivity against heterologous flaviviruses was strongly reduced, enabling sensitive and specific diagnosis of the DENV-infected serum samples in IgG and IgM-measurements. These results have indications for the development of serological DENV-tests with improved specificity. PMID:26565964

  20. The clot gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a conserved member of the thioredoxin-like protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Giordano, E; Peluso, I; Rendina, R; Digilio, A; Furia, M

    2003-02-01

    The conversion of pyruvoyl-H(4)-pterin to pyrimidodiazepine (PDA), which is an essential step in the biosynthesis of the red components of Drosophila eye pigments known as drosopterins, requires the products of the genes sepia and clot. While the product of sepia has been shown to correspond to the enzyme PDA-synthase, the role of clot remains unknown, although the clot(1) allele was one of the first eye-color mutants to be isolated in Drosophila melanogaster,and much genetic and biochemical data has become available since. Here we report the cloning of the clot gene, describe its molecular organization and characterize the sequence alterations associated with the alleles cl(1) and cl(2). The coding properties of the gene show that it encodes a protein related to the Glutaredoxin class of the Thioredoxin-like enzyme superfamily, conserved members of which are found in human, mouse and plants. We suggest that the Clot protein is an essential component of a glutathione redox system required for the final step in the biosynthetic pathway for drosopterins. PMID:12589444

  1. Detection of Aichi virus with antibody targeting of conserved viral protein 1 epitope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Bao-Chen; Lin, You-Sheng; Chang, Jenn-Tzong; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chen, Jih-Jung; Chang, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-10-01

    Aichi virus (AiV) is an emerging single-stranded, positive-sense, non-enveloped RNA virus in the Picornaviridae that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. The first case of AiV infection in Taiwan was diagnosed in a human neonate with enterovirus-associated symptoms; the virus was successfully isolated and propagated. To establish a method to detect AiV, we analyzed the antigen epitope and generated a polyclonal antibody against AiV viral protein 1 (VP1). This peptide-purified anti-AiV VP1 antibody showed high specificity against AiV VP1 without cross-reaction to nine other tested strains of Picornaviruses. The anti-AiV VP1 antibody was used in immunofluorescence analysis, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to elucidate the cell tropism and replication kinetics of AiV. Use of the anti-AiV VP1 antibody also revealed AiV infection restriction with interferon type I and polyI/C antiviral treatment. The AiV infection and detection system may provide an in vitro platform for AiV virology study.

  2. SPN1, a conserved gene identified by suppression of a postrecruitment-defective yeast TATA-binding protein mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Julie A; Kraemer, Susan M; Stargell, Laurie A

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about TATA-binding protein (TBP) functions after recruitment to the TATA element, although several TBP mutants display postrecruitment defects. Here we describe a genetic screen for suppressors of a postrecruitment-defective TBP allele. Suppression was achieved by a single point mutation in a previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, SPN1 (suppresses postrecruitment functions gene number 1). SPN1 is an essential yeast gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. The suppressing mutation in SPN1 substitutes an asparagine for an invariant lysine at position 192 (spn1(K192N)). The spn1(K192N) strain is able to suppress additional alleles of TBP that possess postrecruitment defects, but not a TBP allele that is postrecruitment competent. In addition, Spn1p does not stably associate with TFIID in vivo. Cells containing the spn1(K192N) allele exhibit a temperature-sensitive phenotype and some defects in activated transcription, whereas constitutive transcription appears relatively robust in the mutant background. Consistent with an important role in postrecruitment functions, transcription from the CYC1 promoter, which has been shown to be regulated by postrecruitment mechanisms, is enhanced in spn1(K192N) cells. Moreover, we find that SPN1 is a member of the SPT gene family, further supporting a functional requirement for the SPN1 gene product in transcriptional processes. PMID:12524336

  3. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16797.001 PMID:27502555

  4. In Vitro Properties of the Conserved Mammalian Protein hnRNP D Suggest a Role in Telomere Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Eversole, Ashley; Maizels, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian chromosomes terminate with a 3′ tail which consists of reiterations of the G-rich repeat, d(TTAGGG). The telomeric tail is the primer for replication by telomerase, and it may also invade telomeric duplex DNA to form terminal lariat structures, or T loops. Here we show that the ubiquitous and highly conserved mammalian protein hnRNP D interacts specifically with the G-rich strand of the telomeric repeat. A single gene encodes multiple isoforms of hnRNP D. All isoforms bind comparably to the G-rich strand, and certain isoforms can also bind tightly and specifically to the C-rich telomeric strand. G-rich telomeric sequences readily form structures stabilized by G-G pairing, which can interfere with telomere replication by telomerase. We show that hnRNP D binding to the G-rich strand destabilizes intrastrand G-G pairing and that hnRNP D interacts specifically with telomerase in human cell extracts. This biochemical analysis suggest that hnRNP D could function in vivo to destabilize structures formed by telomeric G-rich tails and facilitate their extension by telomerase. PMID:10891483

  5. The Conserved G-Protein Coupled Receptor FSHR-1 Regulates Protective Host Responses to Infection and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Jennifer A.; Robinson, Joseph D.; Powell, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system’s ability to sense an infection is critical so that it can rapidly respond if pathogenic microorganisms threaten the host, but otherwise maintain a quiescent baseline state to avoid causing damage to the host or to commensal microorganisms. One important mechanism for discriminating between pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria is the recognition of cellular damage caused by a pathogen during the course of infection. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the conserved G-protein coupled receptor FSHR-1 is an important constituent of the innate immune response. FSHR-1 activates the expression of antimicrobial infection response genes in infected worms and delays accumulation of the ingested pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. FSHR-1 is central not only to the worm’s survival of infection by multiple pathogens, but also to the worm’s survival of xenobiotic cadmium and oxidative stresses. Infected worms produce reactive oxygen species to fight off the pathogens; FSHR-1 is required at the site of infection for the expression of detoxifying genes that protect the host from collateral damage caused by this defense response. Finally, the FSHR-1 pathway is important for the ability of worms to discriminate pathogenic from benign bacteria and subsequently initiate an aversive learning program that promotes selective pathogen avoidance. PMID:26360906

  6. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from variable regions, where all variants bind HLA. These regions, although variable, can thus be considered stable in terms of HLA binding and represent valuable vaccine targets. Results We applied this method to predict CD8+ T-cell targets in influenza A H7N9 hemagglutinin and significantly increased the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein or proteome using human leukocyte antigen binding predictions and made a web-accessible software implementation freely available at http://met-hilab.cbs.dtu.dk/blockcons/. PMID:26679766

  7. The Conserved G-Protein Coupled Receptor FSHR-1 Regulates Protective Host Responses to Infection and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth V; Grandi, Leah N; Giannini, Jennifer A; Robinson, Joseph D; Powell, Jennifer R

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system's ability to sense an infection is critical so that it can rapidly respond if pathogenic microorganisms threaten the host, but otherwise maintain a quiescent baseline state to avoid causing damage to the host or to commensal microorganisms. One important mechanism for discriminating between pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria is the recognition of cellular damage caused by a pathogen during the course of infection. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the conserved G-protein coupled receptor FSHR-1 is an important constituent of the innate immune response. FSHR-1 activates the expression of antimicrobial infection response genes in infected worms and delays accumulation of the ingested pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. FSHR-1 is central not only to the worm's survival of infection by multiple pathogens, but also to the worm's survival of xenobiotic cadmium and oxidative stresses. Infected worms produce reactive oxygen species to fight off the pathogens; FSHR-1 is required at the site of infection for the expression of detoxifying genes that protect the host from collateral damage caused by this defense response. Finally, the FSHR-1 pathway is important for the ability of worms to discriminate pathogenic from benign bacteria and subsequently initiate an aversive learning program that promotes selective pathogen avoidance. PMID:26360906

  8. The evolutionarily conserved G protein-coupled receptor SREB2/GPR85 influences brain size, behavior, and vulnerability to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Straub, Richard E.; Marenco, Stefano; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Matsumoto, Shun-ichiro; Fujikawa, Akihiko; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Shobo, Miwako; Takahashi, Shinji; Yarimizu, Junko; Yuri, Masatoshi; Hiramoto, Masashi; Morita, Shuji; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Sasayama, Takeshi; Terai, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Masayasu; Miyake, Akira; Callicott, Joseph H.; Egan, Michael F.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kempf, Lucas; Honea, Robyn; Vakkalanka, Radha Krishna; Takasaki, Jun; Kamohara, Masazumi; Soga, Takatoshi; Hiyama, Hideki; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Ayako; Nishimura, Shintaro; Matsuoka, Nobuya; Kobori, Masato; Matsushime, Hitoshi; Katoh, Masao; Furuichi, Kiyoshi; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family is highly diversified and involved in many forms of information processing. SREB2 (GPR85) is the most conserved GPCR throughout vertebrate evolution and is expressed abundantly in brain structures exhibiting high levels of plasticity, e.g., the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Here, we show that SREB2 is involved in determining brain size, modulating diverse behaviors, and potentially in vulnerability to schizophrenia. Mild overexpression of SREB2 caused significant brain weight reduction and ventricular enlargement in transgenic (Tg) mice as well as behavioral abnormalities mirroring psychiatric disorders, e.g., decreased social interaction, abnormal sensorimotor gating, and impaired memory. SREB2 KO mice showed a reciprocal phenotype, a significant increase in brain weight accompanying a trend toward enhanced memory without apparent other behavioral abnormalities. In both Tg and KO mice, no gross malformation of brain structures was observed. Because of phenotypic overlap between SREB2 Tg mice and schizophrenia, we sought a possible link between the two. Minor alleles of two SREB2 SNPs, located in intron 2 and in the 3′ UTR, were overtransmitted to schizophrenia patients in a family-based sample and showed an allele load association with reduced hippocampal gray matter volume in patients. Our data implicate SREB2 as a potential risk factor for psychiatric disorders and its pathway as a target for psychiatric therapy. PMID:18413613

  9. A single conserved leucine residue on the first intracellular loop regulates ER export of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Duvernay, Matthew T; Dong, Chunmin; Zhang, Xiaoping; Robitaille, Mélanie; Hébert, Terence E; Wu, Guangyu

    2009-05-01

    The intrinsic structural determinants for export trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been mainly identified in the termini of the receptors. In this report, we determined the role of the first intracellular loop (ICL1) in the transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface of GPCRs. The alpha(2B)-adrenergic receptor (AR) mutant lacking the ICL1 is unable to traffic to the cell surface and to initiate signaling measured as ERK1/2 activation. Mutagenesis studies identify a single Leu48 residue in the ICL1 modulates alpha(2B)-AR export from the ER. The ER export function of the Leu48 residue can be substituted by Phe, but not Ile, Val, Tyr and Trp, and is unlikely involved in correct folding or dimerization of alpha(2B)-AR in the ER. Importantly, the isolated Leu residue is remarkably conserved in the center of the ICL1s among the family A GPCRs and is also required for the export to the cell surface of beta(2)-AR, alpha(1B)-AR and angiotensin II type 1 receptor. These data indicate a crucial role for a single Leu residue within the ICL1 in ER export of GPCRs.

  10. Transactivation specificity is conserved among p53 family proteins and depends on a response element sequence code

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Monti, Paola; Bisio, Alessandra; Nguyen, H. Thien; Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Ramos, Ana; Foggetti, Giorgia; Menichini, Paola; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A.; Viadiu, Hector; Fronza, Gilberto; Inga, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Structural and biochemical studies have demonstrated that p73, p63 and p53 recognize DNA with identical amino acids and similar binding affinity. Here, measuring transactivation activity for a large number of response elements (REs) in yeast and human cell lines, we show that p53 family proteins also have overlapping transactivation profiles. We identified mutations at conserved amino acids of loops L1 and L3 in the DNA-binding domain that tune the transactivation potential nearly equally in p73, p63 and p53. For example, the mutant S139F in p73 has higher transactivation potential towards selected REs, enhanced DNA-binding cooperativity in vitro and a flexible loop L1 as seen in the crystal structure of the protein–DNA complex. By studying, how variations in the RE sequence affect transactivation specificity, we discovered a RE-transactivation code that predicts enhanced transactivation; this correlation is stronger for promoters of genes associated with apoptosis. PMID:23892287

  11. The conserved protein Dre2 uses essential [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters for its function in cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Netz, Daili J A; Genau, Heide M; Weiler, Benjamin D; Bill, Eckhard; Pierik, Antonio J; Lill, Roland

    2016-07-15

    The cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly (CIA) machinery comprises 11 essential components and matures Fe-S proteins involved in translation and genome maintenance. Maturation is initiated by the electron transfer chain NADPH-diflavin reductase Tah18-Fe-S protein Dre2 that facilitates the de novo assembly of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the scaffold complex Cfd1-Nbp35. Tah18-Dre2 also play a critical role in the assembly of the diferric tyrosyl radical cofactor of ribonucleotide reductase. Dre2 contains eight conserved cysteine residues as potential co-ordinating ligands for Fe-S clusters but their functional importance and the type of bound clusters is unclear. In the present study, we use a combination of mutagenesis, cell biological and biochemical as well as UV-visible, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches to show that the yeast Dre2 cysteine residues Cys(252), Cys(263), Cys(266) and Cys(268) (motif I) bind a [2Fe-2S] cluster, whereas cysteine residues Cys(311), Cys(314), Cys(322) and Cys(325) (motif II) co-ordinate a [4Fe-4S] cluster. All of these residues with the exception of Cys(252) are essential for cell viability, cytosolic Fe-S protein activity and in vivo (55)Fe-S cluster incorporation. The N-terminal methyltransferase-like domain of Dre2 is important for proper Fe-S cluster assembly at motifs I and II, which occurs in an interdependent fashion. Our findings further resolve why recombinant Dre2 from Arabidopsis, Trypanosoma or humans has previously been isolated with a single [2Fe-2S] instead of native [2Fe-2S] plus [4Fe-4S] clusters. In the presence of oxygen, the motif I-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster is labile and the motif II-bound [4Fe-4S] cluster is readily converted into a [2Fe-2S] cluster.

  12. C-terminal-binding protein interacting protein binds directly to adenovirus early region 1A through its N-terminal region and conserved region 3.

    PubMed

    Bruton, R K; Rasti, M; Mapp, K L; Young, N; Carter, R Z; Abramowicz, I A; Sedgwick, G G; Onion, D F; Shuen, M; Mymryk, J S; Turnell, A S; Grand, R J A

    2007-11-22

    C-terminal-binding protein interacting protein (CtIP) was first isolated as a binding partner of C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP). It is considered to contribute to the transcriptional repression and cell cycle regulatory properties of the retinoblastoma (Rb) family of proteins and to have a role in the cellular response to DNA damage. Here, we have shown that CtIP is a novel target for the adenovirus oncoprotein early region 1A (AdE1A). AdE1A associates with CtIP in both Ad5E1-transformed cells and Ad5-infected cells and binds directly in glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assays. Two binding sites have been mapped on Ad5E1A - the N-terminal alpha-helical region (residues 1-30) and conserved region 3 (CR3) - the transcriptional activation domain. CtIP can bind AdE1A and CtBP independently, raising the possibility that ternary complexes exist in Ad-transformed and -infected cells. Significantly, reduction of CtIP expression with small interfering RNAs results in reduction of the ability of a Gal4 DNA-binding domain-CR3 construct to transactivate a Gal 4-responsive luciferase reporter and this effect is reversed by reduction of CtBP expression. Therefore, in this model, CtIP acts as a transcriptional co-activator of AdE1A when dissociated from CtBP, through the action of AdE1A. These data are consistent with observations that CtIP expression is induced by AdE1A during viral infection and that reduction of CtIP expression with RNA interference can retard virus replication. In addition, AdE1A causes disruption of the CtIP/Rb complex during viral infection by its interaction with CtIP, possibly contributing to transcriptional derepression. PMID:17546052

  13. FeatureMap3D--a tool to map protein features and sequence conservation onto homologous structures in the PDB.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Staerfeldt, Hans-Henrik; Sackett, Peter Wad; Mølgaard, Anne

    2006-07-01

    FeatureMap3D is a web-based tool that maps protein features onto 3D structures. The user provides sequences annotated with any feature of interest, such as post-translational modifications, protease cleavage sites or exonic structure and FeatureMap3D will then search the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for structures of homologous proteins. The results are displayed both as an annotated sequence alignment, where the user-provided annotations as well as the sequence conservation between the query and the target sequence are displayed, and also as a publication-quality image of the 3D protein structure with the selected features and sequence conservation enhanced. The results are also returned in a readily parsable text format as well as a PyMol (http://pymol.sourceforge.net/) script file, which allows the user to easily modify the protein structure image to suit a specific purpose. FeatureMap3D can also be used without sequence annotation, to evaluate the quality of the alignment of the input sequences to the most homologous structures in the PDB, through the sequence conservation colored 3D structure visualization tool. FeatureMap3D is available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/FeatureMap3D/. PMID:16845115

  14. Interactions of an Arabidopsis RanBPM homologue with LisH-CTLH domain proteins revealed high conservation of CTLH complexes in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RanBPM (Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organizing centre) was originally reported as a centrosome-associated protein in human cells. However, RanBPM protein containing highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains is currently considered as a scaffolding protein with multiple cellular functions. A plant homologue of RanBPM has not yet been characterized. Results Based on sequence similarity, we identified a homologue of the human RanBPM in Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRanBPM protein has highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains. Cell fractionation showed that endogenous AtRanBPM or expressed GFP-AtRanBPM are mainly cytoplasmic proteins with only a minor portion detectable in microsomal fractions. AtRanBPM was identified predominantly in the form of soluble cytoplasmic complexes ~230 – 500 kDa in size. Immunopurification of AtRanBPM followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified proteins containing LisH and CRA domains; LisH, CRA, RING-U-box domains and a transducin/WD40 repeats in a complex with AtRanBPM. Homologues of identified proteins are known to be components of the C-terminal to the LisH motif (CTLH) complexes in humans and budding yeast. Microscopic analysis of GFP-AtRanBPM in vivo and immunofluorescence localization of endogenous AtRanBPM protein in cultured cells and seedlings of Arabidopsis showed mainly cytoplasmic and nuclear localization. Absence of colocalization with γ-tubulin was consistent with the biochemical data and suggests another than a centrosomal role of the AtRanBPM protein. Conclusion We showed that as yet uncharacterized Arabidopsis RanBPM protein physically interacts with LisH-CTLH domain-containing proteins. The newly identified high molecular weight cytoplasmic protein complexes of AtRanBPM showed homology with CTLH types of complexes described in mammals and budding yeast. Although the exact functions of the CTLH complexes in scaffolding of protein degradation, in protein interactions and in

  15. Rv0216, a Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Myocbacterium Tuberculosis that is Essential for Bacterial Survival During Infection, has a Double Hotdog Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Castell,A.; Johansson, P.; Unge, T.; Jones, T.; Backbro, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains about 4000 genes, of which approximately a third code for proteins of unknown function or are classified as conserved hypothetical proteins. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of one of these, the rv0216 gene product, which has been shown to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth in vivo. The structure exhibits the greatest similarity to bacterial and eukaryotic hydratases that catalyse the R-specific hydration of 2-enoyl coenzyme A. However, only part of the catalytic machinery is conserved in Rv0216 and it showed no activity for the substrate crotonyl-CoA. The structure of Rv0216 allows us to assign new functional annotations to a family of seven other M. tuberculosis proteins, a number if which are essential for bacterial survival during infection and growth.

  16. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  17. Charge-based interaction conserved within histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complexes is needed for protein stability, histone methylation, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mersman, Douglas P; Du, Hai-Ning; Fingerman, Ian M; South, Paul F; Briggs, Scott D

    2012-01-20

    Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases are conserved from yeast to humans, assemble in multisubunit complexes, and are needed to regulate gene expression. The yeast H3K4 methyltransferase complex, Set1 complex or complex of proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS), consists of Set1 and conserved Set1-associated proteins: Swd1, Swd2, Swd3, Spp1, Bre2, Sdc1, and Shg1. The removal of the WD40 domain-containing subunits Swd1 and Swd3 leads to a loss of Set1 protein and consequently a complete loss of H3K4 methylation. However, until now, how these WD40 domain-containing proteins interact with Set1 and contribute to the stability of Set1 and H3K4 methylation has not been determined. In this study, we identified small basic and acidic patches that mediate protein interactions between the C terminus of Swd1 and the nSET domain of Set1. Absence of either the basic or acidic patches of Set1 and Swd1, respectively, disrupts the interaction between Set1 and Swd1, diminishes Set1 protein levels, and abolishes H3K4 methylation. Moreover, these basic and acidic patches are also important for cell growth, telomere silencing, and gene expression. We also show that the basic and acidic patches of Set1 and Swd1 are conserved in their human counterparts SET1A/B and RBBP5, respectively, and are needed for the protein interaction between SET1A and RBBP5. Therefore, this charge-based interaction is likely important for maintaining the protein stability of the human SET1A/B methyltransferase complexes so that proper H3K4 methylation, cell growth, and gene expression can also occur in mammals. PMID:22147691

  18. Serological Conservation of Parasite-Infected Erythrocytes Predicts Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Gene Expression but Not Severity of Childhood Malaria.

    PubMed

    Warimwe, George M; Abdi, Abdirahman I; Muthui, Michelle; Fegan, Gregory; Musyoki, Jennifer N; Marsh, Kevin; Bull, Peter C

    2016-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), expressed on P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes, is a major family of clonally variant targets of naturally acquired immunity to malaria. Previous studies have demonstrated that in areas where malaria is endemic, antibodies to infected erythrocytes from children with severe malaria tend to be more seroprevalent than antibodies to infected erythrocytes from children with nonsevere malaria. These data have led to a working hypothesis that PfEMP1 variants associated with parasite virulence are relatively conserved in structure. However, the longevity of such serologically conserved variants in the parasite population is unknown. Here, using infected erythrocytes from recently sampled clinical P. falciparum samples, we measured serological conservation using pools of antibodies in sera that had been sampled 10 to 12 years earlier. The serological conservation of infected erythrocytes strongly correlated with the expression of specific PfEMP1 subsets previously found to be associated with severe malaria. However, we found no association between serological conservation per se and disease severity within these data. This contrasts with the simple hypothesis that P. falciparum isolates with a serologically conserved group of PfEMP1 variants cause severe malaria. The data are instead consistent with periodic turnover of the immunodominant epitopes of PfEMP1 associated with severe malaria.

  19. Mutations of Conserved Residues in the Major Homology Region Arrest Assembling HIV-1 Gag as a Membrane-Targeted Intermediate Containing Genomic RNA and Cellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Motoko; Robinson, Bridget A.; Chutiraka, Kasana; Geary, Clair D.; Reed, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major homology region (MHR) is a highly conserved motif that is found within the Gag protein of all orthoretroviruses and some retrotransposons. While it is widely accepted that the MHR is critical for assembly of HIV-1 and other retroviruses, how the MHR functions and why it is so highly conserved are not understood. Moreover, consensus is lacking on when HIV-1 MHR residues function during assembly. Here, we first addressed previous conflicting reports by confirming that MHR deletion, like conserved MHR residue substitution, leads to a dramatic reduction in particle production in human and nonhuman primate cells expressing HIV-1 proviruses. Next, we used biochemical analyses and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that conserved residues in the MHR are required after assembling Gag has associated with genomic RNA, recruited critical host factors involved in assembly, and targeted to the plasma membrane. The exact point of inhibition at the plasma membrane differed depending on the specific mutation, with one MHR mutant arrested as a membrane-associated intermediate that is stable upon high-salt treatment and other MHR mutants arrested as labile, membrane-associated intermediates. Finally, we observed the same assembly-defective phenotypes when the MHR deletion or conserved MHR residue substitutions were engineered into Gag from a subtype B, lab-adapted provirus or Gag from a subtype C primary isolate that was codon optimized. Together, our data support a model in which MHR residues act just after membrane targeting, with some MHR residues promoting stability and another promoting multimerization of the membrane-targeted assembling Gag oligomer. IMPORTANCE The retroviral Gag protein exhibits extensive amino acid sequence variation overall; however, one region of Gag, termed the major homology region, is conserved among all retroviruses and even some yeast retrotransposons, although the reason for this conservation remains poorly understood. Highly

  20. Essential domains of the PRP21 splicing factor are implicated in the binding to PRP9 and PRP11 proteins and are conserved through evolution.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Tartakoff, A M; Krämer, A; Legrain, P

    1996-06-01

    The yeast Prp9p, Prp11p, Prp21p proteins form a multimolecular complex identified as the SF3a splicing factor in higher eukaryotes. This factor is required for the assembly of the prespliceosome. Prp21p interacts with both Prp9p and Prp11p, but the molecular basis of these interactions is unknown. Prp21p, its human homologue, and the so-called SWAP proteins share a tandemly repeated motif, the surp module. Given the evolutionary conservation and the role of SWAP proteins as splicing regulators, it has been proposed that surp motifs are essential for interactions between Prp21p and other splicing factors. In order to characterize functional domains of Prp21p and to identify potential additional functions of this protein, we isolated a series of heat-sensitive prp21 mutants. Our results indicate that prp21 heat-sensitive mutations are associated with defects in the interaction with Prp9p, but not with Prp11p. Interestingly, most heat-sensitive point mutants associate a strong splicing defect with a pre-mRNA nuclear export phenotype, as does the prp9-1 heat-sensitive mutant. Deletion analyses led to the definition of domains required for viability. These domains are responsible for the interaction with Prp9p and Prp11p and are conserved through evolution. They do not include the most conserved surp1 module, suggesting that the conservation of this motif in two families of proteins may reflect a still unknown function dispensable in yeast under standard conditions.

  1. Conserved charged residues in the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Ran GTPase activating protein are required for Ran binding and GTPase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, J; Gerke, V

    1999-01-01

    GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Ran, a Ras-related GTPase participating in nucleocytoplasmic transport, have been identified in different species ranging from yeast to man. All RanGAPs are characterized by a conserved domain consisting of eight leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) interrupted at two positions by so-called separating regions, the latter being unique for RanGAPs within the family of LRR proteins. The cytosolic RanGAP activity is essential for the Ran GTPase cycle which in turn provides directionality in nucleocytoplasmic transport, but the structural basis for the interaction between Ran and its GAP has not been elucidated. In order to gain a better understanding of this interaction we generated a number of mutant RanGAPs carrying amino acid substitutions in the LRR domain and analysed their complex formation with Ran as well as their ability to stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of the G protein. We show that conserved charged residues present in the separating regions of the LRR domain are indispensable for efficient Ran binding and GAP activity. These separating regions contain three conserved arginines which could possibly serve as catalytic residues similar to the arginine fingers identified in GAPs for other small GTPases. However, mutations in two of these arginines do not affect the GAP activity and replacement of the third conserved arginine (Arg91 in human RanGAP) severely interferes not only with GAP activity but also with Ran binding. This indicates that RanGAP-stimulated GTP hydrolysis on Ran does not involve a catalytic arginine residue but requires certain charged residues of the LRR domain of the GAP for mediating the protein-protein interaction. PMID:10527945

  2. The Evolutionarily Conserved Protein LAS1 Is Required for Pre-rRNA Processing at Both Ends of ITS2

    PubMed Central

    Schillewaert, Stéphanie; Wacheul, Ludivine; Lhomme, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis entails the formation of mature rRNAs from long precursor molecules, following a complex pre-rRNA processing pathway. Why the generation of mature rRNA ends is so complicated is unclear. Nor is it understood how pre-rRNA processing is coordinated at distant sites on pre-rRNA molecules. Here we characterized, in budding yeast and human cells, the evolutionarily conserved protein Las1. We found that, in both species, Las1 is required to process ITS2, which separates the 5.8S and 25S/28S rRNAs. In yeast, Las1 is required for pre-rRNA processing at both ends of ITS2. It is required for Rrp6-dependent formation of the 5.8S rRNA 3′ end and for Rat1-dependent formation of the 25S rRNA 5′ end. We further show that the Rat1-Rai1 5′-3′ exoribonuclease (exoRNase) complex functionally connects processing at both ends of the 5.8S rRNA. We suggest that pre-rRNA processing is coordinated at both ends of 5.8S rRNA and both ends of ITS2, which are brought together by pre-rRNA folding, by an RNA processing complex. Consistently, we note the conspicuous presence of ∼7- or 8-nucleotide extensions on both ends of 5.8S rRNA precursors and at the 5′ end of pre-25S RNAs suggestive of a protected spacer fragment of similar length. PMID:22083961

  3. Glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins are functionally conserved in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa during cold adaptation process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yeol; Kim, Won Yong; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Oh, Seung Han; Han, Yeon Soo; Kang, Hunseung

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the increasing amount of knowledge regarding the functional roles of glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (GRPs) in Arabidopsis thaliana in stress responses, the physiological functions of GRPs in rice (Oryza sativa) currently remain largely unknown. In this study, the functional roles of six OsGRPs from rice on the growth of E. coli and plants under cold or freezing stress conditions have been evaluated. Among the six OsGRPs investigated, OsGRP1, OsGRP4, and OsGRP6 were shown to have the ability to complement cold-sensitive BX04 E. coli mutant cells under low temperature conditions, and this complementation ability was correlated closely with their DNA- and RNA-melting abilities. Moreover, OsGRP1 and OsGRP4 rescued the growth-defect of a cold-sensitive Arabidopsis grp7 mutant plant under cold and freezing stress, and OsGRP6 conferred freezing tolerance in the grp7 mutant plant, in which the expression of AtGRP7 was suppressed and is sensitive to cold and freezing stresses. OsGRP4 and OsGRP6 complemented the defect in mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in grp7 mutants during cold stress. Considering that AtGRP7 confers freezing tolerance in plants and harbours RNA chaperone activity during the cold adaptation process, the results of the present study provide evidence that GRPs in rice and Arabidopsis are functionally conserved, and also suggest that GRPs perform a function as RNA chaperones during the cold adaptation process in monocotyledonous plants, as well as in dicotyledonous plants. PMID:20231330

  4. The roles of the conserved tyrosine in the β2-α2 loop of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danzhi; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Prions cause neurodegenerative diseases for which no cure exists. Despite decades of research activities the function of the prion protein (PrP) in mammalians is not known. Moreover, little is known on the molecular mechanisms of the self-assembly of the PrP from its monomeric state (cellular PrP, PrP(C)) to the multimeric state. The latter state includes the toxic species (scrapie PrP, PrP(Sc)) knowledge of which would facilitate the development of drugs against prion diseases. Here we analyze the role of a tyrosine residue (Y169) which is strictly conserved in mammalian PrPs. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies of many mammalian PrP(C) proteins have provided evidence of a conformational equilibrium between a 3(10)-helical turn and a type I β turn conformation in the β2-α2 loop (residues 165-175). In vitro cell-free experiments of the seeded conversion of PrP(C) indicate that non-aromatic residues at position 169 reduce the formation of proteinase K-resistant PrP. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of monomeric PrP and several single-point mutants show that Y169 stabilizes the 3(10)-helical turn conformation more than single-point mutants at position 169 or residues in contact with it. In the 3(10)-helical turn conformation the hydrophobic and aggregation-prone segment 169-YSNQNNF-175 is buried and thus not-available for self-assembly. From the combined analysis of simulation and experimental results it emerges that Y169 is an aggregation gatekeeper with a twofold role. Mutations related to 3 human prion diseases are interpreted on the basis of the gatekeeper role in the monomeric state. Another potential role of the Y169 side chain is the stabilization of the ordered aggregates, i.e., reduction of frangibility of filamentous protofibrils and fibrils, which is likely to reduce the generation of toxic species. PMID:26689486

  5. The roles of the conserved tyrosine in the β2-α2 loop of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danzhi; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Prions cause neurodegenerative diseases for which no cure exists. Despite decades of research activities the function of the prion protein (PrP) in mammalians is not known. Moreover, little is known on the molecular mechanisms of the self-assembly of the PrP from its monomeric state (cellular PrP, PrP(C)) to the multimeric state. The latter state includes the toxic species (scrapie PrP, PrP(Sc)) knowledge of which would facilitate the development of drugs against prion diseases. Here we analyze the role of a tyrosine residue (Y169) which is strictly conserved in mammalian PrPs. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies of many mammalian PrP(C) proteins have provided evidence of a conformational equilibrium between a 3(10)-helical turn and a type I β turn conformation in the β2-α2 loop (residues 165-175). In vitro cell-free experiments of the seeded conversion of PrP(C) indicate that non-aromatic residues at position 169 reduce the formation of proteinase K-resistant PrP. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of monomeric PrP and several single-point mutants show that Y169 stabilizes the 3(10)-helical turn conformation more than single-point mutants at position 169 or residues in contact with it. In the 3(10)-helical turn conformation the hydrophobic and aggregation-prone segment 169-YSNQNNF-175 is buried and thus not-available for self-assembly. From the combined analysis of simulation and experimental results it emerges that Y169 is an aggregation gatekeeper with a twofold role. Mutations related to 3 human prion diseases are interpreted on the basis of the gatekeeper role in the monomeric state. Another potential role of the Y169 side chain is the stabilization of the ordered aggregates, i.e., reduction of frangibility of filamentous protofibrils and fibrils, which is likely to reduce the generation of toxic species.

  6. Role of conserved residues in structure and stability: Tryptophans of human serum retinol-binding protein, a model for the lipocalin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lesley H.; Chrysina, Evangelia D.; Irons, Laurence I.; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Brew, Keith

    2001-01-01

    Serum retinol binding protein (RBP) is a member of the lipocalin family, proteins with up-and-down β-barrel folds, low levels of sequence identity, and diverse functions. Although tryptophan 24 of RBP is highly conserved among lipocalins, it does not play a direct role in activity. To determine if Trp24 and other conserved residues have roles in stability and/or folding, we investigated the effects of conservative substitutions for the four tryptophans and some adjacent residues on the structure, stability, and spectroscopic properties of apo-RBP. Crystal structures of recombinant human apo-RBP and of a mutant with substitutions for tryptophans 67 and 91 at 1.7 Å and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, as well as stability measurements, indicate that these relatively exposed tryptophans have little influence on structure or stability. Although Trp105 is largely buried in the wall of the β-barrel, it can be replaced with minor effects on stability to thermal and chemical unfolding. In contrast, substitutions of three different amino acids for Trp24 or replacement of Arg139, a conserved residue that interacts with Trp24, lead to similar large losses in stability and lower yields of native protein generated by in vitro folding. The results and the coordinated nature of natural substitutions at these sites support the idea that conserved residues in functionally divergent homologs have roles in stabilizing the native relative to misfolded structures. They also establish conditions for studies of the kinetics of folding and unfolding by ideying spectroscopic signals for monitoring the formation of different substructures. PMID:11604536

  7. Microbial Relatives of the Seed Storage Proteins of Higher Plants: Conservation of Structure and Diversification of Function during Evolution of the Cupin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Dunwell, Jim M.; Khuri, Sawsan; Gane, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes the recent discovery of the cupin superfamily (from the Latin term “cupa,” a small barrel) of functionally diverse proteins that initially were limited to several higher plant proteins such as seed storage proteins, germin (an oxalate oxidase), germin-like proteins, and auxin-binding protein. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of two vicilins, seed proteins with a characteristic β-barrel core, led to the identification of a small number of conserved residues and thence to the discovery of several microbial proteins which share these key amino acids. In particular, there is a highly conserved pattern of two histidine-containing motifs with a varied intermotif spacing. This cupin signature is found as a central component of many microbial proteins including certain types of phosphomannose isomerase, polyketide synthase, epimerase, and dioxygenase. In addition, the signature has been identified within the N-terminal effector domain in a subgroup of bacterial AraC transcription factors. As well as these single-domain cupins, this survey has identified other classes of two-domain bicupins including bacterial gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate dioxygenases, fungal oxalate decarboxylases, and legume sucrose-binding proteins. Cupin evolution is discussed from the perspective of the structure-function relationships, using data from the genomes of several prokaryotes, especially Bacillus subtilis. Many of these functions involve aspects of sugar metabolism and cell wall synthesis and are concerned with responses to abiotic stress such as heat, desiccation, or starvation. Particular emphasis is also given to the oxalate-degrading enzymes from microbes, their biological significance, and their value in a range of medical and other applications. PMID:10704478

  8. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction for Q4DY78, a conserved kinetoplastid-specific protein from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    D'Andréa, Éverton Dias; Diehl, Anne; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosma brucei and Leishmania spp. are kinetoplastid protozoa causative agents of Chagas disease, sleeping sickness and leishmaniasis, respectively, neglected tropical diseases estimated to infect millions of people worldwide. Their genome sequencing has revealed approximately 50 % of genes encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function, opening possibilities for novel target identification and drug discovery. Q4DY78 is a putative essential protein from T. cruzi conserved in the related kinetoplastids and divergent from mammalian host proteins. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C chemical shift assignments and secondary structure analysis of the Q4DY78 protein as basis for NMR structure determination, functional analysis and drug screening.

  9. Isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) mesenchyme fork head-1 genes reveals conservation of their gene and protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Naoyuki; Iida, Kiyoshi; Yang, Xiao-Li

    1997-05-01

    The very recently found evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding domain of 100 amino acids, termed the fork head domain, emerged from a sequence comparison of the rat hepatocyte transcription factor HNF-3{alpha} and the homeotic gene fork head of Drosophila. We previously isolated a new member of this family, the mesenchyme fork head-1 (MFH-1) gene, which is expressed in developing mesenchyme. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) chromosomal MFH-1 genes and the determination of the gene and protein structures of MFH-1. We found that the MFH-1 gene has no introns and that the identity of the amino acid sequences of mouse and human MFH-1 proteins is 94%. We also investigated the transcriptional activity of the mouse and human MFH-1 proteins and found that both proteins act as positive transactivators. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Two Pairs of Conserved Cysteines Are Required for the Oxidative Activity of Ero1p in Protein Disulfide Bond Formation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Frand, Alison R.; Kaiser, Chris A.

    2000-01-01

    In the major pathway for protein disulfide-bond formation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), oxidizing equivalents flow from the conserved ER-membrane protein Ero1p to secretory proteins via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Herein, a mutational analysis of the yeast ERO1 gene identifies two pairs of conserved cysteines likely to form redox-active disulfide bonds in Ero1p. Cys100, Cys105, Cys352, and Cys355 of Ero1p are important for oxidative protein folding and for cell viability, whereas Cys90, Cys208, and Cys349 are dispensable for these functions. Substitution of Cys100 with alanine impedes the capture of Ero1p-Pdi1p mixed-disulfide complexes from yeast, and also blocks oxidation of Pdi1p in vivo. Cys352 and Cys355 are required to maintain the fully oxidized redox state of Ero1p, and also play an auxiliary role in thiol–disulfide exchange with Pdi1p. These results suggest a model for the function of Ero1p wherein Cys100 and Cys105 form a redox-active disulfide bond that engages directly in thiol–disulfide exchange with ER oxidoreductases. The Cys352–Cys355 disulfide could then serve to reoxidize the Cys100–Cys105 cysteine pair, possibly through an intramolecular thiol–disulfide exchange reaction. PMID:10982384

  11. The methionine-rich low-molecular-weight chloroplast heat-shock protein: evolutionary conservation and accumulation in relation to thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Downs, C; Heckathorn, S; Bryan, J; Coleman, J

    1998-02-01

    The evolutionary conservation of the low-molecular-weight chloroplast-localized heat-shock protein (LMW chlpHsp) in vascular plants was examined using immunological methods. An antibody (Abmet) specific to the LMW chlpHsp was produced using a synthetic 28-residue peptide containing the most conserved elements of its unique "methionine-rich domain" as an antigen. This antibody detected a heat-inducible low-molecular-weight chloroplast protein in plants of six divergent Anthophyta species, including C3, C4, CAM, monocot, and dicot species. Abmet also detected a LMW chlpHsp in species from the Divisions Psilotophyta, Equisetophyta, Polypodiophyta, and Ginkgophyta. A preliminary examination of the relationship between accumulation of the LMW chlpHsp and habitat was also conducted. Seven Anthophyta species originating from both warm- and cool-temperature habitats were grown at 28C and then heat stressed at 40C. A positive qualitative relationship between the accumulation of the LMW chlpHsp and organismal thermotolerance in these species was observed; similar results were obtained separately with four nonAnthophyta species. The strong evolutionary conservation of this LMW Hsp and its localization to the chloroplast, and the correlation between production of this protein and plant thermotolerance, suggest that the LMW chlpHsp plays an important role in adaptation to heat stress.

  12. The chicken FMR1 gene is highly conserved with a CCT 5{prime} - untranslated repeat and encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.K.; Zhang, F.; Ashley, C.T. Jr.; Warren, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The transcriptional silencing of the human gene, fragile X metal retardation 1 (FMR1), is due to abnormal methylation in response to an expanded 5{prime}-untranslated CGG trinucleotide repeat and accounts for most cases of fragile X syndrome, a frequent inherited form of metal retardation. Although the encoded fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is known to have properties of a RNA-binding protein, the precise function of FMRP remains to be elucidated. We report the cloning of the chicken homolog of FMR1 and show strong evolutionary conservation, with nucleotide and amino acid identities of 85 and 92%, respectively, between chicken and human. In place of the mammalian CGG trinucleotide repeat, a 99-nt tripartite repetitive element containing a CCT trinucleotide repeat flanked on both sides by dinucleotide repeats was identified. Blocks of highly conserved 3{prime}-untranslated sequence were also found. Within the coding region, two copies each of the highly conserved K homology motif and the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) box motif, both ribonucleotide particle family domains implicated in RNA binding, were identified. Chicken FMRP was found to bind RNA in vitro, and this activity correlated with the presence of the carboxy-terminal portion of the protein that includes the RGG motifs. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Conserved Regions as Markers of Different Patterns of Expression and Distribution of the Mucin-Associated Surface Proteins of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    De Pablos, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    The MASP gene family is the second most widely represented gene family in the genome of Trypanosoma cruzi. One of its main characteristics is that its 5′ and 3′ regions are highly conserved. We assessed the expression of these conserved regions as a marker for T. cruzi and also analyzed the expression of the masp genes and MASP proteins. In parasite strains CL-Brener (DTUVI lineage) and PAN4 (DTUI lineage), masp genes were expressed at different levels both with regard to the two strains and between stages in the parasite's life cycle. We also studied the expression of the family during the intracellular cycle of T. cruzi, using antibodies against the conserved MASP signal peptide (SP). Fluorescence intensity showed an increase in expression from 24 h onwards, with a peak in intensity at 72 h postinfection. After 24 and 48 h, the MASP proteins were expressed in 33.33% and 57.14% of the amastigotes, respectively. Our data show that not only the extracellular forms of T. cruzi but also the intracellular phases express this type of protein, though to different extents in the various forms of the parasite. PMID:22025509

  14. CENP-B autoantigen is a conserved protein from humans to higher plants: identification of the aminoterminal domain in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Cisneros, O; Fraire-Velázquez, S; Moreno, J; Herrera-Esparza, R

    1997-06-01

    Centromeres are critical structures in cell division, and CENP-B is the most important protein of the centromeric complex recognized by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma. Our major aim was to demonstrate whether CENP-B is a conserved protein along the phylogenic scale including the higher plants. Vegetal and human cell proteins were extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris and HEp-2 cells and were characterized by PAGE, Western blot, and human autoimmune sera containing anti-CENP-B autoantibodies. The aminoterminus of the gene encoding for CENP-B from HEp-2 cells and Phaseolus vulgaris was isolated by reverse transcriptase-PCR using complementary oligonucleotides to the human CENP-B gene. Also, in situ hybridization was performed on vegetal tissues and HEp-2 cells using human CENP-B box probes. Our main results were as follows: 1) Autoimmune sera were reactive to a vegetal protein of 80 kDa. 2) Affinity-purified anti-CENP-B antibodies recognized a protein from Phaseolus vulgaris with molecular mass similar to that found in human cells. Vegetal and HEp-2 cells CENP-B proteins were immunologically identical. 3) Using RT-PCR, we were able to amplify a cDNA encoding for the aminoterminus domain of CENP-B from Phaseolus vulgaris that had the same molecular behaviour as the cDNA from HEp-2 cells. 4) Complementary oligonucleotides for human CENP-B box hybridized a DNA sequence from Phaseolus vulgaris. In conclusion, CENP-B protein is a conserved protein along the phylogenic scale from humans to higher plants.

  15. REF, an evolutionary conserved family of hnRNP-like proteins, interacts with TAP/Mex67p and participates in mRNA nuclear export.

    PubMed Central

    Stutz, F; Bachi, A; Doerks, T; Braun, I C; Séraphin, B; Wilm, M; Bork, P; Izaurralde, E

    2000-01-01

    Vertebrate TAP and its yeast ortholog Mex67p are involved in the export of messenger RNAs from the nucleus. TAP has also been implicated in the export of simian type D viral RNAs bearing the constitutive transport element (CTE). Although TAP directly interacts with CTE-bearing RNAs, the mode of interaction of TAP/Mex67p with cellular mRNAs is different from that with the CTE RNA and is likely to be mediated by protein-protein interactions. Here we show that Mex67p directly interacts with Yra1p, an essential yeast hnRNP-like protein. This interaction is evolutionarily conserved as Yra1p also interacts with TAP. Conditional expression in yeast cells implicates Yra1 p in the export of cellular mRNAs. Database searches revealed that Yra1p belongs to an evolutionarily conserved family of hnRNP-like proteins having more than one member in Mus musculus, Xenopus laevis, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe and at least one member in several species including plants. The murine members of the family directly interact with TAP. Because members of this protein family are characterized by the presence of one RNP-motif RNA-binding domain and exhibit RNA-binding activity, we called these proteins REF-bps for RNA and export factor binding proteins. Thus, Yra1p and members of the REF family of hnRNP-like proteins may facilitate the interaction of TAP/Mex67p with cellular mRNAs. PMID:10786854

  16. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Tatjana P.; Maria Cherian, Reeja; Gray, Fiona C.; MacNeill, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural studies. PMID:24723920

  17. Folding behavior of four silks of giant honey bee reflects the evolutionary conservation of aculeate silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Maitip, Jakkrawut; Trueman, Holly E; Kaehler, Benjamin D; Huttley, Gavin A; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Sutherland, Tara D

    2015-04-01

    Multiple gene duplication events in the precursor of the Aculeata (bees, ants, hornets) gave rise to four silk genes. Whilst these homologs encode proteins with similar amino acid composition and coiled coil structure, the retention of all four homologs implies they each are important. In this study we identified, produced and characterized the four silk proteins from Apis dorsata, the giant Asian honeybee. The proteins were readily purified, allowing us to investigate the folding behavior of solutions of individual proteins in comparison to mixtures of all four proteins at concentrations where they assemble into their native coiled coil structure. In contrast to solutions of any one protein type, solutions of a mixture of the four proteins formed coiled coils that were stable against dilution and detergent denaturation. The results are consistent with the formation of a heteromeric coiled coil protein complex. The mechanism of silk protein coiled coil formation and evolution is discussed in light of these results. PMID:25712559

  18. Folding behavior of four silks of giant honey bee reflects the evolutionary conservation of aculeate silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Maitip, Jakkrawut; Trueman, Holly E; Kaehler, Benjamin D; Huttley, Gavin A; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Sutherland, Tara D

    2015-04-01

    Multiple gene duplication events in the precursor of the Aculeata (bees, ants, hornets) gave rise to four silk genes. Whilst these homologs encode proteins with similar amino acid composition and coiled coil structure, the retention of all four homologs implies they each are important. In this study we identified, produced and characterized the four silk proteins from Apis dorsata, the giant Asian honeybee. The proteins were readily purified, allowing us to investigate the folding behavior of solutions of individual proteins in comparison to mixtures of all four proteins at concentrations where they assemble into their native coiled coil structure. In contrast to solutions of any one protein type, solutions of a mixture of the four proteins formed coiled coils that were stable against dilution and detergent denaturation. The results are consistent with the formation of a heteromeric coiled coil protein complex. The mechanism of silk protein coiled coil formation and evolution is discussed in light of these results.

  19. Characterization of chicken octamer-binding proteins demonstrates that POU domain-containing homeobox transcription factors have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Petryniak, B.; Postema, C.E.; McCormack, W.T.; Thompson, C.B. ); Staudt, L.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The DNA sequence motif ATTTGCAT (octamer) or its inverse complement has been identified as an evolutionarily conserved element in the promoter region of immunoglobulin genes. Two major DNA-binding proteins that bind in a sequence-specific manner to the octamer DNA sequence have been identified in mammalian species--a ubiquitously expressed protein (Oct-1) and a lymphoid-specific protein (Oct-2). During characterization of the promoter region of the chicken immunoglobulin light chain gene, the authors identified two homologous octamer-binding proteins in chicken B cells. when the cloning of the human gene for Oct-2 revealed it to be a member of a distinct family of homeobox genes, they sought to determine if the human Oct-2 cDNA could be used to identify homologous chicken homeobox genes. Using a human Oct-2 homeobox-specific DNA probe, they were able to identify 6-10 homeobox-containing genes in the chicken genome, demonstrating that the Oct-2-related subfamily of homeobox genes exists in avian species. DNA sequence analysis revealed it to be the chicken homologue of the human Oct-1 gene. Together, the data show that the POU-containing subfamily of homeobox genes have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution, apparently as a result of selection for their DNA-binding and transcriptional regulatory properties.

  20. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the conserved region in the middle domain of S. pombe Sin1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Saori; Furuita, Kyoko; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2015-04-01

    SAPK-interacting protein 1 (Sin1) is an important component of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). TOR is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase and forms functionally distinct protein complexes referred to as TORC1 and TORC2. TORC2, conserved from yeast to humans, phosphorylates AGC-family protein kinases and has many cellular functions including the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. The Sin1 subunit of TORC2 is required for the binding of TORC2 to substrates, and the conserved region in the middle (CRIM) domain of Sin1 is important in the substrate recognition of TORC2. Here, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sin1 (amino acids 247-400) (Sin1CRIM), which possesses the CRIM domain. These data contribute toward the structure determination of Sin1CRIM and an understanding of the interactions of Sin1CRIM with substrates of TORC2.

  1. The black-pearl gene of Drosophila defines a novel conserved protein family and is required for larval growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Becker, S; Gehrsitz, A; Bork, P; Buchner, S; Buchner, E

    2001-01-10

    Using a transposon insertion line of the Drosophila Genome Project we have cloned the black-pearl gene (blp), analyzed cDNA clones, generated various mutants, and characterized their phenotypes. The blp gene codes for a protein of 15.7 kDa calculated molecular weight that has been conserved from yeast to plants and mammals with high homology. A domain of these new proteins shows distant similarity to DnaJ domains indicating a functionally relevant interaction with other proteins. The P element insertion in line P1539 lies within the 5' untranslated leader of the black-pearl gene. Flies homozygous for this insertion are semi-lethal, escapers produce very few offspring and show melanotic inclusions in the hemocoel ('black pearls') similar to various melanotic 'tumor' mutants. Two small deletions confined to the blp gene and two EMS-induced mutations are homozygous lethal. These null mutants appear normal up to a prolonged first instar larval stage but fail to grow and die. Thus in Drosophila the blp gene is specifically required for larval growth. The evolutionary conservation in both unicellular and multicellular organisms suggests for the new protein family described here a fundamental role in cell growth.

  2. The Replacement of 10 Non-Conserved Residues in the Core Protein of JFH-1 Hepatitis C Virus Improves Its Assembly and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Loïc; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Boyer, Audrey; Desvignes, Virginie; Gaillard, Julien; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Roingeard, Philippe; Hourioux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly is still poorly understood. It is thought that trafficking of the HCV core protein to the lipid droplet (LD) surface is essential for its multimerization and association with newly synthesized HCV RNA to form the viral nucleocapsid. We carried out a mapping analysis of several complete HCV genomes of all genotypes, and found that the genotype 2 JFH-1 core protein contained 10 residues different from those of other genotypes. The replacement of these 10 residues of the JFH-1 strain sequence with the most conserved residues deduced from sequence alignments greatly increased virus production. Confocal microscopy of the modified JFH-1 strain in cell culture showed that the mutated JFH-1 core protein, C10M, was present mostly at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, but not at the surface of the LDs, even though its trafficking to these organelles was possible. The non-structural 5A protein of HCV was also redirected to ER membranes and colocalized with the C10M core protein. Using a Semliki forest virus vector to overproduce core protein, we demonstrated that the C10M core protein was able to form HCV-like particles, unlike the native JFH-1 core protein. Thus, the substitution of a few selected residues in the JFH-1 core protein modified the subcellular distribution and assembly properties of the protein. These findings suggest that the early steps of HCV assembly occur at the ER membrane rather than at the LD surface. The C10M-JFH-1 strain will be a valuable tool for further studies of HCV morphogenesis. PMID:26339783

  3. Conservation of the gene for outer membrane protein OprF in the family Pseudomonadaceae: sequence of the Pseudomonas syringae oprF gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ullstrom, C A; Siehnel, R; Woodruff, W; Steinbach, S; Hancock, R E

    1991-01-01

    The conservation of the oprF gene for the major outer membrane protein OprF was determined by restriction mapping and Southern blot hybridization with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprF gene as a probe. The restriction map was highly conserved among 16 of the 17 serotype strains and 42 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Only the serotype 12 isolate and one clinical isolate showed small differences in restriction pattern. Southern probing of PstI chromosomal digests of 14 species from the family Pseudomonadaceae revealed that only the nine members of rRNA homology group I hybridized with the oprF gene. To reveal the actual extent of homology, the oprF gene and its product were characterized in Pseudomonas syringae. Nine strains of P. syringae from seven different pathovars hybridized with the P. aeruginosa gene to produce five different but related restriction maps. All produced an OprF protein in their outer membranes with the same apparent molecular weight as that of P.aeruginosa OprF. In each case the protein reacted with monoclonal antibody MA4-10 and was similarly heat and 2-mercaptoethanol modifiable. The purified OprF protein of the type strain P. syringae pv. syringae ATCC 19310 reconstituted small channels in lipid bilayer membranes. The oprF gene from this latter strain was cloned and sequenced. Despite the low level of DNA hybridization between P. aeruginosa and P. syringae DNA, the OprF gene was highly conserved between the species with 72% DNA sequence identity and 68% amino acid sequence identity overall. The carboxy terminus-encoding region of P. syringae oprF showed 85 and 33% identity, respectively, with the same regions of the P. aeruginosa oprF and Escherichia coli ompA genes. Images PMID:1898935

  4. Conservation of major and minor jelly-roll capsid proteins in Polinton (Maverick) transposons suggests that they are bona fide viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lakshminarayan M. Iyer and I. King Jordan. For complete reviews, see the Reviewers’ Reports section. Polintons (also known as Mavericks) and Tlr elements of Tetrahymena thermophila represent two families of large DNA transposons widespread in eukaryotes. Here, we show that both Polintons and Tlr elements encode two key virion proteins, the major capsid protein with the double jelly-roll fold and the minor capsid protein, known as the penton, with the single jelly-roll topology. This observation along with the previously noted conservation of the genes for viral genome packaging ATPase and adenovirus-like protease strongly suggests that Polintons and Tlr elements combine features of bona fide viruses and transposons. We propose the name ‘Polintoviruses’ to denote these putative viruses that could have played a central role in the evolution of several groups of DNA viruses of eukaryotes. PMID:24773695

  5. Low sequence identity but high structural and functional conservation: The case of Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop/Sti1) of Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Fernanda A H; Seraphim, Thiago V; Santos, Clelton A; Gonzaga, Marisvanda R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Ramos, Carlos H I; Borges, Júlio C

    2016-06-15

    Parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania are subjected to extensive environmental changes during their life cycle; molecular chaperones/co-chaperones act as protagonists in this scenario to maintain cellular homeostasis. Hop/Sti1 is a co-chaperone that connects the Hsp90 and Hsp70 systems, modulating their ATPase activities and affecting the fate of client proteins because it facilitates their transfer from the Hsp70 to the Hsp90 chaperone. Hop/Sti1 is one of the most prevalent co-chaperones, highlighting its importance despite the relatively low sequence identity among orthologue proteins. This multi-domain protein comprises three tetratricopeptides domains (TPR1, TPR2A and TPR2B) and two Asp/Pro-rich domains. Given the importance of Hop/Sti1 for the chaperone system and for Leishmania protozoa viability, the Leishmania braziliensis Hop (LbHop) and a truncated mutant (LbHop(TPR2AB)) were characterized. Structurally, both proteins are α-helix-rich and highly elongated monomeric proteins. Functionally, they inhibited the ATPase activity of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 (LbHsp90) to a similar extent, and the thermodynamic parameters of their interactions with LbHsp90 were similar, indicating that TPR2A-TPR2B forms the functional center for the LbHop interaction with LbHsp90. These results highlight the structural and functional similarity of Hop/Sti1 proteins, despite their low sequence conservation compared to the Hsp70 and Hsp90 systems, which are phylogenetic highly conserved. PMID:27103305

  6. Low sequence identity but high structural and functional conservation: The case of Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop/Sti1) of Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Fernanda A H; Seraphim, Thiago V; Santos, Clelton A; Gonzaga, Marisvanda R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Ramos, Carlos H I; Borges, Júlio C

    2016-06-15

    Parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania are subjected to extensive environmental changes during their life cycle; molecular chaperones/co-chaperones act as protagonists in this scenario to maintain cellular homeostasis. Hop/Sti1 is a co-chaperone that connects the Hsp90 and Hsp70 systems, modulating their ATPase activities and affecting the fate of client proteins because it facilitates their transfer from the Hsp70 to the Hsp90 chaperone. Hop/Sti1 is one of the most prevalent co-chaperones, highlighting its importance despite the relatively low sequence identity among orthologue proteins. This multi-domain protein comprises three tetratricopeptides domains (TPR1, TPR2A and TPR2B) and two Asp/Pro-rich domains. Given the importance of Hop/Sti1 for the chaperone system and for Leishmania protozoa viability, the Leishmania braziliensis Hop (LbHop) and a truncated mutant (LbHop(TPR2AB)) were characterized. Structurally, both proteins are α-helix-rich and highly elongated monomeric proteins. Functionally, they inhibited the ATPase activity of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 (LbHsp90) to a similar extent, and the thermodynamic parameters of their interactions with LbHsp90 were similar, indicating that TPR2A-TPR2B forms the functional center for the LbHop interaction with LbHsp90. These results highlight the structural and functional similarity of Hop/Sti1 proteins, despite their low sequence conservation compared to the Hsp70 and Hsp90 systems, which are phylogenetic highly conserved.

  7. Crucial role of conserved cysteine residues in the assembly of two iron-sulfur clusters on the CIA protein Nar1.

    PubMed

    Urzica, Eugen; Pierik, Antonio J; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland

    2009-06-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein maturation in the eukaryotic cytosol and nucleus requires conserved components of the essential CIA machinery. The CIA protein Nar1 performs a specific function in transferring an Fe/S cluster that is assembled de novo on the Cfd1-Nbp35 scaffold to apoproteins. Here, we used systematic site-directed mutagenesis and a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies to show that Nar1 holds two Fe/S clusters at conserved N- and C-terminal cysteine motifs. A wealth of biochemical studies suggests that the assembly of these Fe/S clusters on Nar1 cannot be studied in Escherichia coli, as the recombinant protein does not contain the native Fe/S clusters. We therefore followed Fe/S cluster incorporation directly in yeast by a (55)Fe radiolabeling method in vivo, and we measured the functional consequences of Nar1 mutations in the assembly of cytosolic Fe/S proteins. We find that both Fe/S clusters are essential for Nar1 function and cell viability. Molecular modeling using a structurally but not functionally related bacterial iron-only hydrogenase as a template provided compelling structural explanations for our mutational data. The C-terminal Fe/S cluster is stably buried within Nar1, whereas the N-terminal one is exposed at the protein surface and hence may be more easily lost. Insertion of an Fe/S cluster into the C-terminal location depends on the N-terminal motif, suggesting the participation of the latter motif in the assembly process of the C-terminal cluster. The vicinity of the two Fe/S centers suggests a close functional cooperation during cytosolic Fe/S protein maturation.

  8. A common set of conserved motifs in a vast variety of putative nucleic acid-dependent ATPases including MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V

    1993-06-11

    A new superfamily of (putative) DNA-dependent ATPases is described that includes the ATPase domains of prokaryotic NtrC-related transcription regulators, MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication, and a group of uncharacterized bacterial and chloroplast proteins. MCM proteins are shown to contain a modified form of the ATP-binding motif and are predicted to mediate ATP-dependent opening of double-stranded DNA in the replication origins. In a second line of investigation, it is demonstrated that the products of unidentified open reading frames from Marchantia mitochondria and from yeast, and a domain of a baculovirus protein involved in viral DNA replication are related to the superfamily III of DNA and RNA helicases that previously has been known to include only proteins of small viruses. Comparison of the multiple alignments showed that the proteins of the NtrC superfamily and the helicases of superfamily III share three related sequence motifs tightly packed in the ATPase domain that consists of 100-150 amino acid residues. A similar array of conserved motifs is found in the family of DnaA-related ATPases. It is hypothesized that the three large groups of nucleic acid-dependent ATPases have similar structure of the core ATPase domain and have evolved from a common ancestor.

  9. Bug22p, a conserved centrosomal/ciliary protein also present in higher plants, is required for an effective ciliary stroke in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Laligné, C; Klotz, C; de Loubresse, N Garreau; Lemullois, M; Hori, M; Laurent, F X; Papon, J F; Louis, B; Cohen, J; Koll, F

    2010-04-01

    Centrioles, cilia, and flagella are ancestral conserved organelles of eukaryotic cells. Among the proteins identified in the proteomics of ciliary proteins in Paramecium, we focus here on a protein, Bug22p, previously detected by cilia and basal-body high-throughput studies but never analyzed per se. Remarkably, this protein is also present in plants, which lack centrioles and cilia. Bug22p sequence alignments revealed consensus positions that distinguish species with centrioles/cilia from plants. In Paramecium, antibody and green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion labeling localized Bug22p in basal bodies and cilia, and electron microscopy immunolabeling refined the localization to the terminal plate of the basal bodies, the transition zone, and spots along the axoneme, preferentially between the membrane and the microtubules. RNA interference (RNAi) depletion of Bug22p provoked a strong decrease in swimming speed, followed by cell death after a few days. High-speed video microscopy and morphological analysis of Bug22p-depleted cells showed that the protein plays an important role in the efficiency of ciliary movement by participating in the stroke shape and rigidity of cilia. The defects in cell swimming and growth provoked by RNAi can be complemented by expression of human Bug22p. This is the first reported case of complementation by a human gene in a ciliate.

  10. Sequence conservation in the Ancylostoma secreted protein-2 of Necator americanus (Na-ASP-2) from hookworm infected individuals in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ungcharoensuk, Charoenchai; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Pattanawong, Urassaya; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2012-12-01

    The Ancylostoma secreted protein-2 of Necator americanus (Na-ASP-2) was one of the promising vaccine candidates against the most prevalent human hookworm species as adverse vaccine reaction has compromised further human vaccine trials. To elucidate the gene structure and the extent of sequence diversity, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the Na-asp-2 gene of individual larvae from 32 infected subjects living in 3 different endemic areas of Thailand. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene encoding Na-ASP-2 comprised 8 exons. Of 3 nucleotide substitutions in these exons, only one causes an amino acid change from leucine to methionine. A consensus conserved GT and AG at the 5' and the 3' boundaries of each intron was observed akin to those found in other eukaryotic genes. Introns of Na-asp-2 contained 23 nucleotide substitutions and 0-18 indels. The mean number of nucleotide substitutions per site (d) in introns was not significantly different from the mean number of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (d(S)) in exons whereas d in introns was significantly exceeded d(N) (the mean number of nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site) in exons (p<0.05), suggesting that introns and synonymous sites in exons may evolve at a similar rate whereas functional constraints at the amino acid could limit amino acid substitutions in Na-ASP-2. A recombination site was identified in an intron near the 3' portion of the gene. The positions of introns and the intron phases in the Na-asp-2 gene comparing with those in other pathogenesis-related-1 proteins of Loa loa, Onchocerca volvulus, Heterodera glycines, Caenorhabditis elegans and human were relatively conserved, suggesting evolutionary conservation of these genes. Sequence conservation in Na-ASP-2 may not compromise further vaccine design if adverse vaccine effects could be resolved whereas microheterogeneity in introns of this locus may be useful for population genetics analysis of N. americanus

  11. The Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Protein CwpV is Antigenically Variable between Strains, but Exhibits Conserved Aggregation-Promoting Function

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Catherine B.; Emerson, Jenny E.; de la Riva, Lucia; Fagan, Robert P.; Fairweather, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, leading to significant morbidity and mortality and putting considerable economic pressure on healthcare systems. Current knowledge of the molecular basis of pathogenesis is limited primarily to the activities and regulation of two major toxins. In contrast, little is known of mechanisms used in colonization of the enteric system. C. difficile expresses a proteinaceous array on its cell surface known as the S-layer, consisting primarily of the major S-layer protein SlpA and a family of SlpA homologues, the cell wall protein (CWP) family. CwpV is the largest member of this family and is expressed in a phase variable manner. Here we show CwpV promotes C. difficile aggregation, mediated by the C-terminal repetitive domain. This domain varies markedly between strains; five distinct repeat types were identified and were shown to be antigenically distinct. Other aspects of CwpV are, however, conserved. All CwpV types are expressed in a phase variable manner. Using targeted gene knock-out, we show that a single site-specific recombinase RecV is required for CwpV phase variation. CwpV is post-translationally cleaved at a conserved site leading to formation of a complex of cleavage products. The highly conserved N-terminus anchors the CwpV complex to the cell surface. Therefore CwpV function, regulation and processing are highly conserved across C. difficile strains, whilst the functional domain exists in at least five antigenically distinct forms. This hints at a complex evolutionary history for CwpV. PMID:21533071

  12. Sequence conservation in the Ancylostoma secreted protein-2 of Necator americanus (Na-ASP-2) from hookworm infected individuals in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ungcharoensuk, Charoenchai; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Pattanawong, Urassaya; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2012-12-01

    The Ancylostoma secreted protein-2 of Necator americanus (Na-ASP-2) was one of the promising vaccine candidates against the most prevalent human hookworm species as adverse vaccine reaction has compromised further human vaccine trials. To elucidate the gene structure and the extent of sequence diversity, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the Na-asp-2 gene of individual larvae from 32 infected subjects living in 3 different endemic areas of Thailand. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene encoding Na-ASP-2 comprised 8 exons. Of 3 nucleotide substitutions in these exons, only one causes an amino acid change from leucine to methionine. A consensus conserved GT and AG at the 5' and the 3' boundaries of each intron was observed akin to those found in other eukaryotic genes. Introns of Na-asp-2 contained 23 nucleotide substitutions and 0-18 indels. The mean number of nucleotide substitutions per site (d) in introns was not significantly different from the mean number of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (d(S)) in exons whereas d in introns was significantly exceeded d(N) (the mean number of nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site) in exons (p<0.05), suggesting that introns and synonymous sites in exons may evolve at a similar rate whereas functional constraints at the amino acid could limit amino acid substitutions in Na-ASP-2. A recombination site was identified in an intron near the 3' portion of the gene. The positions of introns and the intron phases in the Na-asp-2 gene comparing with those in other pathogenesis-related-1 proteins of Loa loa, Onchocerca volvulus, Heterodera glycines, Caenorhabditis elegans and human were relatively conserved, suggesting evolutionary conservation of these genes. Sequence conservation in Na-ASP-2 may not compromise further vaccine design if adverse vaccine effects could be resolved whereas microheterogeneity in introns of this locus may be useful for population genetics analysis of N. americanus.

  13. Identification of a conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope in the VP1 proteins of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Zhou, Guomei; Xin, Yinghao; Chen, Junhao; Lin, Shaoli; Tian, Ye; Xie, Zhijing; Jiang, Shijin

    2015-11-18

    Duck virus hepatitis (DVH), mainly caused by duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), is a severe disease threaten to duck industry and has worldwide distribution. As the major structural protein, the VP1 protein of DHAV is able to induce neutralizing antibody in ducks. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4F8 against the intact DHAV-1 particles was used to identify the possible epitope in the three serotypes of DHAV. The mAb 4F8 had weak neutralizing activities to both DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and reacted with the conserved linear B-cell epitopes of (75)GEIILT(80) in DHAV-1 VP1 and (75)GEVILT(80) in DHAV-3 VP1 protein, respectively, while not with DHAV-2 VP1. This was the first report about identification of the common conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which will facilitate understanding of the antigenic structure of VP1 and the serologic diagnosis of DHAV infection.

  14. PhyloPro2.0: a database for the dynamic exploration of phylogenetically conserved proteins and their domain architectures across the Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    Cromar, Graham L.; Zhao, Anthony; Xiong, Xuejian; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Loughran, Noeleen; Song, Hongyan; Parkinson, John

    2016-01-01

    PhyloPro is a database and accompanying web-based application for the construction and exploration of phylogenetic profiles across the Eukarya. In this update article, we present six major new developments in PhyloPro: (i) integration of Pfam-A domain predictions for all proteins; (ii) new summary heatmaps and detailed level views of domain conservation; (iii) an interactive, network-based visualization tool for exploration of domain architectures and their conservation; (iv) ability to browse based on protein functional categories (GOSlim); (v) improvements to the web interface to enhance drill down capability from the heatmap view; and (vi) improved coverage including 164 eukaryotes and 12 reference species. In addition, we provide improved support for downloading data and images in a variety of formats. Among the existing tools available for phylogenetic profiles, PhyloPro provides several innovative domain-based features including a novel domain adjacency visualization tool. These are designed to allow the user to identify and compare proteins with similar domain architectures across species and thus develop hypotheses about the evolution of lineage-specific trajectories. Database URL: http://www.compsysbio.org/phylopro/ PMID:26980519

  15. Mutation of the conserved polyadenosine RNA binding protein, ZC3H14/dNab2, impairs neural function in Drosophila and humans

    PubMed Central

    Pak, ChangHui; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Gross, Christina; Apponi, Luciano H.; Noto, John J.; Kelly, Seth M.; Leung, Sara W.; Tzschach, Andreas; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Mohseni, Marzieh; Jensen, Lars R.; Hu, Hao; Huang, Brenda; Stahley, Sara N.; Liu, Guanglu; Williams, Kathryn R.; Burdick, Sharon; Feng, Yue; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Bassell, Gary J.; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein; Corbett, Anita H.; Moberg, Kenneth H.; Kuss, Andreas W.

    2011-01-01

    Here we report a human intellectual disability disease locus on chromosome 14q31.3 corresponding to mutation of the ZC3H14 gene that encodes a conserved polyadenosine RNA binding protein. We identify ZC3H14 mRNA transcripts in the human central nervous system, and we find that rodent ZC3H14 protein is expressed in hippocampal neurons and colocalizes with poly(A) RNA in neuronal cell bodies. A Drosophila melanogaster model of this disease created by mutation of the gene encoding the ZC3H14 ortholog dNab2, which also binds polyadenosine RNA, reveals that dNab2 is essential for development and required in neurons for normal locomotion and flight. Biochemical and genetic data indicate that dNab2 restricts bulk poly(A) tail length in vivo, suggesting that this function may underlie its role in development and disease. These studies reveal a conserved requirement for ZC3H14/dNab2 in the metazoan nervous system and identify a poly(A) RNA binding protein associated with a human brain disorder. PMID:21734151

  16. PhyloPro2.0: a database for the dynamic exploration of phylogenetically conserved proteins and their domain architectures across the Eukarya.

    PubMed

    Cromar, Graham L; Zhao, Anthony; Xiong, Xuejian; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Loughran, Noeleen; Song, Hongyan; Parkinson, John

    2016-01-01

    PhyloPro is a database and accompanying web-based application for the construction and exploration of phylogenetic profiles across the Eukarya. In this update article, we present six major new developments in PhyloPro: (i) integration of Pfam-A domain predictions for all proteins; (ii) new summary heatmaps and detailed level views of domain conservation; (iii) an interactive, network-based visualization tool for exploration of domain architectures and their conservation; (iv) ability to browse based on protein functional categories (GOSlim); (v) improvements to the web interface to enhance drill down capability from the heatmap view; and (vi) improved coverage including 164 eukaryotes and 12 reference species. In addition, we provide improved support for downloading data and images in a variety of formats. Among the existing tools available for phylogenetic profiles, PhyloPro provides several innovative domain-based features including a novel domain adjacency visualization tool. These are designed to allow the user to identify and compare proteins with similar domain architectures across species and thus develop hypotheses about the evolution of lineage-specific trajectories. Database URL: http://www.compsysbio.org/phylopro/.

  17. spalt encodes an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger protein of novel structure which provides homeotic gene function in the head and tail region of the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Kühnlein, R P; Frommer, G; Friedrich, M; Gonzalez-Gaitan, M; Weber, A; Wagner-Bernholz, J F; Gehring, W J; Jäckle, H; Schuh, R

    1994-01-01

    The region specific homeotic gene spalt (sal) of Drosophila melanogaster promotes the specification of terminal pattern elements as opposed to segments in the trunk. Our results show that the previously reported sal transcription unit was misidentified. Based on P-element mediated germ line transformation and DNA sequence analysis of sal mutant alleles, we identified the transcription unit that carries sal function. sal is located close to the misidentified transcription unit, and it is expressed in similar temporal and spatial patterns during embryogenesis. The sal gene encodes a zinc finger protein of novel structure composed of three widely spaced 'double zinc finger' motifs of internally conserved sequences and a single zinc finger motif of different sequence. Antibodies produced against the sal protein show that sal is first expressed at the blastoderm stage and later in restricted areas of the embryonic nervous system as well as in the developing trachea. The antibodies detect sal homologous proteins in corresponding spatial and temporal patterns in the embryos of related insect species. Sequence analysis of the sal gene of Drosophila virilis, a species which is phylogenetically separated by approximately 60 million years, suggests that the sal function is conserved during evolution, consistent with its proposed role in head formation during arthropod evolution. Images PMID:7905822

  18. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi Binds to Cytokeratin through Conserved Peptide Motifs Found in the Laminin-G-Like Domain of the gp85/Trans-sialidase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andre Azevedo Reis; de Vasconcelos, Veronica de Cássia Sardinha; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria Júlia Manso; Giordano, Ricardo José

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a disease that affects millions of people most of them living in South and Central Americas. There are few treatment options for individuals with Chagas' disease making it important to understand the molecular details of parasite infection, so novel therapeutic alternatives may be developed for these patients. Here, we investigate the interaction between host cell intermediate filament proteins and the T. cruzi gp85 glycoprotein superfamily with hundreds of members that have long been implicated in parasite cell invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings An in silico analysis was utilized to identify peptide motifs shared by the gp85 T. cruzi proteins and, using phage display, these selected peptide motifs were screened for their ability to bind to cells. One peptide, named TS9, showed significant cell binding capacity and was selected for further studies. Affinity chromatography, phage display and invasion assays revealed that peptide TS9 binds to cytokeratins and vimentin, and prevents T. cruzi cell infection. Interestingly, peptide TS9 and a previously identified binding site for intermediate filament proteins are disposed in an antiparallel β-sheet fold, present in a conserved laminin-G-like domain shared by all members of the family. Moreover, peptide TS9 overlaps with an immunodominant T cell epitope. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, the present study reinforces previous results from our group implicating the gp85 superfamily of glycoproteins and the intermediate filament proteins cytokeratin and vimentin in the parasite infection process. It also suggests an important role in parasite biology for the conserved laminin-G-like domain, present in all members of this large family of cell surface proteins. PMID:26398185

  20. Conservative Tryptophan Mutants of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YopH Exhibit Impaired WPD-Loop Function and Crystallize with Divanadate Esters in Their Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  1. Conservative tryptophan mutants of the protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH exhibit impaired WPD-loop function and crystallize with divanadate esters in their active sites.

    PubMed

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C; Johnson, Sean J

    2015-10-27

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  2. MEPPitope: spatial, electrostatic and secondary structure perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV), provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little emphasis in existing literature, are found to have significant electrostatic perturbation. Thus, a combination of different computational methods enable the rapid and rational detection of critical residues that can be made the target of small drugs, or as epitopes in the search for an elusive therapy or vaccine that neutralizes multiple members of the Flaviviridae family. PMID:27540468

  3. MEPPitope: spatial, electrostatic and secondary structure perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV), provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little emphasis in existing literature, are found to have significant electrostatic perturbation. Thus, a combination of different computational methods enable the rapid and rational detection of critical residues that can be made the target of small drugs, or as epitopes in the search for an elusive therapy or vaccine that neutralizes multiple members of the Flaviviridae family. PMID:27540468

  4. MEPPitope: spatial, electrostatic and secondary structure perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV), provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little emphasis in existing literature, are found to have significant electrostatic perturbation. Thus, a combination of different computational methods enable the rapid and rational detection of critical residues that can be made the target of small drugs, or as epitopes in the search for an elusive therapy or vaccine that neutralizes multiple members of the Flaviviridae family.

  5. Computational analysis of perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV) in three countries, provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV, which has caused global panic to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the family Flaviviridae, the causal agent of the self-limiting Dengue fever and the potentially fatal hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, has been a scourge in tropical countries for many centuries. The recently solved structure of mature ZIKV (PDB ID:5IRE) has provided key insights into the structure of the envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins, the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes, and also enumerates residue pairs that undergo significant polarity reversal. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little

  6. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins delivered to the apoplast and to the host cytoplasm. A number of effectors from G. rostochiensis predicted to be delivered to the host cytoplasm have been identified, including several belonging to the secreted SPRY domain (SPRYSEC) family. SPRYSEC proteins are unique to members of the genus Globodera and have been implicated in both the induction and the repression of host defense responses. We have tested the properties of six different G. rostochiensis SPRYSEC proteins by expressing them in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum. We have found that all SPRYSEC proteins tested are able to suppress defense responses induced by NB-LRR proteins as well as cell death induced by elicitors, suggesting that defense repression is a common characteristic of members of this effector protein family. At the same time, GrSPRYSEC-15 elicited a defense responses in N. tabacum, which was found to be resistant to a virus expressing GrSPRYSEC-15. These results suggest that SPRYSEC proteins may possess characteristics that allow them to be recognized by the plant immune system. PMID:26322064

  7. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins delivered to the apoplast and to the host cytoplasm. A number of effectors from G. rostochiensis predicted to be delivered to the host cytoplasm have been identified, including several belonging to the secreted SPRY domain (SPRYSEC) family. SPRYSEC proteins are unique to members of the genus Globodera and have been implicated in both the induction and the repression of host defense responses. We have tested the properties of six different G. rostochiensis SPRYSEC proteins by expressing them in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum. We have found that all SPRYSEC proteins tested are able to suppress defense responses induced by NB-LRR proteins as well as cell death induced by elicitors, suggesting that defense repression is a common characteristic of members of this effector protein family. At the same time, GrSPRYSEC-15 elicited a defense responses in N. tabacum, which was found to be resistant to a virus expressing GrSPRYSEC-15. These results suggest that SPRYSEC proteins may possess characteristics that allow them to be recognized by the plant immune system.

  8. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins that are delivered to the apoplast, as well as...

  9. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-DMAG decreases expression of conserved herpesvirus protein kinases and reduces virus production in Epstein-Barr virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoping; Bristol, Jillian A; Iwahori, Satoko; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Meng, Qiao; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Tarakanova, Vera L; Kalejta, Robert F; Kenney, Shannon C

    2013-09-01

    All eight human herpesviruses have a conserved herpesvirus protein kinase (CHPK) that is important for the lytic phase of the viral life cycle. In this study, we show that heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) interacts directly with each of the eight CHPKs, and we demonstrate that an Hsp90 inhibitor drug, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), decreases expression of all eight CHPKs in transfected HeLa cells. 17-DMAG also decreases expression the of the endogenous Epstein-Barr virus protein kinase (EBV PK, encoded by the BGLF4 gene) in lytically infected EBV-positive cells and inhibits phosphorylation of several different known EBV PK target proteins. Furthermore, 17-DMAG treatment abrogates expression of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) kinase UL97 in HCMV-infected human fibroblasts. Importantly, 17-DMAG treatment decreased the EBV titer approximately 100-fold in lytically infected AGS-Akata cells without causing significant cellular toxicity during the same time frame. Increased EBV PK expression in 17-DMAG-treated AGS-Akata cells did not restore EBV titers, suggesting that 17-DMAG simultaneously targets multiple viral and/or cellular proteins required for efficient viral replication. These results suggest that Hsp90 inhibitors, including 17-DMAG, may be a promising group of drugs that could have profound antiviral effects on herpesviruses. PMID:23843639

  10. The N-terminus of the Montano virus nucleocapsid protein possesses broadly cross-reactive conformation-dependent epitopes conserved in rodent-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saasa, Ngonda; Yoshida, Haruka; Shimizu, Kenta; Sánchez-Hernández, Cornelio; Romero-Almaraz, María de Lourdes; Koma, Takaaki; Sanada, Takahiro; Seto, Takahiro; Yoshii, Kentaro; Ramos, Celso; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-20

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is an important immunogen that stimulates a strong and cross-reactive immune response in humans and rodents. A large proportion of the response to N protein has been found to target its N-terminus. However, the exact nature of this bias towards the N-terminus is not yet fully understood. We characterized six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N protein of Montano virus (MTNV), a Mexican hantavirus. Five of these mAbs recognized eight American hantaviruses and six European and Asian hantaviruses, but not the Soricomorpha-borne Thottapalayam hantavirus. The N protein-reactive binding regions of the five mAbs were mapped to discontinuous epitopes within the N-terminal 13-51 amino acid residues, while a single serotype-specific mAb was mapped to residues 1-25 and 49-75. Our findings suggest that discontinuous epitopes at the N-terminus are conserved, at least in rodent-borne hantaviruses, and that they contribute considerably to N protein cross-reactivity.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of a neurotoxigenic Clostridium species using partial genome sequence: Phylogenetic analysis of a few conserved proteins involved in cellular processes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Dixit, Aparna; Tomar, Arvind; Singh, Lokendra

    2010-04-01

    Clostridial organisms produce neurotoxins, which are generally regarded as the most potent toxic substances of biological origin and potential biological warfare agents. Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin and is responsible for the fatal tetanus disease. In spite of the extensive immunization regimen, the disease is an important cause of death especially among neonates. Strains of C. tetani have not been genetically characterized except the complete genome sequencing of strain E88. The present study reports the genetic makeup and phylogenetic affiliations of an environmental strain of this bacterium with respect to C. tetani E88 and other clostridia. A shot gun library was constructed from the genomic DNA of C. tetani drde, isolated from decaying fish sample. Unique clones were sequenced and sequences compared with its closest relative C. tetani E88. A total of 275 clones were obtained and 32,457 bases of non-redundant sequence were generated. A total of 150 base changes were observed over the entire length of sequence obtained, including, additions, deletions and base substitutions. Of the total 120 ORFs detected, 48 exhibited closest similarity to E88 proteins of which three are hypothetical proteins. Eight of the ORFs exhibited similarity with hypothetical proteins from other organisms and 10 aligned with other proteins from unrelated organisms. There is an overall conservation of protein sequences among the two strains of C. tetani and. Selected ORFs involved in cellular processes and metabolism were subjected to phylogenetic analysis. PMID:19527791

  12. Functional consequences of mutations in the conserved SF2 motifs and post-translational phosphorylation of the CSB protein.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Mette; Stevnsner, Tinna; Modin, Charlotte; Martensen, Pia M; Brosh, Robert M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2003-02-01

    The rare inherited human genetic disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS) is characterized by developmental abnormalities, UV sensitivity and premature aging. The cellular and molecular phenotypes of CS include increased sensitivity to UV-induced and oxidative DNA lesions. Two genes are involved: CSA and CSB. The CS group B (CSB) protein has roles in transcription, transcription-coupled repair, and base excision repair. It is a DNA stimulated ATPase and remodels chromatin in vitro. Here, we have analyzed wild-type (wt) and motif II, V and VI mutant CSB proteins. We find that the mutant proteins display different degrees of ATPase activity deficiency, and in contrast to the in vivo complementation studies, the motif II mutant is more defective than motif V and VI CSB mutants. Furthermore, CSB wt ATPase activity was studied with different biologically important DNA cofactors: DNA with different secondary structures and damaged DNA. The results indicate that the state of DNA secondary structure affects the level of CSB ATPase activity. We find that the CSB protein is phosphorylated in untreated cells and that UV irradiation leads to its dephosphorylation. Importantly, dephosphorylation of the protein in vitro results in increased ATPase activity of the protein, suggesting that the activity of the CSB protein is subject to phosphorylation control in vivo. These observations may have significant implications for the function of CSB in vivo. PMID:12560492

  13. Outer membrane protein D15 is conserved among Haemophilus influenzae species and may represent a universal protective antigen against invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Loosmore, S M; Yang, Y P; Coleman, D C; Shortreed, J M; England, D M; Klein, M H

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the d15 gene from two strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and two strains of nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHI). The nucleotide and deduced protein sequences of d15 are highly conserved, with only a small variable region identified near the carboxyl terminus of the protein. Analysis of upstream sequences revealed that the H. influenzae d15 gene may be part of a large potential operon of closely spaced open reading frames, including one with significant homology to the Escherichia coli cds gene encoding CDP-diglyceride synthetase. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the d15 gene is also present in H. influenzae types a, c, d, e, and f and in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. A recombinant D15 (rD15) protein was expressed in good quantity in E. coli from the inducible T7 promoter, and monospecific anti-rD15 antibodies were raised. Immunoblot analysis of H. influenzae serotypes a, b, c, d, e, and f, NTHI, and H. parainfluenzae lysates revealed that they all expressed a cross-reactive D15-like protein. Purified rD15 was found to be highly immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits, and passive transfer of anti-rD15 antibodies protected infant rats from challenge with H. influenzae type b or type a in infant rat models of bacteremia. Thus, D15 is a highly conserved antigen that is protective in animal models and it may be a useful component of a universal subunit vaccine against Haemophilus infection and disease. PMID:9284140

  14. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  15. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a conserved hypothetical protein, SA0961 (YlaN), from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Baker, Patrick J.; Rice, David W.

    2006-08-01

    SA0961 is an unknown hypothetical protein from Staphylococcus aureus that can be identified in the Firmicutes division of Gram-positive bacteria. SA0961 was cloned and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and subsequently crystallized. SA0961 is an unknown hypothetical protein from Staphylococcus aureus that can be identified in the Firmicutes division of Gram-positive bacteria. The gene for the homologue of SA0961 in Bacillus subtilis, ylaN, has been shown to be essential for cell survival, thus identifying the protein encoded by this gene as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. SA0961 was cloned and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and subsequently crystallized. Crystals of selenomethionine-labelled SA0961 diffract to beyond 2.4 Å resolution and belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 31.5, b = 42.7, c = 62.7 Å, β = 92.4° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. A full structure determination is under way to provide insights into the function of this protein.

  16. Comparative Study of Human and Mouse Postsynaptic Proteomes Finds High Compositional Conservation and Abundance Differences for Key Synaptic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bayés, Àlex; Collins, Mark O.; Croning, Mike D. R.; van de Lagemaat, Louie N.; Choudhary, Jyoti S.; Grant, Seth G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Direct comparison of protein components from human and mouse excitatory synapses is important for determining the suitability of mice as models of human brain disease and to understand the evolution of the mammalian brain. The postsynaptic density is a highly complex set of proteins organized into molecular networks that play a central role in behavior and disease. We report the first direct comparison of the proteome of triplicate isolates of mouse and human cortical postsynaptic densities. The mouse postsynaptic density comprised 1556 proteins and the human one 1461. A large compositional overlap was observed; more than 70% of human postsynaptic density proteins were also observed in the mouse postsynaptic density. Quantitative analysis of postsynaptic density components in both species indicates a broadly similar profile of abundance but also shows that there is higher abundance variation between species than within species. Well known components of this synaptic structure are generally more abundant in the mouse postsynaptic density. Significant inter-species abundance differences exist in some families of key postsynaptic density proteins including glutamatergic neurotransmitter receptors and adaptor proteins. Furthermore, we have identified a closely interacting set of molecules enriched in the human postsynaptic density that could be involved in dendrite and spine structural plasticity. Understanding synapse proteome diversity within and between species will be important to further our understanding of brain complexity and disease. PMID:23071613

  17. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  18. A conserved docking site in MEKs mediates high-affinity binding to MAP kinases and cooperates with a scaffold protein to enhance signal transmission.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, A J; Flatauer, L J; Matsukuma, K; Thorner, J; Bardwell, L

    2001-03-30

    The recognition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by their upstream activators, MAPK/ERK kinases (MEKs), is crucial for the effective and accurate transmission of many signals. We demonstrated previously that the yeast MAPKs Kss1 and Fus3 bind with high affinity to the N terminus of the MEK Ste7, and proposed that a conserved motif in Ste7, the MAPK-docking site, mediates this interaction. Here we show that the corresponding sequences in human MEK1 and MEK2 are necessary and sufficient for the direct binding of the MAPKs ERK1 and ERK2. Mutations in MEK1, MEK2, or Ste7 that altered conserved residues in the docking site diminished binding of the cognate MAPKs. Furthermore, short peptides corresponding to the docking sites in these MEKs inhibited MEK1-mediated phosphorylation of ERK2 in vitro. In yeast cells, docking-defective alleles of Ste7 were modestly compromised in their ability to transmit the mating pheromone signal. This deficiency was dramatically enhanced when the ability of the Ste5 scaffold protein to associate with components of the MAPK cascade was also compromised. Thus, both the MEK-MAPK docking interaction and binding to the Ste5 scaffold make mutually reinforcing contributions to the efficiency of signaling by this MAPK cascade in vivo. PMID:11134045

  19. The Evolutionarily Conserved LIM Homeodomain Protein LIM-4/LHX6 Specifies the Terminal Identity of a Cholinergic and Peptidergic C. elegans Sensory/Inter/Motor Neuron-Type

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Huh, Yang Hoon; Fang, Zi; Park, Seo Jin; Kim, Myoung Ok; Ryoo, Zae Young; Kang, Kyeongjin; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Jeon, Won Bae; Li, Chris; Kim, Kyuhyung

    2015-01-01

    The expression of specific transcription factors determines the differentiated features of postmitotic neurons. However, the mechanism by which specific molecules determine neuronal cell fate and the extent to which the functions of transcription factors are conserved in evolution are not fully understood. In C. elegans, the cholinergic and peptidergic SMB sensory/inter/motor neurons innervate muscle quadrants in the head and control the amplitude of sinusoidal movement. Here we show that the LIM homeobox protein LIM-4 determines neuronal characteristics of the SMB neurons. In lim-4 mutant animals, expression of terminal differentiation genes, such as the cholinergic gene battery and the flp-12 neuropeptide gene, is completely abolished and thus the function of the SMB neurons is compromised. LIM-4 activity promotes SMB identity by directly regulating the expression of the SMB marker genes via a distinct cis-regulatory motif. Two human LIM-4 orthologs, LHX6 and LHX8, functionally substitute for LIM-4 in C. elegans. Furthermore, C. elegans LIM-4 or human LHX6 can induce cholinergic and peptidergic characteristics in the human neuronal cell lines. Our results indicate that the evolutionarily conserved LIM-4/LHX6 homeodomain proteins function in generation of precise neuronal subtypes. PMID:26305787

  20. Tomato Cutin Deficient 1 (CD1) and Putative Orthologs Comprise an Ancient Family of Cutin Synthase-like (CUS) Proteins that are Conserved among Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yeats, Trevor H.; Huang, Wenlin; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Viart, Hélène M-F.; Clausen, Mads H.; Stark, Ruth E.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aerial epidermis of all land plants is covered with a hydrophobic cuticle that provides essential protection from desiccation, and so its evolution is believed to have been prerequisite for terrestrial colonization. A major structural component of apparently all plant cuticles is cutin, a polyester of hydroxy fatty acids. However, despite its ubiquity, the details of cutin polymeric structure and the mechanisms of its formation and remodeling are not well understood. We recently reported that cutin polymerization in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit occurs via transesterification of hydroxyacylglycerol precursors, catalyzed by the GDSL-motif lipase/hydrolase family protein (GDSL) Cutin Deficient 1 (CD1). Here we present additional biochemical characterization of CD1 and putative orthologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens, which represent a distinct clade of cutin synthases within the large GDSL super-family. We demonstrate that members of this ancient and conserved family of cutin synthase-like (CUS) proteins act as polyester synthases with negligible hydrolytic activity. Moreover, solution-state NMR analysis indicates that CD1 catalyzes the formation of primarily linear cutin oligomeric products in vitro. These results reveal a conserved mechanism of cutin polyester synthesis in land plants, and suggest that elaborations of the linear polymer, such as branching or cross-linking, may require additional, as yet unknown, factors. PMID:24372802

  1. The S7 gene and VP7 protein are highly conserved among temporally and geographically distinct American isolates of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mecham, James O; Stallknecht, David; Wilson, William C

    2003-08-01

    Complete sequences of genome segment 7 (S7) from six isolates of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 1 (EHDV-1) and 37 isolates of serotype 2 (EHDV-2) were determined. These isolates were made between 1978 and 2001 from the southeast, mid-Atlantic, Midwest and intermountain United States. Analysis of the S7 sequence similarities showed 98.1% identity among the EHDV-1 isolates and 91.0% identity among the EHDV-2 isolates. Comparison of the deduced amino acid similarities showed an even greater degree of similarity among the isolates (100% among the EHDV-1 isolates and 98.9% identity among the EHDV-2 isolates). There was only 75.8% identity between the EHDV-1 and EHDV-2 isolates at the nucleic acid level; however, there was 93.7% identity between the two groups at the amino acid level. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide indicates a strong selection for silent substitutions. There was no evidence for reassortment between EHDV-1 and EHDV-2 isolates. The high degree of conservation of S7 gene codons and the VP7 protein, suggests that little variation is allowed in preserving the function of this protein. The high degree of conservation also validates the use of diagnostic tests for EHDV based on S7 and VP7.

  2. Characterization of a highly conserved domain within the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein S2 domain with characteristics of a viral fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Roth, Shoshannah L; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-08-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of alpha-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae.

  3. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Domain within the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein S2 Domain with Characteristics of a Viral Fusion Peptide▿

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of α-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae. PMID:19439480

  4. A Novel Universal Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody against Enterovirus 71 That Targets the Highly Conserved “Knob” Region of VP3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Tao; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Kwang, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71(EV71) leads to the majority of neurological complications and death in young children. While putative inactivated vaccines are only now undergoing clinical trials, no specific treatment options exist yet. Ideally, EV71 specific intravenous immunoglobulins could be developed for targeted treatment of severe cases. To date, only a single universally neutralizing monoclonal antibody against a conserved linear epitope of VP1 has been identified. Other enteroviruses have been shown to possess major conformational neutralizing epitopes on both the VP2 and VP3 capsid proteins. Hence, we attempted to isolate such neutralizing antibodies against conformational epitopes for their potential in the treatment of infection as well as differential diagnosis and vaccine optimization. Here we describe a universal neutralizing monoclonal antibody that recognizes a conserved conformational epitope of EV71 which was mapped using escape mutants. Eight escape mutants from different subgenogroups (A, B2, B4, C2, C4) were rescued; they harbored three essential mutations either at amino acid positions 59, 62 or 67 of the VP3 protein which are all situated in the “knob” region. The escape mutant phenotype could be mimicked by incorporating these mutations into reverse genetically engineered viruses showing that P59L, A62D, A62P and E67D abolish both monoclonal antibody binding and neutralization activity. This is the first conformational neutralization epitope mapped on VP3 for EV71. PMID:24875055

  5. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  6. Identification of a Highly Conserved Epitope on Avian Influenza Virus Non-Structural Protein 1 Using a Peptide Microarray.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiashan; Wang, Xiurong; Wen, Xuexia; Bao, Hongmei; Shi, Lin; Tao, Qimeng; Jiang, Yongping; Zeng, Xianying; Xu, Xiaolong; Tian, Guobin; Zheng, Shimin; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional protein. It is present at high levels in infected cells and can be used for AIV detection and diagnosis. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibody (MAb) D7 against AIV NS1 protein by immunization of BALB/c mice with purified recombinant NS1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Isotype determination revealed that the MAb was IgG1/κ-type subclass. To identify the epitope of the MAb D7, the NS1 protein was truncated into a total of 225 15-mer peptides with 14 amino acid overlaps, which were spotted for a peptide microarray. The results revealed that the MAb D7 recognized the consensus DAPF motif. Furthermore, the AIV NS1 protein with the DAPF motif deletion was transiently expressed in 293T cells and failed to react with MAb D7. Subsequently, the DAPF motif was synthesized with an elongated GSGS linker at both the C- and N-termini. The MAb D7 reacted with the synthesized peptide both in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot-blot assays. From these results, we concluded that DAPF motif is the epitope of MAb D7. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 4-mer epitope on the NS1 protein of AIV that can be recognized by MAb using a peptide microarray, which is able to simplify epitope identification, and that could serve as the basis for immune responses against avian influenza.

  7. Identification of a Highly Conserved Epitope on Avian Influenza Virus Non-Structural Protein 1 Using a Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuexia; Bao, Hongmei; Shi, Lin; Tao, Qimeng; Jiang, Yongping; Zeng, Xianying; Xu, Xiaolong; Tian, Guobin; Zheng, Shimin; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional protein. It is present at high levels in infected cells and can be used for AIV detection and diagnosis. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibody (MAb) D7 against AIV NS1 protein by immunization of BALB/c mice with purified recombinant NS1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Isotype determination revealed that the MAb was IgG1/κ-type subclass. To identify the epitope of the MAb D7, the NS1 protein was truncated into a total of 225 15-mer peptides with 14 amino acid overlaps, which were spotted for a peptide microarray. The results revealed that the MAb D7 recognized the consensus DAPF motif. Furthermore, the AIV NS1 protein with the DAPF motif deletion was transiently expressed in 293T cells and failed to react with MAb D7. Subsequently, the DAPF motif was synthesized with an elongated GSGS linker at both the C- and N-termini. The MAb D7 reacted with the synthesized peptide both in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot-blot assays. From these results, we concluded that DAPF motif is the epitope of MAb D7. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 4-mer epitope on the NS1 protein of AIV that can be recognized by MAb using a peptide microarray, which is able to simplify epitope identification, and that could serve as the basis for immune responses against avian influenza. PMID:26938453

  8. Expression of human Cfdp1 gene in Drosophila reveals new insights into the function of the evolutionarily conserved BCNT protein family.

    PubMed

    Messina, Giovanni; Atterrato, Maria Teresa; Fanti, Laura; Giordano, Ennio; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2016-05-06

    The Bucentaur (BCNT) protein family is widely distributed in eukaryotes and is characterized by a highly conserved C-terminal domain. This family was identified two decades ago in ruminants, but its role(s) remained largely unknown. Investigating cellular functions and mechanism of action of BCNT proteins is challenging, because they have been implicated in human craniofacial development. Recently, we found that YETI, the D. melanogaster BCNT, is a chromatin factor that participates to H2A.V deposition. Here we report the effects of in vivo expression of CFDP1, the human BCNT protein, in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that CFDP1, similarly to YETI, binds to chromatin and its expression results in a wide range of abnormalities highly reminiscent of those observed in Yeti null mutants. This indicates that CFDP1 expressed in flies behaves in a dominant negative fashion disrupting the YETI function. Moreover, GST pull-down provides evidence indicating that 1) both YETI and CFDP1 undergo homodimerization and 2) YETI and CFDP1 physically interact each other by forming inactive heterodimers that would trigger the observed dominant-negative effect. Overall, our findings highlight unanticipated evidences suggesting that homodimerization mediated by the BCNT domain is integral to the chromatin functions of BCNT proteins.

  9. Expression of human Cfdp1 gene in Drosophila reveals new insights into the function of the evolutionarily conserved BCNT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Giovanni; Atterrato, Maria Teresa; Fanti, Laura; Giordano, Ennio; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2016-01-01

    The Bucentaur (BCNT) protein family is widely distributed in eukaryotes and is characterized by a highly conserved C-terminal domain. This family was identified two decades ago in ruminants, but its role(s) remained largely unknown. Investigating cellular functions and mechanism of action of BCNT proteins is challenging, because they have been implicated in human craniofacial development. Recently, we found that YETI, the D. melanogaster BCNT, is a chromatin factor that participates to H2A.V deposition. Here we report the effects of in vivo expression of CFDP1, the human BCNT protein, in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that CFDP1, similarly to YETI, binds to chromatin and its expression results in a wide range of abnormalities highly reminiscent of those observed in Yeti null mutants. This indicates that CFDP1 expressed in flies behaves in a dominant negative fashion disrupting the YETI function. Moreover, GST pull-down provides evidence indicating that 1) both YETI and CFDP1 undergo homodimerization and 2) YETI and CFDP1 physically interact each other by forming inactive heterodimers that would trigger the observed dominant-negative effect. Overall, our findings highlight unanticipated evidences suggesting that homodimerization mediated by the BCNT domain is integral to the chromatin functions of BCNT proteins. PMID:27151176

  10. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  11. Regulation of the Expression of Plant Resistance Gene SNC1 by a Protein with a Conserved BAT2 Domain1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzhong; Tessaro, Mark J.; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2010-01-01

    Plant Resistance (R) genes encode immune receptors that recognize pathogens and activate defense responses. Because of fitness costs associated with maintaining R protein-mediated resistance, expression levels of R genes have to be tightly regulated. However, mechanisms on how R-gene expression is regulated are poorly understood. Here we show that MODIFIER OF snc1, 1 (MOS1) regulates the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1), which encodes a Toll/interleukin receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat type of R protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the mos1 loss-of-function mutant plants, snc1 expression is repressed and constitutive resistance responses mediated by snc1 are lost. The repression of snc1 expression in mos1 is released by knocking out DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION1. In mos1 mutants, DNA methylation in a region upstream of SNC1 is altered. Furthermore, expression of snc1 transgenes using the native promoter does not require MOS1, indicating that regulation of SNC1 expression by MOS1 is at the chromatin level. Map-based cloning of MOS1 revealed that it encodes a novel protein with a HLA-B ASSOCIATED TRANSCRIPT2 (BAT2) domain that is conserved in plants and animals. Our study on MOS1 suggests that BAT2 domain-containing proteins may function in regulation of gene expression at chromatin level. PMID:20439546

  12. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  13. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines.

  14. CMF22 is a broadly conserved axonemal protein and is required for propulsive motility in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, HoangKim T; Sandhu, Jaspreet; Langousis, Gerasimos; Hill, Kent L

    2013-09-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum (or cilium) is a broadly conserved organelle that provides motility for many pathogenic protozoa and is critical for normal development and physiology in humans. Therefore, defining core components of motile axonemes enhances understanding of eukaryotic biology and provides insight into mechanisms of inherited and infectious diseases in humans. In this study, we show that component of motile flagella 22 (CMF22) is tightly associated with the flagellar axoneme and is likely to have been present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The CMF22 amino acid sequence contains predicted IQ and ATPase associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA) motifs that are conserved among CMF22 orthologues in diverse organisms, hinting at the importance of these domains in CMF22 function. Knockdown by RNA interference (RNAi) and rescue with an RNAi-immune mRNA demonstrated that CMF22 is required for propulsive cell motility in Trypanosoma brucei. Loss of propulsive motility in CMF22-knockdown cells was due to altered flagellar beating patterns, rather than flagellar paralysis, indicating that CMF22 is essential for motility regulation and likely functions as a fundamental regulatory component of motile axonemes. CMF22 association with the axoneme is weakened in mutants that disrupt the nexin-dynein regulatory complex, suggesting potential interaction with this complex. Our results provide insight into the core machinery required for motility of eukaryotic flagella.

  15. A novel 43 kd protein binds a conserved Mammalian caccc motif within the Drosophila ras2/rop bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, K; Duarte, R; Segev, O

    1995-11-01

    The Drosophila ras2 promoter is an authentic bidirectional promoter governing the expression of both the Dras2 and rop genes by a single mechanism. Characterisation of the Dras2/rop promoter has revealed that a unitary complex (M) interacts with two promoter sub-domains (regions A and B). Two distinct transcription factors (factors A and B),which make up the major complex (M), bind regions A and B, respectively. We have analyzed the putative CACCC element and AP-1-Iike sequence contained within region B (-41 to -20) of the Dras2/rop promoter. It was found that AP-1 is not involved in Dras2 expression as is the case for the human Ha-ras1 gene. The entire CACCC motif (-34 to -21) shares 83% homology with the conserved mammalian element. Detailed mutational analysis has however revealed that the CACCC core sequence (-27 to -23) is vital for Dras2/rop recognition by factor B. The cytosine residues at positions -27, -25, -24 and -23 were observed to play a critical role in factor B recognition. Factor B has been purified as a 43 kD polypeptide as measured by SDS-PAGE and the relative mass was confirmed by photo-chemical crosslinking. Our findings are the first report of the conservation of the mammalian CACCC motif in Drosophila.

  16. Conservation of the Host-Interacting Proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin among Treponemes and Restriction of Proteolytic Capacity to Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Taylor, John S.; Denchev, Yavor; Hof, Rebecca; Zuerner, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Although several other species in the genus are able to cause or contribute to disease, T. pallidum differs in that it is able to rapidly disseminate via the bloodstream to tissue sites distant from the site of initial infection. It is also the only Treponema species able to cross both the blood-brain and placental barriers. Previously, the T. pallidum proteins, Tp0750 and Tp0751 (also called pallilysin), were shown to degrade host proteins central to blood coagulation and basement membrane integrity, suggesting a role for these proteins in T. pallidum dissemination and tissue invasion. In the present study, we characterized Tp0750 and Tp0751 sequence variation in a diversity of pathogenic and nonpathogenic treponemes. We also determined the proteolytic potential of the orthologs from the less invasive species Treponema denticola and Treponema phagedenis. These analyses showed high levels of sequence similarity among Tp0750 orthologs from pathogenic species. For pallilysin, lower levels of sequence conservation were observed between this protein and orthologs from other treponemes, except for the ortholog from the highly invasive rabbit venereal syphilis-causing Treponema paraluiscuniculi. In vitro host component binding and degradation assays demonstrated that pallilysin and Tp0750 orthologs from the less invasive treponemes tested were not capable of binding or degrading host proteins. The results show that pallilysin and Tp0750 host protein binding and degradative capability is positively correlated with treponemal invasiveness. PMID:26283341

  17. Molecular cloning of a highly conserved mouse and human integral membrane protein (Itm1) and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Guizhu; Tylzanowski, P.; Deleersnijder, W.

    1996-02-01

    We have isolated and characterized a novel cDNA coding for a highly hydrophobic protein (B5) from a fetal mouse mandibular condyle cDNA library. The full-length mouse B5 cDNA is 3095 nucleotides long and contains a potential open reading frame coding for a protein of 705 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 80.5 kDa. The B5 mRNA is differentially polyadenylated, with the most abundant transcript having a length of 2.7 kb. The human homolog of B5 was isolated from a cDNA testis library. The predicted amino acid sequence of the human B5 is 98.5% identical to that of mouse. The most striking feature of the B5 protein is the presence of numerous (10-14) potential transmembrane domains, characteristic of an integral membrane protein. Similarity searches in public databanks reveal that B5 is 58% similar to the T12A2.2 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans and 60% similar to the STT3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Futhermore, the report of an EST sequence (Accession No. Z13858) related to the human B5, but identical to the STT3 gene, indicates that B5 belongs to a larger gene family coding for novel putative transmembrane proteins. This family exhibits a remarkable degree of conservation in different species. The gene for B5, designated Itm1 (Integral membrane protein 1), is located on mouse chromosome 9. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  19. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  20. Conserved Surface Features Form the Double-stranded RNA Binding Site of Non-structural Protein 1 (NS1) from Influenza A and B Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yin,C.; Khan, J.; Swapna, G.; Ertekin, A.; Krug, R.; Tong, L.; Montelione, G.

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-{angstrom} x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier 'working models' of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an {approx}45{sup o} angle relative to the axes of helices {alpha}2/{alpha}2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses.

  1. DNA sequence analysis of conserved and unique regions of swinepox virus: identification of genetic elements supporting phenotypic observations including a novel G protein-coupled receptor homologue.

    PubMed

    Massung, R F; Jayarama, V; Moyer, R W

    1993-12-01

    Swinepox virus (SPV) contains a double-stranded cross-linked linear DNA genome of approximately 175 kilobase pairs with terminal inverted repetitions (TIRs) of 4.3 kb. The nucleotide sequence was determined for fragments from several regions of the genome including a 2.85-kb fragment from the central potentially conserved portion and two fragments within the presumed variable near-terminal regions which tend to be unique to a given poxvirus. The core sequence contains one partial and two complete open reading frames that are highly conserved and colinear with three contiguous ORFs within the HindIII D fragment of vaccinia virus (VV). The two near-terminal fragments, encompassing 14.2 and 3.6 kb, are respectively located 2.1 kb internal to the left and right cross-linked termini of the DNA and span the TIR junctions. The sequences encode 25 open reading frames including numerous proteins predicted to be membrane-bound or secreted in infected cells. Several ORFs unique to SPV were identified that may be involved in cell attachment, immune modulation, and pathogenesis including a novel poxvirus G protein-coupled receptor. In addition, several polypeptides encoded within the near-terminal regions of vaccinia virus DNA that function as host range or virulence factors are lacking within this region of swinepox virus including the VV growth factor, complement-binding protein, and ORFs C7L and K1L, associated with host range. The lack of these functional homologues could explain the characteristic attenuated phenotype and limited host range of SPV.

  2. Chimeric virus-like particles containing a conserved region of the G protein in combination with a single peptide of the M2 protein confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Chai, Feng; Tan, Yiluo; Huo, Chunling; Pan, Zishu

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine composed of the conserved antigenic epitopes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the chimeric RSV VLPs HBcΔ-tG and HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 were generated based on the truncated hepatitis B virus core protein (HBcΔ). HBcΔ-tG consisted of HBcΔ, the conserved region (aa 144-204) of the RSV G protein. HBcΔ-tG was combined with a single peptide (aa 82-90) of the M2 protein to generate HBcΔ-tG/M282-90. Immunization of mice with the HBcΔ-tG or HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 VLPs elicited RSV-specific IgG and neutralizing antibody production and conferred protection against RSV infection. Compared with HBcΔ-tG, HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 induced decreased Th2 cytokine production (IL-4 and IL-5), increased Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2), and increased ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibodies, thereby relieving pulmonary pathology upon subsequent RSV infection. Our results demonstrated that chimeric HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 VLPs represented an effective RSV subunit vaccine candidate. PMID:27154395

  3. Conservation of functional domains involved in RNA binding and protein-protein interactions in human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-mRNA splicing factor SF1.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Rafi, Z; Rhani, Z; Legrain, P; Krämer, A

    1998-05-01

    The modular structure of splicing factor SF1 is conserved from yeast to man and SF1 acts at early stages of spliceosome assembly in both organisms. The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain of human (h) SF1 is the major determinant for RNA binding and is essential for the activity of hSF1 in spliceosome assembly, supporting the view that binding of SF1 to RNA is essential for its function. Sequences N-terminal to the KH domain mediate the interaction between hSF1 and U2AF65, which binds to the polypyrimidine tract upstream of the 3' splice site. Moreover, yeast (y) SF1 interacts with Mud2p, the presumptive U2AF65 homologue in yeast, and the interaction domain is conserved in ySF1. The C-terminal degenerate RRMs in U2AF65 and Mud2p mediate the association with hSF1 and ySF1, respectively. Analysis of chimeric constructs of hSF1 and ySF indicates that the KH domain may serve a similar function in both systems, whereas sequences C-terminal to the KH domain are not exchangeable. Thus, these results argue for hSF1 and ySF1, as well as U2AF65 and Mud2p, being functional homologues.

  4. Identification of a conserved domain of the HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41 which interacts with cholesteryl groups.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Nadine; Genin, Christian; Malvoisin, Etienne

    2002-12-23

    A soluble form of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp160 devoid of the transmembrane anchor domain was found to bind to cholesteryl-hemisuccinate agarose. The external subunit gp120 failed to bind to the resin, suggesting that the site responsible for the binding to cholesterol was located in the transmembrane protein gp41. We constructed a series of maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins representing overlapping fragments of the gp41 molecule and we studied their capacity to bind to cholesteryl beads. The domain responsible for binding to cholesterol was localised within the residues 668 to 684 immediately adjacent to the membrane spanning domain. We identified a short sequence (LWYIK, aa 678-683) comparable to the cholesterol interaction amino acid consensus pattern published by Li and Papadopoulos [Endocrinology 139 (1998) 4991]. We demonstrated that the sequence LWYIK synthesized fused to the MBP was able to bind to cholesteryl groups. A synthetic peptide containing the sequence LWYIK was found to inhibit the interaction between cholesteryl beads and MBP44, an MBP fusion HIV-1 envelope protein that contains the putative cholesterol binding domain. Human sera obtained from HIV-1 seropositive patients did not react in ELISA to the LWYIK sequence, suggesting that this region is not exposed to the immune system. The biological significance of the interaction between gp41 and cholesterol is discussed.

  5. Structure of astrotactin-2: a conserved vertebrate-specific and perforin-like membrane protein involved in neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Tao; Harlos, Karl; Gilbert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate-specific proteins astrotactin-1 and 2 (ASTN-1 and ASTN-2) are integral membrane perforin-like proteins known to play critical roles in neurodevelopment, while ASTN-2 has been linked to the planar cell polarity pathway in hair cells. Genetic variations associated with them are linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders and other neurological pathologies, including an advanced onset of Alzheimer's disease. Here we present the structure of the majority endosomal region of ASTN-2, showing it to consist of a unique combination of polypeptide folds: a perforin-like domain, a minimal epidermal growth factor-like module, a unique form of fibronectin type III domain and an annexin-like domain. The perforin-like domain differs from that of other members of the membrane attack complex-perforin (MACPF) protein family in ways that suggest ASTN-2 does not form pores. Structural and biophysical data show that ASTN-2 (but not ASTN-1) binds inositol triphosphates, suggesting a mechanism for membrane recognition or secondary messenger regulation of its activity. The annexin-like domain is closest in fold to repeat three of human annexin V and similarly binds calcium, and yet shares no sequence homology with it. Overall, our structure provides the first atomic-resolution description of a MACPF protein involved in development, while highlighting distinctive features of ASTN-2 responsible for its activity. PMID:27249642

  6. Cloning of a Conserved Receptor-Like Protein Kinase Gene and Its Use as a Functional Marker for Homoeologous Group-2 Chromosomes of the Triticeae Species

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bi; Chen, Tingting; Cao, Aizhong; Wang, Haiyan; Xing, Liping; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen; Yu, Chunmei; Xiao, Jin; Ji, Jianhui; Chen, Xueluan; Chen, Peidu; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Xiue

    2012-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) play broad biological roles in plants. We report on a conserved receptor-like protein kinase (RPK) gene from wheat and other Triticeae species. The TaRPK1 was isolated from the Triticum aestivum cv. Prins - Triticum timopheevii introgression line IGVI-465 carrying the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm6. The TaRPK1 was mapped to homoeologous chromosomes 2A (TaRPK1-2A), 2D (TaRPK1-2D) and the Pm6-carrier chromosome 2G (TaRPK1-2G) of IGVI-465. Under the tested conditions, only the TaRPK1-2G allele was actively transcribed, producing two distinct transcripts via alternative splicing. The predicted 424-amino acid protein of TaRPK1-2G contained a signal peptide, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular serine/threonine kinase domain, but lacked a typical extracellular domain. The expression of TaRPK1-2G gene was up-regulated upon the infection by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt) and treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA), but down-regulated in response to treatments of SA and ABA. Over-expression of TaRPK1-2G in the powdery mildew susceptible wheat variety Prins by a transient expression assay showed that it slightly reduced the haustorium index of the infected Bgt. These data indicated that TaRPK1-2G participated in the defense response to Bgt infection and in the JA signaling pathway. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that TaRPK1-2G was highly conserved among plant species, and the amino acid sequence similarity of TaRPK1-2G among grass species was more than 86%. Based on its conservation, the RPK gene-based STS primers were designed, and used to amplify the RPK orthologs from the homoeologous group-2 chromosomes of all the tested Triticeae species, such as chromosome 2G of T. timopheevii, 2R of Secale cereale, 2H of Hordeum vulgare, 2S of Aegilops speltoides, 2Sl of Ae. longissima, 2Mg of Ae. geniculata, 2Sp and 2Up of Ae. peregrina. The developed STS markers serve as conserved functional markers for the identification of

  7. Cofilin regulator 14-3-3zeta is an evolutionarily conserved protein required for phagocytosis and microbial resistance.

    PubMed

    Ulvila, Johanna; Vanha-aho, Leena-Maija; Kleino, Anni; Vähä-Mäkilä, Mari; Vuoksio, Milka; Eskelinen, Sinikka; Hultmark, Dan; Kocks, Christine; Hallman, Mikko; Parikka, Mataleena; Rämet, Mika

    2011-05-01

    Phagocytosis is an ancient cellular process that plays an important role in host defense. In Drosophila melanogaster phagocytic, macrophage-like hemocytes recognize and ingest microbes. We performed an RNAi-based in vitro screen in the Drosophila hemocyte cell line S2 and identified Abi, cpa, cofilin regulator 14-3-3ζ, tlk, CG2765, and CG15609 as mediators of bacterial phagocytosis. Of these identified genes, 14-3-3ζ had an evolutionarily conserved role in phagocytosis: bacterial phagocytosis was compromised when 14-3-3ζ was targeted with RNAi in primary Drosophila hemocytes and when the orthologous genes Ywhab and Ywhaz were silenced in zebrafish and mouse RAW 264.7 cells, respectively. In Drosophila and zebrafish infection models, 14-3-3ζ was required for resistance against Staphylococcus aureus. We conclude that 14-3-3ζ is essential for phagocytosis and microbial resistance in insects and vertebrates. PMID:21208897

  8. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  9. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  10. A conserved domain important for association of eukaryotic J-protein co-chaperones Jjj1 and Zuo1 with the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kaschner, Lindsey A; Sharma, Ruchika; Shrestha, Om Kumar; Meyer, Alison E; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2015-05-01

    J-proteins, obligate co-chaperones, provide specialization for Hsp70 function in a variety of cellular processes. Two of the 13 J-proteins of the yeast cytosol/nucleus, Zuo1 and Jjj1, are associated with 60S ribosomal subunits. Abundant Zuo1 facilitates folding of nascent polypeptides; Jjj1, of much lower abundance, functions in ribosome biogenesis. However, overexpression of Jjj1 substantially rescues growth defects of cells lacking Zuo1. We analyzed a region held in common by Zuo1 and Jjj1, outside the signature J-domain found in all J-proteins. This shared "zuotin homology domain" (ZHD) is important for ribosome association of both proteins. An N-terminal segment of Jjj1, containing the J-domain and ZHD, is ribosome-associated and, like full-length Jjj1, is competent to rescue both the cold- and cation-sensitivity of ∆zuo1. However, this fragment, when expressed at normal levels, cannot rescue the cytosolic ribosome biogenesis defect of ∆jjj1. Our results are consistent with a model in which the primary functions of Zuo1 and Jjj1 occur in the cytosol. In addition, our data suggest that Zuo1 and Jjj1 bind overlapping sites on ribosomes due to an interaction via their common ZHDs, but Jjj1 binds primarily to pre-60S particles and Zuo1 to mature subunits. We hypothesize that ZUO1 and JJJ1, which are conserved throughout eukaryotes, arose from an ancient duplication of a progenitor J-protein gene that encoded the ZHD ribosome-binding region; subsequently, specialized roles and additional ribosome interaction sites evolved.

  11. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserv